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Sample records for surgery elective surgery

  1. Blisters associated with elective wrist surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Tsipora; Chernofsky, Michael A; Luria, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Blistering of the skin has been reported after high energy trauma or arthroplasties of large joints. It is rare in wrist trauma and seldom reported following elective wrist surgery. We present three cases of skin blistering after elective wrist surgery. Two female patients aged 18 and 35 years and one male patient aged 53 years were treated with total wrist fusion, carpometacarpal fusion, and open wrist ligament repair. They reported burning pain at the blister site. The blisters were clear and treated with dressing changes. There were no infections or wound complications and all blisters resolved without sequelae. These complications were probably due to a combination of factors, including swelling, compression from dressing and splint, multiple surgical incisions, and the use of adhesive dressing. Reassurance and proper wound care are recommended for the complication of clear blistering following elective wrist surgery.

  2. Children's self-statements and adjustment to elective outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, C J; Erickson, M T

    1990-02-01

    Children's coping self-statements, levels of anxiety, degree of behavioral adjustment, as well as levels of maternal state anxiety and parenting style, and demographic variables were used to predict the reactions of 61 children to elective day surgery. Results indicated that elective day surgery was not psychologically traumatic for most children. However, the use of negative self-statements and both low and high maternal anxiety were found to be related to increased anxiety of the children experiencing elective day surgery.

  3. Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fa-Si-Oen, Patrick Regnier

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preparation is a long standing practice in elective open colon surgery dating from the 1970's. It has always been believed to reduce the rate of postoperative complications in the form of anastomotic leakage and wound infection. In this thesis we broadly and thoroughly examine the various aspects and the value of mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery. - Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery does not reduce the rate of anastomotic le...

  4. What Is Elective Surgery? (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery How to Find Affordable Health Care Financial Management During Crisis Anesthesia Basics Preparing Your Child for Anesthesia Word! Surgery ... Have Surgery? Health Care: What Do You Know? Anesthesia Basics Contact ... Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  5. Preoperative alcohol cessation prior to elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oppedal, Kristian; Møller, Ann Merete; Pedersen, Bolette

    2012-01-01

    Hazardous drinking has been associated with an increased postoperative complication rate after surgery. Common complications include postoperative infections, cardiopulmonary complications, and bleeding episodes. Preoperative abstinence may to some degree reverse alcohol-induced pathophysiological...

  6. A new pathway for elective surgery to reduce cancellation rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovlid, Einar; Bukve, Oddbjørn; Haug, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    The cancellation of planned surgeries causes prolonged wait times, harm to patients, and is a waste of scarce resources. To reduce high cancellation rates in a Norwegian general hospital, the pathway for elective surgery was redesigned. The changes included earlier clinical assessment of patients...

  7. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  8. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Güenaga, Katia F; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bowel contents during colorectal surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only.An enema before the r...... the rectal surgery to clean the rectum and facilitate the manipulation for the mechanical anastomosis is used for many surgeons. This is analysed separately...

  9. Delayed elective surgery in a major teaching hospital in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajja I

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Isaac Kajja,1 Cees Th Smit Sibinga21Department of Orthopedics, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; 2ID Consulting for International Development of Transfusion Medicine (IDTM, Groningen, The NetherlandsBackground: A number of factors come into play in determining the timing of an elective surgical intervention, particularly in the developing world. The present study explores the factors that contribute to the timing of elective surgery and patients' opinions on their quality of life as they wait for surgery.Methods: We followed adult patients with delayed elective surgical interventions (n=204. The causes for the delay and, particularly, the influence of blood shortage on the timing of the procedure were noted. Patients' perceptions on their quality of life as they waited for surgery were also noted.Results: We were able to establish a cause for delayed elective surgery in 133 patients. Shortage of operating space was the leading cause of surgery delay in 44 patients, while blood shortage followed closely in 40 patients. The higher the amount of blood ordered for use in the perioperative time, the longer the delay to surgery (P=0.001. Patients waiting for surgery had a low opinion of their in-hospital quality of life. Here, the key indicators included the threat of losing a job, limited family time, and an increase in day-to-day living costs.Conclusion: Blood shortage is the second most common cause of the delayed performance of elective surgical interventions in our institution. The patients have a low opinion on their quality of life as they wait for surgery.Keywords: blood shortage, delayed elective surgery, quality of life

  10. Mechanical bowel preparation for elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenaga, Katia K F G; Matos, Delcio; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of bowel contents during surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only. OBJECTIVES: To dete......BACKGROUND: The presence of bowel contents during surgery has been related to anastomotic leakage, but the belief that mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is an efficient agent against leakage and infectious complications is based on observational data and expert opinions only. OBJECTIVES...... with no MBP. Primary outcomes included anastomosis leakage - both rectal and colonic - and combined figures. Secondary outcomes included mortality, peritonitis, reoperation, wound infection, extra-abdominal complications, and overall surgical site infections. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data were...

  11. Perspectives and experiences of elective surgery patients regarding pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeh, Nahid; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives and experiences of elective surgery patients regarding pain management. A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used to collect and analyze the experience of 20 elective surgery patients who all had abdominal surgery in surgical wards in two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. After employing purposeful sampling for the selection of the participants, semistructured interviews were held for data collection. During the data analysis, three main themes emerged: "perceptions of pain management goals", "patients' views of nurses' role in pain management", and "interaction in pain management". It was concluded that understanding the factors that influence pain management after surgery from the patients' viewpoint will contribute to the body of knowledge of nurses in order to promote the quality of nursing care.

  12. Anxiety in children having elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, Sarah R; Plummer, John L; Owen, Harry; Hawkins, Russell M F; Materazzo, Felicity; Morrison, Virginia

    2004-04-01

    One hundred and twenty children aged 5-12 years and their parents were interviewed preoperatively about anxiety and fear. Needles, postoperative pain, the unknown, and many unrecognizable people in the induction room were all reported as increasing anxiety for children. Effective modes of reducing children's anxiety were considered to be the prospect of eating after surgery, staff speaking directly to children in a friendly way, and having a television to watch. Parents' suggestions for reducing children's anxiety included giving better explanations, ensuring that children who have had their operations do not return to the same ward where other children are still waiting, and providing more distractions.

  13. Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fa-Si-Oen, Patrick Regnier

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preparation is a long standing practice in elective open colon surgery dating from the 1970's. It has always been believed to reduce the rate of postoperative complications in the form of anastomotic leakage and wound infection. In this thesis we broadly and thoroughly examine the v

  14. Modeling and analysis of multistate access to elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, B; Brown, P; Zelt, D

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, we attempt to determine whether delays in scheduling operation affect waiting time in a queue for elective surgery. We analyze the waiting-list management system in a Canadian hospital. We estimate the impact of scheduling delays by modeling access to treatment as a multistate process. We found that patients with any delay in scheduling surgery had longer waiting times than patients without delays. For certain sources of delays, the admission rate was 50-60% lower compared with the rate for admissions without a delay independent of urgency of surgical intervention. Our findings support a concern that waiting time for elective surgery is not simply determined by how many patients are on the waiting list, or by how urgently they need treatment, but also by the waiting list management practice.

  15. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the

  16. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Cor

  17. Predictors of willingness to undergo elective musculoskeletal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi R

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rajiv Gandhi,1,2 Anthony V Perruccio,1,3 Y Raja Rampersaud1,21Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 3Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario, CanadaPurpose: Knowledge of what influences patients’ willingness to undergo elective orthopedic surgery is vital to the patient shared decision-making process. We sought to document the prevalence and identify the predictors of unwillingness to undergo surgery among a cohort of hip/knee, foot/ankle, neck/back, and hip/knee patients.Patients and methods: Patient demographics and information on patient health status, perceptions of risk and success of surgery, and willingness to undergo surgery were collected. Sequential logistic regression models were used to investigate the influence of the captured variables on willingness to undergo surgery.Results: Overall, 392 (20% of 1946 participants reported being unwilling to undergo or unsure about undergoing (“unwilling/unsure” surgery if it was offered to them. From adjusted analyses, low income and non-White ethnicity were associated with a greater likelihood of being unwilling/unsure. Compared with hip/knee patients, neck/back patients were more likely to report being unwilling/unsure (odds ratio: 1.90 [95% confidence interval: 1.36, 265]; no differences were found between the remaining anatomical groups. However, when perceptions of risk and success were additionally considered, the influence for the neck/back cohort was significantly attenuated. Foot/ankle and elbow/shoulder patients were found to be significantly less likely to report unwillingness when perceptions were considered.Conclusion: In addition to demographic/economic influences, perceptions of surgical risk and success play a critical role in patients’ willingness to undergo surgery.Keywords: risk perception, orthopedic surgery

  18. Anaemia in elective orthopaedic surgery - Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, B; To, J; Southam, K; Howie, D; To, B

    2016-01-01

    An anaemia clinic was established to improve the preoperative management of elective orthopaedic patients scheduled for arthroplasty. This paper is a report on the first 100 patients assessed. To assess the incidence and causes of anaemia in patients on a waiting list for elective arthroplasty in a public hospital and to assess the impact of anaemia detection in this patient population. Patients attending an Anaemia Clinic for elective orthopaedic surgical patients, during March 2010 to June 2013 were studied. Outcome measures included change in haemoglobin preoperative results and perioperative transfusion rates by preoperative haemoglobin. Seventeen per cent of patients scheduled for elective surgery were found to be anaemic. Of the 100 patients who attended, approximately half were found to be iron deficient and the remainder had anaemia of chronic disease. Serum ferritin anaemia were able to be treated, in all cases, to achieve a significant increase in preoperative haemoglobin. The general unavailability of erythropoietin limited effective intervention for the non-iron-deficient anaemic patients. Seven patients had their surgery cancelled because of the screening programme. Half of the anaemic patients in a joint replacement screening clinic were iron deficient, and treatment was effective in improving the pre-operative haemoglobin and reducing perioperative transfusion rates. This screening process should improve patient outcome. Another important finding in this group of patients is that ferritin levels cannot be reliably used as the sole indicator in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia in this group of patients undergoing elective arthroplasty. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. A new pathway for elective surgery to reduce cancellation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovlid Einar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cancellation of planned surgeries causes prolonged wait times, harm to patients, and is a waste of scarce resources. To reduce high cancellation rates in a Norwegian general hospital, the pathway for elective surgery was redesigned. The changes included earlier clinical assessment of patients, better planning and documentation systems, and increased involvement of patients in the scheduling of surgeries. This study evaluated the outcomes of this new pathway for elective surgery and explored which factors affected the outcomes. Methods We collected the number of planned operations, performed operations, and cancellations per month from the hospital’s patient administrative system. We then used Student's t-test to analyze differences in cancellation rates (CRs before and after interventions and a u-chart to analyze whether the improvements were sustained. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with employees of the hospital to explore the changes in the surgical pathway and the factors that facilitated these changes. Results The mean CR was reduced from 8.5% to 4.9% (95% CI for mean reduction 2.6-4.5, p p = 0.04. A clear improvement strategy, involvement of frontline clinicians, introduction of an electronic scheduling system, and engagement of middle managers were important factors for the success of the interventions. Conclusion The redesign of the old clinical pathway contributed to a sustained reduction in cancellations and an increased number of performed operations.

  20. Ring fencing of elective surgery: does it affect hospital efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjekshus, Lars Erik; Hagen, Terje P

    2005-08-01

    Ring fencing (RF) is defined as separating elective from emergency operations in parallel hospital production lines. This study examines the effects of RF of elective surgery on hospital efficiency. The analysis is performed on two levels. First, an intensive three-month study at the departmental level of three hospitals was performed. Second, a panel data analysis of the organizational population of Norwegian hospitals over the period from 1992 to 2000 was conducted, using a 'fixed effect' regression model to analyse the effect of RF on hospitals' cost and technical efficiency. The intensive study indicates that RF could have positive effects both on cost and technical efficiency under certain conditions of case-mix and the demand for elective surgery, while the panel analyses of the effects of RF in the hospital population do not produce stable results. We cannot conclude that RF has unconditional positive effects on hospitals' efficiency. However, in certain situations of case-mix and demand for services, RF could be a valuable tool for managers to increase hospitals' efficiency.

  1. Elective Thoracolumbar Spine Fusion Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Qureshi, Rabia; Carstensen, S Evan; Tyger, Rosemarie; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2016-12-01

    Few data are available concerning clinical outcomes in patients with Parkinson disease who undergo elective thoracolumbar spine fusion surgery. The goal of this study is to elucidate complication and revision rates after posterior thoracolumbar fusion surgery in patients with Parkinson disease, with a focus on how Parkinson disease modifies these rates. The PearlDiver database (2005-2012) was queried for patients who underwent posterior approach thoracolumbar fusion from 2006 to 2011. Cohorts of patients with a previous diagnosis of Parkinson disease (n = 4816) and without (n = 280,702) were compared. Multivariate analysis that included various comorbidities and demographics was used to calculate effects of Parkinson disease on development of postoperative infection and major medical complications within 90 days and revision surgery within 1 year. For analyses, significance was set at P Parkinson disease was significantly associated with an increased risk for medical complications (adjusted odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.34; P Parkinson disease are more likely to require revision surgery and have higher rates of adverse medical events postoperatively. Patients with Parkinson disease should be appropriately selected to ensure favorable clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Renal function changes after elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Lobo, E M; Burdmann, E A; Abdulkader, R C

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac surgery can either induce acute renal failure or improve GFR by improving the cardiac performance. In order to study renal function changes after elective cardiac surgery (CS) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPBP), 21 patients undergoing valvular CS (VCS) or coronary artery bypass (CAB) were prospectively evaluated in three time periods: before, 24 hours after surgery and 48 hours after surgery. Patients were divided in 2 groups according to the GFR percent change in comparison to the baseline value found 24 hours after CS (deltaGFR24): Group 1, deltaGFR24 decrease higher than 20% (n = 11) and Group 2, deltaGFR24 decrease UpH) in both groups. The deltaGFR24 showed positive correlation with baseline FENa (r = 0.44 p = 0.04) and negative correlation with volume balance during the first 24h after CS (r = -0.63, p = 0.007). More patients in Group 1 required nitroprusside than in Group 2 (66% vs. 14%, p = 0.04). Anesthesia time was shorter in Group 1 as compared to Group 2: 323+/-21 vs. 395+/-26 min, p = 0.04. No significant hemolysis occurred during CS in either group. There were no differences in age, gender, CPBP time, need for dopamine and/or dobutamine between the two groups. In conclusion, patients who presented GFR decrease after CS underwent VCS more frequently, had more prevalence of previous CS, presented lower baseline FENa, required more volume infusion and more nitroprusside use. On the other hand, no tubular dysfunction was detected in the early follow-up of CS. These results suggest that the observed renal function changes should be the result of an appropriated renal response to a low effective blood volume. In fact, a low baseline FENa anticipated a GFR decrease in these patients. Consistently, CAB patients that usually improve their cardiac output after surgery showed a clear GFR improvement.

  3. Microvascular response to transfusion in elective spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, J Matthias; Stundner, Ottokar; Girardi, Federico P; Barton, Bruce A; Koll-Desrosiers, Aimee R; Heard, Stephen O; Memtsoudis, Stavros G

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the microvascular (skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation; SmO2) response to transfusion in patients undergoing elective complex spine surgery. METHODS After IRB approval and written informed consent, 20 patients aged 18 to 85 years of age undergoing > 3 level anterior and posterior spine fusion surgery were enrolled in the study. Patients were followed throughout the operative procedure, and for 12 h postoperatively. In addition to standard American Society of Anesthesiologists monitors, invasive measurements including central venous pressure, continual analysis of stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), and stroke volume variability (SVV) was performed. To measure skeletal muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) during the study period, a non-invasive adhesive skin sensor based on Near Infrared Spectroscopy was placed over the deltoid muscle for continuous recording of optical spectra. All administration of fluids and blood products followed standard procedures at the Hospital for Special Surgery, without deviation from usual standards of care at the discretion of the Attending Anesthesiologist based on individual patient comorbidities, hemodynamic status, and laboratory data. Time stamps were collected for administration of colloids and blood products, to allow for analysis of SmO2 immediately before, during, and after administration of these fluids, and to allow for analysis of hemodynamic data around the same time points. Hemodynamic and oxygenation variables were collected continuously throughout the surgery, including heart rate, blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, SV, CO, CI, SVV, and SmO2. Bivariate analyses were conducted to examine the potential associations between the outcome of interest, SmO2, and each hemodynamic parameter measured using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, both for the overall cohort and within-patients individually. The association between receipt of packed red blood cells and SmO2 was performed by

  4. The Influence of Elective Surgery on Functional Health in Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    surgery to decrease pain and disability, improve their cosmetic appearance, and/or set their mind at ease by getting a definitive diagnosis, and...Elective Surgery on Functional Health in Veterans with PTSD 5b. GRANT NUMBER HU0001-11-1-TS03 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S...with greater risk of postoperative mortality in veterans. The purpose of this study was to determine if elective outpatient surgery had a persistent

  5. Measuring preoperative anxiety in patients undergoing elective surgery in Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlína Homzová; Renáta Zeleníková

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The main aim of the study was to measure preoperative anxiety in patients in the Czech Republic before elective surgery, using the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety (VAS-A). Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Methods: The sample consisted of 344 patients undergoing elective surgery. The day before surgery patients completed a questionnaire consisting of demographic data, the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) and the VAS-A. Spearman correlation was use...

  6. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  7. Day of surgery admission for the elective surgical in-patient: successful implementation of the Elective Surgery Programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Concannon, E S

    2012-09-11

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this prospective cross-sectional study was to determine the impact of (1) ring fencing in-patient general surgical beds and (2) introducing a pre-operative assessment clinic (PAC) on the day of surgery admission (DOSA) rate in a single Irish institution. The secondary aim was to analyse the impact of an increased rate of DOSA on cost efficiency and patient satisfaction. METHODS: An 18-month period was examined following ring-fencing of elective and emergency surgical beds. A PAC was established during the study period. Prospectively collected data pertaining to all surgical admissions were retrieved using patient administration system software (Powerterm Pro, Eircom Software) and a database of performance information from Irish Public Health Services (HealthStat). RESULTS: Ring-fencing and PAC establishment was associated with a significant increase in the overall DOSA rate from 56 to 85 %, surpassing the national target rate of DOSA (75 %). Data relating specifically to general surgery admissions mirrored this increase in DOSA rate from a median of 5 patients per month, before the advent of ring-fencing and PAC, to 42 patients per month (p < 0.0387). 100 patient surveys demonstrated high levels of satisfaction with DOSA, with a preference compared to admission one night pre-operatively. Cost analysis demonstrated overall savings of 340,370 Euro from this change in practice. CONCLUSION: The present study supports the practice of DOSA through the introduction of ring-fenced surgical beds and PAC. This has been shown to improve hospital resource utilisation and streamline surgical service provision in these economically challenging times.

  8. Elective surgery to save my life: rethinking the "choice" in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Sarah; Benjamin, Tonya

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explicate the processes by which a patient's choice to undergo bariatric surgery is made to feel like a medical necessity, to explore the ways widespread societal stigmatization of weight and bariatric surgery shapes patient and provider discourse about surgery and to discuss patient rationalizations of the choice to have surgery. Severe obesity is currently highly stigmatized. Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly used option for individuals seeking to lose drastic amounts of weight. The surgery itself, however, remains stigmatized across many diverse settings. This research design is centred on an ethnographic study of bariatric surgery patients who undergo surgery at a particular bariatric clinic in the American Southwest. Data collection included repeated ethnographic interviews with 35 individuals enrolled in the bariatric programme over the past 5 years. The interviews were supplemented by extensive participant observation, starting in 2014 to date. Thematic analysis of fieldnotes and transcribed interviews followed. People who have bariatric surgery for weight-loss may trade one type of stigma for another. Thus, individuals who qualify for bariatric surgery based on weight alone may be reluctant to explore the surgery as a viable option. This research also shows that younger women are more likely to face the effects of weight-related stigma, which has an impact on their motivations for undergoing bariatric surgery. Stigma - both weight-related and surgery-related - needs to be addressed at a larger level, in terms of policy and in clinical bariatric programmes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [What is the role of elective surgery in diverticular sigmoiditis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Néel, J C; Guiberteau, B; Borde, L; Sartre, J Y; Bourseau, J C

    1992-01-01

    From 1981 to 1991 inclusive, 188 operations were carried out for diverticular sigmoiditis. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were operated in emergency for acute complications (123) or fistulae (16), and another 49 had surgery scheduled outside acute crisis periods. Mortality and morbidity respectively are 16.5 and 31% in the first group, against 0 and 12% in the second one. Similarly, the stay in hospital varies from 13 days for scheduled surgery to 23 days for emergent surgery, the latter also requiring to account for risks and for the duration of a second operation that is far from exceptional (40%). Considering the severity of some evolutive complications, the authors advocate early radical surgery for symptomatic diverticular sigmoiditis, after the second crisis or as soon as the first one if it has been severe, and in young subjects and patients at risks.

  10. Preoperative physical therapy for elective cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulzebos, E.H.J.; Smit, Y.; Helders, P.P.J.M.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After cardiac surgery, physical therapy is a routine procedure delivered with the aim of preventing postoperative pulmonary complications. OBJECTIVES: To determine if preoperative physical therapy with an exercise component can prevent postoperative pulmonary complications in cardiac sur

  11. Health-related quality-of-life in patients after elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlers, Lars; Laursen, Kathrine Bang; Jensen, Morten Berg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the health-related quality-of-life (QoL) in patients after elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) compared to a normal population and to study the association between QoL and number of years since surgery. Methods: All Danish men who...

  12. The influence of Mechanical bowel preparation in elective colorectal surgery for diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van 't Sant (Hans Pieter); J.C. Slieker (Juliette); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); W.F. Weidema (Wibo); J.F. Lange (Johan); J. Vermeulen (Jefrey); C.M.E. Contant

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) has been shown to have no influence on the incidence of anastomotic leakage in overall colorectal surgery. The role of MBP in elective surgery in combination with an inflammatory component such as diverticulitis is yet unclear. This study ev

  13. Laparoscopy decreases complications for obese patients undergoing elective rectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Gabriela M; Sieloff, Eric P; Parmar, Abhishek D; Tamirisa, Nina P; Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Riall, Taylor S

    2016-05-01

    While there are many reported advantages to laparoscopic surgery compared to open surgery, the impact of a laparoscopic approach on postoperative morbidity in obese patients undergoing rectal surgery has not been studied. Our goal was to determine whether obese patients undergoing laparoscopic rectal surgery experienced the same benefits as non-obese patients. We identified patients undergoing rectal resections using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project Participant Use Data File. We performed multivariable analyses to determine the independent association between laparoscopy and postoperative complications. A total of 26,437 patients underwent rectal resection. The mean age was 58.5 years, 32.6 % were obese, and 47.2 % had cancer. Laparoscopic procedures were slightly less common in obese patients compared to non-obese patients (36.0 vs. 38.2 %, p = 0.0006). In unadjusted analyses, complications were lower with the laparoscopic approach in both obese (18.9 vs. 32.4 %, p obese (15.6 vs. 25.3 %, p obesity worsened. The likelihood of experiencing a postoperative complication increased by 25, 45, and 75 % for obese class I, obese class II, and obese class III patients, respectively. A laparoscopic approach was associated with a 40 % decreased odds of a postoperative complication for all patients (OR 0.60, 95 % CI 0.56-0.64). Laparoscopic rectal surgery is associated with fewer complications when compared to open rectal surgery in both obese and non-obese patients. Obesity was an independent risk factor for postoperative complications. In appropriately selected patients, rectal surgery outcomes may be improved with a minimally invasive approach.

  14. Effect of elective surgery on subjective health in veterans with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Ken; Hertzberg, Michael; Silva, Susan; Vacchiano, Charles

    2014-08-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common, is often chronic, and has been associated with greater risk of postoperative mortality in veterans. The purpose of this study was to determine if elective outpatient surgery had a persistent effect on the physical or mental health of veterans with chronic PTSD. A longitudinal, quasi-experimental study was conducted that followed up 60 veterans with chronic PTSD over 12 weeks. Self-reported physical and mental health, depressive symptom severity, and posttraumatic symptom severity were measured in 29 veterans undergoing outpatient elective surgery and 31 veterans not having elective surgery (controls). Data collection was performed at baseline and repeated 1, 4, and 12 weeks after surgery or enrollment. At baseline, both surgical and control subjects reported poor physical and mental subjective health status. After surgery, surgical group subjects reported mean age- and gender-adjusted reductions of 3.9 points on the Physical Component Summary score and 2.9 points on the Mental Component Summary score of the Veterans Rand 36-item Health Survey, which resolved by 4 weeks after surgery. These findings suggest that veterans with PTSD were at greater risk of mortality because of poor baseline health, but did not demonstrate persistent decline in health following common elective surgical procedures.

  15. Postoperative infection and natural killer cell function following blood transfusion in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L S; Andersen, A J; Christiansen, P M

    1992-01-01

    The frequency of infection in 197 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery and having either no blood transfusion, transfusion with whole blood, or filtered blood free from leucocytes and platelets was investigated in a prospective randomized trial. Natural killer cell function was measured...... before operation and 3, 7 and 30 days after surgery in 60 consecutive patients. Of the patients 104 required blood transfusion; 48 received filtered blood and 56 underwent whole blood transfusion. Postoperative infections developed in 13 patients transfused with whole blood (23 per cent, 95 per cent...... function was significantly (P less than 0.001) impaired up to 30 days after surgery in patients transfused with whole blood. These data provide a strong case against the use of whole blood transfusion in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Udgivelsesdato: 1992-Jun...

  16. Comparison of omeprazole with cimetidine for prophylaxis of acid aspiration in elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouly, A; Nathan, N; Feiss, P

    1993-05-01

    Gastric pH and volume were measured in four groups of 15 patients scheduled for elective surgery. The patients were randomly allocated to receive either no antacid, oral omeprazole 40 mg the evening before surgery, oral omeprazole 40 mg 2 h before surgery, or effervescent cimetidine 800 mg, 2 h before surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with thiopentone (4-6 mg kg-1), fentanyl (0.03 mg kg-1) and vecuronium (0.1 mg kg-1) and maintained with nitrous oxide in oxygen (50/50) and isoflurane. After induction of anaesthesia and on completion of surgery, gastric pH (mean +/- SEM) and volume were measured using a glass electrode and a phenol red dilution technique. Gastric pH were significantly higher in the three treated groups than in control (P 25 ml).

  17. Managing anemia and blood loss in elective gynecologic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, W A; Meeks, G R

    2001-05-01

    Hysterectomy is the second-most-common surgical procedure among premenopausal women. The conditions that lead to the need for a hysterectomy often are accompanied by chronic blood loss that can lead to anemia. Moreover, hysterectomy and myomectomy may result in significant blood loss, which exacerbates the anemia. The presence of fatigue associated with anemia has a substantially negative impact on quality of life and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Options for alleviating perioperative anemia include minimizing surgical blood loss, blood transfusion, supplementation with hematinics, such as iron and folic acid, and treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin. Treating preoperative anemia is expected to help correct anemia prior to surgery and may have a positive impact on anemia-related symptoms and surgical outcomes.

  18. Life and death of the nasogastric tube in elective colonic surgery in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jottard, K.; Hoff, C.; Maessen, J.; Ramshorst, B. van; Berlo, C.L. van; Logeman, F.; Dejong, C.H.; Bremers, A.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is abundant evidence that the routine use of nasogastric decompression following elective abdominal surgery is ineffective in achieving any goals it is intended for. Nevertheless its use is still standard of care. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether it is

  19. Bed crisis and elective surgery late cancellations: An approach using the theory of constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Abderrazak; Elarref, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Late cancellations of scheduled elective surgery limit the ability of the surgical care service to achieve its goals. Attributes of these cancellations differ between hospitals and regions. The rate of late cancellations of elective surgery conducted in Hamad General Hospital, Doha, Qatar was found to be 13.14% which is similar to rates reported in hospitals elsewhere in the world; although elective surgery is performed six days a week from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm in our hospital. Simple and systematic analysis of these attributes typically provides limited solutions to the cancellation problem. Alternatively, the application of the theory of constraints with its five focusing steps, which analyze the system in its totality, is more likely to provide a better solution to the cancellation problem. To find the constraint, as a first focusing step, we carried out a retrospective and descriptive study using a quantitative approach combined with the Pareto Principle to find the main causes of cancellations, followed by a qualitative approach to find the main and ultimate underlying cause which pointed to the bed crisis. The remaining four focusing steps provided workable and effective solutions to reduce the cancellation rate of elective surgery.

  20. Preoperative prealbumin level as a risk factor for surgical site infection following elective spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Salvetti

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results reinforce the relationship between preoperative nutritional status and outcomes in elective spine surgery. The data indicate that preoperative prealbumin levels may be useful in risk stratification. Further study is needed to determine whether nutritional supplementation may reduce the risk of infection.

  1. Elective surgery after successful endoscopic decompression of sigmoid volvulus may be considered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Helene Tarri; Qvist, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Volvulus is an axial twist of any part of the gastrointestinal tract along its mesentery. If it goes unattended, it will cause bowel obstruction and bowel ischaemia with gangrene and perforation. The primary treatment is endoscopic desufflation, but the place for elective surgery is controversial....... Volvulus is a rare condition in Western Europe and North America that most often affects elderly of either gender....

  2. Major reduction in 30-day mortality after elective colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For years, the outcome of colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery has been inferior in Denmark compared to its neighbouring countries. Several strategies have been initiated in Denmark to improve CRC prognosis. We studied whether there has been any effect on postoperative mortality based...... on the information from a national database. METHODS: Patients who underwent elective major surgery for CRC in the period 2001-2011 were identified in the national Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database. Thirty-day mortality rates were calculated and factors with impact on mortality were identified using logistic...... the study period. CONCLUSION: The 30-day mortality rate after elective major surgery for CRC has decreased significantly in Denmark in the past decade. Laparoscopic surgical approach was associated with a reduction in mortality in colon cancer....

  3. Association between day of the week of elective surgery and postoperative mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Luc; Vogt, Kelly; Vinden, Chris; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; McClure, J. Andrew; Roshanov, Pavel S.; Bell, Chaim M.; Garg, Amit X.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In prior studies, higher mortality was observed among patients who had elective surgery on a Friday rather than earlier in the week. We investigated whether mortality after elective surgery was associated with day of the week of surgery in a Canadian population and whether the association was influenced by surgeon experience and volume. METHODS: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study in the province of Ontario, Canada. We included adults who underwent 1 of 12 elective daytime surgical procedures from Apr. 1, 2002, to Dec. 31, 2012. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. We used generalized estimating equations to compare outcomes for surgeries performed on different days of the week, adjusting for patient and surgeon factors. RESULTS: A total of 402 899 procedures performed by 1691 surgeons met our inclusion criteria. The median length of hospital stay was 6 (interquartile range 5–8) days. Surgeon experience varied significantly by day of week (p < 0.001), with surgeons operating on Fridays having the least experience. Nearly all of the patients who had their procedure on a Friday had postoperative care on the weekend, as compared with 49.1% of those whose surgery was on a Monday (p < 0.001). We found no difference in the 30-day mortality between procedures performed on Fridays and those performed on Mondays (adjusted odds ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.21). INTERPRETATION: Although surgeon experience differed across days of the week, the risk of 30-day mortality after elective surgery was similar regardless of which day of the week the procedure took place. PMID:27754897

  4. A Simple Tool to Predict Development of Delirium After Elective Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Andy; Lee, David S H; An, Amber R; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-11-01

    To identify a quick clinical tool to assess the risk of delirium after elective surgery. Prospective observational study. Preoperative assessment clinic at the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System. Community-living veterans aged 65 and older scheduled for elective surgery requiring general or major anesthesia. Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) or Family Confusion Assessment Method (FAM-CAM). Data on education, medications, substance use, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Frailty, Mini-Cog, and Charlson-Deyo score were collected preoperatively. Of 114 veterans who agreed to participate, 76 completed the final delirium assessment. Ten of the 76 (13%) developed delirium in the 72 hours after surgery as assessed using the CAM or FAM-CAM. In bivariate analysis, factors that increased the odds of delirium at least three times were low education; poor PHQ-9, clock draw, word recall, Mini-Cog, and poor preoperative orientation scores; alcohol use; and higher comorbidities as measured using Charlson-Deyo index. Scoring the Mini-Cog from 0 to 5 had a higher predictive power (area under the receiving operating characteristic curve = 0.77) than other approaches to scoring the Mini-Cog. Other models did not significantly improve prediction of postoperative delirium risk and would be complicated to use in a clinical setting. In this sample of veterans who had elective surgery with major anesthesia, Mini-Cog score predicted likelihood of postoperative delirium. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Consciousness Disorders after Elective Surgery in Patients with Cerebrovascular Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Likhvantsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact of cerebral hypoxemia on the indicators of neuroinjury, by relying on the diagnosis of post- operative cognitive impairments, and the neuroinjury marker S100b protein and to examine the relationship of postoperative cognitive mpairments. Subjects and methods. Forty-eight non-cardiac surgical and non-neurosurgical patients with verified cerebrovascular disease, who had been operated on under total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and total myoplegia, were examined. Blood S100b protein levels were determined after cerebral hypoxemia detectable by transcranial oximetry. Postoperative delirium was diagnosed by the ICU-CAM test; postoperative cognitive dysfunction was diagnosed according to the Montreal cognitive assessment scale in the periods: 7 days, 1, 3, and 6 months, and 1 year, by using the control group, the Z scores of these indicators were standardized. Results. Cerebral desaturation led to early postoperative disorders, such as delirium and dysfunctions, in 72.7% of the cases. Cerebral saturation parameters correlated moderately, but significantly with neuropsychological indicators at 30 days of the study and 3 months after surgery and just stronger with S100b protein level. The risk of postoperative cognitive impairments in relation to the values of S100b protein was validly predicted in the models of logistic regression and ROC analysis. The rate of early and persistent cognitive dysfunction differed statistically significantly in patients with prior delirium; the logistic regression model validly predicted a relationship between this event and the neuropsychological indicators on 7 days postsurgery. Conclusion. In the patients with cerebrovascular diseases, cerebral hypoxemic episodes are dangerous. When they occur, there is an increased risk of postoperative cognitive impairments, including long-term problems. The above-threshold S100b protein concentration of 0.26 ng/mg is an early predictor of

  6. Measuring preoperative anxiety in patients undergoing elective surgery in Czech Republic

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    Pavlína Homzová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main aim of the study was to measure preoperative anxiety in patients in the Czech Republic before elective surgery, using the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety (VAS-A. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Methods: The sample consisted of 344 patients undergoing elective surgery. The day before surgery patients completed a questionnaire consisting of demographic data, the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS and the VAS-A. Spearman correlation was used to test correlation between the VAS-A and the subscales of the APAIS. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and the Kruskal-Walis test were used for group comparison. A p-value < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Female patients and patients without previous experience of surgery had a significantly higher VAS-A score. The anxiety score measured by the VAS-A positively correlated with APAIS-Anxiety (r = 0.71 and its subscales. The results also showed that the most common anxieties resulted from postoperative pain, anaesthesiological complications, postoperative nausea and vomiting, concerns about regaining consciousness after anaesthesia, surgical errors, and postponement of surgery. Conclusion: The findings of this study support the utility of the VAS-A as a measure of preoperative anxiety. The VAS-A quickly and simply assesses anxiety and may be useful for research as well as clinical purposes when researchers or clinicians have very limited time.

  7. Provision of a surgeon's performance data for people considering elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Henderson, Simon

    2015-02-09

    A consumer model of health supports that people undergoing elective surgery should be informed about the past operative performance of their surgeon before making two important decisions: 1. to consent to the proposed surgery, and 2. to have a particular doctor perform the surgery. This information arguably helps empower patients to participate in their care. While surgeons' performance data are available in some settings, there continues to be controversy over the provision of such data to patients, and the question of whether consumers should, or want to, be provided with this information. To assess the effects of providing a surgeon's performance data to people considering elective surgery on patient-based and service utilisation outcomes. For the original review, we searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2009, Issue 4); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1950 to 28 September 2009); EMBASE (Ovid) (1988 to 28 September 2009); PsycINFO (Ovid) (1806 to 28 September 2009); CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 to 20 October 2009); Current Contents (Ovid) (1992 to 23 November 2009); and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 20 October 2009).For this update, we searched: CENTRAL (2009 to 3 March 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); EMBASE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); PsycINFO (Ovid) (2009 to 9 March 2014); CINAHL (EBSCO) (2009 to 9 March 2014), Current Contents (Web of Science) (November 2009 to 21 March 2014), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 21 March 2014). We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, quasi-RCTs and controlled before and after studies (CBAs), in which an individual surgeon's performance data were provided to people considering elective surgery. We considered the CBAs for inclusion from 2009 onwards. Two review authors (AH, SH) independently assessed all titles, abstracts, or both of retrieved citations. We identified no studies for inclusion. Consequently, we

  8. Risk comparison of bleeding and ischemic perioperative complications after acute and elective orthopedic surgery in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Džupa, V; Waldauf, P; Moťovská, Z; Widimský, P; Ondráková, M; Bartoška, R; Ježek, M; Lena, T; Popelka, O; Krbec, M

    2016-07-01

    The study objective was to ascertain the incidence of bleeding and ischemic complications related to acute and planned orthopedic surgery in patients with known cardiovascular diseases. The study conducted between 2010 and 2013 enrolled 477 patients (289 women, 188 men) with a diagnosed cardiovascular disease or a history of thromboembolic event. Aside from gender, age, height and weight, the study observed other anamnestic data and perioperative laboratory test results that may impact on a bleeding or ischemic event. Two hundred seventy-two (57 %) patients had acute surgery, and 205 (43 %) patients had elective surgery. Complications arose in 55 (11.6 %) patients, 32 (6.9 %) had bleeding complications, 19 (4.0 %) ischemic complications, and both complications were experienced by 4 (0.8 %) patients. Bleeding developed in 14 (5.1 %) patients who had acute surgery, and in 22 (10.7 %) who had elective surgery. Twenty-two (8.1 %) patients having acute surgery and one (0.1 %) undergoing elective surgery suffered from ischemic complications. The incidence of bleeding complications was significantly higher in elective surgery (p = 0.026, OR 2.22), and when adjusted (general anaesthesia, gender, and use of warfarin), the difference was even higher (p = 0.015, OR 2.44), whereas the occurrence of ischemic complications was significantly higher in acute surgery (p = 0.005, OR 18.0), and when adjusted (age), the difference remained significant (p = 0.044, OR 8.3). The study noted a significantly higher incidence of bleeding complications in elective orthopedic surgery when compared with acute surgery. Conversely, the incidence of ischemic complications was significantly higher in patients having acute orthopedic surgery when compared with those operated on electively.

  9. The peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy in elective, non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Richard F; Naoum, Chris; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Hillis, Graham S; Brieger, David B

    2013-07-31

    Cardiovascular complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery, with adverse cardiac outcomes estimated to occur in approximately 4% of all patients. Anti-platelet therapy withdrawal may precede up to 10% of acute cardiovascular syndromes, with withdrawal in the peri-operative setting incompletely appraised. The aims of our study were to determine the proportion of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy, and identify current practice in peri-operative management. In addition, the relationship between management of anti-platelet therapy and peri-operative cardiac risk was assessed. We evaluated consecutive patients attending elective non-cardiac surgery at a major tertiary referral centre. Clinical and biochemical data were collected and analysed on patients currently prescribed anti-platelet therapy. Peri-operative management of anti-platelet therapy was compared with estimated peri-operative cardiac risk. Included were 2950 consecutive patients, with 516 (17%) prescribed anti-platelet therapy, primarily for ischaemic heart disease. Two hundred and eighty nine (56%) patients had all anti-platelet therapy ceased in the peri-operative period, including 49% of patients with ischaemic heart disease and 46% of patients with previous coronary stenting. Peri-operative cardiac risk score did not influence anti-platelet therapy management. Approximately 17% of patients undergoing elective non-cardiac surgery are prescribed anti-platelet therapy, the predominant indication being for ischaemic heart disease. Almost half of all patients with previous coronary stenting had no anti-platelet therapy during the peri-operative period. The decision to cease anti-platelet therapy, which occurred commonly, did not appear to be guided by peri-operative cardiac risk stratification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. Multicenter observational case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccalvieri, Doménico; Kreisler Moreno, Esther; Flor Lorente, Blas; Torres García, Antonio; Muñoz Calero, Alberto; Mateo Vallejo, Francisco; Biondo, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of Vicryl Plus(®) suture in reducing the rate of postoperative wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. A prospective case-control multicenter study with 480 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery was performed between 2006 and 2007. Patients were divided in 2 groups of equal sample size: group 1, closure of the abdominal wall using Vicryl Plus(®) and group 2 where PDS II(®) was used. The study involved 5 hospitals in the Spanish State. Wound infection was classified into superficial and deep. All patients diagnosed of wound infection during the hospital stay and up to 30 days after discharge were studied. For the statistical analysis Chi-square test and Fisher exact were used for bivariate analysis and logistic regression model for multivariate analysis. Wound infection rates were significantly lower in group 1: 14.6 vs. 29.2. Multivariate analysis showed that risk of wound infection was higher in patients with cancer, lung disease, anemia, operative time greater than 2 h, lack of second dose intra-operative prophylactic antibiotic and laparotomy closure with PDS suture II(®). The use of suture coated with triclosan can be an effective prophylactic tool in reducing wound infection rate in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute cholecystitis – early laparoskopic surgery versus antibiotic therapy and delayed elective cholecystectomy: ACDC-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büchler Markus W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute cholecystitis occurs frequently in the elderly and in patients with gall stones. Most cases of severe or recurrent cholecystitis eventually require surgery, usually laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the Western World. It is unclear whether an initial, conservative approach with antibiotic and symptomatic therapy followed by delayed elective surgery would result in better morbidity and outcome than immediate surgery. At present, treatment is generally determined by whether the patient first sees a surgeon or a gastroenterologist. We wish to investigate whether both approaches are equivalent. The primary endpoint is the morbidity until day 75 after inclusion into the study. Design A multicenter, prospective, randomized non-blinded study to compare treatment outcome, complications and 75-day morbidity in patients with acute cholecystitis randomized to laparoscopic cholecystectomy within 24 hours of symptom onset or antibiotic treatment with moxifloxacin and subsequent elective cholecystectomy. For consistency in both arms moxifloxacin, a fluorquinolone with broad spectrum of activity and high bile concentration is used as antibiotic. Duration: October 2006 – November 2008 Organisation/Responsibility The trial was planned and is being conducted and analysed by the Departments of Gastroenterology and General Surgery at the University Hospital of Heidelberg according to the ethical, regulatory and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and the Good Clinical Practice guideline (GCP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00447304

  12. Current practice of abdominal wall closure in elective surgery – Is there any consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwelski Karsten

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of incisional hernia after open abdominal surgery remains a major cause of post-operative morbidity. The aim of this study was to determine the current practice of surgeons in terms of access to and closure of the abdominal cavity in elective open surgery. Methods Twelve surgical departments of the INSECT-Trial group documented the following variables for 50 consecutive patients undergoing abdominal surgery: fascial closure techniques, applied suture materials, application of subcutaneous sutures, subcutaneous drains, methods for skin closure. Descriptive analysis was performed and consensus of treatment variables was categorized into four levels: Strong consensus >95%, consensus 75–95%, overall agreement 50–75%, no consensus Results 157 out of 599 patients were eligible for analysis (85 (54% midline, 54 (35% transverse incisions. After midline incisions the fascia was closed continuously in 55 patients (65%, using slowly absorbable (n = 47, 55%, braided (n = 32, 38% sutures with a strength of 1 (n = 48, 57%. In the transverse setting the fascia was closed continuously in 39 patients (72% with slowly absorbable (n = 22, 41% braided sutures (n = 27, 50% with a strength of 1 (n = 30, 56%. Conclusion In the present evaluation midline incision was the most frequently applied access in elective open abdominal surgery. None of the treatments for abdominal wall closure (except skin closure in the midline group is performed on a consensus level.

  13. Preoperative therapeutic programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery: A randomized controlled pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dronkers, J.J.; Lamberts, H.; Reutelingsperger, I.M.M.D.; Naber, R.H.; Dronkers-Landman, C.M.; Veldman, A.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Investigation of the feasibility and preliminary effect of a short-term intensive preoperative exercise programme for elderly patients scheduled for elective abdominal oncological surgery. Design: Single-blind randomized controlled pilot study. Setting: Ordinary hospital in the Netherland

  14. Same day admission for elective cardiac surgery: how to improve outcome with satisfaction and decrease expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvay, George; Goldberg, Andrew; Gutsche, Jacob T; T Augoustides, John G

    2016-06-01

    Admission on the day of surgery for elective cardiac and non-cardiac surgery has been established as a prevalent, critical practice. This approach realizes medical, logistical, psychological and fiscal benefits, and its success is predicated on an effective outpatient pre-operative evaluation. The establishment of a highly functional pre-operative clinic with a comprehensive set-up and efficient logistical pathways is invaluable. This notion has been expanded in recent years to include the entire peri-operative period and the concept of a 'peri-operative anesthesia/surgical home' is gaining popularity and support. Evaluating patients prior to admission for surgery, anesthesiologists can place themselves at the forefront of reducing unnecessary pre-operative hospital admissions, excess lab tests, unneeded consultations, and ultimately decrease the cancellations on the day of surgery. Furthermore, by taking a leadership role in the pre-operative clinic, anesthesiologists place themselves squarely at the forefront of the burgeoning movement for the peri-operative surgical home and continue to cement the indispensability of the anesthesiologist during the entire peri-operative course. The authors present this review as a follow-up describing the successful implementation of a pre-operative same-day cardiac surgery clinic and offer these experiences over the last 8 years as a guide to helping other anesthesiologists do the same.

  15. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF ORAL MIDAZOLAM, BUTORPHANOL AND CLONIDINE AS PREMEDICANTS IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING ELECTIVE SURGERY

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    Mukta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We compared the effects of oral midazolam, butorphanol and clonidine on preoperative sedation and anxiolysis and postoperative recovery profile of the children undergoing elective surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS : 105 children of either sex, aged between 2 - 6 years, of ASA grade I scheduled for elective surgery were randomized into three groups. Group I: 35 children received midazolam 0.5 mg/kg body weight orally, Group II: 35 children received butorphanol 0.2 mg/kg orally, Group III: 35 children received cloni dine 4 μ/kg orally. Premedication was given 30 minutes before induction of anaesthesia. Children were assessed for attitude to venepuncture and face mask acceptance during induction of anaesthesia. RESULTS: The groups were statistically comparable (p>0.05 , regarding the patients’ demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, duration of surgery and awakening. Less time was required for the onset and time of maximum sedation in midazolam group. Sedation scores were highest in the clonidine group at the time o f induction (p0.05 and minimal with butorphanol. Reaction to i.v cannulation was minimal with clonidine whi le it was comparable in midazolam and butorphanol group. CONCLUSION: clonidine causes the best sedation among the three drugs and it causes minimum response to i.v cannulation and comparable mask acceptance with midazolam followed by butorphanol.

  16. Gender-specific differences in chronic rhinosinusitis patients electing endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devyani; Rounds, Alexis B; Divekar, Rohit

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gender-specific differences in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients electing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). This study was a retrospective review of CRS patients electing ESS (2011-2013) at a tertiary-care center. ESS was elected by 272 patients (mean age 54.6 years; 48.5% female). Mean Lund-Mackay computed tomography (CT) score was 10.9; total 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) score was 41.8. Compared to men, women electing ESS had lower CT score (10.1 vs 11.7; p = 0.01) but higher total SNOT-22 score (44.9 vs 39; p = 0.02). Women reported significantly worse postnasal drainage (p embarrassment (p = 0.0021). SNOT-22 scores declined with advancing age (women, p = 0.003; men, p = 0.0005). Reduction in CT scores with age was seen only in males (p = 0.03). Stratifying by age, females aged 61 to 80 years had higher SNOT-22 scores compared to male counterparts (p = 0.04), whereas CT scores were similar. More women underwent surgery for CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) (54.9%) whereas more men underwent surgery for CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) (57.4%), but this difference missed statistical significance (p = 0.052). Women with CRSwNP had higher SNOT-22 scores than men (p = 0.02) for similar CT scores. Men electing ESS for CRSsNP had higher CT scores than women (p = 0.02). Women with CRSsNP aged 18 to 40 years reported higher SNOT-22 scores than men (p = 0.003), even though CT scores were lower (p = 0.005). Equivalent numbers of men and women underwent ESS for CRS. Overall, women electing ESS had higher total SNOT-22 scores and lower Lund-Mackay CT scores than men. Women reported more problems with postnasal drainage (CRS overall, CRSsNP, and CRSwNP), embarrassment (CRS overall and CRSwNP), and facial pain (CRSwNP). Gender differences in CRS are poorly understood and merit further study. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  17. Economic Effects of Anti-Depressant Usage on Elective Lumbar Fusion Surgery

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    Amirali Sayadipour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been suggested, although not proven, that presence of concomitant psychiatric disorders may increase the inpatient costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that elective lumbar fusion surgery is more costly in patients with under treatment for depression. Methods: This is a retrospective case-control study of 142 patients who underwent elective lumbar fusion. Of those 142 patients, 41 patients were chronically using an antidepressant medication that considered as a "study group", and 101 patients were not taking an antidepressant medication that considered as a "control group". Data was collected for this cohort regarding antidepressant usage patient demographics, length of stay (LOS, age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index scores and cost. Costs were compared between those with a concomitant antidepressant usage and those without antidepressant usage using multivariate analysis. Results: Patients using antidepressants and those with no history of antidepressant usage were similar in terms of gender, age and number of operative levels. The LOS demonstrated a non-significant trend towards longer stays in those using anti-depressants. Total charges, payments, variable costs and fixed costs were all higher in the antidepressant group but none of the differences reached statistical significance. Using Total Charges as the dependent variable, gender and having psychiatric comorbidities were retained independent variables. Use of an antidepressant was independently predictive of a 36% increase in Total Charges . Antidepressant usage as an independent variable also conferred a 22% increase in cost and predictive of a 19% increase in Fixed Cost . Male gender was predictive of a 30% increase in Total Charges . Conclusion: This study suggests use of antidepressant in patients who undergo elective spine fusion compared with control group is associated with increasing total cost and

  18. Role of the treating surgeon in the consent process for elective refractive surgery

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    Schallhorn SC

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Steven C Schallhorn,1–3 Stephen J Hannan,3 David Teenan,3 Julie M Schallhorn1 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, 2Roski Eye Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Optical Express, Glasgow, UK Purpose: To compare patient’s perception of consent quality, clinical and quality-of-life outcomes after laser vision correction (LVC and refractive lens exchange (RLE between patients who met their treating surgeon prior to the day of surgery (PDOS or on the day of surgery (DOS. Design: Retrospective, comparative case series. Setting: Optical Express, Glasgow, UK. Methods: Patients treated between October 2015 and June 2016 (3972 LVC and 979 RLE patients who attended 1-day and 1-month postoperative aftercare and answered a questionnaire were included in this study. All patients had a thorough preoperative discussion with an optometrist, watched a video consent, and were provided with written information. Patients then had a verbal discussion with their treating surgeon either PDOS or on the DOS, according to patient preference. Preoperative and 1-month postoperative visual acuity, refraction, preoperative, 1-day and 1-month postoperative questionnaire were compared between DOS and PDOS patients. Multivariate regression model was developed to find factors associated with patient’s perception of consent quality. Results: Preoperatively, 8.0% of LVC and 17.1% of RLE patients elected to meet their surgeon ahead of the surgery day. In the LVC group, 97.5% of DOS and 97.2% of PDOS patients indicated they were properly consented for surgery (P=0.77. In the RLE group, 97.0% of DOS and 97.0% of PDOS patients stated their consent process for surgery was adequate (P=0.98. There was no statistically significant difference between DOS and PDOS patients in most of the postoperative clinical or questionnaire outcomes. Factors predictive of patient’s satisfaction with consent quality

  19. Depression as an independent predictor of postoperative delirium in spine deformity patients undergoing elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Lydon, Emily; Sergesketter, Amanda; Kaakati, Rayan; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Depression is the most prevalent affective disorder in the US, and patients with spinal deformity are at increased risk. Postoperative delirium has been associated with inferior surgical outcomes, including morbidity and mortality. The relationship between depression and postoperative delirium in patients undergoing spine surgery is relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if depression is an independent risk factor for the development of postoperative delirium in patients undergoing decompression and fusion for deformity. METHODS The medical records of 923 adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) undergoing elective spine surgery at a single major academic institution from 2005 through 2015 were reviewed. Of these patients, 255 (27.6%) patients had been diagnosed with depression by a board-certified psychiatrist and constituted the Depression group; the remaining 668 patients constituted the No-Depression group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and intra- and postoperative complication rates were collected for each patient and compared between groups. The primary outcome investigated in this study was rate of postoperative delirium, according to DSM-V criteria, during initial hospital stay after surgery. The association between depression and postoperative delirium rate was assessed via multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Patient demographics and comorbidities other than depression were similar in the 2 groups. In the Depression group, 85.1% of the patients were taking an antidepressant prior to surgery. There were no significant between-group differences in intraoperative variables and rates of complications other than delirium. Postoperative complication rates were also similar between the cohorts, including rates of urinary tract infection, fever, deep and superficial surgical site infection, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, urinary retention, and proportion of patients transferred to the intensive care unit. In

  20. Comprehensive geriatric assessment can predict postoperative morbidity and mortality in elderly patients undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Il; Park, Kay-Hyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Han, Ho-Seong; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of elderly patients who undergo surgery has rapidly increased; however, clinical indicators predicting outcomes are limited. Our aim was to evaluate the significance of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in elderly patients undergoing elective surgery. We studied 141 consecutive elderly patients (age: 78.0±6.5 years old, male: 41.1%) who were referred to our geriatric department for surgical risk evaluation. CGA was performed to evaluate physical health, functional status, psychological health, and social support. The primary composite outcome of this study was in-hospital death or post-discharge institutionalization. In-hospital adverse events, such as delirium, pressure ulcers, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections, were also evaluated. The associations between CGA and in-hospital adverse events, in-hospital death, and post-discharge institutionalization were investigated. There were 32 adverse outcomes (6 in-hospital deaths and 26 post-discharge institutionalizations). Compared with the patients who were discharged to their homes, patients with adverse outcomes were characterized by poor nutritional status and prior strokes. However, there was no significant difference in surgical risk or anesthesia type. The CGA results showed that patients with adverse outcomes were associated with functional dependency and poor nutrition. The cumulative number of impairments in the CGA domain was significantly associated with adverse outcomes, in-hospital events, and prolonged hospital stays. In multiple logistic regression analysis, cumulative impairment in CGA was independently associated with surgical outcomes in elderly patients undergoing elective surgery. Preoperative CGA can identify elderly patients at greater risk for mortality, post-discharge institutionalization, adverse in-hospital events, and prolonged length of hospital stay.

  1. Effect of flunixin meglumine and firocoxib on ex vivo cyclooxygenase activity in horses undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Parkin, Tim D; Cullander, Rose M; Marshall, John F

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate ex vivo cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and compare in vitro and ex vivo COX-1 inhibition by flunixin meglumine and firocoxib in horses. 4 healthy horses for in vitro experiments and 12 healthy horses (6 males and 6 females; 5 Thoroughbreds, 5 Warmbloods, and 2 ponies) undergoing elective surgery for ex vivo experiments. 12 horses received flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, IV, q 12 h) or firocoxib (0.09 mg/kg, IV, q 24 h). Blood samples were collected before (baseline) and 2 and 24 hours after NSAID administration. Prostanoids (thromboxane B2, prostaglandin E2, and prostaglandin E metabolites) served as indicators of COX activity, and serum drug concentrations were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. An in vitro coagulation-induced thromboxane B2 assay was used to calculate drug concentration-COX-1 inhibition curves. Effect of time and treatment on COX activity was determined. Agreement between in vitro and ex vivo measurement of COX activity was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. At 2 and 24 hours after NSAID administration, COX-1 activity was reduced, compared with baseline activity, for the flunixin meglumine group only and relative COX-1 activity was significantly greater for the firocoxib group, compared with that for the flunixin meglumine group. There was no significant change in COX-2 activity after surgery for either group. Bland-Altman analysis revealed poor agreement between in vitro and ex vivo measurement of COX-1 activity. Compared with flunixin meglumine, firocoxib had COX-1-sparing effects ex vivo in equine patients that underwent elective surgery.

  2. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese to ... What are the endocrine-related benefits of bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery and the weight loss that results can: ...

  3. Influence of age on perioperative major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality risks in elective non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Wæde; Gislason, Gunnar H.; Jørgensen, Mads Emil;

    2016-01-01

    -cause mortality were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression models (adjusted for comorbidities, revised cardiac risk index, cardiovascular pharmacotherapy, body mass index, and surgery type). RESULTS: A total of 386,818 procedures on 302,459 patients were included; mean age was 54.8years (min-max 20......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Advanced age increases the risk of perioperative cardiovascular complications and may pose reluctance to subject elderly patients to surgery. We examined the impact of high age on perioperative major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and mortality in a nationwide cohort...... of patients undergoing elective surgery. METHODS: All Danish patients aged ≥20years undergoing non-cardiac, elective surgery in 2005-2011 were identified from nationwide administrative registers. Risks of 30-day MACE (non-fatal ischemic stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or cardiovascular death) and all...

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of intravenous acetaminophen in Japanese patients undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Tsuyoshi; Obara, Shinju; Mogami, Midori; Iseki, Yuzo; Hasegawa, Makiko; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) acetaminophen is administered during surgery for postoperative analgesia. However, little information is available on the pharmacokinetics of i.v. acetaminophen in Japanese patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and registered at UMIN-CTR (UMIN000013418). Patients scheduled to undergo elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled after obtaining written informed consent. During surgery, 1 g of i.v. acetaminophen was administered over 15, 60, or 120 min. Acetaminophen concentrations (15 or 16 samples per case) were measured at time points from 0-480 min after the start of administration (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry; limit of quantitation 0.1 μg/mL). The predictive performance of three published pharmacokinetic models was evaluated. Population pharmacokinetics were also analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effect model based on the NONMEM program. Data from 12 patients who underwent endoscopic or lower limb procedures were analyzed (male/female = 7/5, median age 55 years, weight 63 kg). Anesthesia was maintained with remifentanil and propofol or sevoflurane. The pharmacokinetic model of i.v. acetaminophen reported by Würthwein et al. worked well. Using 185 datapoints, the pharmacokinetics of i.v. acetaminophen were described by a two-compartment model with weight as a covariate but not age, sex, or creatinine clearance. The median prediction error and median absolute prediction error of the final model were -1 and 10%, respectively. A population pharmacokinetic model of i.v. acetaminophen in Japanese patients was constructed, with performance within acceptable ranges.

  5. Near-death experience in a boy undergoing uneventful elective surgery under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ursula; Forster, Alain; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Habre, Walid; Iselin-Chaves, Irène A

    2006-01-01

    Near-death experience (NDE) is a complex subjective experience, which may include affective elements such as a sense of peacefulness, paranormal components such as a sensation of floating out of the body, and a perception of being in a dark tunnel and seeing a brilliant light. It is usually reported to occur in association with a wide range of life-threatening situations, as for instance, cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We report on an episode of NDE that occurred in a 12-year-old boy who underwent a general anesthesia for an elective uncomplicated surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NDE in a child that has been reported in this context.

  6. Postoperative interleukin-6 level and early detection of complications after elective major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Thijs C. D.; Verwijmeren, Lisa; Dijkstra, Ineke M.; Boerma, Djamila; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M. W.; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association of systemic inflammation and outcome after major abdominal surgery. Background: Major abdominal surgery carries a high postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Studies suggest that inflammation is associated with unfavorable outcome. Methods: Levels of

  7. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyez, L; Biemans, I; Verkroost, M; van Swieten, H

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Corpus Christi Heart Project questionnaire concerning physical activity (PA). Based on this questionnaire, 1815 patients were classified as active and 1335 patients were classified as sedentary. The endpoints of the study were hospital mortality and early mortality. The study population had a mean age of 69.7 ± 10.1 (19-95) years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE risk of 5.1 ± 5.6 (0.88-73.8). Sedentary patients were significantly older (p = 0.001), obese (p = 0.001), had a higher EuroSCORE risk (p = 0.001), and a higher percentage of complications. Hospital mortality (1.1 % versus 0.4 % (p = 0.014)) and early mortality (1.5 % versus 0.6 % (p = 0.006)) were significantly higher in the sedentary group compared with the active group. However, a sedentary lifestyle was not identified as an independent predictor for hospital mortality (p = 0.61) or early mortality (p = 0.70). Sedentary patients were older, obese and had a higher EuroSCORE risk. They had significantly more postoperative complications, higher hospital mortality and early mortality. Despite these results, sedentary behaviour could not be identified as an independent predictor for hospital or early mortality.

  8. Hemodynamics, hemostasis and inflammation on the background of thromboprophylaxis with nadroparin calcium at elective abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Миколаївна Клигуненко

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Thombosis affects veins nearly in 3 times more often than arteries. In USA the one third of 150 000 - 200 000 VTE every year is connected with lethal conclusion after surgery [1].Aim of research was to study an impact of presurgical start of thromboprophylaxis with nadrapirin calcium on hemodynamics, hemostasis and inflammation at the elective abdominal surgeries.Matherials and methods. After informed consent 60 patients were prospectively separated into groups depending of preparation and regimen of thromboprophylaxis. The 1 group (n = 30 used UFH (5000 OD for 2 hours before surgery on 5000 OD 2 times during 7 days after it. The 2 group (n = 30 used nadroparin calcium(«Fraxiparin»9500 aXA IU(0,3 ml for 2 hours before surgery on 2500 IU 1 time a day during 7 days after surgery. Patients were united on sex, age, contaminant pathology, class АSA (1-2 and type of surgical procedure (laparoscopic, cholecystectomy, hernioplasty. There were studied the number of trombocitises, prothrombin time, international normalized ratio (INR, activated partial thromboplastic time (APTT, fibrinogen, Х-а factor activity, antithrombin 111, prothein C, soluble fibrin monomeric complexes (SFMC D-dimer before surgery and in 1 and 5 days after it.Results and discussion: Administration of nadroparin calcium for 2 hours before surgery prolongs the time of clot formation from the first to fifth day at the expense of inhibition of the external way of coagulation. The risk of thrombotic complications decreases at administration of nadraparin calcium for 2 hours because of normalization of the level of protein C. At the same time the lysis of fibrin clots was accelerated on the background of nadraparin calcium.At comparative characteristics we detected that an analysis of hemodynamic state at the standard thromboprophylaxis with UFH with output relatively normodynamic type of blood circulation that was formed by power-consuming, isometric, rhythm-depending mechanism was

  9. The Impact of Obesity on Perioperative Resource Utilization after Elective Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchard, Ryan F; Higgins, Dominique M; Mallory, Grant W; Puffer, Ross C; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Curry, Timothy B; Kor, Daryl J; Clarke, Michelle J

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the effect of obesity on the resource utilization and cost in 3270 consecutive patients undergoing elective noninstrumented decompressive surgeries for degenerative spine disease at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2005 and 2012. Methods Groups were assessed for baseline differences (age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] classification, procedure type, and number of operative levels). Outcome variables included the transfusion requirements during surgery, the total anesthesia and surgical times, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, standardized costs, as well as the ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Regression analysis was used to evaluate for strength of association between obesity and outcome variables. Results Baseline differences between the groups (nonobese: n = 1,853; obese: n = 1,417) were found with respect to age, ASA class, gender, procedure type, and number of operative levels. After correcting for differences, we found significant associations between obesity and surgical (p degenerative spine disease.

  10. Evaluating Compliance with Institutional Preoperative Testing Guidelines for Minimal-Risk Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunotai Siriussawakul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few investigations preoperatively are important for low-risk patients. This study was designed to determine the level of compliance with preoperative investigation guidelines for ASA I patients undergoing elective surgery. Secondary objectives included the following: to identify common inappropriate investigations, to evaluate the impact of abnormal testing on patient management, to determine factors affecting noncompliant tests, and to estimate unnecessary expenditure. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on adult patients over a one-year period. The institute’s guidelines recommend tests according to the patients’ age groups: a complete blood count (CBC for those patients aged 18–45; CBC, chest radiograph (CXR and electrocardiography (ECG for those aged 46–60; and CBC, CXR, ECG, electrolytes, blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, and creatinine (Cr for patients aged 61–65. Results. The medical records of 1,496 patients were reviewed. Compliant testing was found in only 12.1% (95% CI, 10.5–13.9. BUN and Cr testings were the most frequently overprescribed tests. Overinvestigations tended to be performed on major surgery and younger patients. Overall, overinvestigation incurred an estimated cost of US 200,000 dollars during the study period. Conclusions. The need to utilize the institution’s preoperative guidelines should be emphasized in order to decrease unnecessary testing and the consequential financial burden.

  11. Perioperative Management of Patients with Diabetes and Hyperglycemia Undergoing Elective Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bithika M; Stearns, Joshua D; Apsey, Heidi A; Schlinkert, Richard T; Cook, Curtiss B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperglycemia are associated with increased surgical morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycemia is a determinant of risk of surgical complications and should be addressed across the continuum of surgical care. While data support the need to address hyperglycemia in patients with DM in the ambulatory setting prior to surgery and in the inpatient setting, data are less certain about hyperglycemia occurring during the perioperative period-that part of the process occurring on the day of surgery itself. The definition of "perioperative" varies in the literature. This paper proposes a standardized definition for the perioperative period as spanning the time of patient admission to the preoperative area through discharge from the recovery area. Available information about the impact of perioperative hyperglycemia on surgical outcomes within the framework of that definition is summarized, and the authors' approach to standardizing perioperative care for patients with DM is outlined, including the special case of patients receiving insulin pump therapy. The discussion is limited to adult ambulatory non-obstetric patients undergoing elective surgical procedures under general anesthesia.

  12. Usability of elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid volvulus: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masami; Onishi, Tadashi; Hata, Taishi; Nishida, Kentaro; Yanagawa, Takehiro; Fujita, Shoichiro; Fujita, Junya; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Tono, Takeshi; Monden, Takushi; Imaoka, Shingi; Mori, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    A therapeutic guideline for sigmoid volvulus (SV) has not been established, and the most recommended surgical procedure for SV has not been determined. Our objective is to assess the usability of elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy and the feasibility of single-incision laparoscopic surgery for SV following endoscopic reduction. SV typically affects the elderly and accounts for 1% to 7% of intestinal obstructions in Western countries. We report on 3 patients with SV who underwent elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy following endoscopic reduction, and we first describe single-port surgery for SV. We discuss the 3 patients (a 79-year-old male, an 88-year-old female, and a 67-year-old female) with SV who underwent elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy following endoscopic reduction. All 3 patients underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, and 2 patients underwent single-port laparoscopic surgery without complications. Recurrence of volvulus was not seen during the course of 12 to 24 months. In experienced hands, elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy after colonoscopic detorsion is a valuable alternative, and single-port surgery is also feasible.

  13. Effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadburn, Andrew J; Garman, Elizabeth; Abbas, Raad; Modupe, Anu; Ford, Clare; Thomas, Osmond L; Chugh, Sanjiv; Deshpande, Shreeram; Gama, Rousseau

    2017-01-01

    Background In acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia, plasma glucose cannot reliably distinguish between stress hyperglycaemia and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. We, therefore, investigated the diagnostic reliability of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in acute illness by prospectively evaluating the effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c. Methods HbA1c and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were compared before and two days after elective knee or hip surgery in 30 patients without diabetes. C-reactive protein was used to assess the systemic inflammatory response. Results The mean (standard deviation) serum C-reactive protein increased following surgery (4.8 [7.5] vs. 179.7 [61.9] mg/L; P<0.0001). HbA1c was similar before and after surgery (39.2 [5.4] vs. 38.1 [5.1] mmol/moL, respectively; P = 0.4363). Conclusions HbA1c is unaffected within two days of a systemic inflammatory response as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery. This suggests that HbA1c may be able to differentiate newly presenting type 2 diabetes mellitus from stress hyperglycaemia in acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia.

  14. Tramadol-Paracetamol Combination for Postoperative Pain Relief in Elective Single-level Microdisectomy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogar, Samie A; Khan, Fauzia A

    2017-04-01

    The tramadol and paracetamol combination is used frequently for postoperative pain management. The literature on the use of this combination for vertebral surgery is limited. Our objective was to compare a combination of paracetamol 1 g and a lower dose of tramadol (1 mg/kg: group 1T) with a combination of paracetamol 1 g and a higher dose of tramadol (1.5 mg/kg: group 1.5T) for postoperative pain after microdisectomy surgery. Our main outcome measure was Visual Analogue Scale pain scores for 4 hours postoperatively. This prospective randomized triple-blind clinical trial was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Ninety-four patients aged between 18 and 50 years scheduled for elective single-level microdisectomy were allocated randomly into 1 of 2 groups. Twenty minutes before the end of the surgery, patients received the study drugs. There was no significant demographic difference between groups. None of the patients experienced severe pain (VAS>6). There was no significant difference in the mean pain score between groups. The mean score at 4 hours was 2.17 (1.38) in group 1.5T and 1.74 (1.37) in group 1T. The difference was not statistically significant (P=0.14). In group 1.5T, 13 patients reported having nausea and vomiting compared with 2 patients in group 1T. This was a statistically significant difference (P=0.004). The sedation score was similar between groups. The combination of low-dose tramadol (1 mg/kg) and paracetamol has comparable analgesia and a decreased incidence of nausea and vomiting compared with the higher dose of tramadol (1.5 mg/kg) and paracetamol combination.

  15. Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Elective Open Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Ishikawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of this study was to clarify the incidence and risk factors for incisional surgical site infections (SSI in patients undergoing elective open surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods. We conducted prospective surveillance of incisional SSI after elective colorectal resections performed by a single surgeon for a 1-year period. Variables associated with infection, as identified in the literature, were collected and statistically analyzed for their association with incisional SSI development. Results. A total of 224 patients were identified for evaluation. The mean patient age was 67 years, and 120 (55% were male. Thirty-three (14.7% patients were diagnosed with incisional SSI. Multivariate analysis suggested that incisional SSI was independently associated with TNM stages III and IV (odds ratio [OR], 2.4 and intraoperative hypotension (OR, 3.4. Conclusions. The incidence of incisional SSI in our cohort was well within values generally reported in the literature. Our data suggest the importance of the maintenance of intraoperative normotension to reduce the development of incisional SSI.

  16. Prevalence of Internet use amongst an elective spinal surgery outpatient population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baker, Joseph F

    2010-10-01

    Nationally 62% of individuals in Ireland have internet access. Previous published work has suggested that internet use is higher among those with low back pain. We aimed to determine the levels of internet access and use amongst an elective spinal outpatient population and determine what characteristics influence these. We distributed a self-designed questionnaire to patients attending elective spinal outpatient clinics. Data including demographics, history of surgery, number of visits, level of satisfaction with previous consultations, access to the internet, possession of health insurance, and details regarding use of the internet to research one\\'s spinal complaint were collected. 213 patients completed the questionnaire. 159 (75%) had access to the internet. Of this group 48 (23%) used the internet to research their spinal condition. Increasing age, higher education level, and possession of health insurance were all significantly associated with access to the internet (p < 0.05). A higher education level predicted greater internet use while possession of insurance weakly predicted non-use (p < 0.05). In our practice, internet access is consistent with national statistics and use is comparable to previous reports. Approximately, one quarter of outpatients will use the internet to research their spinal condition. Should we use this medium to disseminate information we need to be aware some groups may not have access.

  17. Prevalence of Internet use amongst an elective spinal surgery outpatient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Kiely, Paul D; Green, James; Mulhall, Kevin J; Synnott, Keith A; Poynton, Ashley R

    2010-10-01

    Nationally 62% of individuals in Ireland have internet access. Previous published work has suggested that internet use is higher among those with low back pain. We aimed to determine the levels of internet access and use amongst an elective spinal outpatient population and determine what characteristics influence these. We distributed a self-designed questionnaire to patients attending elective spinal outpatient clinics. Data including demographics, history of surgery, number of visits, level of satisfaction with previous consultations, access to the internet, possession of health insurance, and details regarding use of the internet to research one's spinal complaint were collected. 213 patients completed the questionnaire. 159 (75%) had access to the internet. Of this group 48 (23%) used the internet to research their spinal condition. Increasing age, higher education level, and possession of health insurance were all significantly associated with access to the internet (p internet use while possession of insurance weakly predicted non-use (p internet access is consistent with national statistics and use is comparable to previous reports. Approximately, one quarter of outpatients will use the internet to research their spinal condition. Should we use this medium to disseminate information we need to be aware some groups may not have access.

  18. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fax/Phone Home » Thyroid Surgery Leer en Español Thyroid Surgery GENERAL INFORMATION Your doctor may recommend that ... made in conjunction with your endocrinologist and surgeon. Thyroid Surgery FAQs QUESTIONS AND CONSIDERATIONS When thyroid surgery ...

  19. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A A ... forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word "plastic" ...

  20. Acute normovolemic hemodilution is not beneficial in patients undergoing primary elective valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virmani Sanjula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH as a sole method of reducing allogenic blood requirement in patients undergoing primary elective valve surgery. One hundred eighty eight patients undergoing primary elective valve surgery were prospectively randomized into two groups: Group I (n=100 acted as control and in Group II (n=88 autologous blood was removed (10% of estimated blood volume in patients with hemoglobin (Hb > 12g% and 7% when the Hb was < 12g% in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB period for subsequent re-transfusion after protamine administration. The autologous blood withdrawn was replaced simultaneously with an equal volume of hydroxyl-ethyl starch solution. Banked blood was transfused in both the groups when Hb was ≤6g % on CPB and ≤8g% after CPB. Platelets were transfused when the count fell to < 100´10 9 /L and fresh frozen plasma (FFP was transfused whenever there was diffuse bleeding with laboratory evidence of coagulopathy. The two groups were comparable as regards demographic data, type of surgical procedures performed, duration of CPB and ischemia, duration of elective ventilation and re-exploration for excessive bleeding. The autologous blood withdrawn in patients with Hb≥12g% was 288.3±69.4 mL and 244.4±41.3 mL with Hb < 12g% (P=NS. The Hb concentration (g % was comparable pre-operatively (Group I= 12.1±1.6, Group II= 12.4±1.4, on postoperative day 1 (Group I =10.3±1.1, Group II= 10.6±1.2 and day 7 (Group I = 10.9±1.5, Group II=10.4±1.5. However, the lowest Hb recorded on CPB was significantly lower in Group II (Group I =7.7±1.2, Group II=6.7±0.9, P < 0.05. There was no difference in the chest tube drainage (Group I =747.2±276.5 mL, Group II=527.6±399.5 mL, blood transfusion (Group I=1.1±1.0 units vs. Group II=1.3±1.0 units intra-operatively and Group I=1.7±1.2 units vs. Group II=1.7±1.4 units post-operatively and FFP transfusion (Group I

  1. Past history of skin infection and risk of surgical site infection after elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraday, Nauder; Rock, Peter; Lin, Elaina E; Perl, Trish M; Carroll, Karen; Stierer, Tracey; Robarts, Polly; McFillin, Angela; Ross, Tracy; Shah, Ashish S; Riley, Lee H; Tamargo, Rafael J; Black, James H; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Guallar, Eliseo

    2013-01-01

    To identify baseline patient characteristics associated with increased susceptibility to surgical site infection (SSI) after elective surgery. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services considers SSI to be preventable through adherence to current infection control practices; however, the etiology of wound infection is incompletely understood. Prospective cohort study involving patients undergoing cardiac, vascular, craniotomy, and spinal surgery at 2 academic medical centers in Baltimore, MD. A comprehensive medical history was obtained at baseline, and participants were followed for 6 months using active inpatient and outpatient surveillance for deep SSI and infectious death. Infection control best practices were monitored perioperatively. The relative risk of SSI/infectious death was determined comparing those with versus those without a past medical history of skin infection using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 613 patients (mean [SD] = 62.3 [11.5] years; 42.1% women), 22.0% reported a history of skin infection. The cumulative incidence of deep SSI/infectious death was 6.7% versus 3.1% for those with and without a history of skin infection, respectively (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.98-5.14; P = 0.055). Risk estimates increased after adjustments for demographic and socioeconomic variables (HR = 2.82; 95% CI, 1.18-6.74; P = 0.019) and after propensity score adjustment for all potential confounders (HR = 3.41; 95% CI, 1.36-8.59; P = 0.009). Adjustments for intraoperative infection risk factors and adherence to infection control best practice metrics had no impact on risk estimates. A history of skin infection identified a state of enhanced susceptibility to SSI at baseline that is independent of traditional SSI risk factors and adherence to current infection control practices.

  2. What are the Risk Factors for Cerebrovascular Accidents After Elective Orthopaedic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Shobhit V; Goyal, Preeya; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-03-01

    Perioperative cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are one of the leading causes of patient morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. However, little is known regarding the rates of these events and risk factors for CVA after elective orthopaedic surgery. Our goals were to (1) establish the national, baseline proportion of patients experiencing a 30-day CVA and the timing of CVA; and (2) determine independent risk factors for 30-day CVA rates after common elective orthopaedic procedures. Patients undergoing elective TKA, THA, posterior or posterolateral lumbar fusion, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, and total shoulder arthroplasty, from 2006 to 2012, were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program(®) database. A total of 42,150 patients met inclusion criteria. Thirty-day CVA rates were recorded for each procedure, and patients were assessed for characteristics associated with CVA through univariate analysis. Multivariate regression models were created to identify independent risk factors for CVA. A total of 55 (0.13%) patients experienced a CVA within 30 days of the procedure, occurring a median of 2 days after surgery (range, 1-30 days) with 0.08% of patients experiencing a CVA after TKA, 0.15% after THA, 0.00% after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, 0.38% after multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusions, 0.20% after single-level posterior or posterolateral lumbar fusion, 0.70% after multilevel posterior or posterolateral lumbar fusion, and 0.22% after total shoulder arthroplasty. Independent risk factors for CVA included age of 75 years or older (odds ratio [OR], 2.50; 95% CI, 1.44-4.35; p = 0.001), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (OR, 3.08; CI, 1.47-6.45; p = 0.003), hypertension (OR, 2.71; CI, 1.19-6.13; p = 0.017), history of transient ischemic attack (OR, 2.83; CI, 1.24-6.45; p = 0.013), dyspnea (OR, 2.51; CI, 1.30-4.86; p = 0.006), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  3. Up-to-date thromboprophylaxis in elective spinal surgery. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE present a high incidence after surgery, posing a high risk in surgical practice. Although a consensus does exist on thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery, this topic remains controversial in regard to spinal surgery. In this current paper, we review and discuss the different forms of prophyilaxis presented in literature, in order to develop guidelines on prophylactic measures in spinal surgery, improving patient´s outcomes and reducing any medical/legal problems that could arise from a thrombotic complication.

  4. STUDY OF ORAL MIDAZOLAM AS A PREANAESTHTIC MEDICATION FOR ELECTIVE SURGERY IN PAEDIATRIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Pre anaesthetic medication is a real challenge specially in cases of paediatric age group. A good quality oral preanaesthetic must fulfill criteria like easily application, rapid absorption, short duration of action and have minimal side effect. Present study carried out with objective of evaluation of oral Midazolam as a pre-anaesthetic in elective surgical cases in paediatric age group. METHODS: Paediatric cases for elective surgery were included for receiving oral midazolam (0.5/kg pre anaesthetic medication in prospective observational study. Total 50 cases from age group (01-10 yrs, weight (13-23kg, ASA grading I & II, normo-tensive patients were selected. Evaluation of drug was assessed with a scale from 1-4 which includes sedation, separation from parent, and child behaviour at induction. Data analyzed with percentage and mean standard deviation of the scale score. RESULTS: Sedation score mean after pre medication was 2.76+ 0.58. Child behaviour at the time of separation from parents score mean was 2.96+ 0.44. Mean score of behaviour of child during induction was 2.80+0.49. 70% of the cases achieved sedation, 86 % of the cases achieved separation from parents while 76% of the cases had more than 2 score of child behaviour at the time of induction. CONCLUSION: Oral midazolam as a preanaesthetic medication in children allay the anxiety & facilitate separation of children from their parents when they enter surgical unit. These can be overcome by lower degree of sedation in our study.

  5. Monitoring respiration and oxygen saturation in patients during the first night after elective bariatric surgery: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerts, Liselott; Forsberg, Sune; Bouvier, Frederic; Jakobsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea and obese hypoventilation is not uncommon in patients with obesity. Residuals effect from surgery/anaesthesia and opioid analgesics may worsen respiration during the first nights after bariatric surgery. The aim of this observational study was to monitor respiration on the first postoperative night following elective bariatric surgery. Methods: This observational study aimed to determine the incidence and severity of hypo/apnoea in low risk obsess patients undergoing elective bariatric surgery in general anesthaesia. Patients with known or suspected sleep respiratory disturbances was not included. ESS was scored prior to surgery. Oxygen desaturation was analyzed by continuous respiratory monitoring. Mean oxygen saturation (SpO2), nadir SPo2, apnoea/hypopnea index and oxygen desaturation index was assess by standard tools. Results: 45 patients were monitored with portable polygraphy equipment (Embletta, ResMed) during the first postoperative night at the general ward following elective laparoscopic bariatric surgery. The prop ESS was 0-5 in 22, 6-10 in 14 and 11-16 in 6 of the patients studied (missing data 3). Mean SpO2 was 93%; 10 patients had a mean SpO2 of less than 92% and 4 of less than 90%. The lowest mean SpO2 was 87%. There were 16 patients with a nadir SpO2 of less than 85%, lowest nadir SpO2 being 63%. An Apnoea Hypo/apnoea Index (AHI) > 5 was found in 2 patients only (AHI 10 and 6), and an Oxygen Desaturation index (ODI) > 5 was found in 3 patients (24, 10 and 6, respectively). 3 patients had more prolonged (> 30 seconds) apnoea with nadir SpO2 81%, 83% and 86%. ESS score and type of surgery did not impact on respiration/oxygenation during the observation period. Conclusions: A low mean SpO2 and episodes of desaturation were not uncommon during the first postoperative night following elective bariatric surgery in patients without history of night time breathing disturbance. AHI and/or ODI of more than 5 were only

  6. Differential changes in free and total insulin-like growth factor I after major, elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Ørskov, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Major surgery is accompanied by extensive proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). Proteolysis of IGFBP-3 is generally believed to increase IGF bioavailability due to a diminished affinity of the IGFBP-3 fragments for IGFs. We have investigated 18 patients...... undergoing elective ileo-anal J-pouch surgery. Patients were randomized to treatment with GH (12 IU/day; n = 9) or placebo (n = 9) from 2 days before to 7 days after operation. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were measured by ultrafiltration of serum, and IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity was determined by a [125I...

  7. Penetration of prulifloxacin into sinus mucosa of patients undergoing paranasal sinus elective endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Benedetto, Michele; Passali, Desiderio; Tomacelli, Giovanni; Ruggieri, Alessandro; Rosignoli, Maria Teresa; Picollo, Rossella; Bellussi, Luisa; Dionisio, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the concentration of ulifloxacin, the active metabolite of prulifloxacin, in sinuses mucosa and plasma of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, requiring sinus elective endoscopic surgery. Thirty-nine patients (30 males, 9 females; age range 22-77 years) with chronic sinusitis were enrolled, 35 were treated with the investigational medication. Samples from four untreated patients were used to validate the analytical method, while four treated patients dropped out before surgery. One 600 mg prulifloxacin tablet once daily was administered for 5 days before surgery. The last dosing was scheduled from 2 to 12 hours from tissue and plasma sampling. In each patient, two samples of paranasal sinus mucosa (from ethmoid and turbinate, respectively) and one blood sample were collected. Concentrations of ulifloxacin in plasma and sinuses mucosa were measured using validated bioanalytical LC/MS/MS methods. Individual and mean ulifloxacin concentrations in tissues were always higher than the relevant plasma levels. The highest concentrations were observed between 2.5 and 4.5 hours after the last dosing in all districts. The mean tissue/plasma ratios were 2.5 and 3.0 for ethmoid and turbinate, respectively. Data expressed as Area Under the Curves (AUC±SD) showed that ulifloxacin concentrations in the ethmoid were slightly higher (18.68±6.48 μg/g*h) than in turbinate (15.00±2.89 μg/g*h), and definitely higher than in plasma (6.32±1.14 μg/ml*h). The AUC ratios between tissues and plasma were 3.0 for ethmoides and 2.4 for turbinates. One patient reported two treatment-related episodes of diarrhea, which spontaneously resolved after the drug suspension. Results from this study seem to suggest that prulifloxacin showed good distribution in sinus tissues, where it reaches concentrations significantly higher than in plasma. These findings strongly call for confirmatory clinical trials in patients with bacterial rhinosinusitis.

  8. The market for elective surgery: joint estimation of supply and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephen; Rice, Nigel; Jacobs, Rowena; Smith, Peter

    2007-03-01

    This paper develops models of the demand for and supply of elective (non-emergency) surgery using a panel of quarterly data for 200 English hospitals over the period 1995-2002. Unusually, distinct measures of supply (outpatients seen and inpatient admissions) and demand (outpatient referrals and decisions to admit) are available for each observation. These offer the opportunity to estimate separate empirical models of supply and demand using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression methods. However, the strong correlation between the residuals of these models suggests some merit in the deployment of seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) methods. Although both static and dynamic SUR estimations leave the results largely qualitatively unchanged, SUR estimation can have a considerable quantitative effect relative to the OLS results. For example, SUR estimation generates a lower elasticity of inpatient demand with respect to waiting time than that obtained via OLS. The results offer an important justification for more careful econometric modelling of hospital behaviour than has traditionally been employed in the health economics literature.

  9. Effect of sugammadex versus neostigmine/atropine combination on postoperative cognitive dysfunction after elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistaki, C; Riga, M; Zafeiropoulou, F; Lyrakos, G; Kostopanagiotou, G; Matsota, P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of sugammadex and neostigmine/atropine on postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in adult patients after elective surgery. A randomised, double-blind controlled trial was carried out on 160 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to III patients who were >40 years. The Mini-Mental State Evaluation, clock-drawing test and the Isaacs Set test were used to assess cognitive function at three timepoints: 1) preoperatively, 2) one hour postoperatively, and 3) at discharge. The anaesthetic protocol was the same for all patients, except for the neuromuscular block reversal, which was administered by random allocation using either sugammadex or neostigmine/atropine after the reappearance of T2 in the train-of-four sequence. POCD was defined as a decline ≥1 standard deviation in ≥2 cognitive tests. The incidence of POCD was similar in both groups at one hour postoperatively and at discharge (28% and 10%, in the neostigmine group, 23% and 5.4% in the sugammadex group, P=0.55 and 0.27 respectively). In relation to individual tests, a significant decline of clock-drawing test in the neostigmine group was observed at one hour postoperatively and at discharge. For the Isaacs Set test, a greater decline was found in the sugammadex group. These findings suggest that there are no clinically important differences in the incidence of POCD after neostigmine or sugammadex administration.

  10. Evaluation of peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Maria Souza Santos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral muscle strength has been little explored in the literature in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the peripheral muscle strength of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods: This was a longitudinal observational study. The peripheral muscle strength was measured using isometric dynamometry lower limb (knee extensors and flexors at three different times: preoperatively (M1, the day of discharge (M2 and hospital discharge (M3. Participants received physiotherapy pre and postoperatively during the days of hospitalization during the morning and afternoon. Results: Twenty-two patients were evaluated. The values of peripheral muscle strength of knee extensors preoperative found were about 50% lower than those predicted for the healthy population. When comparing muscle strength prior (M1, with the remaining evaluation, found himself in a fall of 29% for the movement of knee extension and 25% for knee flexion in M2 and a decrease of 10% movement for knee extension and 13% for knee flexion in M3 when comparing with M1. Conclusion: The values of peripheral muscle strength prior of the study patients were lower than predicted for the healthy population of the same age. After the surgical event this reduction is even more remarkable, being reestablished until the time of discharge, to values close to baseline.

  11. The LMACTrach, a Aew Approach for Endotracheal Intubation: Apilot Study in 100 Patients Undergoing Elective Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiollah Hassani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgroundand endotracheal intubation under direct vision in both anticipated and unexpecteddifficult intubation situations.: The LMA CTrach system is a new device for airway managementMethodsdifferent types of elective surgeries. After randomly selecting the patients for intubationwith this new device, the airway characteristics, height,weight, dental overbiteand thyromental distance were all evaluated before induction.Our goal was to exploreprimarily the success rate of intubation with LMACTrach.:We used this system in 100 patients undergoing general anesthesia forResultsall 100 patients. Nonetheless,successful tracheal intubation was performed in 95 patients.Among our patients,2 had Mallampati grade IV airways with short necks,body mass index(BMI > 30, and without the capability to bite their upper lips.Amazingly both patients were intubated with this method,proving a device as an assuringapproach in cases of difficulty with ventilation and intubation. Of all patients,44 were females and 56 males.The mean age was 34 ± 2 years. BMI measured for allpatients was 20-25 except for two cases who had BMI > 30.: We were able to insert LMA CTrach and provide optimal ventilation inConclusionand vocal cords during intubation even in difficult cases,it can be assumed that thisdevice is a precious aid as equal as fiberoptic bronchoscopy for the anesthesiologists.:Since the LMA CTrach provided us with direct view of the larynx

  12. Postoperative interleukin-6 level and early detection of complications after elective major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Thijs C. D.; Verwijmeren, Lisa; Dijkstra, Ineke M.; Boerma, Djamila; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M. W.; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association of systemic inflammation and outcome after major abdominal surgery. Background: Major abdominal surgery carries a high postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Studies suggest that inflammation is associated with unfavorable outcome. Methods: Levels of C-react

  13. Postoperative interleukin-6 level and early detection of complications after elective major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Thijs C. D.; Verwijmeren, Lisa; Dijkstra, Ineke M.; Boerma, Djamila; Van De Garde, Ewoudt M. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841528; Noordzij, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the association of systemic inflammation and outcome after major abdominal surgery. Background: Major abdominal surgery carries a high postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Studies suggest that inflammation is associated with unfavorable outcome. Methods: Levels of C-react

  14. The effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in reduction of postoperative respiratory tract infections after elective thoracic surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasja Jul

    2016-01-01

    to increase patients' risk for nosocomial respiratory tract infection. OBJECTIVES: To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in the reduction of postoperative respiratory airway infections in adult patients undergoing...... elective thoracic surgery. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients over the age of 18 years who had been admitted for elective thoracic surgery, regardless of gender, ethnicity, diagnosis severity, co-morbidity or previous treatment.Perioperative systematic oral hygiene (such as mechanical removal of dental biofilm......% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.78) for respiratory tract infections RR 0.48 (95%CI: 0.36-0.65) and for deep surgical site infections RR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic perioperative oral hygiene reduces postoperative nosocomial, lower respiratory tract infections and surgical site infections...

  15. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surgeries become linked to other medical procedures with perceived greater medical necessity, health and aesthetics become entangled. One consequence is that medical needs are magnified while perceptions of the risks of surgery are minimized. Drawing on ethnographic work on plastic surgery, as well as other studies of obstetrics and cosmetic surgery, I illustrate this entanglement of health and aesthetics within the field of women's reproductive health care in Brazil. I argue that while it would be difficult to wholly disentangle aesthetics and health, analysis of how risk-benefit calculations are made in clinical practice offers a useful critical strategy for illuminating ethical problems posed by aesthetic medicine.

  16. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  17. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  18. Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Surgery Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: Elena M ... how they work. What to expect with cataract surgery Before surgery: Your ophthalmologist will measure your eye ...

  19. Risk factors of post-operative delirium after elective vascular surgery in the elderly: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raats, J W; Steunenberg, S L; de Lange, D C; van der Laan, L

    2016-11-01

    Postoperative delirium is a common and serious adverse event in the elderly patient and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is of great importance to identify patients at risk for delirium, in order to focus preventive strategies. The aim of this article is to systematically review current available literature on pre-operative risk factors for delirium after vascular surgery. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE, using the MeSH terms and key words "delirium", "surgery" and "risk factor". Studies were retained for review after meeting strict inclusion criteria that included only prospective studies evaluating risk factors for delirium in patients who had elective vascular surgery. Diagnosis of delirium needed to be confirmed using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) or ICD-10. Fifteen articles were selected for inclusion, incidence of delirium across the studies ranged from 5% to 39%. Many factors have been associated with increased risk of delirium, including age, cognitive impairment, comorbidity, depression, smoking, alcohol, visual and hearing impairment, ASA-score, biochemical abnormalities, operative strategies and blood loss. Delirium is a common complication after elective vascular surgery in elderly. The highest delirium incidence was observed after open aortic surgery as well as after surgery for critical limb ischemia. A picture starts to form of which predisposing factors lead to increased risk of delirium. The leading risk factors consistently identified in this systematic review were advanced age and cognitive impairment. Multi-disciplinary specialist-led interventions in the preoperative phase could decrease incidence and severity of delirium and should be focused on identified high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth > For Parents > Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  1. Comparison of Tramadol and Pethidine for Postanesthetic Shivering in Elective Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zahedi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative shivering is a common event of unknown etiology with an incidence of 5-65%. This study intended to compare the efficacy of tramadol with that of pethidine in controlling postanesthetic shivering. Methods: This double-blind clinical trial was performed on 300 consecutive patients underwent general anesthesia for elective cataract surgery. Intravenous tramadol 1 mg/kg or pethidine 0.5 mg/kg was administered for alternate subjects who developed postanesthetic shivering. They were monitored in the recovery room for 1 hour and the cessation time of shivering, recurrence of the event, duration of recovery, respiratory depression, nausea, vomiting, and arterial O2 saturation were recorded. Results: One hundred and twenty patients (40% had postanesthetic shivering. In the tramadol group, shivering terminated within 8 minutes after injection (mean 5 min. They had not recurrence of shivering, respiratory depression, reduction in SpO2 and nausea or vomiting during recovery. In the pethidine group, shivering terminated within 13 minutes (mean 9 min after injection, but in 10 patients it recurred after 30 minutes. In this group 28 patients had respiratory depression, reduction in SpO2, nausea and vomiting but none of them needed any medication. Conclusion: Tramadol is superior to pethidine as it induced a faster termination of postanesthetic shivering and did not entail adverse effects on the respiratory system and SpO2, recurrence of shivering or nausea and vomiting. Easy availability and minimum monitoring requirements are other advantages of tramadol. Keywords: Postoperative Shivering, General Anesthesia, Postoperative Complications, Tramadol, Pethidine.

  2. Postoperative pain assessment using four behavioral scales in Pakistani children undergoing elective surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several measurement tools have been used for assessment of postoperative pain in pediatric patients. Self-report methods have limitations in younger children and parent, nurse or physician assessment can be used as a surrogate measure. These tools should be tested in different cultures as pain can be influenced by sociocultural factors. The objective was to assess the inter-rater agreement on four different behavioral pain assessment scales in our local population. Materials and Methods: This prospective, descriptive, observational study was conducted in Pakistan. American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II children, 3-7 years of age, undergoing elective surgery were enrolled. Four pain assessment scales were used, Children′s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS, Toddler Preschool Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS, objective pain scale (OPS, and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC. After 15 and 60 min of arrival in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, each child evaluated his/her postoperative pain by self-reporting and was also independently assessed by the PACU nurse, PACU anesthetist and the parent. The sensitivity and specificity of the responses of the four pain assessment scales were compared to the response of the child. Results: At 15 min, sensitivity and specificity were >60% for doctors and nurses on FLACC, OPS, and CHEOPS scales and for FLACC and CHEOPS scale for the parents. Parents showed poor agreement on OPS and TPPS. At 60 min, sensitivity was poor on the OPS scale by all three observers. Nurses showed a lower specificity on FLACC tool. Parents had poor specificity on CHEOPS and rate of false negatives was high with TPPS. Conclusions: We recommend the use of FLACC scale for assessment by parents, nurses, and doctors in Pakistani children aged between 3 and 7.

  3. Nutritional status and nosocomial infections among adult elective surgery patients in a Mexican tertiary care hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Rodríguez-García

    Full Text Available Controversy exists as to whether obesity constitutes a risk-factor or a protective-factor for the development of nosocomial Infection (NI. According to the obesity-paradox, there is evidence that moderate obesity is a protective-factor. In Mexico few studies have focused on the nutritional status (NS distribution in the hospital setting.The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of NS and the prevalence of nosocomial infection NI among adult elective surgery (ES patients and to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics and length of stays (LOS between obese and non-obese patients and between patients with and without NI.We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 82 adult ES patients (21-59 years old who were recruited from a tertiary-care hospital. The prevalences of each NS category and NI were estimated, the assessments were compared between groups (Mann-Whitney, Chi-squared or the Fisher's-exact-test, and the association between preoperative risk-factors and NI was evaluated using odds ratios.The distribution of subjects by NS category was: underweight (3.66%, normal-weight (28.05%, overweight (35.36%, and obese (32.93%. The prevalence of NI was 14.63%. The LOS was longer (p<0.001 for the patients who developed NI. The percentages of NI were: 33.3% in underweight, 18.52% in obese, 17.39% in normal-weight, and 6.90% in overweight patients.The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adult ES patients is high. The highest prevalence of NI occurred in the underweight and obese patients. The presence of NI considerably increased the LOS, resulting in higher medical care costs.

  4. INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS FOR EARLY SURGICAL SITE INFECTION IN ELECTIVE ORTHOPAEDIC IMPLANT SURGERIES: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Surgical site infections in orthopaedic implant surgery is devasting complication range from 1 - 2% to 22%. It leads to increase case cost , prolongs antibiotic use/abuse , increases morbidity and rehabilitation. METHOD : This prospective cross sectional study was conducted on 624 patients with closed fracture cases undergoing clean and elective orthopaedic implant surgeries admitted at Gandhi Medical College and Hamidia Hospital , Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh , India between ‘1st November 2013 to 31st October 2014’. RESULTS : The surgical site infection was diagnosed in 43 (6.89% pati ents within 30 days after surgery. Klebsiella was most common infective organism islolated in 39.53% cases. On data analysis SSI was significantly associated with increasing age , duration of hospital stay more than 7 days , duration of surgery more than 120 minutes , pre - operative Hb less than 12 gm% , diabetes mellitus , use of intra - operative negative suction and tourniquet. CONCLUSION : Incidence of SSI in implants surgeries are quite high , proper measure are needed to control it. In this study gram negative organism has emerged as major threat in contrast to staphylococcus aureus.

  5. Uptake of guidelines in the management of patients taking anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents presenting for elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K; Halliwell, R; Cope, L; Khong, D

    2012-11-01

    Management guidelines for patients on antithrombotic agents presenting for surgery have long been disseminated. Clinical practice, however, does not always follow published guidelines in a timely manner, despite their dissemination. This project is an audit of the management of patients on anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents presenting for elective surgery in a large metropolitan teaching hospital. An audit was conducted of the management of patients on anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents presenting for elective surgery at Westmead Hospital to determine the percentage of patients whose management complied with guidelines, and to identify the prevailing reasons for guideline deviation. This was an observational study with qualitative and quantitative aspects. Data was collected for the 102 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 55.4% of decisions by surgeons and 51.4% of decisions by anaesthetists made in this study matched guidelines; 31.4% of decisions made by anaesthetists were fully compliant with guidelines; 20% of anaesthetic decisions were unintentionally compliant and 48.6% of anaesthetic decisions were noncompliant. A variety of reasons were cited for decisions made without the use of guidelines such as other clinical imperatives, lack of guideline awareness and a belief that it is not the role of the anaesthetist to manage perioperative antithrombotic therapy, amongst others. It is evident from this audit that compliance with guidelines remains an area where there is an opportunity for further practice improvement.

  6. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operating time. Scarce nursing resources were also ... elective admission, treatment and discharge of a patient during the ... professional nurses and 5 auxiliary nurses, It has 2 fully ..... drawn, with the basic premise the provision of safe surgery.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  8. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  9. Enhanced recovery after elective colorectal surgery: now the standard of care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2011-09-01

    Enhanced recovery programmes have been studied in randomised trials with evidence of quicker recovery of gut function, reduced morbidity, mortality and hospital stay and improved physiological and nutritional outcomes. They aim to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of surgery and consequently the uncontrolled stress response. The key elements, reduced pre-operative fasting, intravenous fluid restriction and early feeding after surgery, are in conflict with traditional management plans but are supported by strong clinical evidence. Given the strength of the current data enhanced recovery should now be the standard of care.

  10. Perioperative management of vitamin K antagonists in patients with low thromboembolic risk undergoing elective surgery: A prospective experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Ana Florencia; Cornavaca, María Teresita; Revigliono, José Ignacio; Contreras, Alejandro; Albertini, Ricardo; Tabares, Aldo Hugo

    2017-03-07

    To quantify thromboembolic and bleeding events in patients with low thromboembolic risk, who were chronically receiving vitamin K antagonists and undergoing elective surgery. A descriptive, prospective, single-center study was conducted between December 2010 and July 2014. Patients aged over 18 years old, chronically anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists and admitted for elective surgery were included in the study. We excluded patients with a creatinine clearance120kg, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, pregnant women, carriers of an epidural catheter for analgesia, patients who underwent unscheduled surgery and high thromboembolic risk-patients. Vitamin K antagonists were discontinued 5 days prior to the procedure without administering anticoagulant enoxaparin. The NIR was measured 24h before the procedure. A single dose of 3mg of vitamin K was administered in cases of a NIR>1.5. Vitamin K antagonists was resumed according to the surgical bleeding risk. Events were registered between 5 days prior to the procedure until 30 days after it. A total of 75 procedures were included in the study. Fifty-six patients (74.7%) received vitamin K antagonists for atrial fibrillation, 15 suffered from venous thromboembolism (20%) and 4 had mechanical heart valves (5.3%). Twenty-six patients (34.5%) underwent high-bleeding risk surgeries and 49 (65.5%) underwent low risk procedures. No thromboembolic event was recorded. Four bleeding events (5.3%) were reported, 3 of which were considered major bleeding events (2 fatal). Suspending vitamin K antagonists with no bridging therapy performed in patients with a low thromboembolic risk does not expose such patients to a significant risk of embolic events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A model to prioritize access to elective surgery on the basis of clinical urgency and waiting time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santori Gregorio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prioritization of waiting lists for elective surgery represents a major issue in public systems in view of the fact that patients often suffer from consequences of long waiting times. In addition, administrative and standardized data on waiting lists are generally lacking in Italy, where no detailed national reports are available. This is true although since 2002 the National Government has defined implicit Urgency-Related Groups (URGs associated with Maximum Time Before Treatment (MTBT, similar to the Australian classification. The aim of this paper is to propose a model to manage waiting lists and prioritize admissions to elective surgery. Methods In 2001, the Italian Ministry of Health funded the Surgical Waiting List Info System (SWALIS project, with the aim of experimenting solutions for managing elective surgery waiting lists. The project was split into two phases. In the first project phase, ten surgical units in the largest hospital of the Liguria Region were involved in the design of a pre-admission process model. The model was embedded in a Web based software, adopting Italian URGs with minor modifications. The SWALIS pre-admission process was based on the following steps: 1 urgency assessment into URGs; 2 correspondent assignment of a pre-set MTBT; 3 real time prioritization of every referral on the list, according to urgency and waiting time. In the second project phase a prospective descriptive study was performed, when a single general surgery unit was selected as the deployment and test bed, managing all registrations from March 2004 to March 2007 (1809 ordinary and 597 day cases. From August 2005, once the SWALIS model had been modified, waiting lists were monitored and analyzed, measuring the impact of the model by a set of performance indexes (average waiting time, length of the waiting list and Appropriate Performance Index (API. Results The SWALIS pre-admission model was used for all registrations in the

  12. Early oral feeding after elective abdominal surgery--what are the issues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    procedures. It appears that several factors may promote postoperative oral feeding such as thoracic epidural analgesia, multimodal anti-emetic treatment, opioid-sparing analgesia, selective peripheral opioid antagonists, and enforced oral nutrition. Recent data from multimodal fast-track rehabilitation...... surgical programs in abdominal surgery provide a rational basis for future studies to investigate and facilitate enforced oral feeding after major abdominal procedures....

  13. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C A; Schippers, Carlo C; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J G; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. METHODS: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and respi

  14. Feasibility of Exercise Training in Cancer Patients Scheduled for Elective Gastrointestinal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, Karin; Trappenburg, Jaap C.A.; Schippers, Carlo C.; Wanders, Lisa; Lemmens, Lidwien; Backx, Frank J.G.; Hillegersberg, van Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examines the feasibility of a preoperative exercise program to improve the physical fitness of a patient before gastrointestinal surgery. Methods: An outpatient exercise program was developed to increase preoperative aerobic capacity, peripheral muscle endurance and re

  15. Can medicine be aesthetic? Disentangling beauty and health in elective surgeries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edmonds, A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes tensions between aesthetics and health in medicine. The blurring of distinctions between reconstructive and cosmetic procedures, and the linking of plastic surgery with other medical treatments, have added to the legitimacy of an emerging "aesthetic medicine." As cosmetic surge

  16. Effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on body fluid distribution in patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Jensen, Martin Bach; Frandsen, E.

    1998-01-01

    ) aged 19-47 years were in a double-blinded study randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n = 12) or GH (n = 12) 6 i.u. s.c. twice daily from 2 days before until 7 days after ileo-anal J pouch surgery. Extracellular and plasma volume (ECV, PV) were determined using 82Br and 125I albumin dilution...

  17. Postoperative Interleukin-6 Level and Early Detection of Complications After Elective Major Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Thijs C D; Verwijmeren, Lisa; Dijkstra, Ineke M; Boerma, Djamila; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Noordzij, Peter G

    2016-06-01

    To assess the association of systemic inflammation and outcome after major abdominal surgery. Major abdominal surgery carries a high postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Studies suggest that inflammation is associated with unfavorable outcome. Levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were assessed in 137 patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Blood samples were drawn on days 0, 1, 3, and 7, and SIRS was scored during 48 hours after surgery. Primary outcome was a composite of mortality, pneumonia, sepsis, anastomotic dehiscence, wound infection, noncardiac respiratory failure, atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and reoperation within 30 days of surgery. An IL-6 level more than 432 pg/mL on day 1 was associated with an increased risk of complications (adjusted odds ratio: 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-8.5) and a longer median length of hospital stay (7 vs 12 days, P < 0.001). As a single test, an IL-6 cut-off level of 432 pg/mL on day 1 yielded a specificity of 70% and a sensitivity of 64% for the prediction of complications (area under the curve: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.56-0.77). Levels of CRP started to discriminate from day 3 onward with a specificity of 87% and a sensitivity of 58% for a cut-off level of 203 mg/L (AUC: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.63-0.83). A high IL-6 level on day 1 is associated with postoperative complications. Levels of IL-6 help distinguish between patients at low and high risk for complications before changes in levels of CRP.

  18. Nose Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Health Home Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly ... Terms of Use © Copyright 2017. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, ...

  19. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  20. A PROSPECTIVE, RANDOMIZED CONTROL STUDY EVALUATING THE POSTOPERATIVE ANALGESIA USING RECTAL DICLOFENAC IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the efficacy of rectal diclofenac suppository in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgeries in management of postoperative pain, in reduction of intra operative opioid requirement and in prolongation of postoperative anal gesic initiation time. OBJECTIVES: This prospective randomized single blinded clinical trial evaluates the efficacy of rectal diclofenac suppository for the management of postoperative pain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 100 patients undergoing elective laparosco pic cholecystectomy surgeries were randomized into two groups, Group 1 patients receiving 100mg diclofenac rectal suppository after induction of general anaesthesia, Group 2 patients does not receive any diclofenac rectal suppository. Intra operative hemod ynamic monitoring, post - operative VAS score and adverse reactions were recorded over period of 24 hrs. Intra operative opioid (fentanyl was repeated when heart rate and blood pressure variability of more than 20% from base line are noted. Post operatively if VAS score is more than 4 rescue analgesia with inj. Tramadol is given intramuscularly. RESULTS: Administration of single dose of rectal diclofenac had statistically significant reduction in VAS score post operatively compared to control group, reduced requirement of intra operative opioids (fentanyl. Post - operative rescue analgesia initiation time is prolonged in group 1 mean 9.56 hrs compared to group 2, mean 0.72 hrs (p - 0.000. CONCLUSION: Rectal Diclofenac used in laparoscopic cholecystectomy cases provide adequate, effective prolonged analgesia in the post - operative period with good safety profile

  1. PREPARE: the prevalence of perioperative anaemia and need for patient blood management in elective orthopaedic surgery: a multicentre, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasocki, Sigismond; Krauspe, Rüdiger; von Heymann, Christian; Mezzacasa, Anna; Chainey, Suki; Spahn, Donat R

    2015-03-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) can prevent preoperative anaemia, but little is known about practice in Europe. To assess the pre and postoperative prevalence and perioperative management of anaemia in patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery in Europe. An observational study; data were collected from patient records via electronic case report forms. Seventeen centres in six European countries. Centres were stratified according to whether they had a PBM programme or not. One thousand five hundred and thirty-four patients undergoing major elective hip, knee or spine surgery [49.9% hip, 37.2% knee, 13.0% spine; age 64.0 years (range 18 to 80), 61.3% female]. Prevalence of preoperative (primary endpoint) and postoperative anaemia [haemoglobin (Hb) anaemia management, time to first blood transfusion and number of transfused units. Data are shown as mean (SD) or median (interquartile range). Anaemia prevalence increased from 14.1% preoperatively to 85.8% postoperatively. Mean Hb decrease was 1.9 (1.5) and 3.0 (1.3) g dl in preoperatively anaemic and nonanaemic patients, respectively (P anaemia was less frequent (8.0 vs. 18.5%; P anaemia correction (mainly transfusion) was given to 34.3%. Intraoperatively, 14.8% of preoperatively anaemic and 2.8% of nonanaemic patients received transfusions [units per patient: 2.4 (1.5) and 2.2 (1.4), median time to first intraoperative transfusion: 130 (88, 158) vs. 179 (135, 256) min; P < 0.001]. Postoperative complications were more frequent in preoperatively anaemic vs. nonanaemic patients (36.9 vs. 22.2%; P = 0.009). Most patients who underwent elective orthopaedic surgery had normal preoperative Hb levels but became anaemic after the procedure. Those who were anaemic prior to surgery had an increased intraoperative transfusion risk and postoperative complication rate. PBM measures such as iron status assessment and strategies to avoid transfusion are still underused in Europe.

  2. Validation of the surgical fear questionnaire in adult patients waiting for elective surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Theunissen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Because existing instruments for assessing surgical fear seem either too general or too limited, the Surgical Fear Questionnaire (SFQ was developed. The aim of this study is to assess the validity and reliability of the SFQ. METHODS: Based on existing literature and expert consultation the ten-item SFQ was composed. Data on the SFQ were obtained from 5 prospective studies (N = 3233 in inpatient or day surgery patients. These data were used for exploratory factor analysis (EFA, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, reliability analysis and validity analysis. RESULTS: EFA in Study 1 and 2 revealed a two-factor structure with one factor associated with fear of the short-term consequences of surgery (SFQ-s, item 1-4 and the other factor with fear of the long-term consequences of surgery (SFQ-l, item 5-10. However, in both studies two items of the SFQ-l had low factor loadings. Therefore in Study 3 and 4 the 2-factor structure was tested and confirmed by CFA in an eight-item version of the SFQ. Across all studies significant correlations of the SFQ with pain catastrophizing, state anxiety, and preoperative pain intensity indicated good convergent validity. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha was between 0.765-0.920 (SFQ-total, 0.766-0.877 (SFQ-s, and 0.628-0.899 (SFQ-l. The SFQ proved to be sensitive to detect differences based on age, sex, education level, employment status and preoperative pain intensity. DISCUSSION: The SFQ is a valid and reliable eight-item index of surgical fear consisting of two subscales: fear of the short-term consequences of surgery and fear of the long-term consequences.

  3. The study of risk factors of pressure sore for elective orthopedic surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping ZHOU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:The purposes of the study were to investigate the incidence of pressure ulcer of orthopedics patients undergoing selective operation, and to identify the risk factors of pressure ulcer.Methods: A prospective cohort study was employed in this study. Data were collected concerning the general characteristics as well as preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative indicators probable to induce pressure ulcer and then analyzed in view of the risk factors of pressure ulcer. Results: (1 Pressure ulcers developed in thirty five patients (10.1% on day 0 and the first 3 days following surgery; (2 age, hemoglobin, lymphocyte and getting up late for the first time after surgery were significantly associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers (odds ratio 1.068,  0.948, 0.293, 1.019, respectively.Conclusions: (1 Patients have higher risk of developing pressure ulcer after operation, the critical period beginning from the operation day to the 3rd day after operation. (2 The age older, the later getting up for the first time after surgery, the liable it is for the patients to develop pressure ulcer postoperatively.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  5. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THORACIC PARAVERTEBRAL BLOCK A ND GENERAL ANAESTHESIA FOR POST OPERATIVE ANALGESIA IN ELECTIVE BREAST SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: this randomised control trial is to evaluate unila teral para- vertebral block in elective breast surgery in compa rison with general anaesthesia METHODS: 106 patients of breast surgery were randomised in 2 groups- group-P and group-G. group-P patients received unilateral multiple level paraverteb ral block with 0.25% levo-bupivacaine at T2 to T5 level and group-G patients received general anaesthesia. Pulse, BP were recorded in the perioperative period and rescue analgesic require ment time and VAS scores were recorded in PACU. Recorded data were evaluated after that. RESULTS: In PACU rescue analgesia needed in group-P in 69.22 minutes and in group-G in 41.27 minutes. Post-operative VAS scores were lower in group-P patients at 30 minutes, 1 hr. and 2 hr. There was no incidence of hypotension or hypertension or bradycardia or tachycardia in any group. Patients overall satisfaction score in group-P was 4 vs 3.6 in group-G (p value <0.05 CONCLUSION: Thoracic para-vertebral block is a safe alternative to general anaesthesia for el ective breast surgery as it provides better postoperative analgesia with similar hemodynamic stab ility

  6. Hospital Discharge Information After Elective Total hip or knee Joint Replacement Surgery: A clinical Audit of preferences among general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Briggs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe demand for elective joint replacement (EJR surgery for degenerative joint disease continues to rise in Australia, and relative to earlier practices, patients are discharged back to the care of their general practitioner (GP and other community-based providers after a shorter hospital stay and potentially greater post-operative acuity. In order to coordinate safe and effective post-operative care, GPs rely on accurate, timely and clinically-informative information from hospitals when their patients are discharged. The aim of this project was to undertake an audit with GPs regarding their preferences about the components of information provided in discharge summaries for patients undergoing EJR surgery for the hip or knee. GPs in a defined catchment area were invited to respond to an online audit instrument, developed by an interdisciplinary group of clinicians with knowledge of orthopaedic surgery practices. The 15-item instrument required respondents to rank the importance of components of discharge information developed by the clinician working group, using a three-point rating scale. Fifty-three GPs and nine GP registrars responded to the audit invitation (11.0% response rate. All discharge information options were ranked as ‘essential’ by a proportion of respondents, ranging from 14.8–88.5%. Essential information requested by the respondents included early post-operative actions required by the GP, medications prescribed, post-operative complications encountered and noting of any allergies. Non-essential information related to the prosthesis used. The provision of clinical guidelines was largely rated as ‘useful’ information (47.5–56.7%. GPs require a range of clinical information to safely and effectively care for their patients after discharge from hospital for EJR surgery. Implementation of changes to processes used to create discharge summaries will require engagement and collaboration between clinical staff

  7. N-acetylcysteine instead of theophylline in patients with COPD who are candidates for elective off-pump CABG surgery: Is it possible in cardiovascular surgery unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalil Mirhosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 is a good predictor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is characterized by a chronic limitation of airflow. This study was designed to compare the effects and complications of theophylline alone, N-acetylcysteine (NAC alone, and a combination of the two drugs on the rates of FEV1 in patients with COPD who were candidates for off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 100 patients who had a smoking history of 27 pack years with a range of 20 to 40 pack years but were not heavy smokers and were candidates for elective off-pump CABG surgery in Afshar Cardiovascular Hospital, Yazd, Iran. The patients with a history of asthma and bronchospasm and non-COPD respiratory disorders were excluded. There were three groups, that is, the theophylline group (n=33 that received theophylline 10 mg/kg TDS after consumption of food, NAC group (n=33 who received NAC 10-15 mg/kg BD after consumption of food, and the combined group (n=32 who received theophylline and NAC together. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA, Chi-square, and exact test for quantitative and qualitative variables. Results: One hundred patients with COPD enrolled in this study as possible candidates for CABG surgery. Average age of the patients was 60.36±10.21 years. Of the participants, 83 (83.3% were male and 17 (17% were female. Rate of postoperative FEV1 to basal FEV1 was 0.76±0.32, 0.66±0.22, and 0.69±0.24 in the treatments with theophylline, NAC, and the combination, respectively. Theophylline, NAC, and a combination of these drugs can decrease the rate of postoperative FEV1 compared to basal FEV1 significantly. (P=0.0001 Conclusion: Theophylline alone, NAC alone, and a combination of these drugs improve pulmonary function, and there are no significant differences between these protocols. Stomach discomfort and cardiac complications in

  8. Endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, B S; Rhodes, J S

    2014-03-01

    A better understanding of endodontic disease and the causes of treatment failure has refined the role of surgery in endodontics. The advent of newer materials, advances in surgical armamentarium and techniques have also led to an improved endodontic surgical outcome. The aim of this article is to provide a contemporary and up-to-date overview of endodontic surgery. It will focus primarily on the procedures most commonly performed in endodontic surgery.

  9. Aortic aneurysm disease vs. aortic occlusive disease - differences in outcome and intensive care resource utilisation after elective surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Jannie; Gilsaa, Torben; Rønholm, Ebbe;

    2013-01-01

    clamping is more pronounced in patients with aortic aneurysm disease, which may affect outcome. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this observational cohort study was to evaluate outcome after open elective abdominal aortic surgery, hypothesising a higher 30-day mortality, a higher incidence of postoperative organ...... dysfunction and a longer length of stay in patients with aortic aneurysm compared with aortic occlusive disease. DESIGN: Cohort observational study based on prospective registrations from national databases. SETTING: Eight Danish hospitals, including four university and four non-university centres, from 1...... or inotropes, ICU stay more than 24 h, hospital length of stay and mortality. RESULTS: Compared with aortic occlusive disease, more patients with aortic aneurysm disease had ICU stays more than 24 h (62 vs. 45%, P ...

  10. The Beneficial Effect of Hypnosis in Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Ahmet; Guner, Beyhan; Çırak, Musa; Çelik, Derya; Hergünsel, Oya; Bedirhan, Sevim

    2016-10-01

    Background Single-session hypnosis has never been evaluated as a premedication technique in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial effects of clinical hypnotherapy on perioperative anxiety, pain perception, sedation, and necessity for ventilator assistance in patients undergoing CABG. Methods Double-blind, randomized, clinical trial was performed. Forty-four patients undergoing CABG surgery were randomized into two groups. The patients in group A received preprocedural hypnosis by an anesthesiologist. Patients in group B (control) had only information on the surgical intervention by the same anesthesiologist. State-Trait-Anxiety Index-I (STAI-I) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were performed preoperatively in both groups. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) were evaluated on 0th, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, and 24th hours, postoperatively. Postoperative anxiety level, analgesic drug consumption, and duration of ventilator assistance and intensive care unit (ICU) stay were also documented. Results When anxiety and depression levels were compared, significantly lower STA-I and BDI values were detected in group A after hypnotherapy (p = 0.001, p = 0.001, respectively). Significantly less total doses of remifentanil (34.4 ± 11.4 vs. 50.0 ± 13.6 mg) and morphine (4.9 ± 3.3 vs. 13.6 ± 2.7 mg) were administered in group A in the postoperative period. Ventilator assistance duration (6.8 ± 2.0 vs. 8.9 ± 2.7 hours) was also shorter in group A when compared with that in group B (p = 0.007). Conclusion Hypnosis session prior to surgery was an effective complementary method in decreasing presurgical anxiety, and it resulted in better pain control as well as reduced ventilator assistance following CABG surgery. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Survey of Intraoperative Bacterial Contamination in Dogs Undergoing Elective Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Natalia; Schmiedt, Chad W; Cornell, Karen; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Heidingsfelder, Lauren; Clarke, Kevin; Hurley, David J; Hinson, Whitney D

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the frequency, source, and risk factors of intraoperative (IO) surgeon and patient bacterial contamination during clean orthopedic surgeries, and to investigate the relationship between IO contamination and surgical site infection (SSI) in dogs. Prospective clinical study. Client-owned dogs undergoing stifle surgery (n = 100). IO cultures were taken in each case from surgical foot wrap, peri-incisional skin, surgical gloves, and the surgical team's hands. The environment (operating room [OR] lights, computers, scrub sink faucet, anesthesia gurney, and radiology table) was sampled every 5 months. Bacteria were identified and the contamination of each case was categorized. All gloves from the surgical team were collected and tested for perforations using a water infusion test. Cases were followed for at least 8 weeks to determine the presence or absence of SSI. Perioperative variables were evaluated for association with IO contamination and SSI. Bacterial isolates were yielded from 81% of procedures from 1 or more sources; 58% had positive hand cultures, 46% had positive glove cultures, 23% had positive patient skin cultures, and 12% had positive foot wrap cultures. Staphylococcus spp. was the most commonly recovered bacteria. There was no apparent association between IO contamination and SSI. The highest level of environmental contamination was associated with the scrub sink faucet, followed by the radiology table, anesthesia gurney, and OR computers. The IO glove perforation rate was 18%. Clean orthopedic procedures commonly had clinically insignificant bacterial contamination. In our study, bacteria responsible for SSI did not appear to colonize the patient in the OR. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ... Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained ...

  13. Pain after major elective orthopedic surgery of the lower limb and type of anesthesia: does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diogo Luís; Meleiro, Hugo Lourenço; Correia, Inês Araújo; Fonseca, Sara

    Total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty are associated with chronic pain development. Of the studies focusing on perioperative factors for chronic pain, few have focused on the differences that might arise from the anesthesia type performed during surgery. This was a prospective observational study performed between July 2014 and March 2015 with patients undergoing unilateral elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis. Data collection and pain evaluation questionnaires were performed in three different moments: preoperatively, 24 hours postoperatively and at 6 months after surgery. To characterize pain, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used and SF-12v2 Health survey was used to further evaluate the sample's health status. Forty and three patients were enrolled: 25.6% men and 74.4% women, 51,2% for total knee arthroplasty and48.8% for total hip arthroplasty, with a mean age of 68 years. Surgeries were performed in 25.6% of patients under general anesthesia, 55.8% under neuraxial anesthesia and 18.6% under combined anesthesia. Postoperatively, neuraxial anesthesia had a better pain control. Comparing pain evolution between anesthesia groups, neuraxial anesthesia was associated with a decrease in "worst", "medium" and "now" pain at six months. Combined anesthesia was associated with a decrease of "medium" pain scores at six months. Of the three groups, only those in neuraxial group showed a decrease in level of pain interference in "walking ability". TKA, "worst" pain preoperatively and general were predictors of pain development at six months. Patients with gonarthrosis and severe pain preoperatively may benefit from individualized pre- and intraoperative care, particularly preoperative analgesia and neuraxial anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. [Pain after major elective orthopedic surgery of the lower limb and type of anesthesia: does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Diogo Luís; Meleiro, Hugo Lourenço; Correia, Inês Araújo; Fonseca, Sara

    Total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty are associated with chronic pain development. Of the studies focusing on perioperative factors for chronic pain, few have focused on the differences that might arise from the anesthesia type performed during surgery. This was a prospective observational study performed between July 2014 and March 2015 with patients undergoing unilateral elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteoarthritis. Data collection and pain evaluation questionnaires were performed in three different moments: preoperatively, 24hours postoperatively and at 6 months after surgery. To characterize pain, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used and SF-12v2 Health survey was used to further evaluate the sample's health status. Forty and three patients were enrolled: 25.6% men and 74.4% women, 51,2% for total knee arthroplasty and48.8% for total hip arthroplasty, with a mean age of 68 years. Surgeries were performed in 25.6% of patients under general anesthesia, 55.8% under neuraxial anesthesia and 18.6% under combined anesthesia. Postoperatively, neuraxial anesthesia had a better pain control. Comparing pain evolution between anesthesia groups, neuraxial anesthesia was associated with a decrease in "worst", "medium" and "now" pain at six months. Combined anesthesia was associated with a decrease of "medium" pain scores at six months. Of the three groups, only those in neuraxial group showed a decrease in level of pain interference in "walking ability". TKA, "worst" pain preoperatively and general were predictors of pain development at six months. Patients with gonarthrosis and severe pain preoperatively may benefit from individualized pre- and intraoperative care, particularly preoperative analgesia and neuraxial anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Pain after major elective orthopedic surgery of the lower limb and type of anesthesia: does it matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Luís Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty are associated with chronic pain development. Of the studies focusing on perioperative factors for chronic pain, few have focused on the differences that might arise from the anesthesia type performed during surgery. Methods: This was a prospective observational study performed between July 2014 and March 2015 with patients undergoing unilateral elective total knee arthroplasty (TKA or total hip arthroplasty (THA for osteoarthritis. Data collection and pain evaluation questionnaires were performed in three different moments: preoperatively, 24 hours postoperatively and at 6 months after surgery. To characterize pain, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI was used and SF-12v2 Health survey was used to further evaluate the sample's health status. Results: Forty and three patients were enrolled: 25.6% men and 74.4% women, 51,2% for total knee arthroplasty and48.8% for total hip arthroplasty, with a mean age of 68 years. Surgeries were performed in 25.6% of patients under general anesthesia, 55.8% under neuraxial anesthesia and 18.6% under combined anesthesia. Postoperatively, neuraxial anesthesia had a better pain control. Comparing pain evolution between anesthesia groups, neuraxial anesthesia was associated with a decrease in “worst”, “medium” and “now” pain at six months. Combined anesthesia was associated with a decrease of “medium” pain scores at six months. Of the three groups, only those in neuraxial group showed a decrease in level of pain interference in “walking ability”. TKA, “worst” pain preoperatively and general were predictors of pain development at six months. Conclusions: Patients with gonarthrosis and severe pain preoperatively may benefit from individualized pre- and intraoperative care, particularly preoperative analgesia and neuraxial anesthesia.

  16. Comparison of the i-gel and the LMA-Unique laryngeal mask airway in patients with mild to moderate obesity during elective short-term surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, U; Oguz, R; Potura, L A; Kimberger, O; Kober, A; Tschernko, E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of our study was to compare leakage pressure, ease and time of insertion of the i-gel and the LMA-Unique laryngeal mask airway in patients with mild to moderate obesity during elective short-term surgery. In this prospective, randomised crossover trial, we included patients with a body mass index (BMI) >25 and 18 years, undergoing elective surgery in the supine position with an expected duration of surgery 25 and 30 and LMA-Unique) (pLMA-Unique) (p=0.013) in the mild subgroup, and 25.7 (8.6) cmH₂O (i-gel) and 17.0 (6.2) cmH₂O (LMA-Unique) (pLMA-Unique in mildly and moderately obese patients.

  17. Thyroid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... etc.). Surgery is also an option for the treatment of hyperthyroidism (Grave’s disease or a “toxic nodule” (see Hyperthyroidism brochure ), for large and multinodular goiters and for any goiter that may be causing ... MEANS OF TREATMENT? Surgery is definitely indicated to remove nodules suspicious ...

  18. Choosing surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstensson, Carina; Lohmander, L; Frobell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The objective was to understand patients' views of treatment after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and their reasons for deciding to request surgery despite consenting to participate in a randomised controlled trial (to 'cross-over'). METHODS: Thirty-four in......-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with young (aged 18-35), physically active individuals with ACL rupture who were participating in a RCT comparing training and surgical reconstruction with training only. 22/34 were randomised to training only but crossed over to surgery. Of these, 11 were interviewed...... before surgery, and 11 were interviewed at least 6 months after surgery. To provide additional information, 12 patients were interviewed before randomisation. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using the Framework approach. RESULTS: Strong preference for surgery was commonplace...

  19. Impact of the Economic Downturn on Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery in the United States: A National Trend Analysis, 2003 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David N; Brodell, David; Li, Yue; Rubery, Paul T; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective database analysis. The impact of the 2008-2009 economic downtown on elective lumbar spine surgery is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the economic downturn on the overall trends of elective lumbar spine surgery in the United States. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used in conjunction with US Census and macroeconomic data to determine historical trends. The economic downturn was defined as 2008 to 2009. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), were used in order to identify appropriate procedures. Confidence intervals were determined using subgroup analysis techniques. From 2003 to 2012, there was a 19.8% and 26.1% decrease in the number of lumbar discectomies and laminectomies, respectively. Over the same time period, there was a 56.4% increase in the number of lumbar spinal fusions. The trend of elective lumbar spine surgeries per 100 000 persons in the US population remained consistent from 2008 to 2009. The number of procedures decreased by 4.5% from 2010 to 2011, 7.6% from 2011 to 2012, and 3.1% from 2012 to 2013. The R(2) value between the number of surgeries and the S&P 500 Index was statistically significant (P ≤ .05). The economic downturn did not affect elective lumbar fusions, which increased in total from 2003 to 2013. The relationship between the S&P 500 Index and surgical trends suggests that during recessions, individuals may utilize other means, such as insurance, to cover procedural costs and reduce out-of-pocket expenditures, accounting for no impact of the economic downturn on surgical trends. These findings can assist multiple stakeholders in better understanding the interconnectedness of macroeconomics, policy, and elective lumbar spine surgery trends.

  20. Psychotropic drugs and the perioperative period: a proposal for a guideline in elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyse, Frits J; Touw, Daan J; van Schijndel, Rob Strack; de Lange, Jaap J; Slaets, Joris P J

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the perioperative management of psychotropic drugs are lacking. The level of evidence is low and is based on case reports, open trials, and non-systematic reviews. However, the interactions and effects mentioned indicate that patients who use psychotropics and require surgery have an enhanced perioperative risk. A group of clinicians from several clinical disciplines determined which risks should be considered in an integrated preoperative assessment, as well as how psychotropics might interfere with these risks. The risks that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of the surgery, the patient's physical state, anesthesia, the direct and indirect (Phase I and II) effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms, and risk of psychiatric recurrence or relapse. Because of new drug developments, the risk of interactions increases. The literature has not provided articles that systematically address these risks. On the basis of a systematic analysis of the available literature guided by the formulated perioperative risks, a proposal for the perioperative management of psychotropics was formulated. Patients who use lithium, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, tricyclics, and clozepine have serious drug-drug interactions, with increased physical risks, including withdrawal, and therefore qualify for American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Classification 3. From the perspective of the physical risk, they require discontinuation. However, from the perspective of the risk of withdrawal and psychiatric relapse and recurrence, these patients deserve intensive, integrated anesthetic/psychiatric management. For patients on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) who are mentally and physical stable (ASA Classification 2), the risk of withdrawal seems to justify their continuation. Yet, patients on SSRIs with higher physical or psychiatric risks should be seen in consultation. Both the physical and psychiatric

  1. Preventing hypothermia in elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery patients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duff Jed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery frequently experience periods of inadvertent hypothermia. This common perioperative problem has been linked to adverse patient outcomes such as myocardial ischaemia, surgical site infection and coagulopathy. International perioperative guidelines recommend patient warming, using a forced air warming device, and the use of warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions for the prevention of hypothermia in at-risk patient groups. This trial will investigate the effect of these interventions on patients’ temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Method/Design The trial will employ a randomised 2 x 2 factorial design. Eligible patients will be stratified by anaesthetist and block randomised into one of four groups: Group one will receive preoperative warming with a forced air warming device; group two will receive warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; group three will receive both preoperative warming and warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; and group four will receive neither intervention. Participants in all four groups will receive active intraoperative warming with a forced air warming device. The primary outcome measures are postoperative temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Primary outcomes will undergo a two-way analysis of variance controlling for covariants such as operating room ambient temperature and volume of intraoperative irrigation solution. Discussion This trial is designed to confirm the effectiveness of these interventions at maintaining perioperative normothermia and to evaluate if this translates into improved patient outcomes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12610000591055

  2. USE OF BLOOD PRODUCTS FOR ELECTIVE SURGERY IN 43 EUROPEAN HOSPITALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIRCHIA, G; GIOVANETTI, AM; BAELE, PL; DACOSTA, RBC; DROUET, N; TENDUIS, HJ; JOERGENSEN, J; MANIATIS, A; MCCLELLAND, B; MESSMER, KFW; CASTEL, AN; SISSOURAS, AA; MILANI, S; PAPPALETTERA, M

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of blood products and artificial colloids in six commonly performed elective surgical procedures in 43 teaching hospitals in 10 European countries. 7,195 patient data were analysed. For each product wide differences were found between hospitals, both

  3. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755-0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691-0.783) and 0.742 (0.698-0.785), p machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction.

  4. CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lbadan, Nigeria. Reprint requests to: Dr. V. O. Adegboye, Department Of Surgery, University College Hospital, Iberian,. Nigeria. ... been shown to be related to the rate of bleeding. .... patients after an interval of conservative/medical treatment.

  5. General Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bbshehu

    underwent major colonic restorative resection between July 1997 and September 199 in order to ... factors, the level of anastomosis and the experience of the surgeon are perhaps the ... indications for surgery and cancer stage were similar.

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  7. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and hemorrhoidectomy. In: Delaney CP, ed. Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 26. Review Date 4/5/2015 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason ...

  8. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The traditional operative approach is an open surgical one to drain the cysts and ... early outcomes of laparoscopic treatment of liver hydatid cysts at our institution. .... O. Radical vs. conservative surgery for hydatid liver cysts: Experience from ...

  9. Outpatient Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thirds of all operations are performed in outpatient facilities, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Outpatient surgery provides patients with the convenience of recovering at home, and can cost less. ...

  10. Laparoscopic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgeon’s perspective, laparoscopic surgery may allow for easier dissection of abdominal scar tissue (adhesions), less surgical trauma, ... on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos ...

  11. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    National reports recommended that peri-operative care should be improved for elderly patients undergoing emergency surgery. Postoperative mortality and morbidity rates remain high, and indicate that emergency ruptured aneurysm repair, laparotomy and hip fracture fixation are high-risk procedures...... undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...

  12. Evaluation of hyperglycaemic response to intra-operative dexamethasone administration in patients undergoing elective intracranial surgery: A randomised, prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rakesh; Naqash, Imtiaz A.; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Dutta, Vikas; Ramzan, Altaf Umar; Zahoor, Syed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The glucocorticoid dexamethasone in a bolus dose of 8-10 mg followed by quarterly dose of 4 mg is commonly used during intracranial surgery so as to reduce oedema and vascular permeability. However, the detrimental hyperglycaemic effects of dexamethasone may override its potentially beneficial effects. The present prospective, randomised study aimed at comparing the degree and magnitude of hyperglycaemia induced by prophylactic administration of dexamethasone in patients undergoing elective craniotomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) grade-I and II patients were randomly assigned to three groups of 20 patients each. Group-I received dexamethasone during surgery for the first time. Group-II received dexamethasone in addition to receiving it pre-operatively, whereas Group-III (control group) patients were administered normal saline as placebo. Baseline blood glucose (BG) was measured in all the three groups before induction of anaesthesia and thereafter after every hour for 4 h and then two-hourly. Besides intra- and intergroup comparison of BG, peak BG concentration was also recorded for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t-test and value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Baseline BG reading were higher and statistically significant in Group-II as compared with Group-I and Group-III (P < 0.05). However, peak BG levels were significantly higher in Group-I than in Group-II and III (P < 0.05). Similarly, the magnitude of change in peak BG was significantly higher in Group-I as compared to Group-II and III (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Peri-operative administration of dexamethasone during neurosurgical procedures can cause significant increase in BG concentration especially in patients who receive dexamethasone intra-operatively only. PMID:27057213

  13. Benefits of bariatric surgery before elective total joint arthroplasty: is there a role for weight loss optimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Emanuel E; Santos, Tyler M; Topolski, Mark S; Borgert, Andrew J; Kallies, Kara J; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and osteoarthritis is well established, as is the increased risk of postoperative complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) among patients with obesity. To evaluate the outcomes after TKA/THA based on whether the surgery was performed before or after bariatric surgery. Integrated, multispecialty, community teaching hospital. The medical records of all patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2001 to 2014 were reviewed. Statistical analysis included χ(2) test and t tests. A P valuebariatric procedure, 66 underwent TKA/THA after their bariatric procedure. TKAs/THAs were performed at a mean of 4.9±3.2 years before and 4.3±3.3 years after bariatric surgery. Body mass index for those undergoing TKA/THA after bariatric surgery was lower than those with TKA/THA before bariatric surgery (37.6±7.4 versus 43.7±5.7 kg/m(2); Pbariatric surgery: 81.7±33.9 min versus 117±38.1 min; Pbariatric surgery. Patients who underwent TKA/THA after bariatric surgery had lower body mass index before and 1 year after TKA/THA. Postoperative complication rates were similar. Benefits of bariatric surgery and subsequent weight loss should be considered among patients with obesity requiring TKA/THA. Optimal timing of TKA/THA and bariatric surgery has yet to be established. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Robotic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, César David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodríguez, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robot´s success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: - Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. - Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. - Allowing depth perception (3D images). - Magnifying strength and movement limits. - Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era.

  15. [Aesthetic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Johannes C

    2006-01-01

    The WHO describes health as physical, mental and social well being. Ever since the establishment of plastic surgery aesthetic surgery has been an integral part of this medical specialty. It aims at reconstructing subjective well-being by employing plastic surgical procedures as described in the educational code and regulations for specialists of plastic surgery. This code confirms that plastic surgery comprises cosmetic procedures for the entire body that have to be applied in respect of psychological exploration and selection criteria. A wide variety of opinions resulting from very different motivations shows how difficult it is to differentiate aesthetic surgery as a therapeutic procedure from beauty surgery as a primarily economic service. Jurisdiction, guidelines for professional conduct and ethical codes have tried to solve this question. Regardless of the intention and ability of the health insurances, it has currently been established that the moral and legal evaluation of advertisements for medical procedures depends on their purpose: advertising with the intent of luring patients into cosmetic procedures that do not aim to reconstruct a subjective physical disorder does not comply with a medical indication. If, however, the initiative originates with the patient requesting the amelioration of a subjective disorder of his body, a medical indication can be assumed.

  16. Comparative evaluation of ventilatory function through pre and postoperative peak expiratory flow in patients submitted to elective upper abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeren, Caio Fernando Cavanus; Gonçalves, José Júlio Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the ventilatory function by Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) in the immediate pre and postoperative periods of patients undergoing elective surgical procedures in the upper abdomen. we conducted a prospective cohort study including 47 patients admitted to the Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul from July to December 2014, who underwent elective surgeries of the upper abdomen, and submiited to spirometric evaluation and measurement of PEF immediately before and after surgery. of the 47 patients, 22 (46.8%) were male and 25 (53.20%) female. The mean preoperative PEF was 412.1±91.7, and postoperative, 331.0±87.8, indicating significant differences between the two variables. Men had higher PEF values than women, both in the pre and postoperative periods. There was a reasonable inverse correlation between age and decreased PEF. Both situations showed statistical significance (psexo masculino, e 25 (53,20%) do sexo feminino. A média do PFE pré-operatório foi 412,1±91,7, e do pós-operatório de 331,0±87,8, indicando diferenças significantes entre as duas variáveis. O sexo masculino apresentou maiores valores de PFE do que o feminino, tanto no pré-cirúrgico quanto no pós-cirúrgico. Observou-se razoável correlação inversamente proporcional entre as variáveis idade e diminuição do PFE. Ambas as situações mostraram significância estatística (p<0,001). O grupo composto por fumantes apresentou menores valores de PFE tanto no pré como no pós-operatório. O grupo composto por portadores de co-morbidades (HAS e/ou DM) apresentou menores valores de PFE tanto no pré como no pós-operatório (p=0,005). Em ambos os grupos, o pós-operatório determinou uma diminuição significativa do PFE (p<0,001). O tipo de cirurgia realizada e o tipo de anestesia não mostraram diferenças significantes em relação ao PFE. as variáveis mais implicadas na diminuição da função ventilatória, avaliadas através da PFE, foram: idade avançada, tabagismo e

  17. Equiosmolar Solutions of Hypertonic Saline and Mannitol Do Not Impair Blood Coagulation During Elective Intracranial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Palazón, Joaquín; Fuentes-García, Diego; Doménech-Asensi, Paloma; Piqueras-Pérez, Claudio; Falcón-Araña, Luis; Burguillos-López, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of equiosmolar, equivolemic solutions of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) and 20% mannitol on blood coagulation assessed by rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and standard coagulation tests during elective craniotomy. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial, 40 patients undergoing elective craniotomy were randomized to receive 5 mL/kg of either 20% mannitol or 3% HS for intraoperative brain relaxation. Fibrinogen, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count were simultaneously measured intraoperatively with ROTEM for EXTEM, INTEM, and FIBTEM analysis. ROTEM parameters were: clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), maximum clot firmness (MCF), and α-angle. No significant differences between groups were found in ROTEM variables CT, CFT, MCF, α-angle (EXTEM and INTEM), and MCF (FIBTEM) nor standard coagulation tests. ROTEM parameters did not show changes after administration of hyperosmolar solutions relating to basal values, except for an increase of CFT EXTEM (118±28 vs. 128±26 s) and decrease of CT INTEM (160±18 vs. 148±15 s) with values within normal range. Significant decreases from baseline levels were observed for hematocrit (-7%), platelet count (-10%), and fibrinogen (-13%) after HS infusion, and hematocrit (-9%), platelet count (-13%), and fibrinogen (-9%) after mannitol infusion, but remaining normal. The use of 5 mL/kg of equiosmolar solutions of 3% HS and 20% mannitol applied to reach a brain relaxation during elective craniotomy does not induce coagulation impairment as evidenced by ROTEM and standard coagulation tests.

  18. Evaluating the Efficacy of Tramadol as an Adjuvant to Intrathecal Isobaric Levobupivacaine for Elective Infraumbilical Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dewan Roshan; Mohamed, Hajer; Krishnaveni, N; Nag, Kusha

    2017-01-01

    Long-acting local anesthetics are used in subarachnoid block to increase the duration of anesthesia. Adjuvants are added to improve the duration of analgesia. Randomized controlled trial was conducted in the Department of Anesthesiology in a tertiary care hospital. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose tramadol as an intrathecal adjuvant to levobupivacaine in terms of duration of analgesia, onset of sensory blockade, onset of motor blockade, and duration of motor blockade. After obtaining the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, sixty patients posted for infraumbilical surgeries were recruited. Randomization was done using a sealed envelope technique. Patients were divided into two groups: LT received 3 ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine with tramadol 10 mg (0.2 ml) and LS received 3 ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine with 0.2 ml of normal saline. Duration of analgesia, onset of sensory blockade, and onset and duration of motor blockade were recorded. There was no statistical difference in demographic data between the two groups. The mean onset time of sensory blockade in Group LS was 12.7 ± 9.81 min and for Group LT was 12.9 ± 0.81 min, which was not statistically significant between two groups (P = 0.93). The mean onset time of motor blockade in Group LS was 13.4 ± 10 min and for Group LT was 14.4 ± 10 min, which was no statistically significant between the two groups (P = 0.71). The mean time duration of analgesia in Group LS was 170.3 ± 59 min and for LT was 198.9 ± 57.33 min. There was mild prolongation of analgesia in Group LT, but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.0615). The mean duration of motor blockade in Group LS was 170.23 ± 58 min and Group LT was 190.76 ± 4 min, which was not statistically significant between the two groups (P = 0.14). Low-dose tramadol as an adjuvant to isobaric intrathecal levobupivacaine does not prolong analgesia significantly.

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Dental and Soft Tissue Surgery Oral and facial surgeons ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ...

  20. Tennis elbow surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is usually an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be given ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  2. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  3. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  4. The cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane after premedication of healthy dogs undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Janan M; Pike, Fred S; Clare, Monica C; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Sevoflurane and isoflurane are commonly used in veterinary anesthesia. The objective of this prospective, randomized, open-label clinical study was to compare the cardiovascular effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane via direct arterial blood pressure measurements and the lithium dilution cardiac output (LDCO) on premedicated healthy dogs undergoing elective tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). Nineteen client-owned dogs were included. All dogs were premedicated with hydromorphone (0.05 mg/kg IV and glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg subcutaneously). Ten dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane and nine dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane. Eighteen dogs were instrumented with a dorsal pedal arterial catheter, and one dog had a femoral arterial catheter. All dogs had continuous, direct systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP), and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure readings as well as heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), cardiac index (CI), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), stroke volume variation (SVV), and pulse pressure variation (PPV) recorded q 5 min during the surgical procedure. There was no significant statistical difference in all parameters between the sevoflurane and isoflurane treatment groups. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane inhalant anesthetics appear to have similar hemodynamic effects when used as part of a multimodal anesthetic protocol in premedicated healthy dogs undergoing an elective surgical procedure.

  5. Site-directed topical lidocaine spray attenuates perioperative respiratory adverse events in children undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Wei; He, Long; Ai, Yanqiu; Chu, Qinjun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative respiratory adverse events (PRAEs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with pediatric anesthesia. Topical lidocaine administration reduces risk of PRAE in children undergoing elective endotracheal intubation. However, definitive evidence of its efficacy remains elusive, due, in part, to the wide variability in the methodology for spraying topical lidocaine. In this randomized controlled double-blind clinical trial, we sought to evaluate the effect of site-directed topical airway lidocaine, sprayed directly onto supraglottic, glottis, and subglottic areas, on the incidence of PRAE. The study population consisted of 322 children (age range, 6 mo-12 y), who were scheduled for an elective surgical procedure under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive topical spray of lidocaine (group L) or saline (group S) over the supraglottic, glottis and subglottic areas under direct vision before tracheal intubation. Incidence of PRAE and time to extubation was recorded. There were no statistically significant intergroup differences with regard to baseline demographics, patient characteristics, and surgical parameters. Group L was associated with a significantly lower incidence of PRAE as compared with group S (12.80% versus 38.13%, respectively; P 2%; P = 0.005), and oxygen desaturation lidocaine over supraglottic, glottis, and subglottic areas before tracheal intubation significantly reduced the incidence of PRAE and a prolongation of extubation time in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Checklist Use on Wellness and Post-Elective Surgery Appointments in a Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch-Gallie, Rebecca; Weir, Heather; Kogan, Lori R

    Cognitive functioning is often compromised with increasing levels of stress and fatigue, both of which are often experienced by veterinarians. Many high-stress fields have implemented checklists to reduce human error. The use of these checklists has been shown to improve the quality of medical care, including adherence to evidence-based best practices and improvement of patient safety. Although it has been recognized that veterinary medicine would likely demonstrate similar benefits, there have been no published studies to date evaluating the use of checklists for improving quality of care in veterinary medicine. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of checklists during wellness and post-elective surgery appointments conducted by fourth-year veterinary students within their Community Practice rotation at a US veterinary teaching hospital. Students were randomly assigned to one of two groups: those who were specifically asked to use the provided checklists during appointments, and those who were not asked to use the checklists but had them available. Two individuals blinded to the study reviewed the tapes of all appointments in each study group to determine the amount and type of medical information offered by veterinary students. Students who were specifically asked to use the checklists provided significantly more information to owners, with the exception of keeping the incision clean. Results indicate the use of checklists helps students provide more complete information to their clients, thereby potentially enhancing animal care.

  7. The effect of preoperative oral immunonutrition on complications and length of hospital stay after elective surgery for pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Josephine; Levring, Trine; Hillingsø, Jens Georg;

    2016-01-01

    Major gastrointestinal surgery is associated with immune suppression and a high risk of postoperative complications. The aim of this open, randomized controlled trial was to examine the effect of supplementary per oral immunonutrition (IN) seven days before surgery for pancreatic cancer (PC...

  8. Robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, M; Marescaux, J

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in minimally invasive surgery requires intensive and continuous training, as it is technically challenging for unnatural visual and haptic perceptions. Robotic and computer sciences are producing innovations to augment the surgeon's skills to achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery. This article reviews the current use of robotically assisted surgery, focusing on technology as well as main applications in digestive surgery, and future perspectives. The PubMed database was interrogated to retrieve evidence-based data on surgical applications. Internal and external consulting with key opinion leaders, renowned robotics laboratories and robotic platform manufacturers was used to produce state-of-the art business intelligence around robotically assisted surgery. Selected digestive procedures (oesophagectomy, gastric bypass, pancreatic and liver resections, rectal resection for cancer) might benefit from robotic assistance, although the current level of evidence is insufficient to support widespread adoption. The surgical robotic market is growing, and a variety of projects have recently been launched at both academic and corporate levels to develop lightweight, miniaturized surgical robotic prototypes. The magnified view, and improved ergonomics and dexterity offered by robotic platforms, might facilitate the uptake of minimally invasive procedures. Image guidance to complement robotically assisted procedures, through the concepts of augmented reality, could well represent a major revolution to increase safety and deal with difficulties associated with the new minimally invasive approaches. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevention of thromboembolism following elective hip surgery. The value of regional anesthesia and graded compression stockings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille-Jørgensen, P; Christensen, S W; Bjerg-Nielsen, A

    1989-01-01

    Ninety-eight patients scheduled for elective hip arthroplasty receiving either general or regional anesthesia and graded compression stockings as the only thromboprophylactic treatment were screened for postoperative deep-venous thrombosis with 99mTc-plasmin scintimetry. The diagnosis of deep......-venous thrombosis was established by phlebography and the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism by pulmonary perfusion and ventilation scintigraphy. Of 65 patients surgically treated under general anesthesia, 20 (31%) developed deep-venous thrombosis and six developed pulmonary embolism. Of 33 patients surgically treated...... using regional anesthesia, three (9%) developed deep-venous thrombosis and one developed a pulmonary embolus. The number of patients developing deep-venous thrombosis was significantly lower in the group receiving regional anesthesia compared with the group receiving general anesthesia. The results...

  10. Comparison of an alcohol-based hand rub and water-based chlorhexidine gluconate scrub technique for hand antisepsis prior to elective surgery in horses

    OpenAIRE

    da Silveira, Eduardo Almeida; Bubeck, Kirstin A.; Batista, Edisleidy Rodriguez; Piat, Perrine; Laverty, Sheila; Beauchamp, Guy; Archambault, Marie; Elce, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluates the effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand rub (Avagard™) for pre-surgical hand antisepsis in an equine hospital and compares it with traditional scrubbing technique using 4% chlorhexidine gluconate sponges and water. Prior to elective surgery, 3 board-certified surgeons were randomly assigned to hand antisepsis with either technique. Culture samples of each hand were taken at 4 times: before and after neutral soap hand wash, after scrub or rubbing te...

  11. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were...... in beauty than women (P = 0.030). Sixty-four percent replied that their attractiveness had been increased after OS. Eighty-six percent were happy with the results and 89% would recommend the surgery to others in need. No significant differences in esthetic results and satisfaction were seen with regard...

  12. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of an educational intervention on outcomes of parents and their children undergoing inpatient elective surgery: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Gu; Zhu, Lixia; Chan, Wai-Chi Sally; Xiao, Chunxiang; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Wang, Wenru; Cheng, Kin Fong Karis; Luo, Nan

    2015-03-01

    To report a study protocol that tests the effectiveness of an educational intervention on outcomes of parents and their children who undergo inpatient elective surgery. Inadequate children's postoperative pain management remains a global problem. Parents are required to be involved in their child's pain assessment and management, yet they often lack relevant knowledge and skills. Education is an effective strategy for enhancing a person's knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. However, few studies have examined its effectiveness in parents and their children undergoing inpatient elective surgery. Randomized controlled trial and embedded qualitative process evaluation. One hundred and sixty-two pairs of participants (each comprised of one parent and his/her child undergoing inpatient elective surgery) will be recruited (protocol approved in January 2013). Participants will be randomized to either a Control group (routine care), an Intervention group 1 (routine care and an educational intervention with face-to-face teaching), or an Intervention group 2 (routine care and an educational intervention without face-to-face teaching). Outcome measures will include parents' knowledge, attitude and behaviour related to postoperative pain management; their child's postoperative pain; and parents' satisfaction with their child's pain management at baseline and around 6, 12 and 24 hours after the operation. A standardized educational intervention protocol and detailed study procedure have been developed in this study to improve parents' knowledge, attitude and behaviour related to postoperative pain management and reduce their child's postoperative pain. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Geriatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Netto, Augusto

    2005-10-01

    Modern medicine, which is evidence-based and overly scientific, has forgotten its artistic component, which is very important for surgery in general and for geriatric surgery in particular. The surgeon treating an old patient must be a politician more than a technician, more an artist than a scientist. Like Leonardo da Vinci, he or she must use scientific knowledge with intelligence and sensitivity, transforming the elderly patient's last days of life into a beautiful and harmonious painting and not into something like an atomic power station which, while no doubt useful, is deprived of beauty and sometimes very dangerous.

  14. The Hip Functional Retrieval after Elective Surgery May Be Enhanced by Supplemented Essential Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Baldissarro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not known whether postsurgery systemic inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities are still present during rehabilitation of individuals after elective hip arthroplasty (EHA. Sixty subjects (36 females; age 66.58±8.37 years were randomized to receive 14-day oral EAAs (8 g/day or a placebo (maltodextrin. At admission to and discharge from the rehabilitation center, serum C-reactive protein (CRP and venous plasma amino acid concentrations were determined. Post-EHA hip function was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS test. Ten matched healthy subjects served as controls. At baseline, all patients had high CRP levels, considerable reduction in several amino acids, and severely reduced hip function (HHS 40.78±2.70 scores. After treatment, inflammation decreased both in the EAA group and in the placebo group. Only EAA patients significantly improved their levels of glycine, alanine, tyrosine, and total amino acids. In addition, they enhanced the rate of hip function recovery (HHS (from baseline 41.8±1.15 to 76.37±6.6 versus baseline 39.78±4.89 to 70.0±7.1 in placebo one; p=0.006. The study documents the persistence of inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities in post-EHA rehabilitation phase. EAAs enhance hip function retrieval and improve plasma amino acid abnormalities.

  15. The Hip Functional Retrieval after Elective Surgery May Be Enhanced by Supplemented Essential Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissarro, Eleonora; Aquilani, Roberto; Boschi, Federica; Baiardi, Paola; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Pasini, Evasio; Verri, Manuela; Dossena, Maurizia; Gambino, Arianna; Cammisuli, Sharon; Viglio, Simona

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether postsurgery systemic inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities are still present during rehabilitation of individuals after elective hip arthroplasty (EHA). Sixty subjects (36 females; age 66.58 ± 8.37 years) were randomized to receive 14-day oral EAAs (8 g/day) or a placebo (maltodextrin). At admission to and discharge from the rehabilitation center, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and venous plasma amino acid concentrations were determined. Post-EHA hip function was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS) test. Ten matched healthy subjects served as controls. At baseline, all patients had high CRP levels, considerable reduction in several amino acids, and severely reduced hip function (HHS 40.78 ± 2.70 scores). After treatment, inflammation decreased both in the EAA group and in the placebo group. Only EAA patients significantly improved their levels of glycine, alanine, tyrosine, and total amino acids. In addition, they enhanced the rate of hip function recovery (HHS) (from baseline 41.8 ± 1.15 to 76.37 ± 6.6 versus baseline 39.78 ± 4.89 to 70.0 ± 7.1 in placebo one; p = 0.006). The study documents the persistence of inflammation and plasma amino acid abnormalities in post-EHA rehabilitation phase. EAAs enhance hip function retrieval and improve plasma amino acid abnormalities. PMID:27110573

  16. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  17. EVALUATION OF CLINICAL EFFICACY OF CLONIDINE AS AN ADJUVANT TO GENERAL ANAESTHESIA IN ELECTIVE FACIOMAXILLARY AND AESTHETIC FACE SURGERY- THE PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED SINGLE BLIND CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM AND OBJECTIVES: The present study aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy of clonidine as an adjuvant to General anaesthesia in elective faciomaxillary surgery. Faciomaxillary surgery is generally long duration surgery. Bleeding is expected to be more. As an anesthetist our main aim is to reduce the bleeding and make the patient more hemodynamically stable, so there is always a need to decrease heart rate(H.R., blood pressure (B.P. and prevent hemodynamic stress response to intubation, extubation and intraoperatively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study was conducted on 60 male adults of ASA Grade I & II scheduled for elective faciomaxillary surgery under General anaesthesia. After taking consent from the institutional ethical committee patients were divided into 2 groups comprising 30 patients in each group. Group I received 2µg/kg of clonidine in 100ml normal saline 30 min before surgery and Group II received 100ml normal saline. H.R., non-invasive B.P (N.I.B.P., oxygen saturation in arterial blood (SpO2 were recorded as base line, after induction, after intubation, then at 15 min internal intraoperatively and finally after extubation. H. R. and B. P. were assessed after 30 min, 2hr and 6hr postoperatively. Any complication, side effect and adverse effect upto 24 hrs postoperatively were noted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In Group I, compared to Group II, there was significant decrease in B.P. and H.R. during intubation, intraoperatively, extubation and post operatively and the concentration of isoflurane used was also reduced. Blood loss and incidence of shivering was less and also tube tolerance ability was better when tube was left in situ after surgery Clonidine, 2µg/kg IV in 100ml normal saline, 30min before is safe and effective in preventing the hemodynamic surgical stress response as well as intubation, extubation stress response.

  18. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globally, the entry of female students into medical schools has ... how female registrars perceived the impact of gender on their training and practice of surgery. ... male-dominated specialty, their choice of mentors and the challenges that they encountered ..... Social Determinants of Health2007 (Accessed on 23 Sep 2016).

  19. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  20. Long-term implications of emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome patients in the GenTAC Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Howard K.; Kindem, Mark; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Dietz, Harry C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Devereux, Richard B.; Eagle, Kim A.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara L.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Menashe, Victor; Ravekes, William; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Marfan syndrome patients with aortic root aneurysms undergo elective aortic root replacement to avoid the life-threatening outcomes of aortic dissection and emergency repair. The long-term implications of failed aortic surveillance leading to acute dissection and emergency repair are poorly defined. We compared the long-term clinical courses of Marfan syndrome patients who survive emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery. Methods The GenTAC Registry is an NIH-funded, multicenter database and biorepository that enrolls patients with genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms. Of the 635 patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled as of March 2011, 194 had undergone proximal aortic replacement. Patients were grouped according to emergent (n=47) or elective (n=147) status at the time of surgery. Results Patients in the emergent group were more likely to have incomplete proximal aortic resection; 83% of emergency procedures included aortic root replacement, compared with 95% of elective procedures. At long-term follow-up (mean, >6 years), emergent patients had a higher incidence of chronic dissection of the distal aorta and had significantly larger diameters in distal aortic segments than elective patients. Additionally, emergent patients had undergone more operations (1.31 vs 1.11 procedures/patient; P=0.01) and had lower activity scores on a health-related quality-of-life survey. Conclusions For Marfan syndrome patients, failed aortic surveillance and consequent emergency dissection repair have important long-term implications with regard to status of the distal aorta, the need for multiple procedures, and quality of life. These findings emphasize the importance of aortic surveillance and timely elective aortic root aneurysm repair for Marfan syndrome patients. PMID:22104675

  1. Heart rate variables in the Vascular Quality Initiative are not reliable predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes or mortality after major elective vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scali, Salvatore; Bertges, Daniel; Neal, Daniel; Patel, Virendra; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack; Beck, Adam

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate (HR) parameters are known indicators of cardiovascular complications after cardiac surgery, but there is little evidence of their role in predicting outcome after major vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arrival HR (AHR) and highest intraoperative HR are associated with mortality or major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after elective vascular surgery in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass (LEB), aortofemoral bypass (AFB), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the VQI were analyzed. MACE was defined as any postoperative myocardial infarction, dysrhythmia, or congestive heart failure. Controlled HR was defined as AHR cardiac risk, and their interactions were explored to determine association with MACE or 30-day mortality. A Bonferroni correction with P cardiac risk. These HR associations disappeared in controlling for beta-blocker status. For AFB and open AAA repair patients, there was no significant association between AHR and MACE or 30-day mortality, irrespective or cardiac risk or beta-blocker status. DHR and extremes of highest intraoperative HR (>90 or 100 beats/min) were analyzed among all three operations, and no consistent associations with MACE or 30-day mortality were detected. The VQI AHR and highest intraoperative HR variables are highly confounded by patient presentation, operative variables, and beta-blocker therapy. The discordance between cardiac risk and HR as well as the lack of consistent correlation to outcome makes them unreliable predictors. The VQI has elected to discontinue collecting AHR and highest intraoperative HR data, given insufficient evidence to suggest their importance as an outcome measure. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel risk markers and long-term outcomes of delirium: The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study Design and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Eva M.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; SM; Alsop, David C.; Jones, Richard N.; Rogers, Selwyn O.; Fong, Tamara G.; Metzger, Eran; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Delirium--a costly, life-threatening, and potentially preventable condition--is a common complication for older adults following major surgery. While the basic epidemiology of delirium after surgery has been defined, the contribution of delirium to long-term outcomes remains uncertain, and novel biomarkers from plasma and neuroimaging have yet to be examined. This program project was designed to contribute to our understanding of the complex multifactorial syndrome of delirium. Design Long-term prospective cohort study. Setting 3 academic medical centers (2 hospitals and 1 coordinating center). Participants Patients without recognized dementia (targeted cohort = 550 patients) age 70 and older scheduled to undergo elective major surgery are assessed at baseline prior to surgery, daily during their hospital stay, and for 18-36 months after discharge. Measurements The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) study is an innovative, interdisciplinary study that includes biomarkers, neuroimaging, cognitive reserve markers, and serial neuropsychological testing to examine the contribution of delirium to long-term cognitive and functional decline. The primary goal is to examine the contribution of delirium to long-term cognitive and functional decline. In addition, novel risk markers, for delirium are being examined, including plasma biomarkers (e.g., cytokines, proteomics), advanced neuroimaging markers (e.g., volumetric, white matter hyperintensity, noncontrast blood flow, and diffusion tensor measures) and cognitive reserve markers (e.g., education, occupation, lifetime activities). Conclusion Results from this study will contribute to a fuller understanding of the etiology and prognosis of delirium. Ultimately, we hope this project will provide the groundwork for future development of prevention and treatment strategies for delirium, designed to minimize the long-term negative impact of delirium in older adults. PMID:22999782

  3. Surgical Measures to Reduce Infection in Open Colorectal Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    than 20% for emergency surgery and 5% for elective surgery for cancer; an ... 4% for colonic resection, and wound infection rates after surgery for colorectal cancer should be ..... obesity, jaundice etc) and post operative wound infection53.

  4. What Is Refractive Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  5. LASIK - Laser Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  6. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... the type of defect, and the type of surgery that was done. Many children recover completely and lead normal, active lives.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ... implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Surgery is a common treatment for breast cancer, ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  10. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  11. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects mild-to-moderate nearsightedness, ...

  12. Preparing for Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Preparing for Surgery Home For Patients Search FAQs Preparing for Surgery ... Surgery FAQ080, August 2011 PDF Format Preparing for Surgery Gynecologic Problems What is the difference between outpatient ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  14. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  15. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  16. Facial Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  17. "Fulfilling the chief of his duties as a physician": Harvey Cushing, selective dorsal rhizotomy and elective spine surgery for quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2011-03-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, the development of safer anesthesia, antiseptic techniques, and meticulous surgical dissection led to a substantial decrease in operative risk. In turn, the scope of surgery expanded to include elective procedures performed with the intention of improving the quality of life of patients. Between 1908 and 1912, Harvey Cushing performed 3 dorsal rhizotomies to improve the quality of life of 3 patients with debilitating neuralgia: a 54-year-old man with "lightning" radicular pain from tabes dorsalis, a 12-year-old boy cutaneous hyperesthesia and spasticity in his hemiplegic arm, and a 61-year-old man with postamputation neuropathic pain. Symptomatic improvement was seen postoperatively in the first 2 cases, although the third patient continued to have severe pain. Cushing also removed a prominent spinous process from each of 2 patients with debilitating headaches; both patients, however, experienced only minimal postoperative improvement. These cases, which have not been previously published, highlight Cushing's views on the role of surgery and illustrate the broader movement that occurred in surgery at the time, whereby elective procedures for quality of life became performed and accepted.

  18. “Fulfilling the chief of his duties as a physician”: Harvey Cushing, selective dorsal rhizotomy and elective spine surgery for quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of the 20th century, the development of safer anesthesia, antiseptic techniques, and meticulous surgical dissection led to a substantial decrease in operative risk. In turn, the scope of surgery expanded to include elective procedures performed with the intention of improving the quality of life of patients. Between 1908 and 1912, Harvey Cushing performed 3 dorsal rhizotomies to improve the quality of life of 3 patients with debilitating neuralgia: a 54-year-old man with “lightning” radicular pain from tabes dorsalis, a 12-year-old boy cutaneous hyperesthesia and spasticity in his hemiplegic arm, and a 61-year-old man with postamputation neuropathic pain. Symptomatic improvement was seen postoperatively in the first 2 cases, although the third patient continued to have severe pain. Cushing also removed a prominent spinous process from each of 2 patients with debilitating headaches; both patients, however, experienced only minimal postoperative improvement. These cases, which have not been previously published, highlight Cushing's views on the role of surgery and illustrate the broader movement that occurred in surgery at the time, whereby elective procedures for quality of life became performed and accepted. PMID:21250816

  19. Comparison of an alcohol-based hand rub and water-based chlorhexidine gluconate scrub technique for hand antisepsis prior to elective surgery in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Eduardo Almeida; Bubeck, Kirstin A.; Batista, Edisleidy Rodriguez; Piat, Perrine; Laverty, Sheila; Beauchamp, Guy; Archambault, Marie; Elce, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluates the effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand rub (Avagard™) for pre-surgical hand antisepsis in an equine hospital and compares it with traditional scrubbing technique using 4% chlorhexidine gluconate sponges and water. Prior to elective surgery, 3 board-certified surgeons were randomly assigned to hand antisepsis with either technique. Culture samples of each hand were taken at 4 times: before and after neutral soap hand wash, after scrub or rubbing technique, and after surgery. There was no significant difference in mean bacterial colony forming units between scrub and rub techniques over the 3 time periods (P = 0.6), controlling for initial counts. One horse from the scrub group had a skin incision infection following stifle arthroscopy; this was resolved with medical treatment. The alcohol-based hand rub is equivalent in efficacy for pre-surgical hand antisepsis to traditional water-based scrubs in an equine hospital setting. PMID:26834268

  20. Comparison of an alcohol-based hand rub and water-based chlorhexidine gluconate scrub technique for hand antisepsis prior to elective surgery in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Eduardo Almeida; Bubeck, Kirstin A; Batista, Edisleidy Rodriguez; Piat, Perrine; Laverty, Sheila; Beauchamp, Guy; Archambault, Marie; Elce, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluates the effectiveness of an alcohol-based hand rub (Avagard™) for pre-surgical hand antisepsis in an equine hospital and compares it with traditional scrubbing technique using 4% chlorhexidine gluconate sponges and water. Prior to elective surgery, 3 board-certified surgeons were randomly assigned to hand antisepsis with either technique. Culture samples of each hand were taken at 4 times: before and after neutral soap hand wash, after scrub or rubbing technique, and after surgery. There was no significant difference in mean bacterial colony forming units between scrub and rub techniques over the 3 time periods (P = 0.6), controlling for initial counts. One horse from the scrub group had a skin incision infection following stifle arthroscopy; this was resolved with medical treatment. The alcohol-based hand rub is equivalent in efficacy for pre-surgical hand antisepsis to traditional water-based scrubs in an equine hospital setting.

  1. ProSeal versus Classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamarul Hoda, Muhammad; Samad, Khalid; Ullah, Hameed

    2017-07-20

    The development of supraglottic airway devices has revolutionized airway management during general anaesthesia. Two devices are widely used in clinical practice to facilitate positive pressure ventilation: the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (pLMA) and the Classic laryngeal mask airway (cLMA). It is not clear whether these devices have important clinical differences in terms of efficacy or complications. To compare the effectiveness of the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (pLMA) and the Classic LMA (cLMA) for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 3) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (Ovid SP, 1997 to April 2017); Embase (Ovid SP, 1997 to April 2017); the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1946 to April 2017); and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (EBSCO host, 1982 to April 2017).We searched trial registries for ongoing studies to April 2017.We did not impose language restrictions. We restricted our search to the time from 1997 to April 2017 because pLMA was introduced into clinical practice in the year 2000. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effectiveness of pLMA and cLMA for positive pressure ventilation in adults undergoing elective surgery. We planned to include only data related to the first phase of cross-over RCTs. We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. We included eight RCTs that involved a total of 829 participants (416 and 413 participants in the pLMA and cLMA groups, respectively). We identified six cross-over studies that are awaiting classification; one is completed but has not been published, and data related to the first treatment period for the other five studies were not yet available. Seven included studies provided data related to the primary outcome, and eight studies provided data related to more than

  2. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery: joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  3. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery. Joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  4. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients before elective, noncardiothoracic surgery : Joint recommendation of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society of Surgery, and the German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwissler, B

    2017-06-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e. g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest x‑ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or is controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, noncardiothoracic surgery, which were initially published in 2010. These recommendations have now been updated based on the current literature and existing international guidelines. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and

  5. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, lumbar spine surgery have significant impact on the short-term PROs. Patients with complications, however, do eventually achieve clinically meaningful outcomes and report satisfaction equivalent to those without major complications. This information allows a physician to

  6. An evaluation of preoperative and postoperative ventilation and perfusion lung scintigraphy in the screening for pulmonary embolism after elective orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, A.M.; Palevsky, H.I.; Steinberg, M.E.; Hartman, K.M.; Alavi, A.; Lotke, P.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1991-01-01

    One hundred two patients undergoing elective knee or hip arthroplasty were studied with radionuclide ventilation scans (V) and perfusion scans (Q) preoperatively (preop) and postoperatively (postop) to assess their relative value in the diagnosis of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) after orthopedic surgery. Postop Q were read in combination with preop V and Q and postop V using prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED) criteria. Of 25 postop Q interpreted as either high or intermediate probability for PE, preop Q were judged useful in 96%; the postop V were useful in 78%; and the preop V were not helpful in any of the cases. Of 63 postop Q interpreted as low probability, preop Q were useful in 74%; the postop V were useful in only 33%; and the preop V were useful in only one case. When postop Q were read as normal (14 cases), none of the three auxiliary studies were found to be useful. Overall, postop V were more helpful than preop Q in only 2%, and preop V contributed significantly in only 1%. This experience suggests that preop Q alone is the most useful adjunct to the postop Q in the postoperative evaluation for PE. The authors conclude that to screen for asymptomatic PE after elective orthopedic surgery, preop Q should be performed in all cases, preop V are not necessary, and postop V need be performed only if a baseline preop Q is not available.

  7. Validation of the Estimation of Physiologic Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) score for maintenance hemodialysis patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hayato; Mafune, Ken-Ichi; Minamimura, Keisuke; Hirata, Tooru

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the validity of the Estimation of Physiologic Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) score in maintenance hemodialysis patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 73 hemodialysis patients who underwent elective gastrointestinal surgery. The main outcomes analyzed were the E-PASS score and postoperative course, which were defined by mortality and morbidity. The discriminative capability of the E-PASS score was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The overall mortality rate observed was 2.7% (2 patients) and the morbidity rate was 36.9%. There were no significant differences in the comprehensive risk score, preoperative score or surgical stress score for patients with or without complications (p = 0.556, 0.639 and 0.168, respectively). Subsequent ROC curve analysis demonstrated poor predictive accuracy for morbidity. When the results in our study population were compared with those in Haga's study population, our population exhibited a highly significant rightward shift (p system should not be applied in such a special group with high risk factors. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Early inflammatory response following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A comparison between endovascular procedure and conventional, open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA represents a pathological enlargment of infrarenal portion of aorta for over 50% of its lumen. The only treatment of AAA is a surgical reconstruction of the affected segment. Until the late XX century, surgical reconstruction implied explicit, open repair (OR of AAA, which was accompanied by a significant morbidity and mortality of the treated patients. Development of endovascular repair of (EVAR AAA, especially in the last decade, offered another possibility of surgical reconstruction of AAA. The preliminary results of world studies show that complications of such a procedure, as well as morbidity and mortality of patients, are significantly lower than with OR of AAA. The aim of this paper was to present results of comparative clinical prospective study of early inflammatory response after reconstruction of AAA between endovascular and open, conventional surgical technique. Methods. A comparative clinical prospective study included 39 patients, electively operated on for AAA within the period of December 2008 - February 2010, divided into two groups. The group I counted 21 (54% of the patients, 58-87 years old (mean 74.3 years, who had been submited to EVAR by the use of excluder stent graft. The group II consisted of 18 (46% of the patients, 49-82 (mean 66.8 years, operated on using OR technique. All of the treated patients in both groups had AAA larager than 50 mm. The study did not include patients who have been treated as urgent cases, due to the rupture or with simptomatic AAA. Clinical, biochemical and inflamatory parameters in early postoperative period were analyzed, in direct postoperative course (number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, serum circulating levels of cytokine - interleukine (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. Parameters were monitored on the zero, first, second, third and seventh postoperative days. The study was approved by the Ethics Commitee of the Military Medical Academy. Results

  9. Higher C-Reactive Protein Levels Predict Postoperative Delirium in Older Patients Undergoing Major Elective Surgery: A Longitudinal Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Simon T; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M; Ngo, Long; Otu, Hasan H; Inouye, Sharon K; Jones, Richard N; Alsop, David C; Kuchel, George A; Metzger, Eran D; Arnold, Steven E; Marcantonio, Edward R; Libermann, Towia A

    2017-01-15

    Delirium is a common, morbid, and costly postoperative complication. We aimed to identify blood-based postoperative delirium markers in a nested case-control study of older surgical patients using a proteomics approach followed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) validation. The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery study enrolled dementia-free adults ≥70 years old undergoing major scheduled noncardiac surgery (N = 566; 24% delirium). Plasma was collected at four time points: preoperative, postanesthesia care unit, postoperative day 2, and 1 month postoperative. Matched pairs were selected for the independent discovery (39 pairs) and replication cohorts (36 pairs), which were subsequently combined into the pooled cohort (75 pairs). Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-based relative quantitation mass spectrometry proteomics were performed to identify the strongest delirium-related protein, which was selected for ELISA validation. Using the ELISA results, statistical analyses using nonparametric signed rank tests were performed in all cohorts examining the association between the identified protein and delirium. C-reactive protein emerged from the proteomics analysis as the strongest delirium-related protein. Validation by ELISA confirmed that compared with controls, cases had significantly higher C-reactive protein levels in the discovery, replication, and pooled cohorts at the preoperative (median paired difference [MPD] 1.97 mg/L [p delirium, suggesting that a preinflammatory state and heightened inflammatory response to surgery are potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of delirium. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Orgaran (Org 10172) or heparin for preventing venous thrombosis after elective surgery for malignant disease? A double-blind, randomised, multicentre comparison. ANZ-Organon Investigators' Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallus, A; Cade, J; Ockelford, P; Hepburn, S; Maas, M; Magnani, H; Bucknall, T; Stevens, J; Porteous, F

    1993-10-18

    This double-blind, randomised, multicentre trial in 513 patients having elective surgery for intra-abdominal or intrathoracic malignancy compared the efficacy and safety of venous thrombosis (VT) prophylaxis using 750 anti-factor Xa units of Orgaran (a mixture of low molecular weight heparinoids) given subcutaneously (sc) twice-daily with that of twice-daily injections of 5,000 units standard heparin. The main study endpoints were the development of postoperative VT detected by 125I-fibrinogen leg scanning, and the onset of clinically significant venous thromboembolism or bleeding. "Intent to treat" analysis showed a statistically non-significant trend towards less VT during Orgaran prophylaxis (10.4%) than after heparin (14.9%) and there was no difference in bleeding complications between the two study groups. Results remained similar if only patients who completed the intended course of therapy ("compliant patients") were analysed. Other trials have shown that Orgaran prevents VT after hip surgery and stroke. We now show it is also safe and effective in patients having major surgery for cancer.

  11. Relationship between C-reactive protein levels and wound infections in elective colorectal surgery: C-reactive protein as a predictor for incisional SSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takaaki; Tabe, Yuichi; Yajima, Reina; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acknowledged marker of infections. For early detection of postoperative infections, CRP levels may be a useful marker. In this study, the CRP response with respect to wound infections (incisional surgical site infection (SSI)) in elective colorectal surgery was examined to define the role of serum CRP as a predictor of incisional SSI. One hundred forty-eight patients who underwent elective colorectal resection were identified for inclusion in this study. The outcome of interest was incisional SSI. Twenty-eight patients with incisional SSI were compared to a subgroup of 118 patients with an uneventful postoperative course, and the correlation between postoperative serum CRP levels and incisional SSI in colorectal surgery was investigated. For uneventful cases, the CRP rose postoperatively to a maximum on the third day, and the concentrations then returned to near normal levels on postoperative day (POD) 7. In incisional SSI cases, persistent elevation or a second rise in CRP concentrations was seen. Although no statistically significant differences in CRP concentrations were seen on POD 1 or 3, the initial rise in CRP of cases with incisional SSI was relatively higher compared to uneventful cases. A deviation became obvious at POD 7. A cut-off level of 36 mg/L on POD 7 was recorded (sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 83.1%) for incisional SSI. Our results suggest that elevated serum CRP levels are correlated with incisional SSI. Persistent CRP elevation is predictive of incisional SSI in colorectal surgery if pneumonia or anastomotic leakage are unlikely or excluded.

  12. [Minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery: surgery 4.0?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feußner, H; Wilhelm, D

    2016-03-01

    Surgery can only maintain its role in a highly competitive environment if results are continuously improved, accompanied by further reduction of the interventional trauma for patients and with justifiable costs. Significant impulse to achieve this goal was expected from minimally invasive surgery and, in particular, robotic surgery; however, a real breakthrough has not yet been achieved. Accordingly, the new strategic approach of cognitive surgery is required to optimize the provision of surgical treatment. A full scale integration of all modules utilized in the operating room (OR) into a comprehensive network and the development of systems with technical cognition are needed to upgrade the current technical environment passively controlled by the surgeon into an active collaborative support system (surgery 4.0). Only then can the true potential of minimally invasive surgery and robotic surgery be exploited.

  13. Open heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - open ... lung machine is used in most cases during open heart surgery. While the surgeon works on the ... with these procedures, the surgeon may have to open the chest to do the surgery.

  14. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

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    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by restricting the ... Online Education Directory Search Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery ... Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity ...

  15. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

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    ... epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... long as you are told. This helps ensure tennis elbow will not return. You may be prescribed a ...

  16. Plastic Surgery Statistics

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    ... PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Statistics by Year Print 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2015 ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... Soft Tissue Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral ...

  18. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

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    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat ... will work with you to decide whether you need heart surgery. A cardiologist specializes in diagnosing and ...

  19. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

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    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Gastric Sleeve Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Gastric Sleeve Surgery Print A ... buying healthy food ) continue Preparing for Gastric Sleeve Surgery Preparing for this major operation takes months of ...

  20. Cavus Foot Surgery

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    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Cavus Foot Surgery Page Content What is a cavus foot? A ... problems. What are the goals of cavus foot surgery? The main goal of surgery is to reduce ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  2. Laser surgery - skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery using a laser ... used is directly related to the type of surgery being performed and the color of the tissue ... Laser surgery can be used to: Close small blood vessels to reduce blood loss Remove warts , moles , sunspots, and ...

  3. Smoking and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surgery - quitting smoking; Surgery - quitting tobacco; Wound healing - smoking ... Smokers who have surgery have a higher chance than nonsmokers of blood clots forming in their legs. These clots may travel to and ...

  4. Lung surgery - discharge

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    ... Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge ... milk) for 2 weeks after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and 6 to 8 weeks after open surgery. ...

  5. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

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    ... Health Growth & Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & ... Surgery Types of Surgery Gastric Bypass ... or intestines removed due to ulcers or cancer tended to lose a lot of weight after ...

  6. Diplopia after strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgado, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The presence of diplopia is an undesirable result following strabismus surgery. There are a variety of scenarios where diplopia exists prior to strabismus surgery, and, after surgery, has either been alleviated or decreased to a magnitude amenable to prism correction. In other cases, the patient does not experience diplopia prior to the strabismus surgery, but there exists a definite risk of diplopia after the surgery. In the current review, I examine the literature to help determine the incidence of diplopia after strabismus surgery.

  7. Single incision laparoscopic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Prasad

    2010-01-01

    As a complement to standard laparoscopic surgery and a safe alternative to natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery,single incision laparoscopic surgery is gaining popularity.There are expensive ports,disposable hand instruments and flexible endoscopes that have been suggested to do this surgery and would increase the cost of operation.For a simple surgery like laparoscopic cholecystectomy,these extras are not needed and the surgery can be performed using standard ports,instruments and telescopes.Tri...

  8. Intraoperative Infusion of Dexmedetomidine for Prevention of Postoperative Delirium and Cognitive Dysfunction in Elderly Patients Undergoing Major Elective Noncardiac Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Stacie; Luo, Xiaodong; Lin, Hung-Mo; Sessler, Daniel I; Saager, Leif; Sieber, Frederick E; Lee, Hochang B; Sano, Mary; Jankowski, Christopher; Bergese, Sergio D; Candiotti, Keith; Flaherty, Joseph H; Arora, Harendra; Shander, Aryeh; Rock, Peter

    2017-08-16

    Postoperative delirium occurs in 10% to 60% of elderly patients having major surgery and is associated with longer hospital stays, increased hospital costs, and 1-year mortality. Emerging literature suggests that dexmedetomidine sedation in critical care units is associated with reduced incidence of delirium. However, intraoperative use of dexmedetomidine for prevention of delirium has not been well studied. To evaluate whether an intraoperative infusion of dexmedetomidine reduces postoperative delirium. This study was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that randomly assigned patients to dexmedetomidine or saline placebo infused during surgery and for 2 hours in the recovery room. Patients were assessed daily for postoperative delirium (primary outcome) and secondarily for postoperative cognitive decline. Participants were elderly (>68 years) patients undergoing major elective noncardiac surgery. The study dates were February 2008 to May 2014. Dexmedetomidine infusion (0.5 µg/kg/h) during surgery and up to 2 hours in the recovery room. The primary hypothesis tested was that intraoperative dexmedetomidine administration would reduce postoperative delirium. Secondarily, the study examined the correlation between dexmedetomidine use and postoperative cognitive change. In total, 404 patients were randomized; 390 completed in-hospital delirium assessments (median [interquartile range] age, 74.0 [71.0-78.0] years; 51.3% [200 of 390] female). There was no difference in postoperative delirium between the dexmedetomidine and placebo groups (12.2% [23 of 189] vs 11.4% [23 of 201], P = .94). After adjustment for age and educational level, there was no difference in the postoperative cognitive performance between treatment groups at 3 months and 6 months. Adverse events were comparably distributed in the treatment groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine does not prevent postoperative delirium. The reduction in delirium previously demonstrated

  9. 148 Predictive Model for Return to Work After Elective Surgery for Lumbar Degenerative Disease: An Analysis From National Neurosurgery Quality Outcomes Database Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Chotai, Silky; Devin, Clinton J; Archer-Swygert, Kristen; Parker, Scott L; Bydon, Mohamad; Hui, Nian; Harrell, Frank; Speroff, Theodore; Dittus, Robert; Philips, Sharon; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    The current costs associated with spine care are unsustainable. The productivity loss and time away from work in gainfully employed patients contributes greatly to the financial burden. Therefore, it is vital to identify the factors associated with returning to work after lumbar spine surgery. We present a predictive model of ability to return to work (RTW) after lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Total 4694 patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative lumbar disease who were employed were entered into a prospective multicenter registry (N2QOD). Baseline and 3-month postoperative patient-reported outcomes: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, NRS back and leg pain were recorded. The time to RTW was defined as the period between operation time and date of returning to work. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, including an array of preoperative factors, was fitted for RTW. The model performance was measured by the c-index. Eighty-two percent of patients (n = 3855) returned to work within 3 -months postoperatively. The risk-adjusted predictors of lower likelihood of RTW were preoperatively employed but not working at the time of presentation, those occupied with manual labor, on worker's compensation, on liability insurance, baseline ODI and NRS-BP scores, female sex, African American race, history of diabetes mellitus, and higher ASA grades. The likelihood of RTW within 3 months was higher in patients with higher education level compared with those with less than high school level education. The c-index of our model performance was 0.71. We present a novel predictive model for probability of RTW after lumbar spine surgery. Spine care providers can use this model to educate patients and encourage them in shared decision making regarding the RTW outcome. This will result in better communication between patients and clinicians and improve recovery expectations, which will ultimately increase the likelihood of a

  10. Elective nasal continuous positive airway pressure to support respiration after prolonged ventilation in infants after congenital cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Hemang; Mishra, Amit; Thosani, Rajesh; Acharya, Himanshu; Shah, Ritesh; Surti, Jigar; Sarvaia, Alpesh

    2017-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare the effectiveness of oxygen (O2) treatment administered by an O2 mask and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in infants after congenital cardiac surgery. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, 54 infants undergoing corrective cardiac surgery were enrolled. According to the anesthesiologist's preference, the patients ventilated for more than 48 h were either put on NCPAP or O2 mask immediately after extubation. From pre-extubation to 24 h after treatment, arterial blood gas and hemodynamic data were measured. Results: After 24 h of NCPAP institution, the patients showed a significant improvement in oxygenation compared to O2 mask group. Respiratory rate (per minute) decreased from 31.67 ± 4.55 to 24.31 ± 3.69 (P < 0.0001), PO2 (mmHg) increased from 112.12 ± 22.83 to 185.74 ± 14.81 (P < 0.0001), and PCO2 (mmHg) decreased from 42.88 ± 5.01 to 37.00 ± 7.22 (P < 0.0076) in patients on NCPAP. In this group, mean pediatric cardiac surgical Intensive Care Unit (PCSICU) stay was 4.72 ± 1.60 days, with only 2 (11.11%) patients requiring re-intubation. Conclusion: NCPAP can be used safely and effectively in infants undergoing congenital cardiac surgery to improve oxygenation/ventilation. It also reduces the work of breathing, PCSICU stay, and may reduce the likelihood of re-intubation. PMID:28163425

  11. Age-specific performance of the revised cardiac risk index for predicting cardiovascular risk in elective noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Wissenberg, Mads; Jørgensen, Mads Emil;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) holds a central role in preoperative cardiac risk stratification in noncardiac surgery. Its performance in unselected populations, including different age groups, has, however, not been systematically investigated. We assessed the relationship......%, 71%, 64%, 66%, and 67% in patients aged ≤ 55, 56 to 65, 66 to 75, 76 to 85, and >85 years, respectively; the negative predictive values were >98% across all age groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a nationwide unselected cohort, the performance of the RCRI was similar to that of the original cohort. Having ≥ 1...

  12. THE EFFICACY OF PREGABALIN AS A PREMEDICANT IN ATTENUATING NEUROENDOCRINE STRESS RESPONSE DURING GENERAL ANAESTHESIA IN ELECTIVE SURGERIES: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED PLACEBO CONTROLLED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani Muthukrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The stress response to surgery is characterised by increased secretion of pituitary hormones and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The changes triggered by the stress response are short-lived and well tolerated by normal healthy patients belonging to ASA 1 and 2. In patients with other comorbidities like myocardial ischaemia, renal insufficiency, uncontrolled diabetes, liver disease and cerebrovascular diseases, these changes can be life threatening. The recognition of the factors which initiate the stress response can be considered for modification in the preoperative period itself. Various anaesthetic techniques and pain management strategies have been put into use to control the stress response. AIM To study the rise in serum cortisol levels during surgery after administering oral pregabalin as a premedicant. SETTINGS AND DESIGN A Prospective Randomised Placebo Controlled Study. MATERIALS AND METHODS All consented patients were aged between 18 and 50 years belonging to ASA 1 & 2 undergoing elective surgical procedures under general anaesthesia of duration between 30 minutes and 180 minutes. Group A received oral placebo, Group B oral pregabalin 150 mg 60-90 minutes before surgery with sips of water. They were randomly allocated to a particular group using computer generated numbers. The ward staff nurse administered the drug kept in sealed envelopes. Both the patients and the person administering anaesthesia were unaware of the group. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS The results were analysed using SPSS Version 17 software with the help of the statistician. The students’ paired t-test was used to compare the mean change in the cortisol levels in the two groups. RESULTS There was a significant [p < 0.01] reduction in the intraoperative cortisol levels after premedication with pregabalin. There was an increase in serum cortisol levels after extubation in both the groups which was statistically significant (p < 0.01. CONCLUSION

  13. Singapore General Hospital Experience on Ethnicity and the Incidence of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting after Elective Orthopaedic Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yu Adeline Leong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We explored how ethnicity affects the risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV and established the correlation of suggested risk factors of PONV in the multiethnic population of Singapore. Methods. 785 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery were recruited. These comprised 619 Chinese (78.9%, 76 Malay (9.7%, 68 Indian (8.7%, and 22 other (2.8% cases. The presence of possible risk factors of PONV and nausea and/or vomiting within 24 h after surgery was studied. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results. The incidence of PONV was 33.2% (261 patients. There was no statistically significant difference of PONV incidence between Chinese, Malay, and Indian cases (34.6% versus 34.2% versus 29.4%, p=0.695. Indian females younger than 50 years were found to have a higher incidence of vomiting (p=0.02. The significant risk factors for this population include females, use of nitrous oxide, and a history of PONV. Conclusion. In the groups studied, ethnicity is not a significant risk factor for PONV except for young Indian females who have a higher risk of postoperative vomiting. We suggest the selective usage of antiemetic for young Indian females as prophylaxis and avoiding nitrous oxide use in high-risk patients.

  14. Serum tryptophan and its metabolites in female dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy as treatment of pyometra or as elective spay surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Roman; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Pastor, Josep; Kocki, Tomasz; Turski, Waldemar A

    2015-05-01

    This study compares serum concentrations of tryptophan (TRP), kynurenine (KYN), kynurenic acid (KYNA), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in healthy bitches and bitches with bacterial uterine infection (pyometra). The effects of surgery were also assessed by measuring these variables in both groups of dogs before and after ovariohysterectomy. Presurgery, mean (±standard deviation) TRP, KYN, and KYNA concentrations and IDO activity were 68.44 ± 21.77, 2.00 ± 0.33, 112.11 ± 111.91 μmol/L, and 29.22 ± 10.10, respectively, in the healthy dogs; and 40.16 ± 12.11, 8.27 ± 3.94, 411.11 ± 199.60 μmol/L, and 205.92 ± 154.20, respectively, in the dogs with pyometra. Tryptophan and KYN levels had normalized on suture removal (10 days after surgery) though IDO activity and KYNA concentrations remained elevated during the postoperative period compared with presurgery values in both study groups. Our results suggest that KYNA concentrations and IDO activity could be useful indicators of the inflammation induced by pyometra and could be also used to monitor recovery following ovariohysterectomy in both healthy dogs and dogs with pyometra. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ...

  16. Gastric bypass surgery

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    ... Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... bypass surgery is not a quick fix for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. After this surgery, you must eat healthy foods, control portion sizes of ...

  17. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require ...

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ... out more. Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may ...

  19. Comparison of the centrifugal and roller pump in elective coronary artery bypass surgery--a prospective, randomized study with special emphasis upon platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Knut S; Nygreen, Else L; Grong, Ketil; Leirvaag, Beryl; Holmsen, Holm

    2003-12-01

    Objective--Evaluation of the centrifugal pump vs roller pump concerning effects upon platelet function, hemolysis and clinical outcome in elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Design--Thirty-four patients were randomized to centrifugal or roller pump. Platelet activation was studied by flow cytometry before, during and up to 3 days after bypass. Results--Duration of bypass, ischemic period, peripheral anastomoses, hospital stay and mortality did not differ. In roller pump patients, platelet aggregates increased by 250% between end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p centrifugal pump group, these changes were not significant. Hemolysis increased (20%) at end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p centrifugal pump patients, indicating higher susceptibility to postoperative thrombotic complications with the roller pump. Otherwise, there was no clinical evidence for superiority of the centrifugal pump.

  20. Analysis of NHSLA claims in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Irfan H; Jamil, Wiqqas; Lynn, Sam Mathew; Khan, Osman H; Markland, Kate; Giddins, Grey

    2012-05-01

    National Health Service (NHS) statistics in the United Kingdom demonstrate an increase in clinical negligence claims over the past 30 years. Reasons for this include elements of a cultural shift in attitudes toward the medical profession and the growth of the legal services industry. This issue affects medical and surgical health providers worldwide.The authors analyzed 2117 NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) orthopedic surgery claims between 1995 and 2001 with respect to these clinical areas: emergency department, outpatient care, surgery (elective or trauma operations), and inpatient care. The authors focused on the costs of settling and defending claims, costs attributable to clinical areas, common causes of claims, and claims relating to elective or trauma surgery. Numbers of claims and legal costs increased most notably in surgery (elective and trauma) and in the emergency department. However, claims are being defended more robustly. The annual cost for a successful defense has remained relatively stable, showing a slight decline. The common causes of claims are postoperative complication; wrong, delayed, or failure of diagnosis; inadequate consent; and wrong-site surgery. Certain surgical specialties (eg, spine and lower-limb surgery) have the most claims made during elective surgery, whereas upper-limb surgery has the most claims made during trauma surgery.The authors recommend that individual trusts liaise with orthopedic surgeons to devise strategies to address areas highlighted in our study. Despite differences in health care systems worldwide, the underlying issues are common. With improved understanding, physicians can deliver the service they promise their patients.

  1. Kinetics of changes in serum concentrations of procalcitonin, interleukin-6, and C- reactive protein after elective abdominal surgery. Can it be used to detect postoperative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbić, Jerko; Ivić, Dubravka; Alkhamis, Tamara; Drenjancević, Domagoj; Ivić, Josip; Harsanji-Drenjancević, Ivana; Turina, Ivana; Vcev, Aleksandar

    2013-03-01

    Postoperative increase in inflammation biologic markers is associated with a nonspecific inflammatory response to a surgical injury. We investigated the kinetics of changes in serum concentrations of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) after abdominal surgeries and we focused on the behaviour of those markers in the case of development of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In the single centre we conducted a prospective observational study and we included patients admitted to the ICU after elective abdominal surgery. A total of 41 patients were included and 8 (19.5%) of them had clinical and laboratory signs of SIRS. Sepsis was confirmed in one of the patients, a 72-year old patient operated due to having an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Plasma concentrations of PCT, CRP and IL-6 were measured in all the patients before surgery and at the postoperative day 1 (POD1), postoperative day 2 (POD2) and postoperative day 3 (POD3). Systemic release of PCT, CRP and IL-6 was present in all the measured time points after the abdominal surgery. Median concentrations of IL-6 (100.4 pg/mL) and PCT (1, 17 pg/mL) production were measured highest at POD1 and the median of CRP (147 mg/L) was measured at highest POD2. A larger increase of all three measured markers was found in patients with SIRS compared to those without. IL-6 at POD1 and POD2 was a good predictor of SIRS (areas under curves were 0.71 and 0.765, respectively), showing the highest accuracy among investigated markers at those time points. CRP at POD3 was a good predictor of SIRS (AUC was 0.76). A cut-off of 95 mg/mL in the level of CRP at POD3 yielded a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 66.7% in detecting SIRS. IL-6 and CRP were the best in detecting postoperative SIRS after abdominal surgery with the highest area under ROC curve. This study is showing that PCT is not a good marker of SIRS caused only by surgical injury without sepsis.

  2. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH AQUEOUS POVIDONE IODINE ONLY AND IN COMBINATION WITH ALCHOLIC CHLORHEXIDINE IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latchu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many techniques are there for skin preparation before surgery, the commonest being initial scrub with antiseptic soap solution, followed by painting the prepared area with antiseptic paint solution. But degerming of the skin can be done with antiseptics us ed for less than one minute which is as effective as five minute scrub with germicidal soap solution followed by painting with antiseptics . AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : 1. To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine with povidone iodine in preoperative skin preparation by taking swab culture. 2. To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups . METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Comparative study conducted on 100 patients in two groups. STUDY SETTING: Sri Venkateswara Medical College Tirupathi SOURCE OF DATA: 100 Patients (50 in each Group undergoing elective and emergency surgery admitted in the Department of General Surgery in S.V.R.R. Government General Hospital, Tirupati from 2013 to 2014. INCLUSION CRITERIA: 1. Patients undergoing elective & emergency surgery in department of general surgery. 2. Patients with no focus of infection anywhere on the body. 3. Patients irrespective of their age and sex. 4. Patients neither immunocompromised nor on any long term steroids. 5. Patients undergoing mes h repair of hernia are also included. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: 1. Immuno compromised patients and patients on long term steroids. 2. Patients with septicemia. 3. Patients suffering from malignancies or undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 4. Contaminat ed surgeries in which viscus was opened were excluded from the study. 5. Patients with co - morbid medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension etc. METHOD OF COLLECTION OF DATA: In each case preoperatively, detailed history was taken and routine investiga tions like haemoglobin, total count, differential count, ESR, RBS and chest X - ray, ultrasound were done to

  3. The analgesic effect of nitroglycerin added to lidocaine on quality of intravenous regional anesthesia in patients undergoing elective forearm and hand surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Kimiaei Asadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of nitroglycerine (NTG on sensory and motor block onset and recovery time as well as the quality of tourniquet pain relief, when added to lidocaine (LID for intravenous regional anesthesia in elective forearm and hand surgery. METHODS: A randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 40 patients that were randomly allocated into two groups received lidocaine 3 mg/kg with NTG 200 µg or received only lidocaine 3 mg/kg as the control. RESULTS: There was no difference between the two study groups in hemodynamic parameters before tourniquet inflation, at any time after inflation and after its deflation. There was no difference in the mean of pain score over time between the two groups. The onset time of sensory and motor blockades was shorter in the group received both LID and NTG. The mean recovery time of sensory blockade was longer in the former group. The frequency of opioid injections was significantly lower in those who administered LID and NTG. CONCLUSION: The adjuvant drug of NTG when added to LID is effective in improving the overall quality of anesthesia, shortening onset time of both sensory and motor blockades, and stabling homodynamic parameters in hand and forearm surgery.

  4. Comparison of Second-Generation Supraglottic Airway Devices (i-gel versus LMA ProSeal) During Elective Surgery in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanket, Bhargavi; Ramavakoda, Chandrika Yabagodu; Nishtala, Madhavi Ravindra; Ravishankar, Chandrakala Kunigal; Ganigara, Anuradha

    2015-08-01

    Second-generation supraglottic airway devices i-gel (Intersurgical Ltd) and LMA ProSeal (Teleflex Inc) are designed for a superior airway seal with a high success rate in adults. This study compared the efficacy of i-gel and LMA ProSeal (sizes 1, 1.5, and 2) as an airway device in a pediatric population, especially infants. The study included 163 ASA class 1 and 2 children, aged up to 10 years and weighing 2 to 25 kg, undergoing elective surgeries lasting less than 1 hour under general anesthesia on spontaneous respiration. Participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups: i-gel and LMA ProSeal. With each device, the ease of insertion, time of insertion, manipulations required for placement of the device, and oropharyngeal leak pressure were recorded. A lubricated gastric tube of the recommended size was passed through each device, and ease of insertion was noted. At the end of surgery, the device was removed and complications were noted, including laryngospasm, breath holding, and blood-stains. Mann-Whitney U test and χ2 tests were used to compare collected data. Both devices were found to be comparable in effectively securing the airway in children, even in infants. The insertion time was significantly faster with i-gel.

  5. Risk factors for surgical site infections and other complications in elective surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with special attention for anti-tumor necrosis factor: a large retrospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeder, A. den; Creemers, M.C.W.; Fransen, J.; Jong, Eefje de; Rooij, D.J.R.A.M. de; Wymenga, A.B.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with special attention for anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) treatment. METHODS: All patients with RA who had undergone elective orthopedic surgery since introduction of anti-TNF were

  6. The volume and pH of residual pharyngeal fluid aspirated from the TaperGuard Evac™ Endotracheal Tube following elective surgery: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, R; Gandhi, P; Switkowski, K; Grant, M A B; Bonney, I

    2013-03-01

    Oropharyngeal suctioning prior to extubation aims to minimize postextubation tracheal soiling from remaining fluid. We investigated the amount and nature of any fluid remaining after such suctioning and contributing factors. ASA I - III patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation participated in this prospective observational pilot study. Following oropharyngeal suctioning immediately prior to extubation, a dedicated port of the endotracheal tube (TaperGuard Evac™ Endotracheal Tube) was aspirated. The amount and pH of residual fluid was recorded. Data collection included age, sex, body mass index, comorbidities, ASA status, procedure type and duration. The Chi-Square, Wilcoxon Rank-Sum, t-tests, and univariate regression analysis were used as appropriate. Ninety-eight patients completed the study. The mean aspirated volume in 38 (38.8%) patients was 0.9 ± 1.3 mL and sixty patients (61.2%) had no aspirate. A body mass index of ≥ 30 kg/m2 was associated with the presence of fluid (P=0.03), and a higher volume (P=0.03). The fluid pH was 7 ± 0.81 (mean ± SD). A duration of surgery ≥ 120 minutes predicted a lower pH. The prevalence and amount of residual fluid after oropharyngeal suctioning was low and likely clinically insignificant. A higher body mass index was associated with a higher incidence and volume of residual fluid. Longer procedure duration determined a slightly lower pH, with a mildly acidic pH range. The possibility of a lower fluid pH after prolonged surgery contributing to postoperative sore throat via mucosal irritation warrants investigation.

  7. The effect of pretreatment with clonidine on propofol consumption in opium abuser and non-abuser patients undergoing elective leg surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Jabbari Moghadam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, increases the quality of perioperative sedation and analgesia with a few side effects. This study was designed to assess the effect of clonidine premedication on the anesthesics used for elective below knee surgeries in opium abusers and non-abusers. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 160 patients were selected and assigned into four groups. Eighty patients among the opium abusers were divided randomly into clonidine and no clonidine groups, with 40 patients in each, and 80 among the non-abusers were again divided randomly into clonidine and no clonidine groups, with 40 patients in each group. All were anesthetized for elective orthopedic operation using the same predetermined method. The total administered dose of propofol and other variables were compared. Results: The total propofol dose in a decreasing order was as follows: Abuser patients receiving placebo (862 ± 351 mg, non-abuser patients receiving placebo (806 ± 348 mg, abuser patients receiving clonidine (472 ± 175 mg, and non-abuser patients receiving clonidine (448 ± 160 mg. Hence, a statistically significant difference was observed among the four study groups (P value for ANOVA = 0.0001. Conclusion: Adding clonidine as a preoperative medication decreases the patient′s anesthetic needs; this decrease was even more considerable on the anesthetic needs than the effect of opium abuse history on anesthetic dose.

  8. Oral surgery: part 2. Endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, I

    2013-09-01

    In the past, the interaction between dentoalveolar surgery and restorative dentistry has been limited to the removal of teeth with pulp and/or periradicular disease or those that were unrestorable. However, with the increasing dental awareness of the population and the retention of teeth into later life, the interaction between dentoalveolar surgery and restorative dentistry is becoming a fundamental aspect of clinical practice. Indeed, endodontic and implant surgery are core activities that facilitate the retention of a functional dentition.

  9. Historical Overview of Varicose Vein Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bremer, Jephta; Moll, Frans L.

    2010-01-01

    Varicose veins are as old as Hippocrates. Varicose vein treatments come and go. Surgery for varicose vein disease is one of the commonest elective general surgical procedures. The history of varicose vein surgery has been traced. We note the first descriptions of varicose veins, and we particularly

  10. An analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database, Part 2. Predictive model for return to work after elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Devin, Clinton J; Archer, Kristin R; Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Bydon, Mohamad; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E; Speroff, Theodore; Dittus, Robert S; Philips, Sharon E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Current costs associated with spine care are unsustainable. Productivity loss and time away from work for patients who were once gainfully employed contributes greatly to the financial burden experienced by individuals and, more broadly, society. Therefore, it is vital to identify the factors associated with return to work (RTW) after lumbar spine surgery. In this analysis, the authors used data from a national prospective outcomes registry to create a predictive model of patients' ability to RTW after undergoing lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. METHODS Data from 4694 patients who underwent elective spine surgery for degenerative lumbar disease, who had been employed preoperatively, and who had completed a 3-month follow-up evaluation, were entered into a prospective, multicenter registry. Patient-reported outcomes-Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), numeric rating scale (NRS) for back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP), and EQ-5D scores-were recorded at baseline and at 3 months postoperatively. The time to RTW was defined as the period between operation and date of returning to work. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, including an array of preoperative factors, was fitted for RTW. The model performance was measured using the concordance index (c-index). RESULTS Eighty-two percent of patients (n = 3855) returned to work within 3 months postoperatively. The risk-adjusted predictors of a lower likelihood of RTW were being preoperatively employed but not working at the time of presentation, manual labor as an occupation, worker's compensation, liability insurance for disability, higher preoperative ODI score, higher preoperative NRS-BP score, and demographic factors such as female sex, African American race, history of diabetes, and higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score. The likelihood of a RTW within 3 months was higher in patients with higher education level than in those with less than high school

  11. Infections in outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian Mobin, Sheila S; Keyes, Geoffrey R; Singer, Robert; Yates, James; Thompson, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    In the plastic surgery patient population, outpatient surgery is cost effective and will continue to grow as the preferred arena for performing surgery in healthy patients. Although there is a widespread myth that outpatient surgery centers may suffer from increased infection rates due to lax infection control, the data presented from American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities-accredited facilities prove the contrary. There is a lack of data investigating infection prevention in the perioperative period in plastic surgery patients. As data collection becomes more refined, tracking the postoperative care environment should offer additional opportunities to lower the incidence of postoperative infections.

  12. [Thymus surgery in a general surgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Raquel; Coelho, Fátima; Pimentel, Teresa; Ribero, Rui; Matos, Novo de; Araújo, António

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of thymectomy cases between 1990-2003, in a General Surgery Department. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy in Miastenia Gravis patients. Retrospective study based on evaluation of data from Serviço de Cirurgia, Neurologia and Consult de Neurology processes, between 1990-2003, of 15 patients submitted to total thymectomy. 15 patients, aged 17 to 72, 11 female and 4 male. Miastenia Gravis was the main indication for surgery, for uncontrollable symptoms or suspicion of thymoma. In patients with myasthenia, surgery was accomplish after compensation of symptoms. There weren't post-surgery complications. Pathology were divided in thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. Miastenia patients have there symptoms diminished or stable with reduction or cessation of medical therapy. Miastenia was the most frequent indication for thymectomy. Surgery was good results, with low morbimortality, as long as the protocols are respected.

  13. Safety of elective colorectal cancer surgery : Non-surgical complications and colectomies are targets for quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, Daniel; Ten Berge, Martijn G.; Snijders, Heleen S.; Van Leersum, Nicoline J.; Fiocco, Marta; Wiggers, Theo; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mortality following severe complications (failure-to-rescue, FTR) is targeted in surgical quality improvement projects. Rates may differ between colon- and rectal cancer resections. Methods Analysis of patients undergoing elective colon and rectal cancer resections registered in the Dutch

  14. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... Bariatric procedures also often cause hormonal changes. Most weight loss surgeries today are performed using minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic ...

  15. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  16. Bariatric Surgery Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from depression or anxiety and to have lower self-esteem and overall quality of life than someone who ... is a Candidate for Bariatric Surgery? Childhood and Adolescent Obesity Find a Provider Benefits of Bariatric Surgery ...

  17. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  18. Breast Reduction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breastfeeding: A systematic review. Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery. 2010;63:1688. Kerrigan CL, et al. Evidence-based medicine: Reduction mammoplasty. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2013;132: ...

  19. Aids and Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    HIV/AIDS patients require surgery sometimes during their illness. ... risks to surgical equipes and analysing preventive strategies to HIV ... problems in patients presenting HIV, AIDS and ... Dentistry, Surgery of Awolowo University in Nigeria3.

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  1. Weight Loss Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weight loss surgery helps people with extreme obesity to lose weight. It may be an option if you ... caused by obesity. There are different types of weight loss surgery. They often limit the amount of food ...

  2. Ear Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  3. Scoliosis surgery - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007383.htm Scoliosis surgery - child To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Scoliosis surgery repairs abnormal curving of the spine ( scoliosis ). ...

  4. Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000273.htm Cosmetic breast surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had cosmetic breast surgery to change the size or shape ...

  5. LASIK Eye Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are nearsighted. You may need another refractive surgery (enhancement surgery) within a year to remove more tissue. ... may happen due to certain conditions, such as abnormal wound healing, hormonal imbalances or pregnancy. Visual loss ...

  6. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exhibit Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you need ...

  7. Types of Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Heart Surgery Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary artery bypass grafting ( ... TAHs) might be used to treat these patients. Surgery To Place Ventricular Assist Devices or Total Artificial ...

  8. Cosmetic ear surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  9. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  10. Surgery for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Testicular Cancer Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Surgery is typically the first treatment for all ... Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Testicular Cancer About Testicular Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tricuspid valve stenosis Risks The risks of having cardiac surgery include: Death Heart attack Heart failure Bleeding requiring ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Latest ...

  12. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Otoplasty — also known as cosmetic ear surgery — is a procedure to change the ... Society of Plastic Surgeons. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/Cosmetic-Procedures/Ear-Surgery.html. Accessed June 16, 2015. ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... best performed by a trained surgeon with specialized education and training. Click here to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving skin, muscle, ...

  14. Effect of the duration of food withholding prior to anesthesia on gastroesophageal reflux and regurgitation in healthy dogs undergoing elective orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskjer, Sivert; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the incidence of and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and regurgitation associated with preanesthetic food withholding for periods of 18 hours (overnight) and 3 hours in healthy dogs undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. ANIMALS 82 healthy (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I or II) client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Food was withheld for 18 hours (18-hour group [n = 41]) or each dog was allowed to consume half its daily ration of canned food approximately 3 hours (3-hour group [n = 41]) prior to induction of anesthesia. In each anesthetized dog, a pH catheter was introduced through the oropharynx into the distal portion of the esophagus; the pH was continuously recorded throughout the period of anesthesia. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined as pH food withholding. Regurgitation was significantly associated with duration of GER and duration of preanesthetic food withholding. During anesthesia, 25 (61%) dogs in the 3-hour group had GER and 12 (48%) of those dogs regurgitated gastric content; 18 (43.9%) dogs in the 18-hour group had GER and 2 (11.1%) of those dogs regurgitated gastric content. The mean lowest pH measured in the refluxate in the 3-hour group (2.3) was significantly greater than that in the 18-hour group (1.3). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Among the study dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery, consumption of a light meal 3 hours prior to anesthesia was associated with significantly greater odds of reflux and regurgitation, compared with overnight food withholding.

  15. Potential cost saving of Epoetin alfa in elective hip or knee surgery due to reduction in blood transfusions and their side effects: a discrete-event simulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Tomeczkowski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Transfusion of allogeneic blood is still common in orthopedic surgery. This analysis evaluates from the perspective of a German hospital the potential cost savings of Epoetin alfa (EPO compared to predonated autologous blood transfusions or to a nobloodconservationstrategy (allogeneic blood transfusion strategyduring elective hip and knee replacement surgery. METHODS: Individual patients (N = 50,000 were simulated based on data from controlled trials, the German DRG institute (InEK and various publications and entered into a stochastic model (Monte-Carlo of three treatment arms: EPO, preoperative autologous donation and nobloodconservationstrategy. All three strategies lead to a different risk for an allogeneic blood transfusion. The model focused on the costs and events of the three different procedures. The costs were obtained from clinical trial databases, the German DRG system, patient records and medical publications: transfusion (allogeneic red blood cells: €320/unit and autologous red blood cells: €250/unit, pneumonia treatment (€5,000, and length of stay (€300/day. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to determine which factors had an influence on the model's clinical and cost outcomes. RESULTS: At acquisition costs of €200/40,000 IU EPO is cost saving compared to autologous blood donation, and cost-effective compared to a nobloodconservationstrategy. The results were most sensitive to the cost of EPO, blood units and hospital days. CONCLUSIONS: EPO might become an attractive blood conservation strategy for anemic patients at reasonable costs due to the reduction in allogeneic blood transfusions, in the modeled incidence of transfusion-associated pneumonia andthe prolongedlength of stay.

  16. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  17. Sedative and analgesic effects of buprenorphine, combined with either acepromazine or dexmedetomidine, for premedication prior to elective surgery in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James R; Grint, Nicola J; Taylor, Polly M; Murrell, Joanna C

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the sedative and analgesic effects of intramuscular buprenorphine with either dexmedetomidine or acepromazine, administered as premedication to cats and dogs undergoing elective surgery. Prospective, randomized, blinded clinical study. Forty dogs and 48 cats. Animals were assigned to one of four groups, according to anaesthetic premedication and induction agent: buprenorphine 20 μg kg(-1) with either dexmedetomidine (dex) 250 μg m(-2) or acepromazine (acp) 0.03 mg kg(-1), followed by alfaxalone (ALF) or propofol (PRO). Meloxicam was administered preoperatively to all animals and anaesthesia was always maintained using isoflurane. Physiological measures and assessments of pain, sedation and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were made before and after premedication, intraoperatively, and for up to 24 hours after premedication. Data were analyzed with one-way, two-way and mixed between-within subjects anova, Kruskall-Wallis analyses and Chi squared tests. Results were deemed significant if p ≤ 0.05, except where multiple comparisons were performed (p ≤ 0.005). Cats premedicated with dex were more sedated than cats premedicated with acp (p cats (1.2 ± 1.0 mg kg(-1) ) than acp cats (2.5 ± 1.9 mg kg(-1)) (p = 0.041). There were no differences in sedation in dogs however PRO doses were lower in dex dogs (1.5 ± 0.8 mg kg(-1) ) compared to acp dogs (3.3 ± 1.1 mg kg(-1) ) (p cats or dogs. Choice of dex or acp, when given with buprenorphine, caused minor, clinically detectable, differences in various characteristics of anaesthesia, but not in the level of analgesia. A combination of buprenorphine with either acp or dex, followed by either PRO or ALF, and then isoflurane, accompanied by an NSAID, was suitable for anaesthesia in dogs and cats undergoing elective surgery. Choice of sedative agent may influence dose of anaesthetic induction agent. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists

  18. Development of a Virtual Reality Exposure Tool as Psychological Preparation for Elective Pediatric Day Care Surgery: Methodological Approach for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijlers, Robin; Legerstee, Jeroen S; Dierckx, Bram; Staals, Lonneke M; Berghmans, Johan; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Wijnen, Rene Mh; Utens, Elisabeth Mwj

    2017-09-11

    Preoperative anxiety in children is highly prevalent and is associated with adverse outcomes. Existing psychosocial interventions to reduce preoperative anxiety are often aimed at distraction and are of limited efficacy. Gradual exposure is a far more effective way to reduce anxiety. Virtual reality (VR) provides a unique opportunity to gradually expose children to all aspects of the operating theater. The aims of our study are (1) to develop a virtual reality exposure (VRE) tool to prepare children psychologically for surgery; and (2) to examine the efficacy of the VRE tool in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which VRE will be compared to care as usual (CAU). The VRE tool is highly realistic and resembles the operating room environment accurately. With this tool, children will not only be able to explore the operating room environment, but also get accustomed to general anesthesia procedures. The PREoperative Virtual reality Intervention to Enhance Wellbeing (PREVIEW) study will be conducted. In this single-blinded RCT, 200 consecutive patients (aged 4 to 12 years) undergoing elective day care surgery for dental, oral, or ear-nose-throat problems, will be randomly allocated to the preoperative VRE intervention or CAU. The primary outcome is change in child state anxiety level between baseline and induction of anesthesia. Secondary outcome measures include child's postoperative anxiety, emergence delirium, postoperative pain, use of analgesics, health care use, and pre- and postoperative parental anxiety. The VRE tool has been developed. Participant recruitment began March 2017 and is expected to be completed by September 2018. To our knowledge, this is the first RCT evaluating the effect of a VRE tool to prepare children for surgery. The VRE intervention is expected to significantly diminish preoperative anxiety, postoperative pain, and the use of postoperative analgesics in pediatric patients. The tool could create a less stressful experience for both

  19. Surgery Videos: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Winston-Salem, NC, 1/15/2009) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ... Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ...

  20. Anesthetic Maintenance of Thyroid Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Negovsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases are most common in endocrinology. Thyrotoxicosis induces dysfunction of virtually all organs and systems, the blood circulatory system being subjected to considerable changes. Cardiovascular diseases affect not only the quality of life in a patient, but significantly increase a risk from surgery that is the only radical treatment. For this reason, most authors consider thyrotoxicosis to be a contraindication to elective surgical intervention. At the same time it is known that drug compensation of thyrotoxicosis may be attained in not all patients. In this case, the results of treatment and a patient’s safety during surgery depend on the type and quality of anesthetic protection. The capabilities of anesthetic maintenance of thyroid surgery have recently expanded substantially. The paper deals with the preparation of patients with thyrotoxicosis for surgical intervention and the perioperative management of these patients. Key words: thyroid, toxic goiter, thyrotoxicosis, premedication, anesthetic mode, sevoflurane, xenon.

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis of sutures coated with triclosan for the prevention of surgical site infection after elective colorectal surgery according to the PRISMA statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandini, Marta; Mattavelli, Ilaria; Nespoli, Luca; Uggeri, Fabio; Gianotti, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Several randomized clinical trials (RCTs) conducted to evaluate the effect of triclosan-coated suture on surgical site infection (SSI) yield to controversial results. The primary purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to analyze the available RCTs, comparing the effect of triclosan-coated suture with uncoated suture on the incidence of SSI after elective colorectal operations. As secondary endpoint of the analysis, we considered length of hospital stay after surgery. We performed a systematic literature review through Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Scopus, Ovid, ISI Web of Science, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register searching for RCTs published from 1990 to 2015. To conduct these meta-analyses, we followed the guidelines and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Study inclusion criteria were as follows: parallel-group RCTs in adult populations reporting the closure of the abdominal wall after elective colorectal operation with triclosan-coated suture or noncoated suture, and reporting the outcomes considered in the meta-analysis. Six trials including 2168 patients (1102 treated and 1066 controls) provided data on SSIs. The overall rate was 11.7% (129/1102) in the triclosan group and 13.4% (143/1066) in the control group (odds ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58-1.13, P = 0.220). Heterogeneity among studies was moderate (I = 44.9%). No evidence of publication bias was detectable. Five RCTs (1783 patients; 914 treated and 689 controls) described hospital length of stay with no significant effect (mean difference: -0.02, 95% CI -0.11 to -0.07, P = 0.668). The I test for heterogeneity was 0% (P = 0.836). Moderator analyses showed no significant differences were detected in analyses comparing the suture materials (polydioxanone vs polyglactin). In open-label trials, the odds ratio for SSI risk was 0.62 (95% CI 0.20-1.93, P = 0.413), 0.77 in single-blind (95% CI 0.31-1.95, P

  2. Racial variation in the use of life-sustaining treatments among patients who die after major elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Roland A; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Lopez, Lenny; Finlayson, Samuel R G; Chittenden, Eva; Cooper, Zara

    2015-07-01

    Although various studies have documented increased life-sustaining treatments among racial minorities in medical patients, whether similar disparities exist in surgical patients is unknown. A retrospective cohort study using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2006 to 2011) examining patients older than 39 years who died after elective colectomy was performed. Primary predictor variable was race, and main outcome was the use of life-sustaining treatment. In univariate analysis, significant differences existed in use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; black, 35.9%; Hispanic, 29.0%; other, 24.5%; white, 11.7%; P = .002) and reintubation (Hispanic, 75.0%; other, 69.0%; black, 52.3%; white, 45.2%; P = .01). In multivariate analysis, black (odds ratio [OR], 3.67; P = .01) and Hispanic (OR, 4.21; P = .03) patients were more likely to have undergone CPR, and Hispanic patients (OR, 4.24; P = .01) were more likely to have been reintubated (reference: white). Blacks and Hispanics had increased odds of experiencing CPR, and Hispanics were more likely to have been reintubated before death after a major elective operation. These variations may imply worse quality of death and increased associated costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical evaluation of an air-capsule technique for the direct measurement of intra-abdominal pressure after elective abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembinski Rolf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gold standard for assessment of intraabdominal pressure (IAP is via intravesicular pressure measurement (IVP. This accepted technique has some inherent problems, e.g. indirectness. Aim of this clinical study was to assess direct IAP measurement using an air-capsule method (ACM regarding complications risks and agreement with IVP in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in 30 patients undergoing elective colonic, hepatic, pancreatic and esophageal resection. For ACM a Probe 3 (Spiegelberg®, Germany was placed on the greater omentum. It was passed through the abdominal wall paralleling routine drainages. To compare ACM with IVP t-testing was performed and mean difference as well as limits of agreement were calculated. Results ACM did not lead to complications particularly with regard to organ lesion or surgical site infection. Mean insertion time of ACM was 4.4 days (min-max: 1–5 days. 168 pairwise measurements were made. Mean ACM value was 7.9 ± 2.7 mmHg while mean IVP was 8.4 ± 3.0 mmHg (n.s. Mean difference was 0.4 mmHg ± 2.2 mmHg. Limits of agreement were -4.1 mmHg to 5.1 mmHg. Conclusion Using ACM, direct IAP measurement is feasible and uncomplicated. Associated with relatively low pressure ranges (

  4. Clinical evaluation of an air-capsule technique for the direct measurement of intra-abdominal pressure after elective abdominal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Jens; Kaemmer, Daniel; Biermann, Andreas; Jansen, Marc; Dembinski, Rolf; Schumpelick, Volker; Schachtrupp, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background The gold standard for assessment of intraabdominal pressure (IAP) is via intravesicular pressure measurement (IVP). This accepted technique has some inherent problems, e.g. indirectness. Aim of this clinical study was to assess direct IAP measurement using an air-capsule method (ACM) regarding complications risks and agreement with IVP in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Methods A prospective cohort study was performed in 30 patients undergoing elective colonic, hepatic, pancreatic and esophageal resection. For ACM a Probe 3 (Spiegelberg®, Germany) was placed on the greater omentum. It was passed through the abdominal wall paralleling routine drainages. To compare ACM with IVP t-testing was performed and mean difference as well as limits of agreement were calculated. Results ACM did not lead to complications particularly with regard to organ lesion or surgical site infection. Mean insertion time of ACM was 4.4 days (min-max: 1–5 days). 168 pairwise measurements were made. Mean ACM value was 7.9 ± 2.7 mmHg while mean IVP was 8.4 ± 3.0 mmHg (n.s). Mean difference was 0.4 mmHg ± 2.2 mmHg. Limits of agreement were -4.1 mmHg to 5.1 mmHg. Conclusion Using ACM, direct IAP measurement is feasible and uncomplicated. Associated with relatively low pressure ranges (<17 mmHg), results are comparable to bladder pressure measurement. PMID:18925973

  5. The efficacy and safety of enoxaparin versus unfractionated heparin for prevention of deep vein thrombosis in elective cancer surgery. A double blind randomized multicentre trail with venographic assesment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergkvist, A; Eldor, A; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery for malignant disease carries a high risk of deep vein thrombosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of a low molecular weight heparin, enoxaparin, 40 mg once daily, beginning 2 h before surgery, compared with that of unfractionated low-dose heparin...

  6. Pre-operative assessment of cancer in the elderly (PACE) : A comprehensive assessment of underlying characteristics of elderly cancer patients prior to elective surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, D.; Ramesh, H.; Gennari, R.; Corsini, G.; Maffezzini, M.; Hoekstra, H. J.; Mobarak, D.; Sunouchi, K.; Stotter, A.; West, C.; Audisio, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a disease that particularly affects the elderly and, although surgery is the first treatment choice, many elderly cancer patients do not receive standard surgery because they are considered unfit for treatment due to an inaccurate estimation of operative risk. Pre-operative Ass

  7. Multiple repeated cesarean deliveries: operative complications in the fourth and fifth surgeries in urgent and elective cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedikbasi, Ali; Akyol, Alpaslan; Bingol, Banu; Cakmak, Demet; Sargin, Akif; Uncu, Remzi; Ceylan, Yavuz

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the maternal and neonatal risk related with multiple repeated cesarean sections. A case control study was conducted in a single tertiary maternity and children's center. The outcome of a study group including 122 pregnant women undergoing cesarean section for the fourth or fifth time was compared with a control group comprising 146 women sectioned for the second and third time. All multiple repeated cesarean sections were divided into urgent and elective groups to compare the outcome measures of demographic, neonatal, intra- and post-operative data. Compared with the control group, the study group had significantly lower birth weights (p=0.026), lower Apgar scores at 1 minute (p=0.0001) and 5 minutes (p=0.042), higher numbers of fetal death (p=0.03), higher rate of omentum adhesions (p =0.0001) and peritoneal adhesions (p=0.008), increased risk of cesarean hysterectomy (p = 0.014), increased need for transfusion (p = 0.018), and an increase in hospitalization days (p=0.005). Compared with the elective group, preterm birth incidence was higher (p = 0.01) and birth weight was lower (p=0.004) in the urgent group. The risk for myometrium herniation (p=0.018), need for drainage during operation (p=0.018), and post-operative fever (p =0.001) was also more common in the urgent group. Multiple repeated cesarean sections increase the risks for operative complications and poor perinatal outcomes. Patients must be informed about the related risks of multiple repeated cesarean sections and tubal ligation needs to be encouraged. Copyright © 2010 Taiwan Association of Obstetric & Gynecology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećanac Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Plastic surgery is a medical specialty dealing with corrections of defects, improvements in appearance and restoration of lost function. Ancient Times. The first recorded account of reconstructive plastic surgery was found in ancient Indian Sanskrit texts, which described reconstructive surgeries of the nose and ears. In ancient Greece and Rome, many medicine men performed simple plastic cosmetic surgeries to repair damaged parts of the body caused by war mutilation, punishment or humiliation. In the Middle Ages, the development of all medical braches, including plastic surgery was hindered. New age. The interest in surgical reconstruction of mutilated body parts was renewed in the XVIII century by a great number of enthusiastic and charismatic surgeons, who mastered surgical disciplines and became true artists that created new forms. Modern Era. In the XX century, plastic surgery developed as a modern branch in medicine including many types of reconstructive surgery, hand, head and neck surgery, microsurgery and replantation, treatment of burns and their sequelae, and esthetic surgery. Contemporary and future plastic surgery will continue to evolve and improve with regenerative medicine and tissue engineering resulting in a lot of benefits to be gained by patients in reconstruction after body trauma, oncology amputation, and for congenital disfigurement and dysfunction.

  9. Profilaxis antimicrobiana en cirugía mayor electiva otorrinolaringológica Antimicrobial prophylaxis related to otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Pérez López

    2010-06-01

    results of antibiotic prophylaxis in the otorhinolaryngology elective major surgery. METHODS. A retrospective-descriptive research was made on the prophylactic use of antibiotics in this type of surgery in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the "Comandant Manuel Fajardo" during 6 years (2001-2006. Sample included 661 patients and the following variables were studied: sex, age and therapeutic response criteria (satisfactory and non-satisfactory. According to the intervention complexity oral antibiotic or parenteral prophylaxis was administered carrying out a surgical hound site culture. RESULTS. There was a predominance of male sex (54,1% and the 31 and 62 age group. The 41,90% of patients operated on required antibiotic prophylaxis. The was a 7,9% of surgical wound infections. The more frequent microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter and Escherichia. In head and neck oncology surgeries infection average was high (42,3%. Torpid course was due to concurrence of infection risk factors. There were neither adverse events nor severe complications. CONCLUSIONS. In Otorhinolaryngology, antimicrobial prophylaxis works against a wide variety of microorganisms but not in the Oncology surgeries.

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Intrathecal Fentanyl and Intrathecal Morphine on Pain in Elective Total Knee Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refika Kılıçkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Total knee replacement is one of the most painful orthopedic surgical procedures. In this study, our goal was to compare the intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamic effects, the side effects, the effect on the duration of pain start, the 24-hour VAS, and the amount of additional analgesia used, of the fentanyl and morphine we added to the local anesthetic in the spinal anesthesia we administered in cases of elective knee replacement. Materials and Methods. After obtaining the approval of the Erciyes University Medical Faculty Clinical Drug Trials Ethics Committee, as well as the verbal and written consent of the patients, we included 50 patients in our prospective, randomized study. Results. In our study, the morphine group (Group M had lower pain scores in the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 24th hours compared to the fentanyl group (Group F. When additional analgesic requirements were compared, it was found that in the 2nd, 6th, and 24th hours fewer Group M patients needed more analgesics than did Group F patients. Conclusion. The fentanyl group also had lower first analgesic requirement times than did the morphine group. In terms of nausea and vomiting, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups.

  11. The evolution of robotic general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E B

    2009-01-01

    Surgical robotics in general surgery has a relatively short but very interesting evolution. Just as minimally invasive and laparoscopic techniques have radically changed general surgery and fractionated it into subspecialization, robotic technology is likely to repeat the process of fractionation even further. Though it appears that robotics is growing more quickly in other specialties, the changes digital platforms are causing in the general surgical arena are likely to permanently alter general surgery. This review examines the evolution of robotics in minimally invasive general surgery looking forward to a time where robotics platforms will be fundamental to elective general surgery. Learning curves and adoption techniques are explored. Foregut, hepatobiliary, endocrine, colorectal, and bariatric surgery will be examined as growth areas for robotics, as well as revealing the current uses of this technology.

  12. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF EFFECT OF 0.5% AND 0.75% ISOBARIC ROPIVACAINE IN SPINAL ANAESTHESIA IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE LOWER LIMB SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tridip Jyoti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES The study was conducted to compare the differences in the onset, duration of action and complications of intrathecal isobaric ropivacaine 0.5% (Group I and intrathecal isobaric ropivacaine 0.75% (Group II in elective lower limb surgeries. METHODS We enrolled 60 patients of ASA (American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grade I-II scheduled for lower limb surgeries under spinal anaesthesia for this prospective randomized control trial. The patients were randomized to receive either 15 mg of 0.5% isobaric ropivacaine or 22.5 mg of 0.75% isobaric ropivacaine intrathecally. The time of onset of sensory and motor block, haemodynamic status, time for regression of sensory level to T10 dermatome, time of first request of analgesics and adverse effects were compared in both the groups. RESULTS The time of onset of sensory and motor block was significantly longer in Group-I than Group-II (P0.05. The onset of analgesia was faster in Group II (2.13±0.50 mins. than Group I (2.6±0.93 mins.. The time for regression of sensory level to T10 dermatome (Group-I 150±28.9 minutes and Group-II 180±32.07 were statistically longer in Group II (P<0.001. The time of first request of analgesics by the patient in Group-I was 197±31.20 minutes and in Group II was 219±31.66 minutes, which was statistically significant (P<0.001. The onset of motor block was quicker (P˂0.05 and the total duration of motor block was longer (P˂0.05 in Group II. No unexpected adverse events were registered. CONCLUSION The subarachnoid injection of glucose-free isobaric ropivacaine 0.5% and 0.75% solutions results in a variable spread of analgesia, accompanied by a good quality of motor block. Ropivacaine 0.75% produces a better quality of analgesia and longer duration of analgesia than the 0.5% solution.

  13. Comparison of Post Extubation Complications in 3 Different States of Filling Endotracheal Tube Cuff with Lidocaine 4% in Elective Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Moattari

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Endotracheal intubation during general anesthesia is necessary to control the ventilation of patients during surgery. Nevertheless, the endotracheal tube as an external object can stimulate the patient’s airway during the emergence from general anesthesia and create different reactions and complications. To prevent these reactions, a wide variety of interventions have been examined. In this study, post-extubation endotracheal tube complications are investigated in 3 different states of lidocaine 4% for filling endotracheal tube cuffs. Materials & Methods: In this quasi-experimental clinical trial study executed in one of Shiraz hospitals during 2005-2006, 200 candidates of elective surgery being in class1 and 2 ASA were randomly divided into 4 groups (N=50. The endotracheal tube cuffs of each group members were filled with (5-10ml distilled water, lidocaine 4%, alkalized lidocaine 4% and warmed alkalized lidocaine 4%, respectively. The patients were observed for complications such as cough (for 6 hrs, sore throat, hoarseness (for 24 hrs and laryngospasm (immediately after extubation. The data were analyzed by chi square and logistic regression using SPSS. Results: The findings revealed that the frequency of cough, sore throat and hoarseness was more in the control (distilled water group as compared to the 2 groups of the study (alkalized lidocaine 4% and warmed alkalized lidocaine 4%. Distilled water and lidocaine 4% groups differed significantly in only the frequency of sore throat. The odds ratio of cough, sore throat and hoarseness was just significant for the distilled water group in comparison to warmed alkalized lidocaine 4 %. Furthermore the odds ratio of the above-mentioned complications was significant for the distilled water and lidocaine 4% groups in comparison to the warmed alkalized lidocaine 4% group. Among all the considered variables, the duration of tube existence in trachea was

  14. Ergonomics in Laparoscopic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Supe Avinash; Kulkarni Gaurav; Supe Pradnya

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comf...

  15. Ergonomics in laparoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supe Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery provides patients with less painful surgery but is more demanding for the surgeon. The increased technological complexity and sometimes poorly adapted equipment have led to increased complaints of surgeon fatigue and discomfort during laparoscopic surgery. Ergonomic integration and suitable laparoscopic operating room environment are essential to improve efficiency, safety, and comfort for the operating team. Understanding ergonomics can not only make life of surgeon comfortable in the operating room but also reduce physical strains on surgeon.

  16. General surgery career resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsee, Ana M; Ross, Sharona B; Gantt, Nancy L; Kichler, Kandace; Hollands, Celeste

    2013-11-01

    General surgery residency training can lead to a rewarding career in general surgery and serve as the foundation for careers in several surgical subspecialties. It offers broad-based training with exposure to the cognitive and technical aspects of several surgical specialties and prepares graduating residents for a wide range of career paths. This career development resource discusses the training aspects of general surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Crohn's disease surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Zdeněk; Marek, Filip; Válek, Vlastimil A; Bartušek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Surgery of Crohns disease is an important part of the general treatment algorithm. The role of surgery is changing with the development of conservative procedures. The recent years have seen the return to early treatment of patients with Crohns disease. Given the character of the disease and its intestinal symptoms, a specific approach to these patients is necessary, especially regarding the correct choice of surgery. The paper focuses on the luminal damage of the small and large intestine including complications of the disease. We describe the individual indications for a surgical solution, including the choice of anastomosis or multiple / repeated surgeries.

  18. Abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gefke, K; Schroeder, T V; Thisted, B

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify patients who need longer care in the ICU (more than 48 hours) following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and to evaluate the influence of perioperative complications on short- and long-term survival and quality of life. AAA surgery was performed in 553......, 78% stated that their quality of life had improved or was unchanged after surgery and had resumed working. These data justify a therapeutically aggressive approach, including ICU therapy following AAA surgery, despite failure of one or more organ systems....

  19. Hyperoxaluria and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplin, John R.

    2007-04-01

    Bariatric surgery as a means to treat obesity is becoming increasingly common in the United States. An early form of bariatric surgery, the jejunoileal bypass, had to be abandoned in 1980 due to numerous complications, including hyperoxaluria and kidney stones. Current bariatric procedures have not been systematically evaluated to determine if they cause hyperoxaluria. Presented here are data showing that hyperoxaluria is the major metabolic abnormality in patients with bariatric surgery who form kidney stones. Further studies are needed to assess the prevalence of hyperoxaluria in all patients with bariatric surgery.

  20. Complications of strabismus surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Olitsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen.

  1. Integrated bariatric surgery residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltorai AE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adam EM Eltorai Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major public health concern. Given its lasting efficacy for improving obesity and obesity-related diseases, bariatric surgery is an increasingly common treatment option. As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act progresses, the impending physician shortage will become more severe. Thus there will be an even greater need for doctors specialized in the management and treatment of obese patients. The development of integrated bariatric surgery residency programs could be considered and is discussed herein. Keywords: obesity, bariatric surgery, integrated residency, surgery education

  2. Surgery center joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasa, R J

    1999-01-01

    Surgery centers have been accepted as a cost effective, patient friendly vehicle for delivery of quality ambulatory care. Hospitals and physician groups also have made them the vehicles for coming together. Surgery centers allow hospitals and physicians to align incentives and share benefits. It is one of the few types of health care businesses physicians can own without anti-fraud and abuse violation. As a result, many surgery center ventures are now jointly owned by hospitals and physician groups. This article outlines common structures that have been used successfully to allow both to own and govern surgery centers.

  3. Less extensive surgery compared to extensive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Petersen, Astrid C; Neumann, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the outcome of adult granulosa cell tumor (AGCT) with respect to initial clinical findings, methods of surgery, and perioperative treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective follow-up study. Setting: All hospitals in Jutland. Sample: 163 women diagnosed with AGCT. Methods: Follow......-up by hospital data files, general practitioner, death certificate, and autopsy report. Revision of histopathology by a single pathologist. Main outcome measures: Survival and relapse by clinical data, stage, and type of surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of AGCT was 1.37 per year per 100,000 women (95% CI: 1.08, 1...... in postmenopausal women was associated with surgery including hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (psurgery. Endometrial carcinoma was found 138 times (95% CI: 48, 275) more prevalent than the expected rate. CONCLUSION...

  4. Changes in myocardial lactate, pyruvate and lactate-pyruvate ratio during cardiopulmonary bypass for elective adult cardiac surgery: Early indicator of morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Kapoor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myocardial lactate assays have been established as a standard method to compare various myocardial protection strategies. This study was designed to test whether coronary sinus (CS lactates, pyruvate and lactate-pyruvate (LP ratio correlates with myocardial dysfunction and predict postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted on 40 adult patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. CS blood sampling was done for estimation of myocardial lactate (ML, pyruvate (MP and lactate-pyruvate ratio (MLPR namely: pre-CPB (T 1 , after removal of aortic cross clamp (T 2 and 30 minutes post-CPB (T 3 . Results: Baseline myocardial LPR strongly correlated with Troponin-I at T1 (s: 0.6. Patients were sub grouped according to the median value of myocardial lactate (2.9 at baseline T1 into low myocardial lactate (LML group, mean (2.39±0.4 mmol/l, n=19 and a high myocardial lactate (HML group, mean (3.65±0.9 mmol/l, n=21. A significant increase in PL, ML, MLPR and TropI occurred in both groups as compared to baseline. Patients in HML group had significant longer period of ICU stay. Patients with higher inotrope score had significantly higher ML (T2, T3. ML with a baseline value of 2.9 mmol/l had 70.83% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity (ROC area: 0.7109 Std error: 0.09 while myocardial pyruvate with a baseline value of 0.07 mmol/l has 79.17% sensitivity and 68.75% specificity (ROC area: 0.7852, Std error: 0.0765 for predicting inotrope requirement after CPB. Conclusion: CS lactate, pyruvate and LP ratio correlate with myocardial function and can predict postoperative outcome.

  5. Comparison of the performance of 'Intubating LMA' and 'Cobra PLA' as an aid to blind endotracheal tube insertion in patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlong, Vanlal; Chandrashish, Chakravarty; Chandralekha; Mohan, Virender Kumar

    2011-03-01

    Supraglottic airways (SGA) through which blind endotracheal intubation is made possible is an area of considerable interest. Our study aimed at comparing the Cobra Perilaryngeal Airway (CPLA) with the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) with regard to the performance of the former as a conduit for facilitating blind endotracheal intubation. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients consenting to the study, with no predictors of difficult airway, scheduled for elective surgery were randomized into two groups of 30 each. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl, propofol and vecuronium. CPLA was inserted in Group I and ILMA in Group II. Fibreoptic scoring of the laryngeal view was done through the SGA. Blind intubation through either CPLA or ILMA was then carried out with cuffed polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube in Group I and ILMA-tracheal tube in Group II. Demographic and surgical data were comparable between the two groups. The success rate of intubation (87% through CPLA and 90% through ILMA) (p value 1), number of attempts made and the fibreoptic scores (p value 0.12) were comparable between the two groups. Insertion time was significantly longer in Group I as compared with Group II (9 s vs. 4 s; p value 0.004). Trauma and sore throat were more common in Group I (p value -0.1, 0.19 respectively). Hemodynamic monitoring showed more tachycardia during CPLA insertion as compared with ILMA (p value 0.006). We conclude that CPLA can be used as an effective conduit for blind endotracheal intubation with cuffed PVC tube and has comparable efficacy in tracheal intubation as that with ILMA. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swirta, Jarosław S; Barczyński, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage after thyroid surgery is rare, but if it occurs it is a life-threatening condition necessitating emergency surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate prevalence and risk factors of haemorrhage after thyroid surgery. A retrospective analysis was undertaken in a group of 8931 consecutive patients with various thyroid diseases treated in 2004-2013 at our institution. Potential risk factors for postoperative haemorrhage after thyroid surgery were analysed using logistic regression model. Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgery occurred in 40 (0.45%) of 8931 patients. None of the patients died within the perioperative period. Bleeding occurred within first 24 hours following surgery in 38 (95%) patients, and in the remaining 2 (5%) patients in more than 24 hours after initial surgery. The following risk factors for bleeding after thyroid operation were identified: male sex (OR 3.618; 1.762-7.430; p or = 70 years (OR 3.052; 1.275-7.304; p = 0.012), surgery for hyperthyroidism (OR 2.873; 1.511-5.462; p = 0.001), smoking (OR 2.855; 1.502-5.428; p = 0.001), subtotal thyroidectomy in contrast to total thyroidectomy or lobectomy (OR 2.853; 1.356-6.004; p=0.006), and thyroid operation undertaken by resident in training in general surgery (OR 2.596; 1.393-4.837; p = 0.003). Haemorrhage after thyroid operation necessitating emergency surgical intervention occurs most frequently within first 24 hour following surgery. Hence, for safety reasons a minimum of 24-hour hospital stay is recommended in all patients with risk factors for postoperative bleeding after thyroid operation. Quality monitoring of thyroid surgery should include also risk factors for postoperative bleeding.

  7. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods.

  8. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) ...

  10. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    In coronary artery disease (CAD), the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart muscle grow hardened and narrowed. You may try ... these treatments don't help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new ...

  11. [Cognitive deterioration after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J.; Rasmussen, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are important and common complications after surgery. Risk factors are first of all increasing age and type of surgery, whereas the type of anaesthesia does not seem to play an important role. Mortality is higher among patients with cognitive...

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We ... may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to ...

  13. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIQUEIRA-BATISTA, Rodrigo; SOUZA, Camila Ribeiro; MAIA, Polyana Mendes; SIQUEIRA, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. Objective: To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Method: Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Results: Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. PMID:28076489

  14. A STUDY OF CONVERSIONS OF LAPAROSOCOPIC SURGERIES INTO OPEN SURGERIES: A ANALYTICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Reddy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of present study is to know the Conversions in Laparoscopic surgery to Open surgery in The patients of all the surgical units in the Department of General Surgery, Government General Hospital, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada over a period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015. The Objectives of present study is to compare the Conversion Rates of Laparoscopic Surgery to Open Surgery and the factors causing Conversion to Open Surgery in our institution. PATIENTS AND METHODS The protocol is approved by institution ethics committee and written informed consent was taken from each patient. Present clinical Study is an Analytical study conducted over period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015 in the Department of General Surgery, Government General Hospital, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh. RESULTS Total number of 536 laparoscopic surgeries were attempted in elective operation theatres with 21 cases out of 536 cases were converted from laparoscopy to open surgery. Total conversion rate in present study is 4%. Most of conversions occurred in laparoscopic chelecystectomy 5.73% cases in comparison to laparoscopic appendectomy 2.26% and laparoscopic hernia repair with 0%. CONCLUSIONS Over all conversion rates of laparoscopic procedure into open surgery is low when compared to other international studies. Most common causes of conversion in present study is altered anatomy, adhesions and intra operative bleed. Conversion of laparoscopic surgery into open surgery resulted in decreased morbidity, complications and increase in duration of hospital stay

  15. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Schanaider

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. Methods: A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR, Elsevier/Scopus (SJR, and also Scielo databases were used. Results: Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5% and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. Conclusions: A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor.

  16. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating table ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to-reach ...

  17. Gamma knife surgery for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, D; Steiner, M; Steiner, L

    1995-01-01

    We present our results of Gamma Knife surgery for craniopharyngioma in nine patients. The current status of surgery, radiation therapy, intracavitary instillation of radionucleides and Gamma Knife surgery in the management of craniopharyngiomas is discussed.

  18. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Breast Reconstruction Surgery Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  19. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intracraneal en Espanol. STORE Shop the IHRF Store Medication and Surgery Medication and Surgery Both drugs and surgery are used ... to treat the headache that accompanies chronic IH. Medications for chronic headache like tricyclic anti-depressants, beta- ...

  20. Tests and visits before surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  1. Cleft Lip and Palate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery. Cleft Lip / Palate and Craniofacial Surgery This type of surgery is ... the carefully orchestrated, multiple-stage correctional program for cleft lip and palate patients. The goal is to help restore the ...

  2. Reduced collagen accumulation after major surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, L N; Kallehave, F; Karlsmark, T

    1996-01-01

    The preoperative and postoperative wound-healing capacity of 23 patients undergoing elective major abdominal, thoracic or urological surgery was tested objectively by the subcutaneous accumulation of hydroxyproline and proline in an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) tube. Before scheduled...... surgery two ePTFE tubes were implanted for removal after 5 and 10 days. This was repeated for each patient immediately after surgery. After 10 days a higher amount of hydroxyproline was measured before than after operation (median 2.91 (range 0.37-14.45) versus 1.45 (range 0.26-6.94) micrograms/cm, P = 0...

  3. Planning and scheduling of semi-urgent surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonderland, Maartje E; Boucherie, Richard J; Litvak, Nelly; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M

    2010-09-01

    This paper investigates the trade-off between cancellations of elective surgeries due to semi-urgent surgeries, and unused operating room (OR) time due to excessive reservation of OR time for semi-urgent surgeries. Semi-urgent surgeries, to be performed soon but not necessarily today, pose an uncertain demand on available hospital resources, and interfere with the planning of elective patients. For a highly utilized OR, reservation of OR time for semi-urgent surgeries avoids excessive cancellations of elective surgeries, but may also result in unused OR time, since arrivals of semi-urgent patients are unpredictable. First, using a queuing theory framework, we evaluate the OR capacity needed to accommodate every incoming semi-urgent surgery. Second, we introduce another queuing model that enables a trade-off between the cancelation rate of elective surgeries and unused OR time. Third, based on Markov decision theory, we develop a decision support tool that assists the scheduling process of elective and semi-urgent surgeries. We demonstrate our results with actual data obtained from a department of neurosurgery.

  4. Morbidity and mortality of diabetes with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Chuah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has increased; as a result the number of patients with T2DM undergoing surgical procedures has also increased. This population is at high risk of macrovascular (cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease or microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy or neuropathy complications, both increasing their perioperative morbidity and mortality. Diabetes patients are more at risk of poor wound healing, respiratory infection, myocardial infarction, admission to intensive care, and increased hospital length of stay. This leads to increased inpatient costs. The outcome of perioperative glycaemia management remains a significant clinical problem without a universally accepted solution. The majority of evidence on morbidity and mortality of T2DM patients undergoing surgery comes from the setting of cardiac surgery; there was less evidence on non-cardiac surgery and bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is increasingly performed in patients with severe obesity complicated by T2DM, but is distinguished from general surgery as it immediately improves the glucose homeostasis postoperatively. The improvements in glycaemia are thought to be independent of weight loss and this requires different postoperative management. Patients usually have to follow specific preoperative diets which lead to improvement in glycaemia immediately before surgery. Here we review the available data on the mortality and morbidity of patients with T2DM who underwent elective surgery (cardiac, non-cardiac and bariatric surgery and the current knowledge of the impact that preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative glycaemic management has on operative outcomes.

  5. Chair in Pediatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Graña, Francisco; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Inaugural lecture of the course of 1922, Department of Paediatric Surgery, by Dr. Francisco Grana, Professor of Pediatric Surgery and Orthopedics at the Faculty of Medicine of Lima, the National Academy of Medicine, of the Peruvian Society of Surgery. Lección inaugural del curso de 1922, Cátedra de Cirugía Infantil, por el Dr. Francisco Graña, Catedrático de Cirugía Infantil y Ortopedia en la Facultad de Medicina de Lima, de la Academia Nacional de Medicina, de la Sociedad Peruana de Cirug...

  6. Single port laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Henrik; Istre, Olav

    2012-01-01

    LESS, or laparo-endoscopic single site surgery, is a promising new method in minimally invasive surgery. An increasing number of surgical procedures are being performed using this technique, however, its large-scale adoption awaits results of prospective randomized controlled studies confirming...... potential benefits. Theoretically, cosmetic outcomes, postoperative pain and complication rates could be improved with use of single site surgery. This study describes introduction of the method in a private hospital in Denmark, in which 40 patients have been treated for benign gynecologic conditions...

  7. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly performed for AS, with good long-term implant survival. Heterotopic ossification may occur no more frequently after hip replacement in patients with AS than in patients with other diseases. Corrective spinal surgery is rarely performed and requires specialized centers and experienced surgeons. PMID:22543536

  8. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  9. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  10. Standing equine sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakzai, Safia Z; Dixon, Padraic M

    2014-04-01

    Trephination of the equine sinuses is a common surgical procedure in sedated standing horses. Standing sinus flap surgery has become increasingly popular in equine referral hospitals and offers several advantages over sinusotomy performed under general anesthesia, including reduced patient-associated risks and costs; less intraoperative hemorrhage, allowing better visualization of the operative site; and allows surgeons to take their time. Other minimally invasive surgical procedures include sinoscopic surgery, balloon sinuplasty, and transnasal laser sinonasal fenestration. Despite the procedure used, appropriate indications for surgery, good patient selection, and familiarity with regional anatomy and surgical techniques are imperative for good results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Safe Surgery Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-15

    CDRL A001 For: Safe Surgery Trainer Prime Contract: N00014-14-C-0066 For the Period July 1, 2015 to July 31, 2015 Submitted: 15 Aug 2015...DATE 15 AUG 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 31-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safe Surgery Trainer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b... Surgery Trainer ONR N00014-14-C-0066 Unclassified Unclassified Use or disclosure of the data contained on this page is subject to the restriction

  12. Pre-operative testing for pregnancy in Dublin day surgery units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wong, L F A

    2013-06-01

    The safety of anaesthetic agents in early pregnancy cannot be guaranteed. Certain types of surgery, particularly gynaecological, may also be dangerous. It is therefore important to ensure that, female patients are not inadvertently pregnant when undergoing elective surgery. Different hospitals have different policies and guidelines in place to determine female patients\\' pregnancy status prior to elective surgery.

  13. [Bariatric surgery. Would you undergo surgery again?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaina Landaluce, E; Díez Andrés, A; Navaridas Berganzo, A; Ruiz de Arcaute, I I

    2001-04-01

    The authors analyze the negative repercussions of morbid obesity; then they explain what baryatric surgery, a surgical technique employed with a high degree of success, consists of. They study the results, in terms of satisfaction, obtained from patients operated on in the Txagorritxu Hospital in Vitoria. The project on which this article is based was presented as a Main Project in a Course on Health Research Methodology, extension class section, "IDER", at the University of Alcalá and the University of Antioquia.

  14. Postoperative antibacterial prophylaxis for the prevention of infectious complications associated with tube thoracostomy in patients undergoing elective general thoracic surgery: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxman, David A; Issa, Nicolas C; Marty, Francisco M; Patel, Alka; Panizales, Christia Z; Johnson, Nathaniel N; Licona, J Humberto; McKenna, Shannon S; Frendl, Gyorgy; Mentzer, Steven J; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Bueno, Raphael; Colson, Yolonda; Swanson, Scott J; Sugarbaker, David J; Baden, Lindsey R

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether extended postoperative antibacterial prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery with tube thoracostomy reduces the risk of infectious complications compared with preoperative prophylaxis only. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Brigham and Women's Hospital, an 800-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. A total of 251 adult patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery requiring tube thoracostomy between April 2008 and April 2011. Patients received preoperative antibacterial prophylaxis with cefazolin sodium (or other drug if the patient was allergic to cefazolin). Postoperatively, patients were randomly assigned (at a 1:1 ratio) using a computer-generated randomization sequence to receive extended antibacterial prophylaxis (n = 125) or placebo (n = 126) for 48 hours or until all thoracostomy tubes were removed, whichever came first. The combined occurrence of surgical site infection, empyema, pneumonia, and Clostridium difficile colitis by postoperative day 28. A total of 245 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis (121 in the intervention group and 124 in the placebo group). Thirteen patients (10.7%) in the intervention group and 8 patients (6.5%) in the placebo group had a primary end point (risk difference, -4.3% [95% CI, -11.3% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Six patients (5.0%) in the intervention group and 5 patients (4.0%) in the placebo group developed surgical site infections (risk difference, -0.93% [95% CI, -6.1% to 4.3%]; P = .77). Seven patients (5.8%) in the intervention group and 3 patients (2.4%) in the placebo group developed pneumonia (risk difference, -3.4% [95% CI, -8.3% to 1.6%]; P = .21). One patient in the intervention group developed empyema. No patients experienced C difficile colitis. Extended postoperative antibacterial prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery requiring tube thoracostomy did not reduce the

  15. Complications in neonatal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Mauricio A; Caty, Michael G

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal surgery is recognized as an independent discipline in general surgery, requiring the expertise of pediatric surgeons to optimize outcomes in infants with surgical conditions. Survival following neonatal surgery has improved dramatically in the past 60 years. Improvements in pediatric surgical outcomes are in part attributable to improved understanding of neonatal physiology, specialized pediatric anesthesia, neonatal critical care including sophisticated cardiopulmonary support, utilization of parenteral nutrition and adjustments in fluid management, refinement of surgical technique, and advances in surgical technology including minimally invasive options. Nevertheless, short and long-term complications following neonatal surgery continue to have profound and sometimes lasting effects on individual patients, families, and society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. About Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... us eat, dress, write, earn a living, create art and do many other activities. To accomplish these ... 2009 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Definition developed by ASSH Council. Other Links CME Mission ...

  17. INDIRECT MICROLARYNGOSTROBOSCOPIC SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; DIKKERS, FG

    Detailed preoperative laryngostroboscopic examination is a prerequisite for phonosurgical correction of organic dysphonia. Although suspension microlaryngoscopic surgery has proved its value in the past, it excludes functional control during the removal of vocal fold swellings. Using an indirect

  18. American Board of Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... separate application is no longer required. The American Board of Surgery is an independent, nonprofit organization founded in 1937 to provide board certification to individuals who have met a defined ...

  19. Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB was also analyzed. Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.

  20. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancy. Skin and muscle cannot regain its normal tone. This can be a problem for very overweight people who lost a lot of weight. Tummy tuck is major surgery. It is important to read about the procedure before having it. ...

  1. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... using a tiny video camera) or using a robot depends on: The extent of the surgery The ... Procedure Meet with your doctor to make sure medical problems, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and ...

  2. Surgery for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Cervical Cancer Treating Cervical Cancer Surgery for Cervical Cancer Many women with cervical cancer will have some ... Options for Cervical Cancer, by Stage More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  3. Robotics in Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Allison; Steele, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, robotic surgery has developed from a futuristic dream to a real, widely used technology. Today, robotic platforms are used for a range of procedures and have added a new facet to the development and implementation of minimally invasive surgeries. The potential advantages are enormous, but the current progress is impeded by high costs and limited technology. However, recent advances in haptic feedback systems and single-port surgical techniques demonstrate a clear role for robotics and are likely to improve surgical outcomes. Although robotic surgeries have become the gold standard for a number of procedures, the research in colorectal surgery is not definitive and more work needs to be done to prove its safety and efficacy to both surgeons and patients. PMID:27746895

  4. INDIRECT MICROLARYNGOSTROBOSCOPIC SURGERY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAHIEU, HF; DIKKERS, FG

    1992-01-01

    Detailed preoperative laryngostroboscopic examination is a prerequisite for phonosurgical correction of organic dysphonia. Although suspension microlaryngoscopic surgery has proved its value in the past, it excludes functional control during the removal of vocal fold swellings. Using an indirect mic

  5. Septoplasty and Turbinate Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose. Surgery on the septum can lead to stretching or injury to these nerves. This can lead ... a painless procedure that is performed in our office. A small endoscope is used to visualize the ...

  6. Ear surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Review Date 10/ ...

  7. Retrosternal thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007558.htm Retrosternal thyroid surgery To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The thyroid gland is normally located at the front of ...

  8. Pain Medications After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aspx?id=23897. Accessed Dec. 16, 2013. Winn HR. Youmans Neurological Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders ... Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Notice of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a ...

  9. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sleeve above and below the stain and sewing the cuff back onto the shortened sleeve. A ... because it requires a great deal of technical skill. Possible risks and side effects of lung surgery ...

  10. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AHA/AANN/AANS/ACR/ASNR/CNS/SAIP/SCAI/SIR/SNIS/SVM/SVS guideline on the management of ... Interventions, Society of Interventional Radiology, Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery, Society for Vascular Medicine, and Society for Vascular ...

  11. Knee microfracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartilage regeneration - knee ... Three types of anesthesia may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Medicine to relax you, and shots of painkillers to numb the knee Spinal (regional) anesthesia General anesthesia (you will be ...

  12. Is day surgery safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, Birgitte; Engbæk, J; Bartholdy, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort.......Day surgery is expanding in several countries, and it is important to collect information about quality. The aim of this study was to assess morbidity and unanticipated hospital visits 0-30 days post-operatively in a large cohort....

  13. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  14. Future of cosmetic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert Alan

    2014-04-01

    Changes in cosmetic surgery will be driven by several key forces. The patient's self-image, and perceived place in society, will continue to drive patients to the cosmetic surgeon as well as to demand newer and better treatments. Technological advances, especially those based on an enhanced understanding of cellular and tissue physiology, promise enhanced tools other than the scalpel for the surgeon. Conceptual advances in our understanding of beauty and patient psychology will lead to a more integrative approach to cosmetic surgery.

  15. Physical Therapy and Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Valle-Onate, Rafael; Ward, Michael M.; Kerr, Gail S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapy and orthopedic surgery are important components in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Supervised physical therapy is more effective that individual or unsupervised exercise in improving symptoms, but controlled trials suggest than combined inpatient and outpatient therapy provides the greatest improvement. Recommendations for exercise are universal, but the best types and sequence of therapies are not known. Total hip replacement is the surgery most commonly perfor...

  16. Metabolic surgery: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Leví, Ana M; Rubio Herrera, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The impact of bariatric surgery beyond its effect on weight loss has entailed a change in the way of regarding it. The term metabolic surgery has become more popular to designate those interventions that aim at resolving diseases that have been traditionally considered as of exclusive medical management, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Recommendations for metabolic surgery have been largely addressed and discussed in worldwide meetings, but no definitive consensus has been reached yet. Rates of diabetes remission after metabolic surgery have been one of the most debated hot topics, with heterogeneity being a current concern. This review aims to identify and clarify controversies regarding metabolic surgery, by focusing on a critical analysis of T2D remission rates achieved with different bariatric procedures, and using different criteria for its definition. Indications for metabolic surgery for patients with T2D who are not morbidly obese are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgery for childhood epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of all patients with epilepsy suffer from focal epilepsy syndromes. In about 15% of these patients, the seizures are not adequately controlled with antiepileptic drugs; such patients are potential candidates for surgical treatment and the major proportion is in the pediatric group (18 years old or less. Epilepsy surgery in children who have been carefully chosen can result in either seizure freedom or a marked (>90% reduction in seizures in approximately two-thirds of children with intractable seizures. Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging, neurosurgery, and neuroanaesthesia have improved the outcomes of surgery for children with intractable epilepsy. Early surgery improves the quality of life and cognitive and developmental outcome and allows the child to lead a normal life. Surgically remediable epilepsies should be identified early and include temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis, lesional temporal and extratemporal epilepsy, hemispherical epilepsy, and gelastic epilepsy with hypothalamic hamartoma. These syndromes have both acquired and congenital etiologies and can be treated by resective or disconnective surgery. Palliative procedures are performed in children with diffuse and multifocal epilepsies who are not candidates for resective surgery. The palliative procedures include corpus callosotomy and vagal nerve stimulation while deep brain stimulation in epilepsy is still under evaluation. For children with "surgically remediable epilepsy," surgery should be offered as a procedure of choice rather than as a treatment of last resort.

  18. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooma Sinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon′s console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over.

  19. Photobiomodulation in laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Rong, Dong-Liang; Huang, Jin; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Laser surgery provides good exposure with clear operating fields and satisfactory preliminary functional results. In contrast to conventional excision, it was found that matrix metalloproteinases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases -1 mRNA expression is higher, myofibroblasts appeared and disappeared slower in laser excision wounds. It has been suggested that the better anatomical and functional results achieved following laser cordectomy may be explained by the fact that such procedures result in better, more rapid healing processes to recover vocal cord for early glottic tumors and better. In this paper, the role of photobiomodulation in laser surgery will be discussed by the cultured monolayer normal human skin fibroblast model of the photobiomodulation of marginal irradiation of high intensity laser beam, the photobiomodulation related to the irradiated tissue, the biological information model of photobiomodulation and the animal models of laser surgery. Although high intensity laser beam is so intense that it destroys the irradiated cells or tissue, its marginal irradiation intensity is so low that there is photobiomodulation on non-damage cells to modulate the regeneration of partly damaged tissue so that the surgery of laser of different parameters results in different post-surgical recovery. It was concluded that photobiomodulation might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery, which might be used to design laser surgery.

  20. The scope of plastic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... areas of surgery (especially general surgery), plastic surgeons are arguably the .... Who do you feel are experts in laparoscopic surgery? e (general surgeons) a. Maxillofacial .... of pressure sore. ORIF = open reduction internal fixation. ... Plastic versus cosmetic surgery: What's the difference? Plast Reconstr.

  1. Laparoscopic Surgery - What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? Laparoscopic Surgery - What is it? | ASCRS WHAT IS LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY? Laparoscopic or “minimally ... information about the management of the conditions addressed. It should be recognized that these brochures should not ...

  2. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ... Email Print What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  3. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ... Full Article What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone antegrade ...

  4. LAPAROSCOPIC GYNAEC SURGERIES – A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiremath

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : BACKGROUND: There has been a rapid worldwide adoption of laparoscopic procedures across many surgical specialt ies, most notably in Gynaecology. Unfortunately, the increased adoption of laparoscopic surgery has also been accompanied by a corresponding rise in the rates and types of complications reported. AIMS : To audit the different types of laparoscopic surgerie s and their complications and comparison with other routes of surgery. METHODS & MATERIALS : We have retrospectively analysed 285 laparoscopic surgeries and 306 other routes of surgery which were done at our institute from July 2011 to April 2013.We admit t he patients 1 - 2 days prior to surgery and a complete medical work - up of the patient is done for elective laparoscopic surgery .We defer laparoscopy for malignant conditions, uterine size more than 20 weeks, cervix flushed to the vagina or with history of m ore than 2 pelvic surgeries. Sub - fertile women, after an initial workup, are subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy with chromopertubation. For laparoscopic cystectomies, patients with ultrasono graphy findings suggestive of benign tumours are selected. RESULT S : We have performed 285 laparoscopic procedures over this time period till date. Majority of these cases are Laparoscopic Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomies (LAVH [111 – 38.9%], followed by laparoscopic surgeries for various benign ovarian conditions ( BOC [62 – 21%] and Diagnostic Laparoscopies ( DL with or without laparoscopic ovarian drilling ( LOD [59 cases – 20.7%]. Out of 111 LAVH, 3 patients had bladder injury [2.7%] ; Out of 285 cases that underwent laparoscopic procedures, 5 [1.75%] required conversi on to laparotomy. Overall operative complications including major and minor, are significantly higher in the abdominal surgery group as compared to the laparoscopic group ( p value= 0.001 CONCLUSION : Laparoscopy is a safe route for conventional surgery, with lesser intraoperative, immediate post

  5. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatout, Ibrahim; Mettler, Liselotte; Maass, Nicolai; Ackermann, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgery is the most dynamic development in the sector of minimally invasive operations currently. It should not be viewed as an alternative to laparoscopy, but as the next step in a process of technological evolution. The advancement of robotic surgery, in terms of the introduction of the Da Vinci Xi, permits the variable use of optical devices in all four trocars. Due to the new geometry of the "patient cart," an operation can be performed in all spatial directions without re-docking. Longer instruments and the markedly narrower mechanical elements of the "patient cart" provide greater flexibility as well as access similar to those of traditional laparoscopy. Currently, robotic surgery is used for a variety of indications in the treatment of benign gynecological diseases as well as malignant ones. Interdisciplinary cooperation and cooperation over large geographical distances have been rendered possible by telemedicine, and will ensure comprehensive patient care in the future by highly specialized surgery teams. In addition, the second operation console and the operation simulator constitute a new dimension in advanced surgical training. The disadvantages of robotic surgery remain the high costs of acquisition and maintenance as well as the laborious training of medical personnel before they are confident with using the technology.

  6. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  7. Percutaneous forefoot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, T

    2014-02-01

    Percutaneous methods can be used to perform many surgical procedures on the soft tissues and bones of the forefoot, thereby providing treatment options for all the disorders and deformities seen at this site. Theoretical advantages of percutaneous surgery include lower morbidity rates and faster recovery with immediate weight bearing. Disadvantages are the requirement for specific equipment, specific requirements for post-operative management, and lengthy learning curve. At present, percutaneous hallux valgus correction is mainly achieved with chevron osteotomy of the first metatarsal, for which internal fixation and a minimally invasive approach (2 cm incision) seem reliable and reproducible. This procedure is currently the focus of research and evaluation. Percutaneous surgery for hallux rigidus is simple and provides similar outcomes to those of open surgery. Lateral metatarsal malalignment and toe deformities are good indications for percutaneous treatment, which produces results similar to those of conventional surgery with lower morbidity rates. Finally, fifth ray abnormalities are currently the ideal indication for percutaneous surgery, given the simplicity of the procedure and post-operative course, high reliability, and very low rate of iatrogenic complications. The most commonly performed percutaneous techniques are described herein, with their current indications, main outcomes, and recent developments.

  8. Cardiac surgery 2015 reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Essa, Yasin; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    For the year 2015, almost 19,000 published references can be found in PubMed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been again characterized by lively discussions in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Lacking evidence in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery has been added. As in the years before, CABG remains the gold standard for the revascularization of complex stable triple-vessel disease. Plenty of new information has been presented comparing the conventional to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) demonstrating similar short- and mid-term outcomes at high and low risk, but even a survival advantage with transfemoral TAVI at intermediate risk. In addition, there were many relevant and interesting other contributions from the purely operative arena. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices), and aortic surgery. While the article does not have the expectation of being complete and cannot be free of individual interpretation, it provides a condensed summary that is intended to give the reader "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery.

  9. [Clonidine for remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: a double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled study of clonidine under intra-operative use of remifentanil in elective surgery of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlimp, C J; Pipam, W; Wolrab, C; Ohner, C; Kager, H I; Likar, R

    2011-06-01

    In the postoperative period, α2-adrenergic agonists have an opioid sparing effect. In a previous, experimental study, it was also shown that clonidine attenuates remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. In this study, we examined under clinical conditions whether early administration of a single dose of clonidine can inhibit remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing elective surgery of the shoulder and with continuous intraoperative use of remifentanil. In this study 40 patients received double-blind and randomized either 150 µg clonidine or placebo intravenously before skin incision. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol and remifentanil (0.23 ± 0.09 µg/kg body weight/min) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg body weight) was administered 20 min before incision closure. Postoperatively, the patients were given a patient-controlled analgesia pump (PCA) with morphine. Overall morphine consumption as well as overall assessment of pain with the visual analogue scale in the first 24 h postoperatively did not differ significantly between the groups. Isolated pain scores at 12 h and 24 h were significantly enhanced in the clonidine group (p<0.05). An early single dose of 150 µg of clonidine did not reduce the postoperative morphine consumption and pain scores in patients undergoing elective surgery of the shoulder with remifentanil/propofol-based anaesthesia. After the effect of clonidine has presumably subsided the pain can even increase, therefore further studies with repetitive doses of clonidine should be carried out.

  10. 择期眼科手术围术期抗栓管理%Perioperative management of antithrombotic therapies in patients with elective ophthalmic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 秦明照; 周丹

    2015-01-01

    Elderly patients presenting for ophthalmic surgery are often having systemic diseases and using multiple drugs, particularly antithrombotic drugs.Different antithrombotic drugs has different perioperative bleeding risks in a variety of ophthalmic surgeries, thus it is necessary to adjust antithrombotic strategies, manage antiplatelet drugs and anticoagulants drugs to balance the risk of bleeding and thrombosis.%眼科手术中的老年患者常合并全身性疾病,需应用多种药物,特别是抗栓药物.不同类型的眼科手术围术期应用抗栓药物的出血风险不同,因此需要调整抗栓策略,对抗血小板药物及抗凝药物进行管理,以平衡术中及术后出血及血栓的风险.

  11. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF PREOPERATIVE SKIN PREPARATION WITH AQUEOUS POVIDONE IODINE ONLY AND IN COMBINATION WITH ALCHOLIC CHLORHEXIDINE IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING ELECTIVE AND EMERGENCY SURGERIES

    OpenAIRE

    Latchu; Sareen Babu; Balachandra; Madhusudhan; Lokesh; Mahesh Babu

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many techniques are there for skin preparation before surgery, the commonest being initial scrub with antiseptic soap solution, followed by painting the prepared area with antiseptic paint solution. But degerming of the skin can be done with antiseptics us ed for less than one minute which is as effective as five minute scrub with germicidal soap solution followed by painting with antiseptics . AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : 1. To evaluate the effic...

  12. SURGERY AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY JOURNALS ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanaider, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    To analyze critically the effectiveness and value of bibliometric indicators in journals of Surgery or Cardiovacular Surgery in the context of the postgraduate programs of CAPES Medicine III. A sampling with 16 academic programs and one professional master of Medicine III, encompassing the General and Digestive System Surgery, Cardiovascular Surgery and Multidisciplinary courses with such contents, was evaluated. Thomson Reuters/ISI (JCR), Elsevier/Scopus (SJR), and also Scielo databases were used. Only in seven programs, the teachers had an average of Qualis A1 articles greater than the others strata. Eleven journals in the surgical area are in stratum A1 (5%) and it reaches 25% in Cardiovascular Surgery. Among the six journals with the largest number of publications Qualis A1 in area Medicine III, five are from non-specific areas. The Acta Cirúrgica Brasileira represented 58% of the publications in the stratum A2. There are some obstacles in the Qualis classification with little uniformity among the Medicine areas I, II and III. A permanent committee should be set to update the Qualis, composed by the three medical areas. It should be considered using other index databases and the unification of the Qualis criteria for journals in medicine. Rating criteria of multi and transdisciplinary journals need to be reviewed. It is essential an institutional financial support for national journals chosen by peers aiming to provide a full computerization process and a professional reviewer of the English language, in order to increase the impact factor. Analisar criticamente a eficácia e valor de indicadores bibliométricos dos periódicos da Cirurgia e Cirurgia Cardiovascular no contexto dos Programas de Pós-Graduação da área Medicina III da CAPES. Foi avaliada uma amostragem com 16 programas acadêmicos e um mestrado profissional da área de Medicina III, compreendendo a Cirurgia Geral e do Aparelho Digestivo, a Cirurgia Cardiovascular e Cursos Multidisciplinares

  13. [Indication for bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusch-Enserer, Ursula; Enserer, Christian; Rosen, Harald R; Prager, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    Morbid obesity is defined as obesity with body mass index (BMI) > or = 40 kg/m2 with secondary serious diseases. Conservative treatment generally fails to produce long-term weight loss in these patients, since several bariatric surgical techniques have been developed which are based on gastric restriction and/or gastric malabsorption resulting in permanent weight loss over years. Preoperative evaluation might detect suitable patients and reduce both non-surgical and surgical complications. Postoperative follow-up in a multidisciplinary program, including specialists in various fields of medicine, e.g. surgery, internal medicine, radiology, paediatrics and nutritional surveillance are mandatory in the treatment of patients after obesity surgery. Bariatric surgery results in a major weight loss, with amelioration of most obesity-associated conditions. The most serious side effect of some surgical procedere is malnutrition.

  14. Robotic aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  15. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  16. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  17. Stereolithography for craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Douglas P; Cillo, Joseph E; Miles, Brett A

    2006-09-01

    Advances in computer technology have aided in the diagnostic and clinical management of complex congenital craniofacial deformities. The use of stereolithographic models has begun to replace traditional milled models in the treatment of craniofacial deformities. Research has shown that stereolithography models are highly accurate and provide added information in treatment planning for the correction of craniofacial deformities. These include the added visualization of the complex craniofacial anatomy and preoperative surgical planning with a highly accurate three-dimensional model. While the stereolithographic process has had a beneficial impact on the field of craniofacial surgery, the added cost of the procedure continues to be a hindrance to its widespread acceptance in clinical practice. With improved technology and accessibility the utilization of stereolithography in craniofacial surgery is expected to increase. This review will highlight the development and current usage of stereolithography in craniofacial surgery and provide illustration of it use.

  18. [IMSS in numbers. Surgeries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Surgery occupies a priority place within the organization of health services. In the IMSS around 1.4 million surgeries are performed annually and 3934 take place each day. A great part of the resources goes to obstetric interventions, since 222,928 caesarean sections were performed in 2004, and along with curettages, tubal occlusions and hysterectomies, they sum 37.6% of the surgeries performed in 2004. Abdominal deliveries (caesarean sections) were done in 39% of the pregnancies delivered in the IMSS and 8.3% were done in adolescents. Simple surgical interventions were also important. Cholecystectomies were 6 times more frequent in women aged 20 to 59 years old than in men the same age. Among the main interventions we also describe hernioplasty, appendicectomies, amygdalectomies, rhinoplasties, biopsies and circumcisions. Scarce data on complications are registered and no data is available for infections of surgical wounds. Surgical procedures are more frequent in women and in certain specialities.

  19. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shin-Ichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon's hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor.

  20. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon’s hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor. PMID:26822625

  1. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...

  2. Ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibaek, Lene; Blaakaer, Jan; Petersen, Lone Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study objective was to survey general health and coping in women undergoing ovarian cancer surgery, and subsequently to develop and test a supportive care intervention. METHODS/MATERIALS: Women who underwent surgery on the suspicion of ovarian cancer participated in a follow...... standard levels. Concerning mental health, levels were below standard during the entire period, but did improve with time, also in women in whom the potential cancer diagnosis was refuted. The preoperative differences between these groups leveled out postoperatively in terms of physical health. At the end...

  3. Surgery for Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston FRCS FRCOphth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of congenital cataract is very different to the treatment of a routine age-related cataract. In adults, surgery may be delayed for years without affecting the visual outcome. In infants, if the cataract is not removed during the first year of life, the vision will never be fully regained after surgery. In adults, if the aphakia is not corrected immediately, it can be corrected later. In young children, if the aphakia is not corrected, the vision will never develop normally.

  4. [Trends in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerantola, Y; Christoforidis, D; Halkic, N; Matter, M; Romy, S; Suter, M; Tempia-Caliera, A; Demartines, N; Givel, J-C

    2009-01-21

    More than the number of real novelties, trends and preliminary results characterise the annual development in surgery. The wealth and diversity of topics to be covered require arbitrary choices, therefore not necessarily complete. The constant development of choledocolithiasis management, dominated by minimal invasive technology, treatments of unusual nature of two frequent proctological conditions, fistulae and haemorrhoids, the increasing importance of metabolic bariatric surgery, as well as the strict rules of effective melanoma treatment, represent as many directions in which the operating procedure, although unseen, continue to gain quality and security.

  5. Surgery in Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Norin

    2016-01-01

    Amphibian surgery has been especially described in research. Since the last decade, interest for captive amphibians has increased, so have the indications for surgical intervention. Clinicians should not hesitate to advocate such manipulations. Amphibian surgeries have no overwhelming obstacles. These patients heal well and tolerate blood loss more than higher vertebrates. Most procedures described in reptiles (mostly lizards) can be undertaken in most amphibians if equipment can be matched to the patients' size. In general, the most difficult aspect would be the provision of adequate anesthesia.

  6. Robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbas, Haytham; Bu Ali, Daniah

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the gold standard treatment for patients with thyroid cancer or nodules suspicious for cancer. Open conventional approach is the standard surgical approach. However, a visible neck incision could be a concern for most young female patients, especially for patients with a history of healing with keloid or hypertrophic scars. Robotic remote access approaches have evolved into a safe and feasible approach in selected patients, providing a hidden scar with good patient satisfaction. This review will focus on the performance and safety of robotic retroauricular thyroid surgery. PMID:28149806

  7. Update on obesity surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Eisenberg; Andrew J Duffy; Robert L Bell

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States has reached epidemic proportions. With more than 30 million Americans clinically obese, the younger population has also been affected. Surgical therapy should be offered to the severely obese patient who is refractory to nonsurgical therapy, as established by the 1991 NIH Consensus Conference on Gastrointestinal Surgery for Severe Obesity. Surgery is currently the most effective therapy for weight loss. It is far more effective than any other treatment modality, both in terms of the amount of weight loss and in terms of durability in maintaining weight loss.

  8. Comparison of Sugammadex and Neostigmine in Short Term Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Koc

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study compared the efficacy and cost effectivines of sugammadex and neostigmine for reversal of neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium for short term elective surgery. Material and Method: After written informed consent, 33 patients aged 18%u201365, ASA I-III, who were undergoing short term surgery (

  9. Predicting postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery : a novel clinical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, F. J.; Espin, E.; Vallribera, F.; de Bock, G. H.; Hoekstra, H. J.; van Leeuwen, B. L.; Engel, A. F.

    Aim The aim of this study was to develop and externally validate a clinically, practical and discriminative prediction model designed to estimate in-hospital mortality of patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Method All consecutive patients who underwent elective or emergency colorectal surgery

  10. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibner, Michał; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Mirosław

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This

  11. Stairs climbing test with pulse oximetry as predictor of early postoperative complications in functionally impaired patients with lung cancer and elective lung surgery: prospective trial of consecutive series of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Igor; Majerić-Kogler, Visnja; Plavec, Davor; Maloca, Ivana; Slobodnjak, Zoran

    2008-02-01

    To test the predictive value of stairs climbing test for the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)stairs climbing with pulse oximetry before the operation with the number of steps climbed and the time to complete the test recorded. Oxygen saturation and pulse rate were measured every 20 steps. Data on postoperative complications including oxygen use, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and early postoperative mortality were collected. Eighty-seven of 101 patients (86%) had at least one postoperative complication. The type of surgery was significantly associated with postoperative complications (25.5% patients with lobectomy had no early postoperative complications), while age, gender, smoking status, postoperative oxygenation, and artificial ventilation were not. There were more postoperative complications in more extensive and serious types of surgery (Pstairs climbing test produced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (-1%) and increase in pulse rate (by 10/min) for every 20 steps climbed. The stairs climbing test was predictive for postoperative complications only in lobectomy group, with the best predictive parameter being the quotient of oxygen saturation after 40 steps and test duration (positive likelihood ratio [LR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-3.38; negative LR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.76). In patients with other types of surgery the only significant predictive parameter for incident severe postoperative complications was the number of days on artificial ventilation (P=0.006). Stairs climbing test should be done in routine clinical practice as a standard test for risk assessment and prediction of the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients selected for elective surgery (lobectomy). Comparative to spirometry, it detects serious disorders in oxygen transport that are a baseline for a later development of cardiopulmonary postoperative

  12. Urogenital Reconstructive Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte Kaasgaard

    Urogenital reconstructive surgery Lotte Kaasgaard Jakobsen1 Professor Henning Olsen1 Overlæge Gitte Hvistendahl1 Professor Karl-Erik Andersson2 1 – Dept. of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital 2 – Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University hospital Background: Congenital obstruction...

  13. Femoroacetabular impingement surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiman, Michael P; Thorborg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabuler impingement (FAI) is becoming increasingly recognised as a potential pathological entity for individuals with hip pain. Surgery described to correct FAI has risen exponentially in the past 10 years with the use of hip arthroscopy. Unfortunately, the strength of evidence supporting...

  14. [DRG and gastrointestinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leardi, S; Altilia, F; Pietroletti, R; Risetti, A; Schietroma, M; Simi, M

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis-related-groups (DRG) is the cost-based system for hospital reimbursement. However, the proceeds does not coincide with the costs. Aim of the study was to identify the profit, which we could gained with 147, 155, 158, 162, 165, 198 gastrointestinal surgery DRG. 30 consecutive patients, undergone to surgery in Clinica Chirurgica of L'Aquila University, had been studied. We had calculated the daily costs of medical and nursing practice, diagnostic tests, drugs, hospitalization, surgical instruments for every patient's therapy. The DRG-proceeds had been correlated with the DRG-costs. The "major gastrointestinal surgery" had not profit (147 DRG: anterior resection of rectum = -354428 Pounds, Miles = -94020 Pounds; 155 DRG: total gastrectomy = -1920641 Pounds). On the contrary, "minimal surgery" had good profits (158 DRG: hemorroidectomy with local anestesia = 1469605 Pounds;162 DRG: sutureless groin hernioplasty = 1561200 Pounds; 198 DRG: videolaparochole-cystectomy: 1208807 Pounds). The study seems to demonstrate the disparity of the reimbursement system related to DRG. However, the surgeons, as managers, must employ warily the resources for producing DRG.

  15. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... include: Repair or transfer of nerves Repair of muscle or tendon Splinting or fusion of joints Find a hand surgeon in your area to discuss the best ...

  16. Decreasing strabismus surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, A; Williams, B; Arora, A K; McNamara, R; Yates, J; Fielder, A

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there has been a consistent change across countries and healthcare systems in the frequency of strabismus surgery in children over the past decade. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data on all strabismus surgery performed in NHS hospitals in England and Wales, on children aged 0–16 years between 1989 and 2000, and between 1994 and 2000 in Ontario (Canada) hospitals. These were compared with published data for Scotland, 1989–2000. Results: Between 1989 and 1999–2000 the number of strabismus procedures performed on children, 0–16 years, in England decreased by 41.2% from 15 083 to 8869. Combined medial rectus recession with lateral rectus resection decreased from 5538 to 3013 (45.6%) in the same period. Bimedial recessions increased from 489 to 762, oblique tenotomies from 43 to 121, and the use of adjustable sutures from 29 to 44, in 2000. In Ontario, operations for squint decreased from 2280 to 1685 (26.1%) among 0–16 year olds between 1994 and 2000. Conclusion: The clinical impression of decrease in the frequency of paediatric strabismus surgery is confirmed. In the authors’ opinion this cannot be fully explained by a decrease in births or by the method of healthcare funding. Two factors that might have contributed are better conservative strabismus management and increased subspecialisation that has improved the quality of surgery and the need for re-operation. This finding has a significant impact upon surgical services and also on the training of ophthalmologists. PMID:15774914

  17. Robotics in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, A C; Falcone, T

    2009-06-01

    Robotic surgery has evolved from an investigational surgical approach to a clinically useful adjunct in multiple surgical specialties over the past decade. Advocates of robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery revere the system's wristed instrumentation, ergonomic positioning, and three-dimensional high-definition vision system as significant improvements over laparoscopic equipment's four degrees of freedom and two-dimensional laparoscope that demand the surgeon stand throughout a procedure. The cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the bulky size of the equipment make robotics less attractive to others. Studies evaluating outcomes in robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery are limited. Multiple small retrospective studies demonstrate the safety and feasibility of robotic hysterectomy. With increased surgeon experience, operative times are similar to, or shorter than, laparoscopic cases. Robotic assistance can facilitate suturing in laparoscopic myomectomies, and is associated with decreased blood loss and a shorter hospital stay, although may require longer operative times. Robotic assistance has also been applied to multiple procedures in the subspecialties of infertility, urogynecology and gynecologic oncology with good success and relatively low morbidity. However, further research is warranted to better evaluate the relative benefits and costs of robotic assisted gynecologic surgery.

  18. Ghrelin and Metabolic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios J. Pournaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Ghrelin has been implicated to play a role in the success of these procedures. Furthermore, these operations have been used to study the gut-brain axis. This article explores this interaction, reviewing the available data on changes in ghrelin levels after different surgical procedures.

  19. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Mitral Valve Prolapse Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  20. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2012:chap 61. Otton CM, Bowow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  2. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  3. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Agrawal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors.

  4. Improvements in Cataract Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Lisanne Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the elderly. It involves lens opacification due to biochemical changes in the lens. Cataract surgery provides restoration of good vision by removal of the opaque lens, followed by implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL) in the rem

  5. Orthopaedics in day surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orthopaedics surgery, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 52507-00200, Nairobi, Kenya and M.A. Odhiambo, KRN,. KRM, BSc ... processing of day cases is separate, more efficient and cases of ... centre is by rule of the medicare and accreditation.

  6. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help. Contact your provider if you have a cold, flu, fever, herpes breakout, or any other illness. Prepare your home so you can move around easily when you return from the hospital. The day before your surgery: Shower and shampoo well. You may be asked to ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which will probably include orthodontics before and after surgery, may take several years to complete. Your OMS and orthodontist understand that this is a long-term commitment for you and your family, and will try to realistically estimate the time ...

  8. Nutrition & Pancreatic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the first part of this thesis was to determine the optimal feeding strategy after pancreatoduodenectomy. The available nutritional guidelines give conflicting recommendations and are all based on studies after major gastrointestinal surgery for cancer in general. We systematically reviewe

  9. Thromboprophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Struijk-Mulder

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of thromboprophylatic modalities after total hip and total knee arthroplasty by Dutch orthopedic departments over a period of ten years and several uncertainties regarding thromboprophylaxis in other areas of orthopedic surgery. In this thesis some of these uncertaintie

  10. COMPUTERS IN SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BODE

    technology in the field of surgery and the hopes it hold out to surgeons in developing countries. Key words: ... space-crafts and for specific interest research groups. 8. Broadly ... been left out of this new dispensation and sundry bounties of ...

  11. Cataract surgery - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100079.htm Cataract surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 5 Go to slide ... 5 Overview The lens of an eye is normally clear. A cataract is when the lens becomes cloudy as you ...

  12. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be amputated mid-thigh, the lower leg and foot can be rotated and attached to the thigh bone. The old ankle joint becomes the new knee joint. This surgery is called rotationplasty (roh-TAY-shun-PLAS-tee). A prosthesis is used to make the new leg the ...

  13. Endodontic surgery prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarpazhooh, Amir; Shah, Prakesh S

    2011-01-01

    Medline, (PubMed) and the Cochrane databases together with hand searching of the following journals: Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology (name changed to Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics in 1995), Endodontics and Dental Traumatology (name changed to Dental Traumatology in 2001), Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Clinical studies evaluating apical surgery with placement of a root-end filling were included. Studies on apical surgery with orthograde root canal filling or about apicectomy alone without root-end filling were excluded, as were experimental and animal studies. Only studies with ≥ ten patients with a minimum six month follow-up period and clearly defined radiographic and clinical healing criteria, with healing reported for at least two categories of a specific prognostic factor were accepted. Studies reporting in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Scandinavian languages were included. All studies were assessed separately by two of the three authors, with disagreements resolved by discussion. Prognostic factors were divided into patient related, tooth-related or treatment-related factors. The reported percentages of healed teeth were pooled per category. The statistical method of Mantel-Haenszel was applied to estimate the odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Homogeneity was assessed using Woolf's test. With regard to tooth-related factors, the following were identified as predictors of healing: absence of preoperative pain or signs, good density of the root canal filling and a periapical lesion size of ≤ 5 mm. With regard to treatment-related factors, teeth treated with the use of an endoscope tended to have higher healed rates than teeth treated without the use of an endoscope. Although the clinician may be able to control treatment

  14. The prevalence of body contouring surgery after gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzinger, Hugo B; Abayev, Sara; Pittermann, Anna; Karle, Birgit; Kubiena, Harald; Bohdjalian, Arthur; Langer, Felix B; Prager, Gerhard; Frey, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    As bariatric surgery has become more popular, more patients are undergoing body contouring surgery after massive weight loss. Many of the surgical procedures performed on the massive weight loss patient are complex and labor-intensive. Therefore, the plastic surgery unit needs to be prepared for a patient's demand. Little literature is available on how frequently patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery receive body contouring surgery. Two hundred fifty-two subjects (out of 425 who were mailed the questionnaire) who had undergone gastric bypass surgery between 2003 and 2009 completed the questionnaire, which obtained information on body image satisfaction and frequency of body contouring surgery after massive weight loss. Of all patients, 74% desire a body contouring surgery after gastric bypass surgery. Fifty-three patients (21%) have undergone a total of 61 body contouring procedures. The most common were abdominoplasties (59%), followed by lower body lifts (20%). In contrast to a positive judgment of the general aspect of the body image satisfaction after massive weight loss, both genders are unsatisfied with body areas like abdomen/waist, breast, and thighs. Paralleling the increasing use of bariatric surgery, there is a high demand for body contouring surgery. A huge disparity exists between the number of subjects who desire a body contouring surgery and those who actually received it.

  15. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  16. Accidental burns during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Erhan; O'Dey, Dan Mon; Pallua, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to increase awareness of intraoperative burns during standard procedures, to discuss their possible causes and warning signs and to provide recommendations for prevention and procedures to follow after their occurrence. A total of 19 patients associated with intraoperative burn accidents were treated surgically and analyzed after a mean follow-up of 5 +/- 3.5 months. Review included retrospective patient chart analysis, clinical examination, and technical device and equipment testing. A total of 15 patients recently underwent cardiac surgery, and 4 pediatric patients recovered after standard surgical procedures. A total of 15 patients had superficial and 4 presented with deep dermal or full-thickness burns. The average injured TBSA was 2.1 +/- 1% (range, 0.5-4%). Delay between primary surgery and consultation of plastic surgeons was 4.5 +/- 3.4 days. A total of 44% required surgery, including débridment, skin grafting or musculocutaneous gluteus maximus flaps, and the remaining patients were treated conservatively. Successful durable soft-tissue coverage of the burn region was achieved in 18 patients, and 1 patient died after a course of pneumonia. Technical analysis demonstrated one malfunctioning electrosurgical device, one incorrect positioned neutral electrode, three incidents occurred after moisture under the negative electrode, eight burns occurred during surgery while fluid or blood created alternate current pathways, five accidents were chemical burns after skin preparation with Betadine solution, and in one case, the cause was not clear. The surgical team should pay more attention to the probability of burns during surgery. Early patient examination and immediate involvement of plastic and burn surgeons may prevent further complications or ease handling after the occurrence.

  17. ROBOTIC SURGERY: BIOETHICAL ASPECTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Souza, Camila Ribeiro; Maia, Polyana Mendes; Siqueira, Sávio Lana

    2016-01-01

    The use of robots in surgery has been increasingly common today, allowing the emergence of numerous bioethical issues in this area. To present review of the ethical aspects of robot use in surgery. Search in Pubmed, SciELO and Lilacs crossing the headings "bioethics", "surgery", "ethics", "laparoscopy" and "robotic". Of the citations obtained, were selected 17 articles, which were used for the preparation of the article. It contains brief presentation on robotics, its inclusion in health and bioethical aspects, and the use of robots in surgery. Robotic surgery is a reality today in many hospitals, which makes essential bioethical reflection on the relationship between health professionals, automata and patients. A utilização de robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos tem sido cada vez mais frequente na atualidade, o que permite a emergência de inúmeras questões bioéticas nesse âmbito. Apresentar revisão sobre os aspectos éticos dos usos de robôs em cirurgia. Realizou-se revisão nas bases de dados Pubmed, SciELO e Lilacs cruzando-se os descritores "bioética", "cirurgia", "ética", "laparoscopia" e "robótica". Do total de citações obtidas, selecionou-se 17 artigos, os quais foram utilizados para a elaboração do artigo. Ele contém breve apresentação sobre a robótica, sua inserção na saúde e os aspectos bioéticos da utilização dos robôs em procedimentos cirúrgicos. A cirurgia robótica é uma realidade, hoje, em muitas unidades hospitalares, o que torna essencial a reflexão bioética sobre as relações entre profissionais da saúde, autômatos e pacientes.

  18. Advances in mucogingival surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, G P

    2000-01-01

    The term Mucogingival Surgery was proposed by Friedman in 1957 to indicate any surgery "designed to preserve attached gingiva, to remove frena or muscle attachment, and to increase the depth of the vestibule". The aim of this type of surgery was to maintain an adequate amount of attached gingiva and to prevent continuous loss of attachment. This philosophy was supported by many horizontal observations in humans that confirmed the need for a certain band of attached gingiva to maintain periodontal tissue in a healthy state. Subsequently, clinical and experimental studies by Wennström and Lindhe (1983) demonstrated that as long as plaque buildup is kept under careful control there is no minimum width of keratinised gingiva necessary to prevent the development of periodontal disease. These observations reduce the importance of Mucogingival Surgery. Surgical techniques are used mostly to solve aesthetic problems, since the term "Periodontal Plastic Surgery" has been suggested to indicate surgical procedures performed to correct or eliminate anatomical, developmental or traumatic deformities of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa. More recently the Consensus Report of the American Academy of Periodontology (1996) defines Mucogingival Therapy as "non surgical and surgical correction of the defects in morphology, position and/or amount of soft tissue and underlying bone". This assigns importance to non-surgical therapy and to the bone condition because of its influence on the morphology of the defects. In this respect the Mucogingival Therapy includes: Root coverage procedures, Gingival augmentation, Augmentation of the edentulous ridge, Removing of the aberrant frenulum, Prevention of ridge collapse associated with tooth extraction, Crown lengthening, Teeth that are not likely to erupt, Loss of interdental papilla which presents an aesthetic and/or phonetic problem.

  19. Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Home For Patients Search ... Stress Urinary Incontinence FAQ166, July 2014 PDF Format Surgery for Stress Urinary Incontinence Special Procedures What is ...

  20. Anaesthesia for robotic gynaecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K; Mehta, Y; Sarin Jolly, A; Khanna, S

    2012-07-01

    Robotic surgery is gaining widespread popularity due to advantages such as reduced blood loss, reduced postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay and better visualisation of fine structures. Robots are being used in urological, cardiac, thoracic, orthopaedic, gynaecological and general surgery. Robotic surgery received US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in gynaecological surgery in 2005. The various gynaecological robotic operations being performed are myomectomy, total and supracervical hysterectomy, ovarian cystectomy, sacral colpopexy, tubal reanastomosis, lymph node dissection, surgery of retroperitoneal ectopic pregnancy, Moskowitz procedure and endometriosis surgery. The anaesthetic considerations include difficult access to the patient intraoperatively, steep Trendelenburg position, long surgical duration and the impact of pneumoperitoneum. We highlight the complications encountered in these surgeries and methods to prevent these complications. Robotic gynaecological surgery can be safely performed after considering the physiological effects of the steep Trendelenburg position and of pneumoperitoneum. The benefits of the surgical procedure should be weighed against the risks in patients with underlying cardiorespiratory problems.

  1. Breast Reconstruction with Flap Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast reconstruction with flap surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Breast reconstruction is a surgical procedure that restores shape to ... breast tissue to treat or prevent breast cancer. Breast reconstruction with flap surgery is a type of breast ...

  2. Contemporary oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, F; Machado, L

    1994-04-01

    This article provides a panoramic view of the nine major areas of subspecialty in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery: facial trauma, surgical pathology, dentoalveolar surgery, rehabilitation of the cleft lip/palate patient, temporomandibular joint surgery, preprosthetic and implant rehabilitation, surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea, correction of jaw deformities and cosmetic+ surgery. Clinical cases are used to illustrate the most recent advances in each of these nine areas.

  3. Thurston norm and cosmetic surgeries

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Two Dehn surgeries on a knot are called cosmetic if they yield homeomorphic manifolds. For a null-homologous knot with certain conditions on the Thurston norm of the ambient manifold, if the knot admits cosmetic surgeries, then the surgery coefficients are equal up to sign.

  4. Timing of surgery for sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, Wilco C.

    2008-01-01

    The frequently diagnosed lumbar disc herniation can disappear by natural course, but still leads to high low back surgery rates. The optimal period of conservative care, before surgery is executed, was unknown. It is surprising that scientific evidence was lacking which justified “early” surgery. Su

  5. Robot-assisted endoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruurda, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    During the last three years, robot-assisted surgery systems are increasingly being applied in endoscopic surgery. They were introduced with the objective to overcome the challenges of standard endoscopic surgery. With the improvements in manipulation and visualisation that robotic-assistance offers,

  6. [Hand surgery training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutet, F; Haloua, J P

    2003-10-01

    Training of the hand surgeon HAND SURGEON A CONCEPT: The hand surgeon is supposed to be in charge of all the hand lesions regarding, skeleton, muscles, tendons, nerves and vessels. He has to be able to insure reparation and coverage of all of them. So he is involved in all the structures, which insure integrity and function of the hand. PURPOSE AND WAYS OF TRAINING: To obtain the asked ability, the hand surgeon training has to be global and sustained by two underlying surgical specialities: orthopedic surgery and plastic and reconstructive surgery. From 2000 after many years of dealings, a Right to the Title in Hand Surgery was born. This Right to the Title wants to be the formal recognition of the specific training of the hand surgeon. For the well-recognized ancient hand surgeons they need to be confirmed by one's peers. Now a day the hand surgeon has to satisfy to this specific training: Passed the complete training and exam of the Orthopedic or Plastic surgery board. Spent at least 6 months as resident in the other underlying specialty. Passed a microsurgery examination. Passed one of the four national Hand Surgery diplomas (DIU/Inter-Universitary Diploma). The examinations have been harmonized. A common formation is delivered regarding hand surgery, the way of examination is the same and the formation is 2 years long. The final exam is presented in front of board of examiners where a teacher of one of the other three national diplomas is present. Spent at least 2 years in a formative hand surgery unit, listed by the French College of Hand Surgeons, as senior surgeon. Those requirements are heavy to assume and need a heavy personal involvement. That seems to be necessary to have an ability level as high as possible. Emergency surgery practice is absolutely necessary in this training. All the 17 university formative hand surgery units listed by the French College of Hand Surgeons are members of the FESUM (European Federation of the Emergency Hand Units

  7. Evaluation of malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael Brian; Yi, Paul Hyunsoo; Thomas, Charlotte F; Garcia, Jane; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-03-01

    Malnutrition can increase the risk of surgical site infection in both elective spine surgery and total joint arthroplasty. Obesity and diabetes are common comorbid conditions in patients who are malnourished. Despite the relatively high incidence of nutritional disorders among patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, the evaluation and management of malnutrition is not generally well understood by practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Serologic parameters such as total lymphocyte count, albumin level, prealbumin level, and transferrin level have all been used as markers for nutrition status. In addition, anthropometric measurements, such as calf and arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold, and standardized scoring systems, such as the Rainey-MacDonald nutritional index, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and institution-specific nutritional scoring tools, are useful to define malnutrition. Preoperative nutrition assessment and optimization of nutritional parameters, including tight glucose control, normalization of serum albumin, and safe weight loss, may reduce the risk of perioperative complications, including infection.

  8. Methods of patient warming during abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keeping abdominal surgery patients warm is common and warming methods are needed in power outages during natural disasters. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-cost, low-power warming methods for maintaining normothermia in abdominal surgery patients. METHODS: Patients (n = 160 scheduled for elective abdominal surgery were included in this prospective clinical study. Five warming methods were applied: heated blood transfusion/fluid infusion vs. unheated; wrapping patients vs. not wrapping; applying moist dressings, heated or not; surgical field rinse heated or not; and applying heating blankets or not. Patients' nasopharyngeal and rectal temperatures were recorded to evaluate warming efficacy. Significant differences were found in mean temperatures of warmed patients compared to those not warmed. RESULTS: When we compared temperatures of abdominal surgery patient groups receiving three specific warming methods with temperatures of control groups not receiving these methods, significant differences were revealed in temperatures maintained during the surgeries between the warmed groups and controls. DISCUSSION: The value of maintaining normothermia in patients undergoing abdominal surgery under general anesthesia is accepted. Three effective economical and practically applicable warming methods are combined body wrapping and heating blanket; combined body wrapping, heated moist dressings, and heating blanket; combined body wrapping, heated moist dressings, and warmed surgical rinse fluid, with or without heating blanket. These methods are practically applicable when low-cost method is indeed needed.

  9. Transoral Robotic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Shokjean

    2017-01-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is a technique used to treat oral, throat, and skull base cancers using a minimally invasive robotic approach through the mouth and throat. The TORS procedure allows deeper access and dissection of suspicious lesions and neoplastic growths in the oral cavity and those that extend from the throat to the base of the skull. Robotic surgery allows the surgeon to operate in tight spaces without a large open incision. This article discusses symptoms and risk factors of oral, throat, and skull base cancers; types of procedures that can be performed using the TORS approach; specialized instrumentation; patient selection; surgical advantages and disadvantages; patient benefits; and the role of the surgical team in preparing to intraoperatively care for the TORS patient.

  10. [Cosmetic eyelid surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruban, J-M; Barbier, J; Malet, T; Baggio, E

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetic eyelid surgery is becoming increasingly popular. It can rejuvenate the patient's appearance with relatively minor side effects. Its risk/benefit ratio is one of the best in facial cosmetic surgery. However, the patient does not always accurately assess the aesthetic appearance of his or her eyelids. This underscores the importance of clinical examination in order to determine the patient's wishes, and then make an accurate diagnosis and potential surgical plan. We currently oppose, in general, surgical techniques involving tissue removal (skin-muscle and/or fat) in favor of those involving tissue repositioning and grafting (autologous fat pearl transposition, obtained by liposuction, and lipostructure). Furthermore, the place of adjuvant therapies to blepharoplasty is steadily increasing. They mainly include surface treatments (peels and lasers), dermal fillers and anti-wrinkle botulinum toxin injections. They are also increasingly used in isolation in novel ways. In all cases, a perfect knowledge of anatomy and relevant skills and experience remain necessary.

  11. Cataract Surgery Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA-McGannon cataract surgery tool is a tiny cutter-pump which liquefies and pumps the cataract lens material from the eye. Inserted through a small incision in the cornea, the tool can be used on the hardest cataract lens. The cutter is driven by a turbine which operates at about 200,000 revolutions per minute. Incorporated in the mechanism are two passages for saline solutions, one to maintain constant pressure within the eye, the other for removal of the fragmented lens material and fluids. Three years of effort have produced a design, now being clinically evaluated, with excellent potential for improved cataract surgery. The use of this tool is expected to reduce the patient's hospital stay and recovery period significantly.

  12. [Stress in surgeries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daian, Márcia Rodrigues; Petroianu, Andy; Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Jeunon, Ester Eliane

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide the literature regarding the psychological stress in the peri-operative period of adult patients undergoing operations under general anesthesia. The articles were obtained by surveying the papers published and catalogued in the Medline Pubmed interface database, Lilacs and the Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (BVS) since 1984, crossing the headings stress, surgery, general anesthesia, psychology. Over 800 articles related to stress and surgery were analyzed with regards to their relevance to the considered subject. Eighteen articles were related to psychological stress. Their results confirmed the presence of psychological and physical stress, during the peri-operative period as well as relation between stress and de clinical post-operative recovery. There is a gap regarding in the peri-operative period. More studies on psychological influence on stress may benefit patients and help professionals during the surgical treatment.

  13. Robotic mitral valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypson, Alan P; Nifong, L Wiley; Chitwood, W Randolph

    2003-12-01

    A renaissance in cardiac surgery has begun. The early clinical experience with computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems outlines the limitations of this approach despite some procedural success. Technologic advancements, such as the use of nitinol U-clips (Coalescent Surgical Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) instead of sutures requiring manual knot tying, have been shown to decrease operative times significantly. It is expected that with further refinements and development of adjunct technologies, the technique of computer-enhanced endoscopic cardiac surgery will evolve and may prove to be beneficial for many patients. Robotic technology has provided benefits to cardiac surgery. With improved optics and instrumentation, incisions are smaller. The ergometric movements and simulated three-dimensional optics project hand-eye coordination for the surgeon. The placement of the wristlike articulations at the end of the instruments moves the pivoting action to the plane of the mitral annulus. This improves dexterity in tight spaces and allows for ambidextrous suture placement. Sutures can be placed more accurately because of tremor filtration and high-resolution video magnification. Furthermore, the robotic system may have potential as an educational tool. In the near future, surgical vision and training systems might be able to model most surgical procedures through immersive technology. Thus, a "flight simulator" concept emerges where surgeons may be able to practice and perform the operation without a patient. Already, effective curricula for training teams in robotic surgery exist. Nevertheless, certain constraints continue to limit the advancement to a totally endoscopic computer-enhanced mitral valve operation. The current size of the instruments, intrathoracic instrument collisions, and extrathoracic "elbow" conflicts still can limit dexterity. When smaller instruments are developed, these restraints may be resolved. Furthermore, a working port incision is still required for

  14. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Patient Handouts Aortic valve surgery - open (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Spanish Open heart surgery (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish ... heart surgery Pediatric heart surgery - discharge Sternal exploration or closure Related ...

  15. What to Expect After Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Reconstruction Surgery Women who have surgery as part of ... and after your surgery. Deciding Whether To Have Breast Reconstruction Many women choose to have reconstruction surgery, but ...

  16. Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery and the Endocrine System Fact Sheet Bariatric Surgery and the Endocrine System February, 2012 Download PDFs ... Morton, MD Marzieh Salehi, MD What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  17. The day of surgery for your child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Same-day surgery - child; Ambulatory surgery - child; Surgical procedure - child ... The anesthesia and surgery team will talk with you and your child before surgery. You may meet with them at an appointment before ...

  18. Port Access Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganó, Mario; Minzioni, Gaetano; Spreafico, Patrizio; Rinaldi, Mauro; Pasquino, Stefano; Ceriana, Piero; Locatelli, Alessandro

    2000-10-01

    The port-access technique for cardiac surgery was recently developed at Stanford University in California as a less invasive method to perform some cardiac operations. The port-access system has been described in detail elsewhere. It is based on femoral arterial and venous access for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and on the adoption of a specially designed triple-lumen catheter described originally by Peters, and subsequently modified and developed in the definitive configuration called the endoaortic clamp.

  19. [Apical endodontic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, J A

    2004-04-01

    If (a revision of) a conventional endodontic treatment is not possible or not successful, apical endodontic surgery can be indicated. The contemporary indications, the better retrograde preparation techniques with ultrasonic retro-tips, and the better visualisation of the operation area with an operation microscope can lead to higher success percentages. Moreover, the current developments in the field of compatible filling materials are promising. Also the application of lasers is promising, but has still to prove its clinical usefulness.

  20. Paraendodontic surgery: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Marchetti LODI; Sheila POLETO; Renata Grazziotin SOARES; Luis Eduardo Duarte IRALA; Salles, Alexandre Azevedo; Limongi,Orlando

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Paraendodontic surgery is a procedure that aims problemsresolution that couldn’t be solved by the conventional endodontictreatment, or when the accomplishment conventional treatment is notpossible. Case report and conclusion: The aim of this study was to report a clinical case where was made apicectomy on the teeth 11, 21 and 22.The tooth 22 was sealing of root-end cavity MTA retrofilling.

  1. [Glaucoma and retinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Geerling, G; Zierhut, M; Klink, T

    2010-05-01

    In the therapeutic approach to complex glaucomas different initial situations were considered: pre-existing glaucoma, induction of glaucoma after vitreoretinal surgery and antiglaucomatous procedures. In pre-existing glaucoma and after filtering surgery maintenance of the filtering bleb requires a vitreoretinal approach for conjunctiva preservation with techniques such as pneumatic retinopexy or small gauge vitrectomy. After vitreoretinal surgery an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) is common. Secondary glaucoma may occur after scleral buckling and after vitrectomy with or without gas or silicone oil tamponade as well as after application of steroids. Angle closure glaucoma after scleral buckling develops because of congestion and anterior rotation of the ciliary body. Vitreous tamponades with expansive or saturated gases may cause angle-closure glaucoma with or without pupillary blockage and may critically shorten ocular perfusion. Postoperative checks, immediate action and a ban on boarding aircraft over the period of intraocular gas tamponade prevent permanent damage to the eye. The majority of secondary glaucomas can effectively be controlled by topical medication and adequate postoperative posture of the patient. Besides the temporary use of systemic antiglaucomatous medication or laser therapy, very rarely in cases of massive swelling or overfill, a direct intervention, such as partial gas or silicone oil removal is required. A prophylactic inferior peripheral iridectomy prevents pupillary blockage in aphakic eyes with intraocular tamponade. In cases of heavy silicone oil use, the peripheral iridectomy is placed in the superior position. Nd:YAG laser application will regulate IOP in cases of occlusion. Secondary glaucoma due to silicone oil emulsification overload is treated by trabecular meshwork aspiration and lavage. In refractory glaucoma repetitive cyclophotocoagulation and drainage implants represent an approved method for long-term IOP regulation

  2. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  3. [Aesthetic surgery, psychic preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiss, R

    2003-10-01

    The aesthetic surgery impacts the psychological picture of the body. The candidate must be prepared to this change in appearance. If not, the surgeon must suggest the psychological preparation, evaluating the risk of dissatisfaction, in order to allow the surgical and narcissistic success of his operation. The author, a psychiatric, beneficiary in a strong experience of a surgical assistance, develops the interest of such a preparation upon a period of about 15 years (1988-2002).

  4. Robotic Assisted Colorectal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Baik, Seung Hyuk; M.D&#

    2010-01-01

    Improvements of the robotic surgical system are continuously being made to overcome the technical limitations and disadvantages found during the surgeries. So detailed operation methods are newly designed to adapt to the upgraded model of the robotic surgical system. The major core technologies of the robotic surgical system are a three dimensional image of the surgical field and a function of articulation of the instruments tips compared to conventional laparoscopic instruments. With the hel...

  5. [Bariatric surgery: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Esteban, B; Zugasti Murillo, A

    2004-01-01

    The indication of bariatric surgery as therapeutic procedure for morbid obese patients requires the application of selection criteria which deal with the degree of obesity, associated complications and previous failure of conventional therapy. Alcohol or drug addiction and concomitant serious disease are contraindications for bariatric surgery. Before operation, a full assessment is needed to identify possible eating behaviour disturbances and associated comorbidity such as cardiovascular disease, sleep apnoea, metabolic and psychiatric alterations which might induce intra and postoperative complications. Surgical techniques can be classified as restrictive, malabsortive and mixed procedures. Gastroplasty and adjustable gastric banding are restrictive techniques, which are indicated in obese patients with body mass index less than 45 kg/m2. Mixed techniques are the most used procedures. They include gastric by-pass which causes a reduction of 60-70% of weight excess, biliopancreatic diversion and duodenal switch which can eliminate a 75% of body weight excess. Following bariatric surgery a dramatic improvement in associated comorbidity can be demonstrated, specially in what refers to diabetes, hypertension, dislipidaemia and apnoea. Postoperative mortality is around 1-2%. Peritonitis and venous thromboembolism are the most serious complications. Postoperative follow-up should be lifelong and requires a progressive nutrition planning and vitamin supplementation.

  6. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eBouquet De Jolinière

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Minimally invasive surgery (MIS can be considered as the greatest surgical innovation over the past thirty years. It revolutionized surgical practice with well-proven advantages over traditional open surgery: reduced surgical trauma and incision-related complications, such as surgical-site infections, postoperative pain and hernia, reduced hospital stay, and improved cosmetic outcome. Nonetheless, proficiency in MIS can be technically challenging as conventional laparoscopy is associated with several limitations as the two-dimensional (2D monitor reduction in-depth perception, camera instability, limited range of motion and steep learning curves. The surgeon has a low force feedback which allows simple gestures, respect for tissues and more effective treatment of complications.Since 1980s several computer sciences and robotics projects have been set up to overcome the difficulties encountered with conventional laparoscopy, to augment the surgeon's skills, achieve accuracy and high precision during complex surgery and facilitate widespread of MIS. Surgical instruments are guided by haptic interfaces that replicate and filter hand movements. Robotically assisted technology offers advantages that include improved three- dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision.

  7. Robotic assisted andrological surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sijo J Parekattil; Ahmet Gudeloglu

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the operative microscope for andrological surgery in the 1970s provided enhanced magnification and accuracy,unparalleled to any previous visual loop or magnification techniques.This technology revolutionized techniques for microsurgery in andrology.Today,we may be on the verge of a second such revolution by the incorporation of robotic assisted platforms for microsurgery in andrology.Robotic assisted microsurgery is being utilized to a greater degree in andrology and a number of other microsurgical fields,such as ophthalmology,hand surgery,plastics and reconstructive surgery.The potential advantages of robotic assisted platforms include elimination of tremor,improved stability,surgeon ergonomics,scalability of motion,multi-input visual interphases with up to three simultaneous visual views,enhanced magnification,and the ability to manipulate three surgical instruments and cameras simultaneously.This review paper begins with the historical development of robotic microsurgery.It then provides an in-depth presentation of the technique and outcomes of common robotic microsurgical andrological procedures,such as vasectomy reversal,subinguinal varicocelectomy,targeted spermatic cord denervation (for chronic orchialgia) and robotic assisted microsurgical testicular sperm extraction (microTESE).

  8. Quantifying innovation in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Mayer, Erik K; Marcus, Hani J; Cundy, Thomas P; Pratt, Philip J; Parston, Greg; Vale, Justin A; Darzi, Ara W

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the applicability of patents and publications as metrics of surgical technology and innovation; evaluate the historical relationship between patents and publications; develop a methodology that can be used to determine the rate of innovation growth in any given health care technology. The study of health care innovation represents an emerging academic field, yet it is limited by a lack of valid scientific methods for quantitative analysis. This article explores and cross-validates 2 innovation metrics using surgical technology as an exemplar. Electronic patenting databases and the MEDLINE database were searched between 1980 and 2010 for "surgeon" OR "surgical" OR "surgery." Resulting patent codes were grouped into technology clusters. Growth curves were plotted for these technology clusters to establish the rate and characteristics of growth. The initial search retrieved 52,046 patents and 1,801,075 publications. The top performing technology cluster of the last 30 years was minimally invasive surgery. Robotic surgery, surgical staplers, and image guidance were the most emergent technology clusters. When examining the growth curves for these clusters they were found to follow an S-shaped pattern of growth, with the emergent technologies lying on the exponential phases of their respective growth curves. In addition, publication and patent counts were closely correlated in areas of technology expansion. This article demonstrates the utility of publically available patent and publication data to quantify innovations within surgical technology and proposes a novel methodology for assessing and forecasting areas of technological innovation.

  9. Art and epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Hunter, Gary; Téllez-Zenteno, José Francisco

    2013-10-01

    The impact of health and disease has led many artists to depict these themes for thousands of years. Specifically, epilepsy has been the subject of many famous works, likely because of the dramatic and misunderstood nature of the clinical presentation. It often evokes religious and even mythical processes. Epilepsy surgical treatment has revolutionized the care of selected patients and is a relatively recent advance. Epilepsy surgery has been depicted in very few artistic works. The first portrait showing a potential surgical treatment for patients with epilepsy was painted in the 12th century. During the Renaissance, Bosch famously provided artistic commentary on traditional beliefs in "The stone of madness". Several of these works demonstrate a surgeon extracting a stone from a patient's head, at one time believed to be the source of all "folly", including epileptic seizures, psychosis, intellectual disability, depression, and a variety of other illnesses. There are some contemporary art pieces including themes around epilepsy surgery, all of them depicting ancient Inca Empire procedures such as trepanning. This article reviews the most relevant artistic works related with epilepsy surgery and also its historical context at the time the work was produced. We also present a painting from the Mexican artist Eduardo Urbano Merino that represents the patient's journey through refractory epilepsy, investigations, and ultimately recovery. Through this work, the artist intends to communicate hope and reassurance to patients going through this difficult process.

  10. Pregnancy Management After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreldin, Nevert; Kuller, Jeffrey; Rhee, Eleanor; Brown, Laura; Laifer, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is a source of major morbidity and mortality and is a growing concern worldwide. Maternal obesity is associated with increased maternal and fetal risks during pregnancy. Bariatric surgery has emerged as one of the most sustainable treatments for severe obesity and its comorbidities. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery often experience drastic improvements in hypertension and diabetes. It is not surprising, therefore, that the incidence of bariatric surgery is increasing, particularly in women of childbearing age. In fact, many women undergoing bariatric surgery plan to become pregnant in the future. Bariatric surgery may have a beneficial effect on rates of fetal macrosomia, gestational diabetes, hypertension, and preeclampsia. Conversely, studies have showed that bariatric surgery may increase the risk of small for gestational age infants and preterm birth. Given its rising incidence, it is important that physicians be able to thoroughly and accurately counsel and treat patients who plan to, or do, become pregnant after bariatric surgery.

  11. Differential changes in free and total insulin-like growth factor I after major, elective abdominal surgery: the possible role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjaerbaek, C; Frystyk, J; Orskov, H; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, P; Jensen, M B; Laurberg, S; Møller, N; Flyvbjerg, A

    1998-07-01

    Major surgery is accompanied by extensive proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). Proteolysis of IGFBP-3 is generally believed to increase IGF bioavailability due to a diminished affinity of the IGFBP-3 fragments for IGFs. We have investigated 18 patients undergoing elective ileo-anal J-pouch surgery. Patients were randomized to treatment with GH (12 IU/day; n = 9) or placebo (n = 9) from 2 days before to 7 days after operation. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were measured by ultrafiltration of serum, and IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity was determined by a [125I]recombinant human IGFBP-3 degradation assay. In the GH-treated group, total IGF-I increased preoperatively by 99%. Postoperatively, total IGF-I decreased by 48% (placebo) and 52% (GH). Immunoassayable IGFBP-3 decreased by 27% (placebo) and 26% (GH). In the placebo-treated group, free IGF-I was unchanged throughout the study. In the GH-treated group, free IGF-I increased by 277% preoperatively and remained elevated after operation. IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity increased by 63-73% after operation. The relative elevations of free IGF-I levels despite decreased total IGF-I levels could thus relate to augmented IGFBP-3 proteolysis.

  12. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning.

  13. Energy systems in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The systems of energy in surgery are applied in order to achieve better and more effective performing of procedures. Whereas various energy sources, including electricity, ultrasound, laser and argon gas, may be used, the fundamental principle involves tissue necrosis and hemostasis by heating. Electro Surgery. Electro Surgery is a surgical technique by which surgical procedures are performed by focused heating of the tissue using devices based on high-frequency currents. It represents one of the most frequently used energy systems in laparoscopy. Ultrasound Energy. The basic principle of operation of the ultrasound surgical instruments is the usage of low-frequency mechanic vibrations (ultrasound energy within the range of 20-60 kHz for cutting and coagulation of tissue. Laser. Laser is the abbreviation for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, aimed at increasing light by stimulated emission of radiation and it is the name of the instrument which generates coherent beam of light. Argon Plasma Coagulation. It has been in use since 1991 for endoscopic hemostasis. It uses highfrequency electric current and ionized gas argon. The successful application of devices depends on the type of surgical procedure, training of the surgeon and his knowledge about the device. Surgeons do not agree on the choice of device which would be optimal for a certain procedure. Conclusion. The whole team in the operating room must have the basic knowledge of the way an energy system works so as to provide a safe and effective treatment of patients. The advantages and shortcomings of different systems of energy have to be taken into account while we use a special mode.

  14. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  15. Complications in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischer, Jason S; Rymeski, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal pediatric surgery is a diverse field that encompasses many different procedures. The pullthrough for Hirschsprung disease, the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty for anorectal malformations including complex cloaca reconstructions and the ileal pouch anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis present some of the most technically challenging procedures pediatric surgeons undertake. Many children prevail successfully following these surgical interventions, however, a small number of patients suffer from complications following these procedures. Anticipated postoperative problems are discussed along with medical and surgical strategies for managing these complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rabbit orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Gregory A

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery in rabbits poses several unique parameters for the veterinary surgeon. It is imperative for the veterinarian to be knowledgeable about the anatomic features of the surgical repair site and to become familiar with a rabbit's pain and discomfort often associated with orthopedic injuries. Handling the perioperative and postoperative pain and potential GI disturbances are crucial for a successful outcome of the surgical case. This article is designed to help the veterinary surgeon prepare for the orthopedic surgical procedure and the peripheral physiologic needs of the rabbit from presentation through recovery.

  17. Robotics in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, J; Rockall, T; Darzi, A

    2004-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been shown to offer many advantages to general surgical patients but has not been widely adopted for colorectal disease. Initial fears surrounding the oncological safety of laparoscopic colectomies have largely subsided but the technical challenges still remain. Surgical robots or telemanipulators present the laparoscopic surgeon with unrivaled dexterity and vision, which may allow colonic resections to be completed with greater ease. Although initial studies suggest promising results using currently available systems, it will take further time for patient benefits to be proven, therefore justifying the greater expense of operating with this new technology.

  18. [Temporomandibular joint disc surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, J; Maes, J-M; Nicot, R; Dumousseau, T; Cotelle, M; Ferri, J

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a common disease and may be responsible for major functional and painful repercussions. Treatment is not consensual. The literature highlights the role of conservative treatments (physiotherapy, analgesics, splints) in a first attempt. Minimally invasive surgical techniques (arthroscopy, arthrocentesis) have developed rapidly in recent decades. They have proven effective and reliable, especially in patients suffering from irreducible or reducible anterior disc dislocation or presenting with arthopathies. The goal of our work was to make an update about disk surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  20. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  1. Recovery Following Orthognathic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    USAF Chief Administration 13. ABSTRACT (Mlaxomum 200 words ) Acaesslon For WTTS CPA&t DTIC TAB [1 Unlnlnounced 3)¶’rt QUTALIT 32CT! By~i~’bt f Ditiu~tif...cardiovascular physiology. Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1986;1:133-159. 3. Zimmer B, Schwestka R, Kubein-Meesenburg D: Changes in mandibu- lar...mobility after different procedures of orthoganthic surgery. Eur J Orthod 1992;14:188-197. 4. Aragon SB, Van Sickels JE: Mandibular range of motion with

  2. Cutaneous mucormycosis postcosmetic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarrah, Khaled; Abdelaty, Mahmoud; Behbahani, Ahmad; Mokaddas, Eman; Soliman, Helmy; Albader, Ahdi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mucormycosis is a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening infection that is caused by organisms belonging to the order Mucorales. It is usually acquired through direct means and virtually always affects immunocompromised patients with the port of entry reflecting the site of infection, in this case, cutaneous. Unlike other mucormycoses, patients affected by Apophysomyces elegans (A elegans) are known to be immunocompetent. This locally aggressive disease penetrates through different tissue plains invading adjacent muscles, fascia, and even bone causing extensive morbidity and may prove fatal if treated inadequately. Cutaneous mucormycosis is associated with disruption of cutaneous barriers such as trauma. However, rarely, it may be iatrogenic. No cases have been previously reported postcosmetic surgery, especially one that is so commonly performed, lipofilling. Case Report: The patient is a, previously healthy, 41-year-old middle-eastern female who was admitted to the plastic surgery department 17 days after undergoing cosmetic surgery. She suffered from extensive tissue inflammation and necrosis in both gluteal regions. Following admission, she was initially started on empirical antimicrobial therapy which was changed to an antifungal agent, voriconazole, when preliminary microbiological results showed filamentous fungi. This was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B was commenced when further mycological analysis identified A elegans. Furthermore, she underwent a total of 10 sessions of extensive debridement to the extent that portions of the sacrum and left femoral head became exposed. Her clinical status and wounds improved with the appropriate management and she remained an inpatient for 62 days. Subsequently, she had defects in both gluteal regions which required reconstructive surgery. Conclusion: A elegans is an uncommon cause of iatrogenic cutaneous mucormycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, especially in the

  3. Monitoring in microvascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, H; Rosen, J M

    1991-03-01

    The importance of monitoring in microvascular surgery is underscored by the high reported salvage rates of failing free flaps and replants. In this overview, we begin by defining the physiology of ischemic tissue with emphasis given to the no-reflow phenomenon and the secondary critical ischemia times. Based on the physiological changes accompanying ischemia, several variables are defined that can be monitored to reflect the vascular state of a free flap or replant. Multifarious monitoring systems are then reviewed, including clinical observation, temperature, isotope clearance, ultrasonic Doppler, laser Doppler, transcutaneous oxygen tension, reflection plethysmography, dermofluorometry, pH, electromagnetic flowmetry, serial hematocrits, interstitial fluid pressure, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. [Neurological complications associated with ultrasound-guided interscalene and supraclavicular block in elective surgery of the shoulder and arm. Prospective observational study in a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao Ares, A; Sabaté, A; Porteiro, L; Ibáñez, B; Koo, M; Pi, A

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms after performing interscalene block varies between 4 and 16%. The majority of cases are resolved spontaneously within a year, but some patients have their symptoms permanently. Our objective was to assess the incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms after performing the ultrasound-assisted interscalene and supraclavicular anaesthetic blocks. A prospective and observational study was conducted on consecutive patients who had undergone upper extremity surgery with an interscalene or supraclavicular block as an isolated technique, or as a complement to general anaesthesia. Seven days after the intervention, a telephone interview was conducted that focused on the detection of neurological symptoms in the operated limb. Further serial interviews were conducted on patients with symptoms (after the first, the third and the sixth month, and one year after surgery) until resolution of symptoms. Neurological evaluation was offered to those patients with persistent symptoms after one year. A total of 121 patients were included, on whom 96 interscalene blocks and 22 supraclavicular blocks were performed. Postoperative neurological symptoms were detected in 9.9% (95% CI, 5-15%) of patients during the first week. No significant differences were observed between interscalene (9%) and supraclavicular block (14%). After 3 months the symptoms persisted in 9 patients (7.4%), with symptoms remaining in 4 patients (3.3%) after 1.5 years. Electromyogram was performed on 3 patients who tested positive for nerve damage. A high incidence of postoperative neurological symptoms was observed, and a worrying percentage of permanence of them. There were no significant differences in incidence according to the type of block, or any features of the patient or the anaesthesia technique that were associated with the incidence of these symptoms, except a marginal relationship with age. These complications must be clearly explained to the

  5. Robotic surgery - advance or gimmick?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Rudy L; Herrmann, Anja

    2013-06-01

    Robotic surgery is increasingly implemented as a minimally invasive approach to a variety of gynaecological procedures. The use of conventional laparoscopy by a broad range of surgeons, especially in complex procedures, is hampered by several drawbacks. Robotic surgery was created with the aim of overcoming some of the limitations. Although robotic surgery has many advantages, it is also associated with clear disadvantages. At present, the proof of superiority over access by laparotomy or laparoscopy through large randomised- controlled trials is still lacking. Until results of such trials are present, a firm conclusion about the usefulness of robotic surgery cannot be drawn. Robotic surgery is promising, making the advantages of minimally invasive surgery potentially available to a large number of surgeons and patients in the future.

  6. Pregnancy management following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzoma, A; Keriakos, R

    2013-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is gaining in popularity, due to globally increasing rates of obesity. In the UK, this has manifested as a 14-fold increase in bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2010, making it necessary to develop strategies to manage women who become pregnant following bariatric surgery. This review paper has explored all the current evidence in the literature and provided a comprehensive management strategy for pregnant women following bariatric surgery. The emphasis is on a multidisciplinary team approach to all aspects of care. Adequate pre-conception and antenatal and postnatal care is essential to good pregnancy outcomes with emphasis on appropriate nutritional supplementation. This is especially important following malabsorptive procedures. There is no evidence to suggest that pregnancy outcome is worse after bariatric surgery, though women who remain obese are prone to obesity-related risks in pregnancy. Neonatal outcome post-bariatric surgery is no different from the general population.

  7. Robotic Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert DeBernardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery for the management of gynecologic cancers allows for minimally invasive surgical removal of cancer-bearing organs and tissues using sophisticated surgeon-manipulated, robotic surgical instrumentation. Early on, gynecologic oncologists recognized that minimally invasive surgery was associated with less surgical morbidity and that it shortened postoperative recovery. Now, robotic surgery represents an effective alternative to conventional laparotomy. Since its widespread adoption, minimally invasive surgery has become an option not only for the morbidly obese but for women with gynecologic malignancy where conventional laparotomy has been associated with significant morbidity. As such, this paper considers indications for robotic surgery, reflects on outcomes from initial robotic surgical outcomes data, reviews cost efficacy and implications in surgical training, and discusses new roles for robotic surgery in gynecologic cancer management.

  8. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  9. Circadian distribution of sleep phases after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gogenur, I.; Wildschiotz, G.; Rosenberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. It is believed that the severely disturbed night-time sleep architecture after surgery is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity with rebound of rapid eye movement (REM). The daytime sleep pattern of patients after major general surgery has not been investigated before. We...... decided to study the circadian distribution of sleep phases before and after surgery. Methods. Eleven patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery were included in the study. Continuous ambulatory polysomnographic monitoring was made 24 h before surgery and 36 h after surgery, thus including two...... nights after operation. Sleep was scored independently by two blinded observers and the recordings were reported as awake, light sleep (LS, stages I and II), slow wave sleep (SWS, stages III and IV), and REM sleep. Results. There was significantly increased REM sleep (P=0.046), LS (P=0.020), and reduced...

  10. Nitrous oxide does not influence operating conditions or postoperative course in colonic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, B; Jørn Jensen, P; Henneberg, S W

    1994-01-01

    We studied 150 patients undergoing elective colonic surgery; they were allocated randomly to undergo artificial ventilation with either air-oxygen or nitrous oxide-oxygen during surgery. Eleven patients were excluded. Preoperative management, surgery and postoperative analgesia were similar in bo...

  11. Utility of Ultraportable Echocardiography in the Preoperative Evaluation of Noncardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Jean Allan; Almeida, Maria Lucia Pereira; Estrada, Tereza Cristina Duque; Werneck,Guilherme Lobosco; Rocha, Alexandre Marins; Rosa,Maria Luiza Garcia; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2016-01-01

    Background The ultraportable echocardiogram machine, with relevant portability and easiness in performing diagnoses, when in experienced hands, may contribute to the reliability of preoperative evaluation in noncardiac surgeries. Objectives To assess cardiac function parameters in patients aged older than 60 years, candidates of elective noncardiac surgeries, classified as ASA1 or ASA 2 according to surgical risk. Methods A total of 211 patients referred for elective surgeries, without suspic...

  12. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaki, Veeramalai Nadu; Balu, Kandasamy; Ramesh, Sadashiva Balakrishnapillai; Arvind, Ramraj Jayabalan; Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges. PMID:23066301

  13. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  14. Oncoplastic breast surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Anders; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Siersen, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    With improved survival rates after breast cancer treatment, more attention is drawn to improve the cosmetic outcome after surgical treatment of breast cancer. In this process the oncoplastic breast surgery was conceived. It supplements the traditional surgical treatments (mastectomy and breast...... conserving surgery) with increased focus on individualized therapy. The ambition is to obtain the best possible cosmetic outcome without compromising recurrence rates and survival. This article provides an overview of the current oncoplastic breast surgery treatment offered in Denmark....

  15. Advances in percutaneous stone surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Hartman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of large renal stones has changed considerably in recent years. The increasing prevalence of nephrolithiasis has mandated that urologists perform more surgeries for large renal calculi than before, and this has been met with improvements in percutaneous stone surgery. In this review paper, we examine recent developments in percutaneous stone surgery, including advances in diagnosis and preoperative planning, renal access, patient position, tract dilation, nephroscopes, lithotripsy, exit strategies, and post-operative antibiotic prophylaxis.

  16. New Trends in General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista Iturrizaga, Juan; Facultad de Medicina Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Currently, with the advance of science, more and more basic disciplines are associated with surgery exerting some influence and giving rise to the concept of Medical-Surgical Science. Besides that, surgery has evolved in paralel with immunology (in the field of transplants), interventional radiology and diagnostic-therapeutic endoscopy. Indeed, many of changes in surgery, such as the use of new diagnostic tools, approaches with shorter incisions, and the colaboration -still in an evaluative p...

  17. Robotic surgery: colon and rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seong Kyu; Carmichael, Joseph C; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Although robotic technology aims to obviate some of the limitations of conventional laparoscopic surgery, the role of robotics in colorectal surgery is still largely undefined and different with respect to its application in abdominal versus pelvic surgery. This review aims to elucidate current developments in colorectal robotic surgery.In colon surgery, robotic techniques are associated with longer operative times and higher costs compared with laparoscopic surgery. However, robotics provides a stable camera platform and articulated instruments that are not subject to human tremors. Because of these advantages, robotic systems can play a role in complex procedures such as the dissection of lymph nodes around major vessels. In addition robot-assisted hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomoses can be easily performed by the surgeon, without a substantial need for a competent assistant. At present, although the short-term outcomes and oncological adequacy of robotic colon resection have been observed to be acceptable, the long-term outcomes of robotic colon resection remain unknown.In rectal surgery, robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer can be carried out safely and in accordance with current oncological principles. However, to date, the impact of robotic rectal surgery on the long-term oncological outcomes of minimally invasive total mesorectal excision remains undetermined. Robotic total mesorectal excision may allow for better preservation of urinary and sexual functions, and robotic surgery may attenuate the learning curve for laparoscopic rectal resection. However, a major drawback to robotic rectal surgery is the high cost involved.Large-scale prospective randomized clinical trials such as the international randomized trial ROLARR are required to establish the benefits of robotic rectal surgery.

  18. Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcipal, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery is rarely seen as a separate entity from adult oral and maxillofacial surgery. Many procedures are similar on adults and children; however, children have unique behavioral, anatomic, and physiologic considerations. Children also have a propensity for certain injuries and pathologic lesions. Children born with congenital anomalies may also have a special subset of needs. This article is a brief review of oral and maxillofacial surgery on the pediatric population.

  19. Virtual Mentor Cataract Surgery Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    TITLE: Virtual Mentor Cataract Surgery Trainer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Principal Investigator: John I. Loewenstein MD Co-Investigator: Bonnie A...AND SUBTITLE Virtual Mentor Cataract Surgery Trainer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The Virtual Mentor Cataract Surgery

  20. Robotics for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, R D; Matsuoka, Y

    1999-01-01

    Robotic technology is enhancing surgery through improved precision, stability, and dexterity. In image-guided procedures, robots use magnetic resonance and computed tomography image data to guide instruments to the treatment site. This requires new algorithms and user interfaces for planning procedures; it also requires sensors for registering the patient's anatomy with the preoperative image data. Minimally invasive procedures use remotely controlled robots that allow the surgeon to work inside the patient's body without making large incisions. Specialized mechanical designs and sensing technologies are needed to maximize dexterity under these access constraints. Robots have applications in many surgical specialties. In neurosurgery, image-guided robots can biopsy brain lesions with minimal damage to adjacent tissue. In orthopedic surgery, robots are routinely used to shape the femur to precisely fit prosthetic hip joint replacements. Robotic systems are also under development for closed-chest heart bypass, for microsurgical procedures in ophthalmology, and for surgical training and simulation. Although results from initial clinical experience is positive, issues of clinician acceptance, high capital costs, performance validation, and safety remain to be addressed.

  1. Surgery, sterilization and sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, V W

    1993-03-01

    The history of sterilization was not linked from the first with surgery. Surgery came first, fully 600 years before the principles of asepsis and anesthesia were even introduced in the middle of the 1800s. Also in the 1800s, the beginnings of thermal sterilization were being developed in the food industry. The basic principles of antisepsis and prevention of wound suppuration, including the destruction of germs on instruments, dressings, the hands of the surgeon and his assistants, and everything else in contact with the wound were clearly elucidated by Lister in the 1870s and remain the inviolate principles of surgical asepsis today. In general, the marriage between the surgeons and the sterilizers was a successful one; the major handicap to eternal bliss and harmony, however, was an incompatibility between the partners. As in many marriages, the partners made unwarranted demands upon each other, and became frustrated when these demands were unfulfilled. The field of surgical sterilization and surgical safety is less confused by technical inconsistencies than it is by semantic nightmares, such that we will never reach a universal definition of sterility. However, we do not really need a universal definition of sterility. Rather we should learn how to translate sterility tests in terms of the real world infections hazards.

  2. [Erythropoietin in plastic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, C I; Rezaeian, F; Harder, Y; Lohmeyer, J A; Egert, S; Bader, A; Schilling, A F; Machens, H-G

    2013-04-01

    EPO is an autologous hormone, which is known to regulate erythropoiesis. For 30 years it has been used for the therapy of diverse forms of anaemia, such as renal anaemia, tumour-related anaemias, etc. Meanwhile, a multitude of scientific publications were able to demonstrate its pro-regenerative effects after trauma. These include short-term effects such as the inhibition of the "primary injury response" or apoptosis, and mid- and long-term effects for example the stimulation of stem cell recruitment, growth factor production, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation. Known adverse reactions are increases of thromboembolic events and blood pressure, as well as a higher mortality in patients with tumour anaemias treated with EPO. Scientific investigations of EPO in the field of plastic surgery included: free and local flaps, nerve regeneration, wound healing enhancement after dermal thermal injuries and in chronic wounds.Acute evidence for the clinical use of EPO in the field of plastic surgery is still not satisfactory, due to the insufficient number of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)-conform clinical trials. Thus, the initiation of more scientifically sound trials is indicated.

  3. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  4. Future of robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas Sean; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    In just over a decade, robotic surgery has penetrated almost every surgical subspecialty and has even replaced some of the most commonly performed open oncologic procedures. The initial reports on patient outcomes yielded mixed results, but as more medical centers develop high-volume robotics programs, outcomes appear comparable if not improved for some applications. There are limitations to the current commercially available system, and new robotic platforms, some designed to compete in the current market and some to address niche surgical considerations, are being developed that will change the robotic landscape in the next decade. Adoption of these new systems will be dependent on overcoming barriers to true telesurgery that range from legal to logistical. As additional surgical disciplines embrace robotics and open surgery continues to be replaced by robotic approaches, it will be imperative that adequate education and training keep pace with technology. Methods to enhance surgical performance in robotics through the use of simulation and telementoring promise to accelerate learning curves and perhaps even improve surgical readiness through brief virtual-reality warm-ups and presurgical rehearsal. All these advances will need to be carefully and rigorously validated through not only patient outcomes, but also cost efficiency.

  5. [Pressure sore revision surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsche, Karin Marion

    2010-02-22

    Pressure sores are a major problem for patients as well as society in general. Immobilised patients are especially at risk. This group of patients with pressure sores should be hospitalised to perform surgical revision of the wound and reconstruction using a flap. Such surgery demands extensive postoperative relief of the flap. The University Centre for Wound Healing at Odense University Hospital has tested the effects of a reduction of the formerly recommended relief period from three to two weeks. In this article we report results covering all patients who have undergone surgery and reconstruction of pressure sores during the period from 1st October 2001 to 1st November 2008. The results are divided into two periods: the period before and the period after the introduction of the reduced relief period. A total of 80 patients were included; 34 in the first period and 46 in the second period. We achieved a considerable reduction in median length of stay from 38 to 27 days with no increase in surgical or complication frequency. Furthermore, the share of fully healed remained unchanged. We believe that there is no risk in shortening the immobile postoperative relief phase following reconstruction of pressure wounds in immobilised patients.

  6. Sex reassignment surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bižić Marta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transsexualism, or gender incongruence, presents a state in which a person's assigned sex at birth conflicts with their psychological gender. It is classified in International Classification of Diseases as F64. Treating these persons require multidisciplinary approach, including psychiatrist, endocrinologist, gynecologist, urologist, plastic and reconstructive surgeon. Genital reconstruction is the final step in transition, and can be performed when all other conditions required by World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH are accomplished. Female to male sex reassignment surgery Several surgical procedures can be done in female to male transsexuals, including mastectomy, removal of female genitalia, metoidioplasty, scrotoplasty with implantation of testicular implants, as well as total phalloplasty. The current operative technique of metoidioplasty comprise the following steps: vaginal removal, the release of the ventral chordee and clitoral ligaments, straightening and lengthening of the clitoris, urethroplasty by combining buccal mucosa graft and genital flaps and scrotoplasty with insertion of testicle prostheses. The goal is to perform all these procedures in one stage, and that makes our team famous worldwide. Metoidioplasty results in excellent cosmetic outcome with completely preserved sensitivity and sexual arousal, enables voiding while standing, but without ability to penetrate due to small size of the neophallus. Considering these advantages, including low complication rate, patients often choose this option. For those who require bigger phallus which enables implantation of penile prosthesis, several surgical techniques have been reported using either available local vascularized tissue or microvascular tissue transfer. However, none of them satisfy all the goals of modern penile construction, i.e. reproducibility, tactile and erogenous sensation, a competent neourethra with a meatus at the top of the neophallus

  7. Cosmetic surgery and conscientious objection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerva, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, I analyse the issue of conscientious objection in relation to cosmetic surgery. I consider cases of doctors who might refuse to perform a cosmetic treatment because: (1) the treatment aims at achieving a goal which is not in the traditional scope of cosmetic surgery; (2) the motivation of the patient to undergo the surgery is considered trivial; (3) the patient wants to use the surgery to promote moral or political values that conflict with the doctor's ones; (4) the patient requires an intervention that would benefit himself/herself, but could damage society at large.

  8. Aesthetic adjuncts with orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Waheed V; Perenack, Jon D

    2014-11-01

    Traditional orthognathic surgery aligns the patient's bony jaws into a desired, more appropriate position but may leave other cosmetic issues unaddressed. Soft tissue deformities may be treated concomitantly with orthognathic surgery, including soft tissue augmentation (fillers), reduction (liposuction), hard tissue augmentation, cosmetic lip procedures, and rhinoplasty. Some cosmetic adjunctive procedures may be performed at a later date after soft tissue edema from orthognathic surgery has resolved to achieve a more predictable outcome. Undesired cosmetic changes may occur months to years after orthognathic surgery and may be addressed by adjunctive cosmetic procedures.

  9. Endocrine Surgery: A Hopkins Legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udelsman, Robert

    2017-09-06

    : The field of Endocrine Surgery is linked to extraordinary contributions made by Hopkins leaders in surgery including William Stewart Halsted, Harvey Cushing, and John L Cameron. Halsted's contributions to the anatomic basis of thyroid and parathyroid surgery were based on his experimental and clinical work performed at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Halsted's disciple, Harvey Cushing, created the field of modern neurosurgery and recognized the disease and syndrome that are immortalized with his name. The Halstedian principles promulgated and transmitted by John L Cameron to subsequent generations of endocrine surgeons at Hopkins have transformed the field of Endocrine Surgery with the stamp of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  10. Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Surgery Risk Assessment (SRA) database is part of the VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP). This database contains assessments of selected surgical...

  11. Additional Surgery after Breast-Conserving Surgery Varies Widely

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study published in the Feb. 1, 2012, issue of JAMA found that the number of women who have one or more additional surgeries to remove suspected residual tumor tissue (re-excisions) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer varies widely across surgeons and hospitals.

  12. 正念减压疗法对择期手术患者手术应激源的影响%Effect of mindfulness therapy on surgical stressors of patients undergoing elective surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜彦玲; 蒋维连

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨正念减压疗法对择期手术患者手术应激源的影响.方法 将120例择期手术患者按照随机数字表法随机分为观察组和对照组,每组各60例.对照组患者给予常规的护理干预,观察组患者在此基础上依据正念减压疗法中的身体扫描、正念呼吸、正念冥想、步行冥想、正念瑜伽、正念内省等6方面进行护理干预.采用压力知觉量表、焦虑自评量表和抑郁自评量表对患者进行评分,比较两组患者压力知觉,焦虑和抑郁水平.结果 干预后观察组患者压力知觉、焦虑和抑郁评分均低于对照组,两组比较,差异具有统计学意义(均P<0.05).结论 正念减压疗法能有效降低择期手术患者压力知觉水平,改善其焦虑抑郁情绪,有利于手术的顺利进行和提高手术质量.%Objective To study the impact of mindfulness therapy on the surgical stressors of patients undergoing elective surgery. Methods One hundred and twenty patients undergoing elective surgery were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group according to the random number table with 60 in each group. The control group was treated with conventional care intervention and the former with nursing intervention based on mindfulness therapy, body scanning, mindful breathing, mindfulness meditation, walking meditation, mindfulness yoga and mindfulness aspect introspection, besides the conventional one. The intervention effect was compared between the groups by way of the Chinese version perceived stress scale (CPSS), self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS). Result After the intervention, the scores of the observation group by CPSS, SAS and SDS were all significantly lower as compared to those of the control group (all P<0.05). Conclusion Mindfulness therapy can effectively reduce the level of perceived stress in patients undergoing elective surgery and relieve their anxiety and depression , which is

  13. [Modern inhalational anesthesia in pediatric maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, D V; Afonina, N V; Marusev, D L; Petrova, L L

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of sevoflurane and isoflurane in elective pediatric maxillofacial surgery. Having outlined the major features of anesthesia in this category of patients, the authors emphasize the application of the conception of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and its derivatives (MAC bar and MAC awake) reflecting the analgesic and hypnotic power of an inhalational anesthetic, respectively, and theoretically substantiate the use of certain anesthetic concentrations at particular stages of surgery. The technique described in the paper was used in 82 patients aged 1.5 months to 18 years, undergoing cleft lip and cleft palate repair, residual lip and nose deformation repair, and other elective maxillofacial procedures. The interventions lasted 40 minutes to 8 hours. Sevoflurane was commonly used as an induction agent while isoflurane was applied to maintain anesthesia. The anesthetics were administered at 1 to 1.3 and 0.8 MAC at traumatic and low traumatic stages of surgery, respectively. During the first traumatic period, the dose of fentanyl was not greater than 1.5 and 2.5 microg/kg in old and young children, respectively. Hemodynamics was characterized by moderate controlled hypotension with an average decrease in mean blood pressure by 30% of the age-related value. Emergence occurred 5-15 min after an anesthetic was discontinued. By and large, the technique demonstrated its efficiency and safety in this group of patients.

  14. Applications of piezoelectric surgery in endodontic surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Francesc; de Ribot, Joan; Doria, Guillermo; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Roig, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Piezosurgery (piezoelectric bone surgery) devices were developed to cut bone atraumatically using ultrasonic vibrations and to provide an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments used in conventional oral surgery. Indications for piezosurgery are increasing in oral and maxillofacial surgery, as in other disciplines, such as endodontic surgery. Key features of piezosurgery instruments include their ability to selectively cut bone without damaging adjacent soft tissue, to provide a clear operative field, and to cut without generating heat. Although piezosurgery instruments can be used at most stages of endodontic surgery (osteotomy, root-end resection, and root-end preparation), no published data are available on the effect of piezosurgery on the outcomes of endodontic surgery. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the effect of piezosurgery on root-end resection, and only 1 has investigated root-end morphology after retrograde cavity preparation using piezosurgery. We conducted a search of the PubMed and Cochrane databases using appropriate terms and keywords related to the use and applications of piezoelectric surgery in endodontic surgery. A hand search also was conducted of issues published in the preceding 2 years of several journals. Two independent reviewers obtained and analyzed the full texts of the selected articles. A total of 121 articles published between January 2000 and December 2013 were identified. This review summarizes the operating principles of piezoelectric devices and outlines the applications of piezosurgery in endodontic surgery using clinical examples. Piezosurgery is a promising technical modality with applications in several aspects of endodontic surgery, but further studies are necessary to determine the influence of piezosurgery on root-end resection and root-end preparation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Branding of vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  16. [Surgery for vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, H

    2009-04-01

    Spontaneous recovery or central compensation makes surgical procedures rare in patients with vertigo. Surgery for vertigo proposed after pharmacological or physical therapy fails to eliminate Ménière's disease and some very rare cases of paroxystic positional vertigo. The main target in treating Ménière's disease is to promote vestibular compensation, which is possible only with a nonprogressive and stable deficit leading to readjustment of vestibular reflexes. Surgical procedures can be classified as nondestructive (endolymphatic sac decompression, vestibular nerve decompression, patching of perilymphatic fistulas), selectively destructive (middle fossa or retrosigmoid vestibular neurotomy, lateral semi-circular plugging) and destructive (labyrinthectomy). Surgical indications essentially concern incapacitating vertigo and depend mainly on hearing status. In Ménière's disease, vestibular neurotomy can be regarded as the gold standard considering its good results on vertiginous episodes; however, scoring with functional and quality-of-life scales bring out residual deficiency in some cases.

  17. Cancer immunotherapy with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orita,Kunzo

    1977-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in the immunological surveillance system, an understanding of the role of host immunity has become essential to the management of carcinogenesis, tumor proliferation, recurrence and metastasis. Although it is important to continue chemical and surgical treatment of cancer, support of the anti-tumor immune system of the host should also be considered. Long term remission has been reported in leukemia by treating with BCG after chemotherapy whereas surgical treatment is usually more effective in preventing cancer recurrence in digestive organ cancer. The first step is extirpating the tumor as thoroughly as possible and the second step is chemo-immunotherapy. Cancer immunity, however weak, constitutes the basis for other treatments in selectively attacking cancer cells remaining after surgery, chemotherapy or irradiation. Immunotherapy should thus not replace chemotherapy or radiotherapy, but these methods should be employed in combination to attain more favorable results.

  18. Smartphones in Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara A. Salibian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the capability of enhancing many aspects of the continuum of surgical care by providing an efficient means of multimedia communication among surgeons and healthcare personnel. The ability for mobile Internet and email access, along with features such as built-in cameras and video calling, allow surgeons to rapidly access, send and receive patient information without being restricted by issues of connectivity. Smartphones create an unrestricted network of data sharing, improving the flexibility of patient consultation, timeliness of preoperative preparation, efficiency of post-operative care and the effectiveness of a surgical team. Furthermore, smartphones provide mobile access to a multitude of surgical resources to bolster continued surgical education. This article presents a review of the current literature on the utilizations of smartphones in surgery, discusses their benefits and limitations, and addresses the possibility of incorporating smartphones into the protocol of surgical care.

  19. Impact of Radioimmunoguided Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Valle, G J; Chevinsky, A; Martin, E W

    1991-01-01

    Radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) is a technique employed to locate tumor deposits with the aid of intravenously injected, tumor-specific, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and a small gamma detecting device. The gamma detecting probe (GDP) is a small, portable unit which has the capacity to be used intraoperatively to survey the entire peritoneal surface for increased radioactivity indicative of targeted tumor tissue during abdominal exploration for colorectal cancer. Trials in humans have demonstrated the ability of this system to locate clinically nonpalpable tumor deposits in patients undergoing carcinoembryonic antigen second-look laparotomies. This feature may be of value in improving the definition of tumor location and extent as well as allowing a more thorough resection of tumor-bearing tissue to be performed and hopefully improving overall patient survival.

  20. Robotics and general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Brian P; Gagner, Michel

    2003-12-01

    Robotics are now being used in all surgical fields, including general surgery. By increasing intra-abdominal articulations while operating through small incisions, robotics are increasingly being used for a large number of visceral and solid organ operations, including those for the gallbladder, esophagus, stomach, intestines, colon, and rectum, as well as for the endocrine organs. Robotics and general surgery are blending for the first time in history and as a specialty field should continue to grow for many years to come. We continuously demand solutions to questions and limitations that are experienced in our daily work. Laparoscopy is laden with limitations such as fixed axis points at the trocar insertion sites, two-dimensional video monitors, limited dexterity at the instrument tips, lack of haptic sensation, and in some cases poor ergonomics. The creation of a surgical robot system with 3D visual capacity seems to deal with most of these limitations. Although some in the surgical community continue to test the feasibility of these surgical robots and to question the necessity of such an expensive venture, others are already postulating how to improve the next generation of telemanipulators, and in so doing are looking beyond today's horizon to find simpler solutions. As the robotic era enters the world of the general surgeon, more and more complex procedures will be able to be approached through small incisions. As technology catches up with our imaginations, robotic instruments (as opposed to robots) and 3D monitoring will become routine and continue to improve patient care by providing surgeons with the most precise, least traumatic ways of treating surgical disease.