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Sample records for surgery magnetic resonance

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings after rectus femoris transfer surgery

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    Gold, Garry E. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Asakawa, Deanna S.; Blemker, Silvia S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Delp, Scott L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the knee flexor and extensor tendons after bilateral rectus femoris transfer and hamstring lengthening surgery in five patients (10 limbs) with cerebral palsy. Three-dimensional models of the path of the transferred tendon were constructed in all cases. MR images of the transferred and lengthened tendons were examined and compared with images from ten non-surgical subjects. The models showed that the path of the transferred rectus femoris tendon had a marked angular deviation near the transfer site in all cases. MR imaging demonstrated irregular areas of low signal intensity near the transferred rectus femoris and around the hamstrings in all subjects. Eight of the ten post-surgical limbs showed evidence of fluid near or around the transferred or lengthened tendons. This was not observed in the non-surgical subjects. Thus, MR imaging of patients with cerebral palsy after rectus femoris transfer and hamstring-lengthening surgery shows evidence of signal intensity and contour changes, even several years after surgery. (orig.)

  2. A review of magnetic resonance imaging compatible manipulators in surgery.

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    Elhawary, H; Zivanovic, A; Davies, B; Lampérth, M

    2006-04-01

    Developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coupled with parallel progress in the field of computer-assisted surgery, mean that an ideal environment has been created for the development of MRI-compatible robotic systems and manipulators, capable of enhancing many types of surgical procedure. However, MRI does impose severe restrictions on mechatronic devices to be used in or around the scanners. In this article a review of the developments in the field of MRI-compatible surgical manipulators over the last decade is presented. The manipulators developed make use of different methods of actuation, but they can be reduced to four main groups: actuation transmitted through hydraulics, pneumatic actuators, ultrasonic motors based on the piezoceramic principle and remote manual actuation. Progress has been made concerning material selection, position sensing, and different actuation techniques, and design strategies have been implemented to overcome the multiple restrictions imposed by the MRI environment. Most systems lack the clinical validation needed to continue on to commercial products.

  3. APPLICATION OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE ANGIOGRAPHY IN PORTAL HYPERTENSIVE SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hua; CHEN Zhi-ping; WU Zhi-yong

    2005-01-01

    Objective To compare magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with traditional angiography and doppler ultrasonography (DUS) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and its hemodynamics. MethodsThree dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D-DCE) MRA and two dimensional phase-contrast (2D-PC) MR were used for the study of portal venous system in the patients with portal hypertension and those without liver cirrhosis. The comparison of the portal blood flow (PBF) measured with 2D-PC MR and DUS was made. ResultsThe portal vein, splenic vein, superior mesenteric vein, cephalic collateral veins and anastomotic stoma of surgical shunting were clearly displayed in 3D-DCE MRA. There was no significant difference between PBF measured with 2D-PC MR and DUS. Conclusion The results of present study indicate that the anatomical imaging of the portal venous system can be clearly revealed in MRA and the PBF can be accurately measured with 2D-PC MR. It is believed that MRA is a useful tool in the management of the patients with portal hypertension.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation in Patients with Sciatica Who Are Potential Candidates for Lumbar Disc Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); A.J.H. Verwoerd (Annemieke); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation in Patients with Sciatica Who Are Potential Candidates for Lumbar Disc Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Nijeholt, Geert J. Lycklama A.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; Van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Verwoerd, Annemieke J. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in patients wit

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation in Patients with Sciatica Who Are Potential Candidates for Lumbar Disc Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); A.J.H. Verwoerd (Annemieke); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in p

  7. Design of an interventional magnetic resonance imaging coil for cerebral surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yue; Wang Wen-Tao; Wang Wei-Min

    2012-01-01

    In clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),the design of the radiofrequency (RF) coil is very important.For certain applications,the appropriate coil can produce an improved image quality.However,it is difficult to achieve a uniform B1 field and a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) simultaneously.In this article,we design an interventional transmitter-and-receiver RF coil for cerebral surgery.This coil adopts a disassembly structure that can be assembled and disassembled repeatedly on the cerebral surgery gantry to reduce the amount of interference from the MRI during surgery.The simulation results and the imaging experiments demonstrate that this coil can produce a uniform RF field,a high SNR,and a large imaging range to meet the requirements of the cerebral surgery.

  8. Prevalence of claustrophobia and magnetic resonance imaging after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

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    Rita Katznelson

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Rita Katznelson1, George N Djaiani2, Leonid Minkovich1, Ludwik Fedorko1, Jo Carroll3, Michael A Borger4, Robert J Cusimano5, Jacek Karski21Assistant Professor of Anesthesia; 2Associate Professor of Anesthesia; 3Registered Nurse, Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine; 4Associate Professor of Surgery; 5Assistant Professor of Surgery, Division of Cardiac Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of claustrophobia in patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery.Methods: After IRB approval, we conducted a substudy of a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial of 311 patients evaluating administration of tranexamic acid and early saphenous vein graft patency with MRI after conventional CABG surgery. Chest tube drainage was measured at 6, 12, and 24 hours after surgery. The rate of transfusion and the amount of red blood cells (RBC, fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and platelets transfused were recorded.Results: A total of 237(76% patients underwent MRI after surgery. 39 (14%, [95% CI, 10.2 to 18.0] patients experienced severe anxiety caused by a fear of enclosed space in the MRI coil necessitating termination of the procedure. Patients with claustrophobia were on average 5 years younger. They were more likely to have diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Patients with claustrophobia had increased chest tube drainage during the postoperative period. The rate of blood product transfusion was similar between the two groups but patients with claustrophobia who were transfused received significantly more RBC and FFP than patients without claustrophobia.Conclusions: Postoperative claustrophobia and anxiety, leading to inability to undergo MRI, may be more common than previously described.Keywords: Claustrophobia, magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac surgery, bleeding

  9. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging during surgery for pituitary adenomas: pros and cons.

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    Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven-Martin

    2012-12-01

    Surgery for pituitary adenomas still remains a mainstay in their treatment, despite all advances in sophisticated medical treatments and radiotherapy. Total tumor excision is often attempted, but there are limitations in the intraoperative assessment of the radicalism of tumor resection by the neurosurgeon. Standard postoperative imaging is usually performed with a few months delay from the surgical intervention. The purpose of this report is to review briefly the facilities and kinds of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for all physician and surgeons involved in the management of pituitary adenomas on the basis of current literature. To date, there are several low- and high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems available for intraoperative use and depiction of the extent of tumor removal during surgery. Recovery of vision and the morphological result of surgery can be largely predicted from the intraoperative images. A variety of studies document that depiction of residual tumor allows targeted attack of the remnant and extent the resection. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging offers an immediate feedback to the surgeon and is a perfect quality control for pituitary surgery. It is also used as a basis of datasets for intraoperative navigation which is particularly useful in any kind of anatomical variations and repeat operations in which primary surgery has distorted the normal anatomy. However, setting up the technology is expensive and some systems even require extensive remodeling of the operation theatre. Intraoperative imaging prolongs the operation, but may also depict evolving problems, such as hematomas in the tumor cavity. There are several artifacts in intraoperative MR images possible that must be considered. The procedures are not associated with an increased complication rate.

  10. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery for leiomyoma-associated infertility

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    Bouwsma, Esther V. A.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Hesley, Gina K.; Jensen, Jani R.; Peterson, Lisa G; Stewart, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) as a treatment for a case of leiomyoma-associated infertility. Design Case report from a randomized clinical trial. Setting Academic medical center. Patient(s) A 37-year-old woman with known leiomyomas and a history of 18 months of home-inseminations from a known donor. Intervention(s) Magnetic resonance-guided FUS treatment of uterine fibroids, where the dominant fibroid distorted the uterine cavity. Main Outcome Measure(s) Pregnancy. Result(s) A viable intrauterine pregnancy, with a full-term vaginal delivery, was conceived after a single clomiphene citrate and intrauterine insemination cycle. Conclusion(s) The role of FUS for enhancement of fertility in women with nonhysteroscopically resectable uterine fibroids distorting the uterine cavity should be investigated further. PMID:21570071

  11. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for uterine fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, BJJ; Subramaniam, RV; Omar, SS; Wragg, P; Ramli, N; Wui, AL; Lee, CC; Yusof, Y

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance-guided focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is gaining popularity as an alternative to medical and surgical interventions in the management of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Studies have shown that it is an effective non-invasive treatment with minimal associated risks as compared to myomectomy and hysterectomy. MRgFUS can be offered to a majority of patients suffering from symptomatic uterine fibroids. It has been suggested that the use of broader inclusion criteria as well as the mitigation techniques makes it possible to offer MRgFUS to a much larger subset of patients than previously believed. This paper will describe how MRgFUS treatment for uterine fibroids is performed at the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. PMID:21611036

  12. The design of the robot assisted magnetic resonance imaging guidance for minimally invasive surgery system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Bing; Sun Lining; Du Zhijiang; Fu Lixin

    2005-01-01

    Robot assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) is one of the rapidestdeveloping directions in the current surgical realm. Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) is an optimal imaging modality which was applied in MIS in recent years. By combination of precise positioning to the target by intra-operative MRI guided surgery and dexterous motion by the robot, safe and smooth operation is expected to be performed. An overview of the MRI-guided robotic system for MIS is offered. The design of the intra-operative MR scanner system is described. The MR-compatible robotic system is carefully designed for safety and sterilization issues. This system unifies image information from open MRI, an optical endoscope and conventional vital-sign detectors. It helps and guides the surgeon and other medical staffs so they can make the right decisions. The high-performance manipulator can mimic the movement of the urgeon's hand precisely. And the analysis for active and passive interventional surgical instrument tracking is provided.

  13. Multicenter prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Qian; Liu Yinhua; Xu Ling; Duan Xuening; Li Ting; Qin Naishan; Kang Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background This multicenter prospective study aimed to assess the utility of dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer.Methods The research subjects were drawn from patients with primary early resectable breast cancer treated in the breast disease centers of six three-level hospitals in Beijing from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2012.The participants were allocated to a breast-conserving surgery group (breast-conserving group) or a total mastectomy group (total mastectomy group).Enhanced MRI was used to measure breast volume,longest diameter of tumor and tumor volume.The correlations between these measurements and those derived from histopathologic findings were assessed.The relationships between the success rate of breast-conserving surgery and MRI-and pathology-based measurement results were statistically analyzed in the breast-conserving group.Results The study included 461 cases in the total mastectomy group and 195 in the breast-conserving group.Allocation to these groups was based on clinical indications and patient preferences.The cut-off for concurrence between MRI-and pathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of tumor was set at 0.3 cm.In the total mastectomy group,the confidence interval for 95% concurrence of these measurements was 35.41%-44.63%.Correlation coefficients for MRI and histopathology-based measurements of breast volume,tumor volume and tumor volume/breast volume ratio were r=0.861,0.569,and 0.600,respectively (all P <0.001).In the breast-conserving group,with 0.30 cm taken as the cut-off for concurrence,the 95% confidence interval for MRI and pathology-based measurements of the longest diameter of tumor was 29.98%-44.01%.The subjective and objective success rates for breast-conserving surgery were 100% and 88.54%,respectively.Conclusions There were significant correlations between dynamic enhanced MRI-and histopathology-based measurements of the longest

  14. [Low field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging for brain tumour surgery: preliminary experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Pedro; García, Sergio; González, Josep; Reyes, Luis Alberto; Torales, Jorge; Valero, Ricard; Oleaga, Laura; Enseñat, Joaquim

    Intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is a recently introduced tool in the most advanced neurosurgical operating rooms worldwide. We present our preliminary experience in brain tumour surgery with low field PoleStar N30® intraoperative MRI since its introduction in 2013 in the Barcelona Clinic Hospital. A prospective non-randomised study was conducted on cases operated on using iMRI and intention of complete removal up to October 2015. A record was made of the data as regards surgical times, resection rates, histological diagnosis, hospital stay, and survival rates during follow-up. The study included 50 patients, with a mean age of 55 years (±13.7), a preoperative mean Karnofsky of 92 (being 81 post-operatively), and a mean follow-up of 10.5 months (±6.5). There were 26% re-operations due to recurrence. High-grade gliomas were reported in 56%, low-grade gliomas in 24%, and 20% "Other" tumours. Overall hospital stay was 10 days (±4.5). Depending on the histologiacl diagnosis, the "Others" group had a longer hospital stay. Overall, there were 52% complete removal, 18% of maximum removals, and 30% of partial removals. The overall survival rates during follow-up was 84%. iMRI is a safe and effective tool for brain tumour surgery. Its use allows an increase in resection rates, and minimises post-operative complications. Its implementation involves an increase in surgical time, which improves with the characteristic learning curve. More studies are needed to establish its role in the long-term survival of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulated surgery on computed tomography and magnetic resonance images: an aid for intraoperative radiotherapy.

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    Desco, M; López, J; Calvo, F A; Santos, A; Santos, J A; del Pozo, F; García-Barreno, P

    1997-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a relatively new technique in which irradiation with electrons is performed during an open surgery procedure. This approach poses significant problems in obtaining accurate dosimetry, since neither the pre- nor the postoperative patient images actually matches the irradiation field. Our objective was to implement a software tool able to provide an estimate of the dose distribution, overcoming the problem of the geometrical mismatch between the images and the surgical field during the irradiation. The program was developed in the C programming language, on a noncommercial version of a Philips EasyVision workstation. The application allows to create a new data set by manipulating the preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images in order to simulate the final geometry of the surgical area during the IORT procedure. The exact dose distribution can then be calculated by transferring these new images to a standard radiotherapy planning system. Also an approximate dose distribution can be quickly displayed by superimposing isodose curves obtained from a water phantom. The proposed approach introduces a helpful tool for dosimetry and planning in IORT protocols, improving their accuracy and safety and allowing for more objective quality control and patient follow-up.

  16. Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Bone Metastases Pain Palliation

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    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Nanba, Hirofumi; Kato, Tomonari; Tani, Toshikazu; Ushida, Takahiro

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a novel treatment method that achieves non-invasive thermal ablation by focusing many ultrasound waves on a target tissue with real-time monitoring of the location and temperature of the target during the procedure. We investigated the palliative effect on pain and safety of MRgFUS in painful bone metastases. Six patients (mean age, 65.8 years) who met eligibility criteria for the clinical study approved by our Institutional Ethics Committee based on the cooperative protocol were treated with MRgFUS. Targeted sites included the sacrum (n = 1), ilium (n = 2), scapula (n = 2), and femur (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 9.2 months. All procedures were performed as a single-session treatment using the treatment system that is integrated into the patient table of a magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanner. Endpoints were change in the intensity of pain due to bone metastases from before to after the treatment, as measured on a numerical rating scale, pain interference with daily activities as determined by the Brief pain inventory (BPI), change in images, and safety. Pain relief was obtained in all patients early after treatment, with a reduction in the mean pain score from 6.0±1.3 at baseline to 1.2±1.0 at the end of follow-up as well as in pain interference with daily activities. The mean time required for a single-session treatment was 83.7±37.0 min, with a mean number of sonications required of 13.3±3.7 and mean energy applied of 846.4±273.5 J. No significant growth of tumors was observed, nor were there treatment-related adverse events. These results suggest that MRgFUS has a non-invasive palliative effect on the localized pain in patients with bone metastasis. MRgFUS could become an option in treatment strategies for painful bone metastases in the future.

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  18. Reliable? The Value of Early Postoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging after Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bixia; Göricke, Sophia; Wrede, Karsten; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Wälchli, Thomas; Jägersberg, Max; Sure, Ulrich; Dammann, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) can cause intracerebral hemorrhage. The lesions themselves are frequently associated with perifocal hemosiderin deposits caused by repetitive microhemorrhages. Main indications for a surgical treatment are recurrent symptomatic hemorrhages or cavernoma-related epilepsy. After surgical resection, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is usually performed to confirm 1) the complete resection of the CCM and, especially in cases of cavernoma-related epilepsy, 2) the complete resection of the hemosiderin deposits. This prospective study evaluates the value of early postoperative MRI (within 72 hours) regarding the detection of CCM or hemosiderin remnants compared with a standard 3-6 months postoperative MRI control in 61 CCM cases. Sensitivity of early postoperative MRI for CCM remnant detection was 66.67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.43%-99.16%), specificity was 76.74% (95% CI, 61.37%-88.24%), positive predictive value was 16.67% (95% CI, 2.09%-48.41%), and negative predictive value was 97.06% (95% CI, 84.67%-99.93%). Because of the high number of patients who could not be evaluated because of imaging artifacts, sensitivity and specificity analysis was not performed for early postoperative MRI using T2*/susceptibility-weighted imaging to assess hemosiderin remnants. Sensitivity of early postoperative MRI for hemosiderin remnant detection using T2-weighted sequences was 85.71% (95% CI, 63.66%-96.95%), specificity was 66.67% (95% CI, 44.68%-84.37%), positive predictive value was 69.23% (95% CI, 55.45%-80.27%), and negative predictive value was 84.21% (95% CI, 64.31%-94.04%). Our data suggest that early postoperative MRI after CCM surgery is often hampered by imaging artifacts creating false-positive results and therefore ineligible for a resection control. However, reliability of a negative result on early postoperative T2-weighted MRI is relatively high regarding both CCM and hemosiderin remnants. Copyright © 2017

  19. The role of preoperative cerebral magnetic resonance angiography in the prevention of cerebral complications following cardiovascular surgery

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    Abe, Masakazu; Sakai, Akira; Kodera, Koujirou; Sudo, Kyouichi; Oosawa, Mikio [Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Screening of carotid and intracranial artery diseases by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in forty-one adult patients prior to elective cardiovascular surgery. In twenty patients (48.8%), MRA demonstrated significant cerebrovascular lesions: carotid or main cerebral artery stenosis in 7, diffuse cerebral arteriosclerotic change in 6, vertebral artery lesion in 5 and berry aneurysm in 2. Advanced age (over 70 years) and previous cerebrovascular events increased the incidence of cerebrovascular lesions on MRA. Forty patients underwent scheduled surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass, and pulsatile flow perfusion was used in patients in whom significant cerebrovascular lesions were demonstrated on MRA. One patient with aortic arch aneurysm was judged to be an unacceptable candidate for surgery in light of his marked diffuse arteriosclerotic lesions on MRA. In five patients, staged operation was performed from 10 to 30 days after cerebrovascular surgery (bypass surgery for internal carotid occlusion in 2, aneurysm clipping in 2, carotid endarterectomy in 1). Postoperative neurological complications occurred in one patient (2.5%). In conclusion, screening of carotid and intracranial artery diseases by MRA is a safe and useful method for evaluation of cerebrovascular lesions in patients with advanced age, previous cerebrovascular events and/or arteriosclerotic diseases. (author)

  20. Assessment of cardiac remodeling in asymptomatic mitral regurgitation for surgery timing: a comparative study of echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

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    Ozdogan Oner

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early surgery is recommended for asymptomatic severe mitral regurgitation (MR, because of increased postoperative left ventricular (LV dysfunction in patients with late surgery. On the other hand, recent reports emphasized a "watchful waiting" process for the determination of the proper time of mitral valve surgery. In our study, we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and transthoracic echocardiography to evaluate the LV and left atrial (LA remodeling; for better definitions of patients that may benefit from early valve surgery. Methods Twenty-one patients with moderate to severe asymptomatic MR were evaluated by echocardiography and MRI. LA and LV ejection fractions (EFs were calculated by echocardiography and MRI. Pulmonary veins (PVs were measured from vein orifices in diastole and systole from the tangential of an imaginary circle that completed LA wall. Right upper PV indices were calculated with the formula; (Right upper PV diastolic diameter- Right upper PV systolic diameter/Right upper PV diastolic diameter. Results In 9 patients there were mismatches between echocardiography and MRI measurements of LV EF. LV EFs were calculated ≥60% by echocardiography, meanwhile 0.05. However, both right upper PV indices (0.16 ± 0.06 vs. 0.24 ± 0.08, p: 0.024 and LA EFs (0.19 ± 0.09 vs. 0.33 ± 0.14, p: 0.025 were significantly decreased in patients with depressed EFs when compared to patients with normal EFs. Conclusions MRI might be preferred when small changes in functional parameters like LV EF, LA EF, and PV index are of clinical importance to disease management like asymptomatic MR patients that we follow up for appropriate surgery timing.

  1. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging with fluorescein sodium dyeing for surgery of gliomas in brain motor functional areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jia-gang; YANG Shuai-feng; LIU Yan-hui; WANG Xiang; MAO Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor surgery in brain motor functional areas remains challenging.Novel techniques are being developed to gain maximal and safe resection for brain tumor surgery.Herein,we assessed the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) and fluorescein sodium dyeing (FLS) guiding technique for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas.Methods Totally 83 patients were enrolled according to our inclusion and exclusion criteria (56 patients in experimental group,27 patients in control group).In the experimental group,the surgical approach was designed by DTI imaging,which showed the relationship between the tumor and motor tract.The range of resection in the operation was determined using the FLS-stained area,which recognized the tumor and its infiltrated tissue.The traditional routine method was used in the control group.Postoperatively,all patients underwent enhanced brain MRI within 72 hours to ascertain the extent of resection.Patients were followed in our outpatient clinic over 6-24 months.Neurological deficits and Karnofsky scoring (KPS) were evaluated.Results There were no significant differences in balance test indexes of preoperative data (sex,age,lesion location and volume,and neurological deficits before operation) and diagnosis of histopathology between the two groups.There was a trend in the experimental group for greater rates of gross total resection (80.4% vs.40.7%),and the paralysis rate caused by surgery was lower in experimental (25.0%) vs.control (66.7%) groups (P <0.05).The 6-month KPS in the low-grade and high-grade gliomas was 91±11 and 73±26,respectively,in the experimental group vs.82±9 and 43±27,respectively,in the control group (P <0.05 for both).Conclusions MR-DTI and FLS dye guiding for surgery of glioma located in brain motor functional areas can increase the gross total resection rate,decrease the paralysis rate caused by surgery,and improve patient quality of life compared with traditional

  2. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome: a computer model perspective.

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    Maarten A G Merkx

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vascular access (VA surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative flow enhancement was developed. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA data as patient-specific geometrical input for the model-based prediction of surgery outcome. METHODS: 25 ESRD patients were included in this study. All patients received a NCE-MRA examination of the upper extremity blood vessels in addition to routine ultrasound (US. Local arterial radii were assessed from NCE-MRA and converted to model input using a linear fit per artery. Venous radii were determined with US. The effect of radius measurement uncertainty on model predictions was accounted for by performing Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting flow prediction interval of the computer model was compared with the postoperative flow obtained from US. Patients with no overlap between model-based prediction and postoperative measurement were further analyzed to determine whether an increase in geometrical detail improved computer model prediction. RESULTS: Overlap between postoperative flows and model-based predictions was obtained for 71% of patients. Detailed inspection of non-overlapping cases revealed that the geometrical details that could be assessed from NCE-MRA explained most of the differences, and moreover, upon addition of these details in the computer model the flow predictions improved. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate clearly that NCE-MRA does provide valuable geometrical information for VA surgery planning. Therefore, it is recommended to use this modality, at least for patients at risk for local or global narrowing of the blood vessels as well as for patients for whom an US-based model

  3. Magnetic resonance angiographic assessment of upper extremity vessels prior to vascular access surgery: feasibility and accuracy

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    Planken, Nils R. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tordoir, Jan H. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.; Bosch, Harrie C. van den [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sande, Frank M. van der; Kooman, Jeroen P. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Haan, Michiel W. de; Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    A contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) protocol for selective imaging of the entire upper extremity arterial and venous tree in a single exam has been developed. Twenty-five end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients underwent CE-MRA and duplex ultrasonography (DUS) of the upper extremity prior to hemodialysis vascular access creation. Accuracy of CE-MRA arterial and venous diameter measurements were compared with DUS and intraoperative (IO) diameter measurements, the standard of reference. Upper extremity vasculature depiction was feasible with CE-MRA. CE-MRA forearm and upper arm arterial diameters were 2.94 {+-} 0.67 mm and 4.05 {+-} 0.84 mm, respectively. DUS arterial diameters were 2.80 {+-} 0.48 mm and 4.38 {+-} 1.24 mm; IO diameters were 3.00 {+-} 0.35 mm and 3.55 {+-} 0.51 mm. Forearm arterial diameters were accurately determined with both techniques. Both techniques overestimated upper arm arterial diameters significantly. Venous diameters were accurately determined with CE-MRA but not with DUS (forearm: CE-MRA: 2.64 {+-} 0.61 mm; DUS: 2.50 {+-} 0.44 mm, and IO: 3.40 {+-} 0.22 mm; upper arm: CE-MRA: 4.09 {+-} 0.71 mm; DUS: 3.02 {+-} 1.65 mm, and IO: 4.30 {+-} 0.78 mm). CE-MRA enables selective imaging of upper extremity vasculature in patients requiring hemodialysis access. Forearm arterial diameters can be assessed accurately by CE-MRA. Both CE-MRA and DUS slightly overestimate upper arm arterial diameters. In comparison to DUS, CE-MRA enables a more accurate determination of upper extremity venous diameters. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery for the noninvasive curative ablation of tumors and palliative treatments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Doron; Papa, Moshe

    2007-05-01

    This article reviews and discusses the up-to-date data on and feasibility of focused ultrasound surgery. This technique uses high-energy ultrasound beams that can be directed to penetrate through the skin and various soft tissues, focus on the target, and destroy tumors by increasing the temperature at the targeted tissue volume. The boundaries of the treatment area are sharply demarcated (focused) without causing damage to the surrounding organs. Although the idea of using sound waves to ablate tumors was first demonstrated in the 1940 s, only recent developments have enabled this technology to become more controlled and, hence, more feasible. The major breakthrough toward its clinical use came with coupling the thermal ablative process to advanced imaging. The development of magnetic resonance as the foundation to guide and evaluate the end results of focused ultrasound surgery treatment, the image guidance of the ultrasound beam, and the development of a reliable method for tissue temperature measurement and real-time feedback of the extent of tissue destruction have pushed this novel technology forward in oncological practice.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  6. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy predicts radiotherapy response and time-to-progression in high-grade gliomas after surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Jin-rong; JIANG Tao; DAI Jian-ping; LI Hai-liang; LUO Jun-peng; LI Shao-wu; AI Lin; JIANG Tian-zi

    2012-01-01

    Background Reliable early prediction response to therapy and time-to-progression (TTP) remain an important goal of high-grade gliomas (HGGs) research.Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) has been applied with variable success in clinical application,and we hypothesize that 1H-MRS in predictive value should perform well as a marker of TTP in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) after surgery.Methods 1H-MRS was performed before surgery on 25 patients who had undergone resection of HGGs; then the ratios of lipid/creatine (Lip/Cr) and myo-inositol/creatine (ml/Cr) were determined in the solid tumor.RT response was classified as follows:complete resolution (CR),partial response (PR),stable disease (SD),and progressive disease (PD) by comparison of pre-treatment and post-radiotherapy scans.TTP was defined at the time to radiographic progression by MacDonald criteria.Correlation was evaluated between the ratios of Lip/Cr,ml/Cr and treatment response,TTP.The chi-square test and Pearson correlation test were used for data analyses.Results Multivariate analysis revealed that the prognostic value of spectroscopic variables was independent of age,sex,WHO histologic grade,extent of surgery,and Karnofsky score (KPS).The correlation between the ratios of lipid/Cr and TTP was significant (r=0.894,P=0.000),and between the ratios of ml/Cr and TTP was also significant (r=0.891,P=0.000).As predicted,RT response correlated significantly with TTP (r=0.59,P=0.002):median TTP was 49.9 days for patients with PD compared with 202.7 days for SD,208.0 days for PR,and 234.5 days for CR.Conclusion The ratios of Lip/Cr and ml/Cr of the solid tumor region before surgery could provide important information in predicting RT response and TTP in patients with HGGs treated by radiation alone after surgery.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography combined atlas of developing and adult mouse brains for stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M; Zhang, J; Miller, M I; Sidman, R L; Mori, S

    2009-09-15

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: postnatal day (P) 7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140-P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo magnetic resonance imaging adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains.

  8. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  9. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  10. Ritual and ceremony in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-assisted brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, Vance

    2012-01-01

    Previous photographic research into traditional and shamanic healing practices in Peru and Bolivia and a review of the literature suggested that all medical practices have cultural determined nonmedical activities as integral parts of the healing encounter. These include costume, ritual, ceremony, environment factors that were looked for in a western clinical encounter for this paper. A patient was followed through pre-op preparation and iMRI assisted brain surgery. All activities were photographed extensively and evaluated in a broader healing context. A number of activities were visually and metaphorically comparable with those seen in other practices. These are discussed as rituals of intention on the part of the caregivers to focus their skills on healing and also to mindfully engage the patient in the healing process. Artistic observation and analysis may be an effective way to identify these non quantifiable elements of the healing encounter and suggest directions for further research into the emotional components of the healing process.

  11. Endosphenoidal coil for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland during transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Lalith Talagala, S; Merkle, Hellmut; Sarlls, Joelle E; Montgomery, Blake K; Piazza, Martin G; Scott, Gretchen; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Lonser, Russell R; Oldfield, Edward H; Koretsky, Alan P; Butman, John A

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Pituitary MR imaging fails to detect over 50% of microadenomas in Cushing's disease and nearly 80% of cases of dural microinvasion. Surface coils can generate exceptionally high-resolution images of the immediately adjacent tissues. To improve imaging of the pituitary gland, a receive-only surface coil that can be placed within the sphenoid sinus (the endosphenoidal coil [ESC]) during transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) was developed and assessed. METHODS Five cadaver heads were used for preclinical testing of the ESC. The ESC (a double-turn, 12-mm-diameter surface coil made from 1-mm-diameter copper wire) was developed to obtain images in a 1.5-T MR scanner. The ESC was placed (via a standard sublabial TSS approach) on the anterior sella face. Clinical MR scans were obtained using the 8-channel head coil and ESC as the receiver coils. Using the ESC, ultra-high-resolution, 3D, balanced fast field echo (BFFE) and T1-weighted imaging were performed at resolutions of 0.25 × 0.25 × 0.50 mm(3) and 0.15 × 0.15 × 0.30 mm(3), respectively. RESULTS Region-of-interest analysis indicated a 10-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pituitary when using the ESC compared with the 8-channel head coil. ESC-related improvements (p < 0.01) in the SNR were inversely proportional to the distance from the ESC tip to the anterior pituitary gland surface. High-resolution BFFE MR imaging obtained using ESC revealed a number of anatomical features critical to pituitary surgery that were not visible on 8-channel MR imaging, including the pituitary capsule, the intercavernous sinus, and microcalcifications in the pars intermedia. These ESC imaging findings were confirmed by the pathological correlation with whole-mount pituitary sections. CONCLUSIONS ESC can significantly improve SNR in the sellar region intraoperatively using current 1.5-T MR imaging platforms. Improvement in SNR can provide images of the sella and surrounding structures with unprecedented

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  13. Importance of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for pediatric brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Jawad; Avula, Shivaram; Abernethy, Laurence J; Mallucci, Conor L

    2012-01-01

    High-field intraoperative MRI (IoMRI) is gaining increasing recognition as an invaluable tool in pediatric brain tumor surgery where the extent of tumor resection is a major prognostic factor. We report the initial experience of a dedicated pediatric 3-T intraoperative MRI (IoMRI) unit with integrated neuronavigation in the management of pediatric brain tumors. Seventy-three children (mean age 9.5 years; range 0.2-19 years) underwent IoMRI between October 2009 and January 2012, during 79 brain tumor resections using a 3-T MR scanner located adjacent to the neurosurgical operating theater that is equipped with neuronavigation facility. IoMRI was performed either to assess the extent of tumor resection after surgical impression of complete/intended tumor resection or to update neuronavigation. The surgical aims, IoMRI findings, extent of tumor resection, and follow-up data were reviewed. Complete resection was intended in 47/79 (59%) operations. IoMRI confirmed complete resection in 27/47 (57%). IoMRI findings led to further resection in 12/47 (26%). In 7/47 (15%), IoMRI was equivocal for residual tumor and no evidence of residual tumor was found on re-inspection. In 32/79 (41%) operations, the surgical aim was partial tumor resection. In this subset, surgical resection was extended following IoMRI in 13/32 (41%) operations. None of the patients required early second look procedure for residual disease. At our institution, IoMRI has led to increased rate of tumor resection and a change in surgical strategy with further tumor resection in 32% of patients. While interpreting IoMRI, it is important to be aware of the known pitfalls.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  18. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The optimal timing of post-prostate biopsy magnetic resonance imaging to guide nerve-sparing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hwii Ko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our study was to evaluate the impact of the interval between prostate biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on the accuracy of simple tumor localization, which is essential information that enables nerve-sparing surgery. We also sought to determine the optimal timing of a post-biopsy MRI. A total of 184 patients who had undergone MRI before radical prostatectomy at an institution without a predetermined schedule for MRI after a prostate biopsy were enrolled. The mean interval from the biopsy to the MRI was 30.8 ± 18.6 days. The accuracy of the MRI for simplifi ed tumor location (right, left, bilateral and none was 44.6%. In the group with discordant pathologic and MRI fi ndings, the most common reason recorded was 'MRI predicted a unilateral lesion, but pathology revealed bilateral lesions' (58.3%, followed by 'MRI predicted no lesion, but pathology revealed the presence of a lesion' (32.0%. Multivariable analysis showed that the discordant group had a shorter interval (25.0 ± 14.3 vs 38.1 ± 20.6 days, P < 0.01 preceding the MRI and a higher rate of hemorrhage as observed by MRI (80.4% vs 54.8%, P < 0.01 in comparison with the accordant group. In receiver operating characteristics analysis, the area under the curve of the MRI interval in accurate prediction of the tumor location was 0.707 (P < 0.001. At the MRI interval's cutoff of 28.5 days, the sensitivity was 73.2% and the specificity was 63.7%. When the MRI was performed within 28 days, the accumulated accuracy was only 26.1% (23/88; however, when it was performed after 28 days, the reversely accumulated accuracy was 61.5% (59/96. These data support a waiting period of at least 4 weeks after a biopsy before performing an MRI for the purposes of surgical refinement.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  5. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  10. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  16. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging after acoustic neuroma surgery. Influence of packing materials in the drilled internal auditory canal on assessment of residual tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Hiromichi; Seki, Yojiro [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Serial magnetic resonance (MR) images taken after acoustic neuroma surgery were analyzed to evaluate the pattern and timing of postoperative contrast enhancement in 22 patients who underwent acoustic neuroma removal via the suboccipital transmeatal approach. The opened internal auditory canal (IAC) was covered with a muscle piece in nine patients and with fibrin glue in 13. A total of 56 MR imaging examinations were obtained between days 1 and 930 after surgery. MR imaging showed linear enhancement at the IAC within the first 2 days after surgery, and revealed nodular enhancement on day 3 or later in patients with a muscle piece. MR imaging tended to show linear enhancement at the IAC, irrespective of the timing of the examination in the patients with fibrin glue. Postoperative MR imaging on day 3 or later showed the incidence of nodular enhancement in patients with muscle was significantly higher than in patients with fibrin glue. The results illustrate the difficulty in differentiating nodular enhancement of a muscle piece from tumor by a single postoperative MR imaging study. Therefore, fibrin glue is generally advocated as a packing material of the IAC because it rarely shows masslike enhancement on postoperative MR imaging. When a muscle piece is used in patients at high risk for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks, MR imaging should be obtained within the first 2 days after surgery, since benign enhancement of muscle will not occur and obscure the precise extent of tumor resection. (author)

  17. Impact of Virtual and Augmented Reality Based on Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Functional Neuronavigation in Glioma Surgery Involving Eloquent Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Wang, Fei; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-12-01

    The utility of virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for glioma surgery has not been previously investigated. The study population consisted of 79 glioma patients and 55 control subjects. Preoperatively, the lesion and related eloquent structures were visualized by diffusion tensor tractography and blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI. Intraoperatively, microscope-based functional neuronavigation was used to integrate the reconstructed eloquent structure and the real head and brain, which enabled safe resection of the lesion. Intraoperative MRI was used to verify brain shift during the surgical process and provided quality control during surgery. The control group underwent surgery guided by anatomic neuronavigation. Virtual and augmented reality protocols based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI provided useful information for performing tailored and optimized surgery. Complete resection was achieved in 55 of 79 (69.6%) glioma patients and 20 of 55 (36.4%) control subjects, with average resection rates of 95.2% ± 8.5% and 84.9% ± 15.7%, respectively. Both the complete resection rate and average extent of resection differed significantly between the 2 groups (P virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI can facilitate resection of gliomas involving eloquent areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  5. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  7. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ... Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  11. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  13. Preoperative high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging can identify good prognosis stage I, II, and III rectal cancer best managed by surgery alone: a prospective, multicenter, European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Fiona G M; Quirke, Philip; Heald, Richard J; Moran, Brendan; Blomqvist, Lennart; Swift, Ian; Sebag-Montefiore, David J; Tekkis, Paris; Brown, Gina

    2011-04-01

    To assess local recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-predicted good prognosis tumors treated by surgery alone. The MERCURY study reported that high-resolution MRI can accurately stage rectal cancer. The routine policy in most centers involved in the MERCURY study was primary surgery alone in MRI-predicted stage II or less and in MRI "good prognosis" stage III with selective avoidance of neoadjuvant therapy. Data were collected prospectively on all patients included in the MERCURY study who were staged as MRI-defined "good" prognosis tumors. "Good" prognosis included MRI-predicted safe circumferential resection margins, with MRI-predicted T2/T3a/T3b (less than 5 mm spread from muscularis propria), regardless of MRI N stage. None received preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence were calculated. Of 374 patients followed up in the MERCURY study, 122 (33%) were defined as "good prognosis" stage III or less on MRI. Overall and disease-free survival for all patients with MRI "good prognosis" stage I, II and III disease at 5 years was 68% and 85%, respectively. The local recurrence rate for this series of patients predicted to have a good prognosis tumor on MRI was 3%. The preoperative identification of good prognosis tumors using MRI will allow stratification of patients and better targeting of preoperative therapy. This study confirms the ability of MRI to select patients who are likely to have a good outcome with primary surgery alone.

  14. Magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker, John R; Gianini, John W

    2009-07-01

    Excellent contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation make magnetic resonance urography (MRU) a promising technique for noninvasively evaluating the entire urinary tract. While MRU currently lags behind CT urography (CTU) in spatial resolution and efficiency, new hardware and sequence developments have contributed to a resurgence of interest in MRU techniques. By combining unenhanced sequences with multiphase contrast-enhanced and excretory phase imaging, a comprehensive assessment of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and surrounding structures is possible with image quality rivaling that obtained with other techniques. At the same time, formidable challenges remain to be overcome and further clinical validation is necessary before MRU can replace other forms of urography. In this article, we demonstrate the current potential of MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations and current status of this evolving technique.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  19. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance of late gadolinium enhancement and diastolic wall thickness to predict recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udompunturak Suthipol

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to compare the value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in predicting recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG. Methods We enrolled patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular ejection fraction Results We studied 46 men and 4 women with an average age of 61 years. Baseline left ventricular ejection fraction was 37 ± 13%. A total of 2,020 myocardial segments were analyzed. Abnormal wall motion and the LGE area were detected in 1,446 segments (71.6% and 1,196 segments (59.2% respectively. Wall motion improvement was demonstrated in 481 of 1,227 segments (39.2% that initially had wall motion abnormalities at baseline. Logistic regression analysis showed that the LGE area, EDWT and resting wall motion grade predicted wall motion improvement. Comparison of Receiver-Operator-Characteristic (ROC curves demonstrated that the LGE area was the most important predictor (p Conclusion LGE and EDWT are independent predictors for functional recovery after revascularization. However, LGE appears to be a more important factor and independent of EDWT.

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ... routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require your ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metallic objects from being attracted by the powerful magnet of the MR system, you will typically receive ... teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i.e., transdermal patch) that contains ...

  4. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography Combined Atlas of Developing and Adult Mouse Brains for Stereotaxic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Miller, Michael I.; Sidman, Richard L.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: P7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140–P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo MRI adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains. PMID:19490934

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  1. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  3. Preoperative planning of renal transplantation: a comparison of non-contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance angiography with observations from surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Pedersen, Bodil G; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Andersen, Gratien; Hørlyck, Arne; Østrat, Ernst Ø; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    Many candidates for kidney transplantation need to undergo vessel examination before the transplantation procedure. To identify the optimal preoperative modality for the examination of vessel status without the use of contrast agents in kidney transplant candidates. Fifty-three consecutive patients were examined and 31 patients were transplanted. Ultrasonography (US), non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (NCCT), and non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCMRA) were compared using inspection during kidney transplantation (TX) as a reference standard. The sensitivity and specificity to severe arteriosclerotic changes and the accuracy were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to assess the agreement between TX and the different examination modalities, and McNemar's test was used to test for significant differences. US had higher sensitivity (1.0) and better agreement with observations from surgery (k = 0.89) than both NCCT (sensitivity = 0.60; k = 0.72) and NCMRA (sensitivity = 0.20; k = 0.30). No significant difference was found between TX and US (P = 0.3173) or TX and NCCT (P = 0.1573), but there was a significant difference between TX and NCMRA (P = 0.0455). US was inconclusive in 20% of cases, and the internal iliac artery could not be visualized in 69% of cases. Either US or NCCT can be used as the preferred preoperative imaging modality to examine vessel status before kidney transplantation, but a combination of the two is preferable. NCMRA should not be used as the sole imaging modality for preoperative imaging before kidney transplantation because of its low sensitivity in detecting severe arteriosclerotic disease without the presence of stenosis. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  4. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  5. Prediction of postoperative diabetes insipidus using morphological hyperintensity patterns in the pituitary stalk on magnetic resonance imaging after transsphenoidal surgery for sellar tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Fukui, Issei; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) remains a complication of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for sellar and parasellar tumors. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) appears as hyper intensity (HI) in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its disappearance from the posterior lobe occurs with DI, indicating a lack of ADH. The appearance of HI in the pituitary stalk indicates disturbances in ADH transport. This retrospective study included 172 patients undergoing TSS for sellar tumors at our institute from 2006 to 2014. Sequential T1-weighted MR images without enhancement were evaluated for HI in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe to assess the localization of ADH before and at intervals after TSS. DI was assessed pre- and postoperatively. HI in the pituitary stalk showed the following morphology: (1) ovoid in the distal end of the pituitary stalk (group A), (2) linear in the distal part of the pituitary stalk (group B), (3) linear in the whole pituitary stalk (group C). Preoperative DI occurred in 6 patients (3.5 %) with no HI observed in the posterior lobe. Postoperative DI was transient in 82 patients (47.7 %), and permanent in 11 (6.4 %). One week after surgery, HI was absent in the posterior lobe in 74 patients (43.0 %), and present in the pituitary stalk in 99 patients (57.6 %); both were significantly correlated with postoperative DI (p < 0.001). The absence of HI in the posterior lobe (A, 48.9 %; B, 68.3 %; C, 92.3 %), persistence of DI (A, 3.7 days; B, 45.9 days; C, 20.5 months), and duration until HI recovery in the posterior lobe (A, 3.6 months; B, 6.8 months; C, 22.9 months) were greatest in group C, followed by group B, and then group A. Fourteen group A patients did not have postoperative DI despite having HI in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe. Four group C patients developed permanent DI with persistence HI in the pituitary stalk. HI in the pituitary stalk and its

  6. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  7. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  8. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals and principles of MRI, its capabilities and various techniques of application. Appropriate background for MRI is provided, including basic nuclear magnetic phenomena, modifications required for imaging, the current state of clinical knowledge and a survey of the future potential for in vivo MRI.

  12. Technical aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in parathyroid gland lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmingsson, A.; Ericsson, A.; Ljunghall, S.; Juhlin, C.; Jung, B.; Rastad, J.; Thuomas, K.A.; Akerstroem, G.

    Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were examined before parathyroid surgery with magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 telsa in order to analyse optimal methods of visualization. Two large parathyroid glands in the neck had long transverse relaxation times which rendered them clearly visible in T2-weighted images as structures of a signal intensity higher than that of the surrounding. Large parathyroid lesions may thus be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging provided proper examination parameters are employed.

  13. Standard magnetic resonance imaging is inadequate for patients with refractory focal epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertzen, J. von; Urbach, H.; Jungbluth, S.; Kurthen, M.; Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with intractable epilepsy may benefit from epilepsy surgery especially if they have a radiologically demonstrable cerebral lesion. Dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as performed at epilepsy surgery centres can detect epileptogenic abnormalities with great

  14. Standard magnetic resonance imaging is inadequate for patients with refractory focal epilepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oertzen, J. von; Urbach, H.; Jungbluth, S.; Kurthen, M.; Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with intractable epilepsy may benefit from epilepsy surgery especially if they have a radiologically demonstrable cerebral lesion. Dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols as performed at epilepsy surgery centres can detect epileptogenic abnormalities with great sens

  15. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is the case, you will be given instructions for your child about not eating or drinking several hours prior ... MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  8. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  9. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  10. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  12. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  13. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  14. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  15. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  17. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  20. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  1. Use of magnetic resonance imaging for detecting clinically and mammographically occult ductal carcinoma in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, G; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2008-06-01

    We report on two cases where breast magnetic resonance imaging examination changed clinical management. Breast magnetic resonance imaging is now recognised as an indispensable adjunctive examination to mammography and ultrasound. In each of the two cases described, breast magnetic resonance imaging revealed unsuspected, extensive, and mammographically and ultrasonologically occult, ductal carcinoma in situ. In each of these cases, planned breast conserving surgery was changed to mastectomy. The success of breast conservation treatment depends on removal of all tumour with clear margins at the time of surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging is now considered the most sensitive method for evaluating the extent of breast cancer. Breast magnetic resonance imaging has a very high sensitivity for invasive carcinoma (near 100%), and recent studies show its specificity in high-risk patients is between 93 and 99%. Magnetic resonance imaging may well be proven an important adjunctive examination in patients who have dense breasts or extensive fibrocystic change.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  4. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  5. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, AJE; van den Berg, CAT; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  9. Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids-The tissue effects of GnRH agonist pre-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, O.C. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Hindley, J.T. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Regan, L. [Department of Academic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, W.M.W. [Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, St. Mary' s Hospital and Imperial College School of Medicine, Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: w.gedroyc@imperial.ac.uk

    2006-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the ablative effect of magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) on fibroid tissue following the administration of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist. Study design: Fifty women with clinically symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated. Those with uterine diameter of 10 cm or greater were given 3 months pre-treatment with GnRH agonists. Data regarding number of ultrasound sonications, Joules of energy delivered and volume of thermal destruction was recorded. Results: Twenty-seven subjects were given GnRH agonist therapy before MRgFUS and 23 women underwent MRgFUS without pre-treatment. All patients in both study groups completed MR guided FUS as an outpatient procedure with no device related adverse events reported. In the group of women who received GnRH agonists, the volume of ablation was significantly larger than that in the control group (0.06 cm{sup 3} versus 0.03 cm{sup 3}, P < 0.05), per Joule of energy applied. Conclusion: The use of GnRH agonists potentiates the thermal effects of MRgFUS in women undergoing treatment of uterine fibroids.

  10. Clinical value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma - with a special emphasis on early hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Masanori

    2015-12-28

    Gadoxetic acid- or gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) achieves excellent lesion detection and characterization for both hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in arterial phase imaging and hypovascular early HCC (small well-differentiated HCC of the vaguely nodular type) in hepatobiliary phase imaging, and has become an indispensable imaging modality in the treatment of HCC. Early HCCs have been detected more frequently since the introduction of EOB-MRI into daily clinical practice. Early HCC is known to progress to conventional hypervascular HCC, and many risk factors have been identified for the hypervascularization of early HCC including the diameter of the tumor, presence of fat, and imaging findings of EOB-MRI. The rate of the development of hypervascular HCC was previously reported to be high in patients with chronic liver disease and early HCC. The presence of early HCC is regarded as a predictor for the recurrence of HCC following hepatic resection. On the other hand, although early HCC itself is currently not regarded as a target lesion for hepatic resection, early HCC at high risk of hypervascularity needs to be treated by local ablation therapy. If concomitant early HCC with progressed HCC is at high risk of hypervascularization and the functional liver reserve of a patient is sufficient, its simultaneous treatment at the time of hepatic resection for progressed HCC is recommended. Further studies on larger numbers of patients are needed before this strategy is adopted.

  11. Design, analysis and control of a novel tendon-driven magnetic resonance-guided robotic system for minimally invasive breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Lou, Jinlong; Yang, Zhiyong; Dai, Jiansheng; Yu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Biopsy and brachytherapy for small core breast cancer are always difficult medical problems in the field of cancer treatment. This research mainly develops a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-precision robotic system for breast puncture treatment. First, a 5-degree-of-freedom tendon-based surgical robotic system is introduced in detail. What follows are the kinematic analysis and dynamical modeling of the robotic system, where a mathematic dynamic model is established using the Lagrange method and a lumped parameter tendon model is used to identify the nonlinear gain of the tendon-sheath transmission system. Based on the dynamical models, an adaptive proportional-integral-derivative controller with friction compensation is proposed for accurate position control. Through simulations using different sinusoidal input signals, we observe that the sinusoidal tracking error at 1/2π Hz is 0.41 mm. Finally, the experiments on tendon-sheath transmission and needle insertion performance are conducted, which show that the insertion precision is 0.68 mm in laboratory environment.

  12. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Tomography of tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies and whether there’s a possibility you ... problems, or if you have had any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may ...

  15. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  16. Magnetic resonance images of hematospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Norio; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Nobuki; Furuta, Nozomu; Ohishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kondo, Naoya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    1998-12-01

    We performed MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the pelvic region of 70 cases with hematospermia and conducted a study on the abnormal MRI findings to which hematospermia could be attributed. We conducted a study on the morphological anomaly and change in the signal intensity in the prostate gland and of the seminal vesicle as well as on the presence or absence of dilation in the plexus venous surrounding the deferent duct or the prostate gland out of the abnormal MRI findings. As for the seminal vesicle, the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in higher intensity than the prostate gland in T1 weighted images were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic focus and the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in low intensity both in T1 and T2 weighted images were diagnosed as having fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 40 out of the 70 cases (57%). Anomaly in the prostate gland was indicated in 6 (9%) cases. Abnormality in the seminal vesicle was indicated in 30 cases (43%) including hemorrhage of seminal vesicle in 25 cases, chronic inflammation in five cases and cyst of seminal vesicle in one case. In conducting an examination of the patients with hematospermia, MRI is the nonivasive and reproducible method and it is possible to identify the hemorrhagic region. Therefore, MRI is thought to be useful to identify the causal organs of hematospermia. (author)

  17. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  18. Magnetic resonance in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Biondi, A.; Landoni, L.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres.

  19. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  20. Are There Any Additional Benefits to Performing Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Scans and Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Patients with Ground-Glass Nodules Prior to Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae Uk; Song, Junwhi; Lee, Kyung Jong; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Jhingook; Han, Joungho; Um, Sang Won

    2017-10-01

    A ground-glass nodule (GGN) represents early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. However, there is still no consensus for preoperative staging of GGNs. Therefore, we evaluated the need for the routine use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during staging. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in 72 patients with 74 GGNs of less than 3 cm in diameter, which were confirmed via surgery as malignancy, at the Samsung Medical Center between May 2010 and December 2011. The median age of the patients was 59 years. The median GGN diameter was 18 mm. Pure and part-solid GGNs were identified in 35 (47.3%) and 39 (52.7%) cases, respectively. No mediastinal or distant metastasis was observed in these patients. In preoperative staging, all of the 74 GGNs were categorized as stage IA via chest CT scans. Additional PET/CT scans and brain MRIs classified 71 GGNs as stage IA, one as stage IIIA, and two as stage IV. However, surgery and additional diagnostic work-ups for abnormal findings from PET/CT scans classified 70 GGNs as stage IA, three as stage IB, and one as stage IIA. The chest CT scans did not differ from the combined modality of PET/CT scans and brain MRIs for the determination of the overall stage (94.6% vs. 90.5%; kappa value, 0.712). PET/CT scans in combination with brain MRIs have no additional benefit for the staging of patients with GGN lung adenocarcinoma before surgery.

  1. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  4. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- ..... this study, it is important to note that there were distinct differences in the .... Applications of MRS in the. 13. evaluation ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  6. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  7. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  8. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Characterize a Rodent Model of Covert Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sheryl Lyn

    Covert stroke (CS) comprises lesions in the brain often associated by risk factors such as a diet high in fat, salt, cholesterol and sugar (HFSCS). Developing a rodent model for CS incorporating these characteristics is useful for developing and testing interventions. The purpose of this thesis was to determine if magnetic resonance (MR) can detect brain abnormalities to confirm this model will have the desired anatomical effects. Ex vivo MR showed brain abnormalities for rats with the induced lesions and fed the HFSCS diet. Spectra acquired on the fixed livers had an average percent area under the fat peak relative to the water peak of (20+/-4)% for HFSCS and (2+/-2)% for control. In vivo MR images had significant differences between surgeries to induce the lesions (p=0.04). These results show that applying MR identified abnormalities in the rat model and therefore is important in the development of this CS rodent model.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Fernández, R; Barrera Ortega, J

    Endometriosis is common in women of reproductive age; it can cause pelvic pain and infertility. It is important to diagnose endometriosis and to thoroughly evaluate its extension, especially when surgical treatment is being considered. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with careful examination technique and interpretation enables more accurate and complete diagnosis and staging than ultrasonography, especially in cases of deep pelvic endometriosis. Furthermore, MRI can identify implants in sites that can be difficult to access in endoscopic or laparoscopic explorations. In this article, we describe the appropriate MRI protocol for the study of pelvic endometriosis and the MRI signs of pelvic organ involvement. It is necessary to know the subtle findings and to look for them so we can ensure that they are not overlooked. We describe clinical grading systems for endometriosis and review the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with other imaging techniques and surgery. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  20. Application analysis of breast magnetic resonance imaging in occult breast cancer and breast-conserving surgery%乳腺 MRI 在隐匿性乳腺癌和保乳手术中的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芹; 马行天; 石岚

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss application values of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in occult breast cancer and breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Breast MRI was performed in 120 grouped patients. The examination results were analyzed and summarized. Results: In the 58 cases of occult breast cancer patients with breast MRI, 32 cases were found with breast lesions, in which 19 cases were confirmed by pathology as the original site; the diagnosis rate was 32. 7% . In the 62 cases of breast cancer being performed breast-conserving surgery with breast MRI, multiple lesions was found in 25 cases, in which 23 cases gave up breast-con-serving surgery. Conclusions: Breast MRI has a higher resolution in finding the primary lesion of occult breast cancer, and has impor-tant value in the display of breast cancers with multicentric lesions and the indication of breast-conserving surgery.%目的::探讨乳腺核磁共振成像(MRI)在隐匿性乳腺癌和保乳手术中的应用价值。方法:对120例隐匿性乳腺癌及早期患者进行 MRI 检查,对检查结果进行分析和归纳。结果:入组的58例隐匿性乳腺癌患者 MRI 检查,发现乳腺病灶32例,其中19例经病理证实为原发灶,确诊率为32.7%;入组的62例拟行保乳手术的乳腺癌患者 MRI 检查,有25例发现多中心病灶,其中23例放弃保乳手术。结论:MRI 检查对检出隐匿性乳腺癌原发灶有着有较高的分辨率,对多中心乳腺癌的显示以及明确乳腺癌的保乳适应症,有着重要的临床价值。

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... joints and bones, where it can help: diagnose sports-related injuries detect the presence of an otherwise ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... IV line, into a vein in your child’s hand or arm. A saline solution may be used ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies and whether there’s ... the radiologist know if you have any serious health problems, or if you have had any recent ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is used to: diagnose causes of pain evaluate for injury after trauma diagnose and monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always ... surgical staples In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should always ... metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI ... of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... copied to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent your child from being given gadolinium ... MRI. If your child has a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is used to: diagnose causes of pain evaluate for injury after trauma diagnose and monitor infectious or inflammatory disorders monitor response to cancer treatment MRI is ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. ... or a nurse may ask if you have allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... or infection in a joint diagnose developmental joint abnormalities in children detect bone cancer inspect the marrow ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray may be taken to detect and identify any metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint ...

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  17. Scaled signal intensity of uterine fibroids based on T2-weighted MR images: a potential objective method to determine the suitability for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun [CHA University, Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang-Wook [CHA University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Sungnam-si, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sokolov, Amit [InSightec Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a non-invasive method to treat uterine fibroids. To help determine the patient suitability for MRgFUS, we propose a new objective measure: the scaled signal intensity (SSI) of uterine fibroids in T2 weighted MR images (T2WI). Forty three uterine fibroids in 40 premenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. SSI of each fibroid was measured from the screening T2WI by standardizing its mean signal intensity to a 0-100 scale, using reference intensities of rectus abdominis muscle (0) and subcutaneous fat (100). Correlation between the SSI and the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio (a measure for treatment success) was calculated. Pre-treatment SSI showed a significant inverse-correlation with post treatment NPV ratio (p < 0.05). When dichotomizing NPV ratio at 45 %, the optimal cut off value of the SSI was found to be 16.0. A fibroid with SSI value 16.0 or less can be expected to have optimal responses. The SSI of uterine fibroids in T2WI can be suggested as an objective parameter to help in patient selection for MRgFUS. (orig.)

  18. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  20. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Non-ischemic perfusion defects due to delayed arrival of contrast material on stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Koon; Park, Eun Ah; Park, Sang Joon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Herein we report about the adenosine stress perfusion MR imaging findings of a 50-year-old man who exhibited two different perfusion defects resulting from two different mechanisms after a coronary artery bypass surgery. An invasive coronary angiography confirmed that one perfusion defect at the mid-anterior wall resulted from an ischemia due to graft stenosis. However, no stenosis was detected on the graft responsible for the mid-inferior wall showing the other perfusion defect. It was assumed that the perfusion defect at the mid-inferior wall resulted from delayed perfusion owing to the long pathway of the bypass graft. The semiquantitative analysis of corrected signal-time curves supported our speculation, demonstrating that the rest-to-stress ratio index of the maximal slope of the myocardial territory in question was similar to those of normal myocardium, whereas that of myocardium with the stenotic graft showed a typical ischemic pattern. A delayed perfusion during long graft pathway in a post-bypass graft patient can mimick a true perfusion defect on myocardial stress MR imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this knowledge to avoid misinterpretation of graft and myocardial status in post bypass surgery patients.

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent your child from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If your child has a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the radiologist know if you have any serious health problems, or if you have had any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) ... brain, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries ...

  5. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  6. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... of the body being studied. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... is positioned around the head. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  15. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  16. Magnetically controlled growing rods for scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metkar, Umesh; Kurra, Swamy; Quinzi, David; Albanese, Stephen; Lavelle, William F

    2017-02-01

    Early onset scoliosis can be both a disfiguring as well as a life threatening condition. When more conservative treatments fail, pediatric spinal surgeons are forced to consider operative interventions. Traditionally, these interventions have involved the insertion of a variety of implants into the patient with a limited number of anchor points controlling the spine. In the past, these pediatric patients have had multiple surgeries for elective lengthening of these devices to facilitate their growth while attempting to control the scoliosis. These patients often experience a physical and emotional toll from their multiple repeated surgeries. Growing spine techniques have also had a noted high complication rate due to implant dislodgement and infections. Recently, the development of non-invasively, self-lengthening growing rods has occurred. These devices have the potential to allow for the devices to be lengthened magnetically in a conscious patient in the surgeon's office. Areas covered: This review summarized previously published articles in the English literature using a key word search in PubMed for: 'magnetically controlled growing rods', 'Magec rods', 'magnetic growing rods' and 'growing rods'. Expert commentary: Magnetically controlled growing rods have an advantage over growing rods in lengthening the growing spine in the absence of repetitive surgeries.

  17. 磁共振成像阳性癫(癎)患儿手术效果及其预后因素%Surgery Outcome and Its Prognostic Factors in Child Epilepsy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging -Positive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董文涛; 任榕娜; 杨朋范

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the surgery outcome of children epilepsy with magnetic resonance imaging( MRI) - positive,and prognostic factors in the surgery. Methods Retrospective analysis was done upon 58 epilepsy children with MRI - positive who were operated and followed up for at least 1 year from Jun. 2005 to Sep. 2009. The epileptogenic zone and the surgery programs were determined according to the results of presurgical evaluations,which included video- electroencephalogram(VEEG) ,MRI,positron emission tomography and computed tomography ( PET - CT) , and invasive EEG( IEEG). Surgical resections were aimed at total removal of the epileptogenic zone and the lesions. Patients were categorized as seizure free group (Engel class I ) or seizure attack group ( Engel classes II - IV ). Statistical analysis was used for the predictable prognostic factors of the surgery which included age at surgery, epilepsy duration, age at epilepsy onset, seizure types,seizure frequency,epileptogenic zone and VEEG/MRI concordance. Results According to the Engel classification,39 cases (67.2% ) of the children were seizure free, including 17 cases (73.9% ) of temporal lobe atrophy or hippocampal sclerosis, 11 cases (91.7%)oflow grade tumors,4 cases (66.7% ) of arachnoid cyst,3 cases (42.9% )of cortical dysplasia,2 cases( 100% ) of cavernous hemangioma and 2 cases (25.0% )of malacia. Among 19 cases with seizure attacks after surgery ,4 cases(6.9% )were in Engel class H ,7 cases( 12. 1% )were in Engel class HI, and 8 cases( 13.8% ) were in Engel class IV. The shorter epilepsy duration,low seizure frequency,not secondary generalized seizures and VEEG/MRI concordance were the strongest prognostic factors for favorable surgery outcome. Age at surgery,age at epilepsy onset,epileptogenic zone had no significant correlation with the surgery outcome. Conclusions Surgery is effective and should be done early for childhood epilepsy with MRI - positive. The surgery outcome can be predicted

  18. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: p.boraschi@do.med.unipi.it; Salemi, S. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Liver Transplant Unit of the Dept. of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, F. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, C. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T{sub 2}w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T{sub 1}w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  19. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong [Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images.

  20. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Minoru; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Satoru; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisatoshi.

    1988-04-01

    Nineteen patients with lumbosacral spina bifida were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were divided into two groups: those with lumbosacral lipoma and those with meningomyelocele. All of the patients with meningomyelocele underwent surgery soon after birth for closure of the skin defect. Whenever possible, examination was not confined to the lumbosacral area but also included the brain and other portions of the spinal cord. Certain similarities and differences in pathology were ascertained in the two groups. The tethered cords were the same in both groups. However, Chiari malformations were observed only in patients with meningomyelocele, and hydrocephalus occurred only in patients with Chiari malformations. Syringomyelia and scoliosis were detected in both groups, but scoliosis was more prevalent in the meningomyelocele group. There appeared to be a correlation between scoliosis and syringomyelia; in five of the seven cases of syringomyelia, the locations of the scoliosis and syringomyelia were the same. With MRI, these complex pathologies, including tethered cord, syringomyelia, scoliosis, Chiari malformations, and hydrocephalus, were easily visualized. The superiority of MRI over conventional X-ray technology has been well established. First, a direct image of the spinal cord is obtained. Second, there is no necessity for injection of contrast material into the intrathecal space. Third, any scanning field is possible. There are also some disadvantages with MRI. First, the spatial resolution is inferior to that of high-resolution computed tomography. Second, MRI cannot provide information concerning bone cortex. Therefore, bone involvement cannot be accurately diagnosed. However, in the assessment of spinal dysraphism, MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool and should be the preferred method of diagnosing spinal dysraphism.

  2. Patient perception of magnetic resonance arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, M.I.; Anzilotti, K.F. Jr.; Katz, L.D.; Lange, R.C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Objective. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been demonstrated to be more accurate than MR imaging alone in the identification of a variety of musculoskeletal pathology. While the complication rate of intra-articular gadolinium: saline injection has been shown to be relatively low, MR arthrography is more invasive, painful, and costly, and less convenient, than MR imaging alone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients' perception of the fear and discomfort, and to assess their overall acceptance of the intra-articular gadolinium injection.Design and patients. Between October 1997 and January 1998, 113 outpatients who were referred to Yale-New Haven Hospital for MR arthrography of the ankle, elbow, hip, knee, shoulder, or wrist were asked to complete a questionnaire rating their fear of factors most commonly associated with the procedure including ''pain'', ''needles'', ''complications'', and ''discovery of results that would lead to surgery''. In addition, after having undergone the intra-articular gadolinium:saline injection, patients were asked to rate their perception of pain.Results. While many patients expressed fear of ''pain'' and ''needles'', after having undergone the injection their overall pain rating score was low. Only 6% actually found gadolinium arthrography more painful than expected.Conclusion. Despite the fact that patients expressed apprehension about certain aspects of MR arthrography, subjects who underwent the intra-articular gadolinium injection considered the discomfort less than expected. Clinicians should not hesitate to order MR arthrography because the accuracy of the procedure is high enough that patients accept the discomfort. (orig.)

  3. Role of Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Preoperative Evaluation of Breast Conserving Surgery for Breast Cancer%动态磁共振成像在乳腺癌保乳术中的术前评估作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范培芝; 张超杰; 刘鹏; 张志功; 唐梅徕; 顾晓文; 郑维; 李艳春

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To evaluate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prcopcrativc evaluation of breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer. [Methods! Totally 65 female breast cancer patients with the average age of 35. 8 years old took prcopcrativc mammography and MRI examination. Mammography and MRI examination were used to evaluate the feasibility of breast-conserving surgery. Pathological diagnosis was used to evaluate the accuracy of MRI in the assessment of breast cancer in cutting edge and with multi-center lesions. [Results! Among 65 patients with breast cancer, 64. 6% of the patients could undergo breast-conserving surgery by mammography prcopcrativc evaluation which was lower than that by MRI cvaluation(83. 1 %) , and there was significant difference between thcm( P surgery can more accurately determine multi-center lesion and incisal margin range than mammography, and is more helpful for deciding whether to adopt breast conserving surgery and more precisely determine surgical margin.%[目的]评价动态增强磁共振成像(MRI)在乳腺癌保乳根治术的术前评估作用.[方法]平均年龄35.8岁的65 例女性乳腺癌患者,术前均行钼靶及MRI检查,对钼靶、MRI评估是否可行保乳手术进行分析,通过病理诊断来评价MRI在评估乳腺癌多中心病灶以及切缘范围上的准确性.[结果]65例患者中,钼靶术前评估认为可保乳术患者64.6%,低于MRI评估的83.1%,且两者相比差异有显著性(P<0.05).对癌块切缘判断准确率MRI为80%,显著高于钼靶的53.8%(P<0.05).[结论]在中青年女性的I~IIb期乳腺癌保乳术的术前评估方法中,动态增强MRI成像较钼靶

  4. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; CHEN Li; LI Yong-jie; ZHANG Guo-jun; LI Kun-cheng; WANG Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) is a rare benign neoplasm of the central nervous system affecting young people. A correct preoperative diagnosis is helpful for planning surgical strategies and improving prognosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize DNTs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to analyze the value of these two techniques in the diagnosis of DNTs.Methods MR images of 13 patients with DNTs were reviewed retrospectively; and five of the patients also underwent MRS. Tumors were confirmed by surgery. The distribution, extension and signal features of the lesions were assessed,and the MRS results were analyzed.Results All tumors were supratentorial. The cortex was the main area involved, with nine tumors located in the temporal lobe, three in the frontal lobe, and one on the boundary between the temporal and occipital lobes. All cases had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. On fluid attenuated inversion recovery weighted images, the hyperintense "ring sign" and internal septation of the lesion were seen in 9 cases. Eight tumors had well-demarcated borders. Peritumoral edema or mass effect was absent in all cases. A contrast enhancement examination was performed in 9 cases. Contrast enhancement was absent in five cases, and four cases showed significant enhancement. The MRS showed a low N-acetylaspartate peak and a lack of elevated choline-containing component (Cho) or Cho-Cr ratio (Cho/Cr) in five patients.Conclusions The MRI findings of DNTs were stereotypical. The combination of MRI and MRS techniques were helpful in making a correct presurgical diagnosis.

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  7. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  8. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  9. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: physics and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Robson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the branch of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whose acquisition methods are adapted to surmount the particular challenges caused by motion of the heart and blood in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is supremely flexible; it can produce images showing the spatial distribution of diverse tissue characteristics, for example, proton density, T(1), T(2), T(2)(⁎), fat concentration, flow rate, and diffusion parameters. The image contrast may usefully be modified by intravenous infusion of contrast agents. Magnetic resonance imaging permits 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional acquisitions with arbitrary slice orientation. Unfortunately, MRI's flexibility is matched by a remarkable complexity not only in its fundamental principles but also in the optimization of applications in the clinic. This article attempts to demystify the basic principles of CMR and provides a primer on the terminology used in CMR. Complete confidence in the principles of CMR is not essential to use the technology. Nevertheless, knowledge of the principal terminology of MRI is a valuable first step when seeking to understand and apply modern methods in a clinical or research setting. Thus, the article closes with a glossary of terminology and references to high-quality educational resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  13. Was magnetic resonance imaging scan contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2010-01-01

    An intravenous drug abuser with a retained needle posed a management problem at a neurosurgical unit, having declined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on safety grounds. However, later, having been assessed by the senior radiologist, she went though the MRI scan safely.

  14. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  15. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  16. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  19. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can be

  1. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  2. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  3. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  4. Clinical Significance of Magnetic Resonance Imaging before Complex Anal Fistula Surgery%术前磁共振检查在复杂性肛瘘手术中的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙平良; 陈文福; 李晶; 黄艳; 蒙建兴

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨术前磁共振(MRI)检查对复杂性肛瘘手术的临床意义.方法 将80例复杂性肛瘘患者分为低位观察组、低位对照组、高位观察组、高位对照组四组,每组20例.低位观察组和高位观察组术前进行MRI检查,记录内口位置、数目,并与术中情况进行比较;低位对照组和高位对照组术前单依靠临床经验诊断,不进行MRI检查.对四组的术后手术次数、再次手术率、愈合时间、半年后复发率进行比较.结果 低位观察组与低位对照组比较,在术中发现内口数量、手术次数、再次手术率、愈合时间及复发情况方面,两组差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).而高位观察组与高位对照组比较,在术中发现内口数量、手术次数、愈合时间方面,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).高位对照组的再次手术率高于高位观察组,无统计学差异(P>0.05);高位观察组的MRI内口部位准确率高于低位观察组,无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 术前MRI检查能提高高位复杂性肛瘘的临床疗效,应成为高位复杂性肛瘘的术前常规检查项目.%Objective To explore the clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging( MRI )before complex anal fistula surgery. Methods 80 cases of complex anal fistula were divided into a low - level fistula observation group, a low -level fistula control group, a high -level fistula observation group and a high -level control group ,20 cases in each one. Before the surgery, MRI was performed in low -level fistula observation group and high - level fistula observation group. The location and number of internal opening were recorded and compared with those discovered in the surgery. In low - level control group and high - level control group, the diagnosis relied only on the clinical experience before the surgery,without MRI performed. The comparison was conducted after the surgery among four groups in terms of the surgical frequency, re - surgical

  5. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  6. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  7. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  8. Clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids; Klinische Ergebnisse der Behandlung symptomatischer Uterusmyome mittels MRgFUS (Magnetresonanztomografie-gesteuerter fokussierter Ultraschall)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, J.E.K.; Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Beck, A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; David, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Gynaekologie; Hengst, S. [Klinikum Barnim GmbH, Werner Forssmann Krankenhaus, Eberswalde (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in premenopausal women using the validated USF-QOL (Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life) Questionnaire. Materials and Methods: 54 patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients completed the UFS-QOL Questionnaire prior to MRgFUS treatment as well as after 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: The rate of technical success was 91.5 % (95.2 % after subtraction of screening errors). 6/54 patients (11 %) had other treatments (surgery, n = 4; UAE, n = 2), 8/54 (15 %) dropped out due to pregnancy, and 8/54 were lost to follow-up. The remaining group showed considerable symptom relief as early as after 3 months. The median overall quality of life score increased from 64.7 (quartile range QR: 49.8 - 77.6) before treatment to 77.6 (QR: 61.4 - 87.1) (p < 0.001), 78.4 (QR: 66.4 - 89.7) (p < 0.001), and 82.8 (QR: 69.8 - 92.2) (p < 0.001) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The corresponding median symptom severity score decreased from 46.9 (QR: 28.1 - 56.2) to 34.4 (QR: 21.9 - 43.7) at 3 months (p = 0.003) and 28.1 at 6 and 12 months (QR: 18.7 - 38.3, QR: 15.6 - 34.4) (p < 0.001, p = 0.002). The rate of complications requiring treatment was 9 %, and the rate of overall complications was 39 %. No major complications occurred. Conclusion: Our results indicate significant alleviation of fibroid-related symptoms within 12 months of MRgFUS with improvement beginning as early as 3 months after treatment. We observed no major complications, and some women became pregnant after MRgFUS. There was a low treatment failure rate of 11 %. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  10. Application of magnetic resonance imaging in cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan; Zhang; Sushant; K; Das; Dong-Jun; Yang; Han-Feng; Yang

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy(CSM) is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction and is caused by static or dynamic repeated compression of the spinal cord resulting from degenerative arthritis of the cervical spine and some biological injuries to the cervical spine. The T2 signal change on conventional magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is most commonly associated with neurological deficits. Diffusion tensor imaging and MR spectroscopy show altered microstructure and biochemistry that reflect patient-specific pathogenesis and can be used to predict neurological outcome and response to intervention. Functional MRI can help to assess the neurological functional recovery after decompression surgery for CSM.

  11. Correct diagnosis for plunging ranula by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Plunging ranulas most commonly occupy the submandibular triangle and misdiagnosis inevitably leads to incorrect treatment. Three cases of plunging ranula are reported. The correct diagnosis resulted from the characteristic signs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment consisted of the total removal of the sublingual gland and evacuation of cystic contents by the intraoral approach. The cyst gradually regressed and disappeared within two months after surgery as confirmed by ultrasonography. All three cases have not experienced recurrence in the follow-up period. MRI is a valuable method to correctly diagnosis plunging ranula. Total removal of the sublingual gland is the most reliable method to treat plunging ranula.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  13. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  15. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in the staging of cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camisao, Claudia C. [Hospital Sao Lucas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccamisao@inca.gov.br; Brenna, Sylvia M.F. [Hospital Maternidade Leonor Mendes de Barros, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lombardelli, Karen V.P. [Hospital do Cancer (HCII), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Djahjah, Maria Celia R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Zeferino, Luiz Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Ginecologia

    2007-05-15

    Cervical cancer is the worldwide leading cause of cancer-related death of women, especially in developing countries. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics recommends staging during surgery, however, surgical-pathologic staging would not be feasible in cases of more advanced cancers. Generally, in these cases, the staging is performed by means of clinical and gynecological examination and basic imaging studies. However, such an approach fails to demonstrate the actual extent of the disease, and does not include significant prognostic factors such as tumor volume, stromal invasion and lymph node involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging has increasingly been utilized in cervical cancer staging, since at early stages of the disease its performance may be compared to intraoperative findings and, at advanced stages, it shows to be superior to the clinical evaluation. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging presents an excellent imaging resolution for the different densities of pelvic structures, does not require ionizing radiation, is comfortable for the patient, improves de staging, allowing the early detection of recurrence and the identification of reliable prognostic factors which contribute to the therapeutic decision making process and results prediction with an excellent cost-effectiveness. The present article is aimed at reviewing the most significant aspects of magnetic resonance imaging in the cervical cancer staging. (author)

  18. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  19. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  1. Use of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of placental invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, T.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore)], E-mail: thteo76@gmail.com; Law, Y.M.; Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Cheah, F.K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    Aim: To review and describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in patients with suspected placental invasion and correlate the findings with surgery and pathology findings. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was undertaken of the MRI images of seven consecutive patients with ultrasound findings suspicious for placental invasion. Two experienced MRI radiologists, blinded to the pathology and surgery findings, reviewed the MRI. The pathology or surgical findings were used as the reference standard to establish accuracy and concordance with the MRI findings. Results: Three MRI features described in an earlier series were consistently present in the patients with placental invasion: lower uterine bulging, heterogeneous placenta, and dark intraplacental linear bands on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MRI features, which were described in patients with placental invasion in an earlier series, were useful in establishing the presence and depth of placental invasion.

  2. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  4. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  6. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of trilucent TM breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, Elspeth M.; Jones, Annette; King, Rebecca; Chapman, P.; Stanek, Jan; Irvine, Allan T.; Bingham, John B

    2002-04-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of intact and ruptured Trilucent TM implants with imaging and surgical correlation. The appearances of the implant transponder artefact are also described MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the MRI findings in 34 patients with bilateral subpectoral Trilucent TM breast implants (Lipomatrix, Inc./Collagen Aesthetics International Inc., Neuchatel, Switzerland) was performed. Patients under implant surveillance and those with suspected implant rupture formed the study group. Imaging findings were correlated with surgical appearances. RESULTS: Surgical correlation was available in 53% of patients. Fifty per cent (18/36) of implants were intact at surgery, 50% (18/36) of implants were ruptured. Of the 18 ruptured implants, 17 were intracapsular ruptures and one an extracapsular rupture. The sensitivity of MRI for detection of intracapsular rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants was 82% specificity 76%, positive predictive value 78%, negative predictive value 81% and accuracy 79% in this study group. No case of implant rupture was obscured by the transponder artefact. Four implants were found to have 'pseudocapsules' at surgery (5{center_dot}9%), the implants were intact with fluid present between the implant and capsule. Only one pseudocapsule was demonstrated on MRI. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most accurate technique for diagnosis of implant rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants. Transponder artefact does not appear to interfere with the assessment of implant rupture. Elson, E. M. et al. (2002)

  8. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  9. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    It is quite possible to acquire images with an MR scanner without understanding the principles behind it, but choosing the best parameters and methods, and interpreting images and artifacts, requires understanding. This text serves as an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is aimed at beginners in possession of only a minimal level of technical expertise, yet it introduces aspects of MR that are typically considered technically challenging. The notes were written in conn...

  10. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  11. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  12. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  13. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  14. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  15. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging: review of neurosurgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Stefan; Duncan, Niall; Northoff, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Recent research in brain imaging has highlighted the role of different neural networks in the resting state (ie, no task) in which the brain displays spontaneous low-frequency neuronal oscillations. These can be indirectly measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and functional connectivity can be inferred as the spatiotemporal correlations of this signal. This technique has proliferated in recent years and has allowed the noninvasive investigation of large-scale, distributed functional networks. In this review, we give a brief overview of resting-state networks and examine the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurosurgical contexts, specifically with respect to neurooncology, epilepsy surgery, and deep brain stimulation. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages compared with task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, the limitations of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and the emerging directions of this relatively new technology.

  16. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  17. Can magnetic resonance imaging predict circumferential margins and TNM stage in rectal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Graham; Chave, Helen; Fuller, Clare; McGee, Shaun; Finnis, Derek

    2004-08-01

    This study was designed to assess whether preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were able to predict 1) pathologic tumor and node stage, and 2) those patients with a pathologically clear circumferential resection margin. Patients with histologically proven carcinoma of the rectum were staged preoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging. Histologic specimens from patients undergoing mesorectal excision were reported according to the Royal College of Pathologists minimum dataset. Agreement between radiologic staging of tumor, local lymph nodes and circumferential resection margin involvement, and pathologic reporting was assessed by means of the Kappa statistic. After exclusions (10 radiotherapy, 3 failed scans, 10 no surgery, 9 local surgery), 40 patients remained. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly staged the tumor in 20 patients, understaged in 12, and overstaged in 8. Statistically, there was poor correlation between pathologic and radiologic tumor staging (Kappa, 0.18; 95 percent confidence interval, -0.13 to 0.42). Magnetic resonance imaging correctly staged node status in 27 patients, overstaged in 9, and understaged in 4. Statistically, there was poor correlation between pathologic and radiologic node staging (Kappa, 0.38; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.08-0.64). Magnetic resonance imaging correctly reported the status of the circumferential resection margin in 39 patients and understaged 1. Statistically, there was good correlation between pathologic and radiologic reporting of circumferential resection margin involvement (Kappa, 0.66; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.03-1). Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans provide poor predictive data as to subsequent pathologic tumor and node stage. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging does produce reliable prediction of clear circumferential resection margins and provides valuable information in assessing whether patients can proceed to surgery without the need for preoperative

  18. Intraoperative magnetic résonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seaman Family Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research Canter, Division ofNeurosurgery,. Department .... notes, theatre records, and immediate postoperative course. We analyzed .... Neuronavigation: Concept, Techniques and applications.

  19. Magnetic resonance cisternography for preoperative evaluation of arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awaji, M. [Niigata University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Niigata University, Center for Integrated Human Brain Science, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan); Nishiyama, K. [Niigata University, Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    With a high likelihood of clinical improvement and low rates of complications, minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery is becoming the treatment of choice for symptomatic or growing arachnoid cysts. In neuroendoscopic surgery, visualization of anatomical landmarks is essential in achieving successful fenestration without complications. Because of the restricted visual field in neuroendoscopic surgery, preoperative anatomical assessment is very helpful. Magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) with high spatial resolution and contrast, using for example 3-D Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (CISS) or fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences, is able to detect the arachnoid cyst wall and neighboring anatomical structures as the anatomical landmarks. We retrospectively reviewed T2-weighted (T2-W) fast spin-echo images, and the MRC and intraoperative findings. Axial and coronal T2-W images (6 and 3 mm thickness, respectively) and axial and coronal 0.8 mm thick MRC images with CISS or FIESTA were obtained from four patients with arachnoid cysts treated by neuroendoscopic surgery. Intraoperative findings were reviewed on videotape recorded during the procedures. At the brain surface, the arachnoid cyst wall could be detected clearly in any of the four patients on MRC images, and was only partly seen in the fourth patient T2-W images. Adjacent important anatomical structures including vessels and cranial nerves, and an enough space for cystocisternostomy were identified on MRC images, and the findings were consistent with the findings during neuroendoscopic surgery. Preoperative identification of the arachnoid cyst wall and surrounding anatomical structures by MRC may help avoid complications and allow safer neuroendoscopic surgery. (orig.)

  20. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  1. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  2. Frequency, Prognosis and Surgical Treatment of Structural Abnormalities Seen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.; Mathern, Gary W.; Bronen, Richard A.; Fulbright, Robert K.; DiMario, Francis; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of lesions identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with the use of pre-surgical evaluations and surgery in childhood-onset epilepsy patients has not previously been described. In a prospectively identified community-based cohort of children enrolled from 1993 to 1997, we examined (i) the frequency of lesions…

  3. Frequency, Prognosis and Surgical Treatment of Structural Abnormalities Seen with Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T.; Mathern, Gary W.; Bronen, Richard A.; Fulbright, Robert K.; DiMario, Francis; Testa, Francine M.; Levy, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    The epidemiology of lesions identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with the use of pre-surgical evaluations and surgery in childhood-onset epilepsy patients has not previously been described. In a prospectively identified community-based cohort of children enrolled from 1993 to 1997, we examined (i) the frequency of lesions…

  4. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  5. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  6. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  7. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalo-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  11. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  12. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  13. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawnaur, J.M.; Jenkins, J.P.R.; Isherwood, I. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-10-01

    Musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis can be mistaken for soft-tissue sarcoma both clinically and on X-ray computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three patients with this condition enabled the correct diagnosis to be made prospectively in two. The appearance on MRI of a heterogeneous mass with well-defined, predominantly peripheral areas of very low signal intensity due to dense fibrous tissue and areas of medium to high signal intensity corresponding to a more cellular stroma should raise the suspicion of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis. Cellular areas within the tumour showed moderate enhancement after gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid administration. (orig.).

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of rat fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Yo; Kawanishi, Hiroaki (Imamichi Institute for Animal Reproduction, Ibaraki (Japan)); Hasegawa, Kenichi; Otsu, Shinichi

    1993-06-01

    The internal structures of rat fetuses on day 18.0 of pregnancy were studied by magnetic resonance imaging in 1-mm sagittal slices. Each organ was represented as white to gray images different in tone according to the [sup 1]H proton content and the relaxation time. In solid organs, portions with high cell density were seen as white areas and those with low cell density as gray areas. In the tubular organs, the margins were imaged as white and the lumina as gray. (author).

  16. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  17. Sciatic neuropathy: findings on magnetic resonance neurography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the sciatic nerve are common causes of pain and limitation in the lower limbs. Due to its particular anatomy and its long course, the sciatic nerve is often involved in diseases of the pelvis or leg. In recent years, magnetic resonance neurography has become established as an important tool for the study of peripheral nerves and can be widely applied to the study of the sciatic nerve. Therefore, detailed knowledge of its anatomy and of the most prevalent diseases affecting it is essential to maximizing the accuracy of diagnostic imaging. PMID:28670031

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  19. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  20. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  1. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Svihus, R.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical region was carried out on 139 patients in a ten-month period. 64 patients came from Rogaland Central Hospital and 75 from the rest of Norway. A retrospective questionnaire was filled in by the referring physicians. MRI seems to be of great value in the diagnosis of cervical vertebrogenic myelopathy, multiple sclerosis, syringomyelia, and intraspinal tumors. Besides its diagnostic superiority, at least in patients with cervical myelopathy, MRI has definite economic advantages compared to CT and myelography.

  5. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  6. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  7. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  8. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  9. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  10. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  11. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  12. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  13. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible-near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 benefit. Three strategies can be applied for the monitoring of water contents and dynamics in natural porous media: i) Dedicated high-field scanners (with vertical bore) allowing stronger gradients and faster switching so that shorter echo times can be realized. ii) Special measurement sequences using ultrashort rf- and gradient-pulses like single point imaging derivates (SPI, SPRITE)(1) and multi-echo methods, which monitor series of echoes and allow for extrapolation to zero time(2). Hence, the loss of signal during the first echo period may be compensated to determine the initial magnetization (= water content) as well as relaxation time maps simultaneously. iii) Finally low field( strategies will be given. References 1) Pohlmeier et al. Vadose Zone J. 7, 1010-1017 (2008) 2) Edzes et al., Magn. Res. Imag. 16, 185-196 (1998) 3) Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  18. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  20. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Distortion and Targeting Errors from Strong Rare Earth Metal Magnetic Dental Implant Requiring Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong-Cheol, Park; Chong Sik, Lee; Seok Min, Kim; Eu Jene, Choi; Do Hee, Lee; Jung Kyo, Lee

    2016-12-22

    Recently, the use of magnetic dental implants has been re-popularized with the introduction of strong rare earth metal, for example, neodymium, magnets. Unrecognized magnetic dental implants can cause critical magnetic resonance image distortions. We report a case involving surgical failure caused by a magnetic dental implant. A 62-year-old man underwent deep brain stimulation for medically insufficiently controlled Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging performed for the first deep brain stimulation showed that the overdenture was removed. However, a dental implant remained and contained a neodymium magnet, which was unrecognized at the time of imaging; the magnet caused localized non-linear distortions that were the largest around the dental magnets. In the magnetic field, the subthalamic area was distorted by a 4.6 mm right shift and counter clockwise rotation. However, distortions were visually subtle in the operation field and small for distant stereotactic markers, with approximately 1-2 mm distortions. The surgeon considered the distortion to be normal asymmetry or variation. Stereotactic marker distortion was calculated to be in the acceptable range in the surgical planning software. Targeting errors, approximately 5 mm on the right side and 2 mm on the left side, occurred postoperatively. Both leads were revised after the removal of dental magnets. Dental magnets may cause surgical failures and should be checked and removed before stereotactic surgery. Our findings should be considered when reviewing surgical precautions and making distortion-detection algorithm improvements.

  4. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography in the Diagnosis of Haemobilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Casazza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemobilia is a rare cause of unrecognized gastrointestinal bleeding and is hard to diagnose. Through the present case report we aim to corroborate magnetic resonance relevance in the evaluation of biliary system and bile features, investigating on its role in patients with acute biliary diseases. We report a case of a Caucasian 48-year-old man who was admitted due to abdominal pain and fever. After an ultrasonography exam we detected multiple cysts in the hepatic left lobe: imaging features, laboratory findings, and patient past work experience (woodcutter suggested a diagnosis of hepatic Echinococcosis. Once surgery decision was taken, patient underwent an intervention of cystopericystectomy. On the 8th postoperative day, the procedure was complicated by black stool, jaundice, and severe anaemia. Acomputed tomography revealed an inhomogeneous collection with some air bubbles in the area of previous surgical intervention, but it was not able to solve the diagnosis question. At this stage a magnetic resonance study was mandatory. On T2-weighted images we observed an expanse gallbladder with hypointense intraluminal material and a considerable intrahepatic biliary system dilatation due to bloody material. On the basis of these examination results, we supposed haemobilia arising from previous surgical intervention. A therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure led to decompression of biliary system through a major papilla sphincterotomy with spillage of bile mixed with blood clots.

  6. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging for stroke diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Rastogi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke, diagnosis and identification of the infarct core and the penumbra is integral to therapeutic determination. With advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI technology, stroke visualization has been radically altered. MRI allows for better visualization of factors such as cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, lesion and penumbra size and location, and thrombus identification; these factors help determine which treatments, ranging from tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, anti-platelet therapy, or even surgery, are appropriate. Current stroke diagnosis standards use several MRI modalities in conjunction, with T2- or T2FNx01- weighted MRI to rule out intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA for thrombus identification, and the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI mismatch for penumbral identification and therapeutic determination. However, to better clarify the neurological environment, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI for assessing oxygen saturation and the presence of CMBs as well as additional modalities, such as amide proton transfer (APT imaging for pH mapping, have emerged to offer more insight into anatomical and biological conditions during stroke. Further research has unveiled potential for alternative contrasts to gadolinium for PWI as well, as the contrast has contraindications for patients with renal disease. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs as an exogenous contrast and arterial spin labeling (ASL as an endogenous contrast offer innovative alternatives. Thus, emerging MRI modalities are enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in stroke and provide more guidance for patient outcome by offering increased accessibility, accuracy, and information.

  7. Linear endoscopic ultrasonography vs magnetic resonance imaging in ampullary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Castellani, Danilo; Messerotti, Alessandro; Bertani, Helga; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Vetruccio, Elena; Losi, Luisa; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess linear endoscopic ultrasound (L-EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in biliary tract dilation and suspect small ampullary tumor. METHODS: L-EUS and MRI data were compared in 24 patients with small ampullary tumors; all with subsequent histological confirmation. Data were collected prospectively and the accuracy of detection, histological characterization and N staging were assessed retrospectively using the results of surgical or endoscopic treatment as a benchmark. RESULTS: A suspicion of ampullary tumor was present in 75% of MRI and all L-EUS examinations, with 80% agreement between EUS and histological findings at endoscopy. However, L-EUS and histological TN staging at surgery showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.54). CONCLUSION: L-EUS could be a useful adjunct as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected ampullary tumors. PMID:21105192

  8. Dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in the reoperative neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbach, R., E-mail: rene.aschenbach@helios-kliniken.de [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Tuda, S. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Lamster, E.; Meyer, A. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Roediger, H.; Stier, A. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Visceral Surgery, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Conrad, E. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Basche, S.; Klisch, J. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [University Hospital Frankfurt/Main, Center of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the use of dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in the reoperative neck. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the head-neck MRIs of 30 patients with a history of hyperparathyroidism, prior head-neck surgery, and intraoperative proven adenomas. The protocol included conventional imaging with T2-weighted STIR sequences, T1w axial and coronal prior to and after contrast media administration, and dynamic magnetic resonance angiography. We compared the results from MRI, dynamic magnetic resonance angiography with 99m-Tc-Sestamibi with intraoperative findings as the gold standard. Results: In conventional MRI 19/30 true positives were detected with a sensitivity and specificity of 63.3% and 100%, respectively. However, by adding dynamic magnetic resonance angiography the detection rate increased to 28/30 true positives. Based on intraoperative findings, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic magnetic resonance angiography were 93.3% and 100%, respectively. 99m-Tc-Sestamibi detected 24/30 true positives, sensitivity was 80%. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of MRI including dynamic magnetic resonance angiography is superior to MRI alone and superior to that of 99m-Tc-Sestamibi in the diagnostic workup of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands when compared against intraoperative findings.

  9. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  10. Ferromagnetic resonance of particulate magnetic recording tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzelmann, U.

    1990-08-01

    The room-temperature ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of γ-Fe2O3, CrO2, and barium ferrite particulate magnetic recording tapes have been measured at microwave frequencies of 9.35 and 35 GHz for various orientations of the static and high-frequency magnetic fields with respect to the tape. For CrO2 tapes, the influence of the width of the angular distribution of the particle orientations on the FMR spectra has been studied from the nearly isotropic case up to the highly oriented case. Hysteretic behavior for a CrO2 tape as well as the effect of tape calendering for a γ-Fe2O3 tape has been observed by FMR. Experimental results are found to be in reasonable agreement with results of theoretical calculations based on a model of an ellipsoidal single-domain particle with both shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Magnetostatic interaction inside the magnetic film has been introduced by expressing the total magnetostatic energy as a combination of a part dependent on particle shape and a part dependent on the shape of the tape. As a result of a comparison of experimental data with calculated data from the model, the magnetocrystalline easy axis of the CrO2 particles is found to be parallel with the particle axis.

  11. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  12. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, J Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β-CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures.

  13. Purely electric and magnetic dipole resonances in metamaterial dielectric resonators through perturbation theory inspired geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Campione, Salvatore; Warne, Larry K; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology for tailoring the design of metamaterial dielectric resonators, which represent a promising path toward low-loss metamaterials at optical frequencies. We first describe a procedure to decompose the far field scattered by subwavelength resonators in terms of multipolar field components, providing explicit expressions for the multipolar far fields. We apply this formulation to confirm that an isolated high-permittivity cube resonator possesses frequency separated electric and magnetic dipole resonances, as well as a magnetic quadrupole resonance in close proximity to the electric dipole resonance. We then introduce multiple dielectric gaps to the resonator geometry in a manner suggested by perturbation theory, and demonstrate the ability to overlap the electric and magnetic dipole resonances, thereby enabling directional scattering by satisfying the first Kerker condition. We further demonstrate the ability to push the quadrupole resonance away from the degenerate dipole ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging features of complications following hip replacement: A pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Pilania

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip replacement surgery helps millions of people worldwide walk painlessly each year. With increasing life spans and decreased clinical threshold for surgery, this number will continue to rise. With the increase in the number of surgeries and the longevity of implants, the need for early and prompt diagnosis of complications is also rising. This essay underlines the fact that magnetic resonance imaging on a 1.5T scanner with specialized metal artefact reduction sequences is a viable technique to image the post-arthroplasty hip and has vast potential in the prompt and early diagnosis of complications in these patients.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of residual breast tissue following mastectomy and reconstruction with silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippel, Douglas; Tsehmaister-Abitbol, Vered; Rundstein, Arie; Shalmon, Anat; Zbar, Andrew; Nardini, Gil; Novikov, Ilya; Sklair-Levy, Miri

    2015-01-01

    We present our use of magnetic resonance (MR) measurement to determine the amount of residual breast tissue (RBT) following total mastectomy with reconstruction. Breast MR images of 45 women who underwent surgery between January and November 2011 were reviewed. The cohort included therapeutic and prophylactic mastectomies. RBT was evaluated at four points with a digital caliper assessing T2-weighted and T1-weighted images. Patients undergoing mastectomy for carcinoma tended to have less RBT than in prophylactic surgery. Greater age and recent surgery both correlated with larger RBT. Variable thickness of RBT is demonstrable following mastectomy and implant reconstruction using MR imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV- content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ~2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the

  17. Surface Coil for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Taimy Ricardo Ferro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has become a vital tool for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases, especially in the Nervisos Central System and the Musculos keletal System. Coils(RF are an essential component in the generation of these images, are responsible for exciting thespins of nuclei in a sample and/or detect the resultant signal coming from them. The use of surface RF coils has increased considerably, because they have a high signal to noise ratio, a parameter that defines the quality of the image. In the present work, there was realized the theoretical design and practical implementation of a circular surface RF coil. The experimental prototype was optimized to be used in the tomograph Giroimag03  built in Medical Biophysics Center

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with panhypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi Mucelli, R.S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Frezza, F. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Magnaldi, S. [Ist. di Radiologia, Univ. di Trieste, Ospedale di Cattinara (Italy); Proto, G. [Servizio di Endocrinologia, Ospedale Civile di Udine (Italy)

    1992-02-01

    Primary panhypopituitarism consists of functional deficiency of the anterior pituitary lobe, which appears during infancy or adolescence. The magnetic resonance findings in 10 patients with a history of primary hypopituitarism are presented. The findings include: reduced pituitary size in all cases; partially (8 cases) or totally (2 cases) empty sella; thin (4 cases), partially visible (3 cases) or absent (2 cases) pituitary stalk; absence of the posterior lobe in 9 cases; bright spot corresponding to an ectopic posterior lobe in 8 cases. These findings are similar to those already reported in pituitary dwarfism and may help understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, which seems to be related to a pituitary stalk lesion. (orig.)

  19. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  20. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  2. [Gastric magnetic resonance study (methods, semiotics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashuk, G A

    2003-01-01

    The paper shows the potentialities of gastric study by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The methodic aspects of gastric study have been worked out. The MRI-semiotics of the unchanged and tumor-affected wall of the stomach and techniques in examining patients with gastric cancer of various sites are described. Using the developed procedure, MRI was performed in 199 patients, including 154 patients with gastric pathology and 45 control individuals who had no altered gastric wall. Great emphasis is placed on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of endophytic (diffuse) gastric cancer that is of priority value in its morphological structure. MRI was found to play a role in the diagnosis of the spread of a tumorous process both along the walls of the stomach and to its adjacent anatomic structures.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeab, Dhafer A., E-mail: dhafer_ahmed@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dick, Elizabeth; Sergot, Antoni A.; Sundblon, Lauren; Gedroyc, Wady [Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Campus, Imperial College NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel (MR Enterography, or MRE) is becoming increasingly popular as the first imaging modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of small bowel diseases. The inherent advantages of MRI, including excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability and lack of ionising radiation are well known. In addition, the use of luminal contrast agents in MRE has the added advantage of demonstrating the lumen and the wall directly, something not possible to achieve with conventional small bowel barium follow-through imaging. This review will highlight recent technical advances to this low cost, simple technique which is easily achievable in all hospitals. It will also review normal and abnormal radiological findings and highlight the value of this technique to both the clinician and patient alike in the investigation of small bowel disease.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinig, J.W.; Doppmann, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the adrenals was performed on 50 subjects: 5 normal volunteers, 6 Cushing patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, 14 patients with adrenal adenomas, 3 with adrenal carcinomas, 15 with pheochromocytomas and 7 with metastatic disease to the adrenal. The normal and hyperplastic adrenal glands were imaged in all cases. Using the signal intensity of the adrenals on a T2 weighted image, various forms of adrenal pathology could be differentiated. A ratio of signal intensity of the adrenal mass to the liver was utilized and allowed the differentitaion of adrenal adenomas from adrenal carcinomas, pheochromocytomas and metastases. Using the same ratio, metastases could be distinguished from pheochromocytomas as well. MRI appears to be particularly valuable in distinguishing clinically silent adrenal metastases from nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  6. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrugia, M.E. [Department of Clinical Neurology, University of Oxford, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.e.farrugia@doctors.org.uk; Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States); Francis, J.M.; Robson, M.D. [OCMR, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Facial and tongue muscles are commonly involved in patients with neuromuscular disorders. However, these muscles are not as easily accessible for biopsy and pathological examination as limb muscles. We have previously investigated myasthenia gravis patients with MuSK antibodies for facial and tongue muscle atrophy using different magnetic resonance imaging sequences, including ultrashort echo time techniques and image analysis tools that allowed us to obtain quantitative assessments of facial muscles. This imaging study had shown that facial muscle measurement is possible and that useful information can be obtained using a quantitative approach. In this paper we aim to review in detail the methods that we applied to our study, to enable clinicians to study these muscles within the domain of neuromuscular disease, oncological or head and neck specialties. Quantitative assessment of the facial musculature may be of value in improving the understanding of pathological processes occurring within facial muscles in certain neuromuscular disorders.

  8. Breast conserving therapy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Tsuneaki; Masuda, Yu; Hachiya, Junichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Hisayoshi; Uchigasaki, Shinya [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    Recently, breast conserving therapy has been widely accepted in our country. The extensive intraductal component (EIC) is a serious problem in breast conserving therapy, because it is well-known that EIC frequently causes locoregional recurrence in preserved breast parenchyma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful method for detecting breast masses due to its excellent contrast resolution. We studied the application of MRI to detection of intraductal spread in twenty-two patients. All cases were revealed invasive cancer with intraductal spread by histopathological examination. MRI findings of intraductal spread can be divided into two major groups. One is daugter nodules or strand-like enhancement and the other is bridging enhancement. We also reffered to the preliminary study of MR-guiding transcutaneous aspiration biopsy of mammographically and clinically occult breast masses. (author)

  9. Quantum information processing through nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulnes, J.D.; Sarthour, R.S.; Oliveira, I.S. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonk, F.A.; Azevedo, E.R. de; Bonagamba, T.J. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Freitas, J.C.C. [Espirito Santo Univ., Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2005-09-15

    We discuss the applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to quantum information processing, focusing on the use of quadrupole nuclei for quantum computing. Various examples of experimental implementation of logic gates are given and compared to calculated NMR spectra and their respective density matrices. The technique of Quantum State Tomography for quadrupole nuclei is briefly described, and examples of measured density matrices in a two-qubit I = 3/2 spin system are shown. Experimental results of density matrices representing pseudo-Bell states are given, and an analysis of the entropy of theses states is made. Considering an NMR experiment as a depolarization quantum channel we calculate the entanglement fidelity and discuss the criteria for entanglement in liquid state NMR quantum information. A brief discussion on the perspectives for NMR quantum computing is presented at the end. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance urography by virtual reality modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Navid; Sangild, Thomas; Terkildsen, Søren Vorre; Deding, Dorthe; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a 3D visualization of the urinary tract by a novel virtual reality approach, and to evaluate the usefulness of this method for papillary classification as compared with 2D urogram obtained by maximum intensity projection (MIP). In one healthy pig, magnetic resonance urography was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pulse sequence. Post-processing was performed by means of an MIP algorithm and by using 3D virtual reality modelling, followed by manual classification of papillae as being either simple or compound. The 2D MIP urogram demonstrated 6 simple and 6 compound papillae, whereas the 3D urogram demonstrated 5 simple and 7 compound papillae. In both urograms, some papillae were unsuccessfully classified. The possibility of using virtual reality devices allowed 3D rotation and offered additional diagnostic information. However, further studies should reveal its feasibility in diseased kidneys.

  11. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.H.; Nathanson, J.A.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.; Lownie, S.P.

    1995-06-01

    In order to demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the brain in patients with clinical brain death, high-field MRI was performed on 5 patients using conventional T1-weighted and T2-weighted imaging. The study showed MRI exhibited similar features for all of the patients, features which were not found in MRI of comatose patients who were not clinically brain dead. It was stated that up to now the most important limitation in MRI of patients with suspected brain death has been the extreme difficulty of moving them out of the intensive care setting. If this problem can be overcome, and it appears possible with with the advent of MRI-compatible ventilators and noninvasive monitoring, MRI could become an excellent alternative for confirming clinical diagnosis of brain death for such patients. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholakoff, D; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a completely noninvasive technique for the evaluation of the cardiovascular system. With a multi-section technique and the spin echo pulse sequence the entire heart can be examined within six to ten minutes. All our cardiac MR studies were performed with electrocardiographic (ECG) gating, to obtain adequate resolution of the cardiac structures. With this technique, patients and animals with a variety of cardiac abnormalities were studied. The examined pathologic conditions included acute and chronic myocardial infarctions and their complications, hypertrophic and congestive cardiomyopathies, congenital heart diseases and pericardial diseases. MRI offers an enormous potential for cardiovascular diagnosis, even beyond the demonstration of pathoanatomy, because of the capability for direct tissue characterization and blood flow measurements.

  16. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Parga, Jose Rodrigues; Arteaga, Edmundo; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao. Setor de Tomografia Computarizada e Ressonancia Magnetica Cardiovascular]. E-mail: rochitte@incor.usp.br; Kim, Raymond J. [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Durham, NC (United States); Tassi, Eduardo Marinho [Diagnosticos da America S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sector of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography

    2007-03-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequent genetic cardiac disease that causes sudden death in young people, with an incidence of 1:500 adults. The routinely used criteria for worst prognosis have limited sensitivity and specificity. Thus, the estimated risk of evolving to dilated cardiomyopathy or sudden death is somewhat inaccurate, leading to management uncertainty of HCM patients. Therefore, an accurate noninvasive method for the diagnosis of HCM with prognostic value is of great importance. In the last years, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) emerged not only as a diagnostic tool, but also as a study with prognostic values, by characterizing myocardial fibrosis with great accuracy in HCM patients. Additionally, CMR identifies the types of hypertrophy, analyses the ventricular function, estimates the intraventricular gradient and allows the determination of differential diagnosis. Moreover, CMR can uniquely access myocardial fibrosis in HCM. (author)

  20. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of septic sacroiliitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Saifuddin, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Coral, A. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)); Butt, W.P. (MRI Unit, Dept. of Radiology, St. James' s Univ. Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    Five cases of septic sacroiliitis diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are presented. Imaging was performed between 2 and 14 days after onset of symptoms and consisted of varying combinations of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), axial T2-weighted spin echo (SE), and coronal and axial pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted SE scans. Abnormalities included demonstration of sacroiliac joint effusions, bone oedema and adjacent inflammation as high signal on STIR and T2-weighted SE scans, and identification of abscesses in two cases as rim-enhancing lesions anterior to the joint on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted SE scans. The role of MRI and other forms of imaging in septic sacroiliitis is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    -angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...... and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti...... in a transgenic mouse model. The last manuscript presents a new method for in vivo cell labeling. This method could find use in studying the metastatic spread of cancer cells throughout the body....

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn{sup ++}). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  5. Observation of spin diffusion in zero-field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, D.; Jarvie, T.P.; Sun, B.; Pines, A.

    1987-07-06

    We report the measurement of spin diffusion at zero field, observed by two-dimensional deuterium magnetic resonance of a polycrystalline sample. This demonstrates for the first time an appealing feature of pulsed zero-field magnetic resonance, namely the potential for structure determination in solids without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  6. Resonances and dipole moments in dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A.; Arslanagic, Samel; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    An eigenfunction solution to the problem of plane wave scattering by dielectric, magnetic, and magnetodielectric cylinders is used for a systematic investigation of their resonances. An overview of the resonances with electric and magnetic dipole moments, needed in, e.g., the synthesis...... of metamaterials, is given with an emphasis on their strength, bandwidth, and isolation....

  7. Monitoring Locally Induced Hyperthermia with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Vogel (M.)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Magnetic resonance thermometry is a relatively new and unique technology for non-invasive monitoring of (local) therapeutic temperature changes that is not yet in common use. Temperature measurements using magnetic resonance heat thermometry can be performed in several

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J.N.; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measure

  10. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  11. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eckardt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  12. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan T.; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob A.; Compton, Shawn R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory E.; Thomson, Douglas J.; Freeman, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    An optomechanical platform for magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. The method relies on frequency mixing of orthogonal RF fields to yield a torque amplitude (arising from the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment, in analogy to magnetic resonance detection by electromagnetic induction) on a miniaturized resonant mechanical torsion sensor. In contrast to induction, the method is fully broadband and allows for simultaneous observation of the equilibrium net magnetic moment alongside the associated magnetization dynamics. To illustrate the method, comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a mesoscopic, single-crystal YIG disk at room temperature will be presented, along with situations where torque spectroscopy can offer complimentary information to existing magnetic resonance detection techniques. The authors are very grateful for support from NSERC, CRC, AITF, and NINT. Reference: Science 350, 798 (2015).

  13. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  14. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  15. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomeriki, Giorgi, E-mail: giokhomeriki123@gmail.com

    2016-07-15

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at a free end of the pendulum. In this system the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments. - Highlights: • A damped magnetic pendulum is considered driven by off resonant magnetic field. • Our system is chaotic only when the conditions for parametric resonance are fulfilled. • Conducted experiments give a good agreement with theory and numerical simulations. • Calculated Lyapunov exponents are compared with parametric instability growth rates.

  16. Electric and magnetic dipole couplings in split ring resonator metamaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Jing; Sun Guang-Yong; and Zhu Wei-Ren

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the electric and the magnetic dipole couplings between the outer and the inner rings of a single split ring resonator (SRR) are investigated.We numerically demonstrate that the magnetic resonance frequency can be substantially modified by changing the couplings of the electric and magnetic dipoles,and give a theoretical expression of the magnetic resonance frequency.The results in this work are expected to be conducive to a deeper understanding of the SRR and other similar metamaterials,and provide new guidance for complex metamaterials design with a tailored electromagnetic response.

  17. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee [Koear Advanced Institute of Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected.

  19. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  20. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  1. Controlling interactions between highly-magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic $^7$S$_3$ chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on Dysprosium and Erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  2. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  3. Control of Transport-barrier relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, M; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S

    2009-01-01

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  4. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  5. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  6. Non-resonant magnetic braking on JET and TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Shaing, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    The non-resonant magnetic braking effect induced by a non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation is investigated on JET and TEXTOR. The collisionality dependence of the torque induced by the n = 1, where n is the toroidal mode number, magnetic perturbation generated by the error field correction coil...

  7. Tuning Coler Magnetic Current Apparatus with Magneto-Acoustic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Thorsten

    An attempt was made to tune the Coler magnetic current apparatus with the magneto acoustic resonance of the magnetic rods. Measurements with a replica of the famous Coler "Magnetstromapparat" were conducted. In order to tune the acoustic, magnetic and electric resonance circuits of the Coler device the magneto-acoustic resonance was measured with a frequency scan through a function generator and a lock-in amplifier. The frequency generator was powering a driving coil, while the lock-in was connected to a pickup coil. Both coils were placed on a magnetic rod. Resonances were observed up to the 17th harmonic. The quality Q of the observed resonances was 270. To study the magneto-acoustic resonance in the time domain a pair of Permendur rods were employed. The magneto-acoustic resonances of the Permendur rods were observed with an oscilloscope. Spectra of the magneto acoustic resonance were measured for the Permendur rods and for a Coler replica magnet in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 380 kHz. The next step was to bring the resonances of the Permendur rods close together so that they overlap. The 10thharmonic was chosen because it was close to the 180 kHz that Hans Coler related to ferromagnetism. Further more magneto-acoustic coupling between the Permendur rods was studied. Finally the question was explored if Hans Coler converted vacuum fluctuations via magnetic and acoustic resonance into electricity. There is a strong connection between magnetism and quantum field zero point energy (ZPE). An outlook is given on next steps in the experiments to unveil the working mechanism of the Coler magnetic current apparatus.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in primary lymphoma of the liver: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilaj Fatmir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary lymphoma of the liver is an extremely rare finding, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing magnetic resonance imaging scan findings with such a lesion. In the case reported here, magnetic resonance imaging gave us the opportunity to ascertain the correct diagnosis, confirmed by histopathology, thus avoiding unnecessary surgery or other treatments. Although this condition is rare, knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients. Case presentation A focal lesion was incidentally detected by ultrasound in a 75-year-old asymptomatic Albanian man being treated for benign hypertrophy of prostate. Chest and abdomen computed tomography scans did not reveal any abnormal findings besides a solid focal lesion on the right lobe of the liver and a mild homogenous enlargement of the prostate gland. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging of the upper abdomen was performed for better characterization of this lesion. Our patient was free of symptoms and his laboratory test results were normal. Conclusions The magnetic resonance imaging scan results showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, and were thus very important in helping us provide the correct treatment for our patient.

  9. Purcell factor of Mie resonators featuring electric and magnetic modes

    CERN Document Server

    Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    We present a modal approach to compute the Purcell factor in Mie resonators exhibiting both electric and magnetic resonances. The analytic expressions of the normal modes are used to calculate the effective volumes. We show that important features of the effective volume can be predicted thanks to the translation-addition coefficients of a displaced dipole. Using our formalism, it is easy to see that, in general, the Purcell factor of Mie resonators is not dominated by a single mode, but rather by a large superposition. Finally we consider a silicon resonator homogeneously doped with electric dipolar emitters, and we show that the average electric Purcell factor dominates over the magnetic one.

  10. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging investigation of resonance tuning in soprano singing

    OpenAIRE

    Bresch, Erik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates using real-time magnetic resonance imaging the vocal tract shaping of 5 soprano singers during the production of two-octave scales of sung vowels. A systematic shift of the first vocal tract resonance frequency with respect to the fundamental is shown to exist for high vowels across all subjects. No consistent systematic effect on the vocal tract resonance could be shown across all of the subjects for other vowels or for the second vocal tract resonance.

  11. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Section on Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Elbow Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudas, T.; Hurme, T.; Mattila, K.; Svedstroem, E. [Univ. of Turku, (Finland). Depts. of Radiology and Pediatric Surgery

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pediatric elbow trauma with or without a visible fracture on radiography. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in the acute phase in 25 children with an elbow injury. Nine patients with an elbow effusion only on radiographs and 16 with a fracture or luxation seen on radiographs underwent subsequent MRI. No sedation was used. Results: MRI revealed eight occult fractures (89%) in seven out of nine patients who had only an effusion on radiographs. Based on MRI findings, septic arthritis was suspected in one patient. Two patients out of five with a supracondylar fracture on the radiograph had a cartilage lesion in the humerus. MRI depicted a 3-mm gap on the articular surface in two patients with a lateral condyle fracture, a more accurate fracture location in two patients than the radiographs, and an additional occult fracture in two patients. MRI showed a fracture not seen on radiographs in two of three patients with prior luxation. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive and accurate method in the diagnosis of pediatric elbow injuries, especially when only an effusion is present on radiographs. Occult fractures are more common in pediatric patients with elbow injury than reported earlier.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1989-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author).

  14. Focal liver lesions: Practical magnetic resonance imagingapproach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread of cross-sectional imaging, a growthof incidentally detected focal liver lesions (FLL) hasbeen observed. A reliable detection and characterizationof FLL is critical for optimal patient management.Maximizing accuracy of imaging in the context ofFLL is paramount in avoiding unnecessary biopsies,which may result in post-procedural complications. Atremendous development of new imaging techniqueshas taken place during these last years. Nowadays,Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key rolein management of liver lesions, using a radiation-freetechnique and a safe contrast agent profile. MRI playsa key role in the non-invasive correct characterizationof FLL. MRI is capable of providing comprehensiveand highly accurate diagnostic information, withthe additional advantage of lack of harmful ionizingradiation. These properties make MRI the mainstay forthe noninvasive evaluation of focal liver lesions. In thispaper we review the state-of-the-art MRI liver protocol,briefly discussing different sequence types, the uniquecharacteristics of imaging non-cooperative patients anddiscuss the role of hepatocyte-specific contrast agents.A review of the imaging features of the most commonbenign and malignant FLL is presented, supplementedby a schematic representation of a simplistic practicalapproach on MRI.

  15. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerwinka, Wolfgang H; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has evolved into an effective imaging tool for the evaluation of the urinary tract in children. The goal of this article is to describe current techniques and applications of MRU and to review recent advances. MRU is most commonly applied to the evaluation of hydronephrosis and provides valuable insight into a wide range of obstructive uropathies. MRU was shown to be superior to renal scintigraphy for the diagnosis of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. The use of MRU for the assessment of urolithiasis, vesicoureteral reflux, renal trauma, and fetal urinary tract abnormalities is limited and technical refinements are required. Judicious use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients at risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was recently shown to avoid new occurrences. Potential future applications include virtual endoscopy and MRU-guided procedures. MRU has the potential to revolutionize imaging of the urinary tract in children. It integrates exquisite anatomical information with a variety of functional data and avoids ionizing radiation. MRU is increasingly employed as a problem solver when conventional imaging studies remain inconclusive and its growing application will likely improve availability and cost in the future.

  16. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in persistent hemospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Prando

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the spectrum of abnormalities found at endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI, in patients with persistent hemospermia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of E-MRI findings observed in 86 patients with persistent hemospermia was performed and results compared with those reported in the literature. Follow-up was possible in 37 of 86 (43% patients with hemospermia. RESULTS: E-MRI showed abnormal findings in 52 of 86 (60% patients with hemospermia. These findings were: a hemorrhagic seminal vesicle and ejaculatory duct, isolated (n = 11 or 21% or associated with complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 10 or 19.0%; b hemorrhagic chronic seminal vesiculitis, isolated (n = 14 or 27% or associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory ducts (n = 2 or 4 %; c hemorrhagic seminal vesicle associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory duct (n = 4 or 7.7% or within seminal vesicle (n = 4 or 7.7%; d non-complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 6 or 11.5%; and e prostate cancer (n = 1 or 2%. Successful treatment was more frequent in patients with chronic inflammatory and/or obstructive abnormalities. CONCLUSION: E-MRI should be considered the modality of choice, for the evaluation of patients with persistent hemospermia.

  17. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging in persistent hemospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prando, Adilson [Vera Cruz Hospital, Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging

    2008-03-15

    Objective: To present the spectrum of abnormalities found at endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI), in patients with persistent hemospermia. Materials and methods: A review of E-MRI findings observed in 86 patients with persistent hemospermia was performed and results compared with those reported in the literature. Follow-up was possible in 37 of 86 (43%) patients with hemospermia. Results: E-MRI showed abnormal findings in 52 of 86 (60%) patients with hemospermia. These findings were: a) hemorrhagic seminal vesicle and ejaculatory duct, isolated (n = 11 or 21%) or associated with complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 10 or 19.0%); b) hemorrhagic chronic seminal vesiculitis, isolated (n = 14 or 27%) or associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory ducts (n = 2 or 4 %); c) hemorrhagic seminal vesicle associated with calculi within dilated ejaculatory duct (n = 4 or 7.7%) or within seminal vesicle (n = 4 or 7.7%); d) non-complicated midline prostatic cyst (n = 6 or 11.5%); and e) prostate cancer (n = 1 or 2%). Successful treatment was more frequent in patients with chronic inflammatory and/or obstructive abnormalities. Conclusion: E-MRI should be considered the modality of choice, for the evaluation of patients with persistent hemospermia. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaicher, Wibke; Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Schwindt, Jens; Deutinger, Josef; Bernaschek, Gerhard; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, Wibke [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wibke.blaicher@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Schwindt, Jens [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Deutinger, Josef [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Bernaschek, Gerhard [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  20. Pancreatitis: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P.J.A.; Sheridan, M.B. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, St. James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2000-03-01

    The value of CT in management of severe acute pancreatitis is well established. Some, but not all, experimental studies suggest a detrimental effect of intravenous iodinated contrast agents in acute pancreatitis, but although initial clinical data tends to support this, the positive advantages of enhanced CT outweigh the possible risks. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be as effective as CT in demonstrating the presence and extent of pancreatic necrosis and fluid collections, and probably superior in indicating the suitability of such collections for percutaneous drainage. Image-guided intervention remains a key approach in the management of severely ill patients, and the indications, techniques and results of radiological intervention are reviewed herein. Both CT and MRI can be used to diagnose advanced chronic pancreatitis, with the recent addition of MRCP as a viable alternative to diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Both MRCP and CT/MR imaging of the pancreatic parenchyma still have limitations in the recognition of the earliest changes of chronic pancreatitis - for which ERCP and tests of pancreatic function remain more sensitive - but the clinical significance of these minor changes remains contentious. (orig.)

  1. Potts disease: Diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pursey, Jacqueline [MRI Department, Gartnavel General Hospitial, 1053 Great Western road, Glasgow G12 0YN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Jacqueline.pursey@ggc.scot.nhs.uk; Stewart, Sharon [School of Health and Social Care, Caledonian University, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The eponymously named Potts disease is a relatively rare form of Tuberculosis (TB) which affects the spine. TB of the spine is one of the earliest diseases known to man and in the 20th century was thought to be a disease which had been defeated by the advent of antitubercular drugs. Over the last two decades there have been several reports which indicate a revival of TB in both the developing and developed world. Factors which may be contributing to this are the spread of the HIV virus, increased immigration and the emergence of drug resistant strains of the TB bacteria. Potts disease has an insidious onset and often the radiographic findings are far advanced when a diagnosis is finally reached. MRI is able to detect changes to the vertebrae in Potts disease earlier than radiographs. This case report outlines the clinical presentation of a young male with Potts disease who was HIV negative, and the important role that MRI plays in diagnosis and therefore in appropriate and timely intervention. The typical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and the radiographic hallmarks of the disease will also be discussed.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T{sub 2} weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author).

  3. Statistical normalization techniques for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Shinohara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While computed tomography and other imaging techniques are measured in absolute units with physical meaning, magnetic resonance images are expressed in arbitrary units that are difficult to interpret and differ between study visits and subjects. Much work in the image processing literature on intensity normalization has focused on histogram matching and other histogram mapping techniques, with little emphasis on normalizing images to have biologically interpretable units. Furthermore, there are no formalized principles or goals for the crucial comparability of image intensities within and across subjects. To address this, we propose a set of criteria necessary for the normalization of images. We further propose simple and robust biologically motivated normalization techniques for multisequence brain imaging that have the same interpretation across acquisitions and satisfy the proposed criteria. We compare the performance of different normalization methods in thousands of images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, hundreds of patients with multiple sclerosis, and hundreds of healthy subjects obtained in several different studies at dozens of imaging centers.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Department of Medical Imaging Computing, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Velghe, Beatrijs [Department of Radiology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600, Genk (Belgium)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  7. Meralgia paresthetica: 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Del Grande, Filippo; Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Belzberg, Allan J; Williams, Eric H; Jalali, Farahani S; Thawait, Gaurav K; Eng, John; Carrino, John A

    2013-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and observer performance of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the evaluation of meralgia paresthetica (MP). Two independent readers were blinded to the clinical diagnosis and evaluated the MRN studies of the pelvis of 11 patients with MP and 28 control participants. In each study, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were assessed for signal alteration and/or neuroma formation, indicating lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy, at various levels along their course. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated. Both readers exhibited substantial intraobserver agreement in detecting signal alterations and neuroma formation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). The readers demonstrated moderate interobserver agreement in detecting signal alteration of the LFCN and poor interobserver agreement in diagnosing neuroma formation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of LFCN neuropathy diagnosis were ≥ 71 % and ≥ 94 % for both readers respectively. The diagnostic test accuracy was ≥ 90 % for both readers. 3-Tesla MRN provides reliable and accurate diagnostic evaluation of meralgia paresthetica.

  8. Neural network segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Blaise

    1990-07-01

    Neural networks are well adapted to the task of grouping input patterns into subsets which share some similarity. Moreover once trained they can generalize their classification rules to classify new data sets. Sets of pixel intensities from magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a natural input to a neural network by varying imaging parameters MR images can reflect various independent physical parameters of tissues in their pixel intensities. A neural net can then be trained to classify physically similar tissue types based on sets of pixel intensities resulting from different imaging studies on the same subject. A neural network classifier for image segmentation was implemented on a Sun 4/60 and was tested on the task of classifying tissues of canine head MR images. Four images of a transaxial slice with different imaging sequences were taken as input to the network (three spin-echo images and an inversion recovery image). The training set consisted of 691 representative samples of gray matter white matter cerebrospinal fluid bone and muscle preclassified by a neuroscientist. The network was trained using a fast backpropagation algorithm to derive the decision criteria to classify any location in the image by its pixel intensities and the image was subsequently segmented by the classifier. The classifier''s performance was evaluated as a function of network size number of network layers and length of training. A single layer neural network performed quite well at

  9. Antepartum pelvimetry by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshiba, Hisato; Kikuchi, Noriko; Ogino, Yoshio [Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-09-01

    Evaluation of the pelvis by pelvimetry plays an important role in selecting patients for possible vaginal delivery. However, x-ray pelvimetry involves the disadvantage of fetal exposure to ionizing radiation. The clear advantage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry is that this procedure is free from ionizing radiation. Measurements with MRI are as reliable as those with x-ray pelvimetry and the contrast of MRI is even better. MRI shows soft-tissue structures as well as bone. The use of this scanning technique is contraindicated for patients with pacemakers. But, pacemakers are rarely encountered in young pregnant women. In our department, 203 patients underwent antepartum pelvimetry with MRI during the last 5 years. T1-weighted mediosagittal images were used for measurement of the obstetric conjugate (OC) and to determine whether a straight sacrum can be recognized. Data were compared between patients who had undergone cesarean section due to cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD) and patients who experienced vaginal delivery. OC and OC-biparietal diameter were significantly different between the two groups. MRI can be further used for the diagnosis of CPD and to select patients for whom planned vaginal delivery is appropriate. (author)

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francone Marco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases.

  11. Constraining groundwater modeling with magnetic resonance soundings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Marie; Favreau, Guillaume; Nazoumou, Yahaya; Cappelaere, Bernard; Massuel, Sylvain; Legchenko, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is a noninvasive geophysical method that allows estimating the free water content and transmissivity of aquifers. In this article, the ability of MRS to improve the reliability of a numerical groundwater model is assessed. Thirty-five sites were investigated by MRS over a ∼5000 km(2) domain of the sedimentary Continental Terminal aquifer in SW Niger. Time domain electromagnetic soundings were jointly carried out to estimate the aquifer thickness. A groundwater model was previously built for this section of the aquifer and forced by the outputs from a distributed surface hydrology model, to simulate the observed long-term (1992 to 2003) rise in the water table. Uncertainty analysis had shown that independent estimates of the free water content and transmissivity values of the aquifer would facilitate cross-evaluation of the surface-water and groundwater models. MRS results indicate ranges for permeability (K = 1 × 10(-5) to 3 × 10(-4) m/s) and for free water content (w = 5% to 23% m(3) /m(3) ) narrowed by two orders of magnitude (K) and by ∼50% (w), respectively, compared to the ranges of permeability and specific yield values previously considered. These shorter parameter ranges result in a reduction in the model's equifinality (whereby multiple combinations of model's parameters are able to represent the same observed piezometric levels), allowing a better constrained estimate to be derived for net aquifer recharge (∼22 mm/year).

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in parasinus mucocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Watanabe, Yoshihiro (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 cases of parasinus mucocele. The series included frontal mucocele 1 case, frontal and anterior ethmoidal mucocele 3 cases, anterior mucocele 2 cases, posterior ethmoidal mucocele 2 cases, and maxillary mucocele 1 case. MRI was performed with proton density P (300), inversion recovery IR (1000, 350), and spin echo SE (1000, 60/90) with 0.1 tesla resistive conducting system, or with T/sub 1/-weighted SE (440, 40), IR (1500, 500) and T/sub 2/-weighted SE (1500, 500) with 0.5 tesla superconducting system. We obtained images of variable intensities when employing P, IR and T/sub 1/-weighted SE imaging. It was possible to differentiate mucocele from normal orbital tissue by comparison with T/sub 2/-weighted imaging. All the 9 cases manifested a high intensity of T/sub 2/-weighted images. The findings were suggestive of a possibility to verify the content to parasinus cysts by MRI findings. (author).

  13. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  14. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF URANOCENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Wayne D.; Streitwieser, Jr., Andrew

    1979-12-01

    In the past several years a substantial amount of work has been devoted toward evaluation of the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed isotropic shifts in H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of uranium(IV) organometallic compounds. One reason for interest in this area arises from using the presence of contact shifts as a prcbe for covalent character in the uranium carbon bonds in these compounds. Several extensive {sup 1}H NNR studies on Cp{sub 3} U-X compounds and less extensive studies on uranocenes have been reported. Interpretation of these results suggests that contact shifts-contribute significantly to the observed isotropic shifts. Their presence has been taken as indicative of covalent character of metal carbon bonds in these systems, but agreement is not complete. In this paper we shall review critically the work reported on uranocenes in the light of recent results and report recent work on attempted separation of the observed isotropic shifts in alkyluranocenes into contact and pseudocontact components.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellopontine angle lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiksha Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellopontine angle (CPA tumors are usually benign, and they are divided into extra-axial, intra-axial, extradural, and petrous axis tumors. CPA pathologies can be asymptomatic or it may present with vertigo, tinnitus, or unilateral hearing loss depending upon the site of tumor origin and displacement of the neurovascular structure. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI aided with contrast-enhanced MRI as an imaging modality for diagnosis of CPA lesions. Materials and Methods: Analysis of 36 patients of CPA lesions over a period of 2 years was done. MRI was performed on Siemens 1.5 Tesla MAGNETOM Avanto Machine. Conclusion: There are spectrums of pathologies, which can present with these symptoms, which includes tumors, vascular malformations, and vascular loop compressing vestibulocochlear nerve or mastoid pathology so it is important to investigate the patient by MRI. Contrast-enhanced MRI is the most sensitive investigation in the evaluation of the CPA lesions, its characteristic, and its extent.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  17. Bolus characteristics based on Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Xiaoming

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed contrast bolus propagation model is essential for optimizing bolus-chasing Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA. Bolus characteristics were studied using bolus-timing datasets from Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA for adaptive controller design and validation. Methods MRA bolus-timing datasets of the aorta in thirty patients were analyzed by a program developed with MATLAB. Bolus characteristics, such as peak position, dispersion and bolus velocity, were studied. The bolus profile was fit to a convolution function, which would serve as a mathematical model of bolus propagation in future controller design. Results The maximum speed of the bolus in the aorta ranged from 5–13 cm/s and the dwell time ranged from 7–13 seconds. Bolus characteristics were well described by the proposed propagation model, which included the exact functional relationships between the parameters and aortic location. Conclusion The convolution function describes bolus dynamics reasonably well and could be used to implement the adaptive controller design.

  18. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultrahigh fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurbil, Kamil

    2014-05-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultrahigh fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques.

  20. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  1. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  2. Anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W; Taeger, K

    2000-08-01

    The need for general anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography investigations can be reduced by the implementation of structured sedation programmes supervised by anaesthetists. Despite its side-effects, chloral hydrate is still the drug most widely used. Rectal thiopental or intravenous propofol are suggested anaesthetic agents for pre-school children and uncooperative or claustrophobic individuals. Spiral computed tomography scans and ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging shorten immobilization times further. However, functional magnetic resonance imaging and intervention techniques in neuroradiology depend on a motionless patient. A useful strategy for testing anaesthesia equipment has been outlined.

  3. Trapped periosteum in a distal femoral physeal injury: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Vimieiro Timponi de Moura

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epiphyseal fractures are frequently associated with knee trauma during sports in children and adolescents. Usually, Salter-Harris types I and II fractures are conservatively treated. However, failed closed reduction of displaced fractures suggest the presence of trapped periosteum, with indication for surgery. The present report describes a case of Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal femur in a child, complicated with trapped periosteum detected at magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Resonant Raman Scattering from Silicon Nanoparticles Enhanced by Magnetic Response

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Flow Quantification across the Atrioventricular Valve in Patients with Functional Univentricular Heart after Fontan's Surgery and Healthy Controls: Measurement by 4D Flow Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Streamline Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Hoi Lam; Roest, Arno A W; Calkoen, Emmeline E; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; van der Geest, Rob J; Hazekamp, Mark G; de Roos, Albert; Westenberg, Jos J M

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the inflow pattern and flow quantification in patients with functional univentricular heart after Fontan's operation using 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with streamline visualization when compared with the conventional 2D flow approach. Seven patients with functional univentricular heart after Fontan's operation and twenty-three healthy controls underwent 4D flow MRI. In two orthogonal two-chamber planes, streamline visualization was applied, and inflow angles with peak inflow velocity (PIV) were measured. Transatrioventricular flow quantification was assessed using conventional 2D multiplanar reformation (MPR) and 4D MPR tracking the annulus and perpendicular to the streamline inflow at PIV, and they were validated with net forward aortic flow. Inflow angles at PIV in the patient group demonstrated wide variation of angles and directions when compared with the control group (P functional univentricular heart with previous Fontan's procedure. 4D flow aided generation of measurement planes according to the blood flood dynamics and has proven to be more accurate than the fixed plane 2D flow measurements when calculating flow quantifications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Beam induced electron cloud resonances in dipole magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvey, J. R.; Hartung, W.; Makita, J.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    The buildup of low energy electrons in an accelerator, known as electron cloud, can be severely detrimental to machine performance. Under certain beam conditions, the beam can become resonant with the cloud dynamics, accelerating the buildup of electrons. This paper will examine two such effects: multipacting resonances, in which the cloud development time is resonant with the bunch spacing, and cyclotron resonances, in which the cyclotron period of electrons in a magnetic field is a multiple of bunch spacing. Both resonances have been studied directly in dipole fields using retarding field analyzers installed in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. These measurements are supported by both analytical models and computer simulations.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H11ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H13ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  9. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...

  10. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Fiber Tracking in a Neonate with Hemimegalencephaly

    OpenAIRE

    Re, Thomas J.; Scarciolla, Laura; Takahashi, Emi; Specchio, Nicola; Bernardi, Bruno De; Longo, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    A magnetic resonance diffusion fiber tracking study in neonate diagnosed with left hemisphere hemimegalencephaly is presented. Despite diffuse morphologic deformities identified in conventional imaging, all major pathways were identifiable bilaterally with minor aberrations in vicinity of morphologic lesions.

  12. Normal perinatal and paediatric postmortem magnetic resonance imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Barber, Joy L. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Cardiorespiratory Division, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Department of Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    As postmortem imaging becomes more widely used following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the correct interpretation of images becomes imperative, particularly given the increased use of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging. Many pathological processes may have similar appearances in life and following death. A thorough knowledge of normal postmortem changes is therefore required within postmortem magnetic resonance imaging to ensure that these are not mistakenly interpreted as significant pathology. Similarly, some changes that are interpreted as pathological if they occur during life may be artefacts on postmortem magnetic resonance imaging that are of limited significance. This review serves to illustrate briefly those postmortem magnetic resonance imaging changes as part of the normal changes after death in fetuses and children, and highlight imaging findings that may confuse or mislead an observer to identifying pathology where none is present. (orig.)

  13. Nonlinear magnetization dynamics of antiferromagnetic spin resonance induced by intense terahertz magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Mukai, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kageyama, H; Tanaka, K

    2016-01-01

    We report on the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a HoFeO3 crystal induced by a strong terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with a split ring resonator and measured with magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The terahertz magnetic field induces a large change (~40%) in the spontaneous magnetization. The frequency of the antiferromagnetic resonance decreases in proportion to the square of the magnetization change. A modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a phenomenological nonlinear damping term quantitatively reproduced the nonlinear dynamics.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  15. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  16. Lymphoma of uterine cervix: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaan, Daniel; Constantino, Carolina Pesce Lamas; Souza, Rodrigo Canellas de, E-mail: daniel.kanaan@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Parente, Daniella Braz [Instituto D' Or de Pesquisa e Ensino, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Lymphoma of the cervix is a rare disease. About 1.0% to 1.5% of extranodal lymphomas originates in the female genital tract. The clinical presentation of this condition is nonspecific and magnetic resonance imaging is important for diagnostic elucidation. The present report describes the case of a 80-year-old patient with lumbar pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging showed a large uterine mass. The final diagnosis was lymphoma. (author)

  17. Can magnetic resonance spectroscopy differentiate endometrial cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Han, Xue; Liu, Qingwei; Xin, Yinghui [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, Changzhong; Yang, Chunrun [Shandong University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Sun, Xichao; Zong, Yuanyuan [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Siemens MRI Center, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-15

    To investigate whether the choline-containing compounds (Cho) obtained from three-dimensional {sup 1}H magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy can differentiate endometrial cancer (ECa) from benign lesions in endometria or in submucosa (BLs-ESm) and is associated with the aggressiveness of ECa. Fifty-seven patients (ECa, 38; BLs-ESm, 19) underwent preoperative multi-voxel MR spectroscopy at 3.0 T. The ratio of the sum of the Cho peak integral to the sum of the unsuppressed water peak integral (Cho/water) and the coefficient of variation (CV) used to describe the variability of Cho/water in one lesion were calculated. Mean Cho/water (±standard deviation [SD]) was (3.02 ± 1.43) x 10{sup -3} for ECa and (1.68 ± 0.33) x 10{sup -3} for BLs-ESm (p < 0.001). Mean Cho/water was (4.42 ± 1.53) x 10{sup -3} for type II ECa and (2.65 ± 1.17) x 10{sup -3} for type I ECa (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences among different stages of ECa (p = 0.107) or different grades of ECa (p = 0.142). The Cho/water was positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.386, p = 0.017) and size (r = 0.333, p = 0.041). The CV was also positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.537, p = 0.001) and size (r = 0.34, p = 0.037). The Cho/water can differentiate ECa from BLs-ESm and differentiate type II from type I ECa, but cannot differentiate different stages of ECa or different grades of ECa. Cho/water increased with the increase of tumour stage and size. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsiedel, H. von; Stepan, R.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty-four patients with intramedullary space-occupying lesions or cord compression syndromes were examined with a resistive and two different superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging units. Studies were done primarily by the spin-echo (SE) technique and in the majority of patients different pulse sequences were used. Images with short echo-time (TE) and short recovery-time (TR) were best for demonstration of spinal cord anatomy, for depicting cystic portions in intramedullary tumours and for showing syringomyelia. Solid intramedullary tumours showed normal cord signal intensity. Images with prolonged TE and TR predominantly enhanced CSF signal intensity and, to a more considerable extent, solid intramedullary tumours. Thus, the diameter of the subarachnoid space and the presence of a solid intramedullary tumour, not concomittant with a significant enlargement of the spinal cord, could only be recognized on these prolonged SE images. Major advantages of MR in comparison to CT are that the spinal cord can be imaged in the sagittal plane and that beam hardening artifacts do not occur; in comparison to myelography the cord can be imaged directly by MR. Partial volume is a major limitation of MR, not only in the preferably applied sagittal plane. The choice of slice thickness adequate to the diameter of the lesion and straight positioning of the patient for sagittal single slice midline images are fundamental for reliable MR investigations. Another limitation to MR is that cortical bone gives no signal. The actual diameter of the spinal canal therefore cannot be correctly appreciated and consequently it was difficult or impossible to assess spinal stenosis.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefrova, Jana, E-mail: sefrova@post.cz [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Paluska, Petr [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Belobradek, Zdenek [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brodak, Milos [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Dolezel, Martin [Department of Clinical and Radiation Oncology, Multiscan and Pardubice Regional Hospital, Pardubice (Czech Republic); First and Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Prosvic, Petr [Department of Urology, Regional Hospital Nachod, Nachod (Czech Republic); Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hoffmann, Petr [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Louda, Miroslav [Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Nejedla, Anna [Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T1 and T2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially resolved

  1. Time-dependent scar enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging of the postoperative lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickstein, M.F.; Sussman, S.K. (Hartford Hospital, CT (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a principal modality in the evaluation of the postoperative lumbar spine. Gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) can often facilitate differentiation of scar from recurrent disc herniation according to established criteria. Scar has been believed to enhance predictably. We reviewed the contrast-enhanced MR scans of 44 patients who were examined for recurrent back pain following disc surgery and attempted to assess the enhancement characteristics of scar as a function of the time interval between initial surgery and the imaging study. In 44 patients, scar was believed to be present at 32 of 49 disc levels. In patients examined long after surgery, scar enhancement may be less intense than in those examined shortly after surgery, or even nonexistent. This temporal factor should be considered when using contrast material to differentiate scar from recurrent disc herniation in postoperative examinations of the lumbar spine. (orig./GDG).

  2. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  3. Toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar THz metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Song; Gupta, Manoj; Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-09-01

    The toroidal dipole moment, a localized electromagnetic excitation of torus magnetic fields, has been observed experimentally in metamaterials. However, the metamaterial based toroidal moment was restricted at higher frequencies by the complex three-dimensional structure. Recently, it has been shown that toroidal moment could also be excited in a planar metamaterial structure. Here, we use asymmetric Fano resonators to illustrate theoretically and experimentally the underlying physics of the toroidal coupling in an array of planar metamaterials. It is observed that the anti-parallel magnetic moment configuration shows toroidal excitation with higher quality (Q) factor Fano resonance, while the parallel magnetic moment shows relatively lower Q factor resonance. Moreover, the electric and toroidal dipole interferes destructively to give rise to an anapole excitation. The magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is employed to understand the differences between the toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances. We further study the impact of intra unit-cell coupling between the Fano resonator pairs in the mirrored and non-mirrored arrangements. The numerical and theoretical approach for modelling the near-field effects and experimental demonstration of toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar systems are particularly promising for tailoring the loss in metamaterials across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  4. Virtual special issue: Magnetic resonance at low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    It appears to be a common understanding that low magnetic fields need to be avoided in magnetic resonance, as sensitivity and the frequency dispersion of the chemical shift increase with increasing field strength. But there many reasons to explore magnetic resonance at low fields. The instrumentation tends to be far less expensive than high-field equipment, magnets are smaller and lighter, internal gradients in heterogeneous media are smaller, conductive media and even metals become transparent at low frequencies to electromagnetic fields, and new physics and phenomena await to be discovered. On account of an increasing attention of the scientific community to magnetic resonance at low field, we have decided to launch JMR's Virtual Special Issue Series with this compilation about Low-Field Magnetic Resonance. This topic, for which we have chosen to focus on articles reporting measurements at fields lower than 2 T, is of widespread interest to our readership. We are therefore happy to offer to this constituency a selected outlook based on papers published during the last five years (volumes 214-270) in the pages of The Journal of Magnetic Resonance. A brief survey of the topics covered in this Virtual Special Issue follows.

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit. The magnetic field is not harmful in ... malfunction or cause problems during the examination. Most MRI exams are relatively painless. However, some patients may ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance (MR)-Guided Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology correlation in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masopust, Václav; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír; Májovský, Martin; Belšán, Tomáš; Bradáč, Ondřej; Hořínek, Daniel; Kosák, Mikuláš; Hána, Václav; Kršek, Michal

    We continuously look for new techniques to improve the radicality of resection and to eliminate the negative effects of surgery. One of the methods that has been implemented in the perioperative management of Cushing's disease was the combination of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: SE, SPGR and fSPGR. We enrolled 41 patients (11 males, 30 females) diagnosed with Cushing's disease. A 3D tumour model with a navigation console was developed using each SPGR, fSPGR and SE sequence. The largest model was then used. In all cases, a standard four-handed, bi-nostril endoscopic endonasal technique was used. Endocrinological follow-up evaluation using morning cortisol sampling was performed for 6-34 months in our study. In total, 36 patients (88%) were disease-free following surgery. Our results indicate we achieved 100% sensitivity of MR. Overall, the conformity of at least one donor site, as compared with the places designated on MR, was in 78% of patients. We searched the place of compliance in individual locations. There is a consensus in individual locations in 63 of the 123 cases (or 56%). The correlation gamma function at a 5% significance level was then 0.27. The combination of MR sequences (SE, SPGR, fSPGR), neuronavigation system and iMRI led to increased sensitivity of up to 100%. Specificity reached 56% in our study. We found a high success rate in surgical procedure in terms of the correlation between MR findings and histology, which leads to remission of Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  9. All-fiber magnetic-field sensor based on microfiber knot resonator and magnetic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianli; Ding, Hui

    2012-12-15

    All-fiber magnetic-field sensor based on a device consisting of a microfiber knot resonator and magnetic fluid is proposed for the first time in this Letter. Sensor principles and package technology are introduced in detail. Experimental results show that the resonance wavelength of the proposed sensor regularly varies with changes to the applied magnetic field. When the magnetic field is increased to 600 Oe, the wavelength shift reaches nearly 100 pm. Moreover, the sensor responding to the 50 Hz alternating magnetic field is also experimentally investigated, and a minimal detectable magnetic-field strength of 10 Oe is successfully achieved.

  10. Examination of funnel chests by X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography: First results and experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raithel, H.J.; Hartung, M.; Gruennewig, B.; Willital, G.

    1983-01-01

    Funnel chest (pectus excavatum) is a congenital malformation of the thorax. Operative correction must presently be regarded as the treatment of choise. In addition to cosmetical and psychological reasons, there are mainly functional aspects justifying a surgery. The indication for surgery results mostly from the objective clinical-diagnostical findings. This article describes the efficiency of both X-ray computerized tomography and also nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (NMR-CAT) which has only recently been introduced to clinical diagnostics.

  11. Pulse Design in Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palani, Ravi Shankar

    2017-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation is centred on the theory of experimental methods in solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which deals with interaction of electromagnetic radiation with nuclei in a magnetic field and possessing a fundamental quantum mechanical property...

  12. A Quantum Mechanical Review of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Odaibo, Stephen G

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review the quantum mechanics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We traverse its hierarchy of scales from the spin and orbital angular momentum of subatomic particles to the ensemble magnetization of tissue. And we review a number of modalities used in the assessment of acute ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury.

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  14. Terahertz Magnetic Mirror Realized with Dielectric Resonator Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headland, Daniel; Nirantar, Shruti; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Gutruf, Philipp; Abbott, Derek; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Fumeaux, Christophe; Sriram, Sharath

    2015-11-25

    Single-crystal silicon is bonded to a metal-coated substrate and etched in order to form an array of microcylinder passive terahertz dielectric resonator antennas (DRAs). The DRAs exhibit a magnetic response, and hence the array behaves as an efficient artificial magnetic conductor (AMC), with potential for terahertz antenna and sensing applications.

  15. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  16. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)has been widely used in basic research in the past decade, and more clinically in recent years.Unlike conventional MRI that demonstrates the anatomy and morphology of the brain, fMRI provides the functional information of the brain, including neuronal activation, perfusion, diffusion, metabolism,and fiber connection. Since the publication of the pioneer study by Ogawa et al1 in 1990, blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) technique has been adopted by neuroscientists and psychologists in research into the mechanisms of motion, vision,hearing, language, memory, and functions of the brain. Soon after, clinical studies with BOLD technique were conducted in some fields like surgery (surgical planning). In China, however, basic and clinical studies on fMRI in the early years were limited by the shortage of funding, difficulty in integrating personnel of different disciplines from different institutions, and long-term use of MR scanners. In recent years, the studies on fMRI in this country have been flourishing as the conditions are greatly improved, and the number of published papers has increased because more and more radiologists and clinicians are involved.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of the common bile duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, M; Barbalace, G; Capparelli, G; Carrano, A; Castaldo, P; Tamburrini, O; Musella, S

    1998-01-01

    The ideal method for evaluation of the common bile duct (CBD) before or during cholecystectomy remains controversial. Magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is a new, promising technique. A prospective evaluation is reported. Sixty-one patients (45 women) were studied by MRC. There were 29 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease and without clinical, biochemical or ultrasonographic evidence of CBD stones (group 1); 28 of them also underwent intraoperative cholangiography (IOC). In addition, there were 21 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease, with mild biochemical and ultrasonographic signs of CBD involvement (group 2), of whom 19 underwent IOC, and 11 patients with symptomatic CBD stones (group 3), nine of whom had preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) following MRC. MRC showed that no patient in group 1 and three patients in group 2 had CBD stones. Three patients (one in group 1, two in group 2) did not undergo IOC because of technical or clinical problems. In group 3, ERCP confirmed the results of MRC in nine patients. Two patients underwent open surgery because of ultrasonographic, MRC and radiographic signs of pancreatic malignancy. MRC could replace IOC and ERCP for identification of asymptomatic CBD stones. In symptomatic patients MRC combined with other non-invasive imaging techniques can direct the surgeon to appropriate management.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed radiography in Achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenaga, Tateo; Hachiya, Junichi; Miyasaka, Yasuo and others

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Radiography (CR) were performed in 15 patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture who were treated conservatively without surgery. MRI was obtained using Toshiba MRT 50 A superconductive machine, operaing at 0.5 Tesla. CR was performed by CR-101, Fuji Medical System. In fresh cases, ruptured tendons showed intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images. Thickening of the tendon was observed in all cases except in very acute stage. Configuration of thickend tendons tends to be dumbbell shape in subacute stage and fusiform in chronic stage of more than six months after the initial trauma. In cases which showed high signal intensity at the ruptured area both on T1 and T2 weighted images, migration of fat into the sapces between the ruptured tendons was considered to be the major source of increased signal intensity. Computed radiography showed thickening of the tendon, blurring of anterior margin of the tendon, and decreased translucency of pre-Achilles fat pad. However, MRI better demonstrated the details of ruptured tendons when compared to CR, and thought to be an usefull way of following up the healing process of the ruptured tendon to facilitate more reasonable judgement of the time of removing plaster casts and stating exercise.

  19. Degenerative Achilles tendon disease; Assessment by magnetic resonance and ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhold, A.; Stiskal, M. (Rudolfinerhaus, Vienna (Austria). Department of Diagnostic Imaging); Kainberger, F.; Schwaighofer, B. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik)

    As Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Ultrasound (US) allow the evaluation of soft-tissue structures not previously possible with other imaging techniques, a clinical study has been undertaken to determine the value of these 2 modalities in the detection of lesions in the Achilles tendon (AT), other than acute total rupture. Seven healthy subjects and 28 symptomatic patients with Achillodynia and/or signs of thickening of the AT were investigated with MR and US; all results were compared with the clinical features. Surgical findings were available in 14 patients. Patients were divided into 3 groups; those with tendon thickening, incomplete and complete ruptures. Thickening of the AT was easily detected with both methods. MR was superior in the detection of incomplete tendon rupture and in the evaluation of various stages of chronic degenerative changes. It is concluded that only if US remains unclear, an additional MR study should be performed and together with the clinical diagnosis indication for surgery can be made more efficient. (author). 24 refs.; 4 figs.

  20. Diagnosis of Bell palsy with gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becelli, R; Perugini, M; Carboni, A; Renzi, G

    2003-01-01

    Bell palsy is a condition resulting from a peripheral edematous compression on the nervous fibers of the facial nerve. This pathological condition often has clinical characteristics of no importance and spontaneously disappears in a short time in a high percentage of cases. Facial palsy concerning cranial nerve VII can also be caused by other conditions such as mastoid fracture, acoustic neurinoma, tumor spread to the temporal lobe (e.g., cholesteatoma), neoformation of the parotid gland, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Therefore, it is important to adopt an accurate diagnostic technique allowing the rapid detection of Bell palsy and the exclusion of causes of facial paralysis requiring surgical treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with medium contrast of the skull shows a marked increase in revealing lesions, even of small dimensions, inside the temporal bone and at the cerebellopontine angle. The authors present a clinical case to show the important role played by gadolinium MRI in reaching a diagnosis of Bell palsy in the differential diagnosis of the various conditions that determine paralysis of the facial nerve and in selecting the most suitable treatment or surgery to be adopted.

  1. Task-related signal decrease on functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yoshie; Nakamura, Mitsugu; Tamaki, Norihiko; Tamura, Shogo [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Kitamura, Junji

    2001-10-01

    An atypical pattern of signal change was identified on functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging in pathologic patients. Three normal volunteers and 34 patients with pathologic lesions near the primary motor cortex underwent fMR imaging with echo-planar imaging while performing a hand motor task. Signal intensities were evaluated with the z-score method, and the time course and changes of the signal intensity were calculated. Nine of the 34 patients with pathologic lesions displayed a significant task-related signal reduction in motor-related areas. They also presented a conventional task-related signal increase in other motor-related areas. The time courses of the increase and decrease were the inverse of each other. There was no significant difference between rates of signal increase and decrease. Our findings suggest that this atypical signal decrease is clinically significant, and that impaired vascular reactivity and altered oxygen metabolism could contribute to the task-related signal reduction. Brain areas showing such task-related signal decrease should be preserved at surgery. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of labral cysts of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnarkowski, P. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Steinbach, L.S. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tirman, P.F.J. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Peterfy, C.G. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Genant, H.K. [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Objective. To present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in patients with labral cysts adjacent to the acetabulum and to examine their association with hip pathology. Design. MR images and conventional radiographs of seven patients with paralabral cysts were retrospectively reviewed by three musculoskeletal radiologists. Patients. The patients included three men and four women with hip pain, ranging in age from 29 to 82 years. Two patients had developmental dysplasia of the hip and six had a history of remote trauma/dislocation. Clinical history and follow-up were obtained in all patients. Surgery was performed on one patient. Results and conclusions. Paralabral cysts were located in the posterosuperior aspect of the hip joint in five patients and in the anterior aspect in two patients. A tear of the adjacent acetabular labrum was confirmed surgically in one patient, and in all patients the MR features suggested the presence of an abnormal labrum. Osteoarthritis was observed in three patients and there was associated subchondral cyst formation in the acetabulum adjacent to the cyst in three patients. The paralabral cyst of the hip is well visualized on MR imaging and is seen in patients with a predisposition to labral pathology. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. A Faraday effect position sensor for interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, M; Umathum, R; Sikora, J; Brenner, S; Aguor, E N; Semmler, W

    2006-02-21

    An optical sensor is presented which determines the position and one degree of orientation within a magnetic resonance tomograph. The sensor utilizes the Faraday effect to measure the local magnetic field, which is modulated by switching additional linear magnetic fields, the gradients. Existing methods for instrument localization during an interventional MR procedure often use electrically conducting structures at the instruments that can heat up excessively during MRI and are thus a significant danger for the patient. The proposed optical Faraday effect position sensor consists of non-magnetic and electrically non-conducting components only so that heating is avoided and the sensor could be applied safely even within the human body. With a non-magnetic prototype set-up, experiments were performed to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both the localization and the orientation in a magnetic resonance tomograph. In a 30 mT m(-1) gradient field, a localization uncertainty of 1.5 cm could be achieved.

  4. Filling defect artefacts in magnetic resonance urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girish, G.; Chooi, W.K.; Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of filling defect artefacts (FDA) in magnetic resonance urography (MRU). Retrospectively, we assessed MRU examinations of 45 patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (21 men, 24 women; mean age 35 years, age range 18-71 years). The MRU was performed 30 min after intramuscular injection of 20 mg frusemide using heavily T2-weighted fast-spin-echo techniques [axial, thick coronal slab, coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) images] with fat saturation. The images were reviewed by two observers to determine the presence of filling defects and dilatation of pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The filling defects were classified into central, eccentric and complete. Clinical course and plain films were reviewed to determine significance of the detected filling defects. True filling defects were observed in 5 patients (11%) and all due to stones seen on the plain radiograph of the abdomen. Filling defects artefacts (FDAs) were seen in 23 patients (51%; 17 pelvicalyceal system, 17 upper third of ureters, 7 mid ureters and 1 distal ureter). No stones were seen on the plain radiograph of these patients and they had a favourable clinical course for over 24 months. The true filling defects were large in size, eccentric in position and seen in more than one sequence of the MRU examination (axial, n=5; slab, n=5; and MIP, n=4). Four (80%) of the patients with true defects and 21 (91%) of those with FDAs had dilatation of the pelvicalyceal system and ureters. The FDAs were small in size, centrally placed (74%) and always seen in axial images, rarely in slab images (2 cases) and not seen in MIP images. Artefactual filling defects can be seen in MRU examinations. The cause of the FDAs is not fully explained and could be secondary to turbulent and fast flow of the urine. Some of the FDAs seen in the calyces could be due to the tips of the papillae. Awareness of such defects obviates misinterpretation and prevents

  5. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  6. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-05-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. Resumo O estudo de viabilidade miocárdica é de grande importância para a orientação e manejo de pacientes que necessitam de cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica ou angioplastia. A técnica de realce tardio (RT) é precisa e transformou o estudo de viabilidade em um teste fácil, não só para a detecção de fibrose, mas também como um modelo binário para a detecção do que é ou não é viável. Uma fibrose identificada pelo RT é considerada como não viável quando igual ou maior do que 50% da área segmentar e como viável quando menor que 50%. A ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) também pode lançar mão de outras técnicas para estudo funcional e de perfusão para uma avaliação global da doença isquêmica do coração no mesmo exame. Este estudo tem como objetivo destacar os conceitos atuais e enfatizar amplamente o uso da RMC como um método que nos últimos 20 anos se tornou referência na detecção de infarto e avaliação de viabilidade miocárdica.

  7. Spatially coherent surface resonance states derived from magnetic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Zeyong; Cao, Yang; Wu, Chao; Ren, Jinzhi; Hang, Zhihong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Daozhong; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    A thin metamaterial slab comprising a dielectric spacer sandwiched between a metallic grating and a ground plane is shown to possess spatially coherent surface resonance states that span a large frequency range and can be tuned by structural and material parameters. They give rise to nearly perfect angle-selective absorption and thus exhibit directional thermal emissivity. Direct numerical simulations show that the metamaterial slab supports spatially coherent thermal emission in a wide frequency range that is robust against structural disorder.

  8. Histopathology of breast cancer after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound and radiofrequency ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuttel, Floor; Waaijer, Laurien; Merckel, LG; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Witkamp, Arjen J.; Deckers, Roel; van Diest, Paul J.

    AIMS: Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are being researched as possible substitutes for surgery in breast cancer patients. The histopathological appearance of ablated tissue has not been studied in great detail. This

  9. Magnetically tunable Mie resonance-based dielectric metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ke; Guo, Yunsheng; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Qian; Xiao, Jinghua; Lei, Ming; Zhou, Ji

    2014-11-11

    Electromagnetic materials with tunable permeability and permittivity are highly desirable for wireless communication and radar technology. However, the tunability of electromagnetic parameters is an immense challenge for conventional materials and metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate a magnetically tunable Mie resonance-based dielectric metamaterials. The magnetically tunable property is derived from the coupling of the Mie resonance of dielectric cube and ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboid. Both the simulated and experimental results indicate that the effective permeability and permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. This mechanism offers a promising means of constructing microwave devices with large tunable ranges and considerable potential for tailoring via a metamaterial route.

  10. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas; Ganssle, Paul; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnet...

  11. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  12. Characterization of magnetically actuated resonant cantilevers in viscous fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vančura, Cyril; Lichtenberg, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Josse, Fabien

    2005-10-01

    The vibration behavior of magnetically actuated resonant microcantilevers immersed in viscous fluids has been studied. A dependence of the resonance frequency and the quality factor (Q factor) on the fluid properties, such as density and viscosity and on the cantilever geometry is described. Various cantilever geometries are analyzed in pure water and glycerol solutions, and the results are explained in terms of the added displaced fluid mass and the fluid damping force for both the resonance frequency and the quality factor. An in-depth knowledge and understanding of such systems is necessary when analyzing resonant cantilevers as biochemical sensors in liquid environments.

  13. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  14. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L., E-mail: jinliang@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov–Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms. -- Highlights: •The light transport is investigated through ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic field. •Aharonov–Bohm ring interferometer of arbitrary configuration is investigated. •The half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to destructive interference and transmission zeros for two-arm at equal length. •Complete transmission is available via tuning synthetic magnetic flux.

  15. Chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A.S.; D' Ippolito, G.; Caldana, R.P.; Cecin, A.O.; Ahmed, M.; Szejnfeld, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Federal Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the hepatosplenic manifestations and the portal venous system in patients with chronic infection by Schistosoma mansoni. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 28 patients with chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the abdomen. Images were interpreted independently by two radiologists to determine the reproducibility of image interpretation and who evaluated the presence of morphological alterations in the liver and spleen, such as hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic fissure widening, periportal fibrosis, and the presence of siderotic nodules. Interobserver and intra-observer agreement were measured with the kappa and intraclass correlation tests. Evaluation of venous collateral pathways and portal and splenic veins was done in consensus by both examiners. Results: Observers identified enlargement of the left lobe (78.5-92.8%) and caudate-to-right-lobe ratio (78.5-92.8%), irregularity of hepatic contours (89.2-96.4%), fissure widening (89.2-100%), and splenic siderotic nodules (84.2%). Splenomegaly, heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, peripheral hepatic vessels, and periportal fibrosis were observed in 100% of patients. MRI findings presented almost perfect interobserver (kappa 0.65-1) and intra-observer (kappa = 0.73-1 for observer 1, and kappa = 0.65-1 for observer 2) agreement for the variables analyzed. MRA showed the presence of collateral pathways in the majority of patients (71.4%) along with widening of portal and splenic veins. Conclusion: Using MRI, hepatosplenic alterations in schistosomiasis are characterized by heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, presence of peripheral perihepatic vessels, periportal fibrosis, splenomegaly, siderotic nodules, and the presence of venous collateral pathways.

  16. Rotational characteristics in the resonance state of the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morii, Y.; Sukedai, M. [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Ohashi, S., E-mail: ohashi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The hybrid magnetic bearing has been developed. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller. Influence of the vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state is large. The resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system. The hybrid magnetic bearing using permanent magnets and the high-Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) has been developed. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced to increase the load weight of the magnetic bearing. Effect of the hybrid system has been shown. In this paper, influence of the hybrid system on the dynamic characteristics of the rotor is studied. The rotational characteristics in the mechanical resonance state are studied, and the equivalent magnetic spring coefficient is estimated from the experimental results of the load weight. The resonance frequency is measured by the rotation experiments. The rotor achieves stable levitation even in the resonance state. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller than that of the lateral force generated by the repulsive force between the two permanent magnets at the smaller air gap. Thus influence of the lateral vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state becomes larger at a smaller air gap. The equivalent magnetic spring coefficient becomes also small, and the resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system.

  17. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic recording using ferromagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kanao, Taro; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-07-01

    To meet the ever-increasing demand for data storage, future magnetic recording devices will need to be made three-dimensional by implementing multilayer recording. In this article, we present methods of detecting and manipulating the magnetization direction of a specific layer selectively in a vertically stacked multilayer magnetic system, which enable layer-selective read and write operations in three-dimensional magnetic recording devices. The principle behind the methods is ferromagnetic resonance excitation in a microwave magnetic field. By designing each magnetic recording layer to have a different ferromagnetic resonance frequency, magnetization excitation can be induced individually in each layer by tuning the frequency of an applied microwave magnetic field, and this selective magnetization excitation can be utilized for the layer-selective operations. Regarding media for three-dimensional recording, when layers of a perpendicular magnetic material are vertically stacked, dipolar interaction between multiple recording layers arises and is expected to cause problems, such as degradation of thermal stability and switching field distribution. To solve these problems, we propose the use of an antiferromagnetically coupled structure consisting of hard and soft magnetic layers. Because the stray fields from these two layers cancel each other, antiferromagnetically coupled media can reduce the dipolar interaction.

  19. resonant inverter supplied interior permanent magnet (ipm)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Permanent Magnet (IPM) or Surface Permanent. Magnet ... desired torque is produced to rotate the motor in the desired ... u axis, and the direct-axis of the rotor is at angle θ from the ..... Based Stator Flux Estimator” International. Journal of ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Postpartum Depression: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiorelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum depression is a frequent and disabling condition whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In recent years, the study of the neural correlates of mental disorders has been increasingly approached using magnetic resonance techniques. In this review we synthesize the results from studies on postpartum depression in the context of structural, functional, and spectroscopic magnetic resonance studies of major depression as a whole. Compared to the relative wealth of data available for major depression, magnetic resonance studies of postpartum depression are limited in number and design. A systematic literature search yielded only eleven studies conducted on about one hundred mothers with postpartum depression overall. Brain magnetic resonance findings in postpartum depression appear to replicate those obtained in major depression, with minor deviations that are not sufficient to delineate a distinct neurobiological profile for this condition, due to the small samples used and the lack of direct comparisons with subjects with major depression. However, it seems reasonable to expect that studies conducted in larger populations, and using a larger variety of brain magnetic resonance techniques than has been done so far, might allow for the identification of neuroimaging signatures for postpartum depression.