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Sample records for surgery chemotherapy radiation

  1. Radiation, chemotherapy and surgery for canine osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, B.E.; Withrow, S.J.; La Rue, S.M.; Straw, R.C.; Gillette, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous canine osteosarcomas is an excellent model for of human osterosarcoma. Twenty dogs with obsteorsarcoma were treated with intravenous or intraarterial cisplatin with or without radiation therapy. This treatment was given 3 weeks prior to limb sparing surgery involving excision of the tumor and allograft replacement. The excised tumor specimen was examined for complete removal and percentage of necrotic tumor measured by planimetry. Intraveneous and intraarterial cisplatin and radiation methods were compared. Data discussing rate of disease development and recurrences is given

  2. Malignant gliomas treated after surgery by combination chemotherapy and delayed radiation therapy. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, M.; Mashaly, R.; Pertuiset, B.F.; Metzger, J.

    1979-01-01

    34 patients operated on for malignant gliomas were successively treated by combination chemotherapy with VM 26 and CCNU and conventional radiation therapy with an average dosage of 5,800 rads, six months after surgery. The general and haematological tolerance of delayed irradiation after chemotherapy was satisfactory. Twelve patients developed neurological complications during or after irradiation. The complications were early in 10 cases, and delayed in 2. They were probably due to tumour growth in five cases, and secondary to irradiation in seven. In four of the seven cases the preradiation chemotherapy seemed to potentiate the radiation effect on the central nervous system. (author)

  3. Combination of chemotherapy, surgery and radiation in carcinoma ovary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, T.K.; Mapa, M.K.; Gupta, B.D.; Dhall, G.I.

    1979-01-01

    The management of ovarian carcinoma is difficult mainly due to the fact that ovary, unlike other organs in the body remains the seat of wide variety of histological type of tumor with even wider biological behaviour and response to each modality of treatment. The objective of present paper is to evaluate the changing policy towards this tumor with emphasis on the combination plan in general and chemotherapy supplement in particular. Prognosis of advanced cancer which forms the bulk of the cases almost in every centre remains dismal. In this group of patients in a retrospective analysis, a guideline of treatment has been formulated. (auth.)

  4. Treatment results of non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults treated by surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Masao; Nishikawa, Ryo; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Fujimaki, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Osamu

    1999-01-01

    Non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas in adults are oncopathologically defined as well-differentiated carcinoma of the brain. They grow invasively and can not be cured by extensive surgery followed by radiation therapy. We performed multidisciplinary treatments consisting of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy in 26 adult patients with non-pilocytic cerebral astrocytomas. The 5- and 10-year survival rates of the patients were 90.9% and 75.6%, respectively; these were better than reported survival rates of patients treated by postoperative radiation therapy alone. Precise analysis of clinical findings of astrocytic tumors suggested that glioblastomas growing superficially might be derived from preexisting astrocytomas. This hypothesis proposes that multidisciplinary treatments for astrocytomas in early stages could cure the disease and could ultimately decrease a number of glioblastomas. (author)

  5. Sequential transurethral surgery, multiple drug chemotherapy and radiation therapy for invasive bladder carcinoma: Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervek, J.; Cufer, T.; Kragelj, B.; Zakotnik, B.; Stanonik, M.

    1993-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2--T4, Nx, MO) were treated by transurethral resection, followed by 3--4 cycles of combination chemotherapy (methothrexate 30 mg/m2 on days 1, 14; cis-platinum 100 mg/m2 on day 2; vinblastine 3 mg/m2 on days 1, 14; repeated every 21 days), and external beam irradiation (64--66 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics). Complete remission after transurethral resection and chemotherapy was achieved in 24 out of 45 patients (53%). Cystectomy was performed in patients without complete response to transurethral resection and chemotherapy. The therapy was completed as planned in 45/47 patients. After transurethral resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, biopsy proven complete response was achieved in 62% (28/45); Stage T2T3 in 67% (23/24), Stage T4 in 45% (5/11) of patients. Among 19 patients with positive biopsy findings after transurethral resection and chemotherapy, 14 underwent cystectomy. After follow-up of 4--55 months (median 23 months) 75% (34/45) are alive, 68% (31/45) have had their bladders preserved, and 53% (24/45) are free of the primary tumor. The actuarial survival of all 45 patients is 73%. Moderate nausea and vomiting during treatment were common; severe leukopenia and mucositis were observed in five patients. Late side effects such as miction disorders and diarrhea were predominantly mild. Although the observation period has been too short to allow a definitive evaluation of treatment results, the authors feel both from the point of bladder preservation and disease-free survival that the presented treatment approach is successful in a majority of T2T3 patients, whereas a large tumor size (T4) renders this treatment less effective. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Concurrent chemotherapy, accelerated hyperfractionated split course radiation therapy and surgery for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Adelstein, D.J.; Rice, T.W.; Kirk, M.A. van; Kirby, T.J.; Koka, A.; Tefft, M.; Zuccaro, G.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A prospective single arm trial was undertaken to determine the toxicity, the clinical and pathologic response rates and survival for patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy(CC) and accelerated hyperfractionated split course radiotherapy(AHFSCRT) followed by surgical resection. Materials and Methods: A prospective single arm trial was conducted between 1991 and 1995 for patients with T1-4, N0-1, M1(celiac or supraclavicular) adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. A total of 74 patients entered onto the protocol, and 72 are eligible and evaluable. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of two cycles of Cisplatin(20mg/m2/day) and 5-fluorouracil (1000mg/m2/day) given concurrently with AHSCRT 1.5Gy BID (at least 6 hour between fractions) to 2400cGy and 2100cGy, with cycles 1 and 2 of chemotherapy respectively. Patients were staged/restaged with barium esophagram(BS), computerized tomograph of the chest(CAT), upper endoscopy(EGD) with ultrasound (EUS) and evaluated for surgical resection. A single adjuvant course of concurrent chemotherapy and AHSCRT was delivered for those patients who were pathologic partial responders(pPR). Results: Initial clinical staging revealed one patient stage I, 24 patients' stage IIA, 2 patients' with stage IIB, 34 patients' with stage III and 6 patients' with stage IV disease. Five patients could not be staged adequately. The toxicity to neoadjuvant therapy included nausea in 85% (grade 3 in 1%), esophagitis 90% (grade 3 in 18%), neutropenia grade 3 of 43% (with fever 17%), thrombocytopenia grade 4 in 10% and nephrotoxicity in 8%. There was one death due to neoadjuvant therapy. Of the 72 evaluable patients, 67 underwent surgery, and 65(90%) had a complete resection. Twenty-seven percent were pathologic complete responders, including 22% with adenocarcinoma and 36% with squamous cell carcinoma. Complete pathologic response after neoadjuvant therapy was accurately predicted by

  7. Combined conservative surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treatment of the breast cancer patient: the influence of the interval between surgery and start of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, Henning; Wuerschmidt, F.; Janik, I.; Buenemann, H.; Heilmann, H.-P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze our experience treating breast cancer patients with combined breast conserving surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy in the light of considerable discussion on the role of the interval between surgery and radiation therapy (S-RT). Materials and Methods: Between 1985 and 1992, 100 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent radiation treatment at our institution after conservative surgery with axillary dissection and some form of chemotherapy. Criteria for inclusion in this retrospective analysis were: Stage M0, no simultaneous malignancies, gross total resection of primary and involved lymph nodes, at least three cycles of postoperative polychemotherapy, complete radiation treatment, complete follow-up information. Seventy-four patients fulfilling these criteria form the basis of this report. For patients alive at last observation date, median follow-up time was five years (i.e., 59 months; range, 36-112 months). Age at diagnosis ranged between 20 and 69 years (median, 48 years). Fifty-four patients were pre- or perimenopausal (73%) and 20 were postmenopausal (27%). Tumors were staged using the AJCC-system. Distribution of T-Stage was: T1 (n=36), T2 (n=37), T3 (n=1). In 95% of patients, axillary lymph nodes were positive: 1-3 nodes (n=50), ≥ 4 nodes (n=20), and 0 nodes (n=3). Thus, 91% of patients were Stage II. In 65% of patients, final pathological margins were negative. Margins showed invasive and intraductal carcinoma in 5 and 11% of cases, respectively (margins unknown in 19%). Chemotherapy regimens and doses varied according to the referring physicians as well as during the study period. Seventy percent of patients received six cycles of chemotherapy (predominan CMF) before onset of irradiation. The median S-RT interval was 20.5 weeks (range, 8.4-31.9 weeks). Usually, the breast was treated to 50 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction, five fractions per week, using Cobalt-60 (n=66) or 5 MeV photons (n=8). Then the tumor bed was boosted with

  8. Invasive bladder cancer: treatment strategies using transurethral surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy with selection for bladder conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Althausen, Alex F.; Heney, Niall M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Combined modality therapy has become the standard oncologic approach to achieve organ preservation in many malignancies. Methods and Materials: Although radical cystectomy has been considered as standard treatment for invasive bladder carcinoma in the United States, good results have been recently reported from several centers using multimodality treatment, particularly in patients with clinical T2 and T3a disease who do not have a ureter obstructed by tumor. Results: The components of the combined treatment are usually transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Following an induction course of therapy a histologic response is evaluated by cystoscopy and rebiopsy. Clinical 'complete responders' (tumor site rebiopsy negative and urine cytology with no tumor cells present) continue with a consolidation course of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Those patients not achieving a clinical complete response are recommended to have an immediate cystectomy. Individually the local monotherapies of radiation, TURBT, or multidrug chemotherapy each achieve a local control rate of the primary tumor of from 20 to 40%. When these are combined, clinical complete response rates of from 65 to 80% can be achieved. Seventy-five to 85% of the clinical complete responders will remain with bladders free of recurrence of an invasive tumor. Conclusions: Bladder conservation trials using combined modality treatment approaches with selection for organ conservation by response of the tumor to initial treatment report overall 5-year survival rates of approximately 50%, and a 40-45% 5-year survival rate with the bladder intact. These modern multimodality bladder conservation approaches offer survival rates similar to radical cystectomy for patients of similar clinical stage and age. Bladder-conserving therapy should be offered to patients with invasive bladder carcinoma as a realistic alternative to radical

  9. Metastatic hidradenocarcinoma: Surgery and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Trabelsi; Olfa, Gharbi; Faten, Hammedi; Makrem, Hochlef; Slim, Ben Ahmed; Moncef, Mokni

    2009-12-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma of high malignant potential. It most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera. We report a case of 52-year-old woman who presented with an invasive hidradenocarcinoma of the finger, treated with surgical excision. The patient presented with skin and lymph node metastases four years after, treated by chemotherapy. Hidradenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor. It seems important to use adjuvant therapies particularly for recurrent and metastatic forms.

  10. Metastatic hidradenocarcinoma: Surgery and chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Trabelsi Amel; Gharbi Olfa; Hammedi Faten; Hochlef Makrem; Ben Ahmed Slim; Mokni Moncef

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma of high malignant potential. It most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera. Case report: We report a case of 52-year-old woman who presented with an invasive hidradenocarcinoma of the finger, treated with surgical excision. The patient presented with skin and lymph node metastases four years after, treated by chemotherapy. Conclusion: Hidradenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor. It seems important to use adjuvant therapies parti...

  11. Isolated local-regional recurrence following mastectomy for adenocarcinoma of the breast treated with radiation therapy alone or combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendenhall, N.P.; Devine, J.W.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Million, R.R.; Bland, K.I.; Copeland, E.M. III

    1988-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy alone or combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy are reported for 47 patients who presented with local and/or regional recurrence without evidence of distant metastases following initial management of adenocarcinoma of the breast with radical or modified radical mastectomy (43) or simple mastectomy (4). Patients were treated between October 1964 and March 1983 at the University of Florida; all have a 2-year minimum follow-up and 42/47 (89%) have had follow-up for ≥5 years. The overall actuarial local-regional control rates were 80% at 2 years, 68% at 5 years, and 61% at 10 years. The 5-year actuarial local-regional control rates by site and extent of disease were as follows: single chest wall nodule, 92%; multiple chest wall nodules, 49%; regional lymph nodes, 66%; and multiple sites, 64%. The 5- and 10-year actuarial determinate disease-free survival rates for all patients were 41 and 17%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year actuarial survival rates for all patients were 50 and 34%, respectively. 22 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Radiation Therapy–First Strategy After Surgery With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage IIIA-N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Woo [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Noh, O Kyu, E-mail: okyu.noh@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young-Taek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin-Hyuk [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Mison; Kim, Hwan-Ik; Heo, Jaesung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mi Sun [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Yong [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Rae Woong; Yoon, Dukyong [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and postoperative chemotherapy (POCT) can be administered as adjuvant therapies in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to present the clinical outcomes in patients treated with PORT-first with or without subsequent POCT in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC. Methods and Materials: From January 2002 to November 2014, the conditions of 105 patients with stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC who received PORT-first with or without subsequent POCT were analyzed. PORT was initiated within 4 to 6 weeks after surgical resection. Platinum-based POCT was administered 3 to 4 weeks after the completion of PORT. We analyzed the outcomes and the clinical factors affecting survival. Results: Of 105 patients, 43 (41.0%) received POCT with a median of 4 cycles (range, 2-6 cycles). The follow-up times ranged from 3 to 123 months (median, 30 months), and the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 40.2%. The 5-year OS of patients treated with PORT and POCT was significantly higher than that of patients with PORT (61.3% vs 29.2%, P<.001). The significant prognostic factors affecting OS were the use of POCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.453, P=.036) and type of surgery (pneumonectomy/lobectomy; HR = 2.845, P<.001). Conclusions: PORT-first strategy after surgery appeared not to compromise the clinical outcomes in the treatment of stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC. The benefit of POCT on OS was preserved even in the PORT-first setting. Further studies are warranted to compare the sequencing of PORT and POCT, guaranteeing the proper use of POCT.

  13. Routine surgery in addition to chemotherapy for treating spinal tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jutte, PC; Van Loenhout-Rooyackers, JH; Loenhout-Rooyackers, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is generally curable with chemotherapy, but there is controversy in the literature about the need for surgical intervention in the one to two per cent of people with tuberculosis of the spine. Objectives To compare chemotherapy plus surgery with chemotherapy alone for

  14. A combination therapy with preoperative full-dose gemcitabine, concurrent 3-dimensional conformal radiation, surgery and postoperative liver perfusion chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Due to the high incidence of local recurrence and liver metastasis, long-term outcomes for patients after resection of pancreatic cancer are extremely poor. For improving the survival of the patients, a combination of preoperative chemoradiation, surgery, and postoperative liver-perfusion chemotherapy (LPC) were performed. Postoperative histopathologic study revealed a marked degenerative change in cancer tissue, showing negative surgical margins (R0) in 98% of patients and negative nodal involvement in 85% of patients. The 5-year survival rate after pancreatectomy was 56%, with low incidences of both local recurrence (11%) and liver metastasis (9%). This combination therapy were able to effectively reduce the incidence of both local and liver recurrence and improved long-term outcomes for patients with T3-4 cancers of the pancreas. (author)

  15. RADIATION AND SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. S.A. Adewuyi

    Radiation therapy and surgery in cancer management. 1S.A.Adewuyi,. 2 ... cancer, since axillary node status may determine whether or not a ... The principles are 'En-bloc' dissection which ... prevention of symptoms of cancer, including pain alleviation, and .... Pre-Operative And Post-Operative Radiotherapy: These terms ...

  16. Carcinoma of the anal canal: radiation or radiation plus chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    An editorial is presented which discusses the treatment of carcinoma of the anal canal. Following the initial report of the successful preoperative use of combined chemotherapy and radiation by Nigro in 1974, several centers have confirmed the effectiveness of such combinations either as preoperative or as definitive treatment of anal carcinomas, and many patients are now being referred for radiation therapy. The article by Cantril in this issue describe the successful treatment of anal carcinomas by radiation alone, and raises the important issue of whether radiation plus chemotherapy is more effective treatment than radiation alone for squamous or cloacogenic carcinomas arising in the anal canal or perianal area. Several studies are cited

  17. Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation KidsHealth / For Parents / Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation What's in this article? What to ...

  18. Radiation Therapy-First Strategy After Surgery With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage IIIA-N2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Noh, O Kyu; Oh, Young-Taek; Choi, Jin-Hyuk; Chun, Mison; Kim, Hwan-Ik; Heo, Jaesung; Ahn, Mi Sun; Park, Seong Yong; Park, Rae Woong; Yoon, Dukyong

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and postoperative chemotherapy (POCT) can be administered as adjuvant therapies in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to present the clinical outcomes in patients treated with PORT-first with or without subsequent POCT in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC. From January 2002 to November 2014, the conditions of 105 patients with stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC who received PORT-first with or without subsequent POCT were analyzed. PORT was initiated within 4 to 6 weeks after surgical resection. Platinum-based POCT was administered 3 to 4 weeks after the completion of PORT. We analyzed the outcomes and the clinical factors affecting survival. Of 105 patients, 43 (41.0%) received POCT with a median of 4 cycles (range, 2-6 cycles). The follow-up times ranged from 3 to 123 months (median, 30 months), and the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 40.2%. The 5-year OS of patients treated with PORT and POCT was significantly higher than that of patients with PORT (61.3% vs 29.2%, Ptreatment of stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC. The benefit of POCT on OS was preserved even in the PORT-first setting. Further studies are warranted to compare the sequencing of PORT and POCT, guaranteeing the proper use of POCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rectum neoplasms treatment advanced with radio and chemotherapy before - surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo Cespedes, A.; Aguiar Vitacca, S.

    1993-01-01

    In Uruguay the colorectal neoplasms has a can rate of mobility. The surgery has 13-26% local recurrence. The irradiation before surgery has demonstrated to improve the resect and the local control.The objective of this protocol it is to decrease the percentage of local relapse , using radiotherapy(RT) before surgery and concomitant chemotherapy that potencies the effect of the RT, improvement this way the therapeutic quotient (AU) [es

  20. Radiation recall supraglottitis. A hazard in head and neck chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenborn, P.A.; Postma, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    The enhanced effects of chemotherapy on previously irradiated tissue have been well demonstrated. When chemotherapy is given some time after irradiation and elicits a tissue reaction in the radiation field, the reaction is termed radiation recall. We review known interactions between chemotherapy and radiotherapy and report, to our knowledge, the first case of a supraglottitis radiation recall reaction. Familiarity with this phenomenon and potential complications of chemotherapy following head and neck irradiation may expedite early diagnosis and appropriate lifesaving treatment

  1. Therapeutic challenge in brain metastases: chemotherapy, surgery or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, Ivan; Contreras, Manuel; Ceballos Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Metastases to the brain occur in 25 to 35% of patients with systemic cancer. Cerebral metastatic is the most common intracranial tumor in adults and occur up to 10 times more frequently than primary tumors in the central nervous system. Significant advances have occurred in the diagnosis and treatment of metastases to the brain, and the therapeutic nihilism of the past is now no longer warranted for most patients. With the currently available treatments, most patients do not die of their brain metastases and usually experience effective palliation of neurologic symptoms and meaning full extension of life. As a trial to limit the cerebral metastatic disease, many and diverse therapy options have been developed such as: chemotherapy, surgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy, only radiation therapy, therapy with neutron, intersticial brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. In selected cases, surgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy is the conventional treatment for single metastases. However, recurrence usually limits the quality of life and greatly decrease the patients time life, and the therapy options are scarce. This piece of writing also includes a review of the available therapy forms to manage this kind of lesions. (The author)

  2. Survival and neurologic outcome of infants with medulloblastoma treated with surgery and MOPP chemotherapy. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, T Z; van Eys, J; Dowell, R E; Cangir, A; Pack, B; Bruner, J M

    1987-07-15

    The results of treatment of infants with medulloblastoma using surgery and chemotherapy, without the use of radiation therapy, are reported. Both survival and outcome, in terms of growth, neurologic deficit, and intelligence are compared with the same parameters in children treated conventionally. Although preliminary, our results suggest that chemotherapy combined with surgery is a valid option for the treatment of infants with this type of neoplasm.

  3. Neurologic complications of radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna

    1998-01-01

    Radiation induced toxicities are due to the effect of irradiation of normal surrounding tissue which is included in the radiation port. The mechanisms of radiation induced damage have not been completely elucidated. Hypotheses include direct damage to neural cells versus damage to the vascular endothelium with secondary effects on nervous system structures. Another hypothesis is that radiation damaged glial cells release antigens that are able to evoke and antimmune response against the nervous system resulting in both cellular necrosis and vascular damage. The clinical diagnosis of radiation induced neurotoxicity may be difficult especially in patients who had neurologic signs prior to treatment. It is helpful to determine if the clinical signs correlate with the irradiated site and to know the total dose received and the dose per fraction. Prior or concomitant chemotherapy may act to increase the toxicity produced by radiation. The age of the patient at the time of radiation is important as the very young and the elderly are more likely to develop toxicities. Finally, concurrent neurologic diseases such as demyelinating disorders appear to sensitize neural tissue to radiation damage. Radiation injury can occur at almost any time, from immediately after irradiation to years later. The side effects can generally be divided into those that are acute (within days), early -delayed (within 4 weeks to 4 months after treatment) and late- delayed (months to years after treatment). (The author)

  4. Combination of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagiri, S.; Gupta, B.D.; Dutta, T.K.

    1980-01-01

    In locally advanced oral cancer, the main modalities of treatment, e.g. surgery and radiotherapy, most often fail to control the disease when used singly. A combination policy of surgery and radiotherapy achieves adequate control of the disease. In order to improve the results in advanced oral cancer, chemotherapy given prior to and during radiation treatment and judicious combination of surgery offer the best possible approach in the management. The experience in the combination policy in the treatment of oral cancer in Northern India is dealt with. (auth.)

  5. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation in a man secondary to chemotherapy and radiation: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jungang; Shen, Guoliang; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Chengwu; Hong, Defei; Jin, Li; Yang, Hongguo; Sun, Wei; Cai, Hanhui; Hu, Zhiming; Wu, Weiding

    2018-05-01

    Gallbladder perforation is a serious clinical condition and associated with high morbidity and mortality. A definitive diagnosis is contentious before surgery. We herein report a case of perforation of the gallbladder neck secondary to chemotherapy and radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient. Gallbladder perforation secondary to chemotherapy and radiation. To decrease the mortality associated with gallbladder perforation, Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and peritoneal lavage were performed followed for gallbladder perforation patient because of chemotherapy and radiation. The patient recovered fully without serious complication and discharged on the 10th postoperative day. A pathological examination of the resected gallbladder revealed cholecystitis in the thinning of the neck. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention of gallbladder perforation in relation to asopharyngeal carcinoma chemotherapy and radiation are of prime importance. The laparoscopic procedure is safe and feasible in the selected patients.

  6. The role of adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in esophagogastric cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John H; Bowman, Christopher R; Reece-Smith, Alex M; Pang, Vincent; Dorrington, Matthew S; Mumtaz, Errum; Soomro, Irshad; Kaye, Philip; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Parsons, Simon L

    2017-06-01

    For patients with operable esophagogastric cancer, peri-operative chemotherapy confers a significant overall survival benefit compared to surgery alone, however only 30-40% of patients demonstrate histopathological response. It is unclear whether those with no neoadjuvant chemotherapy response should go onto receive adjuvant chemotherapy, as no further benefit may be conferred. Esophagogastric cancers were prospectively captured with associated histopathological tumor regression grades following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This cohort was then interrogated for clinico-pathological and survival outcomes. Following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery, patients with chemotherapy responsive cancers, who were administered adjuvant chemotherapy gained a significant overall survival benefit. Multivariate Cox analysis, demonstrated a final adjusted hazard ratio for adjuvant therapy of 0.509; (95%CI 0.28-0.93); P = 0.028. In contrast, patients with non-responsive tumors, who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy, did not show any survival benefit. Chemotherapy toxicity was prevalent and contributed to only half of patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest the benefit of the adjuvant portion of chemotherapy is limited to those who demonstrate a histopathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The administration of the adjuvant portion of chemotherapy to patients without a response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may not provide any survival benefit, while potentially causing increased morbidity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Radiation and chemotherapy from the viewpoint of radiochemist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moebius, S.

    1989-01-01

    Fundamentals of radiation and chemotherapy in cancer treatment are presented from the viewpoint of radiochemistry. Properties and mechanism of chemotherapy, especially of platinum compounds are explained. The present state of radiation therapy is shown and possibilities for future reduction of the patients dose burden are discussed. Promising ways are the radiation sensitization of tumor cells by oxygen or the use of particle radiation instead of γ-quants. (orig.) [de

  8. Small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus with regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.A.; Levine, M.S.; Silberg, D.G.; Phillipe, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus, which manifested on double-contrast esophagography as an ulcerated submucosal mass. The lesion underwent dramatic regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which has occasionally been used as an alternative to surgery in patients with this rare but aggressive esophageal neoplasm. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  9. Long-term results of RTOG trial 8911 (USA Intergroup 113): a random assignment trial comparison of chemotherapy followed by surgery compared with surgery alone for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, David P; Winter, Katryn A; Gunderson, Leonard L; Mortimer, Joanne; Estes, Norman C; Haller, Daniel G; Ajani, Jaffer A; Kocha, Walter; Minsky, Bruce D; Roth, Jack A; Willett, Christopher G

    2007-08-20

    We update Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 8911 (USA Intergroup 113), a comparison of chemotherapy plus surgery versus surgery alone for patients with localized esophageal cancer. The relationship between resection type and between tumor response and outcome were also analyzed. The chemotherapy group received preoperative cisplatin plus fluorouracil. Outcome based on the type of resection (R0, R1, R2, or no resection) was evaluated. The main end point was overall survival. Disease-free survival, relapse pattern, the influence of postoperative treatment, and the relationship between response to preoperative chemotherapy and outcome were also evaluated. Two hundred sixteen patients received preoperative chemotherapy, 227 underwent immediate surgery. Fifty-nine percent of surgery only and 63% of chemotherapy plus surgery patients underwent R0 resections (P = .5137). Patients undergoing less than an R0 resection had an ominous prognosis; 32% of patients with R0 resections were alive and free of disease at 5 years, only 5% of patients undergoing an R1 resection survived for longer than 5 years. The median survival rates for patients with R1, R2, or no resections were not significantly different. While, as initially reported, there was no difference in overall survival for patients receiving perioperative chemotherapy compared with the surgery only group, patients with objective tumor regression after preoperative chemotherapy had improved survival. For patients with localized esophageal cancer, whether or not preoperative chemotherapy is administered, only an R0 resection results in substantial long-term survival. Even microscopically positive margins are an ominous prognostic factor. After a R1 resection, postoperative chemoradiotherapy therapy offers the possibility of long-term disease-free survival to a small percentage of patients.

  10. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  11. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Per, E-mail: per.karlsson@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Cole, Bernard F. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont (United States); Price, Karen N. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gelber, Richard D. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Harvard T. F. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Coates, Alan S. [International Breast Cancer Study Group and University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Goldhirsch, Aron [Senior Consultant Breast Cancer, European Institute of Oncology and International Breast Cancer Study Group, Milan (Italy); Castiglione, Monica [International Breast Cancer Study Group, Bern (Switzerland); Colleoni, Marco [Division of Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology and International Breast Cancer Study Group, Milan (Italy); Gruber, Günther [Institute of Radiotherapy, Klinik Hirslanden, Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  12. Ovarian carcinoma: Role of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, W.M.; Meyer, R.L.; Cormier, W.J.; Jazy, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated 83 patients with ovarian cancer who were irradiated or treated by a combination of cytoxan, adriamycin, and cisplatin. According to FIGO stage, eight patients had stage I disease, 12 had stage II disease, 61 had stage II disease and two has stage IV disease. Fifty patients had bulky disease and 33 had minimal disease of 2 cm or less. Sixty patients were irradiated to an open abdominopelvic field (30 Gy delivered over 4 weeks), with or without a pelvic boost. Fifty-five patients received combination chemotherapy and 30 received a single agent as initial therapy. The patients were divided into three groups. The 26 patients in group I received primary radiation therapy with or with out adjuvant single-agent chemotherapy, then combination chemotherapy to salvage. The 34 patients in group II were irradiated after chemotherapy, mainly combination chemotherapy, failed. The 23 patients in group III received, mainly combination chemotherapy with second-line drugs for salvage

  13. The effects of sequence and type of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on cosmesis and complications after breast conservation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, Deborah A.; Schultz, Delray J.; Haas, Jonathan A.; Harris, Eleanor E. R.; Fox, Kevin R.; Glick, John H.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Chemotherapy plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of both node-negative and node-positive breast cancer patients, but the optimal sequencing of chemotherapy and radiation therapy is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the interaction of sequence and type of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy given with radiation therapy on the cosmetic outcome and the incidence of complications of Stage I and II breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 1053 Stage I and II breast cancer patients treated with curative intent with breast-conserving surgery, axillary dissection, and radiation therapy between 1977-1991 were reviewed. Median follow-up after treatment was 6.7 years. Two hundred fourteen patients received chemotherapy alone, 141 patients received hormonal therapy alone, 86 patients received both, and 612 patients received no adjuvant therapy. Patients who received chemotherapy ± hormonal therapy were grouped according to sequence of chemotherapy: (a) concurrent = concurrent chemotherapy with radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy; (b) sequential = radiation followed by chemotherapy or chemotherapy followed by radiation; and (c) sandwich = chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation followed by chemotherapy. Compared to node negative patients, node-positive patients more commonly received chemotherapy (77 vs. 9%, p < 0.0001) and/or hormonal therapy (40 vs. 14%, p < 0.0001). Among patients who received chemotherapy, the majority (243 patients) received concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with two cycles of cytoxan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) administered during radiation followed by six cycles of chemotherapy with cytoxan, 5-fluorouracil and either methotrexate(CMF) or doxorubicin(CAF). For analysis of cosmesis, patients included were relapse free with 3 years minimum follow-up. Results: The use of chemotherapy had an adverse effect

  14. Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Koichi; Uno, Takashi; Hanazawa, Toyoyuki

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the prognostic factors for the management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the maxillary sinus, who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT). We also elucidated the appropriate sequence of chemotherapy. A total of 124 patients (median age 62 years) with SCC of the maxillary sinus were analysed retrospectively. T3 or T4 disease was found in 93% of the patients. Thirty-nine patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NA), 38 patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 47 patients received NA followed by CRT. The median dose of RT was 60 Gy. Maxillectomy was undertaken in 98 patients. The 5 year overall survival (OAS) and local control probability (LCP) were 56.6 and 73.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis, surgery (P<0.0001) and T classification (P<0.04) were significant prognostic factors for OAS and LCP. Histological grade and nodal status were also related to OAS. However, any chemotherapy sequence was not associated with the treatment outcome. On multivariate analysis, surgery (P<0.0005) and T classification (P<0.05) were identified as significant prognostic factors for LCP and OAS. This study suggests that both surgery and T stage are important prognostic factors for LCP and OAS in the management of SCC of the maxillary sinus. The appropriate sequence of chemotherapy remains to be elucidated in the future study. (author)

  15. Simultaneous adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy in high-risk breast cancer--toxicity and dose modification: a trans-tasman radiation oncology group multi-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, James W.; Hamilton, Christopher S.; Christie, David; O'Brien, Maree; Bonaventura, Antonino; Stewart, John F.; Ackland, Stephen P.; Lamb, David S.; Spry, Nigel A.; Dady, Peter; Atkinson, Christopher H.; Wynne, Christopher; Joseph, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the toxicity profile of simultaneously administered postoperative radiation therapy and CMF chemotherapy as a prelude to a randomized controlled study addressing the sequencing of the two modalities. Methods and Materials: One hundred and thirty eight breast cancer patients at high risk of locoregional, as well as systemic relapse, who were referred to three centers in Australia and New Zealand were treated with postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy simultaneously. Acute toxicity and dose modifications in these patients were compared with 83 patients treated over the same time frame with chemotherapy alone. In a separate study the long-term radiation and surgical effects in 24 patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy at Newcastle (Australia) following conservative surgery were compared with 23 matched patients treated at Newcastle with radiation therapy alone. Results: Myelotoxicity was increased in patients treated simultaneously with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. The effect was not great, but may have contributed to chemotherapy dose reductions. Lymphopenia was observed to be the largest factor in total white cell depressions caused by the simultaneous administration of radiation therapy. Postsurgical appearances were found to so dominate long-term treatment effects on the treated breast that the effect of radiation therapy dose and additional chemotherapy was difficult to detect. Conclusion: Studies addressing the sequencing of radiation therapy and chemotherapy will necessarily be large because adverse effects from administering the two modalities simultaneously are not great. The present study has endorsed the importance in future studies of stratification according to the extent and type of surgery and adherence to a single strict policy of chemotherapy dose modification

  16. Chemotherapy preceding surgery or irradiation in carcinoma of the ovaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, N.; Nilsson, B.; Sjovall, K.

    1985-01-01

    At the Gynaecological Department of Radiumhemmet a noninvasive procedure in the diagnosis of ovarian masses has been developed during the 1950's. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy instrument developed and evaluated has been extensively utilized during the last 20 years for the diagnosis of ovarian masses. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy gave the opportunity to apply the philosophy of Hans-Ludvig Kottmeier who already declared in 1961 that aggressive and extensive surgery is valid for mucinous cancer but not for serous and endometrioid neoplasms fixed to surrounding tissues. This was the rational behind the Radiumhemmet policy where preoperative fine-needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis made it possible to use pre-operative chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with loco-regional disease

  17. Oncoplastic breast surgery does not delay the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Anders; Tvedskov, Tove Filtenborg; Kroman, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Only a few studies of limited size have examined whether oncoplastic breast surgery delays the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy as compared to conventional breast surgery. We investigated whether oncoplastic breast surgery causes a delay in the onset of adjuvant chemotherapy in comparison...... to lumpectomy and mastectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a population-based cohort study. Within the nationwide registry of the Danish Breast Cancer Group (DBCG), we identified 1798 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy following mastectomy, lumpectomy or oncoplastic breast surgery for early...... and unilateral invasive breast cancer. Women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy were excluded. RESULTS: We found no significant difference between the three groups (mastectomy, lumpectomy, oncoplastic breast surgery) in the time from biopsy to surgery (mean time 17.9, 17.0 and 18.3 days, respectively...

  18. Oray surgery and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W

    1975-07-01

    Clinical evidence seems to indicate that careful oral surgery after radiation therapy contributes little, if anything at all, to the onset of osteoradionecrosis. In many cases the process of bone dissolution has already well progressed before teeth have to be extracted. The bone changes can be demonstrated radiographically and clinically. The teeth in the immediate area become very mobile and cause severe pain during mastication. Whether this condition could have been prevented by extractions before radiation therapy is difficult to establish. Osteoradionecrosis may be encountered in edentulous jaws. It manifests itself clinically by bone segments which break loose and penetrate through the mucosa leaving a defect which does not heal over. More research and more comparative studies are needed in this area in order to make reasonably accurate predictions.

  19. Five fractions of radiation therapy followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy as preoperative treatment for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Robert J; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-03-15

    Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Alterations of nutritional status: impact of chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, S.S.; Lenon, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nutritional status of a cancer patient may be affected by the tumor, the chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy directed against the tumor, and by complications associated with that therapy. Chemotherpay-radiotherapy is not confined exclusively to malignant cell populations; thus, normal tissues may also be affected by the therapy and may contribute to specific nutritional problems. Impaired nutrition due to anorexia, mucositis, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may be dependent upon the specific chemotherapeutic agent, dose, or schedule utilized. Similar side effects from radiation therapy depend upon the dose, fractionation, and volume irradiated. When combined modality treatment is given the nutritional consequences may be magnified. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are underway to investigate the efficacy of nutritional support during chemotherapy-radiotherapy on tolerance to treatment, complications from treatment, and response rates to treatment. Preliminary results demonstrate that the administration of total parenteral nutrition is successful in maintaining weight during radiation therapy and chemotherapy, but that weight loss occurs after discontinuation of nutritional support. Thus, longterm evaluation is mandatory to learn the impact of nutritional support on survival, diease-free survival, and complication rates, as well as on the possible prevention of morbidity associated with aggressive chemotherapy-radiation therapy

  1. Vaginal carcinoma in a young woman who underwent fertility-sparing treatment involving chemotherapy and conservative surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Yasushi; Yahata, Tamaki; Kobayashi, Aya; Tanizaki, Yuko; Minami, Sawako; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Vaginal carcinoma is a rare gynecological malignancy that is usually treated by radiation therapy and/or surgery combined with chemotherapy. Here, we report a case of invasive vaginal carcinoma in a young woman who underwent fertility-sparing treatment involving neoadjuvant chemotherapy and conservative surgery. A 36-year-old non-parous woman had a solid tumor in the vagina. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed a tumor in the vagina with high FDG uptake (SUV = 17.33) but no metastatic lesions. The patient was diagnosed with vaginal squamous cell carcinoma, FIGO stage I, T1N0M0. Because she wished to retain her fertility, neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of irinotecan hydrochloride and nedaplatin was initiated. After four courses of chemotherapy, partial vaginectomy was carried out and the pathological diagnosis of the residual lesion was VAIN 3. Following two further courses of the same chemotherapy, she obtained complete response, and has shown no evidence of disease for 14 months. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Chemotherapy and molecular target therapy combined with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been established as standard treatment approach for locally advanced head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer and so on through randomized clinical trials. However, radiation-related morbidity such as acute toxicity also increased as treatment intensity has increased. In underlining mechanism for enhancement of normal tissue reaction in chemo-radiation therapy, chemotherapy enhanced radiosensitivity of normal tissues in addition to cancer cells. Molecular target-based drugs combined with radiation therapy have been expected as promising approach that makes it possible to achieve cancer-specific enhancement of radiosensitivity, and clinical trials using combined modalities have been performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In order to obtain maximum radiotherapeutic gain, a detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the interaction between radiation and Molecular target-based drugs is indispensable. Among molecular target-based drugs, inhibitors targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its signal transduction pathways have been vigorously investigated, and mechanisms regarding the radiosensitizing effect have been getting clear. In addition, the results of randomized clinical trials demonstrated that radiation therapy combined with cetuximab resulted in improvement of overall and disease-specific survival rate compared with radiation therapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer. In this review, clinical usefulness of chemo-radiation therapy and potential molecular targets for potentiation of radiation-induced cell killing are summarized. (author)

  3. Chemotherapy of radiation injuries: research perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynchev, N.

    1993-01-01

    The therapy of radiation injuries - single and combined with other physical trauma (burn or wound) - are considered. Anti-bacterial therapy of infections in irradiated mice, rats and dogs and in irradiated dogs inflicted with burns has been applied. The results demonstrate that radiation induced exogenous and endogenous infections can be treated successfully with proper antimicrobial agents. Some immunomodulators also are effective in treating endogenous infection. The synergy between antimicrobial and immuno-modulator therapy holds promise for increasing the survival of irradiated victims. The improvement of managing infections in immuno-compromised (irradiated and injured) hosts will require further research using these therapeutic modalities. (author)

  4. Time-to-administration in postoperative chemotherapy for colorectal cancer: does minimally-invasive surgery help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore Bonapasta, Stefano; Checcacci, Paolo; Guerra, Francesco; Mirasolo, Vita M; Moraldi, Luca; Ferrara, Angelo; Annecchiarico, Mario; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The optimal delay in the start of chemotherapy following rectal cancer surgery has not yet been identified. However, postponed adjuvant therapy has been proven to be connected with a significant survival detriment. We aimed to investigate whether the time to initiation of adjuvant treatment can be influenced by the application of minimally invasive surgery rather than traditional open surgery. By comprehensively evaluating the available inherent literature, several factors appear to be associated with delayed postoperative chemotherapy. Some of them are strictly related to surgical short-term outcomes. Laparoscopy results in shortened length of hospital stay, reduced surgical morbidity and lower rate of wound infection compared to conventional surgery. Probably due to such advantages, the application of minimally-invasive surgery to treat rectal malignancies seems to impact favorably the possibility to start adjuvant chemotherapy within an adequate timeframe following surgical resection, with potential improvement in patient survival.

  5. Chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy after surgery and preoperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (CRITICS): an international, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P M; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Sikorska, Karolina; Lind, Pehr; Nordsmark, Marianne; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Boot, Henk; Trip, Anouk K; Swellengrebel, H A Maurits; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Putter, Hein; van Sandick, Johanna W; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Hartgrink, Henk H; van Tinteren, Harm; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Verheij, Marcel

    2018-05-01

    . Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1·8 Gy, for 5 weeks, five daily fractions per week, combined with capecitabine (575 mg/m 2 orally twice daily on radiotherapy days) and cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 intravenously on day 1 of each 5 weeks of radiation treatment). The primary endpoint was overall survival, analysed by intention-to-treat. The CRITICS trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00407186; EudraCT, number 2006-004130-32; and CKTO, 2006-02. Between Jan 11, 2007, and April 17, 2015, 788 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to chemotherapy (n=393) or chemoradiotherapy (n=395). After preoperative chemotherapy, 372 (95%) of 393 patients in the chemotherapy group and 369 (93%) of 395 patients in the chemoradiotherapy group proceeded to surgery, with a potentially curative resection done in 310 (79%) of 393 patients in the chemotherapy group and 326 (83%) of 395 in the chemoradiotherapy group. Postoperatively, 233 (59%) of 393 patients started chemotherapy and 245 (62%) of 395 started chemoradiotherapy. At a median follow-up of 61·4 months (IQR 43·3-82·8), median overall survival was 43 months (95% CI 31-57) in the chemotherapy group and 37 months (30-48) in the chemoradiotherapy group (hazard ratio from stratified analysis 1·01 (95% CI 0·84-1·22; p=0·90). After preoperative chemotherapy, in the total safety population of 781 patients (assessed together), there were 368 (47%) grade 3 adverse events; 130 (17%) grade 4 adverse events, and 13 (2%) deaths. Causes of death during preoperative treatment were diarrhoea (n=2), dihydropyrimidine deficiency (n=1), sudden death (n=1), cardiovascular events (n=8), and functional bowel obstruction (n=1). During postoperative treatment, grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 113 (48%) and 22 (9%) of 233 patients in the chemotherapy group, respectively, and in 101 (41%) and ten (4%) of 245 patients in the chemoradiotherapy group, respectively. Non-febrile neutropenia occurred more frequently during

  6. Acute myelogenous leukemia following chemotherapy and radiation for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Teijiro; Hirota, Yuichi; Kondou, Seiji; Matsumoto, Isao; Matsuzaka, Toshimitsu; Iwashita, Akinori

    1989-03-01

    In August 1982, a 44-year-old man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer, histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma, and abdominoperineal resection and colostomy were performed. Postoperatively, he received chemotherapy with mitomycin C up to a total dose of 100 mg. In September 1986, lung metastasis occurred and he was treated with a combination chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, pirarubicin and 5-fluorouracil. In the following year, radiation treatment (total: 6900 rad) was given for a recurrent pelvic lesion. Peripheral blood on April 30, 1988, showed anemia, thrombocytopenia and appearance of myeloblasts, and a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB: M1) was made. Combination chemotherapy (including aclarubicin, vincristine, behenoyl ara-C, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, cytarabine, etoposide and prednisolone) failed to induce remission and the patient died in June 1988. This case was thought to be one of secondary leukemia occurring after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for rectal cancer. This case clearly indicates the need for a careful follow-up of long-term survivors who have received cancer therapy. (author).

  7. Malignant cliomas treated after surgery by combination chemotherapy and delayed irradiation. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, M.; Mashaly, R.; Pertuiset, B.F.; Metzger, J.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-six patients with gliomas were introduced after surgery into a therapeutic programme of six cycles of combination chemotherapy with VM 26 and CCNU, followed by delayed irradiation six months after surgery with an average dose of 5,800 rads. After irradiation the same preradiation chemotherapy was readministered for an average of four cycles. The results were compared to those from another group of 28 patients treated only by the same chemotherapy (CRC and C groups successively). Twelve patients (26%) died before irradiation in the CRC groups, six patients (13%) had recurrences at the time of irradiation, and 28 patients (61%) had no clinical or radiological signs of recurrence at the time of irradiation. For the total of treated patients the median survival after surgery was 17 months, and 46% of the patients were surviving at 18 months. The percentage of survivors at 18 months was significantly more elevated in the group treated by combination chemotherapy and delayed irradiation than in a control group treated by the same combination chemotherapy alone. This result suggests that in approximately 50% of cases combination chemotherapy after surgery, and delayed irradiation six months after surgery, cumulated their effects on survival time. (author)

  8. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  9. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92–1.01). The median V 30 (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V 20 (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V 40 (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate pathologic

  10. Risk factors for positive margins in conservative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzón, Alberto; Acea, Benigno; García, Alejandra; Iglesias, Ángela; Mosquera, Joaquín; Santiago, Paz; Seoane, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy intends to remove any residual tumor with negative margins. The purpose of this study was to analyze the preoperative clinical-pathological factors influencing the margin status after conservative surgery in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective study of 91 breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (92 breast lesions) during the period 2006 to 2013. A Cox regression analysis to identify baseline tumor characteristics associated with positive margins after breast conservative surgery was performed. Of all cases, 71 tumors were initially treated with conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Pathologic exam revealed positive margins in 16 of the 71 cases (22.5%). The incidence of positive margins was significantly higher in cancers with initial size >5cm (P=.021), in cancers with low tumor grade (P=.031), and in patients with hormone receptor-positive cancer (P=.006). After a median follow-up of 45.2 months, 7 patients of the 71 treated with conservative surgery had disease recurrence (9.8%). There was no significant difference in terms of disease-free survival according to the margin status (P=.596). A baseline tumor size >5cm, low tumor grade and hormone receptor-positive status increase the risk for surgical margin involvement in breast conservative surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The treatment of soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremities - prospective randomized evaluations of (1) limb-sparing surgery plus radiation therapy compared with amputation and (2) the role of adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, S.A.; Tepper, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1982-01-01

    Between May 1975 and April 1981, 43 adult patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities were prospectively randomized to receive either amputation at or above the joint proximal to the tumor, including all involved muscle groups, or to receive a limb-sparing resection plus adjuvant radiation therapy. The limb-sparing resection group received wide local excision followed by 5000 rads to the entire anatomic area at risk for local spread and 6000 to 7000 rads to the tumor bed. Both randomization groups received postoperative chemotherapy with doxorubicin (maximum cumulative dose 550 mg/m 2 ), cyclophosphamide, and high-dose methotrexate. Twenty-seven patients randomized to receive limb-sparing resection and radiotherapy, and 16 received amputation (randomization was 2:1). There were four local recurrences in the limb-sparing group and none in the amputation group (p 1 = 0.06 generalized Wilcoxon test). However, there were no differences in disease-free survival rates (83% and 88% at five years; p 2 = 0.99) between the limb-sparing group and the amputation treatment groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that the only correlate of local recurrence was the final margin of resection. Patients with positive margins of resection had a higher likelihood of local recurrence compared with those with negative margins (p 1 1 = 0.00008) and overall survival (95% vs. 74%; p 1 = 0.04)

  12. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy with ACNU and radiation therapy for malignant glioma in the cerebral hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Katayama, Yoichi; Nakamura, Saburo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Seventy-two patients with malignant gliomas (57 with glioblastoma and 15 with anaplastic astrocytoma) in the cerebral hemisphere were studied retrospectively to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy with nimustine and radiation after surgery. Survival was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method in 21 patients treated with radiotherapy after surgery and 51 patients treated with nimustine and radiotherapy after surgery. Histological classification age, and the extent of resection of the tumors were significantly correlated with survival. The median survival time was 8 months in patients treated with radiotherapy and 15 months in patients treated with nimustine and radiotherapy. The 2- and 5-year survival rates were 12% and 0% in patients treated with radiotherapy and 33% and 22% in patients treated with nimustine and radiotherapy. Thus, a significant difference in survival was recognized, and chemotherapy with nimustine was found to be useful as an adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma after surgery. However, survival time did not differ between intravenous and intra-arterial infusion of nimustine. (author)

  14. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O.; Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C.

    2007-01-01

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  15. Relationship between surgery, chemotherapy, irradiation and immunological state in patients of laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajina, Z.; Kosokovic, F.; Bolanca, S.; Bumber, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between surgery, chemotherapy irradiation and the immunological state in patients of laryngeal cancer with or without metastasis was investigated. The lymphocyte reaction to PHA (Phytohaemagglutinin) stimulation and T-lymphocyte count was examined before and immediately after the therapy in 66 patients divided into three groups. From the results the authors conclude that surgical treatment, partial or total laryngectomy, with or without radical Neckdissection influence the immunological state of the patients at least chemotherapy more and irradiation at most. (orig.) [de

  16. Survival outcome of women with stage IV uterine carcinosarcoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Johnson, Marian S; Im, Dwight D; Ross, Malcolm S; Bush, Stephen H; Yunokawa, Mayu; Blake, Erin A; Takano, Tadao; Klobocista, Merieme M; Hasegawa, Kosei; Ueda, Yutaka; Shida, Masako; Baba, Tsukasa; Satoh, Shinya; Yokoyama, Takuhei; Machida, Hiroko; Ikeda, Yuji; Adachi, Sosuke; Miyake, Takahito M; Iwasaki, Keita; Yanai, Shiori; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masato; Nagano, Tadayoshi; Takekuma, Munetaka; Shahzad, Mian M K; Pejovic, Tanja; Omatsu, Kohei; Kelley, Joseph L; Ueland, Frederick R; Roman, Lynda D

    2018-03-01

    To examine survival of women with stage IV uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS) who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by hysterectomy. This is a nested case-control study within a retrospective cohort of 1192 UCS cases. Women who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by hysterectomy based-surgery for stage IV UCS (n = 26) were compared to those who had primary hysterectomy-based surgery without neoadjuvant chemotherapy for stage IV UCS (n = 120). Progression-free survival (PFS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were examined. The most common regimen for neoadjuvant chemotherapy was carboplatin/paclitaxel (53.8%). Median number of neoadjuvant chemotherapy cycles was 4. PFS was similar between the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group and the primary surgery group (unadjusted-hazard ratio [HR] 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-1.89, P = 0.45). Similarly, CSS was comparable between the two groups (unadjusted-HR 1.13, 95%CI 0.68-1.90, P = 0.64). When the types of neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens were compared, women who received a carboplatin/paclitaxel regimen had better survival outcomes compared to those who received other regimens: PFS, unadjusted-HR 0.38, 95%CI 0.15-0.93, P = 0.027; and CSS, unadjusted-HR 0.21, 95%CI 0.07-0.61, P = 0.002. Our study found that there is no statistically significant difference in survival between women with stage IV UCS who are tolerated neoadjuvant chemotherapy and those who undergo primary surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Work Environment in the Operating Room during Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy : Factors Influencing Choice of Protective Equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Näslund Andréasson, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is a common metastatic manifestation of both gastrointestinal and gynecological malignancies. Curative modes of treatment are cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Surgeons and operating room (OR) staff attending these procedures are exposed to chemotherapy and electrocautery smoke. Heated chemotherapy (HIPEC) may vaporize and become inhaled by those administering it and, moreover, large quant...

  18. The importance of second-look surgery following radio-chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janisch, H.; Gerstner, G.

    1980-01-01

    Fifteen patients with advanced, initially inoperable ovarian cancer (stages III and IV) were subjected to second-look surgery between May 1976 and August 1979 following combined radio-chemotherapy. Each case had shown a distinct reduction in tumour size and a demarcation of the foreign issue, which is considered to be prerequisite for second-look surgery. The diagnostic goal of the operation was to verify the success of the preceding radio-chemotherapeutic treatment by means of exact determination of the extent of the residual tumour. The subsequent therapeutic regimen can, if necessary, be modified accordingly. The therapeutic goal is complete surgical removal of the tumour, if at all possible, since the success of subsequent chemotherapy is dependent on the achievement of this aim. The mean interval between initial and second-look surgery was three and a half months. Tumour tissue of varying extent was found in 14 out of 15 cases. In 12 cases total extirpation of the internal genitals was successfully carried out, tumour resection was performed twice, and only of third-look surgery, when after two years of radio-chemotherapy and secondary removal of the internal genitals abdominal tumour diagnosis this patient is now undergoing further chemotherapeutic treatment. We believe that this very case illustrates the importance of second-look surgery and of consistent continuation with radio-chemotherapy in cases of advanced inoperable ovarian cancer. (author)

  19. Management of metastatic apocrine hidradenocarcinoma with chemotherapy and radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Miller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare aggressive form of cutaneous adnexal skin carcinoma originating from the sweat gland. Due to its low incidence, prognostic and treatment strategies are still being explored both for primary and advanced disease. This tumor most often presents as either solid or cystic appearing subcutaneous nodules, which may be associated with pruritus or ulceration. To date the mainstay of treatment for local disease has been surgical excision; however, the paucity of historical data available has shown that these tumors often behave aggressively with high rates of local recurrence, metastasis, and poor overall outcomes. There are few case reports describing the utility of radiation therapy in the treatment of hidradenocarcinoma. Herein, we present a case of metastatic apocrine hidradenocarcinoma in a 32-year-old Caucasian male. The patient initially underwent excisional biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated, highly infiltrative, apocrine hidradenocarcinoma. He received systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease, followed by radiation therapy to areas of grossly palpable adenopathy. Prior to radiation therapy the patient had an enlarged hypermetabolic conglomerate of lymph nodes in the right axilla, and borderline enlarged low activity nodes within the left axilla. He received 3 cycles of chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen and radiation therapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to areas of progressive disease in the bilateral axilla, lower neck, and axillary skin. Following treatment, the patient had complete resolution of skin nodules and improvement of his pruritus. While the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hidradenocarcinoma has not been well established, this case report demonstrated the potential benefit of external beam radiotherapy in the management of this rare disease

  20. Management of Metastatic Apocrine Hidradenocarcinoma with Chemotherapy and Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel H; Peterson, Jennifer L; Buskirk, Steven J; Vallow, Laura A; Ta, Randy; Joseph, Richard; Krishna, Murli; Ko, Stephen J; Tzou, Katherine S

    2015-09-07

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare aggressive form of cutaneous adnexal skin carcinoma originating from the sweat gland. Due to its low incidence, prognostic and treatment strategies are still being explored both for primary and advanced disease. This tumor most often presents as either solid or cystic appearing subcutaneous nodules, which may be associated with pruritus or ulceration. To date the mainstay of treatment for local disease has been surgical excision; however, the paucity of historical data available has shown that these tumors often behave aggressively with high rates of local recurrence, metastasis, and poor overall outcomes. There are few case reports describing the utility of radiation therapy in the treatment of hidradenocarcinoma. Herein, we present a case of metastatic apocrine hidradenocarcinoma in a 32-year-old Caucasian male. The patient initially underwent excisional biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated, highly infiltrative, apocrine hidradenocarcinoma. He received systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease, followed by radiation therapy to areas of grossly palpable adenopathy. Prior to radiation therapy the patient had an enlarged hypermetabolic conglomerate of lymph nodes in the right axilla, and borderline enlarged low activity nodes within the left axilla. He received 3 cycles of chemotherapy followed by tamoxifen and radiation therapy (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions) to areas of progressive disease in the bilateral axilla, lower neck, and axillary skin. Following treatment, the patient had complete resolution of skin nodules and improvement of his pruritus. While the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hidradenocarcinoma has not been well established, this case report demonstrated the potential benefit of external beam radiotherapy in the management of this rare disease.

  1. Radical surgery after chemotherapy: a new therapeutic strategy to envision in grade II glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffau, Hugues; Taillandier, Luc; Capelle, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    While surgery is proned in low-grade glioma (LGG), the invasion of functional areas frequently prevents a complete resection. We report the first case of a patient operated on for a left frontal LGG, diagnosed because of seizures, with partial resection due to an invasion of the controlateral hemisphere. Chemotherapy enabled a regression of this controlateral extension. Postchemotherapy surgery performed with intraoperative functional mapping then allowed a complete resection, without sequelae. The patient has a normal socio-professional life, with no seizure. No other treatment was given. There was no recurrence, with a follow-up of 2 years since the second surgery (3.5 years since the first symptom). We propose a new therapeutic strategy in unresectable LGG, with preoperative chemotherapy, to make a radical surgery possible in a second step, while preserving the quality of life.

  2. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial

  3. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pierre-yves.bondiau@nice.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Courdi, Adel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Bahadoran, Phillipe [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Nice, Nice (France); Chamorey, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Queille-Roussel, Catherine [Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique Appliquée à la Dermatologie, Nice (France); Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  4. Combination therapy of gastric carcinoma with radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Yamada, Shogo; Matsumoto, Ko [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1982-08-01

    The concurrent combination therapy of radiation and chemotherapy was performed in a total of 134 cases of stomach cancer. Radiation response of tumor was remarkable in 35 (37%) of 95 cases, irradiated more than 5,000 rad. Yearly survival rates in 81 cases, in which the scheduled curative treatment was completed, were 63% in one, 31% in two, 21% in three, 17% in four and 13% in five years. These rates were intimately correlated to tumor size and cancer type. However, this combination therapy accompanied some fatal complications in a few percent. From the results, it was concluded that this combination therapy should be valuable to prolong the life of patients with gastric cancer, and that the curable indications for this treatment should be T1-T3: M0 cases with radio-responsive tumor.

  5. Genetically modified vaccines augment the efficacy of cancer surgery and chemotherapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2009), s. 199-200 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genetically modified vaccines * cancer surgery and chemotherapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2009

  6. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Tan, Benjamin; Hunt, Steven; Olsen, Jeffrey; Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James; Gao, Feng; Hall, Lannis; Kodner, Ira; Lockhart, A. Craig; Mutch, Matthew; Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron; Safar, Bashar; Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Parikh, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  7. Five Fractions of Radiation Therapy Followed by 4 Cycles of FOLFOX Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myerson, Robert J., E-mail: rmyerson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tan, Benjamin [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hunt, Steven [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Birnbaum, Elisa; Fleshman, James [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Gao, Feng [Division of Biostatistics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hall, Lannis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Kodner, Ira [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Lockhart, A. Craig [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Mutch, Matthew [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Naughton, Michael; Picus, Joel; Rigden, Caron [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Safar, Bashar [Section of Colorectal Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sorscher, Steven; Suresh, Rama; Wang-Gillam, Andrea [Division of Medical Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Background: Preoperative radiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy is a standard of care for cT3-4 rectal cancer. Studies incorporating additional cytotoxic agents demonstrate increased morbidity with little benefit. We evaluate a template that: (1) includes the benefits of preoperative radiation therapy on local response/control; (2) provides preoperative multidrug chemotherapy; and (3) avoids the morbidity of concurrent radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT3-4, any N, any M rectal cancer were eligible. Patients were confirmed to be candidates for pelvic surgery, provided response was sufficient. Preoperative treatment was 5 fractions radiation therapy (25 Gy to involved mesorectum, 20 Gy to elective nodes), followed by 4 cycles of FOLFOX [5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, leucovorin]. Extirpative surgery was performed 4 to 9 weeks after preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was at the discretion of the medical oncologist. The principal objectives were to achieve T stage downstaging (ypT < cT) and preoperative grade 3+ gastrointestinal morbidity equal to or better than that of historical controls. Results: 76 evaluable cases included 7 cT4 and 69 cT3; 59 (78%) cN+, and 7 cM1. Grade 3 preoperative GI morbidity occurred in 7 cases (9%) (no grade 4 or 5). Sphincter-preserving surgery was performed on 57 (75%) patients. At surgery, 53 patients (70%) had ypT0-2 residual disease, including 21 (28%) ypT0 and 19 (25%) ypT0N0 (complete response); 24 (32%) were ypN+. At 30 months, local control for all evaluable cases and freedom from disease for M0 evaluable cases were, respectively, 95% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 89%-100%) and 87% (95% CI: 76%-98%). Cases were subanalyzed by whether disease met requirements for the recently activated PROSPECT trial for intermediate-risk rectal cancer. Thirty-eight patients met PROSPECT eligibility and achieved 16 ypT0 (42%), 15 ypT0N0 (39%), and 33 ypT0-2 (87

  8. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced carcinoma of the esophagus. Phase II study and clinical review on literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, P.; Stoll, P.; Wannenmacher, M.; Zierhut, D.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Neither surgical advances nor those in therapeutic radiology have been able to significantly reduce the mortality related to esophageal carcinomas. The results of combining: first surgery, then radiation therapy, which have been dissatisfactory for decades, encourage therapeutic concepts involving a variety of modalities. Patients and Methods: For 50 patients with unresectable locally advanced esophageal carcinomas, a palliative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy was carried out according to the ''intent to treat'' principle. The aim was a minimal dose of 40 Gy. The concurrent chemotherapy was carried out using cisplatin/5-FU during the 1st and 4th weeks of radiation therapy. In the case of partial or complete remission, the chemotherapy was to be continued as maintenance therapy with a maximum of four cycles. In the case of no change or minor response, instead of maintenance chemotherapy, the dose of local radiation was to be increased by means of brachytherapy. Results: The median survival rate for the entire population under study was 8.7 months. The survival rates of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were, respectively, 38%, 20.5%, 13.7%, 6.8%, and 6.8%. The remission rates were as follows: NC: 14 patients (28%), PR: 32 patients (64%), CR: 4 patients (8%). 17 patients (34%) tolerated the full concurrent chemotherapy; only twelve patients (24%) tolerated supportive chemotherapy. The following factors exhibited a significant correlation to survival: the intensity of the chemotherapy, the Karnofsky index, the age of the patients, and the improvement of oral food intake. Conclusions: The concurrent chemotherapy was toxic and the benefit to the patients questionable. At best, meta-analyses of randomized studies along the lines of ''evidence-based medicine'' demonstrate for concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy an improvement of 2-year survival rates, but with these also involving a high level of toxicity. Due to the heterogeneous data available

  9. Radiation pneumonitis: a complication resulting from combined radiation and chemotherapy for early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gez, E.; Sulkes, A.; Isacson, R.; Catane, R.; Weshler, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Described is a patient with early breast carcinoma who developed clinical radiation pneumonitis during primary radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy that included prednisone. This syndrome developed three days following abrupt steroid withdrawal. Retrieval of steroids brought complete resolution of the clinical and radiological findings. Although this syndrome is rare, it is recommended that steroid therapy in a patient previously irradiated to the chest be avoided

  10. Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse can help you balance the risks of chemotherapy against the potential benefits. It is important to note that the information provided here is basic and does not take the place of professional advice. If you have any questions ... Publication Quimioterapia (Chemotherapy) Una publicación de ...

  11. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  12. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, C.; O'Donnell, A.; Tattersall, M.H.N.; Dalrymple, C.; Firth, I.

    2001-01-01

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  13. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  14. Locally Advanced Rectal Carcinoma: Curative Surgery Alone vs. postoperative Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Sang Hee

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effects of postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy on the pattern of failure and survival for locally advanced rectal carcinoma, we analyzed the two groups of patients who received curative resection only and who received postoperative radiochemotherapy retrospectively. Materials and Methods : From June 1989 to December 1992, ninety nine patients with rectal cancer were treated by curative resection and staged as B2-3 or C. Group I(25) patients received curative resection only and group II(74) patients postoperative adjuvant therapy. Postoperative adjuvant group received radiation therapy (4500 cGy/ 25fx to whole pelvis)with 5-FU (500 mg/m 2 , day 1-3 IV infusion) as radiosensitizer and maintenance chemotherapy with 5-FU(400mg/m 2 for 5 days) and leucovorin (20mg/m 2 for 5 days) for 6 cycles. Results : The patients in group I and group II were comparable in terms of age, sex, performance status, but in group II 74% of patients showed stage C compared with 56% of group I. All patients were flowed from 6 to 60 months with a median follow up of 29 months. Three year overall survival rates and disease free survival rates were 68%, 64% respectively in group I and 64%, 61%, respectively in group II. There was no statistical difference between the two treatment groups in overall survival rate and disease free survival rate. Local recurrences occurred in 28% of group I, 21% of group II (p>.05) and distant metastases occurred in 20% of group I, 27% of group II(p>.05). The prognostic value of several variables other that treatment modality was assessed. In multivariate analysis for prognostic factors stage and histologic grade showed statistically significant effect on local recurrences, and lymphatic or vessel invasion on distant metastasis. Conclusion : This retrospective study showed no statistical difference between two groups on the pattern of failure and survival. But considering that group II had more advanced stage and poor prognostic

  15. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the jaw treated with skull base surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Misaki; Asato, Ryo; Torii, Hiroko; Kanda, Tomoko; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Shigeru; Ito, Juichi; Tanaka, Shinzou

    2009-01-01

    Head and neck osteosarcomas are rare. A 33-year-old woman received radiation therapy for lymphoepithelioma of the epipharynx in her childhood. After twenty-two years, she presented with a swelling of the right cheek. We did a work up, and diagnosed her radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the jaw. We treated her with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery including skull base resection, and adjuvant chemo-therapy. A small skin recurrence developed after one year, but it was resected under local anesthesia, and there have been no recurrences since. We think that skull base surgery with a combined approach is a useful method in therapy for osteosarcomas in the skull base region. (author)

  16. The Results of Radiation Therapy Alone vs Radiation Plus Chemotherapy of Uterine Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Za; Choi, Suk Young; Chun, Ha Jeong

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Radiation therapy(RT) is conventionally standard treatment for locally advanced stage for uterine cervix cancer. Recently to improve treatment results, combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy was tried. We retrospectively analysed our experience of 122 patients. Comparison of the results in 45 patients treated with RT alone and 77 patients treated with RT plus chemotherapy was made. Materials and Methods : from January 1985 to December 1991, 122 patients with cervix cancer were treated with whole pelvic external RT and ICR(34 1 ICR, 77 2 ICR, 11 high dose rate ICR) in our department. Forty five patients were treated with RT alone, and 77 patients were treated with combined plus chemotherapy. Mean age was 58 years(range:29-81). Histologic types were 111 squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, 3 adenocarcinoma, and 2 adenosquamous cell carcinoma. According to the FIGO stage 6 had stage IA94.9%, 11 had IIA(9.0%), 37 had IIB(30.3%), 3 had IIA(2.5%), 63 had IIB(51.6%), and 2 had stage IV(1.6%). In 77 patients with RT plus chemotherapy, 36 patients were treated with VBP(vinblastin, bleoycin, cisplainum), 39 patients with cisplatinum plus 5-FU and 2 patients with 5-FU. Results : Complete response after external RT(3960cGy-5500cGy)was achieved in 61 patients(50%). He actuarial 5 year and 9 year survival rate was 57.8% and 53.9%, respectively. Five year actuarial survival rate was 63.1% with RT alone(n=45) and 55.9% with RT plus chemotherapy(n=77). Their 5 year survival rate was 35.5% for 1 course of ICR and 67% for 2 courses of ICR. There was statistically significant advantage of survival with RT alone group who were treated with 2 coursed of ICR and dose to the A point≥8000cGy(4/25 died). In RT plus chemotherapy group, dose response was not seen and there was no difference in 5 year survival between 1 course and 2 course of ICR(50% vs 56.8%), and dose to point A less than 8000cGy and more than 8000 cGy(55.6% vs 55.7%). There was no significant

  17. Is adjuvant chemotherapy necessary for patients with microinvasive breast cancer after surgery?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Fei Niu; Li-Juan Wei; Jin-Pu Yu; Zhen Lian; Jing Zhao; Zi-Zheng Wu; Jun-Tian Liu

    2016-01-01

    .105). Conclusions:Patients with MIBC who overexpress Ki-67 and with negative hormonal receptors have relatively substantial risk of relapse within the first five years after surgery. However, adjuvant chemotherapy can only improve the outcomes of ER(-)/PR(-) patients, but not those who overexpress Ki-67. Further studies with prolonged follow-up of large cohorts are recommended to assess the prognostic significance and treatment of this lesion.

  18. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and surgery in patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong Kan; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Dahl; Cho, Kyu Sup; Kim, Dong Won [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Roh, Hwan Jung [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The optimal treatment of advanced maxillary sinus cancer has been challenging for several decades. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for head and neck cancer has been controversial. We have analyzed the long-term outcome of neoadjuvant IAC followed by radiation therapy (RT) and surgery. Twenty-seven patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer were treated between 1989 and 2002. Five-fluorouracil (5-FU, 500 mg/m2) was infused intra-arterially, and followed by RT (total 50.4 Gy/28 fractions). A planned surgery was performed 3 to 4 weeks after completion of IAC and RT. At a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 12 to 169 months), the 5-year rates of overall survival in all patients were 63%. The 5-year rates of overall survival of stage T3/T4 patients were 70.0% and 58.8%, respectively. Seven of fourteen patients with disease recurrence had a local recurrence alone. The 5-year actuarial local control rates in patients with stage T3/T4, and in all patients were 20.0%, 32.3%, and 27.4%, respectively. Overall response rate after the completion of IAC and RT was 70.3%. During the follow-up, seven patients (25.9%) showed mild to moderate late complications. The tumor extent (i.e., the involvement of either orbit and/or base of skull) appeared to be related with local recurrence. Neoadjuvant IAC with 5-FU followed by RT and surgery may be effective to improve local tumor control in the patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer. However, local failure was still the major cause of death. Further investigations are required to determine the optimal treatment schedule, radiotherapy techniques and chemotherapy regimens.

  19. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Seok Mo; Cho, Chi-Heum; Kim, Byoung Gie; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m 2 was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study

  20. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanbyoul [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute for National Cancer Control and Evaluation, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Mo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chi-Heum [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hee-Sug [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Beom [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hoon, E-mail: jaehoonkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  1. Combination chemotherapy concurrent with small dose radiation therapy for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Toshihiko; Fujita, Hiroji; Shintomi, Takenori

    1987-01-01

    Forty consecutive patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both. Of 34 patients treated with chemotherapy, 24 were treated with combination chemotherapy, containing cyclophosphamide vincristine methotrexate and procarbazine, concurrent with small dose radiation therapy (500 cGy/5 fraction) as a chemosensitizer (COMPrt). The response rate to this regimen was 81 % (29 % complete) and the 2 year survival rate was 28.6 %. These results have been superior to other regimens and the toxicity was not see to be any higher. After completion of COMPrt regimen, 10 patients were treated with intrathoracic radiation therapy (average dose 3000 cGy) and 3 recieved surgical treatment. Radiation therapy improved the 2-year survival rate (42.2 %) when compared with those patients who received no radiation therapy (18.2 %). Three patients received surgical treatment were considered to be disease-free for 23, 17, and 9 months respectively, after induction of chemotherapy. (author)

  2. Castration in breast cancer. Surgery or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Munoz, G.

    1977-01-01

    A summary is done on the indication of oophorectomy - by surgery or radiation - in the treatment of breast cancer. Prophylactic - and therapeutic oophorectomy are analysed. It is concluded that the treatment of advanced cancer is a fight against time, once the survival of patients ought to be prolonged with the minor number of therapeutic agents, avoiding the usage of them all at once not to exaust them. Castration performed with therapeutic purposes in pre-or post-menopause patients with hyperestrogenism is the first link in the chain of paliative treatment of advanced breast cancer. (M.A.) [pt

  3. Response of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Hong-qing

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma is a rare disease with no characteristic symptoms. It is difficult to diagnose early and is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary embolism. Case presentation Here we report a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma in a 54-year-old woman presenting with complaints of shortness of breath on exertion. Echocardiography and a computed tomography scan showed that the right pulmonary artery trunk was blocked by a low-density mass. The patient was diagnosed with pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma by pathology and a complete mass resection was performed. After experiencing 10 months of disease-free survival, she was re-admitted because of the recurrence and metastasis of the tumor. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy were performed; however, only limited success was achieved. The patient died 15 months after the initial onset of symptoms. Conclusion Some patients with intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery can benefit from radiotherapy and chemotherapy as well as surgery.

  4. Treatment results of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kato, Eriko; Ito, Yosiyuki; Kikuti, Yuzo

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen patients with nasopharyngeal cancer were treated with a combination chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil and radiation therapy. Systemic chemotherapy with cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 , 2 days) and 5-fluorouracil (700 mg/m 2 , 5 days) was given successively with radiation therapy. The complications of chemotherapy were generally acceptable except one patient who was shocked by cisplatin. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. (author)

  5. Peritoneal metastases of colorectal origin - cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). The financial aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębski, Tomasz; Bębenek, Marek

    2017-12-30

    The incidence of peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer amounts to 5%-15% for synchronous metastases and as much as 40% in cases of local recurrence. Best results are obtained for cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). This treatment offers much better outcomes, leading to 5-year survival rates of as much as 30%-50%. The procedures require significant experience in abdominal surgery, are time-consuming (mean duration of the procedure ranging from 6 to 8 hours) and are burdened by complications that are due not only to the procedure itself but also to the intraperitoneal administration of the cytostatic drug at elevated temperature (41.5 °C). After the procedure, patients are required to be admitted to intensive care units due to potential complications associated with the extent and duration of the procedure as well as chemotherapy administered in hyperthermia. Postoperative management of these patients requires appropriate experience of the entire medical and nursing team. Cytoreductive surgeries combined with HIPEC as highly specialized medical procedures should be assessed for their potential long-term benefits and their costs should be appropriately calculated with consideration to realistic reimbursement rates. Realistic valuation and reimbursement covering the overall average cost of the procedure is recommended by the National Consultant in Surgical Oncology as well as the ESMO consensus guidelines.

  6. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for advanced ovarian and peritoneal cancers in patients following interval debulking surgery or primary cytoreductive surgery: Tom Baker Cancer Centre experience from 2006 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Lucero, Carlos Aspe; Chu, Pamela; Nation, Jill; Ghatage, Prafull

    2010-03-01

    To describe our experience with cisplatin- and paclitaxel-based IP chemotherapy in patients treated initially with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (IDS) or primary cytoreductive surgery (PCRS). We performed a retrospective review of the records of 67 patients (38 IDS, 29 PCRS) enrolled in the intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy program at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre between 2006 and 2009. Information pertaining to patient demographics, IP chemotherapy toxicity, and catheter complications was extracted, and the median time to recurrence was calculated. Most patients in the study were aged 50 to 70 years and had a diagnosis of stage III serous ovarian cancer. Overall, 295/393 IP cycles (75%) were successfully administered. The proportion of patients completing six cycles of chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups was 53% and 59%, respectively. Frequent (> 25%) Grade 1 to 2 chemotherapy toxicities included fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and nausea. Catheter complications were observed in 34% of patients (23/67). The recurrence rates for patients completing four or more cycles of IP chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups were 58% and 35%, respectively, with the median time to recurrence approximately one year. Although IP chemotherapy is well tolerated in both IDS and PCRS patients, the median time to recurrence is shorter than expected.

  7. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy

  8. Increased incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following breast cancer treatment with radiation alone or combined with chemotherapy: a registry cohort analysis 1990-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Henry G; Malmgren, Judith A; Atwood, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    Our objective was to measure myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) risk associated with radiation and/or chemotherapy breast cancer (BC) treatment. Our study cohort was composed of BC patients diagnosed from 1990 to 2005 and followed up for blood disorders, mean length of follow up = 7.17 years, range 2-18 years. 5790 TNM stage 0-III patients treated with surgery alone, radiation and/or chemotherapy were included. Patients without surgery (n = 111), with stem cell transplantation (n = 98), unknown or non-standard chemotherapy regimens (n = 94), lost to follow up (n = 66) or 'cancer status unknown' (n = 67) were excluded. Rates observed at our community based cancer care institution were compared to SEER incidence data for rate ratio (RR) calculations. 17 cases of MDS/AML (10 MDS/7 AML) occurred during the follow up period, crude rate .29% (95% CI = .17, .47), SEER comparison RR = 3.94 (95% CI = 2.34, 6.15). The RR of MDS in patients age < 65 comparing our cohort incidence to SEER incidence data was 10.88 (95% CI = 3.84, 24.03) and the RR of AML in patients age < 65 was 5.32 (95% CI = 1.31, 14.04). No significant increased risk of MDS or AML was observed in women ≥ 65 or the surgery/chemotherapy-only group. A RR of 3.32 (95% CI = 1.42, 6.45) was observed in the surgery/radiation-only group and a RR of 6.32 (95% CI = 3.03, 11.45) in the surgery/radiation/chemotherapy group. 3 out of 10 MDS cases died of disease at an average 3.8 months post diagnosis and five of seven AML cases died at an average 9 months post diagnosis. An elevated rate of MDS and AML was observed among breast cancer patients < 65, those treated with radiation and those treated with radiation and chemotherapy compared to available population incidence data. Although a small number of patients are affected, leukemia risk associated with treatment and younger age is significant

  9. Histopathological studies of radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy on squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonemochi, Takemi

    1996-01-01

    The 2nd Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, Iwate Medical University has performed radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy as a preoperative treatment and subsequent mandibulectomy. During a 20 year-period from 1975 to 1994, clinical and histopathological examination of the above therapy was made for its effect and usefulness by using 15 primary cases of mandibular gingival squamous cell carcinoma, which were all identifiable. Roentgenological examination by bone resorptive pattern (invasive type, erosive type) and by bone resorptive depth (degree 0-III) revealed that early infiltration case and advanced case were predominant in the erosive type and the invasive type respectively. Histopathologically, the therapeutical effect of the radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy on the tumor cells was examined using osteoclast, fibrous connective tissue, osteoblast, new bone, site of neoosteogenesis, and post-treatment site of residual tumor ceils as findings in the healing process. The histological therapeutic effect was good on well-differentiated type cases, and the histological effect on osteo-infiltrated region was as good as, or better than on soft tissue region. The cases with good histological therapeutic effect scarcely showed osteoclast, but showed remarkable hyperplasia of fibrous connective tissue, appearance of osteoblast and repair mechanism via neoosteogenesis. Invasive type tumor was persistent in the depth of the mandible, while erosive type tumor showed a tendency to be persistent in superficial layer. The results suggested that the application of the present radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy to mandibular gingival squamous cell carcinoma is very useful leading to the improvement in radical curability of the tumor in its primary focus and the preservation of mandibular continuity in surgery. (author)

  10. Thoracoscopic surgery for pulmonary metastases after chemotherapy using a tailor-made virtual lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Tadashi; Marushima, Hideki; Kinoshita, Satoki; Kamiya, Noriteru; Odaka, Makoto; Takeyama, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Details with regard to the standard criteria for a therapeutic metastasectomy and the use of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) remain elusive. To evaluate the feasibility of VATS using a tailor-made virtual lung for patients with pulmonary metastases after chemotherapy, we reviewed the following cases. Clinical data from October 2006 to April 2010 were obtained from patients who received chemotherapy before a pulmonary metastasectomy (lobectomy or segmentectomy). VATS was the primarily selected surgical approach except for treating hilar lesions. A lobectomy was performed when the metastasis was greater than 3.0 cm in diameter or located deeply in the lobe. Tailor-made virtual lungs were created using three-dimensional multidetector computed tomography before lobectomy on a routine basis. The virtual lung consisted of three-dimensional pulmonary vessels, a tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary parenchyma, and tumors. Twelve operations, consisting of 1 segmentectomy, 10 lobectomies, and 1 wedge bronchoplasty upper lobectomy, were performed on 11 patients during the study period. VATS was completed in 10 of these 12 operations. The mean operative time for the lobectomies was 257 min, and the mean operative bleeding volume was 215 ml. Two cases experienced postoperative transient atrial fibrillation, and no mortalities associated with these operations were reported. VATS was performed safely in instances of metastasectomy after chemotherapy, and the tailor-made virtual lung assisted in lung orientation during the operation. (author)

  11. Solid tumors after chemotherapy or surgery for testicular nonseminoma: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D; Milano, Michael T; Oldenburg, Jan; Travis, Lois B

    2013-10-20

    Increased risks of solid tumors after older radiotherapy strategies for testicular cancer (TC) are well established. Few population-based studies, however, focus on solid cancer risk among survivors of TC managed with nonradiotherapy approaches. We quantified the site-specific risk of solid cancers among testicular nonseminoma patients treated in the modern era of cisplatin-based chemotherapy, without radiotherapy. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for solid tumors were calculated for 12,691 patients with testicular nonseminoma reported to the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program (1980 to 2008) and treated initially with either chemotherapy (n = 6,013) or surgery (n = 6,678) without radiotherapy. Patients accrued 116,073 person-years of follow-up. Two hundred ten second solid cancers were observed. No increased risk followed surgery alone (SIR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.14; n = 99 solid cancers), whereas significantly increased 40% excesses (SIR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.73; n = 111 solid cancers) occurred after chemotherapy. Increased risks of solid cancers after chemotherapy were observed in most follow-up periods (median latency, 12.5 years), including more than 20 years after treatment (SIR, 1.54; 95% CI, 0.96 to 2.33); significantly increased three- to seven-fold risks occurred for cancers of the kidney (SIR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.79 to 5.77), thyroid (SIR, 4.40; 95% CI, 2.19 to 7.88), and soft tissue (SIR, 7.49; 95% CI, 3.59 to 13.78). To our knowledge, this is the first large population-based series reporting significantly increased risks of solid cancers among patients with testicular nonseminoma treated in the modern era of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Subsequent analytic studies should focus on the evaluation of dose-response relationships, types of solid cancers, latency patterns, and interactions with other possible factors, including genetic susceptibility.

  12. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation therapy in patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kubota, Kaoru

    2000-01-01

    Thymic carcinoma is a rare mediastinal neoplasm with poor prognosis. Although the clinical benefit of chemotherapy for thymic carcinoma is controversial, cisplatin-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is ordinarily adopted in advanced cases. We evaluated the clinical outcome of platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in unresectable thymic carcinoma patients. Ten patients with unresectable thymic carcinoma were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy in the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1989 and 1998. We reviewed the histological type, treatment, response and survival of these patients. Four of the 10 patients responded to chemotherapy and both the median progression-free survival period and the median response duration were 6.0 months. The median survival time was 11.0 months. There was no relationship between histological classification and prognosis. Platinum-based chemotherapy with or without thoracic radiation is, regardless of tumor histology, marginally effective in advanced thymic carcinoma patients, giving only a modest tumor response rate and short response duration and survival. (author)

  13. Comparing Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy Combined With Intravesical Chemotherapy Versus Intravesical Chemotherapy Alone: A Randomised Prospective Pilot Study for T1G3 Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma After Bladder-Preserving Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junxing, E-mail: Junxingchen@hotmail.com; Yao, Zhijun, E-mail: yaozhijun1985@qq.com; Qiu, Shaopeng, E-mail: qiushp@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Chen, Lingwu, E-mail: chenlingwu@hotmail.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Urology (China); Wang, Yu, E-mail: zsyyjr@163.com; Yang, Jianyong, E-mail: yangjianyong_2011@163.com; Li, Jiaping, E-mail: jpli3s@126.com [First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Interventional Oncology (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) followed by bladder-preserving surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with T1G3 BTCC were randomly divided into two groups. After bladder-preserving surgery, 29 patients (age 30-80 years, 24 male and 5 female) received intra-arterial chemotherapy in combination with intravesical chemotherapy (group A), whereas 31 patients (age 29-83 years, 26 male and 5 female) were treated with intravesical chemotherapy alone (group B). Twenty-nine patients were treated with intra-arterial epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) + cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy 2-3 weeks after bladder-preserving surgery once every 4-6 weeks. All of the patients received the same intravesical chemotherapy: An immediate prophylactic was administered in the first 6 h. After that, therapy was administered one time per week for 8 weeks and then one time per month for 8 months. The instillation drug was epirubicin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) and lasted for 30-40 min each time. The end points were tumour recurrence (stage Ta, T1), tumour progression (to T2 or greater), and disease-specific survival. During median follow-up of 22 months, the overall survival rate, tumour-specific death rate, recurrence rate, progression rate, time to first recurrence, and adverse reactions were compared between groups. Results: The recurrence rates were 10.3 % (3 of 29) in group A and 45.2 % (14 of 31) in group B, and the progression rates were 0 % (0 of 29) in group A and 22.6 % (7 of 31) in group B. There was a significant difference between the two groups regarding recurrence (p = 0.004) and progression rates (p = 0.011). Median times to first recurrence in the two groups were 15 and 6.5 months, respectively. The overall survival rates were 96.6 and 87.1 %, and the tumour-specific death rates were 0 % (0 of 29) and 13.5 % (4 of 31

  14. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  15. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Medicine. Div. of Solid Tumor Oncology; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States).Dept. of Surgery. Head and Neck Service; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology]. E-mail: pfisterd@mskcc.org

    2000-06-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  16. Long-term follow-up in patients treated with larynx preservation approach using sequential chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the Memorial Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluf, Fernando; Sherman, Eric J.; Bosl, George J.; Pfister, David G.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    While many combined modality, organ preservation programs are reported in the literature, few provide long-term follow-up with functional outcomes. The goal of this report is to provide this outcome data for patients treated with a sequential chemotherapy/radiotherapy (CT/RT) approach - the only strategy successfully compared to surgery and RT in randomized trials to date - treated at our institution with a median follow-up of over 10 years. Eligible patients had advanced, resectable, histologically-confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of larynx or pharynx for which standard surgical management would have jeopardized the larynx. Treatment occurred as part of three consecutive larynx preservation protocols and consisted of three cycles of induction, cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed, if the primary site had a major response, by definitive dose radiation therapy (65-70 Gy to sites of initial disease bulk) via conventional fractionation (1.8-2 Gy fraction). If the tumor did not respond to the induction chemotherapy or persisted after radiation therapy, appropriate locoregional treatment was pursued. Response to induction chemotherapy, initial rendered disease-free rate, local control with a functional larynx (without any surgery except biopsy to the primary site, permanent tracheostomy or gastrostomy - LCLP), and actuarial survival rates were calculated. A multivariate assessment of prognostic variables was performed using Cox-proportional hazards model to evaluate for predictors of successful larynx preservation. One hundred and ten patients (109 evaluable) with cancer of the larynx (40%), hypopharynx (29%), and oropharynx (30%) were enrolled from 1983 to 1990. The median age was 60 years With a median Karnofsky Performance Status of 80%. The stage of the patients consisted of 33% T4, 74% node positive, and 69% stage IV. The major response rate at the primary site to induction chemotherapy was 74% (complete response in 36%). Seventy-eight percent were rendered

  17. Combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy for advanced oral or oropharngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomohiko; Kita, Midori; Tanaka, Makiko; Ishii, Tetsuo

    1989-01-01

    During the period 1982-1988, 34 patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma were treated with radical radiation therapy combined with intraarterial chemotherapy. Five patients were clinically staged as Stage II,15 as Stage III, and 14 as Stage IV. For intraarterial chemotherapy, ACNU (25mg/body) or CDDP (20 mg/m 2 ) plus MMC (6 mg/m 2 ) was used. Overall, the complete response rate was 56%: it was independent of the site of carcinoma, clinical stage, and the kind of drugs. The two-year cumulative survival rate was 80% for Stage II, 56% for Stage III, and 61% for Stage IV. Side effects were not so severe as to continue with the withdrawal of chemotherapy. In view of the efficacy and safety, combined radiation therapy and intraarterial chemotherapy should be performed in the treatment of oral or oropharyngeal carcinoma. (N.K.)

  18. Impact of chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy for laryngeal preservation. A comparative study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and induction chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraga, Yukihiro; Kou, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    During the past 23 years, from June 1989 to December 2012, our treatment paradigm for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) had involved comprehensive use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy followed by surgery. Between 1989 and 2005, chemotherapy using fluorouracil and carboplatin had been administered via intravenous drip infusion as induction chemotherapy (ICT), and more recently between 2006 and 2012 as concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). In the present study, we examined the superiority of definitive CCRT (dCCRT) over the ICT followed by definitive radiotherapy (ICT-dRT) as to the impact on the treatment of HNSCC with the stage-categories of T2-T4a, retrospectively analyzing survival rates and laryngeal preservation rates at the 3-year point between the two groups. The number of patients assigned for this study was 76, all of whom were previously untreated, and of whom 51 suffered from laryngeal carcinoma and 25 from hypopharyngeal carcinoma: 21 with Stage II, 25 with Stage III, 23 with Stage IV A, 7 with Stage IV C. The three-year overall survival rate and cause-specific survival rate were 54.5%, 73.5% in the ICT-dRT group and 69.2%, 80.5% in the dCCRT group, respectively, both of which statistically had no difference. But the dCCRT was found to contribute to obtaining a higher rate of laryngeal preservation than that of the ICT-dRT in T2 and T3 but not in T4a. In conclusion, dCCRT showed more significant efficacy for organ preservation on T2 and T3 HNSCC than ICT-dRT. (author)

  19. Bulky mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery: report of the first case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Bogani, Giorgio; Gasparri, Maria L; Donato, Violante Di; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria L; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2016-11-11

    Malignant mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare occurrence with few cases described in the literature. Although surgery seems to be effective in the treatment of early-stage tumor, no cases describing outcomes of locally advanced stage are available. We report the first case of a patient with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecologists stage IIB mesonephric adenocarcinoma undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery. Despite the inherent limitation of a single description of a case, our experience supports the utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with malignant mesonephric adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. Further prospective multi-institutional studies are needed.

  20. A combined radiation and platinum chemotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Akio; Saito, Hiroya; Sakurai, Yasuo; Horio, Keiji; Mizoe, Junetsu.

    1993-01-01

    The prognosis of the patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy is still dismal with a reported 5-year survival rate of 5-10% in most series. Since 1986, combined radiotherapy with chemotherapy using platinum analogue was initiated at Asahikawa and Obihiro Kosei Hospitals in order to improve local-regional control and the survival of the patients. From 1980 to 1992, 81 patients with unresectable esophageal carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy. Since April 1986, 37 out of the 81 patients received both radiotherapy and chemotherapy with platinum. Platinum was used during the course of radiotherapy. The method of administration of platinum was as follows; Cisplatin intravenously (50 mg, weekly, total 200 mg) in 9 patients, Carboplatin intravenously (100-150 mg, weekly, total 400-900 mg) in 11 patients and Cisplatin intraarterially (100 mg, at a 3-4 week interval, total 100-300 mg) in 17 patients. These 37 patients (Group A) were compared to 44 patients treated by radiotherapy alone (Group B) with respect to initial response and survival rate. Response was defined according to the guidelines recommended by Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases. Response rates were 59.1% (19 CR and 7 PR) in Group B and 70.3% (7 CR and 19 PR) in Group A. Primary relapse-free rates were 36.4% in Group B and 37.8% in Group A. The cumulative survival at 3 years were 11.7% in Group B and 10.6% in Group A. Enhancement of side effects by chemotherapy was minimal and acceptable. Improvement of local-regional control and survival was not obvious by adding a concomitant platinum-chemotherapy. A definite conclusion, however, could not be drawn because of the retrospective, non-controlled nature of this study. Introduction of more intensive, multiple agents chemotherapy seems necessary if one aims at improving the results. (author)

  1. Efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy or surgery in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hua Yang,* Li-Qiong Diao,* Mei Shi, Rui Ma, Jian-Hua Wang, Jian-Ping Li, Feng Xiao, Ying Xue, Man Xu, Bin ZhouDepartment of Radiotherapy Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjectives: Long-term locoregional control following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck (SCCHN remains challenging. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of IMRT with and without chemotherapy or surgery in locally advanced SCCHN.Materials and methods: Between January 2007 and January 2011, 61 patients with locally advanced SCCHN were treated with curative IMRT in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University; 28% underwent definitive IMRT and 72% postoperative IMRT, combined with simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy in 58%. The mean doses of definitive and postoperative IMRT were 70.8 Gy (range, 66–74 Gy. Outcomes were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier curves. Acute and late toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer radiation morbidity scoring criteria.Results: At a median follow-up of 35 months, 3-year local recurrence-free survival (LRFS, regional recurrence-free survival (RRFS, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS, disease-free survival (DFS, and overall survival (OS were 83.8%, 86.1%, 82.4%, 53.2%, and 62%, respectively. Postoperative IMRT (n = 44, 72% had significantly higher LRFS/OS/DMFS than definitive IMRT (n = 17, 28%; P < 0.05. IMRT combined with chemotherapy (n = 35, 58% had significantly higher LRFS/OS/DMFS than IMRT alone (n = 26, 42%; P < 0.05. One year after radiotherapy, the incidence of xerostomia of grade 1, 2, or 3 was 13.1%, 19.7%, and 1.6%, respectively. No grade 4 acute or late toxicity was observed.Conclusion: IMRT combined with

  2. Disorders of the endocrine system due to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalet, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Panhypopituitarism, infertility, gynaecomastia, impaired growth leading to short stature, failure to undergo normal pubertal development, hyperparathyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid tumours may complicate the treatment of malignant disease. The complexity of modern anti-cancer treatment has made it more difficult to delineate the exact aetiological role of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy as many patients receive both modalities of therapy. In addition, combination chemotherapy has largely replaced treatment with a single cytotoxic drug, which means that it is often impossible to estimate the contribution of any one single drug to the adverse side effects of chemotherapy. The biological effect of a given radiation treatment regime depends not only on the total radiation dose received but also the method of irradiation, number of fractions, fraction size and duration of irradiation. Only a limited amount of information is available on dose-time relationships for radiation-induced damage to endocrine glands. (author)

  3. Disorders of the endocrine system due to radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalet, S M [Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Inst., Manchester (UK)

    1983-11-01

    Panhypopituitarism, infertility, gynaecomastia, impaired growth leading to short stature, failure to undergo normal pubertal development, hyperparathyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid tumours may complicate the treatment of malignant disease. The complexity of modern anti-cancer treatment has made it more difficult to delineate the exact aetiological role of radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy as many patients receive both modalities of therapy. In addition, combination chemotherapy has largely replaced treatment with a single cytotoxic drug, which means that it is often impossible to estimate the contribution of any one single drug to the adverse side effects of chemotherapy. The biological effect of a given radiation treatment regime depends not only on the total radiation dose received but also the method of irradiation, number of fractions, fraction size and duration of irradiation. Only a limited amount of information is available on dose-time relationships for radiation-induced damage to endocrine glands.

  4. Efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery when considered over all cancer types: a synthesis of meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowater, Russell J; Abdelmalik, Sally M E; Lilford, Richard J

    2012-10-01

    Despite a large number of clinical trials having been conducted to assess the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for various cancers, whether it is best to use this treatment remains a generally contentious issue for many common cancers. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether any general conclusions can be drawn about the efficacy or inefficacy of this treatment within different cancer classifications. Meta-analyses of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery were synthesized over as many types of cancer as possible. Data sources were Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library. Eligible meta-analyses were meta-analyses of RCTs for any type of cancer that compared surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with surgery followed by no adjuvant chemotherapy. The literature search found 25 meta-analyses for 15 cancer types that satisfied the criteria necessary for detailed analysis within this study. The estimates of relative risk for all cause mortality were reported as being less than one (indicating adjuvant chemotherapy is beneficial) by all meta-analyses apart from a meta-analysis for colorectal cancer metastasized to the liver. Moreover, 15 of these meta-analyses also reported that the 95% confidence interval for this relative risk is less than one (indicating statistical significance at the 5% level). The results for all cancer types included in this study except for cancer metastasized to the liver can be thought of as supporting each other through the idea of there being a common treatment effect or at least a common range of effect across all (or most) of these cancer types. For example, with regard to cancer types where the evidence in favor of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery is only moderately strong, the results of this study may encourage more clinicians to regard the use of this treatment as standard practice.

  5. Comparison of neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus upfront surgery with or without chemotherapy for patients with clinical stage III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, S; Tsubosa, Y; Sato, H; Takebayashi, K; Kawamorita, K; Mori, K; Niihara, M; Tsushima, T; Yokota, T; Onozawa, Y; Yasui, H; Takeuchi, H; Kitagawa, Y

    2017-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and chemoradiotherapy have been shown to extend postoperative survival, and preoperative therapy followed by esophagectomy has become the standard treatment worldwide for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The Japan Clinical Oncology Group 9907 study showed that NAC significantly extended survival in advanced ESCC, but the survival benefit for patients with clinical stage III disease remains to be elucidated. We compared the survival rates of NAC and upfront surgery in patients with clinical stage III ESCC. Consecutive patients histologically diagnosed as clinical stage III (excluding cT4) ESCC were eligible for this retrospective study. Between September 2002 and April 2007, upfront transthoracic esophagectomy was performed initially and, for patients with positive lymph node (LN) metastasis in a resected specimen, adjuvant chemotherapy using cisplatin and 5-fluororouracil every 3 weeks for two cycles was administered (Upfront surgery group). Since May 2007, a NAC regimen used as adjuvant chemotherapy followed by transthoracic esophagectomy has been administered as the standard treatment in our institution (NAC group). Patient characteristics, clinicopathological factors, treatment outcomes, post-treatment recurrence, and overall survival (OS) were compared between the NAC and upfront surgery groups. Fifty-one and 55 patients were included in the NAC and upfront surgery groups, respectively. The R0 resection rate was significantly lower in the NAC group than in the upfront surgery group (upfront surgery, 98%; NAC, 76%; P = 0.003). In the upfront surgery group, of 49 patients who underwent R0 resection and pathologically positive for LN metastasis, 22 (45%) received adjuvant chemotherapy. In the NAC group, 49 (96%) of 51 patients completed two cycles of NAC. In survival analysis, no significant difference in OS was observed between the NAC and upfront surgery groups (NAC: 5-year OS, 43.8%; upfront surgery: 5

  6. Eradication of breast cancer with bone metastasis by autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV) combined with palliative radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Fumito; Ohno, Tadao

    2013-06-04

    Skeletal metastasis of breast carcinoma is refractory to intensive chemo-radiation therapy and therefore is assumed impossible to cure. Here, we report an advanced case of breast cancer with vertebra-Th7 metastasis that showed complete response to combined treatments with formalin-fixed autologous tumor vaccine (AFTV), palliative radiation therapy with 36 Gy, and adjuvant chemotherapy with standardized CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and 5FU), zoledronic acid, and aromatase inhibitors following mastectomy for the breast tumor. The patient has been disease-free for more than 4 years after the mammary surgery and remains well with no evidence of metastasis or local recurrence. Thus, a combination of AFTV, palliative radiation therapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for this devastating disease.

  7. Chinese expert consensus on cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhou, Yun-Feng; Liang, Han; Wang, Hua-Qing; Hao, Ji-Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Wan, De-Seng; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Ji, Jia-Fu; Xu, Hui-Mian; Wei, Shao-Zhong; Xu, Hong-Bin; Suo, Tao; Yang, Shu-Jun; Xie, Cong-Hua; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Locoregional spread of abdominopelvic malignant tumors frequently results in peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The prognosis of PC patients treated by conventional systemic chemotherapy is poor, with a median survival of < 6 mo. However, over the past three decades, an integrated treatment strategy of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) + hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been developed by the pioneering oncologists, with proved efficacy and safety in selected patients. Supported by several lines of clinical evidence from phases I, II and III clinical trials, CRS + HIPEC has been regarded as the standard treatment for selected patients with PC in many established cancer centers worldwide. In China, an expert consensus on CRS + HIPEC has been reached by the leading surgical and medical oncologists, under the framework of the China Anti-Cancer Association. This expert consensus has summarized the progress in PC clinical studies and systematically evaluated the CRS + HIPEC procedures in China as well as across the world, so as to lay the foundation for formulating PC treatment guidelines specific to the national conditions of China. PMID:27570426

  8. Quality of life after cytoreductive surgery plus early intraperitoneal postoperative chemotherapy for pseudomyxoma peritonei: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Per; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Nielsen, Mette B

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The modern treatment of pseudomyxoma peritonei is cytoreductive surgery plus intraperitoneal chemotherapy resulting in a survival of up to 70 percent after 20 years. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact on quality of life of this very aggressive treatment, which has not b...

  9. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  10. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  11. Anaesthetic management and perioperative outcomes of cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana P Balakrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC is becoming the standard treatment option for peritoneal carcinomatosis but is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to retrospectively analyse and evaluate intra-operative factors associated with morbidity and mortality of CRS and HIPEC. Methods: Intra-operative data were collected for cases done over 1 year (24 cases and analysed for the primary outcome of post-operative ventilation >24 h, and secondary outcome of length of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay >5 days. Statistical analysis was carried out in STATA 11 software. Results: Higher peritoneal carcinoma index (PCI, (P = 0.0047, longer duration of surgery (P = 0.0016, higher delta temperatures (P = 0.0119, increased estimated blood loss (EBL (P = 0.0054, high intraoperative fluid requirement (P = 0.0038, lower mean arterial pressure (MAP (P = 0.0021 and higher blood products requirement were associated with >24 h ventilation. These factors were also associated with longer ICU stay. All these factors associated with >24 h ventilation and prolonged ICU stay are related to the PCI which is an indicator of the extent of surgery. Conclusion: Higher PCI, longer duration of surgery, higher delta temperatures, increased EBL, high intraoperative fluid requirement, lower mean arterial pressure and higher blood products requirement were associated with >24 h postoperative ventilation as well as ICU stay >5 days. All these factors are related to the PCI, which is a major predictor of post-operative morbidity.

  12. Use of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy and Embolization Before Limb Salvage Surgery for Osteosarcoma of the Lower Extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huojun; Yang Jijin; Lu Jianping; Lai Chaojen; Sheng Jin; Li Yuxiao; Hao Qiang; Zhang Shunmin; Gupta, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    We report our experience with the use of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before limb salvage surgery in patients with osteosarcoma of the lower extremity. We evaluated the effect of this procedure on the degree of tumor necrosis and on the amount of blood loss during surgery. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who received intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before undergoing limb salvage surgery for osteosarcoma of the lower extremity at our institution between January 2003 and April 2008. Patient demographic, tumor characteristics, treatment details, postembolization complications, and surgical and pathological findings were recorded for each patient. We evaluated the operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), and volume of blood transfusion during surgery and in the postoperative period in all patients in the study group. The same parameters were recorded for 65 other patients with lower extremity osteosarcoma who underwent limb salvage operation at our institution without undergoing preoperative intervention. The study included 47 patients (25 males and 22 females). Angiography showed that the tumors were hypervascular. Intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization were performed successfully, resulting in a substantial reduction or complete disappearance of tumor stain in all patients. No major complications were encountered. At the time of surgery, performed 3-7 days after embolization, a fibrous edematous band around the tumor was observed in 43 of the 47 patients, facilitating surgery. The goal of limb salvage was achieved successfully in all cases. Percentage tumor necrosis induced by treatment ranged from 70.2% to 94.2% (average, 82.9%). EBL during surgery, EBL from drains in the postoperative period, total EBL, and transfusion volumes were significantly lower in the 47 study patients compared to the 65 patients who underwent surgery without preoperative treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization. The

  13. Factors associated with thromboembolic events following cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenstreich, Amihai; Kalish, Yosef; Kleinstern, Geffen; Yaacov, Almog Ben; Dux, Joseph; Nissan, Aviram

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the risk factors, incidence, and role of thromboprophylaxis in the development of thrombosis following cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC). We reviewed data of patients with CRS/HIPEC in three hospitals. Overall, 192 patients underwent CRS/HIPEC during 2007-2016. Mechanical (thigh-length pneumatic compression stockings) and pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis (40 mg enoxaparin daily, starting 12 h before surgery until discharge) was provided for all patients; and 116 (60.4%) also received an extended course of enoxaparin for 2-4 weeks after discharge. Twenty-six patients experienced thrombotic complications (13.5%) including portal-splenic-mesenteric venous thrombosis (n = 11, 5.7%), pulmonary embolism (n = 10, 5.2%), and deep vein thrombosis (n = 5, 2.6%); most (n = 21, 80.8%) occurred after hospital discharge. Univariate analysis identified Peritoneal Cancer Index, intraoperative transfusion requirement, operative blood loss, operative time, lengths of hospital, and intensive care unit stay, and lack of administration of anticoagulation at discharge as significantly associated with thrombosis. With multivariate analysis, only the lack of anticoagulation therapy at discharge remained significantly associated with thrombosis (P = 0.0001). Thromboembolic complications are common following CRS/HIPEC. As significantly lower rates of thrombosis were found in patients who received an extended course of anticoagulation, we support its use for at least 2 weeks after discharge. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Initial Results of Retrospective Study: Preoperative Transurethral Excision Plus Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy and Trial of Bladder Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammal El-Deen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    For patients with invasive bladder cancer the usual recommended treatment is radical cystectomy, although transurethral resection of the tumor, systemic chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are each effective in some patients. This retrospective study evaluated the experience of the Clinical Oncology Department, Tanta University Hospital with combined modality treatment and selective bladder preservation in patients with muscle-invading bladder cancer with assessment of its safety, tolerance, and efficacy to determine whether these treatments in combination might be as effective as radical cystectomy and thus might allow the bladder to be preserved and the cancer cured and to identify factors that may predict treatment response, risk of relapse and survival. Patients and Methods: Between January 2000 and January 2006, 55 consecutive patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (stages T2 through T4, NX M0) were treated with as complete transurethral surgery as possible, followed by induction combination chemotherapy, and irradiation with 4500 cGy with concurrent cisplatin administration. Urologic evaluation by cystoscopy, cytology, and re biopsy 2-3 weeks later of the tumor response directed further therapy: either radical cystectomy in the patients who had incomplete responses, or additional chemotherapy with the same drugs and doses and radiotherapy up to 6480 cGy in the patients who had complete responses. The median follow-up was 48 months. Results: In 37 patients (67.3%) the bladder was free of invasive tumor and functioning well, even though in 13(23.6%) a superficial tumor recurred and required further transurethral surgery and intravesical drug therapy. Of the 18 (32.7%) patients who still had detectable tumor after initial treatment, all of them underwent radical cystectomy. None of the patients had required a cystectomy for radiation toxicity. Of the 37 (67.3%) patients who had complete responses with no tumor detectable on urine cytology or re biopsy after

  15. ROLES OF RADIATION DOSE AND CHEMOTHERAPY IN THE ETIOLOGY OF STOMACH CANCER AS A SECOND MALIGNANCY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W.; Aleman, Berthe M. P.; Besseling, Gijs; de Bruin, Marie L.; Hauptmann, Michael; van 't Veer, Mars B.; de Wit, Ronald; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated

  16. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral complications of chemotherapy and head/neck radiation are common and should be considered before, during, and after treatment. Learn about preventing and managing mouth and throat problems like dryness, taste changes, pain, and infection in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral complications of chemotherapy and head/neck radiation are common and should be considered and addressed before, during, and after treatment. Get detailed information about mucositis, salivary gland dysfunction, and taste changes, as well as psychosocial issues in this clinician summary.

  18. Preoperative Chemotherapy, Radiation Improve Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and his colleagues enrolled 368 patients who had cancer of the esophagus or of the junction between the stomach and the esophagus that had not spread to other organs. Participants in the ChemoRadiotherapy for Oesophageal cancer followed by Surgery Study (CROSS) were mostly men, ...

  19. Splenectomy Increases Postoperative Complications Following Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagbert, Francois; Thievenaz, Remy; Decullier, Evelyne; Bakrin, Naoual; Cotte, Eddy; Rousset, Pascal; Vaudoyer, Delphine; Passot, Guillaume; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Complete cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS + HIPEC) is increasingly performed on patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis of various origins. Splenectomy often is required in these patients to achieve complete tumor removal. Although splenectomy has been associated with increased morbidity in many major abdominal surgeries, its effect in patients undergoing CRS + HIPEC is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of splenectomy during CRS + HIPEC on postoperative outcomes. We retrospectively identified 39 patients who underwent CRS + HIPEC with splenectomy during a 3-year study period from a prospective database. We compared them to case controls (CRS + HIPEC without splenectomy) that were matched for the complexity of the procedure. We evaluated the complication rate and outcomes of patients in each group. During the study period, splenectomy was performed in 32 % of patients undergoing CRS + HIPEC procedure. Patients in the splenectomy group experienced more grade 3-4 complications than patients in the control group (59 vs. 35.9 %, p = 0.041) as well as more pulmonary complications (41 vs. 7.7 %, p = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis identified splenectomy as the only predictor of overall major complications (odds ratio = 2.57, 95 % confidence interval = 1.03-6.40). Mortality was similar in both groups. Splenectomy increases major complication rate in patients undergoing CRS + HIPEC and efforts should be made to preserve the spleen during the surgery.

  20. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced epithelial and recurrent ovarian carcinoma: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Maja J; Ceranic, Miljan S; Latincic, Stojan M; Sabljak, Predrag V; Kecmanovic, Dragutin M; Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2017-09-07

    With standard treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), prognosis is very poor. The aim of this study is to show early and late results in patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This was a retrospective single centre study. All patients with advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) or modified early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) were included in the study. In the period 1995-2014, 116 patients were treated, 55 with primary EOC and 61 with recurrent EOC. The mean age was 59 years (26-74). Statistically, median survival time was significantly longer in the group with primary advanced cancer of the ovary (41.3 months) compared to relapsed ovarian cancer (27.3 months). Survival for the primary EOC was 65 and 24% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Survival for recurrent EOC was 33 and 16% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Mortality was 1/116 (0.8%). Morbidity was 11/116 (9.5%). Peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was ≤20 in 59 (51%) patients and statistically, their average survival was significantly longer than in the group of 57 (49%) patients with PCI >20 (p = 0.014). In advanced or recurrent EOC, a curative therapeutic approach was pursued that combined optimal cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PCI and timing of the intervention (primary or recurrent) were the strongest independent prognostic factors.

  1. Effect of acyclovir on radiation- and chemotherapy-induced mouth lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubley, G.J.; Chapman, B.; Chapman, S.K.; Crumpacker, C.S.; Schnipper, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation therapy, if delivered to the oral mucosa, are associated with a high frequency of mouth lesions. The cause of this side effect is not known for certain, but in past studies it has sometimes been associated with the ability to culture herpes simplex virus type 1 from the mouth. In a double-blind prospective trial, patients with head and neck tumors treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were treated with either acyclovir or placebo. Although the frequency of culture-positive herpes simplex virus was low in the untreated group, it was significantly lower, zero, in the acyclovir-treated group. However, there were no differences in the frequency or type of mouth lesions experienced by patients receiving either radiation or chemotherapy who were taking acyclovir or placebo. These results suggest that herpes simplex virus is not a frequent cause or complication of oral lesions afflicting this patient population

  2. Effect of integrated surgery + radiotherapy + chemotherapy treatment on survival status and serum indexes in patients with gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Li Wei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of integrated surgery + radiotherapy + chemotherapy treatment on the survival status and serum indexes in patients with gallbladder carcinoma. Methods: A total of 68 patients with gallbladder carcinoma were divided into observation group (received integrated surgery + radiotherapy + chemotherapy treatment and control group (received surgery + radiotherapy according to different treatments. Differences in the content of tumor markers, growth factors and adhesion molecules in serum as well as the median survival time and survival rate in 5 years of follow-up were compared between the two groups 1 month after treatment. Results: Tumor markers β2-MG, CA19-9, CA242, CA125, CA724, CEA and AFP content in serum of observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those of control group; growth factors VEGF, FGF, EGFR and HER2 content in serum were significantly lower than those of control group while IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 content were significantly higher than those of control group; adhesion molecules E-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and sE-Cd content in serum were significantly lower than those of control group; the median survival time of 5-year follow-up as well as 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rate were significantly greater than those of control group. Conclusions: Integrated treatment of surgery + radiotherapy + chemotherapy can optimize the short-term and long-term curative effect in patients with gallbladder carcinoma.

  3. Glioblastoma: single institutional experience with 48 patients treated with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; Glioblastoma: experiencia uni-institucional com 48 pacientes tratados com cirurgia, radioterapia e quimioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potamianos, Carina Fernandes; Souza, Paulo Gustavo Cavalcanti de; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo SP, (Brazil). Setor de Radioterapia], e-mail: segreto.dmed@epm.br; Malheiros, Suzana Maria Fleury [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia-Neurocirurgia

    2009-01-15

    Objective: to identify prognostic factors and evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with glioblastoma treated with surgery and radiotherapy combined or not with chemotherapy. Material and method: in this retrospective study, 48 patients with glioblastoma were treated between 1997 and 2007. All patients were classified according the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) criteria. Results: the majority of patients were female, with 50 years of age or above. Performance status of 70 or greater were found in 70.8% of cases, and RPA classes V and VI prevailed. Seventy-two percent of patients were submitted to partial resection and 27.1% to total or subtotal resection. Chemotherapy was administered in 47.9% of patients and doses between 50 and 60 Gy were delivered in 72.9%. The median overall survival was 52 weeks. Conclusion: our data show an overall survival that approaches the related in others reports and were dependent of factors such as chemotherapy, dose of radiation and Karnofsky performance status. (author)

  4. Importance of Absent Neoplastic Epithelium in Patients Treated With Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enblad, Malin; Birgisson, Helgi; Wanders, Alkwin; Sköldberg, Filip; Ghanipour, Lana; Graf, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    The importance of absent neoplastic epithelium in specimens from cytoreductive surgery (CRS) is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and prognostic value of histopathology without neoplastic epithelium in patients treated with CRS and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Data were extracted from medical records and histopathology reports for patients treated with initial CRS and HIPEC at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden, between 2004 and 2012. Patients with inoperable disease and patients undergoing palliative non-CRS surgery were excluded from the study. Patients lacking neoplastic epithelium in surgical specimens from CRS, with or without mucin, were classified as "neoplastic epithelium absent" (NEA), and patients with neoplastic epithelium were classified as "neoplastic epithelium present" (NEP). The study observed NEA in 78 of 353 patients (22 %). Mucin was found in 28 of the patients with NEA. For low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms and adenomas, the 5-year overall survival rate was 100 % for NEA and 84 % for NEP, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100 % for NEA and 59 % for NEP. For appendiceal/colorectal adenocarcinomas (including tumors of the small intestine), the 5-year overall survival rate was 61 % for NEA and 38 % for NEP, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 60 % for NEA and 14 % for NEP. Carcinoembryonic antigen level, peritoneal cancer index, and completeness of the cytoreduction score were lower in patients with NEA. A substantial proportion of patients undergoing CRS and HIPEC have NEA. These patients have a favorable prognosis and a decreased risk of recurrence. Differences in patient selection can affect the proportion of NEA and hence explain differences in survival rates between reported series.

  5. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Orthopedic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Elzaki, A.; Sam, A.K.; Sulieman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of orthopedic procedures requiring the use of the fluoroscopic guidance has increased over the recent years. Consequently the patient exposed to un avoidable radiation doses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate patient radiation dose during these procedures.37 patients under went dynamic hip screw (DHS) and dynamic cannulated screw (DCS) were evaluated using calibrated Thermolumincent Dosimeters (TLDs), under carm fluoroscopic machines ,in three centers in Khartoum-Sudan. The mean Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was 7.9 m Gy per procedure. The bone marrow and gonad organ exposed to significant doses. No correlation was found between ESD and Body Mass Index (BMI), or patient weight. Well correlation was found between kilo voltage applied and ESD. Orthopedic surgeries delivered lower radiation dose to patients than cardiac catheterization or hysterosalpingraphy (HSG) procedures. More study should be implemented to follow radiation dose before surgery and after surgery

  6. Incidence and predictors of postoperative delirium after cytoreduction surgery-hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plas, Matthijs; Hemmer, Patrick H J; Been, Lukas B; van Ginkel, Robert J; de Bock, Geertruida H; van Leeuwen, Barbara L

    2018-02-01

    Incidence of, and baseline characteristics associated with delirium in patients after cytoreduction surgery-hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC), were subject of investigation. The study was conducted among a consecutive series of prospectively included patients who underwent CRS-HIPEC at the University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands, between February 2006 and January 2015. A chart-based instrument for delirium during hospitalization was used to identify patients with symptoms of delirium who were not diagnosed by a psychiatrist during admission. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Data of 136 patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 60 years (range: 18-76) and 50 (37%) patients were male. During hospitalization, 38 (28%) patients were diagnosed with delirium. Factors that differed significantly between the patients with and without delirium by univariate analysis were included in multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that after adjustment for age and complications other than delirium, having three or more organs resected and the CRP serum levels were independent predictors for delirium (OR: 3.97; 95% 1.24-12.76; OR: 1.01; 95% 1-1.01, respectively). This report shows an incidence of 28% of delirium, occurring after CRS-HIPEC and suggests a role for systemic inflammation in the development of postoperative delirium. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Systemic Chemotherapy using FLOT - Regimen Combined with Cytoreductive Surgery plus HIPEC for Treatment of Peritoneal Metastasized Gastric Cancer. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H; Hotopp, Th; Tofeili, A; Wutke, K

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the feasibility and the effectiveness of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by cytoreductive surgery (CRS), hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) followed by systemic chemotherapyand in patients with peritoneal carciriomatosis (PC) from gastric cancer. Twenty six (median age 53 years, range 39 - 71) were scheduled for three cycles of neoadjuvant systemic chemotherapy using bi-weekly FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC. Thereafter 3 additional cycles of FLOT were given. During HIPEC in Colliseum technique Oxaliplatin was given in a dosage of 200 mg/m2 and Docetaxel in a dosage of 80 mg/m2. All patients underwent cytoreductive surgery plus HIPEC. Peritoneal Cancer index was > 15 in 3 cases only. Complete resection could be carried out in all cases (CC-O 18, CC-18). Postoperative complication rate was 23% with no mortality within 30 days. Anastomotic leakage rate was 3.2%. Overall survival was 19.0 months with a 2-year survival rate 38%. Regression analysis demonstrated a Peritoneal Cancer Index PCI > 12 as negative factor for survival. Neoadju- vant chemotherapy using FLOT - protocol followed by CRS + HIPEC seems to be associated with prolonged OS in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer. This treatment is not recommended for patients with extensive peritoneal involvement and PCI > 12.

  8. Combination of bronchial artery infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuping; Cai Yuecheng; Wang Xiangming; Luo Jianyun; Lian Yingni; Ouyang Mingxin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy between bronchial artery infusion (BAI) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy plus radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: One hundred and twenty-one patients with stage III NSCLC were randomized into treatment group (58 cases) and control group (63 cases). In the treatment group, all patients were administered with BAI for 2-3 sessions, followed by irradiation 4-7 days after BAI. In the control group, altogether 4-6 cycles of standard systemic chemotherapy were given. Radiation was delivered alternately between the cycles of chemotherapy. Results: The short-term, long-term survival, median response duration and median survival time were similar between the two groups, except patients with stage IIIb who had a higher distant metastasis rate in the treatment group. The major side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy were hematological, gastrointestinal toxicities, pneumonitis, mediastinitis, and esophagitis, respectively. The side effects were milder, better tolerated and did not influence the regimen schedule in the treatment group, as compared with the control group. Seven patients withdrew from the control group, and in 28 patients, the scheduled chemotherapy and radiation was delayed or canceled. Conclusions: Bronchial artery infusion plus radiation is more advantageous over systemic chemotherapy plus radiation in less toxicities, better compliance, shorter treatment courses and more cost-effectiveness

  9. Vascular Endothelial-Targeted Therapy Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Induces Inflammatory Intratumoral Infiltrates and Inhibits Tumor Relapses after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan F. Judy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS, cisplatin (cis, or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02. Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  10. Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Brendan F; Aliperti, Louis A; Predina, Jarrod D; Levine, Daniel; Kapoor, Veena; Thorpe, Philip E; Albelda, Steven M; Singhal, Sunil

    2012-04-01

    Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS), cisplatin (cis), or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02). Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  11. Radiation recall dermatitis after docetaxel chemotherapy. Treatment by antioxidant ointment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Freund, Ulrich; Momm, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute skin toxicity caused by different anticancer or antibiotic drugs within a former completely healed irradiation field. Predictive factors for RRD are not known and its mechanisms are not completely understood. A case of RRD induced by docetaxel and successfully treated by an antioxidant ointment (Mapisal registered ) is presented here. Such an ointment might be useful not only in RRD therapy, but also in the treatment of high-grade dermatitis induced by radiotherapy and thus may contribute to the improvement of patients' quality of life and to the scheduled completion of cancer therapies. (orig.) [de

  12. Monstrous cell in malignant gliomas. In relation to radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogashiwa, M; Takeuchi, K; Akai, K [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1981-06-01

    The pathological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy have been studied in 9 autopsy cases of malignant and low grade gliomas. The brains have been examined by means of the complete study technique. Many histological features have been related to surgery, grading of histological classification of gliomas, irradiation and chemotherapy. Following irradiation and chemotherapy, in addition to increased necrosis and vascular response, a variety of characteristic changes were observed in cell and nuclear morphology with prominent formation of monstrous cells in all of 5 malignant gliomas treated with nitrosourea. These monstrous cells had irregular and hyperchromatic multinuclei and showed cytoplasmic degeneration. These cells which had no direct relationship to vessels distributed both in the periphery of tumor or necrosis and in the white matter remote from the main tumor. These changes were more pronounced in autopsy than in biopsy. The features showed here indicate that the monstrous cells may appear due to the result of inhibition of tumor cell division at the late mitotic phase after irradiation and chemotherapy.

  13. Analysis of cortical bone porosity using synchrotron radiation microtomography to evaluate the effects of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Salata, C.; Mantuano, A.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    Microporosities play important biologic and mechanical roles on health. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to cortical bone changes. In the present work, the femur diaphysis of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D morphometric parameters using synchrotron radiation microtomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur diaphysis of rats.

  14. Radiation Therapy to the Primary and Postinduction Chemotherapy MIBG-Avid Sites in High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazloom, Ali; Louis, Chrystal U.; Nuchtern, Jed; Kim, Eugene; Russell, Heidi; Allen-Rhoades, Wendy; Krance, Robert; Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@mdanderson.org

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Although it is generally accepted that consolidation therapy for neuroblastoma includes irradiation of the primary site and any remaining metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-avid metastatic sites, limited information has been published regarding the efficacy of this approach. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with high-risk neuroblastoma were treated at 1 radiation therapy (RT) department after receiving 5 cycles of induction chemotherapy and resection. All patients had at least a partial response after induction therapy, based upon international neuroblastoma response criteria. The primary sites were treated with 24 to 30 Gy whereas the MIBG-avid metastatic sites were treated with 24 Gy. RT was followed by high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue and 6 months of cis-retinoic acid. Results: The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 48% and 59%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional control at the primary site was 84%. There were no differences in locoregional control according to degree of primary surgical resection. The 5-year local control rate for metastatic sites was 74%. The 5-year PFS rates for patients with 0, 1, 2, and >3 postinduction MIBG sites were 66%, 57%, 20%, and 0% (P<.0001), respectively, whereas 5-year OS rates were 80%, 57%, 50%, and 0%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: RT to the primary site and postinduction MIBG-positive metastatic sites was associated with 84% and 74% local control, respectively. The number of MIBG-avid sites present after induction chemotherapy and surgery was predictive of progression-free and overall survival.

  15. Roles of radiation dose and chemotherapy in the etiology of stomach cancer as a second malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W; Aleman, Berthe M P; Besseling, Gijs

    2009-01-01

    in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated...... of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects....

  16. Treatment with dixaphen for aborting neurotoxic response to radiation and chemotherapy in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legeza, V.I.; Korytova, L.I.; Rakhmilevich, B.M.; Rambovskij, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses a clinical trial of a newly-developed Soviet preparation - dixaphen which was administered to 40 patients who had received radiation and chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and tumors at other sites. A single intramuscular injection of 1.0 ml was found to abort emesis in 80-90% and asthenic syndrome - in 60-75%. The drug was well tolerated; it is recommended for treatment of malignant tumors

  17. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  18. A meta-analysis of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun He

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation can decrease the risk of recurrence and metastasis but not improve the 5 years overall survival and 5 years disease free survival compared to radiotherapy alone in the patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  19. Hypoxia and anemia: factors in decreased sensitivity to radiation therapy and chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Louis; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors that occurs across a wide variety of malignancies. Hypoxia and anemia (which contributes to tumor hypoxia) can lead to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy resistance by depriving tumor cells of the oxygen essential for the cytotoxic activities of these agents. Hypoxia may also reduce tumor sensitivity to radiation therapy and chemotherapy through one or more indirect mechanisms that include proteomic and genomic changes. These effects, in turn, can lead to increased invasiveness and metastatic potential, loss of apoptosis, and chaotic angiogenesis, thereby further increasing treatment resistance. Investigations of the prognostic significance of pretreatment tumor oxygenation status have shown that hypoxia (oxygen tension [pO(2)] value effect of hypoxia on standard cancer treatment, a variety of hypoxia- and anemia-targeted therapies have been studied in an effort to improve therapeutic effectiveness and patient outcomes. Early evidence from experimental and clinical studies suggests the administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) may enhance the effectiveness of radiation therapy and chemotherapy by increasing hemoglobin levels and ameliorating anemia in patients with disease- or treatment-related anemia. However, further research is needed in the area of hypoxia-related treatment resistance and its reversal.

  20. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for gingival carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Y.; Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Inoue, T.; Mitsudo, K.; Koizumi, T.; Oguri, S.; Kioi, M.; Tohnai, I.; Omura, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. In all, 34 patients (21 men and 13 women) with squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva underwent radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of daily external irradiation and concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion with cisplatin and docetaxel. A median total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was delivered to tumors. Of the 34 patients, 29 (85 %) achieved a complete response (CR) and 5 had residual tumors. Of the 29 patients with a CR, 2 had local recurrences and 1 had distant metastasis 1-15 months after treatment. Twenty-six of the 36 patients had survived at a median follow-up time of 36 months (range 12-79 months); 4 died of cancer and 4 died of non-cancer-related causes. At both 3 and 5 years after treatment, the overall survival rates were 79 % and the cause-specific survival rates were 85 %. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandibular bone only developed in 1 patient after treatment. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy was effective and safe in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. This treatment may be a promising curative and organ-preserving treatment option for gingival carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  1. Malignant Esophagogastric Junction Obstruction: Efficacy of Balloon Dilation Combined with Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi-Young; Song, Ho-Young; Hong, Heuk-Jin; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Seo, Tae-Seok; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for palliation of dysphagia due to malignant esophagogastric junction strictures. Methods: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was attempted in 20 patients. The causes of strictures were gastric adenocarcinoma (n = 10) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (n = 10). Scheduled chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy followed balloon dilation in all patients. Results: There were no technical failures or major complications. After balloon dilation, 15 (75%) patients showed improvement of dysphagia. No patient complained of reflux esophagitis during the follow-up period. Among the 15 patients, seven needed no further treatment for palliation of dysphagia until their deaths. The remaining eight patients underwent repeat balloon dilation(n = 4) or stent placement (n = 4)3-43 weeks (mean 15 weeks) after the initial balloon dilation because of recurrent dysphagia. Conclusion: Balloon dilation combined with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy seems to be an easy and reasonably effective palliative treatment for malignant esophagogastric strictures

  2. Whole abdomen radiation therapy after a short chemotherapy course and second-look laparotomy in advanced ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franchin, G.; Tumolo, S.; Scarabelli, C.; De Paoli, A.; Boz, G.; Crivellari, D.; Arcicasa, M.; Bortolus, R.; Gobitti, C.; Minatel, E.

    1991-01-01

    From April 1983 through December 1989, 42 consecutive patients with diagnosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma were initially managed by aggressive surgery and three courses of endoperitoneal cis-platinum-based chemotherapy followed by an alternating combination chemotherapy and second-look laparotomy. Patients with residual tumor less than or equal to 2 cm subsequently received whole abdominal radiation therapy (WAR). Twenty-eight patients (42% with no residual disease, 21% with microscopic disease, and 36% with residual disease less than 2 cm) were eligible for WAR. WAR was delivered using an open-field technique up to 22 Gy in 20 fractions followed by a pelvic boost of 18 Gy in 10 fractions. The kidneys were shielded posteriorly at 1100 cGy; hepatic shields were not added. One patient did not complete WAR for lung metastases after 5 radiotherapy fractions. The complete treatment program lasted 8 months (range, 6.8-11). The median follow-up of the 28 patients entered into the study was 50 months. Eight patients are alive and disease-free at 5 years. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 5 years are 45 and 30%, respectively. All but 2 patients relapsed within the abdominopelvic cavity and 3 developed brain metastases. Toxic effects, during WAR, required treatment interruption in all but 4 patients: 3 developed a small bowel obstruction requiring surgery and 1 died of surgical complications in complete remission. The poor disease-free survival and the severe toxicity encountered have been valid indications that WAR should be discontinued as a treatment modality in advanced ovarian cancer at the authors department

  3. The effects of multidisciplinary therapies, surgery plus gemcitabine, cisplatin and paclitaxel (GCP) chemotherapy, against advanced urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Saika, Takashi; Fujio, Kei

    2008-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy with Gemcitabine, Cisplatin and Paclitaxel (GCP) is an active and well-tolerated combination for the treatment of advanced urothelial carcinoma. There is no evidence that multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, can improve survival for patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the tolerability and efficacy of multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, against advanced urothelial carcinoma. In this institution, patients (pts) with histologically verified advanced urothelial carcinoma received 2-4 cycles of gemcitabine 1,200 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8, cisplatin 70 mg/m 2 on day 1, and paclitaxel 80 mg/m 2 on days 1 and 8 prior or subsequent to surgery. Radiologic response was evaluated with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Between May 2003 and Oct 2007, 19 pts (8 pts as neoadjuvant therapy (group A) and 11 as adjuvant therapy (group B)) were analyzed. Median age was 57 years. All pts had Performance Status 0 or 1. Initial tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) stage was T3-4 N0 M0 in 5, T any N1-2 M0 in 9 and T any N any M1 in 5 pts. The chemotherapy was well tolerated with infrequent grade III/IV toxicity (neutropenia in 6 and anemia in 2, thrombocytopenia in 4 patients). Median follow-up was 18 months (4-47). By Oct 2007, 18 pts had undergone radical surgery (9 pts radical cystectomy, 8 pts nephroureterectomy, and 1 pt retroperitoneal lymph node dissection). In group A, the radiologic response rate was documented in 6 out of 8 accessible pts (75%), including 1 complete response (CR) and 1 pathological CR. Two out of 8 pts (25%) relapsed and died. In group B, 6 pts out 11 (55%) relapsed and 2 (18%) died of the cancer. Median estimated progression-free survival and median overall survival were 15.4 months and 19.9 months respectively. Multidisciplinary therapy, surgery plus GCP chemotherapy, is effective and tolerable even in cases of metastatic urothelial carcinoma. A

  4. Multimodality treatment including postoperative radiation and concurrent chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is feasible and effective in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.F.; Bitter, K.; Mose, S.; Boettcher, H.D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: to examine the feasibility and efficacy of weekly docetaxel with concurrent radiation as postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Patients and methods: 94 patients (Table 1) with primary resectable squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (UICC stage I 14%, II 15%, III 18%, IV 53%; Table 2) were treated with a multimodality therapy program consisting of neoadjuvant intra-arterial high-dose chemotherapy (cisplatin 150 mg/m 2 with parallel systemic sodium thiosulfate 9 g/m 2 for neutralization), followed by surgery of the primary and neck, and postoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel (20-30 mg/m 2 ; Table 3). Chronic toxicities were followed over a period of 5 years. Results: at a median follow-up of 4 years, the 5-year survival rate for all 94 patients was 80%, and disease-free survival was 73% (Figures 1 and 2). Among patients with advanced disease (stage III and IV), survival was 83 and 59%, respectively (Figure 4). Grade 3 and 4 mucositis was the main acute toxicity necessitating supportive care. Long-term toxicity appears to be moderate (Table 4). The maximum tolerated dose of weekly docetaxel was 25 mg/m 2 . Conclusions: concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with weekly docetaxel is a feasible postoperative treatment in a multimodality approach to oral and oropharyngeal cancer, resulting in high overall and disease-free survival. This approach warrants further evaluation in prospective randomized trials. (orig.)

  5. Role of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy After Surgery for Abdominal Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Vincent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bergonie Institute, Bordeaux (France); Honore, Charles [Department of Digestive Surgery, Gustave-Roussy Institute, Paris (France); Orbach, Daniel; Helfre, Sylvie [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Ducassou, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitary Cancer Institute, Toulouse (France); Thomas, Laurence [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bergonie Institute, Bordeaux (France); Levitchi, Mihai-Barbu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Alexis-Vautrin Center, Nancy (France); Mervoyer, Augustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancerologie de l' ouest Institute, Nantes (France); Naji, Salem [Department of Radiation Oncology, Paoli-Calmette Institute, Marseille (France); Dupin, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitary Hospital, Bordeaux (France); Bosco-Levy, Pauline J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bergonie Institute, Bordeaux (France); Philippe-Chomette, Pascale [Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Hôpital Robert Debré, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Kantor, Guy; Henriques de Figueiredo, Benedicte [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bergonie Institute, Bordeaux (France); Sunyach, Marie-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leon-Berard Center, Lyon (France); Sargos, Paul, E-mail: p.sargos@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bergonie Institute, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic role of adjuvant abdominal radiation therapy (RT) on oncologic outcomes as a part of multimodal treatment in the management of desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to determine its impact according to the quality of surgical resection. Methods and Materials: All patients treated for primary abdominal DSRCT in 8 French centers from 1991 to 2014 were included. Patients were retrospectively staged into 3 groups: group A treated with adjuvant RT after cytoreductive surgery, group B without RT after cytoreductive surgery, and group C by exclusive chemotherapy. Peritoneal progression-free survival (PPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. We also performed a direct comparison between groups A and B to evaluate RT after cytoreductive surgery. Radiation therapy was also evaluated according to completeness of surgery: complete cytoreductive surgery (CCS) or incomplete cytoreductive surgery (ICS). Results: Thirty-seven (35.9%), thirty-six (34.9%), and thirty (28.0%) patients were included in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Three-year OS was 61.2% (range, 41.0%-76.0%), 37.6% (22.0%-53.1%), and 17.3% (6.3%-32.8%) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. Overall survival, PPFS, and PFS differed significantly among the 3 groups (P<.001, P<.001, and P<.001, respectively). Overall survival and PPFS were higher in group A (RT group) compared with group B (no RT group) (P=.045 and P=.006, respectively). Three-year PPFS was 23.8% (10.3%-40.4%) for group A and 12.51% (4.0%-26.2%) for group B. After CCS, RT improved PPFS (P=.024), but differences in OS and PFS were not significant (P=.40 and P=.30, respectively). After ICS, RT improved OS (P=.044). A trend of PPFS and PFS increase was observed, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=.073 and P=.076). Conclusions: Adjuvant RT as part of multimodal treatment seems to confer oncologic benefits for patients treated for abdominal DSRCT

  6. Radiation recall dermatitis after docetaxel chemotherapy. Treatment by antioxidant ointment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Freund, Ulrich; Momm, Felix [Ortenau-Klinikum Offenburg-Gengenbach Lehrkrankenhaus der Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg i. Br., Radio-Onkologie, Offenburg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute skin toxicity caused by different anticancer or antibiotic drugs within a former completely healed irradiation field. Predictive factors for RRD are not known and its mechanisms are not completely understood. A case of RRD induced by docetaxel and successfully treated by an antioxidant ointment (Mapisal {sup registered}) is presented here. Such an ointment might be useful not only in RRD therapy, but also in the treatment of high-grade dermatitis induced by radiotherapy and thus may contribute to the improvement of patients' quality of life and to the scheduled completion of cancer therapies. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlen-Recall-Dermatitis (RRD) ist eine akute Hauttoxizitaet, die durch verschiedene Chemotherapeutika oder Antibiotika innerhalb eines frueheren, komplett abgeheilten Bestrahlungsfelds hervorgerufen wird. Praediktive Faktoren fuer die RRD sind nicht bekannt und ihr Mechanismus ist nicht vollstaendig geklaert. Es wird ein Fallbericht einer durch Docetaxel induzierten RRD dargestellt, die erfolgreich mit einer antioxidativen Salbe (Mapisal {sup registered}) behandelt wurde. Solche Salben koennten nicht nur zur Therapie der RRD, sondern auch bei der Behandlung einer akuten Dermatitis waehrend der Strahlentherapie nuetzlich sein und damit zur Verbesserung der Lebensqualitaet der Patienten und zur planmaessigen Durchfuehrung der Tumortherapie beitragen. (orig.)

  7. Postoperative treatment of malignant tumors of the parotid gland: radiotherapy, concomitant chemotherapy and radiation therapy; Tumeurs malignes de la parotide: prise en charge multidisciplinaire, role de la radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyon, A.; Durdux, C.; Housset, M. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Hans, S. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' ORL et de Chirurgie de la Face et du Cou, 75 - Paris (France)

    2007-12-15

    The low incidence, the wide histological spectrum and the natural, sometimes slow, evolution of malignant parotid gland tumours do not allow to easily establish the impact of their treatments. At present, clinical data come from retrospective cohort analysis, whereas randomized phase II-III trials are confidential. Moreover conclusions from these studies are controversial. We present here the therapeutic highlights of parotid cancers: surgery, with the particular concern of facial nerve preservation; and adjuvant treatment essentially based on radiotherapy. This review focused on adjuvant care explores the indications and the technical aspects of radiation, as well as the role of concurrent chemotherapy. (authors)

  8. Primary management of esophageal carcinoma with radiation therapy and surgery and correlation of failure pattern based on autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.M.; Goertz, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a study of forty-seven patients with esophageal carcinoma who were treated definitively with radiation therapy (n = 18) and radical surgery (n = 18) or received palliative treatment (n = 11) at the Medical College of Virginia between 1967 and 1982. The average intervals between diagnosis and death were 5, 7, and 4 months, respectively. Autopsy revealed that 80% with radiation therapy and 50% in the surgery group had persistent local-regional disease. Eleven of 36 had adrenal metastasis and eight of 36 had a second primary in the head, neck, lung or prostate. The data show a significant incidence of persistent disease in spite of negative surgical margins. Additional treatment with chemotherapy or postoperative radiation therapy should be considered

  9. Laparoscopic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for refractory malignant ascites in patients unsuitable for cytoreductive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, S J; Alzahrani, N A; Alzahrani, S E; Liauw, W; Morris, D L

    2015-11-01

    Malignant ascites (MA) is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity of patients with intraperitoneal dissemination of their disease and is associated with a short life expectancy. The most common clinical feature is a progressive increase of abdominal distention resulting in pain, discomfort, anorexia and dyspnoea. Currently, no treatment is established standard of care due to limited efficacy or considerable toxicity. The objective was to examine the efficacy of laparoscopic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in the palliation of refractory MA in patients who were unsuitable for cytoreductive surgery. From May 2009 to June 2015, 12 patients with MA due to their peritoneal malignancy were treated with laparoscopic HIPEC. The time between operation and repeat paracentesis, in-hospital data, and the proportion of patients that did not require repeat paracentesis was analyzed. One patient (8%) was admitted to ICU for 1 day. The mean operating time and hospital stay was 149.3 min (range 79-185) and 4.6 days (range 2-11) respectively. Neither high-grade morbidity nor mortality was observed. The median OS was 57 days. In our experience, a complete and definitive disappearance of MA was observed in 83% of patients. Two patients (17%) developed recurrent MA 124 days and 283 days post-HIPEC. Laparoscopic HIPEC is a beneficial treatment for the management and palliation of refractory MA and results in an excellent clinical and radiological resolution in patients with a complete resolution observed in selected patients. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy followed by surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kies, Merrill S; Boatright, Dowin H; Li, Guojun; Blumenschein, George; El-Naggar, Adel K; Brandon Gunn, G; Lewin, Jan S; Steinhaus, Ganene D; Sturgis, Erich M

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a phase II clinical trial of induction chemotherapy followed by surgery ± radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT) in young adults. From September 2001 to October 2004, 23 patients aged 18 to 49 years with clinical T2-3 N0-2 M0 SCCOT and no prior radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or neck dissection underwent induction chemotherapy (paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and carboplatin) followed by glossectomy and neck dissection ± radiotherapy and chemotherapy. On final surgical pathology, 9 patients (39%) had a complete/major (2 complete) histologic response at the primary tumor site; 8 patients (35%) had no response or progression. Similarly, 9 patients (39%) had a complete response in the neck or remained node negative; 6 patients (26%) had an increase in nodal category. No treatment-associated deaths occurred, and toxicity was modest. At a median follow-up from the end of treatment of 52 months (minimum, 23 months), 10 patients (43%) developed recurrence, and all 10 died of cancer. Crude recurrence/cancer death rates were associated with ≤ a partial response at the tongue (p = .029), poor histologic differentiation (p = .012), and multiple adverse features on final surgical pathology (p = .040). Response rates and overall survival with this induction chemotherapy regimen were limited, but complete/major response at the tongue was associated with excellent prognosis. Additionally, improved patient selection and predictive tumor biomarkers will be needed for induction chemotherapy to be routinely incorporated into the treatment of oral tongue cancer in young adults. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Esophageal Metastasis to the Iris Effectively Palliated Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Adjuvant Intravitreal Chemotherapy: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sughosh Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of isolated iris metastasis from esophageal adenocarcinoma that was successfully managed with local application of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and adjunctive intravitreal therapy. A 53-year-old man with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma achieved a complete clinical and radiographic response after surgery and chemotherapy. Four months later, he developed headache and decreased vision and was diagnosed with metastasis to the iris by slit-lamp examination. The decrease in vision was secondary to cystoid macular edema. The metastatic tumor and the patient’s symptoms resolved after treatment with SBRT and intravitreal injections of bevacizumab and triamcinolone. We conclude that SBRT combined with intravitreal chemotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated palliative treatment for metastasis of esophageal adenocarcinoma to the iris.

  12. Radiation therapy and arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokodate, Hirofumi; Saito, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Horikawa, Masahiro; Takamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The standard therapy is not yet established for the unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer (AGC). Here described is the outcome of authors' therapeutic protocol for AGC during the time Jan., 1989-Dec., 2008. Subjects are 73 patients (M 32/F 41, average age 65 y) with AGC of Stage IV. One shot arterial infusion (AI) of EEP regimen (etoposide (VP16)/4'epiadriamycin (EPIR)/cisplatin (CDDP)) is conducted via hepatic artery proper or common at the first angiography and one week later, external radiation therapy (RT), with about 30-50 Gy/6 fractions (actually, 12-61.6 Gy). AI is weekly done with FP regimen (CDDP/5-fluorouracil (FU)) through the reservoir indwelled in the gastroduodenal artery for 6 months where a metal stent for the stegnosis of bile duct is used if necessary after RT, and in recent days, additionally with biweekly CDDP/gemcitabin (GEM) regimen depending on patient's state after FP. As a result, RT is conducted to 62 cases (RT alone 8 cases), AI, 64 (alone, 10), and RT+AI, 54. Response is found to be 49% (CR 7 cases and PR, 28). Survivals 1- and 3-year are 39 and 6%, respectively, and average survival time, 408 days. Survival rate in (RT+AI) is significantly superior to that in AI alone and in RT alone. Prognosis in patients with jaundice, hepatic or duodenal invasion is significantly inferior to those without the symptom, and in non-responded cases, to responded cases. Complications like hepatic abscess are seen in 4 cases at 6 months after treatment. Four actual case-reports are presented in details with their images. Combination of RT+AI is suggested to be of utility for AGC, of which multi-center trial is awaited with addition of newer anti-cancers developed recently. (K.T.)

  13. Uses of chemotherapy together with radiation, and its biological basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ikuo; Terashima, Toyozo

    1978-01-01

    Effect of use of anticancer drugs together with radiation, especially effects of Actinomycin D (AMD), Bleomycin (BLM), and Adriamycin (Ad) which seemed to have synergistic effect, and other substances which have possibility to have synergistic effect were described. It was clarified that AMD out of them showed synergistic effect to inhibit repair of sublethel damage induced by irradiation in addition to anticancer effect itself. Therefore, it is thought that use of AMD is effective especially to cancer with high radioresistance and it is better to administer this drug just before or just after irradiation. It seems to be better to administer at one time with high concentration in the allowable range. It is difficult to come to a conclusion as to BLM and Ad, generalized as well as the conclusion of AMD, but it seems to be better to use BLM and Ad together with irradiation at the same time. As BLM is highly effective especially to epithelial cells, it must be necessary to investigate whether there is a difference of characteristics between cells. In any case, there are two great factors, the concentration and action time (containing the time remaining in vivo) of drugs, and moreover, another factor, time relation to irradiation is added. Therefore, an experiment schedule is complicated so much, and it is important to study quantitatively on the basis of systematic experimental plan. As to clinical application of them, it is necessary to perform an experiment in vitro which is exullent in estimation and an experiment in vivo which certified the effects in keeping organic cooperation. (Tsunoda, M.)

  14. Prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and survival using pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji-In; Ha, Seunggyun; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Keun-Wook [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye-Seung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho-Young [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate metabolic and textural parameters from pretreatment [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans for the prediction of neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy response and 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We performed a retrospective review of 74 patients diagnosed with LARC who were initially examined with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT, and who underwent neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy followed by complete resection. The standardized uptake value (mean, peak, and maximum), metabolic volume (MV), and total lesion glycolysis of rectal cancer lesions were calculated using the isocontour method with various thresholds. Using three-dimensional textural analysis, about 50 textural features were calculated for PET images. Response to neoadjuvant radiation chemotherapy, as assessed by histological tumour regression grading (TRG) after surgery and 3-year DFS, was evaluated using univariate/multivariate binary logistic regression and univariate/multivariate Cox regression analyses. MVs calculated using the thresholds mean standardized uptake value of the liver + two standard deviations (SDs), and mean standard uptake of the liver + three SDs were significantly associated with TRG. Textural parameters from histogram-based and co-occurrence analysis were significantly associated with TRG. However, multivariate analysis revealed that none of these parameters had any significance. On the other hand, MV calculated using various thresholds was significantly associated with 3-year DFS, and MV calculated using a higher threshold tended to be more strongly associated with 3-year DFS. In addition, textural parameters including kurtosis of the absolute gradient (GrKurtosis) were significantly associated with 3-year DFS. Multivariate analysis revealed that GrKurtosis could be a prognostic factor for 3-year DFS. Metabolic and textural parameters from initial [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scans could be indexes to assess

  15. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for gingival carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Y.; Hata, M.; Koike, I.; Inoue, T. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Mitsudo, K.; Koizumi, T.; Oguri, S.; Kioi, M.; Tohnai, I. [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Omura, M. [Shonankamakura General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kamakura, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this study was to review the efficacy and toxicity of radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. In all, 34 patients (21 men and 13 women) with squamous cell carcinoma of the gingiva underwent radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of daily external irradiation and concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion with cisplatin and docetaxel. A median total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was delivered to tumors. Of the 34 patients, 29 (85 %) achieved a complete response (CR) and 5 had residual tumors. Of the 29 patients with a CR, 2 had local recurrences and 1 had distant metastasis 1-15 months after treatment. Twenty-six of the 36 patients had survived at a median follow-up time of 36 months (range 12-79 months); 4 died of cancer and 4 died of non-cancer-related causes. At both 3 and 5 years after treatment, the overall survival rates were 79 % and the cause-specific survival rates were 85 %. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandibular bone only developed in 1 patient after treatment. Radiation therapy with concurrent retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy was effective and safe in the treatment of gingival carcinoma. This treatment may be a promising curative and organ-preserving treatment option for gingival carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel dieser Studie war die Ueberpruefung der Effizienz und Toxizitaet einer Strahlenbehandlung des Gingivakarzinoms mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Insgesamt 34 Patienten (21 Maenner und 13 Frauen) mit Zahnfleischplattenzellkarzinom erhielten eine Strahlenbehandlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Chemotherapie. Die Behandlung umfasste eine taegliche externe Bestrahlung mit gleichzeitiger retrograder, superselektiver intraarterieller Infusion von Cisplatin und

  16. Comparative Investigation of Postoperative Complications in Patients With Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy or Surgery Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Jensen, L.B.; Larsson, H.

    2016-01-01

    complications of patients with cancer at the gastroesophageal junction treated with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or surgery alone in patients from "The Danish Clinical Registry of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach." MATERIALS AND METHODS: A historical follow-up study......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Gastroesophageal junction cancer is one of the leading causes to cancer-related death and the prognosis is poor. However, progress has been made over the last couple of decades with the introduction of multimodality treatment and optimized surgery. Three-year survival rates have...... of Carcinomas of the Esophagus, the Gastro-Esophageal Junction and the Stomach. No difference was found in demographics between the two groups, except for alcohol consumption and a lower T and N stage in the surgery-only group, and no difference in complication rates was found. Furthermore, no variable...

  17. Assessing residual cancer cells using MRI and US after preoperative chemotherapy in primary breast cancer to omit surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Madoka; Sawaki, Masataka; Hattori, Masaya; Yoshimura, Akiyo; Ishiguro, Junko; Kotani, Haruru; Gondo, Naomi; Adachi, Yayoi; Kataoka, Ayumi; Onishi, Sakura; Sugino, Kayoko; Iwata, Hiroji

    2018-04-04

    Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) are used to assess residual lesions after preoperative chemotherapy before surgery. However, residual lesion assessments based on preoperative imaging often differ from postoperative pathologic diagnoses. We retrospectively reviewed the accuracy of preoperative residual lesion assessments, including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cases to find criteria for cases in which surgery can be omitted. We reviewed 201 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and surgery in our hospital from January 2013 to November 2016. Presurgical evaluations regarding the possible existence of residual lesions, and clinical Complete Response (cCR) or non-cCR, were compared with postoperative pathological diagnoses. Of the 201 patients, 52 were diagnosed with cCR, and 39 with pathological complete response (pCR). Predictions for residual lesions were 86.4% sensitive, 76.9% specific, and 84.6% accurate. When patients were divided into 4 groups by estrogen receptor (ER) and HER2 status, sensitivity in each group was ER + /HER2 - : 91.4%; ER - /HER2 - : 94.1%; ER + /HER2 + : 78.6%; and ER - /HER2 + : 78.5%. Of the 22 patients preoperatively assessed with cCR, but diagnosed with non-pCR, the median invasive residual tumor size was 2 mm (range 0-46 mm); 5 patients (22.7%) had only DCIS. Predicting residual lesions after preoperative chemotherapy by using MRI and US is a reasonable strategy. However, current methods are inadequate for identifying patients who can omit surgery; therefore, a new strategy for detecting small tumors in these patients is needed.

  18. Combining chemotherapy and/or hyperthermia with radiation in the treatment of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douple, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation survival curves for some but not all human melanoma cells show broad shoulders and recovery of potentially lethal radiation damage (PLD), both in vitro and in situ as xenografts in mice. Studies have also demonstrated a significant hypoxic melanoma cell population. Chemotherapy and/or hyperthermia with radiation offers the potential for additive cell killing plus modification of the terminal slope and/or shoulder as a result of supra-additive killing via radiosensitization of hypoxic cells and/or post-irradiation inhibition of cellular recovery from PLD. Such interactions should provide a therapeutic gain factor, expecially if the long-term normal tissue damage is not based on PLD repair. Higher radiation doses per fraction warrant use of PLD recovery inhibitors and would accommodate a practical consideration for the use of fewer drug/heat doses. Peak heat or drug concentrations should probably be present just before and immediately following irradiation. This paper reviews the radiobiological experiments to support the rationale for the addition of chemotherapy and/or hyperthermia to melanoma. The author stresses the problems which remain including the paucity of appropriate preclinical experiments as well as clinical problems of tumor heterogeneity, pharmacokinetics and anatomy

  19. Systematic overview of preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiotherapy trials in oesophageal cancer: Evidence of a radiation and chemotherapy dose response

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    Geh, J. Ian; Bond, Simon J.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Glynne-Jones, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Numerous trials have shown that pathological complete response (pCR) following preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and surgery for oesophageal cancer is associated with improved survival. However, different radiotherapy doses and fractionations and chemotherapy drugs, doses and scheduling were used, which may account for the differences in observed pCR and survival rates. A dose-response relationship may exist between radiotherapy and chemotherapy dose and pCR. Patients and methods: Trials using a single radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimen (5FU, cisplatin or mitomycin C-based) and providing information on patient numbers, age, resection and pCR rates were eligible. The endpoint used was pCR and the covariates analysed were prescribed radiotherapy dose, radiotherapy dosexdose per fraction, radiotherapy treatment time, prescribed chemotherapy (5FU, cisplatin and mitomycin C) dose and median age of patients within the trial. The model used was a multivariate logistic regression. Results: Twenty-six trials were included (1335 patients) in which 311 patients (24%) achieved pCR. The probability of pCR improved with increasing dose of radiotherapy (P=0.006), 5FU (P=0.003) and cisplatin (P=0.018). Increasing radiotherapy treatment time (P=0.035) and increasing median age (P=0.019) reduced the probability of pCR. The estimated α/β ratio of oesophageal cancer was 4.9 Gy (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-17 Gy) and the estimated radiotherapy dose lost per day was 0.59 Gy (95% CI 0.18-0.99 Gy). One gram per square metre of 5FU was estimated to be equivalent to 1.9 Gy (95% CI 0.8-5.2 Gy) of radiation and 100 mg/m 2 of cisplatin was estimated to be equivalent to 7.2 Gy (95% CI 2.1-28 Gy). Mitomycin C dose did not appear to influence pCR rates (P=0.60). Conclusions: There was evidence of a dose-response relationship between increasing protocol prescribed radiotherapy, 5FU and cisplatin dose and pCR. Additional significant factors were radiotherapy

  20. The treatment of colorectal liver metastases with conformal radiation therapy and regional chemotherapy

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    Robertson, John M; Lawrence, Theodore S; Walker, Suzette; Kessler, Marc L; Andrews, James C; Ensminger, William D

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: Whole-liver radiation, with or without chemotherapy, has been of modest benefit in the treatment of unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. A Phase I/II study combining escalating doses of conformally planned radiation therapy (RT) with intraarterial hepatic (IAH) fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) was performed. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with unresectable hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer, 14 of whom had progressed after previous chemotherapy (2 with prior IAH FdUrd), were treated with concurrent IAH FdUrd (0.2 mg/kg/day) and conformal hepatic radiation therapy (1.5-1.65 Gy/fraction twice a day). The total dose of radiation given to the tumor (48-72.6 Gy) depended on the fraction of normal liver excluded from the high-dose volume. All patients were assessed for response, toxicity, hepatobiliary relapse, and survival. Median potential follow-up was 42 months. Results: Eleven of 22 patients demonstrated an objective response, with the remainder showing stable disease. Actuarial freedom from hepatic progression was 25% at 1 year. The most common acute toxicity was mild to moderate nausea and transient liver function test abnormalities. There were three patients with gastrointestinal bleeding (none requiring surgical intervention) after the completion of treatment. Overall median survival was 20 months. The presence of extrahepatic disease was associated with decreased survival (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Combined conformal radiation therapy and IAH FdUrd can produce an objective response in 50% of patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. However, response was not durable, and hepatic progression was frequent. Improvements in hepatic tumor control for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer may require higher doses of conformal radiation and/or improved radiosensitization. In an effort to increase radiosensitization, we have recently initiated a clinical trial combining IAH bromodeoxyuridine, a thymidine analog

  1. Impact of Blood Transfusions on Survival of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Plus Radical Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Chiappa, Valentina; Lopez, Carlos; Indini, Alice; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Transfusions represent one of the main progresses of modern medicine. However, accumulating evidence supports that transfusions correlate with worse survival outcomes in patients affected by solid cancers. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of perioperative blood transfusion in locally advanced cervical cancer. Data of consecutive patients affected by locally advanced cervical cancer scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical surgery were retrospectively searched to test the impact of perioperative transfusions on survival outcomes. Five-year survival outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox models. The study included 275 patients. Overall, 170 (62%) patients had blood transfusion. Via univariate analysis, we observed that transfusion correlated with an increased risk of developing recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-4.40; P = 0.02). Other factors associated with 5-year disease-free survival were noncomplete clinical response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR, 2.99; 95% CI, 0.92-9.63; P = 0.06) and pathological (P = 0.03) response at neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as parametrial (P = 0.004), vaginal (P < 0.001), and lymph node (P = 0.002) involvements. However, via multivariate analysis, only vaginal (HR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.20-7.85; P = 0.01) and lymph node involvements (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.00-6.06; P = 0.05) correlate with worse disease-free survival. No association with worse outcomes was observed for patients undergoing blood transfusion (HR, 2.71; 95% CI, 0.91-8.03; P = 0.07). Looking at factors influencing overall survival, we observed that lymph node status (P = 0.01) and vaginal involvement (P = 0.06) were independently associated with survival. The role of blood transfusions in increasing the risk of developing recurrence in LAAC patients treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical surgery remains unclear; further prospective studies are warranted.

  2. A case report of metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the right adrenal gland successfully treated with chemotherapy and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Toshiya; Komiyama, Sosuke; Ikoma, Hisashi; Kubota, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Shojiro; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Sakakura, Chohei; Kokuba, Yukihito; Sonoyama, Teruhisa; Otsuji, Eigo

    2010-08-01

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma has a poor prognosis, especially when associated with distant metastasis. A 60-year-old man was admitted to a private hospital because of dyspnea at work in 2007. Computed tomography revealed lung infarction and a right adrenal tumor sized 12 cm in diameter that was tightly compressed against the inferior vena cava (IVC). Moreover, multiple lymph node metastases around the celiac axis and a solitary liver metastasis at the lateral segment were observed. Thus, we planned chemotherapy without surgery. We selected a combination therapy of irinotecan (CPT-11) and cisplatin (CDDP) (i.e., IP therapy): administration of CDDP [60 mg/m(2) body surface area (BSA)] on day 1 plus CPT-11 (80 mg/m(2)) BSA on days 1 and 8. Thereafter, this protocol was repeated at 3-week intervals. After 15 months of this chemotherapy strategy, the whole lesions showed a partial response by RECIST. The primary tumor had shrunk to 4.2 cm in diameter. In November 2008, we planned surgery to perform resection of the whole lesions. Histological diagnosis of the specimen was a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma based on the immunostaining features, i.e., synaptophysin- and chromogranin positive. There were no viable tumor cells at the dissected lymph nodes or at the liver tumor. After surgery, CPT-11 administration was continued. The patient has remained well for 9 months without recurrence.

  3. Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Peritoneal Surface Malignancy: Experience with 1,000 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Edward A.; Stewart, John H.; Shen, Perry; Russell, Gregory B.; Loggie, Brian L.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dissemination of abdominal malignancy (carcinomatosis) has a clinical course marked by bowel obstruction and death; it traditionally does not respond well to systemic therapy and has been approached with nihilism. To treat carcinomatosis, we utilize cytoreductive surgery (CS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Methods A prospective database of patients has been maintained since 1992. Patients with biopsy proven peritoneal surface disease (PSD) were uniformly evaluated for, and treated with, CS and HIPEC. Patient demographics, performance status (ECOG), resection status (R), PSD was classified according to primary site. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed. The experience was divided into quintiles and compared with outcomes. Results Between 1991 and 2013, 1,000 patients underwent 1,097 HIPEC procedures. Average age was 52.9 years and 53.1% were female. Primary tumor sites were: appendix 472(47.2%), colorectal 248(24.8%), mesothelioma 72(7.2%), ovary 69(6.9%), gastric 46(4.6%), others 97(9.7%). Thirty day mortality rate was 3.8% and median hospital stay was 8 days. Median overall survival (OS) was 29.4 months, with a 5 year survival of 32.5%. Factors correlating with improved survival on univariate and multivariate analysis (p≤.0001 for each) were preoperative performance status, primary tumor type, resection status, and experience quintile (p=.04). Over the 5 quintiles, the 1 and 5 year survival, as well as the complete cytoreduction score (R0,R1,R2a) have increased, while transfusions, stoma creations, and complications have all significantly decreased (p<.001 for all). Conclusions This largest reported single center experience with CS and HIPEC demonstrates that prognostic factors include primary site, performance status, completeness of resection, and institutional experience. The data shows that outcomes have improved over time with more complete cytoreduction and fewer serious complications

  4. Diaphragm and lung-preserving surgery with hyperthermic chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: A 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogi, Marcello Carlo; Bertoglio, Pietro; Aprile, Vittorio; Chella, Antonio; Korasidis, Stylianos; Fontanini, Gabriella; Fanucchi, Olivia; Lucchi, Marco; Mussi, Alfredo

    2018-04-01

    The best surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma is still under a debate, but recent evidence points toward a less-invasive approach to reduce morbidity and mortality. We reported our 10-year experience of a limited surgical approach associated with hyperthermic intrathoracic chemotherapy (HITHOC). Between 2005 and 2014, patients with epithelioid or biphasic malignant pleural mesothelioma were treated with lung-diaphragm-pericardium-sparing pleurectomy associated with double-drug HITHOC; at least 3 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy were then administered. The primary outcome examined was the feasibility of the procedure, whereas secondary outcomes were overall survival and disease-free interval. Among 49 patients, 41 were male. Median age was 68 years (35-76 years). Histology was epithelioid in 43 cases. Pathologic stage I, II, III, and IV occurred in 12, 14, 20, and 3 cases, respectively. No intraoperative complications or postoperative mortality occurred, whereas morbidity rate was 46.9%. Median hospital stay was 8 days (5-45 days). Actuarial median overall survival was 22 months and a 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival accounted for 79.6%, 45.7%, and 9.9%, respectively. Disease-free survival after surgery was 62%, 37.5%, and 18.5% at 1, 2, and 5 years, respectively. Risk factors analysis for overall survival confirmed a significant role for early stages, epithelioid histology, and fibrinogen serum levels. Cytoreductive surgery associated with HITHOC and adjuvant chemotherapy appears feasible and safe, with no mortality and low morbidity. Preserving lung and diaphragmatic function might warrant an acceptable long-term outcome. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heon; Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Kwon, Keun Sang; Lynch, David

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0–2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan–Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

  6. Salvage surgery for radiation failure in oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Terada, Akihiro; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa

    2007-01-01

    Few reports have covered salvage surgery after radiotherapy, especially with chemotherapy for oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The feasibility of salvage surgery is unclear. We analyzed postoperative complications and prognosis after salvage surgery for local recurrence after definitive radiotherapy. Subjects were 37 patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated from 1994 to 2003. Of these, 14 (37.8%) had postoperative complications. The complication rate was significantly high in the reconstructive operation group (p=0.031) and the chemotherapy group (p=0.049). The 5-year overall survival rate after salvage surgery was 70.7%. Although there was no significant improvement, the prognosis was good in early-stage groups with primary tumors. We found that salvage surgery after definitive radiotherapy was effective for recurrent oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We stress the need to pay attention to postoperative complications in reconstructive operation and chemotherapy groups. (author)

  7. The long term effect and outcome of preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasu, Takahito; Nakane, Hiroshi; Kamata, Seiji; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Shigeaki; Shinohara, Youichi.

    1996-01-01

    The object of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for bladder cancer. A total of 44 patients with bladder cancer were treated by preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy between October, 1981 and December, 1986. Clinical stages included 4 patients in Ta, 25 in T1, 11 in T2, and 4 in T3. Each patient was treated twice with 15 gray of radiation to the small pelvic cavity and a chemotherapy combination of adriamycin, cis-platinum, tegaful, and peplomycin. The average observation time after the therapy was 83 month, with the maximum being 146 months. Complete remission was included in 5 patients, partial remission in 27, and no change in 12. Thus, the overall effective rate was 72.8%. Operations, selected by the results of the preoperative therapy, included transurethral resection on 28 patients, transurethral fulguration on 2, partial cystectomy on 4, resection of tumor on 4, and total cystectomy on 3. Operations were not performed on 2 patients and not allowed on 1 patient. The outcome during the long-term follow-up included cancer related deaths in 4 patients, and death resulting from other disorders in 9. The 5-year survival rates for superficial and invasive bladder cancer were 92.4%, and 83.9%, respectively. The 10-year survival rates for superficial and invasive bladder cancer were also 92.4% and 83.9%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year non-recurrence rates for superficial bladder cancer were 75.8%, and 66.9% respectively, according to the Kaplan-Meier method. On the other hand, the 3-year and 5-year non-recurrence rates for invasive bladder cancer were both 73.8%. During the follow-up between 9 and 11 years, 3 upper tract tumor were diagnosed (2 ureteral cancer, and 1 renal pelvic cancer). We concluded that preoperative chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy may be effective for the treatment of bladder cancer. (author)

  8. The study of combination therapy for arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy in unresectable gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takuma; Saito, Hiroya; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated an effective strategy of treatment for unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC) by the retrospective analysis of prognostic factors and anti-tumor therapies, especially combination therapy of arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy (AI+PT). Forty-three patients with unresectable GBC were enrolled, and prognostic factors were investigated by multivariate analysis using a proportional hazard model. In addition, we examined the indication and after-therapy by analyzing the each factor cumulative survival rates and anti-tumor effect about the AI + RT group (n=24). AI + RT and the responders to the first-line therapy were significant prognostic factors. In AI + RT group, median survival time, progression-free survival and the 1-year survival rate, the response and disease control rates was 15.5 months, 7.1 months, 62.5%. 54.2% and 95.8%, respectively; which suggested prolonged survival and high anti-tumor effect. Cumulative survival rate was significantly shorter in cases with distant metastasis except liver metastases, and has been tendency to extend in the group who underwent systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy. The treatment strategy, using the Al + RT as first-line with the systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy, suggested contribute to the prolonged survival in locally advanced and liver metastases cases of GBC. (author)

  9. Bladder preservation for locally advanced bladder cancer by transurethral resection, systemic chemotherapy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Masahito; Satoh, Mototaka; Tujimoto, Yuichi; Takada, Tuyoshi; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Fujioka, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-three out of 31 patients with clinical T2-4a N0 M0 bladder cancer and given a trial of trimodality therapy including transurethral resection (TUR), systemic chemotherapy and radiation between 1991 and 2002 completed this therapy. The other 8 dropped out because of insufficient clinical effect. Local bladder recurrence was seen in 3 patients and the bladder preservation rate was 64.5%. Nineteen of the 23 patients showed a complete histological response on a subsequent TUR specimen, the other 4 were not examined for histological response. Thirteen of the 19 patients showed a complete histological response after maximal TUR and systemic chemotherapy, while 6 did after TUR, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Bladder cancer was T2 in, 15, T3 in 1, and T4a in 3 patients. The CR rate for T2 cancer was significantly higher than that for T3-4a cancer. The 5-year disease-specific survival of the 23 patients treated with preservation therapy was 67.1%. Some of the patients with locally advanced bladder cancer may benefit from this preservation therapy. (author)

  10. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, Alain; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m 2 ), 5-FU (500 mg/m 2 ), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m 2 ), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy (± boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects

  11. Evaluation of preoperative radiation combined with chemotherapy for prevention of local recurrence of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarashina, Hiromi; Inoue, Ikuo; Saitoh, Norio

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study of 44 patients with rectal cancer who received preoperative radiation (42.6 Gy) combined with chemotherapy and 37 who received resection alone (control group) was undertaken to evaluate the effect of preoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of rectal cancer. The rate of local recurrence in the radiation group was reduced to 4.5% compared with that in the controls (18.9%). From a pathological point of view, factors that have a close association with recurrence, such as depth of invasion, ew (defined as the distance between the external surgical surface and the deepest site of invasion) and lymph nodal involvement, have been successfully changed after radiation therapy. It was also evident that the rate of recurrence in irradiated patients, depth of invasion of a 2 (defined as the invasion of cancer far beyond the muscle layer but without involvement of other organs) or ew less than 2 mm was significantly lower than in patients with the same pathological conditions in whom radiation was not used. However, especially in patients with remote lymph node metastasis, there was no difference in local recurrence rate between the two groups. From these findings, it was concluded that a careful follow up is necessary for patients with remote lymph node involvement even after radiation therapy. (author)

  12. Butyrate down regulates BCL-XL and sensitizes human fibroblasts to radiation and chemotherapy induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Diana H.; Ljungman, Mats; Zhang Fenfen; Chen Feng; McLaughlin, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Butyrate is a short chain fatty acid that has been implicated in the induction of cell cycle arrest, cell differentiation and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if butyrate treatment sensitizes cells to radiation or chemotherapy induced apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Normal neonatal human diploid fibroblasts were used throughout this study. Apoptosis was scored and quantified using three different methods. First, cell morphology using propidium iodide and fluorescence microscopy was used to qualitatively determine apoptosis and to quantify the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. Second, apoptosis induced DNA degradation was scored by quantifying the amount of cells appearing in a sub-G1 peak using fixed and PI-stained cells and flow cytometry. Third, apoptosis-induced DNA degradation was examined by using an assay involving direct lysis of cells in the wells of agarose gels followed by conventional gel electrophoresis. Western blotting was used to quantify the cellular levels of the apoptosis regulators, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax. Results: Human diploid fibroblasts, which were resistant to radiation induced apoptosis, were found to undergo massive apoptosis when radiation was combined with butyrate treatment. Sensitization was obtained when butyrate was added before or after radiation although the combination of both pre and post-treatment was the most effective. Butyrate was also found to enhance UV light and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. These findings correlated with a reduction of the apoptosis antagonist Bcl-XL. Bcl-XL levels significantly dropped in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition, butyrate effectively blocked UV-induced accumulation of p53. Conclusion: Our results suggest that butyrate may be an attractive agent to use in combination with radiation or chemotherapy to lower the apoptotic threshold of tumor cells, regardless of the p53 status of the tumor cells

  13. Persistence of dysphagia and odynophagia after mediastinal radiation and chemotherapy in patients with lung cancer or lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Helen; Li, Justin; Pelletier, Stephen; Wang, Helen; Freedman, Rachel; Mamon, Harvey; Ng, Andrea; Freedman, Arnold; Come, Steven; Avigan, David; Huberman, Mark; Recht, Abram

    2017-02-01

    Esophageal symptoms are common during radiation and chemotherapy. It is unclear how often these symptoms persist after therapy. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 320 adults treated for nonmetastatic breast cancer (84), lung cancer (109), or Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (127) who were disease-free at 10-14 months after therapy. Treatment included chemotherapy with or without nonmediastinal radiation therapy (150 patients), chemotherapy plus sequential mediastinal radiation therapy (MRT) (48 patients), chemotherapy plus concurrent MRT (61 patients), or non-MRT only (61 patients). Proton pump inhibitor use was documented. All treatment groups had similar prevalence of the esophageal symptom of heartburn before therapy. Rates were higher during treatment in those who received MRT with or without chemotherapy, but declined by 10-14 months after treatment. However, low baseline rates of dysphagia (4%) and odynophagia (2%) increased significantly after combined chemotherapy and MRT to 72% for dysphagia and 62% for odynophagia (P dysphagia and 11% having odynophagia at 10-14 months after treatment. The use of proton pump inhibitors by patients who had MRT with chemotherapy was significantly increased during and after treatment (P = 0.002). Dysphagia, odynophagia and the use of proton pump inhibitors were significantly more common both during and after treatment than before treatment in patients who received both chemotherapy and mediastinal radiation. Our data highlight the important challenge for clinicians of managing patients with lung cancer and lymphoma who have persistent esophageal problems, particularly dysphagia and odynophagia, at approximately 1 year after treatment. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  14. Combination therapy with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy for stage C prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Toshihisa; Matsumoto, Hidetsugu

    1996-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of treatment for patients with stage C prostate cancer, therapy in combination with hormonal, radiation and chemotherapy was given for the initial period, and there after, hormonal therapy was continuously administered to 18 patients with chemotherapy and three patients without it. At the Social Health Insurance Medical Center, between May 1988 and August 1991, 21 patients were diagnosed to have stage C histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The average age of the patients was 69.0 years. The tumor was well, moderate and poorly differentiated in 5, 6 and 10 patients, respectively. As hormonal therapy, orchiectomy was performed on 19 of the 21 patients. Furthermore, 11 patients were administered estramustine phosphate, 9 chlormadinone acetate, and one diethylstilbesterol diphosphate. As, radiation therapy, all patients were treated with AP-PA parallel opposing technique to small pelvis with a 12 cm x 12 cm treatment field (44-45 Gy) combined with conformation radiotherapy to prostate (20-26 Gy). Chemotherapy was performed using either one or a combination of the following; cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate and etoposide. The observation period was 54.5 months on the average. Recurrence was observed in 3 patients, for all of which the sites were at bone. The 5-year non-recurrence rate was 90.4% by Kaplan-Meier's method. There were 4 deaths, three were due to prostate cancer and one to gastric cancer. The 5-year cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier's method was 90.5%. In conclusion, this treatment was effective for stage C cases of prostate cancer. (author)

  15. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, José

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m²). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D mean and D max of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade ≥2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade ≥3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade ≥2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade ≥3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade ≥2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  16. [Intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with gynecological malignancies after hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-yun; Ma, Yue-bing; Sheng, Xiu-gui; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Xue, Li; Song, Qu-qing; Liu, Nai-fu; Miao, Hua-qin

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the value of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patient with gynecological malignancies after treatment of hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy. All 32 patients with cervical or endometrial cancer after hysterectomy received full course IMRT after 1 to 3 cycles of chemotherapy (Karnofsky performance status(KPS) > or =70). Seventeen of these patients underwent postoperative preventive irradiation and the other 15 patients were pelvic wall recurrence and/or retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis, though postoperative radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy had been given after operation. The median dose delivered to the PTV was 56.8 Gy for preventive irradiation, and 60.6 Gy for pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis irradiation. It was required that 90% of iso-dose curve could covere more than 99% of GTV. However, The mean dose irradiated to small intestine, bladder, rectum, kidney and spinal cord was 21.3 Gy, 37.8 Gy, 35.3 Gy, 8.5 Gy, 22.1 Gy, respectively. Fourteen patients presented grade I (11 patients) or II (3 patients) digestive tract side-effects, Five patients developed grade I or II bone marrow depression. Twelve patients had grade I skin reaction. The overall 1-year survival rate was 100%. The 2- and 3- year survival rate for preventive irradiation were both 100%, but which was 5/7 and 3/6 for the patients with pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis. Intensity modulated radiation therapy can provide a better dose distribution than traditional radiotherapy for both prevention and pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis. The toxicity is tolerable. The adjacent organs at risk can well be protected.

  17. Craniopharyngioma: treatment by conservative surgery and radiation therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal R

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Benign neoplasms are curable only when excised. This applies even to craniopharyngiomas. The proximity of craniopharyngiomas to the hypothalamus and neurovascular structures makes total excision difficult to achieve. Over the last 3-4 decades, it has become increasingly obvious that craniopharyngiomas respond to radiation therapy. Early, unhappy results with major excisions have prompted us to adopt a policy of conservative surgery and radiation therapy to the residual tumour. Preliminary results suggest a good outcome in 35 of the 63 patients so treated from 1981. Details of the study are presented.

  18. Effective chemotherapy of acute myelocytic leukemia occurring after alkylating agent or radiation therapy for prior malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, W.P.; Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven consecutive patients with acute myelocytic leukemia occurring as a second malignancy were treated with high-dose, timed, sequential chemotherapy. Eight of the patients were felt to have ''secondary'' acute leukemia because they had received an alkylating agent or radiation therapy. The other three patients were considered controls. Despite a median age of 65, four of the eight secondary leukemia patients achieved complete remission with this regimen. One of the three control patients also achieved complete remission. This remission rate and duration are comparable to what was achieved with this treatment of ''primary'' acute myelocytic leukemia during the same period of time. These results suggest that patients with leukemia occurring after an alkylating agent or radiation therapy are not at especially high risk if treated aggressively

  19. Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. [Complications of local irradiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carabell, S.C.; Cassady, J.R.; Weinstein, H.J.; Jaff, N.

    1978-11-01

    Between 1971 and 1976, 64 patients less than 18 years of age with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated at Boston's Children's Hospital Medical Center-Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. A multimodality approach was used, consisting of radiation therapy (3500 to 4500 rad), surgery, and chemotherapy. Since 1973, all patients have received a regimen initially comprising Adriamycin, Prednisone, 6-Mercaptopurine, Vincristine, and L-Asparaginase. Methotrexate was substituted for Adriamycin following a cumulative total dose of 450 mg/m/sup 2/. The 5-year actuarial survival for all patients was 61%, while relapse-free survival was 54%. The actuarial and relapse-free survival for patients presenting with localized disease was 75% and 72%, respectively. Median follow-up was 40 months and all relapses occurred within 24 months of initial therapy. A multidisciplinary approach, such as the current regimen, offers a good prognosis for this disease.

  20. Hearing Loss in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma after Chemotherapy and Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Feng Wang

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available In light of the possible adverse effects of radiation on hearing, we conducted a study to evaluate the long-term sensorineural hearing status following radiotherapy (RT in patients suffering from nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Audiologic examinations were performed at regular intervals before and after RT. We also analyzed the effects of age, chemotherapy, pre-RT hearing status, and post-RT otitis media with effusion (OME on post-RT hearing change. A total of 150 patients (261 ears were enrolled in this study and followed up for a mean of 43.8 months. After RT, 8.9-28.8% of ears had at least a 10 dB loss in bone conduction threshold at speech frequency, which was defined as an average of hearing threshold at 0.5 kHz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz, while the percentage was 18-34.2% at 4 kHz. Patient age was related to these changes at speech frequency, and the presence of post-RT OME was related to significant loss at both speech frequency and 4 kHz. Pre-RT hearing status and chemotherapy did not influence hearing change. To sum up, sensorineural hearing loss began as early as after completion of RT. Early changes may be transient, but the effect of radiation on hearing tended to be chronic and progressive.

  1. Pregnancies and menstrual function before and after combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy (TVPP) for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacher, M.J.; Toner, K.

    1986-01-01

    The menstrual cycle, pregnancies, and offspring were evaluated before and after initial combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy with thiotepa, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (TVPP), in 34 women between the ages of 18 and 44 (median 26.5 years) treated for Stage II and Stage III Hodgkin's disease. The median range of follow-up is 83.1 months (range 40.5-140). After therapy 94.1% (32/34) continued to menstruate. Two of the four patients over the age of 35 ceased to menstruate. All patients under the age of 35 continued to menstruate (30/30). Age at the time of diagnosis was the only factor affecting change in menses with a significant probability (p = .001) that women greater than 30 years of age will experience some change in menstrual pattern. Seventeen pregnancies occurred in 12 women after therapy; 2 had 4 elective abortions; 10 delivered 12 children with normal physical development; 1 will deliver six months from now. Twelve of thirteen patients who wanted to become pregnant have conceived. The ability to become pregnant and deliver normal children after intensive treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy (RT/TVPP) was comparable to the patients' pretreatment record

  2. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  3. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  4. Recovery of sperm production following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease after induction chemotherapy with mitoxantrone, vincristine, vinblastine, and prednisone (NOVP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, Praveen; Wilson, Gene; Mathur, Kevin K.; Hagemeister, Frederick B.; Fuller, Lillian M.; Ha, Chul S.; Cox, James D.; Meistrich, Marvin L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The effect on human male fertility of radiotherapy following chemotherapy for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease (HD) is unknown. The impact of radiation therapy, given after mitoxantrone, vincristine, vinblastine, and prednisone (NOVP) chemotherapy, on sperm production is the focus of this study. Patients: Serial semen analyses were performed on 34 patients with HD Stages I-III before NOVP chemotherapy, after chemotherapy prior to radiation, and after radiation therapy. The most inferior radiation portals for patients were: mantle, 1 patient; paraaortic-spleen, 3 patients; upper abdomen, 24 patients; abdominal spade, 4 patients; and pelvic, 2 patients. Testicular radiation dose measurements were available for 20 of these patients. Results: Before the start of radiation, 90% of patients were normospermic. The magnitude of the decline in sperm counts was related to the measured testicular dose and/or radiation fields employed. The minimum postradiotherapy counts, expressed as a fraction of pretreatment counts, for the various treatment groups are as follows: paraaortic-spleen, 20%; upper abdomen, testicular dose < 30 cGy, 4%; upper abdomen, testicular dose 30-39 cGy, 0.9%; abdominal spade, 0.02%; and pelvis, 0%. The time to nadir of sperm counts averaged 4.5 months. Recovery to normospermic levels occurred in 96% of patients, with most recovering to that level within 18 months. Conclusion: The effect of radiation following NOVP chemotherapy on sperm counts was no greater than would be expected with radiation therapy alone. In most patients, sperm counts recovered to levels compatible with normal fertility

  5. Ovarian preservation in locally advanced cervical cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical surgery: our experience and analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Mauro; Bogani, Giorgio; Chiappa, Valentina; Ditto, Antonino; Scaffa, Cono; Martinelli, Fabio; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-03-30

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of ovarian metastases and recurrences among patients affected by locally advanced stage cancer patients (LACC), undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery with conservation of ovaries. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive patients affected by LACC (stage IB2- IIB), treated by NACT followed by radical surgery at National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between 1990-2015. Overall, 331 patients were included. Stage at presentation included stage IB2, IIA and IIB in 120 (36.3%), 63 (19%) and 148 (44.7%) patients, respectively. Main histotype was squamous cell carcinoma (n=265, 80.1%) followed by adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous (n=51, 15.4%), and more than half of patients had a grade 3 carcinoma . Overall, 102 (30.8%) women had at least one ovary preserved during surgery, while 229 (69.2%) had bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Comparing patients who had ovarian preservation with patients who had not, we observed that the two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Survival outcomes were not influenced by ovarian preservation (disease-free (p=0.93) and overall (p=0.65) survivals). One (1%) woman had a localized ovarian recurrence. Our data suggest that ovarian preservation at the time of surgery is a safe option among women with LACC after NACT with no detrimental impact on oncologic outcome. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  6. Role of Postmastectomy Radiation After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, Barbara L.; Einck, John P.; Kim, Danny N.; McCloskey, Susan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Yashar, Catheryn; Chen, Steven L.; Hwang, E. Shelley

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a cohort of women treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy for whom postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) may be omitted according to the projected risk of local-regional failure (LRF). Methods and Materials: Seven breast cancer physicians from University of California cancer centers created 14 hypothetical clinical case scenarios, identified, reviewed, and abstracted the available literature (MEDLINE and Cochrane databases), and formulated evidence tables with endpoints of LRF, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Using the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria methodology, appropriateness ratings for postmastectomy radiation were assigned for each scenario. Finally, an overall summary risk assessment table was developed. Results: Of 24 sources identified, 23 were retrospective studies from single institutions. Consensus on the appropriateness rating, defined as 80% agreement in a category, was achieved for 86% of the cases. Distinct LRF risk categories emerged. Clinical stage II (T1-2N0-1) patients, aged >40 years, estrogen receptor-positive subtype, with pathologic complete response or 0-3 positive nodes without lymphovascular invasion or extracapsular extension, were identified as having ≤10% risk of LRF without radiation. Limited data support stage IIIA patients with pathologic complete response as being low risk. Conclusions: In the absence of randomized trial results, existing data can be used to guide the use of PMRT in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy setting. Using available studies to inform appropriateness ratings for clinical scenarios, we found a high concordance of treatment recommendations for PMRT and were able to identify a cohort of women with a low risk of LRF without radiation. These low-risk patients will form the basis for future planned studies within University of California Athena Breast Health Network.

  7. Influence of radiation on the blood-brain barrier and optimum time of chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, D.X.; Zheng, R.; Tang, J.; Li, J.X.; Hu, Y.H.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot study of the destructive effects of radiation on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was made on 14 patients with localized and limited brain tumors by 99MTc-GH imaging from August 1988 to November 1989. Count/pixel data were obtained from the unirradiated, irradiated, and tumor areas before and after radiotherapy of 30-40 Gy. It was observed that the BBB in the unirradiated area outside the radiation portal was not changed and the degree of destructive effect on the BBB in the irradiated normal area was directly proportional to the radiation dose. For 30-40 Gy, the count/pixel change enhances to average 24.7% [(147.6-118.4)/118.4], and (c) the BBB in the tumor area is partially destroyed on an average of 22.1% [(206.8-169.4)/169.4] by the tumor. The radiotherapy further enhances this effect to an average of 74.7% [(206.8-118.4)/118.4]. Case 3 showed that before radiation, the degree of destructive effect on the BBB in the tumor area was 22% [(167-137)/137] higher than normal brain tissue. After a dose of 30 Gy of irradiation, it increased to 76.7% [(242-137)/137]; 8 months later it decreased to 17% [(160.3-137)/137]. It has been proven that the BBB can recover at least partially. Based on these observations, the authors believe that in the combined treatment of operated brain tumors, radiotherapy should precede chemotherapy so as to enhance the destruction of the BBB, facilitating the incorporation of drugs into the tumor. The dose at which to start chemotherapy is 20-30 Gy

  8. Phase II trial of neoadjuvant pemetrexed plus cisplatin followed by surgery and radiation in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federico, Rea; Matteo, Ceccarelli; Gbenga, Kazeem; Paolo, Marchi; Francesco, Facciolo; Adolfo, Favaretto; Giuseppe, Marulli; Lorenzo, Spaggiari; Martino, DePas Tommaso; Anna, Ceribelli; Adriano, Paccagnella; Gino, Crivellari; Francesca, Russo

    2013-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor that has a poor prognosis and is resistant to unimodal approaches. Multimodal treatment has provided encouraging results. Phase II, open-label study of the combination of chemotherapy (pemetrexed 500 mg/m 2 +cisplatin 75 mg/m 2 IV every 21 days × 3 cycles), followed by surgery (en-bloc extrapleural pneumonectomy, 3–8 weeks after chemotherapy) and hemithoracic radiation (total radiation beam 54 Gy, received 4–8 weeks post-surgery). The primary endpoint was event-free survival, defined as the time from enrollment to time of first observation of disease progression, death due to any cause, or early treatment discontinuation. Fifty-four treatment-naïve patients with T1-3 N0-2 malignant pleural mesothelioma were enrolled, 52 (96.3%) completed chemotherapy, 45 (83.3%) underwent surgery, 22 (40.7%) completed the whole treatment including 90-day post-radiation follow-up. The median event-free survival was 6.9 months (95%CI: 5.0-10.5), median overall survival was 15.5 months (95%CI 11.0-NA) while median time-to-tumor response was 4.8 months (95%CI: 2.5-8.0). Eighteen (33.3%) and 13 (24.1%) patients were still event-free after 1 and 2 years, respectively. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were nausea (63.0%), anemia (51.9%) and hypertension (42.6%). Following two cardiopulmonary radiation-related deaths the protocol was amended (21 [38.9%] patients were already enrolled in the study): the total radiation beam was reduced from 54 Gy to 50.4 Gy and a more accurate selection of patients was recommended. The combination of pemetrexed plus cisplatin followed by surgery and hemithoracic radiation is feasible and has a manageable toxicity profile in carefully selected patients. It may be worthy of further investigation. Clinicaltrial.com registrationID #NCT00087698

  9. Treatment of dogs with oral melanoma by hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-based chemotherapy (1987-1997).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Kim P; Hahn, Kevin A; Harris, F Dee; King, Glen K

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study in 39 dogs with incompletely resected oral melanoma examined the efficacy of hypofractionated radiation therapy and platinum-containing chemotherapy. All dogs were completely staged, with the majority of dogs classified as stage 1. Dogs received 6 weekly fractions of 6-gray (Gy) megavoltage irradiation with a cobalt-60 unit or a 4-MeV (megaelectron volts) linear accelerator. Dogs received cisplatin (10-30 mg/m2 IV) or carboplatin (90 mg/m2 IV) chemotherapy 60 minutes before radiation delivery. Durations of local control, metastasis-free survival time, and overall survival time were recorded. By the Kaplan-Meier method, 15% of the dogs had local recurrence within a median time of 139 days. Fifty-one percent of the dogs developed metastatic disease within a median time of 311 days (range, 24-2, 163 days). Median survival time for all 39 dogs was 363 days. The combined use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy in this protocol provided local control consistent with previous studies. Low-dose chemotherapy was used with the intent of enhancing radiation therapy for the local control of an incompletely excised tumor. Survival times were longer than previously reported for dogs with oral malignant melanoma. Additional studies are required to determine whether these results were due to the effects of chemotherapy on microscopic disease or the enhanced local control provided by chemoradiation therapy.

  10. Intra-arterial and intra-venous chemotherapy combined with radiation in the treatment of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watne, K.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigations were undertaken to study the effect of combining different modalities of chemotherapy with radiation in post-operative treatment of brain tumours. The conclusions and clinical implication of the investigations are as follows: The combination of combined intra-arterial chemotherapy followed by radiation leads to an increased median survival with more long term survivors in patients with anaplastic astrocytomas and in patients older than 40 years with astrocytomas. In patients with glioblastoma multiforme, this modality of treatment do not improve median survival, but an increased number of long-term survivors may be seen. Patients younger than 40 years with astrocytomas do not benefit from this modality of treatment. A parallelism exists between sensitivity to chemotherapy and response to radiotherapy. Patients who will benefit from the treatment may be selected early, normally two months after treatment start. Combining intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation does not lead to an increased incidence of adverse CNS reactions. Specific transient abnormalities in the brain may occur during the first year after treatment and may be misinterpreted as tumour recurrence. EEG may be valuable in predicting adverse CNS reactions following treatment. Nuclear brain scan may be of valuable in selecting the patients who are in danger of developing adverse CNS reactions. Intra-arterial chemotherapy does have an effect in patients with brain tumours who have recurrent tumour after radiation. The most important prognostic factors are age, corticosteroid dependency at treatment start, performance status, histology and frontal lobe location. 103 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Successful pregnancy outcome after fertility-sparing surgery and chemotherapy for dysgerminoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Muhammad

    2010-09-01

    Ovarian dysgerminoma is a rare malignancy of the ovary. This is a case report of a 30-year-old female, presenting with a huge ovarian mass along with multiple gallstones; she was treated by fertility-sparing excision of the mass and cholecystectomy, followed by chemotherapy. She later had an uneventful pregnancy and delivered a healthy baby.

  12. Adjuvant radiation therapy versus surgery alone in operable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, L.E.; Pettersson, D.; Johansson, H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents long-term results from a randomized trial of pre- or postoperative megavoltage radiation therapy versus surgery alone in pre- and postmenopausal women with operable breast cancer. Treatment outcome after relapse among patients who developed loco-regional recurrences was also analyzed. A total of 960 patients were included in the trial. The mean follow-up was 16 years (range: 13-19 years). The radiation therapy was individually planned. It included the chest wall (and the breast in the preoperative cases) and the regional lymph nodes. The tumor dose was 45 Gy/5 weeks. No adjuvant systemic therapy was used. The results showed a significant benefit with radiation therapy in terms of recurrence-free survival during the entire follow-up period. There was also an overall survival difference - corresponding to 16% reduction of deaths - in favour of the irradiated patients which, however, was not statistically significant (p=0.09). Among those 169 patients who developed loco-regional recurrences long-term control was only achieved in about one-third of the cases. This figure was similar among those who had received adjuvant radiation therapy (34%) compared to those initially treated with surgery alone (32%). This implied that the overall proportion of patients who eventually developed uncontrolled local disease was significantly higher among those initially allocated to surgery alone (16%) compared to those allocated to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy (6%, p<0.01). These results suggest that local undertreatment may be deleterious in subgroups of patients. (author) 5 tabs

  13. The sequencing of radiation therapy and chemotherapy after mastectomy in premenopausal women with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakir, S.; Gursel, B.; Meydan, D.; Yildiz, L.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic importance of the sequencing of radiation therapy and chemotherapy after mastectomy in high-risk premenopausal women with breast cancer in addition to other known prognostic factors in the literature. In this retrospective study, 176 premenopausal women with breast cancer were evaluated. The median age at referral was 39 years (range, 28-59 years); 106 patients had stage II and 70 had stage III disease. All were subjected to mastectomy. The median number of lymph nodes removed was 19. The influence of age, histological grade, number of nodes removed, number of positive nodes, tumor size, estrogen receptor status, lymphovascular invasion and sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on 5-year locoregional disease-free survival, 5-year systemic disease-free survival, 5-year disease-free survival and 5-year cancer-specific survival were studied. The 5-year locoregional disease-free survival was 94% for the entire patient population. Because of the small number of locoregional recurrences, none of the evaluated factors was prognostically significant for locoregional recurrence. The 5-year systemic disease-free, disease-free and cancer-specific survival rates were 72, 70 and 77%, respectively. On multi-variate analysis of host, tumor and treatment-related factors, the number of positive nodes [risk ratio (RR) 1.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36-2.63), RR 2 (1.46-2.84) and RR 1.8 (1.3-2.71), respectively], histopathological grade [RR 1.8 (95% CI: 1.24-2.65), RR 1.9 (1.34-2.88), RR 2.5 (1.65-4.07), respectively], estrogen receptor status [RR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.5-8.6), RR 3.9 (1.64-9.41), RR 2.5 (1.05-6.24), respectively] and the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy [RR 1.6 (95% CI: 1.17-2.39), RR 1.7 (1.25-2.54), RR 1.6 (1.14-2.43), respectively] were all significant independent predictors of outcome. Our results show that in addition to traditional prognostic factors, the sequencing of radiation therapy

  14. Summary of major radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for organ preservation therapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, James T; Greene, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    To review radiation fractionation and chemotherapy trials for patients undergoing organ preservation therapy for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Radiation therapy fractionation and chemotherapy trial results as well as historical evidence are systematically reviewed. Trial results, which involve nearly 30,000 patients, have been interpreted, compared, and presented in a structured manner to demonstrate the changing approaches in treatment over the years from the 1960s to the present. The review includes data from the split-course radiation therapy era, meta-analyses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy fractionation trials, cetuximab trials, "triple-drug trials," and modern trials of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This summary will be useful to clinicians making treatment decisions today and to investigators designing trials in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer of the breast: Conservation surgery and curative radiation therapy - Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Bedwinek, J.M.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.

    1987-01-01

    Current evidence strongly suggests that radiation therapy following conservation surgery in the primary local management of stage I and stage II breast cancer can achieve survival and local-regional control rates that are comparable to those obtained by radical and modified radical mastectomy. Since primary radiation therapy has the benefit of leaving the patient with intact and cosmetically acceptable breasts, it should be considered as a viable and reasonable alternative to radical mastectomy. An analysis of current series of primary radiation data suggests that total excision of the tumor should be carried out. An axillary node sampling or dissection including level 1 and level 2 axillary nodes (those lying beneath and lateral to the pectoralis minor muscle) should be carried out in addition to tumor excision since knowledge of the axillary nodal status serves as a prognostic indicator and facilitates the intelligent selection of those patients for adjuvant hormonal or chemotherapy. Technique then becomes a critical and important part of the management of the patient. No effort should be spared to insure that the volumes irradiated are properly chosen, receive the appropriate dose to maximize the potential for local-regional control and done within the context of minimization of complication from the treatment program. It is only under these circumstances that the best in terms of long-term survival and cosmetic can be achieved

  16. Combined regional chemotherapy and radiation therapy in the treatment of epidermoid carcinoma in the oro-facial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, J; Satko, I [Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Lekarska Fakulta; Durkovsky, J [Institute of Clinical Oncology, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)

    1979-01-01

    Treatment was studied of oro-facial epidermoid carcinoma by combined chemo- and radiotherapy and eventual surgery. Cytostatic drugs were applied intraarterially. After a monocytostatic treatment trial with Methotrexate (MTX), a combined cytostatic program was developed alternating two cytostatic drugs, viz., MTX and Bleomycin (BLM). The usefulness of chemotherapy and its inclusion in the treatment of epidermoid carcinoma in the oro-facial region was found justified for combined therapy. The selected intraarterial administration, however, is not suitable for routine application. For this reason, the combination irradiation or surgical therapy with chemotherapy was adopted.

  17. Gastrosplenic fistula in Hodgkin's lymphoma treated successfully by laparoscopic surgery and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Asghar, Hamad I.; Khan, Mohammad Q.; Ghamdi, Abdullah M.; Bamehirz, Fahad Y.; Maghfoor, I.

    2007-01-01

    A gastrosplenic fistula is a rare complication of a gastric or splenic lesion. We report a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma (nodular sclerosis) involving the spleen that was complicated by spontaneous gastrosplenic fistula. The fistula was closed laparoscopically and the patient underwent partial gastrectomy and gastric wall repair followed by successful chemotherapy. This is also the first reported case in published literature where the closure of gastrosplenic fistula and partial gastrectomy was carried out laparoscopically. We recommend that extensive open surgical procedures including total gastroectomy, splenectomy and pancreatectomy may be avoided in the management of gastrosplenic fistula and the patient could be managed by less radical, simple laparoscopic fistulectomy, with partial gastric resection. If the fistula is caused by a malignant process, the surgical repair should be followed by definitive treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  18. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author).

  19. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author)

  20. Risk of Subsequent Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood: Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allodji, Rodrigue S., E-mail: rodrigue.allodji@gustaveroussy.fr [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France); Schwartz, Boris; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Rubino, Carole; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Labbé, Martine; Diop, Fara; Jackson, Angela; Dayet, Florent; Benabdennebi, Aymen; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France); Chavaudra, Jean; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Deutsch, Eric [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Inserm, UMR 1030, Villejuif (France); Oberlin, Odile [Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima [Inserm, Radiation Epidemiology Team, CESP-Unit 1018, Villejuif (France); Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Paris Sud University, Orsay (France)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the occurrence of subsequent leukemia after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from a case-control study with 35 cases and 140 controls. The active bone marrow (ABM) was segmented into 19 compartments, and the radiation dose was estimated in each. The chemotherapy drug doses were also estimated to enable adjustments. Models capable of accounting for radiation dose heterogeneity were implemented for analysis. Results: Univariate analysis showed a significant trend in the increase of secondary leukemia risk with radiation dose, after accounting for dose heterogeneity (P=.046). This trend became nonsignificant after adjustment for doses of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and platinum compounds and the first cancer on multivariate analysis (P=.388). The role of the radiation dose appeared to be dwarfed, mostly by the alkylating agents (odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence interval 1.9-25.0). Among the patients who have received >16 Gy to the ABM, the radiogenic risk of secondary leukemia was about 4 times greater in the subgroup with no alkylating agents than in the subgroup receiving ≥10 g/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the limitations resulting from the size of our study population and the quite systematic co-treatment with chemotherapy, the use of detailed information on the radiation dose distribution to ABM enabled consideration of the role of radiation therapy in secondary leukemia induction after childhood cancer.

  1. Risk of Subsequent Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood: Impact of Bone Marrow Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allodji, Rodrigue S.; Schwartz, Boris; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Rubino, Carole; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Labbé, Martine; Diop, Fara; Jackson, Angela; Dayet, Florent; Benabdennebi, Aymen; Llanas, Damien; Vu Bezin, Jérémi; Chavaudra, Jean; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Deutsch, Eric; Oberlin, Odile; Vathaire, Florent de; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the roles of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the occurrence of subsequent leukemia after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from a case-control study with 35 cases and 140 controls. The active bone marrow (ABM) was segmented into 19 compartments, and the radiation dose was estimated in each. The chemotherapy drug doses were also estimated to enable adjustments. Models capable of accounting for radiation dose heterogeneity were implemented for analysis. Results: Univariate analysis showed a significant trend in the increase of secondary leukemia risk with radiation dose, after accounting for dose heterogeneity (P=.046). This trend became nonsignificant after adjustment for doses of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and platinum compounds and the first cancer on multivariate analysis (P=.388). The role of the radiation dose appeared to be dwarfed, mostly by the alkylating agents (odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence interval 1.9-25.0). Among the patients who have received >16 Gy to the ABM, the radiogenic risk of secondary leukemia was about 4 times greater in the subgroup with no alkylating agents than in the subgroup receiving ≥10 g/m"2. Conclusions: Notwithstanding the limitations resulting from the size of our study population and the quite systematic co-treatment with chemotherapy, the use of detailed information on the radiation dose distribution to ABM enabled consideration of the role of radiation therapy in secondary leukemia induction after childhood cancer.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  3. Intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy after surgery and carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer: phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  4. Three-drug chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, Y.; Steyaert, J.; Francis, C.; Bosly, A.; Prignot, J.

    1983-01-01

    In 43 cases of small cell carcinoma of the lung, a combined treatment has been initiated with three drugs (cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , adriamycin 50 mg/m 2 and vincristine sulphate 1 or 2 mg total dosis), split-course-radiation therapy on the primary tumour (3500 rads) and prophylactic irradiation of the brain (2000 rads). The median survival of the 34 cases evaluable at day 50 attains 253 days. A more favourable evolution is observed for patients with a good response after therapy (median survival: 315 days) and for cases with limited disease (321 days) than for non-responders (median survival: 157 days) and for cases with extensive disease (median survival: 214 days). In spite of tumour site irradiation, prophylactic irradiation of CNS and chemotherapy, there were six local relapses, two CNS extensions and six metastatic relapses and only two autopsied cases without macroscopic evidence of relapse. (author)

  5. A procedure for estimating the dose modifying effect of chemotherapy on radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Y.; Keane, T.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure based on a logistic regression model was used to estimate the dose-modifying effect of chemotherapy on the response of normal tissues to radiation. The DEF in the proposed procedure is expressed as a function of logistic regression coefficients, response levels and values of covariates in the model. The proposed procedure is advantageous as it allows consideration of both the response levels and the values of covariates in calculating the DEF. A plot of the DEF against the response or a covariate describes how the DEF varies with the response levels or the covariate values. Confidence intervals of the DEF were obtained based on the normal approximation of the distribution of the estimated DEF and on a non-parametric Bootstrap method. An example is given to illustrate the proposed procedure. (Author)

  6. The Efficacy of Dextran-40 as a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Strategy in Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jason M; Sleightholm, Richard; Watley, Duncan; Wahlmeier, Steven; Patel, Asish

    2017-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in peritoneal malignancies can approach 30 to 50 per cent without prophylaxis. Prophylaxis in cytoreductive surgeries (CRS) presents a challenge to preoperative heparin-based therapy because of an increased risk of coagulopathy and potential for bleeding. Herein, we report the large series of CRS and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy receiving dextran-40 prophylaxis. Retrospective chart review of peritoneal malignancies patients undergoing CRS at University of Nebraska Medical Center identified 69 individuals who received dextran-40 between 2010 and 2013. The incidences of VTEs, perioperative bleeding, complications, morbidity, and mortality were determined in-hospital and at 90 days. Of the 69 patients treated, the 30-day VTE rate was 8.7 per cent, and no pulmonary embolisms, bleeding, anaphylactoid reaction, or mortality were observed with dextran usage. The specific VTE events included three upper extremity and three lower extremity VTEs. No additional VTE events were identified between 30 and 90 days. In conclusion, dextran-40 prophylaxis was not associated with any perioperative bleeding events, and the observed incidence of VTE was comparable to reported heparin-based prophylaxis in CRS/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy patients. This data supports further exploration of dextran-40 as a VTE prophylactic agent in complex surgical oncology cases.

  7. The p53 serology is predictive of the response to the pre surgery radio chemotherapy in the oesophagus cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metges, J.P.; Giroux, M.A.; Volant, A.; Morin, J.F.; Malhaire, J.P.; Gouerou, H.; Ferec, C.; Robaskiewicz, M.; Labat, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The mutations of the TP 53 and MTS1 (p16) gene have been described in numerous neoplasms but their relation with a response to the treatment is still little described. The aim of this work was to evaluate the value of the p53 status(serology, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology) and of the MTS1 gene( protein p16) for the response to the pre surgery radio chemotherapy in a troop of patients suffering from esophagus epidermoid cancer. The p53 serology is positive in 40% of cases and is statistically associated to a bad response. The lost of alleles for MTS1 has been found in 20% of cases but non predictive to the response. A prospective study would be interesting. (N.C.)

  8. Peritoneal carcinomatosis: patients selection, perioperative complications and quality of life related to cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlitt Hans J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peritoneal tumor dissemination arising from colorectal cancer, appendiceal cancer, gastric cancer, gynecologic malignancies or peritoneal mesothelioma is a common sign of advanced tumor stage or disease recurrence and mostly associated with poor prognosis. Methods and results In the present review article preoperative workup, surgical technique, postoperative morbidity and mortality rates, oncological outcome and quality of life after CRS and HIPEC are reported regarding the different tumor entities. Conclusion Cytoreductive surgery (CRS and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC provide a promising combined treatment strategy for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis that can improve patient survival and quality of life. The extent of intraperitoneal tumor dissemination and the completeness of cytoreduction are the leading predictors of postoperative patient outcome. Thus, consistent preoperative diagnostics and patient selection are crucial to obtain a complete macroscopic cytoreduction (CCR-0/1.

  9. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of preirradiation chemotherapy with BCNU, cisplatin, etoposide, and accelerated radiation therapy in patients with high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Buckner, Jan C.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Reid, Joel M.; Bagniewski, Pamela J.; Ames, Matthew M.; Cascino, Terrence L.; Marks, Randolph S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a Phase I study of bischloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU), cisplatin, and oral etoposide administered prior to and during accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy in newly diagnosed high-grade glioma. Pharmacokinetic studies of oral etoposide were also done. Methods and Materials: Patients started chemotherapy after surgery but prior to definitive radiation therapy (160 cGy twice daily x 15 days; 4800 cGy total). Initial chemotherapy consisted of BCNU 40 mg/m 2 days 1-3, cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 days 1-3 and 29-31, and etoposide 50 mg orally days 1-14 and 29-42, repeated in 8 weeks concurrent with radiation therapy. BCNU 200 mg/m 2 every 8 weeks x 4 cycles was given after radiation therapy. Results: Sixteen patients, 5 with grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma and 11 with glioblastoma were studied. Grade 3-4 leukopenia (38%) and thrombocytopenia (31%) were dose-limiting. Other toxicities were anorexia (81%), nausea (94%), emesis (56%), alopecia (88%), and ototoxicity (38%). The maximum tolerated dose was BCNU 40 mg/m 2 days 1-3, cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 days 1-3 and 29-31, and oral etoposide 50 mg days 1-21 and 29-49 prior to radiation therapy and repeated in 8 weeks with the start of radiation therapy followed by BCNU 200 mg/m 2 every 8 weeks for 4 cycles. Median time to progression and survival were 13 and 14 months respectively. Responses occurred in 2 of 9 (22%) patients with evaluable disease. In pharmacokinetic studies, all patients achieved plasma concentrations of >0.1 μg/ml etoposide (the in vitro radiosensitizing threshold), following a 50 mg oral dose. The mean ± SD 2 hr and 6 hr plasma concentrations were 0.92 ± 0.43 μg/ml and 0.36 ± 0.12 μg/ml, respectively. Estimated duration of exposure to >0.1 μg/ml etoposide was 10-17 hr. Conclusions: Preirradiation chemotherapy with BCNU, cisplatin, and oral etoposide with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy in high-grade gliomas is feasible and merits further investigation. Sustained

  10. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative......-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during optimization, but more clinical data is required to facilitate evidence-based plan optimization in the multi-modality setting....... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  11. Radiation sterilisation of tissue allografts for transplant surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.O.

    1994-01-01

    The application of ionising radiation to sterilise biological tissues is an extension of their use for the sterilisation of other medical products and pharmaceuticals. This paper describes the effects of radiation on biological tissues, both at the macro- and molecular level. Changes in mechanical and other physical properties can accompany irradiation. These are shown to be due to the glycosamino-glycan component (hyaluronic acid), rather than to the collagen fibrils. Fast reaction methods are used to identify the mechanism of the radiation degradation processes. Methods by which tissues can be protected from these undesirable effects are discussed. The application of radiation sterilisation to human tissues used in transplant surgery is described, and the practical methods of processing given. Such radiation sterilised allografts now have wide application, with more than 500,000 used each year. The IAEA programme in this field has extended the application to 13 countries of the Asia and Pacific Region. Such Tissue Banks are also established with the support of IAEA in Africa and South America. The allografts can now be produced in developing countries in a readily available form, at low cost, and reduce the need for costly imported alternatives. (author). 45 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Role of surgery in multimodal cancer therapy for small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Sarah; Henderson, Ralph A

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is a critical component in the treatment of most solid tumors in small animals. Surgery is increasingly combined with adjuvant therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation so surgeons who are treating cancer must have a good understanding of surgical oncology principles, cancer biology, and the roles and potential interactions of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. The sequencing plan for these modalities should be determined before treatment is initiated. The surgical oncologist must have a working knowledge of chemotherapy agents and radiation and the effect of these treatments on the ability of tissues to heal and the outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ototoxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Children With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Lobo, Mark; Teh, Bin S.; Okcu, M. Fatih; South, Michael; Butler, E. Brian; Su, Jack; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) Grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity in a cohort of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by posterior fossa (PF) and/or tumor bed (TB) boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 44 patients with medulloblastoma were treated with CSI followed by IMRT to the PF and/or TB and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients with standard-risk disease were treated with 18 to 23.4 Gy CSI followed by either a (1) PF boost to 36 Gy and TB boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy or (2) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Patients with high-risk disease received 36 to 39.6 Gy CSI followed by a (1) PF boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy, (2) PF boost to 45 Gy and TB boost to 55.8 Gy, or (3) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Median audiogram follow-up was 41 months (range, 11-92.4 months). Results: POG Grade Ototoxicity 0, 1, 2, 3. and 4 was found in 29, 32, 11, 13. and 3 ears. respectively, with POG Grade 3 or 4 accounting for 18.2% of cases. There was a statistically significant difference in mean radiation dose (D mean ) cochlea according to degree of ototoxicity, with D mean cochlea increasing with severity of hearing loss (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Severe ototoxicity was seen in 18.2% of ears in children treated with IMRT boost and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Increasing dose to the cochlea was associated with increasing severity of hearing loss.

  14. Progress in treatment of head and neck cancer. Pt. 1. Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupp, R.; Vokes, E.E.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1995-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck is commonly diagnosed in an advanced stage with a poor prognosis. New active agents and combinations have recently been identified. By adding chemotherapy to a multimodality approach with surgery and radiation therapy the outcome may be altered. We reviewed the more recently published literature on induction and adjuvant chemotherapy. No survival advantage has been shown for adjuvant chemotherapy. Organ preservation can be achieved with induction chemotherapy followed by limited surgery and radiation in approximately two thirds of the patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Patients achieving a complete response after induction chemotherapy have a better prognosis. Chemotherpy has consistently shown to reduce the frequency of distant metastases. Chemotherapy is indicated only in recurrent or metastatic disease. Induction chemotherapy is limited to laryngeal carcinoma with organ preservation as intent. Local recurrences and intercurrent morbidity are the main reasons for treatment failures. (orig.) [de

  15. Comparison of risk of local-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conservation therapy for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation stratified according to a prognostic index score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Chen, Allen M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hunt, Kelly K.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We previously developed a prognostic index that stratified patients treated with breast conservation therapy (BCT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy into groups with different risks for local-regional recurrence (LRR). The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of LRR as a function of prognostic index score for patients treated with BCT or mastectomy plus radiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 815 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation. Patients were assigned an index score from 0 to 4 and given 1 point for the presence of each factor: clinical N2 to N3 disease, lymphovascular invasion, pathologic size >2 cm, and multifocal residual disease. Results: The 10-year LRR rates were very low and similar between the mastectomy and BCT groups for patients with an index score of 0 or 1. For patients with a score of 2, LRR trended lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (12% vs. 28%, p = 0.28). For patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was significantly lower for those treated with mastectomy vs. BCT (19% vs. 61%, p = 0.009). Conclusions: This analysis suggests that BCT can provide excellent local-regional treatment for the vast majority of patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For the few patients with a score of 3 to 4, LRR was >60% after BCT and was <20% with mastectomy. If these findings are confirmed in larger randomized studies, the prognostic index may be useful in helping to select the type of surgical treatment for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation

  16. Adjuvant external beam radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy in the management of gallbladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresl, John J.; Schild, Steven E.; Henning, George T.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Donohue, John; Pitot, Henry; Haddock, Michael G.; Nagorney, David

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the outcome of patients with gallbladder cancer who received postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Curative resection followed by adjuvant combined modality therapy with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and chemotherapy was attempted in 21 consecutive gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) patients at the Mayo Clinic from 1985 through 1997. All patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil during EBRT. EBRT fields encompassed the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes (median dose of 54 Gy in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions). One patient received 15 Gy intraoperatively after EBRT. A retrospective analysis was performed for the end points of local control, distant failure, and overall survival. Results: After maximal resection, 12 patients had no residual disease on pathologic evaluation, 5 had microscopic residual disease, and 4 had gross residual disease. One patient had Stage I disease, and 20 had Stage III-IV disease. With median follow-up of 5 years (range: 2.6-11.5 years), 5-year survival for the entire cohort was 33%. The 5-year survival rate of patients with Stage I-III disease was 65% vs. 0% for those with Stage IV disease (p 54 Gy (microscopic residual, 3 patients; gross residual, 1 patient; negative but narrow margins, 2 patients) vs. 65% for the 15 who received a lower dose (3, gross residual; 2, microresidual; 10, negative margins). Conclusion: Patients with completely resected (negative margins) GBC followed by adjuvant EBRT plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy had a relatively favorable prognosis, with a 5-year survival rate of 64%. These results seem to be superior to historical surgical controls from the Mayo Clinic and other institutions, which report 5-year survival rates of approximately 33% with complete resection alone. Both tumor stage and extent of resection seemed to influence survival and local control. More aggressive measures using current cancer therapies and integration

  17. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I.; Alzimami, K.; Osman, H.; Omer, H.; Sassi, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  18. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  19. Cytoreductive surgery with a hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy program: Safe after 40 cases, but only controlled after 140 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voron, T; Eveno, C; Jouvin, I; Beaugerie, A; Lo Dico, R; Dagois, S; Soyer, P; Pocard, M

    2015-12-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), used to treat peritoneal surface malignancies (PSM), is a complex procedure with significant major morbidity (MM). To investigate the learning curve (LC) of CRS with HIPEC in a new specialized surgical unit with a fully trained senior surgeon and individualize the variables associated with morbidity and oncological results. A total of 290 consecutive patients with PSM were included. Complete CRS with HIPEC was performed in 204 patients. A risk-adjusted sequential probability ratio test was used to assess the LC on the basis of rates of incomplete cytoreduction (IC) and MM. Complete CRS, MM, and mortality rates were 70.4%, 30.4%, and 2.5%, respectively. Tumor histotype, a high peritoneal cancer index (PCI) and the invaded region were the major independent risk factors for IC, whereas previous surgery, high PCI, stomia realization and blood transfusion were predictors of MM. RA-SPRT showed that 140 and 40 cases were needed to achieve the lowest risk of IC and MM, respectively. CRS with HIPEC to treat PSM has a steep LC. Drastic selection has to be made at the beginning, excluding high PCI, rare peritoneal disease and patients previously operated on. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer; A retrospective analysis of 39 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fountzilas, G.; Danilidis, J.; Kosmidis, P.; Srihar, K.S.; Kalogera-Fountzila, A.; Nicolaou, A.; Makrantonakis, P.; Banis, K.; Dimitriadis, A.; Sombolos, K.; Zaramboukas, T.; Themelis, C.; Vritsios, A.; Tourkantonis, A. (Ahepa Univ. Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece) Metaxa Cancer Hospital, Piraeaus (Greece) Miami School of Medicine and VA Hospital, FL (United States). Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center)

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 39 patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy during the last five years at our departments. There were 26 men and 13 women with median age 55 (24-75) years. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients and undifferentiated carcinoma in the remaining 33 patients. Induction chemotherapy consisted of either regimen A (cisplating 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m{sup 2} days 2-6 as continuous infusion, bleomycin 15 mg days 15 and 29 i.m., mitomycin 4 mg/m{sup 2} day 22 and hydroxyurea 1000 mg/m{sup 2} daily days 23-27) or regimen B (carboplatin 300 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, 5-FU 1000 mg/m{sup 2} days 1-5 as continuous infusion and methotrexate 1.2 g/m{sup 2} day 14 with leucovorin rescue). After completion of induction chemotherapy 13 patients (33%) had complete remission (CR) and 19 (49%) partial remission (PR). The CR rate was increased after radiation therapy to 72%. Survival rates were 88% at 12 and 78% at 24 months. Median time to progression was 29.5 months. In conclusion, induction chemotherapy with a platinum-based regimen followed by radiation therapy achieved a high rate of local control. If the treatment also prolongs survival must, however, be studied by randomized trials. (orig.).

  1. Potential risk and benefit of the combination of trastuzumab to chemotherapy and radiation therapy in non-metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Laharie-Mineur, H.; Gligorov, J.; Azria, D.

    2007-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is the first humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the HER2 antigen in breast cancer. HER2 receptor has been individualised 20 years ago. During the past 10 years, trastuzumab administration has radically modified the prognosis of the patients that are treated for HER2 positive breast cancer. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. While, trastuzumab based-regimens became the standard of care in the treatment of HER2/neu positive breast cancer, the optimal combination (concurrently or sequentially) to chemotherapy and radiation therapy is still unknown. Indeed, while the concurrent administration of trastuzumab and anthracyclines is not recommended because of a high risk of cardiac toxicity, there is no published data on the best sequence of trastuzumab and radiation therapy administration, particularly when internal mammary chain is involved. The benefit/risk ratio of the concurrent and sequential administration of trastuzumab with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will be discussed in this review. (authors)

  2. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  3. The role of chemotherapy and radiation in the management of biliary cancer: a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raderer, M.; Pruckmayer, M.; Hejna, M.

    1998-01-01

    Carcinoma of the biliary tract is a rare tumour. To date, there is no therapeutic measure with curative potential apart from surgical intervention. Thus, patients with advanced, i.e. unresectable or metastatic disease, face a dismal prognosis. They present a difficult problem to clinicians as to whether to choose a strictly supportive approach or to expose patients to the side-effects of a potentially ineffective treatment. The objective of this article is to review briefly the clinical trials available in the current literature utilising non-surgical oncological treatment (radiotherapy and chemotherapy) either in patients with advanced, i.e. locally inoperable or metastatic cancer of the biliary tract or as an adjunct to surgery. From 65 studies identified, there seems to be no standard therapy for advanced biliary cancer. Despite anecdotal reports of symptomatic palliation and survival advantages, most studies involved only a small number of patients and were performed in a phase II approach. In addition, the benefit of adjuvant treatment remains largely unproven. No clear trend in favour of radiation therapy could be seen when the studies included a control group. In addition, the only randomised chemotherapeutic series seemed to suggest a benefit of treatment in advanced disease, but due to the small number of patients included, definitive evidence from large, randomised series concerning the benefit of non-surgical oncological intervention as compared with supportive care is still lacking. Patients with advanced biliary tract cancer should be offered the opportunity to participate in clinical trials. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Chemotherapy with ACNU and radiation therapy for malignant glioma in cerebral hemisphere of adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    Fifty four cases of malignant gliomas in adults localized in the cerebral hemisphere including the location of basal ganglia and corpus callosum in 26% were survived over one month and followed more than 2 years after operation for 10 years recently. Histologically they had 40 cases of glioblastoma multiform and 14 cases of anaplastic astrocytoma. All malignant gliomas were given an operation and radiation, classifying 4 groups due to chemotherapeutic methods: Group I (20 cases) was treated by intraarterial infusion of ACNU with 20% mannitol. The others were Group II (8 cases) treated by intraarterial infusion of ACNU only, Group III (13 cases) by intravenous infusion of ACNU only and Group IV (13 cases) by no chemotherapy. Post-operative survival rates in the malignant gliomas of Group I were that 1 year survival rate was in 16 out of 20 cases (80%), 2 years in 55%, and 5 years in 25%. In glioblastoma multiform, 1 year survival rate of Group I was recognized in 70% and 2 years in 36%, a little better than the other treatments. Two year survival rate of other treatments demonstrated 17% in Group II, 25% in Group III, and 11% in Group IV. CT findings of glioblastoma multiform in Group I showed no rest tumor in 4 cases and one case of CR, and 3 cases of PR in the follow up study of 10 cases with rest tumor on CT after operation. There were no permanent complications except for temporary mild neurological deficit in 7% of Group I improving within 2 to 3 days after intraarterial infusion of ACNU and 20% mannitol. It is suggested that chemotherapy of Group I by intraarterial infusion of ACNU and 20% mannitol demonstrated a little better therapeutic efficacy than the other Groups, at least within 2 years after operation. (author).

  5. Phase II/III multicentre randomised controlled trial evaluating a strategy of primary surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy versus peri-operative chemotherapy for resectable gastric signet ring cell adenocarcinomas – PRODIGE 19 – FFCD1103 – ADCI002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piessen, Guillaume; Mariette, Christophe; Messager, Mathieu; Le Malicot, Karine; Robb, William B; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Guilbert, Marie; Moreau, Marie; Christophe, Véronique; Adenis, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    A dramatic increase in the incidence of the diffuse form of gastric adenocarcinomas and particularly signet ring cell carcinomas has been observed in Western countries. Evidence is accruing that signet ring cell carcinomas may have inherent chemo resistance leaving many clinicians unsure of the benefits of delaying surgery to pursue a neoadjuvant approach. PRODIGE-19-FFCD1103-ADCI002 is a prospective multicentre controlled randomised phase II/III trial comparing current standard of care of perioperative chemotherapy (2x3 cycles of Epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) with a strategy of primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (6 cycles of Epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) in patients with a stage IB-III gastric signet ring cell tumour. The principal objective of the phase II study (84 patients) is to determine if the experimental arm (primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy) has sufficient interest in terms of percentage of living patients at 24 months to be evaluated in a phase III trial. If 7 or less patients in the experimental arm are alive at 24 months, phase III will not be initiated. The primary objective of phase III (230 additional patients) is to demonstrate superiority of the experimental arm in terms of overall survival. Secondary endpoints include overall survival at 36 months, disease free survival at 24 and 36 months, R0 resection rates, treatment tolerance, postoperative mortality and morbidity evaluated by Clavien-Dindo severity index, the prognostic impact of positive peritoneal cytology and the assessment of quality of life. An ancillary study will assess the emotional and cognitive impact of surgery and perioperative chemotherapy for both the patient and their partner. As inherent chemo resistance of signet ring cell tumours and delay in definitive surgery may favour tumour progression we hypothesise that a policy of primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy will improve overall survival compared to a standard

  6. Clinical features of pulmonary emboli in patients following cytoreductive surgery (peritonectomy) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec), a single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukadinovic, V; Chiou, J D; Morris, D L

    2015-05-01

    Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) can be complicated by pulmonary emboli (PE). Patients are at high risk due to surgery, underlying malignancy, immobility and indwelling lines. This paper aims to identify clinically significant signs and symptoms preceding acute PE in post CRS-HIPEC patients, assess the PE investigative approach in this population and the significance of PE on patient management. 25 cases with a positive and 50 controls with a negative CTPA for PE were isolated from the peritonectomy database at St George Hospital Sydney, January 2006 to July 2013. Vital signs, patient symptoms, adjunct investigation findings and patient outcomes were collected and graphed in Microsoft Excel. P values and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using GraphPad Prism version 6. 25 of 562 (4.4%) CRS-HIPEC patients were diagnosed with acute PE. Raised body temperature was the only statistically significant clinical finding that differentiated cases from controls (p value 0.02). Arterial blood gas results did not correlate with PE (p values 0.62; 0.29; 0.55, 0.84). Troponin, ECG and CXR were not routinely conducted. CXR and CTPA findings were similar between cases and controls (Table 4). PE patients required lower supplementary oxygen and escalation of care. Body temperature is the only statistically significant clinical finding observed with PE. We recommend a standardised investigative approach consisting of troponin, ECG and CXR. PE in CRS-HIPEC does not cause significant cardio-respiratory dysfunction, or escalation of care. PE rates are higher than other major surgeries, thus we propose a trial with increased chemical prophylaxis in CRS-HIPEC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Unique Case of a Patient with Rectal Cancer Who Developed Benign Esophageal Stenosis after Localized Rectal Radiation and Systemic Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophagitis and esophageal strictures typically occur after local radiation therapy to the thoracic field. Toxicity is usually limited to the field of radiation and potentially augmented by concomitant use of chemotherapy, however esophageal stricturing due to chemotherapy alone is exceedingly rare. Gastrointestinal toxicity has been previously reported in the setting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-based chemotherapy with abnormal thymidylate synthase or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities. We present a unique case of isolated chemotherapy-induced esophageal stricture in the setting of stage IIIa rectal adenocarcinoma which presented shortly after initiation of treatment with 5-FU-based chemotherapy in a patient with normal thymidylate synthase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase assays. These findings prompt further investigation of pathways and potential risk factors leading to esophageal toxicity in patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  8. Broncho-pulmonary toxicity in stage III non small cell lung cancer patients treated with taxol containing chemotherapy and concurrent preoperative or definitive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M. Maddie; Gupta-Burt, Shalina; Recine, Diane C.; Faber, L. Penfield; Warren, William H.; LaFollette, Suzanne; Lincoln, Sarah T.; Bonomi, Philip D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The objective of this trial was to test the feasibility of taxol containing combination chemotherapy and concurrent radiation as preoperative or definitive treatment for stage III non small cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients were treated on this trial. The initial regimen was (Group 1 pts.): paraplatin (P) (AUC of 4) on day 2, etoposide (E) 50 mg po days 1-5 and 8-12, cisplatin (C) 50 mg/m2 on day 21 and taxol (T) 35 mg/m2 escalated to 45 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8, 24 hr. infusion. After treatment of 10 pts., the regimen was modified as follows (Group 2 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1, E 40 mg/m2 IV daily and days 2-5, and T 80 mg/m2 escalated to 120 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. After the next 16 pts., the regimen was modified again as follows (Group 3 pts.): P (AUC of 4) on day 1 and T 120 mg/m2 escalated to 140 mg/m2 on day 1, 3 hr. infusion. Seven patients were treated on the latest version of the regimen for a total of 33 pts. The radiation given was uniform throughout the 3 groups. A dose of 4000 cGy in 20 fxs was given in the surgical arm and 6000 cGy in 30 fxs in the non surgical arm. Treatments were given at 200 cGy/fx. once a day, on a 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off basis. The RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria was used to grade pneumonitis. Post-operative complications were defined as occurring early (less than or equal to 30 days) or late (greater than 30 days) following surgery. Results: Sixteen of the 33 patients went to surgery. Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis developed in 4 of the 33 patients (12%). There were no episodes of Grade 4 pneumonitis. Grade 3 pneumonitis occured in: One patient in Group 1, (RT dose 5800 cGy), 2 pts in Group 2 (RT dose 4000 cGy and 6000 cGy, respectively), and 1 pt in Group 3 (RT dose 6000 cGy). Major post-operative complications occurred in 6 of the 16 patients (37.5%) who went to surgery. In Group 1, 1 pt. required oxygen supplementation secondary to a significant

  9. Induction chemotherapy combined with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Aiqing; Yu Jinming; Zhao Xianguang; Wang Xuetao; Wei Guangsheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect and complication of induction chemotherapy combined with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for locally advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ninety-two such patients were randomized into radiation therapy alone group(RT-, 50 patients) and induction chemotherapy combined radiotherapy group (CMT-, 42 patients). The induction chemotherapy consisted of 2-4 cycles of platinum-based regimen. Results: The overall median survival time was 15 months with 12 months in the RT group and 18 months in the CMT group (P=0.014) respectively. The 1-year overall survival rates were 48.6% and 71.2% in RT and CMT group, respectively (P=0.004). The 2-year survival rates were 20.8% and 37.6% in RT and CMT group, respectively (P=0.041). Treatment was well tolerated and the toxicities were similar in either group. Conclusion: The addition of induction chemotherapy to 3DCRT takes a survival advantage over 3DCRT alone for Stage III NSCLC without increasing toxicities. (authors)

  10. The Impact of Induction Chemotherapy and the Associated Tumor Response on Subsequent Radiation-Related Changes in Lung Function and Tumor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jingfang; Kocak, Zafer; Zhou Sumin; Garst, Jennifer; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Zhang Junan; Larrier, Nicole A.; Hollis, Donna R.; Folz, Rodney J.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of induction chemotherapy, and associated tumor shrinkage, on the subsequent radiation-related changes in pulmonary function and tumor response. Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective institutional review board-approved study, 91 evaluable patients treated definitively with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable lung cancer were analyzed. The rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without pre-RT chemotherapy. In the patients receiving induction chemotherapy, the rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without a response (modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor criteria) to the pre-RT chemotherapy. Comparisons of the rates of improvements in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) post-RT, dyspnea requiring steroids, and percent declines in PFTs post-RT were compared in patient subgroups using Fisher's exact test, analysis of variance, and linear or logistic regression. Results: The use of pre-RT chemotherapy appears to increase the rate of radiation-induced pneumonitis (p = 0.009-0.07), but has no consistent impact on changes in PFTs. The degree of induction chemotherapy-associated tumor shrinkage is not associated with the rate of subsequent RT-associated pulmonary toxicity. The degree of tumor response to chemotherapy is not related to the degree of tumor response to RT. Conclusions: Additional study is needed to better clarify the impact of chemotherapy on radiation-associated disfunction

  11. Is less more? Comparing chemotherapy alone with chemotherapy and radiation for high-risk grade 2 glioma: An analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Jaymin; Liu, Yuan; Chowdhary, Mudit; Buchwald, Zachary S; Gillespie, Theresa W; Olson, Jeffrey J; Voloschin, Alfredo D; Eaton, Bree R; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Crocker, Ian R; Curran, Walter J; Patel, Kirtesh R

    2018-03-15

    The addition of chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy (chemotherapy and radiation therapy [CRT]) improves overall survival (OS) for patients with high-risk grade 2 gliomas; however, the impact of chemotherapy alone (CA) is unknown. This study compares the OS of patients with high-risk grade 2 gliomas treated with CA versus CRT. Patients with high-risk grade 2 gliomas (subtotal resection or age ≥ 40 years) with oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, or mixed tumors were identified with the National Cancer Data Base. Patients were grouped into CA and CRT cohorts. Univariate analyses and multivariate analyses (MVAs) were performed. Propensity score (PS) matching was also implemented. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze OS. A total of 1054 patients with high-risk grade 2 gliomas were identified: 496 (47.1%) received CA, and 558 (52.9%) received CRT. Patients treated with CA were more likely (all P values  6 cm, astrocytoma histology, and older age were predictors for worse OS (all P values < .05). After 1:1 PS matching (n = 331 for each cohort), no OS difference was seen (P = .696) between the CA and CRT cohorts at 5 (69.3% vs 67.4%) and 8 years (52.8% vs 56.7%). No long-term OS difference was seen in patients with high-risk grade 2 gliomas treated with CA versus CRT. These findings are hypothesis-generating, and prospective clinical trials comparing these treatment paradigms are warranted. Cancer 2018;124:1169-78. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (Sphase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this

  13. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee

    2009-01-01

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis

  14. Radiation Induced Rib Fractures on Bone Scan after Breast Cancer Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Zeon, Seok Kil; Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University, School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    This study is to evaluate rib fractures on bone scan in breast cancer patients treated with breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy and to evaluate its relation with radiation therapy and operation modality. Two hundred seventy cases that underwent serial bone scan after breast cancer surgery and radiation therapy were enrolled. Bone scan and chest CT findings of rib fracture were analyzed. The rib uptake was seen in 74 of 270 cases (27.4%) on bone scan and 50 cases (18.5%) were confirmed to have rib fracture by chest CT. The rate of modified radical mastectomy in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (66.0% vs. 27.0%, p=0.000). The rate of additional radiation therapy to axillar or supraclavicular regions in patients with rib fracture was significantly higher than that in patients without rib fracture (62.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.000). Rib fracture was seen most frequently at 1-2 years after radiation therapy (51.9%) and single rib fracture was seen most frequently (55.2%). Of total 106 rib fractures, focal rib uptake was seen in 94 ribs (88.7%) and diffuse rib uptake was seen in 12 ribs (11.3%). On one year follow-up bone scan, complete resolution of rib uptake was seen in 15 ribs (14.2%). On chest CT, the rate of fracture line in ribs with intense uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with mild or moderate uptake (p=0.000). The rate of presence of fracture line in ribs with focal uptake was significantly higher than that in ribs with diffuse uptake (p=0.001). Rib fracture in breast cancer patients after radiation therapy was related to radiation portal and operation modality. It should be interpreted carefully as a differential diagnosis of bone metastasis.

  15. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography and histomorphometry for evaluation of chemotherapy effects in trabecular bone structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessio, R; Almeida, A P; Braz, D; Nogueira, L P; Colaço, M V; Barroso, R C; Andrade, C B V; Salata, C; De Almeida, C E; Ferreira-Machado, S C; Tromba, G

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional microtomography has the potential to examine complete bones of small laboratory animals with very high resolution in a non-invasive way. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to bone changes. In the present work, the femur heads of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D histomorphometry using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur heads of rats in both analyzed groups.

  16. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography and histomorphometry for evaluation of chemotherapy effects in trabecular bone structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, R.; Nogueira, L. P.; Almeida, A. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Braz, D.; Andrade, C. B. V.; Salata, C.; Ferreira-Machado, S. C.; de Almeida, C. E.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional microtomography has the potential to examine complete bones of small laboratory animals with very high resolution in a non-invasive way. One of the side effects caused by some chemotherapy drugs is the induction of amenorrhea, temporary or not, in premenopausal women, with a consequent decrease in estrogen production, which can lead to bone changes. In the present work, the femur heads of rats treated with chemotherapy drugs were evaluated by 3D histomorphometry using synchrotron radiation microcomputed tomography. Control animals were also evaluated for comparison. The 3D tomographic images were obtained at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline at the Elettra Synchrotron Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. Results showed significant differences in morphometric parameters measured from the 3D images of femur heads of rats in both analyzed groups.

  17. Effect of preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy during and after radical operation for esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamichi, Sonoko; Fujino, Yuji; Taenaka, Nobuyuki; Yoshiya, Ikuto; Murata, Atsuo [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Hospital

    1997-10-01

    The effect of preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CR therapy) on peri- and postoperative circulatory and respiratory status was studied retrospectively. Forty-two patients of esophageal cancer who had radical operation were included in this study. Twelve patients had CR therapy before operation (group CR) and 30 patients without CR (group N). During the operation there was more bleeding in group CR than in group N, necessitating more intraoperative blood transfusion in group CR. Body weight of group CR increased more than that of group N from the 1st to the 4th postoperative day. AaDo{sub 2} also increased in group CR on the 1st postoperative day, which was thought to reflect an increase in water in the lungs. Diuretics required during the postoperative period did not show difference between both groups. Plasma IL-6 level was lower in group CR than in group N, although there was no statistical significance. No patients died in both groups. In conclusion, postoperative body weight and AaDo{sub 2} in group CR increased more than those in group N. (author)

  18. Cytological studies of esophageal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma receiving radiation and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T; Nakano, N; Asakawa, H [Miyagi Prefectural Adult Disease Center, Natori (Japan)

    1982-10-01

    The cytology of the endoscopic biopsy materials from 85 cases of esophageal cancer were analyzed for effects of the combined radiotherapy with Bleomycin. Cancer cells were remarkably decreased in number after the combination therapy. Unaffected cancer cells declined to negligible levels in 64 of 79 esophageal cancer cases irradiated more than 6,000 rad. Out of 42 gastric cancer cases treated with only anticancer drugs, 37 cases exhibited cytologic changes in the smears of biopsied materials. About the remnant 5 cases, cancer cells showed partially cytoplasmic swelling, nuclear enlargement and nuclear abnormal stain. The smears of the biopsy and resected specimens from 64 gastric cancer cases with radiation and chemotherapy were cytologically discussed. The combination therapy increased the amount of both necrotic materials and neutrophils in the smears. The cytoplasms of treated cancer cells were swollen, vacuolated and stained abnormally. The nuclei of cancer cells became enlarged, multiple, piknotic and/or stained pale. Nuclear swelling was more prominent in cancer cells of differentiated adenocarcinomas. Cancer cells were decreased in number almost in inverse proportion to irradiation dose. Unaffected cancer cells were disappeared in 13 of 24 cases irradiated more than 6,000 rad, in 7 of 35 cases irradiated in the range 3,000 to 6,000 rad, in none of 5 cases irradiated less than 3,000 rad.

  19. Post-mastectomy radiation therapy and overall survival after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Olga; Pesce, Catherine; Singh, Puneet; Miller, Megan; Tseng, Jennifer; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Winchester, David J; Yao, Katharine

    2017-05-01

    The role of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy is unclear, especially in patients that have post-treatment tumor negative axillary nodes (ypN0). The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify women that had PMRT after NAC and mastectomy for clinically node positive (cN1-2) disease from 2004 to 2008. Median follow-up time was 69 months. 8,321 patients were included for analysis, and 6140 (65.6%) had cN1 disease and 2181 (23.3%) had cN2 disease. On adjusted survival analysis, PMRT was associated with an overall survival (OS) benefit in both patients with cN1 (5-yr OS 75.8% vs. 71.9%, P  0.11) for PMRT compared to those patients who were not ypN0, except for patients with hormone-receptor negative tumors, who had improved OS with PMRT (HR 0.65, P < 0.01). PMRT is associated with improved OS in patients with cN1 and cN2 disease after NAC and mastectomy. However, in the subgroup of patients that were ypN0 after NAC, PMRT improved OS for hormone-receptor negative patients but not hormone-receptor positive patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Ultrasound Evaluation of Thyroid Gland Pathologies After Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy to Treat Malignancy During Childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollert, André, E-mail: andre.lollert@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Gies, Christina; Laudemann, Katharina [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Faber, Jörg [Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Jacob-Heutmann, Dorothee [Department of Radio-oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); König, Jochem [Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Düber, Christoph; Staatz, Gundula [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations between treatment of malignancy by radiation therapy during childhood and the occurrence of thyroid gland pathologies detected by ultrasonography in follow-up examinations. Methods and Materials: Reductions of thyroid gland volume below 2 standard deviations of the weight-specific mean value, occurrence of ultrasonographically detectable thyroid gland pathologies, and hypothyroidism were retrospectively assessed in 103 children and adolescents 7 months to 20 years of age (median: 7 years of age) at baseline (1997-2013) treated with chemoradiation therapy (with the thyroid gland dose assessable) or with chemotherapy alone and followed by ultrasonography and laboratory examinations through 2014 (median follow-up time: 48 months). Results: A relevant reduction of thyroid gland volume was significantly correlated with thyroid gland dose in univariate (P<.001) and multivariate analyses for doses above 2 Gy. Odds ratios were 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 1.02-9.2; P=.046) for medium doses (2-25 Gy) and 14.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-160; P=.027) for high doses (>25 Gy). Thyroid gland dose was significantly higher in patients with thyroid gland pathologies during follow-up (P=.03). Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between hypothyroidism and thyroid gland dose (P<.001). Conclusions: Ultrasonographically detectable changes, that is, volume reductions, pathologies, and hypothyroidism, after malignancy treatment during childhood are associated with thyroid gland dose. Both ultrasonography and laboratory follow-up examinations should be performed regularly after tumor therapy during childhood, especially if the treatment included radiation therapy.

  1. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiation with boost chemotherapy for advanced T-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Faye M.; Garden, Adam S.; Palmer, J. Lynn; Shin, Dong M.; Morrison, William; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Khuri, Fadlo; Clayman, Gary; Goepfert, Helmuth; Ang, K. Kian; Hong, Waun K.; Glisson, Bonnie S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the most common site of failure for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with neoadjuvant cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (PF) and definitive radiation at our center. Based on this, we studied the addition of chemotherapy during the boost phase of radiation after neoadjuvant PF for advanced T-stage (T3-T4) NPC. This strategy was based on theoretical radiosensitization with chemotherapy during accelerated repopulation of the tumor with relatively radioresistant clonogens. Methods and Materials: Three cycles of neoadjuvant PF was followed by conventionally fractionated radiation with additional PF during the boost portion of the radiation course. An initial Phase I study was done to establish the maximum tolerated dose of concurrent PF. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled. Six patients in Phase I defined the MTD for concurrent PF as: cisplatin 10 mg/m 2 /day and PF 320 mg/m 2 /day, on Days 1-5 during Weeks 6 and 7 of radiation therapy based on dose-limiting toxicities of mucositis, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. Forty-one patients were treated with concurrent therapy per protocol: complete, partial, and minor responses were seen in 23, 16, and 2 patients, respectively. Progression-free and overall survival rates at 5 years were 55% (95% CI, 41-75%) and 66% (95% CI, 52-85%), respectively. Seven of 11 tumor-related deaths were due to local recurrence. Nine of 10 patients with local recurrence had T4-stage disease at presentation. Local control of T4 disease was achieved in 74% of patients overall, and in 25% (1/4) with World Health Organization (WHO) type 1, 76% (16/21) with WHO type 2, and 90% (9/10) with WHO type 3 histology. Common toxicities included mucositis, dermatitis, fatigue, vomiting, and weight loss. Conclusions: This regimen was feasible and associated with promising overall survival. Local recurrence remains the major reason for treatment failure in advanced T-stage NPC, especially WHO types 1 and 2

  2. Peritoneal Carcinomatosis of Urachus Origin Treated by Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC): An International Registry of 36 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Frederic; Passot, Guillaume; Villeneuve, Laurent; Levine, Edward A; Yonemura, Yutaka; Goéré, Diane; Sugarbaker, Paul H; Marolho, Christelle; Bartlett, David L; Glehen, Olivier

    2018-04-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis or pseudomyxoma peritonei from urachus is a rare form of presentation, often diagnosed at an advanced state of tumor burden. Because of its rarity, little is known about its natural history, prognosis, or optimal treatment. We searched a large international multicenter database of peritoneal surface disease to identify cases of peritoneal carcinomatosis of urachus that were treated with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) at expert centers. The aim is to improve knowledge and understanding of the disease and standardize its treatment. A prospective multicenter international database was retrospectively searched to identify all patients with urachus tumor and peritoneal metastases who underwent CRS and HIPEC through the Peritoneal Surface Oncology Group International (PSOGI). Postoperative complications, long-term results, and principal prognostic factors were analyzed. The analysis included 36 patients. After median follow-up of 48 months, median overall survival (OS) was 58.5 months. Three- and 5-year OS was 55.4 and 46.2%, respectively. Patients who underwent complete macroscopic CRS had significantly better survival than those treated with incomplete CRS, with median OS not achieved and of 20.1 months, respectively [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4-30.5, p < 0.001]. There were no postoperative deaths, and 37.9% of patients had major complications. CRS and HIPEC may increase long-term survival in selected patients with peritoneal metastases of urachus origin, especially when complete CRS is achieved.

  3. Stage IA non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring; Limited chemotherapy and radiation therapy versus radiation therapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Minoru (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Dept. of Radiology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama (Japan)); Kondo, Makoto (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Hiramatsu, Hideko (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Ikeda, Yasuo (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Hematology); Mikata, Sumio (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Katayama, Michiaki (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Ito, Hisao (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Kusano, Shoichi (Dept. of Radiology, National Defense Medical College, Saitama (Japan)); Kubo, Asuchishi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-01-01

    Seventeen patients with stage IA non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the Waldeyer's ring were treated with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. All lesions were judged as having intermediate grade malignancy in the Working Formulation. Eight patients received combined treatment with three cycles of cylcophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednison (CHOP) and radiation therapy with 30 to 40 Gy. Another 9 patients were treated with radiation therapy 40 to 60 Gy alone. After a median follow-up of 69 months, all 8 patients, treated with combined modality were alive and relapse-free whereas 4 of the 9 treated with irradiation alone had relapsed. All relapses occurred transdiaphragmatically. Two of the 4 relapsing patients were saved, but the other two died of the disease. The 5-year relapse-free and cause-specific survival rates were 100% and 100% in the combined modality group, and 56% and 76% in the radiation therapy alone group (relapse-free: p=0.04, cause-specific: p=0.16). There were no serious complications related to treatment, although most patients complained of mouth dryness and most patients given CHOP had paresthesia. Our opinion was that the total impact of these two side-effects on quality of life was less pronounced after combined modality than after radiation therapy alone. Limited chemotherapy and radiation therapy seemed to be more beneficial than radiation therapy alone not only in relapse-free survival but also in quality of life after treatment. (orig.).

  4. Unresectable Retiform Hemangioendothelioma Treated with External Beam Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Z. Hirsh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retiform hemangioendothelioma (RH is an infrequently encountered vascular neoplasm of intermediate or borderline malignancy. Treatment of RH is controversial. We present a case of a 44-year-old Asian male presenting with an unresectable RH of the pelvis. The patient was treated with concurrent low-dose Cisplatin and External beam Radiation (4140cGy in 180cGy per fraction. This is the first report of a clinical complete response and a long-term local control of this rare tumor. This has significant clinical implication, since it gives the first evidence of treatment of this rare tumor using concurrent low-dose chemotherapy and radiation.

  5. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, Eli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tao, Yebin [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D{sub 50} doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  6. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapir, Eli; Tao, Yebin; Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A.; Feng, Mary; Schipper, Matthew; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D_5_0 doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  7. Radiation and concurrent chemotherapy for the treatment of Lewis lung tumor and B16 melanoma tumor in C57/BL mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, J.E.; Barron, G.

    1984-01-01

    C57/BL mice bearing either Lewis lung tumor or B16 melanoma tumor were treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. The treatment results were determined in vivo by tumor regrowth delay assay. When continuous infusion of either Cyclophosphamide (CYCLO) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or Adriamycin (ADRIA) or Mitomycin-C (MITO-C) was used in combination with continuous radiation at 1 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. When multiple drug chemotherapy, FAM (5-FU, ADRIA, MITO-C) was administered in combination with radiation at 80 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. In these two murine tumor models, when clinically relevant concentrations of commonly used chemotherapy agents were combined with radiation, no therapeutic advantage was observed

  8. Augmented therapy of extensive Hodgkin's disease: radiation to bulk disease or prolongation of induction chemotherapy did not improve survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafla, S.; Coleman, M.; Propert, K.; Glicksman, A.; Peterson, B.; Nissen, N.; Brunner, K.; Kaufmann, T.; Holland, J.; Anderson, J.; Gottlieb, A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective, randomized trial in extensive, untreated Hodgkin's disease was undertaken to assess the potential benefit of augmented therapy (12 months chemotherapy or radiation to 'bulk' disease) compared to standard, six months chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred fifty-eight patients, mostly stage IV, were randomized to four treatment regimens consisting of 6 cycles of CCNU, vinblastine, procarbazine, and prednisone (CVPP); 12 cycles of CVPP; 6 cycles of CVPP followed by 25 Gray (Gy) radiotherapy; or 3 cycles CVPP, 25 Gy radiotherapy, and 3 cycles CVPP. Results: Complete remissions were achieved in 65% of all patients. A 58% overall 5 year survival was obtained. Relapses in irradiated areas of bulk disease occurred in only 6% of responding patients. There was, however, no statistical difference in response frequency, disease free survival or overall survival amongst the four regimens. Elderly patients responded less frequently. Conclusion: While radiotherapy provided control of local (bulk) disease, no impact on overall survival was apparent. Likewise doubling the duration of chemotherapy did not improve response or survival. Augmentation of therapy with either radiotherapy or more chemotherapy in this study was of no benefit when compared to the standard six months of treatment

  9. Clinical efficacy of breast-conserving surgery combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer: a report of 81 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu CAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with breast-conserving surgery for locally advanced breast cancer. Methods Eighty-one patients with locally advanced breast cancer were selected from those who were admitted into 309 Hospital of PLA from January 2009 to October 2013, consisting of 65 patients in stage Ⅲa and 16 in stage Ⅲb, and they were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with breast-conserving surgery. The clinical efficacy [complete response (CR, partial response (PR, stable disease (SD and progress disease (PD] was observed during follow-up. Results All the patients were followed-up for 12-60 months with a median of 34 months. There were 12 CR patients (14.8%, including 4 with pathological complete response (4.9%, and 52 PR patients (64.2%, 17 SD patients (21.0%. No PD was observed. The overall response rate(ORR was 79.0%(64/81. After follow-up for 12-60 months (median 34 months, distant metastasis to the lung, liver, meninges and bone occurred in 3 patients (3.7%, 3/81 and 1 of them died. Forty-eight patients received breastconserving surgery. The local recurrence rate was 6.3% (3/48. Assessment of cosmetic result was carried out in 48 patients who received breast-conserving surgery and comprehensive treatment for one year, and excellent results were obtained in 14.6% (7/48, good in 43.8% (21/48, and poor in 41.7% (20/48. Conclusions The therapeutic efficacy of locally advanced breast cancer is satisfactory by neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery. Standardization of excision and postoperative radiotherapy, systemic comprehensive treatment is the key to the success of the treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.14

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  11. Results of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osteen, R.T.; Smith, B.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    For stage I or II breast cancer, conservative surgery and radiation therapy are as effective as modified radical or radical mastectomy. In most cases, cosmetic considerations and the availability of therapy are the primary concerns. The extent of a surgical resection less than a mastectomy has not been a subject of a randomized trial and is controversial. It appears that removal of a quadrant of the breast for small lesions is safe but excessive. It may be possible to limit the breast resection to gross tumor removal for most patients while using wider resections for patients with an extensive intraductal component or for invasive lobular carcinoma. It also appears that excluding patients from breast conservation on the basis of positive margins on the first attempt at tumor excision may be unnecessarily restrictive. Although patients with an extensive intraductal component or invasive lobular carcinoma should have negative margins, it appears that a patient with predominantly invasive ductal carcinoma can be treated without re-excision if all gross tumor has been resected and there is no reason to suspect extensive microscopic disease. Patients with indeterminate margins should have a re-excision. Axillary dissection provides prognostic information and prevents progression of the disease within the axilla. Axillary dissections limited to level I will accurately identify a substantial number of patients who have pathologically positive but clinically negative nodes. When combined with radiation therapy to the axilla, a level I dissection results in a limited number of patients with progressive axillary disease. Patients with pathologically positive axillas and patients at particularly high risk for systemic disease because of the extent of axillary node involvement can be identified by dissections of levels I and II. 60 references.

  12. Fat Composition Changes in Bone Marrow During Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Pritz, Jakub [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Bydder, Mark [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Gulaya, Sachin; Zhu, He; Williamson, Casey W. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Welch, Christian S. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Bydder, Graeme [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify changes in bone marrow fat fraction and determine associations with peripheral blood cell counts. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 19 patients received either highly myelotoxic treatment (radiation therapy plus cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil mitomycin C [FU/MMC], or cisplatin/5-FU/cetuximab) or less myelotoxic treatment (capecitabine-radiation therapy or no concurrent chemotherapy). Patients underwent MR imaging and venipuncture at baseline, midtreatment, and posttreatment visits. We performed mixed effects modeling of the mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF[%]) by linear time, treatment, and vertebral column region (lumbar [L]4-sacral [S]2 vs thoracic [T]10-L3 vs cervical[C]3-T9), while controlling for cumulative mean dose and other confounders. Spearman rank correlations were performed by white blood cell (WBC) counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) before and after treatment. Results: Cumulative mean dose was associated with a 0.43% per Gy (P=.004) increase in PDFF(%). In the highly myelotoxic group, we observed significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit within L4-S2 (10.1%, P<.001) and within T10-L3 (3.93%, P=.01), relative to the reference C3-T9. In the less myelotoxic group, we did not observe significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit according to region. Within L4-S2, we observed a significant difference between treatment groups in the change in PDFF(%) per visit (5.36%, P=.04). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in WBC versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within T10-S2 ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 (P<.05). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in absolute neutrophil counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within L4-S2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 (P<.05). Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging fat quantification is sensitive to marrow composition changes that result from chemoradiation therapy. These changes are associated with peripheral blood cell counts. This study supports a

  13. Fat Composition Changes in Bone Marrow During Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Ruben; Pritz, Jakub; Bydder, Mark; Gulaya, Sachin; Zhu, He; Williamson, Casey W.; Welch, Christian S.; Vaida, Florin; Bydder, Graeme; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify changes in bone marrow fat fraction and determine associations with peripheral blood cell counts. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 19 patients received either highly myelotoxic treatment (radiation therapy plus cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil mitomycin C [FU/MMC], or cisplatin/5-FU/cetuximab) or less myelotoxic treatment (capecitabine-radiation therapy or no concurrent chemotherapy). Patients underwent MR imaging and venipuncture at baseline, midtreatment, and posttreatment visits. We performed mixed effects modeling of the mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF[%]) by linear time, treatment, and vertebral column region (lumbar [L]4-sacral [S]2 vs thoracic [T]10-L3 vs cervical[C]3-T9), while controlling for cumulative mean dose and other confounders. Spearman rank correlations were performed by white blood cell (WBC) counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) before and after treatment. Results: Cumulative mean dose was associated with a 0.43% per Gy (P=.004) increase in PDFF(%). In the highly myelotoxic group, we observed significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit within L4-S2 (10.1%, P<.001) and within T10-L3 (3.93%, P=.01), relative to the reference C3-T9. In the less myelotoxic group, we did not observe significant changes in PDFF(%) per visit according to region. Within L4-S2, we observed a significant difference between treatment groups in the change in PDFF(%) per visit (5.36%, P=.04). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in WBC versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within T10-S2 ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 (P<.05). Rank correlations of the inverse log differences in absolute neutrophil counts versus the differences in PDFF(%) overall and within L4-S2 ranged from 0.79 to 0.81 (P<.05). Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging fat quantification is sensitive to marrow composition changes that result from chemoradiation therapy. These changes are associated with peripheral blood cell counts. This study supports a

  14. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients with unresectable disease; advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer with the intent of larynx preservation, or advanced nasopharynx cancer. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Veterans Administration and EORTC larynx preservation studies. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  15. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients seeking to avoid potentially morbid surgical procedures or with unresectable disease. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Memorial Hospital experience with larynx preservation and the Veterans Administration larynx preservation study. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  16. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow and Liver Function during Closed Abdominal Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy following Cytoreduction Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dupont

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP during closed abdominal hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC leads to major haemodynamic changes and potential organ dysfunction. We investigated these effects on hepatic blood flow (HBF and liver function in patients undergoing HIPEC following cytoreductive surgery and fluid management guided by dynamic preload indices. Methods. In this prospective observational clinical study including 15 consecutive patients, we evaluated HBF by transesophageal echocardiography and liver function by determination of the indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (ICG-PDR. Friedman’s two-way analysis of variance by ranks and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were performed for statistical analysis. Results. During HIPEC, HBF was markedly reduced, resulting in the loss of any pulsatile Doppler flow signal in all but one patient. The ICG-PDR, expressed as median (interquartile 25–75, decreased from 23 (20–30 %/min to 18 (12.5–19 %/min (p<0.001. Despite a generous crystalloid infusion rate (27 (22–35 ml/kg/h, cardiac index decreased during the increased IAP period, inferior vena cava diameter decreased, stroke volume variation and pulse pressure variation increased, lung compliance dropped, and there was an augmentation in plateau pressure. All changes were significant (p<0.001 and reversed to baseline values post HIPEC. Conclusion. Despite optimizing intravenous fluids during closed abdominal HIPEC, we observed a marked decrease in HBF and liver function. Both effects were transient and limited to the period of HIPEC but could influence the choice between closed or open abdominal cavity procedure for HIPEC and should be considered in similar clinical situations of increased IAP.

  17. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sun Young [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Surgery, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Ju [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  18. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  19. The value of f-18 FDG PET /CT in the assessment of recurrent ovarian cancer after cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Zeon, Seok Kil; Won, Kyoung Sook

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and clinical impact of integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) for detection of recurrent ovarian carcinoma after cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy. Medical records of 39 patients (age, 54.912.6 years) with previously treated ovarian cancer who underwent integrated PET/CT between April 1, 2007 and June 30, 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT was performed for the evaluation of suspected recurrence. Imaging findings were compared with results of histological examination after surgical exploration or clinical follow-up to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT in the evaluation of disease status. The clinical impact of information provided by PET/CT on patient management was assessed on the basis of clinical follow up data concerning further diagnostic or therapeutic approach. Sixteen of the 39 patients had documented recurrence during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up. Of the 16 patients with recurrence, 14 patients showed suspected lesions on PET/CT. Twenty-three of the 39 patients had no evidence of recurrent tumor during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up, and two of the 23 patients with no recurrent tumor showed suspected lesions on PET/CT. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT were 87.5 %, 91.3 %, 89.7 %, 87.5 % and 91.3 %, respectively. PET/CT modified the diagnostic or treatment plan in 15 (38.4 %) patients, by leading to the use of previously unplanned therapeutic procedures in 10 (66.7 %) patients and the avoidance of previously planned diagnostic procedures in 5 (33.3 %) patients. Integrated FDG PET/CT has high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of recurrent ovarian cancer. Thus, it is likely to play a significant role in management of recurrent ovarian cancer

  20. The role of chemotherapy in brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohori, Hisatsugu; Takahashi, Shin; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases have a very poor prognosis with a median survival of 1-2 months. Despite the use of surgery and radiotherapy including whole-brain radiation and stereotactic radiosurgery to locally control brain metastases, survival times for those patients has not improved. Although chemotherapy plays a limited role in the treatment of brain metastases, metastases from lung or breast cancer are often well-controlled by chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggest that brain metastases are equally sensitive to chemotherapy as are metastases elsewhere in the body in particular chemotherapy-naive cases. Finally, since nearly a half of patients with brain metastases die from progression of systemic disease, control of systemic disease as well as intracranial disease are both important. (author)

  1. Sites of local recurrence after surgery, with or without chemotherapy, for rectal cancer: implications for radiotherapy field design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruby, George; Barton, Michael; Miles, Sharon; Carroll, Susan; Nasser, Elias; Stevens, Graham

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the sites of pelvic recurrence in patients with rectal cancer previously untreated with radiotherapy to determine the relative frequency and location of recurrence within the pelvis. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer referred to three radiation oncology departments between 1984 and 1997 were reviewed. The data collected included the date and type of the initial resection and the pathologic findings. The site of recurrence within the pelvis, presence of metastasis, and date of recurrence were documented. Results: A total of 269 patients were included. Tumor had invaded through the muscularis in 74% and involved other organs in 9%. Fifty-two percent of patients were node positive at initial surgery. The median time to local recurrence from surgery was 18 months (range 15-20) and from local recurrence to death was 14 months (range 12-17). Both the initial tumor stage and the resection type influenced the recurrence location within the pelvis (p<0.01). T4 tumors comprised only 9% of initial T stage tumors but accounted for 38% of anterior central pelvic recurrences (p<0.01). All perineal recurrences occurred after abdominoperineal resection. The sites of recurrence within the pelvis were the posterior central pelvis (47%) and anastomotic (21%). Conclusion: If those patients with T4 tumors at presentation were excluded, 89% had local recurrence at, or posterior to, the anastomosis. Furthermore, if we exclude both patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection and those with T4 tumors at presentation, the rate increases to 93%. The rate of recurrence anteriorly (7%) does not justify routine radiation of the anterior pelvis beyond that required to adequately cover the anastomotic site

  2. Mucosite bucal rádio e quimioinduzida Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O aumento da intensidade da quimioterapia e radioterapia no tratamento do câncer tem elevado a incidência de efeitos colaterais, em especial da mucosite bucal. OBJETIVO E MÉTODO: Através de revisão bibliográfica realizou-se atualizar informações quanto à definição, características clínicas, incidência, etiologia, patofisiologia, morbidade associada, prevenção e tratamento dessa manifestação clínica. RESULTADOS: Estudos atuais definem a mucosite bucal como uma inflamação e ulceração dolorosa bastante freqüente na mucosa bucal apresentando formação de pseudomembrana. Sua incidência e severidade são influenciadas por variáveis associadas ao paciente e ao tratamento a que ele é submetido. A mucosite é conseqüência de dois mecanismos maiores: toxicidade direta da terapêutica utilizada sobre a mucosa e mielossupressão gerada pelo tratamento. Sua patofisiologia é composta por quatro fases interdependentes: fase inflamatória/vascular, fase epitelial, fase ulcerativa/bacteriológica e fase de reparação. É considerada fonte potencial de infecções com risco de morte, sendo a principal causa de interrupção de tratamentos antineoplásicos. Algumas intervenções mostraram-se potencialmente efetivas para sua prevenção e tratamento. Entretanto, faz-se necessária a realização de novos estudos clínicos mais bem conduzidos para obtenção de melhor evidência científica acerca do agente terapêutico de escolha para o controle da mucosite bucal, permitindo a realização da quimioterapia e radioterapia do câncer em parâmetros ideais.Tincreasing the intensity of radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the management of cancer has increased the incidence of adverse effects, especially oral mucositis. AIM AND METHODS: a bibliographical review was conducted on the definition of oral mucositis, its clinical findings, the incidence, its etiology, the pathofisiology, associated morbidity, prevention and treatment

  3. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, Ying J.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m 2 weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m 2 every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m 2 or 40 mg/m 2 of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m 2 were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer

  4. Rectum neoplasms treatment advanced with radio and chemotherapy before - surgery; Tratamiento de cancer de recto localmente avanzado con radioterapia y quimioterapia preoperatoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luongo Cespedes, A; Aguiar Vitacca, S [and others

    1993-12-01

    In Uruguay the colorectal neoplasms has a can rate of mobility. The surgery has 13-26% local recurrence. The irradiation before surgery has demonstrated to improve the resect and the local control.The objective of this protocol it is to decrease the percentage of local relapse , using radiotherapy(RT) before surgery and concomitant chemotherapy that potencies the effect of the RT, improvement this way the therapeutic quotient (AU) [Spanish] En Uruguay el cancer colorrectal tiene una lata tasa de mortalidad.La cirugia exclusiva,tiene 13-26 % de recurrencias locales.La irradiacion preoperatoria ha demostrado mejorar la resecabilidad y el control local.El objetivo de este protocolo es disminuir el porcentaje de recidiva local,utilizando radioterapia(RT) preoperatoria y quimioterapia concomitante que potencie el efecto de la RT,mejorando asi el cociente terapeutico (AU)

  5. Prognostic value of hemoglobin concentrations in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with combined radio-chemotherapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.; Hermann, R.; Koch, O.; Hartlapp, J.; Krech, R.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Hemoglobin levels are currently the focus of interest as prognostic factors in patients with head and neck cancer. Most published clinical trials have confirmed hemoglobin to process a significant influence on survival in patients treated with radiotherapy. In our study we have investigated the prognostic value of hemoglobin in a combined modality schedule. Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients with advanced head and neck tumors were treated with combined radiochemotherapy. The therapy comprised 2 courses of induction chemotherapy with ifosfamide (1,500 mg/m 2 , day 1 to 5) and cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 , day 5) followed by hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with a total dose of only 30 Gy. Surgery involved tumor resection and neck dissection. Results: The 1-year overall survival rate and the 2-year survival rate were 79% and 56%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rates were 68% and 49%, respectively. Prognostic factors with an impact on survival were seen in tumor size (T3 vs T4, p=0.0088), response to radio-chemotherapy at the primary site (no vital tumor rest vs vital tumor rest, p=0.045), response to lymph node radio-chemotherapy (no vital tumor cells vs vital tumor cells, p=0.013) and level of hemoglobin after radio-chemotherapy (Hb≥11.5 g/dl vs [de

  6. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  7. Radical Radiation Therapy After Lung-Sparing Surgery for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Survival, Pattern of Failure, and Prognostic Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minatel, Emilio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Bearz, Alessandra [Department of Medical Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Di Maso, Matteo [Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Baresic, Tania [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Drigo, Annalisa; Barresi, Loredana [Department of Medical Physics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Furlan, Carlo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Del Conte, Alessandro [Department of Medical Oncology, Pordenone General Hospital, Pordenone (Italy); Bruschi, Gioia [Department of Pneumology, Pordenone General Hospital, Pordenone (Italy); Fontana, Paolo [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Mestre General Hospital, Mestre (Italy); Pagan, Vittore [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Franchin, Giovanni [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the survival, patterns of failure, and prognostic factors in a large cohort of patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who had undergone a novel trimodal therapeutic approach, including lung-sparing surgery, chemotherapy, and subsequent treatment with high doses of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole hemithorax. Methods and Materials: The analysis was conducted on the data from 69 patients. Of the 69 patients, 35 underwent extended pleurectomy/decortication (P/D), with resection of the entire pleura, along with portions of the pericardium and diaphragm and 34, partial pleurectomy, defined as partial removal of parietal or visceral pleura for diagnostic purposes, leaving gross tumor behind in all cases. All patients received cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy. Postoperative IMRT was delivered to the entire hemithorax, excluding the intact lung. The IMRT dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Any fluorodeoxyglucose-avid areas or regions of particular concern for residual disease were given a simultaneous boost to 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up duration was 19 months. No difference was seen in overall survival and locoregional control between the extended P/D group and the partial pleurectomy group. The 2-year overall survival was 65% and 58% in the extended P/D and partial pleurectomy groups, respectively (P=.94). Locoregional control at 2 years was 65% and 64% in the extended P/D and partial pleurectomy groups, respectively (P=.75). The predominant pattern of failure was distant: 19 patients (27.5%) developed distant metastases as the first site of relapse. Gross residual disease after surgery was significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio 3.45). One fatal pneumonitis was reported; 14 cases (20%) of grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis were documented. Conclusions: Radical IMRT after lung-sparing surgery and chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma leads to promising survival results and

  8. Is a reduction in radiation lung volume and dose necessary with paclitaxel chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Alphonse G; Assaad, Sherif I; Niemierko, Andrzej; Floyd, Scott R; Powell, Simon N

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate and quantify the effect of irradiated lung volume, radiation dose, and paclitaxel chemotherapy on the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes. We previously reported the incidence of RP among 41 patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy. We recorded the central lung distance, a measure of the extent of lung included in the RT volume, in these patients. We used this measure and the historical and observed rates of RP in our series to model the lung tolerance to RT in patients receiving chemotherapy (CHT) both with and without paclitaxel. To evaluate the risk factors for the development of RP, we performed a case-control study comparing paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP with those who did not, and a second case-control study comparing patients receiving paclitaxel in addition to standard CHT/RT (n = 41) and controls receiving standard CHT/RT alone (n = 192). The actuarial rate of RP in the paclitaxel-treated group was 15.4% compared with 0.9% among breast cancer patients treated with RT and non-paclitaxel-containing CHT. Our mathematical model found that the effective lung tolerance for patients treated with paclitaxel was reduced by approximately 24%. No statistically significant difference was found with regard to the dose delivered to specific radiation fields, dose per fraction, central lung distance, or percentage of lung irradiated in the case-control study of paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP compared with those who did not. In the comparison of 41 patients receiving RT and CHT with paclitaxel and 192 matched controls receiving RT and CHT without paclitaxel, the only significant differences identified were the more frequent use of a supraclavicular radiation field and a decrease in the RT lung dose among the paclitaxel-treated patients. This finding indicates that the major factor associated with development

  9. Treatment results and complications in clinical combinations of radiation and chemotherapy in the treatment of localized cancer in the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Norie; Shigematsu, Yasushi

    1981-01-01

    By using chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy, significant improvements were achieved in treatment results of localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, intraoral cancer, and carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Administering chemotherapy with radiation was given sumultaneously in the patients with intraoral cancer (BLM iv) and with carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (5-FU ia). In the patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chemotherapy (1 or 2 cycles of COPP) was administered and followed by radiotherapy. If radiation dose were reduced by about 50% in the intraoral cancer, 20% in carcinoma of the maxillary sinus, and 10% in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute and/or chronic complications were within tolerable limits in this series of observations, although toxicity was dose-related for both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m 2 intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m 2 intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of ≥180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  11. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  12. Postoperative radiation therapy following laser surgery in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, O.; Schmidberger, H.; Christiansen, H.; Florez, R.; Hess, C.F.; Jackel, M.C.; Steiner, W.

    2002-01-01

    The results achieved with trans oral micro-surgery in advanced head and neck carcinoma with adjuvant radiotherapy are comparable to those with radical surgery. The haemoglobin level has an important role in the loco regional control and on survival. Split course radiation therapy regimen has not a place in the adjuvant situation. (author)

  13. The Impact of Skin-Sparing Mastectomy With Immediate Reconstruction in Patients With Stage III Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Postmastectomy Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Roshan; Godette, Karen; Carlson, Grant; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Fasola, Carolina; O’Regan, Ruth; Zelnak, Amelia; Torres, Mylin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The safety and efficacy of skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM) with immediate reconstruction (IR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer are unclear. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of women with noninflammatory Stage III SSM with IR vs. non–SSM-treated women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and March 2010, 100 consecutive patients (40 SSM with IR vs. 60 non-SSM) with Stage III breast cancer received anthracycline- and/or taxane-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, and adjuvant XRT. Clinical stage (SSM with IR vs. for non-SSM) was IIIA (75% vs. 67%), IIIB (8% vs. 18%), and IIIC (8% vs. 8%). Tumors greater than 5 cm were found in 74% vs. 69%; 97% of patients in both groups were clinically node positive; and 8% vs. 18% had T4b disease. Results: The time from initial biopsy to XRT was prolonged for SSM–IR patients (274 vs. 254 days, p = 0.04), and there was a trend toward XRT delay of more than 8 weeks (52% vs. 31%, p = 0.07) after surgery. The rate of complications requiring surgical intervention was higher in the SSM–IR group (37.5% vs. 5%, p < 0.001). The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, breast cancer–specific survival, and overall survival rates for SSM with IR vs. non-SSM were 94.7% vs. 97.4%, 91.5% vs. 86.3%, and 87.4% vs. 84.8%, respectively (p = not significant). Conclusions: In our small study with limited follow-up, SSM with IR prolonged overall cancer treatment time and trended toward delaying XRT but did not impair oncologic outcomes. Complication rates were significantly higher in this group. Longer follow-up is needed.

  14. Obesity and Peritoneal Surface Disease: Outcomes after Cytoreductive Surgery with Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Appendiceal and Colon Primary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Swords, Douglas S.; Swett, Katrina R.; Randle, Reese W.; Shen, Perry; Stewart, John H.; Levine, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 37 % of the U.S. population is obese. It is unknown how obesity influences the operative and survival outcomes of cytoreductive surgery (CRS)/hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) procedures. Methods A retrospective analysis of a prospective database of 1,000 procedures was performed. Type of malignancy, performance status, resection status, hospital and intensive care unit stay, comorbidities, morbidity, mortality, and survival were reviewed. Results A total of 246 patients with body mass index (BMI) of >30 kg/m2 underwent 272 CRS/HIPEC procedures. Ninety-five (38.6 %) were severely obese (BMI > 35 kg/m2). A total of 135 (49.6 %) procedures were performed for appendiceal and 60 (22.1 %) for colon cancer. Median follow-up was 52 months. Both major and minor morbidity were similar for obese and non-obese patients. The 30-day mortality rates for obese and nonobese patients were 1.5 and 2.5 %, respectively. Median intensive care unit and hospital stay were 1 and 9 days, regardless of BMI. The 30-day readmission rate was similar between obese and non-obese patients (24.8 vs. 19.4 %, p = 0.11). Median survival for low-grade appendiceal cancer (LGA) was 76 months for obese patients and 107 months for non-obese patients (p = 0.32). Survival was worse for severely obese patients (median survival 54 months) versus non-obese patients with LGA (p = 0.04). Survival was similar for obese and non-obese patients with peritoneal surface disease (PSD) from colon cancer or high-grade appendiceal cancer. Conclusions Obesity does not influence postoperative morbidity or mortality of patients with PSD, regardless of primary tumor. Severe obesity is associated with decreased long-term survival only in patients with LGA primary disease; however, application of CRS/HIPEC still offers meaningful prolongation of life. Obesity should not be considered a contraindication for CRS/HIPEC procedures. PMID:23800899

  15. Photon buildup factors of some chemotherapy drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaz, Esra; Ahmadishadbad, Nader; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2015-02-01

    Everyday more and more people are diagnosed with some form of cancer. Some are treatable with chemotherapy alone, while others need radiotherapy and occasionally surgery. Recently, concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been increasingly used in cancer treatment, leading to improvements in survival as well as quality of life. Accordingly, interaction of chemotherapy drugs with radiation will be meaningful to examine. In the present study, gamma ray energy absorption and exposure of buildup factors were computed using the five-parameter geometric progression (G-P) fitting formula for some chemotherapy drugs in the energy range 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free path (mfp). The generated energy absorption (EABF) and exposure buildup factors (EBF) of chemotherapy drugs have been studied as a function of penetration depth and incident photon energy. The significant variations in EABF and EBF for chemotherapy drugs have been observed at the moderate energy region. It has been concluded that the buildup of photons is less in azathioprine and is more in vinblastine compared with other drugs. Buildup factors investigated in the present work could be useful in radiation dosimetry and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Which dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma benefit most from chemotherapy after surgery? Results from an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A F; Groenwold, R H H; Amsellem, P; Bacon, N; Klungel, O H; Hoes, A W; de Boer, A; Kow, K; Maritato, K; Kirpensteijn, J; Nielen, M

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a malignant tumor of mesenchymal origin that produces osteoid. Given that the prognosis can vary considerably between dogs, we aimed to explore whether treatment could be tailored towards patient subgroups, characterized by their predicted risk of mortality. For the current study, a subset of five nonrandomized studies (400 subjects of whom 88 were dead at 5 months follow-up) was used from a previously published 20 study individual patient data meta-analysis. Missing data was dependent on observed variables and was imputed to correct for this dependency. Based on a previously published multivariable prognostic model, the 5-month mortality risk was predicted. Subsequently, in surgically treated dogs, using a logistic regression model with a random intercept for a study indicator, we explored whether chemotherapy effectiveness depended on predicted 5-month mortality risk. After adjustment for potential confounders the main effect of any chemotherapy was 0.48 (odds ratio) (95%CI 0.30; 0.78). Testing for chemotherapy by predicted 5-month mortality risk interaction revealed that the effects of any chemotherapy decreased with increasing predicted risk; interaction OR 3.41 (1.07; 10.84). Results from individually comparing carboplatin, cisplatin, doxorubicin and doxorubicin combination therapy to no chemotherapy, were similar in magnitude and direction. These results indicate that the main treatment effects of chemotherapy do not necessarily apply to all patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis,

  18. Preoperative Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Bulky Stage IB2, IIA, and IIB Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix With Proximal Parametrial Invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, Florence; Cojocariu, Oana-Maria; Levy, Pierre; Lefranc, Jean-Pierre; Darai, Emile; Jannet, Denis; Ansquer, Yan; Lhuillier, Pierre-Eugene; Benifla, Jean-Louis; Seince, Nathalie; Touboul, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity, local tumor control, and survival after preoperative chemoradiation for operable bulky cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and July 2006, 92 patients with operable bulky stage IB2, IIA, and IIB cervical carcinoma without pelvic or para-aortic nodes on pretreatment imaging were treated. Treatment consisted of preoperative external beam pelvic radiation therapy (EBRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CT) during the first and fourth weeks of radiation combining 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The pelvic radiation dose was 40.5 Gy over 4.5 weeks. EBRT was followed by low-dose rate uterovaginal brachytherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 62 patients. After a median rest period of 44 days, all patients underwent Class II modified radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Thirty patients who had not received preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy underwent postoperative low-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy at a dose of 20 Gy. The mean follow-up was 46 months. Results: Pathologic residual tumor was observed in 43 patients. After multivariate analysis, additional preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy was the single significant predictive factor for pathologic complete response rate (p = 0.019). The 2- and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.4% and 72.2%, respectively. Pathologic residual cervical tumor was the single independent factor decreasing the probability of DFS (p = 0.020). Acute toxicities were moderate. Two severe ureteral complications requiring surgical intervention were observed. Conclusions: Concomitant chemoradiation followed by surgery for operable bulky stage I-II cervical carcinoma without clinical lymph node involvement can be used with acceptable toxicity. Pathologic complete response increases the probability of DFS

  19. Pregnancies and menstrual function before and after combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy (TVPP) for Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacher, M.J.; Toner, K.

    1986-01-01

    The menstrual cycle, pregnancies, and offspring were evaluated before and after initial combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy with thiotepa, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (TVPP), in 34 women between the ages of 18 and 44 (median 26.5 years) treated for Stage II and Stage III Hodgkin's disease. The median range of follow-up is 83.1 months (range 40.5-140). After therapy 94.1% (32/34) continued to menstruate. Two of the four patients over the age of 35 ceased to menstruate. All patients under the age of 35 continued to menstruate (30/30). Age at the time of diagnosis was the only factor affecting change in menses with a significant probability (p = .001) that women greater than 30 years of age will experience some change in menstrual pattern. Seventeen pregnancies occurred in 12 women after therapy; 2 had 4 elective abortions; 10 delivered 12 children with normal physical development; 1 will deliver six months from now. Twelve of thirteen patients who wanted to become pregnant have conceived. The ability to become pregnant and deliver normal children after intensive treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy (RT/TVPP) was comparable to the patients' pretreatment record.

  20. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers; Radiotherapie postoperatoire apres chirurgie laser avec ou sans chimiotherapie dans les cancers evolues de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Morvan, Dept. de Cancerologie, Brest (France); Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C. [Universitatsklinikum, Dept. de Cancerologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  1. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients' age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  2. Hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, I. K.; Kim, J. C. [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-09-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with surgery has an important role in the therapy of the head and neck cancer. We conducted a prospective study for patients with head and neck cancer treated with surgery and radiation to evaluate the effect of therapies on the thyroid gland, and to identify the factors that might influence the development of hypothyroidism. From September 1986 through December 1994, 71 patients with head and cancer treated with surgery and radiation were included in this prospective study. Patients` age ranged from 32 to 73 years with a median age of 58 years. There were 12 women and 59 men. Total laryngectomy with neck dissection was carried out in 45 patients and neck dissection alone in 26 patients. All patients were serially monitored for thyroid function before and after radiation therapy. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 40.6Gy to 60Gy with a median dose of 50Gy. The follow-up duration was 3 to 80 months. The overall incidence of hypothyroidism was 56.3% (40/71); 7 out of 71 patients (9.9%) developed clinical hypothyroidism and 33 patients (46.4%) developed subclinical hypothyroidism. No thyroid nodules, thyroid cancers, or hyperthyroidism was detected. The risk factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was a combination of surgery (total laryngectomy with neck dissection) and radiation therapy (P=0.0000). Four of 26 patients (15.4%) with neck dissection alone developed hypothyroidism while 36 of 45 patients (80%) with laryngectomy and neck dissection developed hypothyroidism. The hypothyroidism following surgery and radiation therapy was a relatively common complication. The factor that significantly influenced the incidence of hypothyroidism was combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Evaluation of thyroid function before and after radiation therapy with periodic thyroid function tests is recommended for an early detection of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone replacement therapy is

  3. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction chemotherapy plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in the definitive treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Sang; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Schindelheim, Rachel; Ng, Kenneth K.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institution's experience using chemotherapy in conjunction with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 152 patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with 3D-CRT at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. A total of 137 patients (90%) were surgically staged with either thoracotomy or mediastinoscopy. The remainder were staged radiographically. Seventy patients were treated with radiation therapy alone, and 82 patients received induction chemotherapy before radiation. The majority of chemotherapy-treated patients received a platinum-containing regimen. Radiation was delivered with a 3D conformal technique using CT-based treatment planning. The median dose in the radiation alone group was 70.2 Gy, while in the combined modality group, it was 64.8 Gy. Results: The median follow-up time was 30.5 months among survivors. Stage IIIB disease was present in 36 patients (51%) in the radiation-alone group and 57 patients (70%) in the combined-modality group. Thirty-nine patients had poor prognostic factors (KPS 5%), and they were equally distributed between the two groups. The median survival times for the radiation-alone and the combined-modality groups were 11.7 months and 18.1 months, respectively (p=0.001). The 2-year rates of local control in the radiation-alone and combined-modality groups were 35.4% and 43.1%, respectively (p=0.1). Grade 3 or worse nonhematologic toxicity occurred in 20% of the patients receiving radiation alone and in 16% of those receiving chemotherapy and radiation. Overall, there were only 4 cases of Grade 3 or worse esophagitis. Conclusion: Despite more Stage IIIB patients in the combined-modality group, the addition of chemotherapy to 3D-CRT produced a survival advantage over 3D-CRT alone in Stage III NSCLC without a concomitant increase in toxicity. Chemotherapy thus appears to be beneficial, even in patients who are receiving higher

  6. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  7. Impact of Sequencing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy on Long-Term Local Toxicity for Early Breast Cancer: Results of a Randomized Study at 15-Year Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Farneti, Alessia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia; Landoni, Valeria [Department of Physics, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Marucci, Laura; Petrongari, Maria Grazia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Sanguineti, Giuseppe, E-mail: sanguineti@ifo.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To compare long-term late local toxicity after either concomitant or sequential chemoradiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2002, women aged 18 to 75 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection for early breast cancer and in whom CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy was planned were randomized between concomitant and sequential radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered to the whole breast through tangential fields to 50 Gy in 20 fractions over a period of 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost. Surviving patients were tentatively contacted and examined between March and September 2014. Patients in whom progressive disease had developed or who had undergone further breast surgery were excluded. Local toxicity (fibrosis, telangiectasia, and breast atrophy or retraction) was scored blindly to the treatment received. A logistic regression was run to investigate the effect of treatment sequence after correction for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates on selected endpoints. The median time to cross-sectional analysis was 15.7 years (range, 12.0-17.8 years). Results: Of 206 patients randomized, 154 (74.8%) were potentially eligible. Of these, 43 (27.9%) refused participation and 4 (2.6%) had been lost to follow-up, and for 5 (3.2%), we could not restore planning data; thus, the final number of analyzed patients was 102. No grade 4 toxicity had been observed, whereas the number of grade 3 toxicity events was low (<8%) for each item, allowing pooling of grade 2 and 3 events for further analysis. Treatment sequence (concomitant vs sequential) was an independent predictor of grade 2 or 3 fibrosis according to both the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-12.2; P=.013) and the SOMA (Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic

  8. Impact of Sequencing Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy on Long-Term Local Toxicity for Early Breast Cancer: Results of a Randomized Study at 15-Year Follow-Up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnarò, Paola; Giordano, Carolina; Farneti, Alessia; Strigari, Lidia; Landoni, Valeria; Marucci, Laura; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare long-term late local toxicity after either concomitant or sequential chemoradiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2002, women aged 18 to 75 years who underwent breast-conserving surgery and axillary dissection for early breast cancer and in whom CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy was planned were randomized between concomitant and sequential radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was delivered to the whole breast through tangential fields to 50 Gy in 20 fractions over a period of 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost. Surviving patients were tentatively contacted and examined between March and September 2014. Patients in whom progressive disease had developed or who had undergone further breast surgery were excluded. Local toxicity (fibrosis, telangiectasia, and breast atrophy or retraction) was scored blindly to the treatment received. A logistic regression was run to investigate the effect of treatment sequence after correction for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates on selected endpoints. The median time to cross-sectional analysis was 15.7 years (range, 12.0-17.8 years). Results: Of 206 patients randomized, 154 (74.8%) were potentially eligible. Of these, 43 (27.9%) refused participation and 4 (2.6%) had been lost to follow-up, and for 5 (3.2%), we could not restore planning data; thus, the final number of analyzed patients was 102. No grade 4 toxicity had been observed, whereas the number of grade 3 toxicity events was low (<8%) for each item, allowing pooling of grade 2 and 3 events for further analysis. Treatment sequence (concomitant vs sequential) was an independent predictor of grade 2 or 3 fibrosis according to both the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (odds ratio [OR], 4.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-12.2; P=.013) and the SOMA (Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic

  9. Survival benefit of adding chemotherapy to intensity modulated radiation in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the contribution of chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC treated by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and to identify the optimal combination treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2006 and 2010, 276 patients with stage II-IVb NPC were treated by IMRT alone or IMRT plus chemotherapy. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy included neoadjuvant or concurrent, or neoadjuvant plus concurrent protocols. The IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy groups were well-matched for prognostic factors, except N stage, with more advanced NPC in the chemoradiotherapy arm. RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 33.8 months, the 3-year actuarial rates of overall survival (OS, metastasis-free survival (MFS, relapse-free survival (RFS, and disease-free survival (DFS were 90.3%, 84.2%, 80.3%, and 69.2% for all of the patients, respectively. Compared with the IMRT alone arm, patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significantly better DFS (HR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.12-6.22; P = 0.03, patients with neoadjuvant-concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significant improvement in RFS and DFS (HR = 4.03; 95% CI, 1.35-12.05; P = 0.01 and HR = 2.43; 95% CI, 1.09-5.44; P = 0.03, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy provided no significant benefit in OS, MFS, RFS, and DFS. Stage group and alcohol consumption were prognostic factors for OS and N stage was a significant predictor for DFS. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of concurrent or neoadjuvant-concurrent chemotherapy to IMRT is available to prolong RFS or DFS for locoregionally advanced NPC. Such work could be helpful to guide effective individualized therapy.

  10. Age-related differences in renal side-effects of radiation and chemotherapy in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Jongejan, Mieke

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe improved life-expectancy of cancer patient has brought to light late sequelae of oncology therapy. This is especially true for pediatric patients. Renal damage is one of the adverse side-effects of anti-tumor therapy that may occur. Studies conceming damaging effects of radiotherapy or chemotherapy on the kidney have generally been performed in adults. There is scant experimental or clinical information on renal function after anti -tumor therapy in the young. Rapid growth occ...

  11. Indications for radiation therapy and surgery in the treatment of fibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spear, M.A.; Jennings, L.C.; Efird, J.T.; Mankin, H.J.; Springfield, D.S.; Gebhardt, M.C.; Spiro, I.J.; Rosenberg, A.E.; Suit, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the roles of radiation and surgery in treating fibromatosis (desmoid tumors). Methods and Materials: Records of 92 patients treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1971 and 1992 were analyzed. Treatment consisted of: radiation, 15 tumors; surgery, 37 tumors; radiation plus surgery, 40 tumors. Radiation doses ranged from 10 Gy to 72 Gy, and were delivered as megavoltage external beam, brachytherapy or a combination. Minimum follow up was 1 year (median 6.2 yrs). The margin status of resected specimens included: 14 negative, 11 negative at 18 yrs and 0% for age <18 yrs. Conclusions: Surgery remains the primary treatment of choice for fibromatosis. Radiation therapy, however, is also effective either as a primary treatment or a surgical adjuvent. Additional advantage in recurrence free survival with peri-operative treatment was seen in patients for whom negative margins were not achieved. Thus, radiation might be recommended to these patients, particularly if the lesion is located such that further recurrence and resection could result in a significant functional or cosmetic defect. Radiation would also be recommended as a primary therapy for those in which a primary resection could not be expected without such deficits. It should also be noted when considering the potential consequences of recurrence that these lesions may often fail locally even with negative margins. Of further interest lesions located in the planter or palmer regions appear as a different disease entity, with a very benign course in adults and an extremely aggressive course in children

  12. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Sunil, E-mail: skrishnan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chadha, Awalpreet S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Suh, Yelin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Hsiang-Chun [Department of Biostatistics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results: Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P=.03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P=.05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS.

  13. Is aortic lymphadenectomy indicated in locally advanced cervical cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical surgery? A retrospective study on 261 women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, F; Signorelli, M; Bogani, G; Ditto, A; Chiappa, V; Perotto, S; Scaffa, C; Lorusso, D; Raspagliesi, F

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of aortic lymph nodes (LN) metastases/recurrences among patients affected by locally advanced stage cancer patients (LACC), treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and radical surgery. Retrospective evaluation of consecutive 261 patients affected by LACC (stage IB2-IIB), treated with NACT followed by radical surgery at National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy, between 1990 and 2011. Stage at presentation included stage IB2, IIA and IIB in 100 (38.3%), 50 (19.2%) and 111 (42.5%) patients, respectively. Squamous cell carcinoma accounted for more than 80%, followed by adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous cancers (20%). Overall, 56 women (21.5%) had LN metastases. Four out of 83 women (5%) who underwent both pelvic and aortic LN dissection had aortic LN metastases, and all women had concomitant pelvic and aortic LN metastases. Only one woman out of 178 (0.5%) who underwent pelvic lymphadenectomy only, had an aortic LN recurrence. Overall 2% of women (5/261) had aortic LN metastases/recurrence. Our data suggest that aortic lymphadenectomy at the time of surgery is not routinely indicated in LACC after NACT, but should reserved in case of bulky LN in both pelvic and/or aortic area. The risk of isolated aortic LN relapse is negligible. Further prospective studies are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ the Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of Children With Central Nervous System Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors/Pinealoblastomas in the Prospective Multicentric Trial HIT 2000 Using Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Nicolas U., E-mail: nicolas.gerber@kispi.uzh.ch [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Hoff, Katja von; Resch, Anika [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ottensmeier, Holger [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kwiecien, Robert; Faldum, Andreas [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster (Germany); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hornung, Dagmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Institute for Radiation Therapy and Special Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Benesch, Martin [Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Pietsch, Torsten [Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, Joachim [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rutkowski, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The prognosis for children with central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET) or pinealoblastoma is still unsatisfactory. Here we report the results of patients between 4 and 21 years of age with nonmetastatic CNS-PNET or pinealoblastoma diagnosed from January 2001 to December 2005 and treated in the prospective GPOH-trial P-HIT 2000-AB4. Methods and Materials: After surgery, children received hyperfractionated radiation therapy (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis, 68 Gy to the tumor region, and 72 Gy to any residual tumor, fractionated at 2 × 1 Gy per day 5 days per week) accompanied by weekly intravenous administration of vincristine and followed by 8 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy (lomustine, cisplatin, and vincristine). Results: Twenty-six patients (15 with CNS-PNET; 11 with pinealoblastoma) were included. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years old (range, 4.0-20.7 years). Gross total tumor resection was achieved in 6 and partial resection in 16 patients (indistinct, 4 patients). Median follow-up of the 15 surviving patients was 7.0 years (range, 5.2-10.0 years). The combined response rate to postoperative therapy was 17 of 20 (85%). Eleven of 26 patients (42%; 7 of 15 with CNS-PNET; 4 of 11 with pinealoblastoma) showed tumor progression or relapse at a median time of 1.3 years (range, 0.5-1.9 years). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates (±standard error [SE]) were each 58% (±10%) for the entire cohort: CNS-PNET was 53% (±13); pinealoblastoma was 64% (±15%; P=.524 and P=.627, respectively). Conclusions: Postoperative hyperfractionated radiation therapy with local dose escalation followed by maintenance chemotherapy was feasible without major acute toxicity. Survival rates are comparable to those of a few other recent studies but superior to those of most other series, including the previous trial, HIT 1991.

  15. Survival Advantage With the Addition of Radiation Therapy to Chemotherapy in Early Stage Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xi-Mei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institution, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin (China); Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institution, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing (China); Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Fang, Hui; Ren, Hua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institution, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing (China); Zhou, Li-Qiang [Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institution, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing (China); Liu, Xin-Fan; Yu, Zi-Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital and Institution, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing (China)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Early stage peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of treatment as well as the potential role of radiation therapy in PTCL-NOS. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with early stage PTCL-NOS were included. There were 13 patients with stage I disease and 22 with stage II. All patients except 1 received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy alone (n=13) or a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CMT) (n=21). Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for the entire group were 41.3% and 25.7%, respectively. The addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved OS and PFS in early stage PTCL-NOS. The 3-year OS and PFS rates were 49.7% and 33.3% for CMT, compared with 23.1% (P=.042) and 15.4% (P=.035) for chemotherapy alone, respectively. The prognosis for patients who achieved a complete response (CR) was significantly better than that observed in those who did not achieve a CR. Conclusions: Despite the aggressive clinical course of early stage PTCL-NOS, additional radiation therapy has a significant impact on outcome. The integration of local radiation therapy into more effective systemic therapies may further improve survival.

  16. Survival Advantage With the Addition of Radiation Therapy to Chemotherapy in Early Stage Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xi-Mei; Li, Ye-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Fang, Hui; Ren, Hua; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Liu, Xin-Fan; Yu, Zi-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Early stage peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of treatment as well as the potential role of radiation therapy in PTCL-NOS. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with early stage PTCL-NOS were included. There were 13 patients with stage I disease and 22 with stage II. All patients except 1 received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy alone (n=13) or a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CMT) (n=21). Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for the entire group were 41.3% and 25.7%, respectively. The addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved OS and PFS in early stage PTCL-NOS. The 3-year OS and PFS rates were 49.7% and 33.3% for CMT, compared with 23.1% (P=.042) and 15.4% (P=.035) for chemotherapy alone, respectively. The prognosis for patients who achieved a complete response (CR) was significantly better than that observed in those who did not achieve a CR. Conclusions: Despite the aggressive clinical course of early stage PTCL-NOS, additional radiation therapy has a significant impact on outcome. The integration of local radiation therapy into more effective systemic therapies may further improve survival

  17. Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Accelerated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: christopher.kelsey@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Gu, Lin [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dunphy, Frank R.; Ready, Neal E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy (RT) given in an accelerated fashion with concurrent chemotherapy using intensity modulated RT. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced lung cancer (non-small cell and small cell) with good performance status and minimal weight loss received concurrent cisplatin and etoposide with RT. Intensity modulated RT with daily image guidance was used to facilitate esophageal avoidance and delivered using 6 fractions per week (twice daily on Fridays with a 6-hour interval). The dose was escalated from 58 Gy to a planned maximum dose of 74 Gy in 4 Gy increments in a standard 3 + 3 trial design. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as acute grade 3-5 nonhematologic toxicity attributed to RT. Results: A total of 24 patients were enrolled, filling all dose cohorts, all completing RT and chemotherapy as prescribed. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 1 patient at 58 Gy (grade 3 esophagitis) and 1 patient at 70 Gy (grade 3 esophageal fistula). Both patients with DLTs had large tumors (12 cm and 10 cm, respectively) adjacent to the esophagus. Three additional patients were enrolled at both dose cohorts without further DLT. In the final 74-Gy cohort, no DLTs were observed (0 of 6). Conclusions: Dose escalation and acceleration to 74 Gy with intensity modulated RT and concurrent chemotherapy was tolerable, with a low rate of grade ≥3 acute esophageal reactions.

  18. Clinical outcome and cosmetic results of conservative surgery plus radiation therapy in early stage breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Yening; Wang Yajie; Zhang Xiaoqing; Meng Yan; Li Rongqing; Shi Junyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome and cosmetic results in early stage breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery plus radiation therapy. Methods: From May 1995 to December 2002, 109 such patients were so treated. The post-operative radiotherapy consisted of whole-breast 6 MV linear accelerator irradiation with two tangential half-fields to a total dose of 45-52 Gy (mean 48.6 Gy), followed by a boost irradiation to the tumor bed. Among them, 79 patients received 10-12 Gy (DB) boost by interstitial implantation brachytherapy ( 192 Ir HDR, Nucletron), with single plane implantation for T1 and double plane implantation for T2 tumor. Thirty patients received 15 Gy boost by electron beam. Adjuvant/concurrent chemotherapy (CMF or CEF) and hormonotherapy were also used according to the patients' clinical characteristics. The cosmetic results were scored by both the doctor and the patients. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 93.8%, with local recurrence of 6.5%. No radiation-induced ulcer was observed in the breast except for acute inflammation at skin pinholes in 5 patients treated by interstitial implant brachytherapy. Among the 75 patients who had had breast examination, cosmetic result scored as good by patient and doctor were 81% and 87%, respectively. The good rate assessed by doctor in brachytherapy boost group and electron beam boost group were 81.2% (39/48) and 85.2% (23/27), There was no significant difference between these two boost techniques (P>0.05). Conclusions: Tumor bed boost irradiation by either brachytherapy or electron beam technique can provide satisfactory local control in early breast cancer treated with conservative surgery plus radiotherapy without increasing the side effects. There is no significant difference in cosmetic result between these two boost techniques. (authors)

  19. Sequence of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy as Adjuvant Treatment in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABU-HAMAR, A.M.; BARAKAT, A.F.; NASEF, H.H.; ELGANTIRY, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the work was to evaluate the prognostic importance of the sequence of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) as adjuvant treatment in women with breast cancer who were treated with modified radical mastectomy or total mastectomy and their correlation also with other known prognostic factors. Methods: In this retrospective study, 200 women with breast cancer were evaluated. The age ranged from 25 to 73 years, with the mean age of 44 years; 125 patients had stage II and 75 had stage III disease. All were subjected to mastectomy. The influence of the following prognostic factors were evaluated: Age, histological grade, nodal status, number of positive nodes, tumor size, estrogen receptor status, menstrual status and as well as the sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on 5-year locoregional disease free survival, 5-year systemic disease-free survival, and 5-year overall survival. Results: The 5-year locoregional disease free survival was 90.9% for the entire patient population. Nodal status, number of positive nodes and estrogen receptor status were prognostically significant for locoregional recurrence. The 5-year systemic disease-free survival was 67.6% for the whole group. On univariate analysis, the presence of positive axillary nodes, grade III tumor, ER-negative disease and radiotherapy first followed by chemotherapy, were independent poor risk factors for systemic recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 71.8%. On univariate analysis, the presence of positive axillary nodes, grade III tumor, ER-negative disease and radiotherapy first followed by chemotherapy, were independent poor risk factors for death from breast cancer. Conclusions: In patients with breast cancer, a treatment protocol consisting of 6 cycles of CT followed by RT resulted in a better 5-year OS and DPS, and was easier to administer when compared with other treatment protocols. Ideal candidates are those with early-stage, age >35 years, low tumor grade, positive ER, and

  20. Large germinoma in basal ganglia treated by intraarterial chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Makio.

    1988-10-01

    A rare case of large germinoma in the basal ganglia is reported which was effectively treated by intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption using 20 % mannitol and radiation therapy. A 19-year-old man displayed slowly progressive right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and predementia on admission. Plain CT demonstrated a tumor which had a slightly high density with intratumoral calcification and a small cyst, and slight to moderate enhancement was observed following intravenous injection of contrast medium, but there was no unilateral ventricular enlargement. Cerebral angiography revealed hypervascular tumor staining with early draining veins. After biopsy, and as a result of intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy, the tumor decreased rapidly to about 20 % of its original mass. After discharge, tumor progression was observed. However, the enlarged tumor mass almost disappeared (except for calcification) on CT with clinical improvement in response to intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following 20 % mannitol.

  1. A case of leukoencephalopathy caused by radiation and chemotherapy for brain metastasis of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sonoo, Hiroshi; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Ohkubo, Sumiko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Kurebayashi, Junichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    A case of treatment-related leukoencephalopathy is presented. A patient with breast cancer metastasis to the brain, liver, bone and distant lymph nodes was treated with whole brain radiation and docetaxcel. Eleven months after radiation, magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Twenty-two months after radiation, the patient had gait disturbance, parkinsonism, dementia and urinary incontinence. From this experience, stereotactic radiosurgery such as cyber knife and gamma knife therapy, representing a new modality for delivering intense focal radiation, should be come preferred techniques for treating patients with brain metastases, to avoid the potential cognitive side effects of fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Seemed Not to Have Survival Benefit in Rectal Cancer Patients with ypTis-2N0 After Preoperative Radiotherapy and Surgery from a Population-Based Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Li, Ya-Qi; Li, Qing-Guo; Ma, Yan-Lei; Peng, Jun-Jie; Cai, San-Jun

    2018-04-19

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is currently offered routinely, as standard, after radical resection for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation. However, the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 has not been documented to the same extent, and the survival benefit remained controversial. The purpose of this work was to determine the role of chemotherapy in patients with ypTis-2N0M0 classification. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database ( n  = 4,217). A propensity score model was utilized to balance baseline covariates. Of the 4,217 included patients, 335 with ypTis-2N0M0 did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There were comparable cancer-specific survivals (CSS) between those undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy or not (log-rank test = 0.136, p  = .712) in the overall sample. After propensity score matching, the cancer-specific survival did not differ between the chemotherapy and observation groups (log-rank test = 0.089, p  = .765). Additionally, the Cox model did not demonstrate adjuvant chemotherapy as the prognostic factor, with hazard ratio = 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.32) for CSS. Furthermore, the 10-year cumulative CSS was 78.7% and 79.4% between the chemotherapy and observation groups, indicating no significance, and no impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival was observed in different subgroups stratified by T stage, histological grade, histology, lymph nodes, and tumor size. Patients with ypTis-2N0 rectal cancer did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative radiology and radical surgery in this cohort study. These results provided new insight into the routine use of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer with completed neo-adjuvant radiotherapy and curative surgery. Inconsistent recommendations for patients with rectal cancer receiving neo-adjuvant chemoradiation are offered by clinical guidelines. Adjuvant

  3. Can we optimize chemo-radiation and surgery in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer based on evidence from randomized clinical trials? A hypothesis-generating study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dehing, Cary; Bentzen, Soren M.; Houben, Ruud; Dekker, Andre; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques; Hochstenbag, Monique; Boersma, Liesbeth; Geskes, Gijs; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Lammering, Guido; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Improved local tumor control (LC) improves survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We estimated the capability of surgical and non-surgical options to improve LC further in this disease. Methods: Eligible studies were phase III trials reporting 2-year survival data as well as the incidence of LC and/or distant metastases. Effect estimates, as well as the statistical uncertainty of these, were combined in order to estimate the benefit in terms of LC from combining multiple modalities. Results: It was estimated that the highest rates of LC can be obtained with high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery. In this situation, escalating the pre-operative radiation dose from 45 to 66 Gy, delivered concurrently with chemotherapy, could increase LC from 58% to 76%. Toxicity may also be higher, but could not be estimated. Without surgery, the gain in LC from concurrent chemo-radiation versus sequential, corresponds to a radiation dose increase from 65 to 72 Gy. Conclusions: We hypothesize that high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery could be superior to other current treatment approaches for selected patients with stage III NSCLC, provided toxicity would be low. At present, high-dose concurrent chemo-radiation followed by surgery should be considered experimental.

  4. Comparative adequacy of surgery and radiation therapy in 175 T2 glottic carcinomas: 116 cases treated with surgery and 59 with radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellai, E.; Olmi, P.; Chiavacci, A.; Fallai, C.; Aulisi, L.; Bottai, G.A.; De Meester, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results were analyzed of 175 patients with glottic squamous cell carcinomas who were treated with curative purposes (1970-1986). Overall 10-year local control rates were 74% for the surgical series and 69% for the cases treated by radiation therapy. After salvage therapy 10-year survival rates were 83% and 76% respectively. The analysis of the results showed no statistically significant difference. In the group treated by radical surgery 80% local control was observed, versus 66% in the cases treated with conservative surgery. 10-year survival rate was higher in the latter group (89% versus 81%) because of better results of salvage therapy: 7 of 10 recurrences were salvaged with the second treatment. Several prognostic factors were evaluated-i.e., T extent, anterior commissure involvement, subglottic invasion, vocal cord mobility impairment, and ventricular involvement. Anterior commissure involvement was the main factor affecting out-come in the surgical series: in the presence of this factor, 64% 10-year local control was observed versus 85% in the patients without commissure involvement. This factor proved more important in the patients treated with conservative surgery (10-year control: 42 versus 88%) than in those undergoing radical surgery (78% versus 85%). Anterior commissure involvement and the number of involved subsites were found to worsen prognosis in the serial treated by radiation therapy: cases with anterior commissure involvement had 59% 10-year local control versus 83%. The cases with a deeper spread had 60% local control versus 75%. Vocal cord mobility impairment was a less important prognosis factor in both series. Our results suggest radiation therapy as a valuable method in a treatment of the small T2 laryngeal cancers which are not suitable for conservative surgery

  5. A phase I/II study of external beam radiation, brachytherapy and concurrent chemotherapy in localized cancer of the esophagus (RTOG 9207)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, L.E.; Qian, C.; Kocha, W.I.; Coia, L.R.; Herskovic, A.; Graham, M.

    1996-01-01

    Introduction: A multi-institutional, prospective study was designed to determine the feasibility and toxicity of chemotherapy, external beam irradiation and esophageal brachytherapy (EB) in a potentially curable group of patients with adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods: Planned treatment was 50 Gy external beam radiation (25 fractions/5 wks) followed 2 weeks later by EB (either HDR 5 Gy wks 8,9 and 10 for a total of 15 Gy or LDR 20 Gy wk 8). The protocol was later revised to delete the LDR alternative due to poor accrual and decrease the HDR dose to 10 Gy, ie 5 Gy wks 8 and 9. Chemotherapy was given wks 1,5,8 and 11 with DDP 75 mg/m2 and 5-FU 1000 mg/m2/24 hrs, 96 hour infusion. Data is available on 50 patients (46 squamous, 3 adenocarcinoma) treated on the HDR alternative (EB dose 15 Gy and 10 Gy in 40 and 10 patients, respectively. Results: Thirty-five patients (70%) were able to complete external beam, EB and at least 2 courses of chemotherapy. Estimated survival rate at 12 months is 48%. Life-threatening toxicity or death occurred in 13 (26%) and 4 (8%) patients, respectively. Treatment-related esophageal fistulas occurred in 6 patients (12%) at 0.5 to 6.2 months from the first day of brachytherapy, leading to death in 3. So far all treatment-related fistulas occurred in the 15 Gy EB group. Conclusions: Survival following this combination of chemotherapy, external beam radiation and EB does not appear to be different from survival seen following chemotherapy and external beam radiation only. Based on the high incidence of fistulas, we urge extreme caution in employing EB as a boost following concurrent chemotherapy and external beam radiation with the schema utilized in this prospective study

  6. Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkin, J.S.; Kalser, M.H.; Thomsen, S.; Redlhammer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients

  7. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Liu, Jian, E-mail: liujianfj@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Li, Jiancheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zhu, Kunshou [Department of Surgery, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, Xiongwei [Department of Pathology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Mingqiang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Teaching Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fujian Provincial Cancer Hospital, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Ming [School of Graduate, Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou (China); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  8. Impact of Radiation and Chemotherapy on Risk of Dental Abnormalities: A Report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, Sue C.; Goodman, Pamela; Leisenring, Wendy; Stovall, Marilyn; Hayashi, Robert; Yeazel, Mark; Beiraghi, Soraya; Hudson, Melissa M.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Baker, K. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Describe frequencies and risk factors of altered oral health and odontogenesis in childhood cancer survivors. Patients and Methods 9308 survivors, diagnosed between 1970–1986, and 2951 siblings from Childhood Cancer Survivor Study completed a survey containing oral-dental health information. We analyzed treatment impact, socioeconomic data and patient demographics on dental outcomes using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR). Results In multivariate analysis, survivors more likely reported microdontia (OR 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–3.8), hypodontia (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.4–2.0), root abnormalities (OR 3.0, 95% CI 2.2–4.0), abnormal enamel (OR 2.4, 95% CI 2.0–2.9), teeth loss ≥6 (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.9–3.6), severe gingivitis (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0–1.5), xerostomia (OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.8–19.7). Controlling for chemotherapy and socio-economic factors, radiation exposure of ≥20Gy to dentition was significantly associated with increased risk of ≥1 dental abnormality. Dose-dependent alkylating agent therapy significantly increased risk ≥1 anatomic/developmental dental abnormalities in survivors diagnosed Radiation and chemotherapy are independent risk factors for adverse oral-dental sequelae among childhood cancer survivors. Patients receiving alkylating agents at < 5 years should be closely monitored. PMID:19834960

  9. Hypothyroidism in a dog after surgery and radiation therapy for a functional thyroid adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R.W.; Price, G.S.; Spodnick, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hypothyroidism was diagnosed in a dog which had undergone unilateral thyroid lobectomy and external beam irradiation (48 Gy in 3 Gy fractions) for a functional cystic thyroid adenocarcinoma. Hypothyroidism became biochemically apparent within 4 months of completion of radiation therapy, and clinically apparent within 7 months. Clinical signs resolved after thyroid hormone supplementation. The potential for alterations in thyroid function should be considered in any animal undergoing radiation therapy in which the thyroid gland is included in the radiation field. This potential may be greater if surgery and radiation are combined

  10. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemo-radiation therapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amro, Abdullah; Al-Rajhi, Nasser; Khafaga, Yasser; Memon, Mohammad; Al-Hebshi, Adnan; El-Enbabi, Ashraf; El-Husseiny, Gamal; Radawi, Amer; Belal, Abdulaziz; Allam, Ayman; El-Sebaie, Medhat

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of neoadjuvant cisplatinum and epirubicin chemotherapy followed by concurrent cisplatinum chemotherapy with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred ten patients (80 male, 30 female) with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma, staged according to the 1997 International Union Against Cancer/American Joint Committee on Cancer classification system as IIB (n = 9), III (n = 20), IVA (n = 32), and IVB (n = 49), World Health Organization types II (n = 25) and III (n = 85), were included in this protocol between January 1998 and July 2000 at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre. Patients underwent two cycles of induction chemotherapy with cisplatinum 100 mg/m 2 and epirubicin 70 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 21, followed by a radical course of radiotherapy (6,600 cGy in 6.5 weeks, 200 cGy/fraction) starting on Day 42, with three cycles of concurrent cisplatinum 25 mg/m 2 for 4 days on Days 42, 63, and 84. Results: Of 110 patients included in this study, intracranial extension was present in 32 (29%), and nodal stage was N3 in 49 (45%). Complete remission and partial remission were achieved in 87 patients (79%) and 23 patients (21%), respectively. At a median follow-up for surviving patients of 37 months (22-55 months), 49 of 110 patients (44%) had failed treatment: 12 with local, 9 with regional nodes, 4 locoregional, 5 locoregional plus distant areas, and 19 with distant metastases. At the time of writing, 34 patients had died; all deaths were related to the patients' cancer except for 1 patient with treatment-related toxicity. Three-year actuarial overall survival, relapse-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 89%, 78%, 88%, and 89% for patients with stage IIB; 71%, 70%, 89%, and 74% for stage III; 68%, 49%, 61%, and 77% for stage IVA; and 70%, 45%, 60%, and 69% for stage IVB, respectively. One patient

  11. Comparison of mediastinal lymph node status and relapse pattern in clinical stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy versus upfront surgery: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Milan; Kontic, Milica; Ercegovac, Maja; Stojsic, Jelena; Bascarevic, Slavisa; Moskovljevic, Dejan; Kostic, Marko; Vesovic, Radomir; Popevic, Spasoje; Laban, Marija; Markovic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Dragana

    2017-09-01

    In spite of the progress made in neoadjuvant therapy for operable non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many issues remain unsolved, especially in locally advanced stage IIIA. Retrospective data of 163 patients diagnosed with stage IIIA NSCLC after surgery was analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups: a preoperative chemotherapy group including 59 patients who received platinum-etoposide doublet treatment before surgery, and an upfront surgery group including 104 patients for whom surgical resection was the first treatment step. Adjuvant chemotherapy or/and radiotherapy was administered to 139 patients (85.3%), while 24 patients (14.7%) were followed-up only. The rate of N2 disease was significantly higher in the upfront surgery group ( P   0.05). There was significant difference in preoperative chemotherapy group regarding relapse rate and treatment outcomes related to the lymph node status comparing to the upfront surgery group. Neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemo-therapy is a part of treatment for patients with stage IIIA NSCLC, but further investigation is required to determine optimal treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Concurrent chemotherapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and oropharynx: A retrospective single-institution analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.F. Saba (Nabil); D.J. Edelman (David); M. Tighiouart (Mourad); J.G. Gaultney (Jennifer G.); L.W. Davis (Lawrence); F.R. Khuri (Fadlo); A. Chen (Amy); S. Grist (Scott); D.M. Shin (Dong)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We present outcome data from concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the larynx and oropharyx. Methods. Eighty patients with laryngeal (n = 15) or oropharyngeal (n = 65) SCC underwent concurrent IMRT and

  13. Can concurrent chemoradiotherapy replace surgery and postoperative radiation for locally advanced stage III/IV tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumju; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-Hong; Kim, Young Seok; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; DO Ahn, Seung

    2013-03-01

    To compare surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with the non-surgical combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil by measuring treatment outcomes and treatment-related complications. The records of 114 patients with non-metastatic stage III/IV tonsillar SCC treated between July, 1998 and December, 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Among the 114 patients, 65 received PORT and 49 received CCRT. In the PORT group, treatment included wide surgical resection of the tumor with neck dissection and administration of PORT to the primary tumor bed with a median dose of 60 Gy. In the CCRT group, a median dose of 70 Gy was delivered to the gross tumor, and 46 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with i.v. cisplatin. The median follow-up time was 58 months in the PORT group and 44 months in the CCRT group. There was no significant difference between PORT and CCRT in terms of 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (88.4% vs. 91.4%, p=0.68), distant metastasis-free survival (88.9% vs. 92.3%, p=0.60), disease-free survival (79.5% vs. 84.2%, p=0.63) or overall survival (78.9% vs. 88.9%, p=0.45). More CCRT patients than PORT patients experienced grade 3 (or higher) hematological toxicities and grade 2 pharyngitis during treatment. Chronic toxicity, manifested as swallowing difficulty, dry mouth and trismus, was similar between the two treatment groups. CCRT provides similar levels of local and distant control in patients with locally advanced tonsillar SCC as PORT, yet fails to show any superiority in preserving functions such as swallowing, saliva production, and mastication.

  14. Acute toxicity of postoperative IMRT and chemotherapy for endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, R.M.; Powell, M.A.; Mutch, D.G.; Gibb, R.K.; Rader, J.S.; Grigsby, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with and without chemotherapy in patients with endometrial cancer. A total of 19 patients with stages IB-IVB endometrial cancer who underwent surgery and postoperative IMRT were reviewed. The treatment planning goal was to cover the tissue at risk and minimize the dose to the bladder, bowel, and bone marrow. Median dose was 50.4 Gy (range 49.6-51.2 Gy). Altogether, 14 patients underwent chemotherapy; most were given carboplatin and paclitaxel. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAE). The prescribed radiation treatment was completed in all patients. The prescribed cycles of chemotherapy were completed in all 14 patients, except one who received five of six cycles limited by prolonged thrombocytopenia. Chemotherapy was delayed in two patients (14%). Three patients required growth factor support during chemotherapy, and one patient required a blood transfusion. Acute grades 3-4 hematological toxicity occurred in 9 of the 14 patients (64%) who underwent chemotherapy. None experienced acute grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity. Adjuvant IMRT and chemotherapy following surgery in patients with endometrial cancer is well tolerated and did not lead to treatment modification in most patients. (author)

  15. The rate and factors associated with non-adherence to surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy among breast cancer patients attending public hospitals in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Aishah Taib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of breast cancer treatments in reducing recurrence and death has been established. However, the treatments side effects greatly impact on quality of life and little is known about the non-adherence rates. The purpose of this study was to determine the non-adherence rates to surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, and factors that affect it in public hospitals in Malaysia. Methods: A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in six public hospitals involving all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients in 2012. Data were collected through medical record reviews and interview by using structured questionnaire. Non-adherence was categorized as any breast cancer patients refusing or discontinuing any treatment due to non-medical reasons. Univariable logistic regression and multiple logistic regressions were used for analysis. Results: A total of 340 breast cancer patients were included in the study. The proportion for non-adherence to surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy were 14%, 30.1%, 33.3% and 36.3% respectively. Factors associated with non-adherence to surgery were localities involving Kuala Lumpur (2 (OR: 3.41, Johor (OR: 8.38 and Kelantan (OR: 6.32, and those required mastectomy (OR: 5.66. No factors were found to be associated with non-adherence to chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy. These three treatment modalities were then combined as oncology therapy and the only independent factor associated with non-adherence to oncology therapy was Perak locality (OR: 1.42. Conclusion: Non-adherence to breast cancer treatments was high among breast cancer patients at public hospitals in Malaysia. Factors influencing non-adherence were locations and mastectomy implicating of socio-culture, body image issues, psychological disturbance and treatment navigation. Community educational programs focusing on correcting misconceptions, treatment outcomes and treatments’ side effects

  16. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizer, Ayal A., E-mail: aaaizer@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Parekh, Arti [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choueiri, Toni K. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Simon P. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Martin, Neil E. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hu, Jim C. [Department of Urology, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Trinh, Quoc-Dien [Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Nguyen, Paul L. [Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  17. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Kim, Simon P.; Martin, Neil E.; Hu, Jim C.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life

  18. Refusal of curative radiation therapy and surgery among patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K; Hoffman, Karen E; Kim, Simon P; Martin, Neil E; Hu, Jim C; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L

    2014-07-15

    Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (PRefusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; Prefuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life-saving care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Orthopaedic surgeries - assessment of ionising radiations exposure in health care workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, E.S.; Uva, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 1. Objectives: The health care workers are exposed to ionizing radiations during their activities. In the operating rooms, the ionizing radiations are used in orthopaedic surgery and the dose depends on some factors, like the characteristics of the equipment. This study aims to: Estimate the occupational dose of ionizing radiations exposure of the orthopaedic doctors and nurses during the orthopaedic surgeries, in a Portuguese operating room; Sensitize the health care workers to use the individual dosimeter and to adopt radiation preventive measures. 2. Population and methods The study was conducted on nine Orthopaedic doctors and two nurses of an operating room of a hospital in Lisbon neighborhoods. We made a risk evaluating concerning: the radiations dose in different points, corresponding to gonads, hands and crystalline lens levels of all the professionals, during the surgeries; the average period of radiation in the orthopaedic surgeries; the number of annual orthopaedic surgeries, looking for that in the surgeries registers, to estimate the annual ionizing radiations dose of each orthopaedic doctor and nurse. 3. Results The annual doses estimated at different levels for orthopaedic doctors were the following: gonads: between 20,63 and 68,75 mGy; hands: 4,95 16,50 mGy; crystalline lens: 8,25 27,50 mGy). For the orthopaedic nurses: gonads: 130,63 151,25 mGy; hands: 31,35 36,30 mGy; crystalline lens 52,25 60,25 mGy. 4. Conclusions Although the location and positions of health care workers are not the same during the different surgeries and the equipment has an automatic control of the X ray emission, the annual ionizing radiations dose exposure for health care workers is an important one. The risk rating justifies the use of individual dosimeters for better individual dose assessment as part of an ionizing radiations prevention program. As a matter of fact preventive measures begin with a good quantitative risk assessment of

  20. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  1. Clinical significance of radiation therapy in breast recurrence and prognosis in breast-conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1999-03-01

    Significant risk factors for recurrence of breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy, which has become a standard treatment for breast cancer, are positive surgical margins and the failure to perform radiation therapy. In this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of radiation therapy after primary surgery or breast recurrence. In 344 cases of breast-conserving surgery, disease recurred in 43 cases (12.5%), which were classified as follows: 17 cases of breast recurrence, 13 cases of breast and distant metastasis, and 13 cases of distant metastasis. Sixty-two patients (16.7%) received radiation therapy. A positive surgical margin and younger age were significant risk factors for breast recurrence in patients not receiving postoperative radiation therapy but not in patients receiving radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for younger patients with positive surgical margins. Furthermore, radiation therapy after recurrence was effective in the cases not treated with postoperative radiation but not in cases with inflammatory recurrence. Patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates than did patients with distant metastases regardless of breast recurrence. These findings suggest that the adaptation criteria of radiation therapy for local control must be clarified. (author)

  2. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Habeeballa, B.; Osman, H.; Abdelaziz, I.; Sassi, S.A.; Sam, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients’ doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies

  3. The Effect of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy on Overall Survival in 237 Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Zhao Lujun; Hayman, James; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Lyons, Susan; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and their interaction in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A total of 237 consecutive Stage III NSCLC patients were evaluated. Median follow-up was 69.0 months. Patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone (n = 106), sequential chemoradiation (n = 69), or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Radiation dose ranged from 30 to 102.9 Gy (median 60 Gy), corresponding to a bioequivalent dose (BED) of 39 to 124.5 Gy (median 72 Gy). Results: The median OS of the entire cohort was 12.6 months, and 2- and 5-year survival rates were 22.4% and 10.0%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression model demonstrated that Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.020), weight loss < 5% (p = 0.017), chemotherapy (yes vs. no), sequence of chemoradiation (sequential vs. concurrent; p < 0.001), and BED (p < 0.001) were significant predictors of OS. For patients treated with RT alone, sequential chemoradiation, and concurrent chemoradiation, median survival was 7.4, 14.9, and 15.8 months, and 5-year OS was 3.3%, 7.5%, and 19.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). The effect of higher radiation doses on survival was independent of whether chemotherapy was given. Conclusion: Radiation dose and use of chemotherapy are independent predictors of OS in Stage III NSCLC, and concurrent chemoradiation is associated with the best survival. There is no interaction between RT dose and chemotherapy.

  4. Examinations on cases of surgery for radiation-induced disorders of large intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Tadaaki [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Author`s experience of surgery for radiation colitis was examined and discussed on the primary disease, radiation dose, major symptoms, surgical techniques, results and post-operative complication. Patients were 1 male and 21 females of the average age of 59.5 y. The primary diseases were bladder cancer for the male and uterine cancer for the females. The radiation dose ranged from 35-120 Gy and was 63.4 Gy in a mean. The symptoms for surgery were 14 ileuses, 4 intestinal hemorrhages, 1 perforation and 3 burrows. Colostomy was performed for 18 cases; enterostomy, 2; anastomosis, 1; and enterectomy, 1, which resulted in improvement of symptoms in 5 cases, 0, 1 and 1, respectively. The author concluded that radiation colitis should be treated preventively. (K.H.)

  5. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required

  6. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong

    2006-01-01

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis

  7. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis.

  8. Radiation therapy in recurrence of carcinoma of the uterine cervix after primary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment results in terms of the survival and failure patterns subsequent to radiation therapy in recurrent cervical cancer, following primary surgery. Between January 1990 and December 1999, 27 patients, with recurrent cervical cancer following primary surgery, were subsequently treated with radiation in the Department of Radiation Oncology, at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. Their median age was 48, ranging from 31 to 70 years old. With regard to the initial FIGO stage on presentation, 20 and 7 patients were stages I and II, respectively. Twenty three patients had squamous ceH carcinomas and 4 had adenocarcinomas. The time interval from the primary surgery to the recurrence ranged from 2 to 90 months with a median of 29 months. The recurrent sites were the vaginal cuff alone, the pelvic cavity and combined recurrence in 14, 9 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiation was performed, with external and vaginal intracavitary radiation in 13 patients, external radiation alone in 13 and vaginal intracavitary radiation alone in another one. The median follow-up period was 55 months, ranging from 6 to 128 months. The five year disease free survival (5y DFS) and five year overall survival (5y OS) rates were 68.2 and 71.9%, respectively. There was a marginal statistically significant difference in the 5y DFS in relation to the recurrent site (5y DFS, 85.7% in vaginal cuff recurrence alone, 53.3% in pelvic cavity recurrence, p=0.09). There was no difference in the survival according to the time interval between the primary surgery and a recurrence. There was only a 7% local failure rate in the patients with a vaginal cuff recurrence. The major failure patterns were local failure in the patients with pelvic cavity recurrence, and distant failure in the patients with a combined recurrence. There were no complications above grade 3 after the radiation therapy. Radiation therapy was safe and effective treatment for a

  9. Risk of a Second Kidney Carcinoma Following Childhood Cancer: Role of Chemotherapy and Radiation Dose to Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vathaire, Florent; Scwhartz, Boris; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Allodji, Rodrigue Sètchéou; Escudier, Bernard; Hawkins, Mike; Diallo, Ibrahima; Haddy, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    Kidney carcinoma is a rare second malignancy following childhood cancer. We sought to quantify risk and assess risk factors for kidney carcinoma following treatment for childhood cancer. We evaluated a cohort of 4,350 patients who were 5-year cancer survivors and had been treated for cancer as children in France and the United Kingdom. Patients were treated between 1943 and 1985, and were followed for an average of 27 years. Radiation dose to the kidneys during treatment was estimated with dedicated software, regardless of the site of childhood cancer. Kidney carcinoma developed in 13 patients. The cumulative incidence of kidney carcinoma was 0.62% (95% CI 0.27%-1.45%) at 40 years after diagnosis, which was 13.3-fold higher (95% CI 7.1-22.3) than in the general population. The absolute excess risk strongly increased with longer duration of followup (p kidney carcinoma was 5.7-fold higher (95% CI 1.4-14.7) if radiotherapy was not performed or less than 1 Gy had been absorbed by the kidney but 66.3-fold higher (95% CI 23.8-142.5) if the radiation dose to the kidneys was 10 to 19 Gy and 14.5-fold higher (95% CI 0.8-63.9) for larger radiation doses to the kidney. Treatment with chemotherapy increased the risk of kidney carcinoma (RR 5.1, 95% CI 1.1-22.7) but we were unable to identify a specific drug or drug category responsible for this effect. Moderate radiation dose to the kidneys during childhood cancer treatment increases the risk of a second kidney carcinoma. This incidence will be further increased when childhood cancer survivors reach old age. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Peritoneal Carcinomatosis of Colorectal Origin in the Era of Value-Based Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanounou, Tsafrir; Garfinkle, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Peritoneal spread from colorectal cancer is second only to the liver as a site for metastasis. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) is a well-established treatment option for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) of colorectal origin. However, due to concerns regarding both its clinical benefit and high cost, its universal adoption as the standard of care for patients with limited peritoneal dissemination has been slow. The purpose of this review was to clarify the clinical utility and cost effectiveness of CRS-HIPEC in the treatment of colorectal PC using the framework of value-based medicine, which attempts to combine both benefit and cost into a single quantifiable metric. Our comprehensive review of the clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of CRS-HIPEC demonstrate that it is a highly valuable oncologic therapy and a good use of healthcare resources.

  11. Management of advanced ovarian cancer in South West Wales - a comparison between primary debulking surgery and primary chemotherapy treatment strategies in an unselected, consecutive patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, F; Bertelli, G; Lutchman-Singh, K

    2017-08-01

    This study represents the first reported outcomes for patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC) in South-West Wales undergoing treatment with primary debulking surgery or primary chemotherapy respectively. This is a retrospective study of consecutive, unselected patients with advanced ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer (FIGO III/IV) presenting to a regional cancer centre between October 2007 and October 2014. Patients were identified from Welsh Cancer Services records and relevant data was extracted from electronic National Health Service (NHS) databases. Main outcome measures were median overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS) and perioperative adverse events. Hazard ratio estimation was carried out with Cox Regression analysis and survival determined by Kaplan-Meier plots. Of 220 women with AOC, 32.3% underwent primary debulking surgery (PDS) and 67.7% primary chemotherapy and interval debulking (PCT-IDS). Patients were often elderly (median age 67 years) with a poor performance status (26.5% PS >1). Complete cytoreduction (0cm residual) was achieved in 32.4% of patients in the PDS group and in 50.0% of patients undergoing IDS. Median OS for all patients was 21.9 months (PDS: 27.0 and PCT-IDS: 19.2 months; p >0.05) and median PFS was 13.1 months (PDS: 14.3 months and PCT-IDS: 13.0 months; p >0.05). Median overall and progression free survival for patients achieving complete cytoreduction were 48.0 and 23.2 months respectively in the PDS group and 35.4 months and 18.6 months in the IDS group (p >0.05). This retrospective study of an unselected, consecutive cohort of women with AOC in South West Wales shows comparable survival outcomes with recently published trials, despite the relatively advanced age and poor performance status of our patient cohort. Over the seven-year study period, our data also demonstrated a non-significant trend towards improved survival following primary surgery in patients who achieved maximal

  12. Pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts locoregional control in patients with triple negative breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Victor E.; Gillespie, Erin F.; Zakeri, Kaveh; Murphy, James D.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Lu, Sharon; Einck, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Our goal was to determine the impact of pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) on the subsequent risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) and disease-free survival (DFS) in the setting of adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and materials: This was an institutional review board–approved retrospective chart review of patients with clinical stage I-III breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, local surgery (breast conservat...

  13. Which patients benefit most from primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage IIIC or IV ovarian cancer? An exploratory analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 55971 randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; Tajik, Parvin; Hof, Michel H. P.; Vergote, Ignace; Kenter, Gemma G.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Buist, Marrije R.; Bossuyt, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether biomarkers consisting of baseline characteristics of advanced stage ovarian cancer patients can help in identifying subgroups of patients who would benefit more from primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We used data of the European Organisation for Research and

  14. Clinical results for salvage surgery in head and neck carcinoma after chemoradiation or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Katsuhiro; Makino, Yohjiroh; Nagaoka, Masato; Seino, Youichi; Hama, Takanori; Aoki, Kensuke; Uchida, Mitsuru; Kato, Takakuni

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the post-operative complications of surgical procedures in oral or pharyngeal carcinoma by analyzing and comparing between patients who underwent salvage surgery after chemoradiation and radiation. A retrospective review was performed of 18 patients who underwent salvage surgery and reconstruction after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT group), and another 41 patients who underwent salvage surgery and reconstruction after radiation therapy (RT group). No perioperative deaths or life threatening systemic complications occurred, and all flaps survived completely in both groups. Surgical site infection (SSI) occurred in five patients (12.2%) in the RT group and seven patients (38%) in the CCRT group. SSI other than donor site infection occurred in four patients (9%) in the RT group and four patients (22%) in the CCRT group. The rate of SSI excluding donor site infection did not differ significantly between patients who underwent salvage surgery after CCRT and RT. The rate of donor site infection was higher in the CCRT group than in the RT group (p=0.04). This study showed that salvage surgery after CCRT or RT can be performed safely, without significant morbidity or mortality. However, patients who received CCRT are at risk for major complications caused by minor troubles, and thus reconstruction after salvage surgery should be performed with sufficient care. (author)

  15. Radical surgery in patients with residual disease after (chemo)radiation for cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Aniek; Arts, Henriette J. G.; Klip, Harry; Nijhuis, Esther R.; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Nijman, Hans W.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; Reyners, Anna K. L.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Thomas, Gillian; van der Zee, Ate G. J.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine possible impact of routinely scheduled biopsies and more radical surgery for residual central disease in locally advanced cervical cancer after (chemo) radiation. Methods/Materials: Data were analyzed of a consecutive series of cervical cancer

  16. Diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced CT combined with 18-FDG PET in patients selected for cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, Antonio; Evangelista, Laura; Pintacuda, Giovanna; Cervino, Anna Rita; Ramondo, Gaetano; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo

    2018-05-01

    Aim of the study is to assess the reliability and correlation with surgical peritoneal cancer index (PCI) of combined PET/CT and ceCT scans (PET/ceCT) performed in a session in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis candidates for cytoreductive surgery (CS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). We retrospectively analyzed data collected from 27 patients with different types of peritoneal carcinomatosis candidates to CS + HIPEC who underwent FDG PET/ceCT in a single session. Two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists independently and blindly evaluated PET/CT and ceCT imaging, respectively. In the case of discordance, the consensus was reached by a discussion between the specialists. Moreover, the combined images were evaluated by all the specialists in consensus. The PCIs obtained from surgical look, PET/CT, ceCT, and PET/ceCT were compared with each other. The coefficients of correlation (r) were calculated. The study was conducted after approval of local ethics committee. Surgical PCI was available in 21 patients. The coefficient of correlation between PCI of PET/CT and surgery was 0.528, while it resulted higher between PET/ceCT and surgery (r = 0.878), very similar to ceCT and surgery (r = 0.876). The r coefficient between surgical PCI and PET/CT was higher in patients with a non-mucinous cancer (n = 12) than the counterpart (0.601 vs. 0.303) and the addition of ceCT significantly increases the correlation (r = 0.863), which is anyway similar to ceCT alone (r = 0.856). PET/ceCT as single examination is more accurate than PET/CT but not than ceCT alone for the definition of PCI in a selected group of patients candidates to CS + HIPEC.

  17. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffty, Bruce G.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Quiet, Coral; Keleher, Angela; Garcia, Delia; Snider, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Zannis, Victor; Kuerer, Henry; Whitacre, Eric; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Keisch, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  18. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on treatment strategies for localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werier, Joel; Yao, Xiaomei; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; di Primio, Gina; Ghert, Michelle; Gupta, Abha A; Kandel, Rita; Verma, Shailendra

    2016-06-01

    (1) To provide recommendations regarding the choice of surgery, radiation therapy (RT), or the combination of surgery plus RT in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (2) To determine the appropriate surgical planning imaging (pre-chemotherapy magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or post-chemotherapy MRI) to identify optimal resection margins in patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who undergo surgery following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1999 to February 2015), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2012 to January 2015) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. 1. Recommendation (1) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma of bone following neoadjuvant chemotherapy: (a) Surgery alone or RT alone are two reasonable treatment options; the combination of surgery plus RT is not recommended as an initial treatment option. (b) The local treatment for an individual patient should be decided by a multidisciplinary tumour board together with the patient after consideration of the following: (1) patient characteristics (e.g., age, tumour location, tumour size, response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and existing comorbidities), (2) the potential benefit weighed against the potential complications from surgery and/or toxicities associated with RT, and (3) patient preferences. 2. Recommendation (2) - In patients with localized Ewing's sarcoma who will undergo surgery: (a) Both pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy MRI scans should be taken into consideration for surgical planning. In certain anatomic locations with good chemotherapy response, the post-chemotherapy MRI may be the appropriate imaging modality to plan surgical resection margins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mobilizing Transit-Amplifying Cell-Derived Ectopic Progenitors Prevents Hair Loss from Chemotherapy or Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Lai, Shih-Fan; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Chang, Michael; Plikus, Maksim V; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Chen, You-Tzung; Tsao, Po-Nien; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Chi, Peter; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2017-11-15

    Genotoxicity-induced hair loss from chemotherapy and radiotherapy is often encountered in cancer treatment, and there is a lack of effective treatment. In growing hair follicles (HF), quiescent stem cells (SC) are maintained in the bulge region, and hair bulbs at the base contain rapidly dividing, yet genotoxicity-sensitive transit-amplifying cells (TAC) that maintain hair growth. How genotoxicity-induced HF injury is repaired remains unclear. We report here that HFs mobilize ectopic progenitors from distinct TAC compartments for regeneration in adaptation to the severity of dystrophy induced by ionizing radiation (IR). Specifically, after low-dose IR, keratin 5 + basal hair bulb progenitors, rather than bulge SCs, were quickly activated to replenish matrix cells and regenerated all concentric layers of HFs, demonstrating their plasticity. After high-dose IR, when both matrix and hair bulb cells were depleted, the surviving outer root sheath cells rapidly acquired an SC-like state and fueled HF regeneration. Their progeny then homed back to SC niche and supported new cycles of HF growth. We also revealed that IR induced HF dystrophy and hair loss and suppressed WNT signaling in a p53- and dose-dependent manner. Augmenting WNT signaling attenuated the suppressive effect of p53 and enhanced ectopic progenitor proliferation after genotoxic injury, thereby preventing both IR- and cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. Hence, targeted activation of TAC-derived progenitor cells, rather than quiescent bulge SCs, for anagen HF repair can be a potential approach to prevent hair loss from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6083-96. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Evaluation and analysis of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Kiyoto; Tateda, Masaru; Saijo, Shigeru [Miyagi Cancer Center Hospital, Natori (Japan); Yokoyama, Junkichi

    2001-03-01

    Superselective intra-arterial (IA) chemotherapy was administered 213 times to 76 patients, from April 1995 to August 1999, in our hospital. These included 64 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 cases out of these 64 cases dropped out because of severe complications when their survival was evaluated. The five-year overall survival rate, calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, was 49% for all patients, 78% for the patients who underwent surgery before or after IA chemotherapy (20 cases), and 48% for the patients who were treated by IA chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy (26 cases). No renal failure was observed in these patients. The five-year overall survival rate was 53% for the patients with stage III or stage IV disease who were treated by surgery alone or surgery and radiation therapy (+chemotherapy), while it was 45% for the patients with stage III or stage IV disease who were treated by IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Since this study was not randomized and more advanced cases tended to be treated by IA chemotherapy, this result was assumed to be good enough to improve the prognosis of the patients with advanced disease. The prognosis of the patients treated by IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy who had recurrence, or who were cases of secondary treatment, was poor and similar to that of the patients who received palliative radiation therapy (+chemotherapy). Drop-out cases of IA chemotherapy encountered severe complications, such as 2 cerebral infarctions, one sudden death, one pneumonia with DIC, and one ARDS. There was also a sudden death, and deaths due to bleeding from local recurrent lesions after the treatment was finished. As some patients complained of dysphagia and/or dyspnea after IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the QOL of the patients was not very satisfactory. It is suggested that the indication of IA chemotherapy should be limited, considering the patient's condition and the location of

  1. Evaluation and analysis of superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Kiyoto; Tateda, Masaru; Saijo, Shigeru; Yokoyama, Junkichi

    2001-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial (IA) chemotherapy was administered 213 times to 76 patients, from April 1995 to August 1999, in our hospital. These included 64 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 cases out of these 64 cases dropped out because of severe complications when their survival was evaluated. The five-year overall survival rate, calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, was 49% for all patients, 78% for the patients who underwent surgery before or after IA chemotherapy (20 cases), and 48% for the patients who were treated by IA chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy (26 cases). No renal failure was observed in these patients. The five-year overall survival rate was 53% for the patients with stage III or stage IV disease who were treated by surgery alone or surgery and radiation therapy (+chemotherapy), while it was 45% for the patients with stage III or stage IV disease who were treated by IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Since this study was not randomized and more advanced cases tended to be treated by IA chemotherapy, this result was assumed to be good enough to improve the prognosis of the patients with advanced disease. The prognosis of the patients treated by IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy who had recurrence, or who were cases of secondary treatment, was poor and similar to that of the patients who received palliative radiation therapy (+chemotherapy). Drop-out cases of IA chemotherapy encountered severe complications, such as 2 cerebral infarctions, one sudden death, one pneumonia with DIC, and one ARDS. There was also a sudden death, and deaths due to bleeding from local recurrent lesions after the treatment was finished. As some patients complained of dysphagia and/or dyspnea after IA chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the QOL of the patients was not very satisfactory. It is suggested that the indication of IA chemotherapy should be limited, considering the patient's condition and the location of the

  2. Pre-Irradiation Chemotherapy in High Risk Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El-Aal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: The present study evaluates the effect of pre-irradiation chemotherapy in pediatric patients with high risk medulloblastoma. Twenty-four (24) pediatric patients attended the pediatric unit of Kasr-EI-Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine (NEMROCK) from January 2000 to January 2003. Patients and Methods: Our patients were 13 boys and II girls aged 3-12 years with a median of 6.5 years. According to Chang staging system 6 cases had T2, 14 cases had T3 A and 4 cases had T3 B, 20 cases were M0, 3 cases were M I and I case was M2. All patients were treated by initial surgery, 2 cycles of pre-irradiation chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiation then by 4 cycles of post-radiation chemotherapy. Results: Fifteen out of the 20 patients with M0 had objective response (10CR + 5PR) and no one had disease progression after pre-irradiation chemotherapy. Among 4 patients with M0 disease, 2 patients had PR and 2 had S.D. There was no disease progression among patients who received pre-irradiation chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival and 3-year progression-free survival; (PFS) were 50% and 51 %, respectively, Myelosuppression was the main toxic effect observed during pre-irradiation chemotherapy; however, there was no delay or interruption of craniospinal irradiation. Conclusion: Pre-irradiation chemotherapy is effective in high risk medulloblastoma and is associated with acceptable side effects. The delay in craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for about 5 weeks to receive 2 courses of chemotherapy will not significantly increase disease progression. Multiple cycles of post-irradiation chemotherapy can be given safely after C51. A larger number of patients and longer follow-up is needed to confirm the results

  3. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 {approx} 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 {approx} 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 {approx} 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 {approx} 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy{sub 10} (range:77 {approx} 94 Gy{sub 10}). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy{sub 3} (range: 122 {approx} 140 Gy{sub 3}) at point A, 109 Gy{sub 3} (range:88{approx} 125 Gy{sub 3}) at the rectum and 111 Gy{sub 3} (range: 91 {approx} 123 Gy{sub 3}) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 {approx} 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8{approx} 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure

  4. Preliminary results of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy using high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Re Na; Suh, Hyun Suk

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From January 2001 to December 2002, 30 patients with cervical cancer were treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5-FU) and definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 58 (range 34 ∼ 74) year old. The pathology of the biopsy sections was squamous cell carcinoma in 29 patients and one was adenocarcinoma. The distribution to FIGO staging system was as follow: stage IB, 7 (23%); IIA, 3 (10%); IIB, 12 (40%); IIIA, 3 (10%); IIIB, 5 (17%). All patients received pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) to a total dose of 45 ∼ 50.4 Gy (median: 50.4 Gy) over 5 ∼ 5.5 weeks. Ir-192 HDR intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) was given after a total dose of 41.1 Gy. HDR-ICBT was performed twice a week, with a fraction point. A dose of 4 Gy and median dose to point A was 28 Gy (range: 16 ∼ 32 Gy) in 7 fractions. The median cumulative biologic effective dose (BED) at point A (EBRT + ICBT) was 88 Gy 10 (range:77 ∼ 94 Gy 10 ). The median cumulative BED at ICRU 38 reference point (EBRT + ICBT) was 131 Gy 3 (range: 122 ∼ 140 Gy 3 ) at point A, 109 Gy 3 (range:88∼ 125 Gy 3 ) at the rectum and 111 Gy 3 (range: 91 ∼ 123 Gy 3 ) at the urinary bladder. Cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 ) and 5-FU (1,000 mg/m 2 ) was administered intravenously at 2 weeks interval from the first day of radiation for median 5 (range:2 ∼ 6) cycles. The assessment was performed at 1 month after completion of radiation therapy by clinical examination and CT scan. The median follow-up time was 36 months (range:8∼ 50 months). The complete response rate after concurrent chemo radiation therapy was 93.3%. The 3-yr actuarial pelvic control rate was 87% and 3-yr actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 93% and 87%, respectively. The local failure rate was 13% and distant metastatic rate was 3.3%. The crude rate of minor hematologic

  5. The efficacy of concurrent cisplatin and 5-flurouracil chemotherapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced cancer of the uterine cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Il Jung; Park, Eunku Seul; Han, Myung Seok; Choi, Youngmin; Je, Goo Hwa; Kim, Hyun Ho

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 57 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (stage IIB-IVA and bulky IB2-IIA tumor) who underwent the CCRT at Dong-A University Hospital from January 1997 to June 2007. The CCRT consisted of 5-FU, cisplatin and pelvic radiation. Every three weeks, 75 mg/m2 cisplatin was administered on the first day of each cycle and 5-FU was infused at the dose of 1,000 mg/m2/d from the second day to the fifth day of each cycle. Radiation was administered to the pelvis at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for five days per week until a medium accumulated dose reached to 50.4 Gy. If necessary, the radiation field was extended to include paraaortic lymph nodes. Consolidation chemotherapy was performed using 5-FU and cisplatin. Results Fifty-seven patients were enrolled and the median follow-up duration was 53 months (range 7-120 months). The overall response rate was 91.5% (74% complete response and 17.5% partial response). The 5-year overall survival and 3-year progression free survival rates were 69.4% and 74.9%, respectively. During the follow-up period (median 23 months, range 7-60 months), fourteen patients were diagnosed as recurrent disease. Conclusion CCRT with 5-FU and cisplatin which is the primary treatment for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer was effective and well tolerated. PMID:19471554

  6. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yafen; Zhang Junmin; Huang Zhiqin

    1993-01-01

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  7. Quantitative comparison between treatment results for uterine cervix cancer by radiation therapy and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Takeshi; Fukuhisa, Kenjiro; Arai, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    Treatment results for uterine cervix cancer were evaluated using a new concept named ''Effective Survival Rate''. This rate was calculated by subtracting the weighted sum of incidence rates of various complications from the 5-year survival rate. The numerical values for various complications were assigned as follows: surgical death, 1.0; severe complications, such as fistula ureterovaginalis and ileus, 0.5; mild complications, such as rectum and urinary bladder complications, 0.3 and 0.2. These values were determined with reference to the Karnofsky index of performance status. The effective survival rate was calculated for patients with satage 2 and 3 uterine cervix cancer treated by radiation therapy and surgery, and compared as a function of age between 30 and 70 years. We concluded that the effective survival rate was comparable for radiation therapy and surgery for stage 2 uterine cervix cancer. However, in patients with stage 3, radiation therapy was superior. (author)

  8. Impact of concurrent chemotherapy with radiation therapy for elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma: a review of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayi; Samson, Pamela; Perkins, Stephanie M; Ansstas, George; Chheda, Milan G; DeWees, Todd A; Tsien, Christina I; Robinson, Clifford G; Campian, Jian L

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the utilization and overall survival (OS) impact of concurrent chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy (RT) for elderly glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Elderly patients (age >70) with supratentorial and nonmetastatic GBM who received RT of 20-75 Gy with concurrent single-agent chemotherapy (ChemoRT) or without (RT alone) during 2004-2012 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The Cochran-Armitage test was used for trend analysis. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined using Cox proportional hazards. Propensity score analysis was performed to reduce selection bias in treatment allocation. A total of 5252 patients were identified (RT alone: n = 1389; ChemoRT: n = 3863). There was increasing utilization of chemotherapy during this period (45-80%, P 80 (25-68%, P benefit was demonstrated with 1202 pairs of propensity-matched patients (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.73-0.86, P chemotherapy has been administered with RT for the majority of elderly GBM patients. Addition of chemotherapy to RT for elderly GBM patients is associated with significantly improve OS in routine clinical practice.

  9. Quantitative analysis of tumor shrinkage due to chemotherapy and its implication for radiation treatment planning in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Bing; Wang, Jia-Zhou; Liu, Qi; Cheng, Jing-Yi; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Fu, Xiao-Long

    2013-01-01

    The optimal timing of chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) hasn’t been established, although evidence from studies supported that patients can benefit from early radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to quantify tumor shrinkage in response to induction chemotherapy (IC), evaluate the impact of tumor shrinkage on radiation dosimetric parameters and determine its implication for the timing of radiation therapy for patients with LS-SCLC. Twenty patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with IC followed by concomitant radiation therapy were investigated retrospectively. Ten patients received 1 cycle of IC, and 10 patients received 2 cycles of IC. Pre-IC CT imaging was coregistered with a simulation CT, and virtual radiation plans were created for pre- and post-IC thoracic disease in each case. The changes in the gross target volume (GTV), planning target volume (PTV) and dosimetric factors associated with the lungs, esophagus and heart were analyzed. The mean GTV and PTV for all of the patients decreased by 60.9% and 40.2%, respectively, which resulted in a significant reduction in the radiation exposure to the lungs, esophagus and heart. Changes in the PTV and radiation exposure of normal tissue were not significantly affected by the number of chemotherapy cycles delivered, although patients who received 2 cycles of IC had a greater decrease in GTV than those who received only 1 cycle of IC (69.6% vs. 52.1%, p = 0.273). Our data showed that targeting the tumor post-IC may reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue in patients with LS-SCLC. However, the benefit to the normal tissue was not increased by an additional cycle of IC. These findings suggest that the first cycle of chemotherapy is very important for tumor shrinkage and that initiating thoracic radiation therapy at the second cycle of chemotherapy may be a reasonable strategy for timing of radiation therapy in LS-SCLC treatment

  10. Probable clonal origin of acute myeloblastic leukemia following radiation and chemotherapy of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggans, R.G.; Jacobson, R.J.; Fialkow, P.J.; Woolley, P.V. III; Macdonald, J.S.; Schein, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    A 64-yr-old female developed acute myeloblastic leukemia following radiation and drug therapy for colon carcinoma. The patient was heterozygous for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G-6-PD) and displayed types A and B isoenzymes in nonhematopoietic tissue. In contrast, only type B G-6-PD was observed in peripheral blood white cells. In addition, a karyotypic abnormality was found in peripheral blood and marrow cells but not in skin fibroblasts. The data are consistent with a clonal origin of this leukemia

  11. Efficacy and safety of SOX chemotherapy with or without surgery in AFP-producing advanced gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhu; Hou, Xu; Chen, Juan; Sun, Huidong; Mi, Yuetang; Sui, Yongling; Li, Yuhong; Xie, Jiaping; Qiao, Yingli; Lei, Xiaofeng; Che, Xiaoshuang; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the clinical efficacy of S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX) regimen, with or without surgery in ?-fetoprotein-producing gastric cancer (APGC) with liver metastasis. A total of 24 patients with APGC treated at the Liaocheng People's Hospital between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical efficacy and patient safety were compared between the two groups. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the SOX group we...

  12. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  13. Postradiation sarcomas: importance of surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, J.L.; Ramaioli, A.; Chateau, M.C.; Pignol, J.P.; Marchal, C.; Resbeut, M.; Richaud, P.; Rambert, P.; Tortechaux, J.; Seng, S.H.; La Fontan, B. de; Reme-Saumon, M.; Roullet, B.; Bof, J.; Coindre, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of surgery in the treatment of Post-radiation sarcomas Materials. Post-radiation sarcomas is a rare entity and large series have rarely been reported. In order to improve knowledge about this entity the Radiotherapist group of the French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) decided to collect retrospectively the cases treated in their institutions. In order to be sure of the histology, all the cases were reviewed by a panel of pathologists of the FNCLCC Pathologist group. A total of 129 cases of sarcomas, and 108 were reviewed; analysis of 8 is in progress, and no material was obtained in the other 11 cases. The diagnosis of sarcomas was confirmed in 80 cases. All patients (60 F, 20 M) have received radiation therapy (median dose 50 Gy; 9-110 Gy) for the treatment of the primary tumor. At this time the age was 44 years (6-83 y). Diagnoses included: breast C. 42%, Lymphomas 11.5%, gynaecological C. 10% benign lesions 5% miscellaneous. Sarcomas developed after a mean interval of 12 years (3-64 y), in bone in 30% of the cases and in soft tissue in 70%. The majority of lesions (90%) developed in the irradiated field (dose received was between 50 Gy and 60 Gy). Histologically there were 29% Malignant HistiocytofibroSarcomas, 19% OsteoSarcomas, 15% FibroSarcomas, 9% LipoSarcomas, 6% LeiomyoSarcomas, miscellaneous sarcomas 22%. Treatment included: Surgery 28 cases, Surgery+Chemotherapy 17 cases, Chemotherapy only 16 cases, Radiation therapy only 1 case, surgery + Radiation therapy 5 cases, Radiation therapy +chemotherapy 6 cases, Surgery + Radiation therapy + Chemotherapy 7 cases, no treatment 5 cases. Results. The outcome is known for all but 3 patients. 51 patients have died (44 of their sarcoma, 4 of the primary tumour, 2 of other cause and 1 iatrogenic). Median survival is 23 months (95% confidence interval 16-29 mo) but 9 patients survived 5 yr or more. Median survival was 43 mo for patients treated by surgery (28p), 6 mo for chemotherapy group (16 p

  14. Radiation Protection Considerations about gamma probe-guided intraoperative sentinel lymph node surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Jimenez-Hoyuela Garcia, J. L.; Rebollo Aguirre, J. M.; Custodio, A.

    2002-01-01

    The sentinel node concept is based on the sequential dissemination hypothesis. According to it, there's a lymph node (named sentinel node) which is the first receiving cancer cells metastasizing from a primary tumor. Further, others nodes sequentially located might be affected. Surgical performance for several types of cancer includes the complete removal of the tumor and a complete local lymph node dissection (LND). so removing and analyzing the sentinel node may avoid the complete LND. To locate the sentinel node, it's usual the local administration (intradermal injection) of a radiopharmaceutical Tc-99, sulfur colloid (activity about 1 mCi( several hours prior to surgery, and using an intraoperative gamma probe very sensitive to the gamma radiation. Although the activity is injected by the Nuclear Medicine staff, and be exposed to the gamma radiation. In this study we estimated maximum possible doses that would be received by personnel (surgical staff during surgery and pathologists during lumpectomy of the sentinel node). For the surgical staff, to avoid dose errors due to the very low residual activities and not to interfere with the personnel in the surgery room, we estimated doses by taking into account only the physical decay of Tc99m injected. for the pathologists, we estimated the residual activity in the sentinel node with the gamma probe. The highest effective dose rate found was to the surgeon (o,44 μSv/h, respectively. so a surgeon could perform 407 hours/yr, and a pathologist 1717 hours/yr, dedicated exclusively to sentinel node biopsy, before being classified as professionally exposed to radiation, and 4070 and 17170 hours per year, respectively, to surpass the annual limits (national regulations of the European Communities). In short, radiation doses to clinical staff involved in the technique are low, and in normal conditions, by establishing appropriate procedures (precautions during surgery, during manipulation surgical specimen...) control

  15. Effect of concomitant use of immunomodulator (OK-432 and/or PSK) on primary lung cancer (stages III, IV) treated with radiation combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Imajo, Y.

    1982-01-01

    OK-432 (a lyophilized preparation of a low virulent strain, Su, of Streptococcus hemolytics (Group A) treated with penicillin G) and/or PSK (a protein-bound polysaccharide prepared from Coriolus versicolor) as an immunomodulator was administered to 209 patients of advanced lung cancer treated with radiation with combined chemotherapy. Their effects on immunological parameters and patients' survival periods were examined. Suppression of both PHA (phytohemagglutinin) skin test activities and lymphocyte blastoid transformation with PHA were reduced in the immunomodulator administered group compared with the non-administered group. Survival curves were evaluated between the patients with OK-432 and/or PSK and those without immunomodulator. It was suggested that OK-432 and/or PSK combined with radiation with combined chemotherapy was effective for the elongation of the survival period. These results indicated that the long-term administration of OK-432 and/or PSK was recommended for patients with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  16. Triple primary urogenital cancer. A case of secondary cancers following combination therapy comprising chemotherapy plus radiation therapy for testicular cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iuchi, Hiromichi; Watabe, Yoshihiko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Katsuyuki; Takeyama, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to our outpatient clinic with left renal cell cancer and bladder cancer. He had undergone combination therapy comprising chemotherapy plus radiation therapy following radical orchiectomy for testicular cancer at the age of 48 years. The right testis could be felt within the scrotum, however the left testis could not. Blood tests showed no abnormality in regard to testicular tumor markers. Urine cytology was class V. Computed tomography revealed a 3.0 x 3.4 cm mass in the left kidney and a 4.5 x 1.5 cm mass in the left wall of the bladder. We made it a priority to treat the bladder cancer which was strongly suspected to be invasive cancer. At first the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Then left partial nephrectomy was carried out. Our case would appear to be the 24th case of triple primary urogenital cancer in Japan that consisted of left testicular cancer, left renal cancer and bladder cancer. Our case was also thought to be a case of secondary cancer that developed following treatment for testicular cancer. (author)

  17. Long-term survival of bladder preservation therapy with radiation and chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Sumio; Takase, Kazunori; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Masuda, Mitsunobu; Yao, Masahiro; Hosaka, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    The prognoses and prognostic factors of the 54 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer who underwent bladder preservation therapy at Yokohama City University Hospital between 1977 and 1995 were analyzed statistically. The therapeutic modalities of bladder preservation were mainly radiation or chemotherapy. The prognosis for the patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy was worse than that for the patients who underwent total cystectomy. The prognostic factors of these patients were size and grade of tumor, presence of hydronephrosis and performance status (PS) of the patients by univariate analysis. Tumor grade was the most predictable prognostic factor using multivariate analysis. Only 17 patients survived more than 5 years after treatment; 78% of the survivors had good PS (0 or 1). Five of them died of cancer and two patients were alive with cancer. All of them had G3 tumors. These results suggest that patients with locally invasive G2 tumor could be candiates for bladder preservation therapy and patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy should be evaluated at 10 years post-therapy. (author)

  18. Tumor reoxygenation by aqueous oxygen solutions and its role in cancer treatment with chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderwood, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Many tumors contain significant areas of hypoxia which cause resistance to tumor radiation therapy and chemotherapy. We have used perfusion into afferent arteries with super saturated aqueous oxygen solutions (AO) to re-oxygenate the hypoxic areas of experimental tumors with the aim of restoring sensitivity to treatment and enhancing cancer therapy. We first concentrated on examining the ability of AO infusion to reoxygenate the MAT B III 13762 rat carcinoma growing in the thighs of rats. In experiments on 33 AO infused tumors using Eppendorf microelectrode monitoring, we consistently observed a significant decrease in the fraction of tumor domains with O 2 less than 5mmHg before and after AO infusion. Significant tumor reoxygenation was observed in most tumors with a volume less than 2.5 cm 3 . We next examined 15 New Zealand white rabbits transplanted with the VX2 carcinoma. Tissue oxygen studies indicated that intramuscular rabbit VX-2 tumor has a consistently lower hypoxic fraction (O 2 2 <5mm Hg). Significant reoxygenation did occur in these infused tumors although the degree of reoxygenation was slightly less than in the rat MAT B III 13762 perhaps reflecting the lower hypoxic fraction. Further studies showed that AO could also be infused directly into tumors with a reduction of hypoxic fraction of between 60-90% Overall, the experiments show that AO infusion into either arterial or intratumor sites is a viable approach to tumor reoxygenation and preliminary studies indicate increase effectiveness in treatment with cyclophosphamide / AO combination

  19. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy elicits tumor specific T cell responses in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Estévez, David; Sánchez, Ramiro; Tejada, Rafael E.; Parra-López, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical studies in breast cancer suggest that some anti-tumor therapy regimens generate stimulation of the immune system that accounts for tumor clinical responses, however, demonstration of the immunostimulatory power of these therapies on cancer patients continues to be a formidable challenge. Here we present experimental evidence from a breast cancer patient with complete clinical response after 7 years, associated with responsiveness of tumor specific T cells. T cells were obtained before and after anti-tumor therapy from peripheral blood of a 63-years old woman diagnosed with ductal breast cancer (HER2/neu+++, ER-, PR-, HLA-A*02:01) treated with surgery, followed by paclitaxel, trastuzumab (suspended due to cardiac toxicity), and radiotherapy. We obtained a leukapheresis before surgery and after 8 months of treatment. Using in vitro cell cultures stimulated with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that produce high levels of IL-12, we characterize by flow cytometry the phenotype of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) HER2/neu and NY-ESO 1 specific T cells. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) were performed in order to correlate both repertoires prior and after therapy. We evidence a functional recovery of T cell responsiveness to polyclonal stimuli and expansion of TAAs specific CD8+ T cells using peptide pulsed DCs, with an increase of CTLA-4 and memory effector phenotype after anti-tumor therapy. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and TILs showed that whereas the TCR-Vβ04-02 clonotype is highly expressed in TILs the HER2/neu specific T cells are expressed mainly in blood after therapy, suggesting that this particular TCR was selectively enriched in blood after anti-tumor therapy. Our results show the benefits of anti-tumor therapy in a breast cancer patient with clinical complete response in

  20. Case report of two patients having successful surgery for lung cancer after treatment for Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-02-01

    Conclusion: Surgery for lung cancer on patients with Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis should be deferred until the patients complete steroid therapy, and the clinical pneumonitis is cured. Moreover, it is believed that it is important to remove the resolved radiation pneumonitis without leaving any residual areas and not to cut into any areas of active radiation pneumonitis as much as possible.

  1. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Squamous Carcinoma of Oral Cavity: a Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanambar Sadighi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of adding neoadjuvant chemotherapy to surgery and radiation therapy for locally advanced resectable oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, 24 patients with T3 or T4a oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were randomly assigned to surgery alone or Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-FU (TPF induction chemotherapy followed by surgery. All patients were planned to receive chemoradiotherapy after surgery. The primary end-points were organ preservation and progression-free-survival. SPSS version 17 was used for data analysis. Median follow-up was 16 months. The median age of the patients was 62 years old (23-75 years. Man/woman ratio was 1.13. The primary site of the tumor was the tongue in most patients (48%. No significant difference was observed between pathologic characteristics of the two groups. Chemotherapy group showed 16% complete pathologic response to TPF. No significant difference in organ preservation surgery or overall survival was detected. However, the patients in the chemotherapy group had longer progression-free-survival (P=0.014. Surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy with or without TPF induction results in similar survival time. However, progression-free-survival improves with the TPF induction chemotherapy. Studies with more patents and new strategies are recommended to evaluate organ preservation improvement and long-term outcomes.

  2. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inuyama, Yukio; Fujii, Masato; Tanaka, Juichi; Takaoka, Tetsuro; Hosoda, Hyonosuke; Kawaura, Mitsuhiro; Toji, Masao

    1988-01-01

    There are 4 modalities of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy which include (1) concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy, (2) sequential use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy (pre-radiation chemotherapy), (3) pre-radiation chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy, and (4) alternating use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis. We studied concurrent use of radiotherapy and UFT by means of animal experimentation and clinical trials. The results obtained revealed that UFT was a most suitable agent together with 5-fluorouracil for concurrent application of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy including pre-radiation chemotherapy was also studied in cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. From the results, it seemed desirable to use cisplatin and bleomycin analogs sequentially in combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy should be studied successively to improve local tumor control rates and prevent distant metastases. For future perspectives, new trials of alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy based upon Looney's hypothesis seem necessary. (author)

  3. A comparative study of preoperative B-V-M-M chemotherapy and irradiation in advanced squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olasz, L.; Kwashie, F.; Herzegh, P.; Bruncsics, Z.; Hrovath, A.; Kiralyfalvi, L.

    1996-01-01

    From January 1976, 50 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were treated with telecobalt preoperative irradiation followed by appropriate surgery. Another group of 50 patients, who matched in risk factors and stage of disease, were treated with preoperative chemotherapy and surgery. Chemotherapy consisted of bleomycin, vincristine, mitolactol and methotrexate. All patients received 3 courses. Surgery was performed 2-3 weeks post-chemotherapy or 4-6 weeks post-radiotherapy. Forty four percent of the patients in the radiotherapy group showed recurrences, while 30% of the patients had recurrence in the chemotherapy group. The overall 3-year survival rate was 66% in the chemotherapy group and 57% in the radiation therapy group, with no statistical difference. (author)

  4. Clinical and histopathological studies on the squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue treated with radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Hideki [Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2000-12-01

    Because oral cancer treatment has advanced, resulting in a higher survival rate, it is necessary to treat the preserved oral functions such as speech, mastication, and deglutition, as well as the aesthetics. Oral cancer treatment has been performed mainly by surgical therapy and radiation therapy, however, integrated treatment including chemotherapy has recently been performed. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy for carcinomas of the tongue, which shows a high incident rate among oral cancers and has become more common recently, to establish treatment methods for preserving the function and morphology. The subjects were 63 patients who consulted our department and underwent radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy. With this therapy, the case of complete response (CR) was clinically obtained in 43 patients, and the case of partial response (PR) was obtained in 17 patients with a 68.3% CR rate and a 95.2% therapeutic effectiveness rate. Maintenance therapy was performed in 44 patients without performing surgical therapy of the primary lesion in the primary treatment. Twenty-nine among 44 patients showed a good clinical course without recurrence of primary lesion. Regarding T4, a good clinical course without recurrence was observed in 3 patients in which PR was obtained, and surgical therapy was added to the primary treatment, showing a 57.1% local control rate in T4. Considering these results, there is a high possibility that radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy for carcinomas of the tongue can be implemented for avoiding surgical therapy of the primary lesion in the primary treatment, and it is useful for preserving the function and morphology with a high local control rate. (author)

  5. Clinical and histopathological studies on the squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue treated with radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Hideki

    2000-01-01

    Because oral cancer treatment has advanced, resulting in a higher survival rate, it is necessary to treat the preserved oral functions such as speech, mastication, and deglutition, as well as the aesthetics. Oral cancer treatment has been performed mainly by surgical therapy and radiation therapy, however, integrated treatment including chemotherapy has recently been performed. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and usefulness of radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy for carcinomas of the tongue, which shows a high incident rate among oral cancers and has become more common recently, to establish treatment methods for preserving the function and morphology. The subjects were 63 patients who consulted our department and underwent radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy. With this therapy, the case of complete response (CR) was clinically obtained in 43 patients, and the case of partial response (PR) was obtained in 17 patients with a 68.3% CR rate and a 95.2% therapeutic effectiveness rate. Maintenance therapy was performed in 44 patients without performing surgical therapy of the primary lesion in the primary treatment. Twenty-nine among 44 patients showed a good clinical course without recurrence of primary lesion. Regarding T4, a good clinical course without recurrence was observed in 3 patients in which PR was obtained, and surgical therapy was added to the primary treatment, showing a 57.1% local control rate in T4. Considering these results, there is a high possibility that radiation-combined intra-arterial chemotherapy for carcinomas of the tongue can be implemented for avoiding surgical therapy of the primary lesion in the primary treatment, and it is useful for preserving the function and morphology with a high local control rate. (author)

  6. In vitro therapy study combined with low doses of radiation (Rn-222) and chemotherapy (taxol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, J.; Sainz, C.; Cos, S.; Gonzalez-Lamuno, D.

    2004-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the possibility that breast cancer cells show increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic agent taxol when they have been treated with low radiation doses from the gas radon. To this end, the cells were cultivated in a medium containing dissolved radon and then in a second medium containing a concentration of taxol. After the culture phase the surviving cells were counted and their viability was assessed. The results obtained indicate that the cells treated with low doses of radon exhibit increased sensitivity when treated with certain concentrations of taxol; in particular a lower survival rate and lower viability were observed in cells treated with radon and 50 nM of taxol in cells treated with the same concentration of taxol alone. These effects seem to result from the influence of the radon on the expression of apoptosis -related genes, which is complementary to the action of taxol on bcl-x related genes. (author)

  7. Effect of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy on Survival for Patients With Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Lachlan J.; Huang, Shao Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei; Che, Jiahua [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Brierley, James; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Waldron, John; Bayley, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hansen, Aaron [Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Witterick, Ian [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ringash, Jolie, E-mail: jolie.ringash@rmp.uhn.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of consecutive protocols on overall survival (OS) for cervical esophageal carcinoma (CEC). Methods and Materials: All CEC cases that received definitive radiation therapy (RT) with or without chemotherapy from 1997 to 2013 in 3 consecutive protocols were reviewed. Protocol 1 (P1) consisted of 2-dimensional RT of 54 Gy in 20 fractions with 5-fluorouracil plus either mitomycin C or cisplatin. Protocol 2 (P2) consisted of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DRT) of ≥60 Gy in 30 fractions plus elective nodal irradiation plus cisplatin. Protocol 3 (P3) consisted of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) of ≥60 Gy in 30 fractions plus elective nodal irradiation plus cisplatin. Multivariable analyses were used to assess the effect of the treatment protocol, RT technique, and RT dose on OS, separately. Results: Of 81 cases (P1, 21; P2, 23; and P3, 37), 34 local (P1, 11 [52%]; P2, 12 [52%]; and P3, 11 [30%]), 16 regional (P1, 6 [29%]); P2, 3 [13%]; and P3, 7 [19%]), and 34 distant (P1, 10 [48%]; P2, 9 [39%]; and P3, 15 [41%]) failures were identified. After adjusting for age (P=.49) and chemotherapy (any vs none; hazard ratio [HR] 0.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.3-0.9; P=.023), multivariable analysis showed P3 had improved OS compared with P1 (HR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8; P=.005), with a trend shown for benefit compared with P2 (HR 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.0; P=.061). OS between P1 and P2 did not differ (P=.29). Analyzed as a continuous variable, higher RT doses were associated with a borderline improved OS (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95-1.0; P=.075). IMRT showed improved OS compared with non-IMRT (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.3-0.8; P=.008). Conclusions: The present retrospective consecutive cohort study showed improved OS with our current protocol (P3; high-dose IMRT with concurrent high-dose cisplatin) compared with historical protocols. The outcomes for patients with CEC remain poor, and novel approaches to improve the therapeutic ratio are warranted.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and the Influence of Chemotherapy on Overall Survival for Large (≥5 Centimeter) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Simone, Charles B., E-mail: charles.simone@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for ≥5 cm lesions is poorly defined, largely owing to the low sample sizes in existing studies. The present analysis examined the SBRT outcomes and assessed the effect of chemotherapy in this population. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for primary non-small cell lung cancer ≥5 cm treated with SBRT (≤10 fractions). Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Statistical methods involved Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: From 2004 to 2012, data from 201 patients were analyzed. The median follow-up was 41.1 months. The median tumor size was 5.5 cm (interquartile range 5.0-6.0), with cT2a, cT2b, and cT3 disease in 24.9%, 53.2%, and 21.9%, respectively. The median total SBRT dose and fractionation was 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and 92.5% of the patients underwent SBRT with ≤5 fractions. The median OS was 25.1 months. Of the 201 patients, 15% received chemotherapy. The receipt of chemotherapy was associated with longer OS (median 30.6 vs 23.4 months; P=.027). On multivariable analysis, worse OS was seen with increasing age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.03; P=.012), poorly differentiated tumors (HR 2.06; P=.049), and T3 classification (HR 2.13; P=.005). On multivariable analysis, chemotherapy remained independently associated with improved OS (HR 0.57; P=.039). Conclusions: SBRT has utility in the setting of tumors ≥5 cm, with chemotherapy associated with improved OS in this subset. These hypothesis-generating data now raise the necessity of performing prospective analyses to determine whether chemotherapy confers outcome benefits after SBRT.

  9. Which patients benefit most from primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage IIIC or IV ovarian cancer? An exploratory analysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 55971 randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meurs, Hannah S; Tajik, Parvin; Hof, Michel H P; Vergote, Ignace; Kenter, Gemma G; Mol, Ben Willem J; Buist, Marrije R; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2013-10-01

    To investigate whether biomarkers consisting of baseline characteristics of advanced stage ovarian cancer patients can help in identifying subgroups of patients who would benefit more from primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We used data of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 55971 trial in which 670 patients were randomly assigned to primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The primary outcome was overall survival. Ten baseline clinical and pathological characteristics were selected as potential biomarkers. Using Subpopulation Treatment Effect Pattern Plots (STEPP), biomarkers with a statistically significant qualitative additive interaction with treatment were considered as potentially informative for treatment selection. We also combined selected biomarkers to form a multimarker treatment selection rule. The size of the largest metastatic tumour and clinical stage were significantly associated with the magnitude of the benefit from treatment, in terms of five-year survival (p for interaction: 0.008 and 0.016, respectively). Stage IIIC patients with metastatic tumours ⩽45 mm benefited more from primary surgery while stage IV patients with metastatic tumours >45 mm benefited more from neoadjuvant chemotherapy. In stage IIIC patients with larger metastatic tumours and in stage IV patients with less extensive metastatic tumours both treatments were equally effective. We estimated that by selecting treatments for patients based on largest metastatic tumour and clinical stage, the potential five-year survival rate in the population of treated patients would be 27.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 21.9-33.0), 7.8% higher than if all were treated with primary surgery, and 5.6% higher if all were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Although survival was comparable after primary surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the overall group of patients with ovarian cancer in the EORTC 55971 trial, we found in this exploratory

  10. Radiation exposure of patient and surgeon in minimally invasive kidney stone surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, A; Raif Karabacak, O; Yalçınkaya, F; Yiğitbaşı, O; Aktaş, C

    2016-05-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) are the standard treatments used in the endoscopic treatment of kidney stones depending on the location and the size of the stone. The purpose of the study was to show the radiation exposure difference between the minimally invasive techniques by synchronously measuring the amount of radiation the patients and the surgeon received in each session, which makes our study unique. This is a prospective study which included 20 patients who underwent PNL, and 45 patients who underwent RIRS in our clinic between June 2014 and October 2014. The surgeries were assessed by dividing them into three steps: step 1: the access sheath or ureter catheter placement, step 2: lithotripsy and collection of fragments, and step 3: DJ catheter or re-entry tube insertion. For the PNL and RIRS groups, mean stone sizes were 30mm (range 16-60), and 12mm (range 7-35); mean fluoroscopy times were 337s (range 200-679), and 37s (range 7-351); and total radiation exposures were 142mBq (44.7 to 221), and 4.4mBq (0.2 to 30) respectively. Fluoroscopy times and radiation exposures at each step were found to be higher in the PNL group compared to the RIRS group. When assessed in itself, the fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure were stable in RIRS, and the radiation exposure was the highest in step 1 and the lowest in step 3 in PNL. When assessed for the 19 PNL patients and the 12 RIRS patients who had stone sizes≥2cm, the fluoroscopy time in step 1, and the radiation exposure in steps 1 and 2 were found to be higher in the PNL group than the RIRS group (PPNL because it has short fluoroscopy time and the radiation exposure is low in every step. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Pathologic response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy predicts locoregional control in patients with triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor E. Chen, BS

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Patients with TNBC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy who have residual disease in the breast or lymph nodes at the time of surgery have significantly higher rates of locoregional failure and lower DFS compared with those with a pCR despite the use of adjuvant radiation therapy. Strategies to intensify therapy for patients with residual disease warrant further investigation.

  12. Experimental and clinical research on the inhibition of scarring formation after glaucoma surgery 90Sr radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Meien; Wang Guzhu; Li Shuqing

    1994-01-01

    Beta radiation of 90 Sr can inhibit the scarring formation so that the success rate of filtration surgery may be improved. After success in animal experiment, trabeculectomy was performed with small sclera flap on 31 eyes of 23 cases of patients with a high risk of scarring formation. Local 90 Sr radiation with a total dosage of 30.24 Gy were given by several times 3 days postoperatively, combined with local use of steroids. The patients were followed-up at 1 to 24 months, averaging 7 months. The intraocular pressure were successfully controlled in 90.3% of the patients. No lens impairment and other complications were observed. This procedure is an adoptive method in preventing scarring formation after glaucoma filtering surgery

  13. Radio chemotherapy for uterine cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resbeut, M.; Alzieu, C.; Gonzague-Casabianca, L.; Haie-Meder, C.

    2000-01-01

    Low-stage uterine cervix carcinoma can be treated by either surgery, radiation therapy or combined treatments with high cure rates ranging from 90 to 95 % for stage IB1 tumors. However, the standard treatment, combining external beam plus intracavitary radiation, fails to control the progression of the disease in 35 to 90 % of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. No substantial improvements have been made in the treatment of these tumors in the past two decades. The addition of concurrent 5-FU in a phase III study failed to improve the results in the overall patient population, but the five-year DFS was significantly better in a subset of patients (tumor > 5 cm and IB/IIA or medial parametrial IIB disease). Concurrent chemo-radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin showed, in a phase III study, a significant longer DFS in patients treated with chemotherapy despite the same long-term local tumor control. After many phase II studies, five phase III studies have recently demonstrated a 40 to 60 % reduction in the relative risk of recurrence with cisplatin containing chemo-radiation. Across these studies, the risk of death was reduced by 30 to 50 %. The benefit was less clear in patients with stages III-IV tumors than in patients with lower stages associated with poor prognostic factors. Hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity of chemo-radiation was greater than that of radiotherapy alone. However, late side effects were similar in the different treatment groups. These results must be confirmed with a longer follow-up. The importance of concurrent chemotherapy during the brachytherapy procedure should be analyzed. It has yet to be determined which chemotherapy regimen achieves the most favorable therapeutic ratio. (authors)

  14. Hypothyroidism and wound healing: occurrence after head and neck radiation and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, M.V.; Zajtchuk, J.T.; Henderson, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective five-year review of patients treated for cancer of the larynx disclosed a high prevalence of hypothyroidism after combined therapy. A total of 29 patients were studied. Seven (24%) of the 29 patients had hypothyroidism develop in the posttreatment period (zero to two years). Two (22%) of the nine patients treated with a combination of surgery and radiation had hypothyroidism develop. An additional ten patients treated with radiation alone remained clinically euthyroid, and no thyroid function tests were performed. Of the five patients who became hypothyroid after treatment with a combination of surgery and radiation, two had fistulae develop that were resistant to intensive local care. They closed promptly after treatment of the hypothyroidism. Of the two patients who had hypothyroidism develop after surgery alone, one had fistulae develop that were resistant to local cae, but responsive to thyroid hormone. These patients should have thyroid function tests done in the early postoperative period, and those found to be hypothyroid should be treated promptly

  15. Surgery or radiation therapy for Stage I and IIA carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.

    1979-01-01

    The choice of treatment in carcinoma of the cervix is best decided after careful individual appraisal has been carried out. For best results, a long-term view must be agreed upon initially and careful followup by the same team is obligatory. At present, surgery, radiation therapy, and a combination of these two modalities have been employed successfully to manage carcinoma of the cervix. To a great extent, the facilities, the experience, and the interest of the personnel involved influence the type of therapy that will be employed. Generally speaking, the choice of treatment is determined primarily by the stage of the disease process. Radical surgery in the management of patients with Stage I and Stage II-A carcinoma of the cervix must be planned to include within the en bloc dissection the uterus, tubes, ovaries, and regional lymph node drainage from those organs. Therefore, a radical lymphadnectomy is an integral and important part of the overall management program when radical surgery is performed. In most institutions, radiation therapy is used most frequently to treat carcinoma of the cervix in Stages I and II-A. The data from various institutions indicate significant survival potential from radiation therapy treatment programs that are appropriately devised. In Stages I and II-A the complications are minimal in character (primarily proctitis and cystitis); generally, they involve a potential incidence of about six percent

  16. Eaton-Lambert syndrome with small cell carcinoma of the lung. A case with a favorable clinical course through chemotherapy and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Shigeki; Hanyu, Norinao; Ichiyoshi, Takeo; Yanagisawa, Nobuo

    1987-04-01

    A case of Eaton-Lambert syndrome with small cell carcinoma of the lung responding favorably to chemotherapy and radiation was described. The patient, 56-year-old man, began to feel weakness of the upper limbs in 1982 (age 52). His condition deteriorated gradually, followed by weakness of the lower limbs, dysphagia and bilateral ptosis. He was admitted to our hospital in Janualy 1984. We started radiation therapy for the lung mass and his neurological findings improved slightly. In June 1984, he complained of pain in the left elbow accompanied by increased ptosis and weakness in the limbs. The biopsy of left elbow lymphnode revealed the metastasis of intermediate cell type small cell carcinoma of the lung, and the diagnosis of Eaton-Lambert syndrome was confirmed. Metastases were also found at the right parietal bone and cervical lymphnode. We started a combination chemotherapy consisting of ACNU, vincristine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide, adding prophylactic irradiation to the cranium and metastatic regions. After treatment, the metastases disappeared completely and no abnormal findings were found except for decreased tendon reflexes of the upper limbs. Post-treatment electromyography showed marked reduction of waxing and post-tetanic facilitation. We have intermittently continued a combination chemotherapy for consolidation. The patient is living well 21 months after the distant metastases became apparent, and is showing marked improvement of Eaton-Lambert syndrome through chemotherapy and radiation. We propose that anti-neoplastic treatment is the first choice for the treatment of Eaton-Lambert syndorame associated with small cell carcinoma of long. (J.P.N.).

  17. Hospital readmission rates and risk factors for readmission following cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) for peritoneal surface malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreznik, Yael; Hoffman, Aviad; Hamburger, Tamar; Ben-Yaacov, Almog; Dux, Yossi; Jacoby, Harel; Berger, Yaniv; Nissan, Aviram; Gutman, Mordechai

    2018-02-08

    Cytoreductive surgery and Hyperthermic intra-peritoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) for peritoneal surface malignancies is associated with high morbidity. The increased numbers of patients undergoing CRS/HIPEC in recent years mandates risk analysis and quality assurance. However, only scarce data exist regarding causative parameters for readmission. The aim of this study was to assess readmission rates and risk factors associated with readmission. A retrospective-cohort study including patients from two high-volume centers who underwent CRS/HIPEC surgery between the years 2007-2016 was performed. Patients' demographics, peri-operative data and readmission rates were recorded. 223 patients were included in the study. The 7 and 30-day readmission rates were 3.5% (n = 8) and 11% (n = 25), respectively. Late readmission rates (up to 90 days) were 11% (n = 25). The most common causes of readmission were surgical related infections (35%), small bowel obstruction (17.5%) and dehydration (14%). Post-operative complications were associated with higher readmission rates (p = 0.0001). PCI score was not associated with higher rates of readmission. Readmissions following CRS/HIPEC occur mainly due to infectious complications and dehydrations. Patients following CRS/HIPEC should be discharged after careful investigation to a community based continuing care with access for IV fluid replacement or antibiotics administration when required. Copyright © 2018 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CEA to peritoneal carcinomatosis index (PCI) ratio is prognostic in patients with colorectal cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis undergoing cytoreduction surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozman, Mathew A; Fisher, Oliver M; Rebolledo, Bree-Anne J; Parikh, Roneil; Valle, Sarah J; Arrowaili, Arief; Alzahrani, Nayef; Liauw, Winston; Morris, David L

    2018-03-01

    Serum tumor markers are prognostic in patients with colorectal cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC) undergoing cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC). Assessment of the ratio of tumor marker to volume, as depicted by peritoneal carcinomatosis index (PCI), and how this may affect overall (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) has not been reported. Survival effect of this ratio was analyzed in patients with CRPC managed from 1996 to 2016 with CRS and IPC. Of 260 patients included, those with low CEA/PCI ratio (PCI ratio was most pronounced in patients with PCI ≤ 10 (OS of 72 vs 30 months, P PCI ratio was independently associated with poorer OS (adjusted HR 1.85, 95%CI 1.11-3.10, P = 0.02) and RFS (adjusted HR 1.58, 95%CI 1.04-2.41, P = 0.03). CEA/PCI ratio is an independent prognostic factor for OS and RFS in CRPC. This novel approach allows both tumor activity and volume to be accounted for in one index, thus potentially providing a more accurate indication of tumor biological behavior. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genetic variations in radiation and chemotherapy drug action pathways and survival in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Treatment outcomes vary greatly in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of radiation and chemotherapy drug action pathway gene polymorphisms on the survival of patients with locoregionally advanced NPC treated with cisplatin- and fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Four hundred twenty-one consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were prospectively recruited. We utilized a pathway approach and examined 18 polymorphisms in 13 major genes. Polymorphisms were detected using the LDR-PCR technique. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR analysis was performed to detect potential gene-gene interaction. RESULTS: After adjustment for clinicopathological characteristics, overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with the MPO rs2243828 CT/CC genotype (HR=2.453, 95% CI, 1.687-3.566, P<0.001. The ERCC1 rs3212986 CC (HR=1.711, 95% CI, 1.135-2.579, P=0.010, MDM2 rs2279744 GT/GG (HR=1.743, 95% CI, 1.086-2.798, P=0.021, MPO rs2243828 CT/CC (HR=3.184, 95% CI, 2.261-4.483, P<0.001 and ABCB1 rs2032582 AT/AA (HR=1.997, 95% CI, 1.086-3.670, P=0.026 genotypes were associated with poor progression-free survival. Prognostic score models based on independent prognostic factors successfully classified patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. Furthermore, MDR analysis showed no significant interaction between polymorphisms. CONCLUSIONS: Four single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with survival in patients with locoregionally advanced NPC treated with cisplatin- and fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy. Combining clinical prognostic factors with genetic information was valuable in identifying patients with different risk.

  20. Development of a bowel function assessment tool to measure bowel function in patients receiving radiation and/or chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throckmorton, Terry; Janjan, Nora; Bisanz, Annette; Pearce, Ann Nette; Bevins, Melinda; DeFord, Linda; Skibber, John; Abbruzzese, James; Rich, Tyvin

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: One of the goals in the treatment of gastrointestinal tract malignancies is to preserve normal bowel function. Evaluation of bowel function to date, however, has been highly subjective and restricted in definition. Presented is a tool that has been validated for use as a more specific assessment of bowel function after therapeutic intervention. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Bowel Function Self Assessment Tool [BFSAT] was developed from descriptive data obtained from cancer patients who presented with problems related to bowel function. The BFSAT and FACT-C scale were administered to 134 patients with colorectal cancer. Prior treatment had included radiation, administered either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, following surgical resection. RESULTS: Content validity was achieved through the multimodality review panel process. Based on descriptors provided by patients, publications and a multimodality review panel who screened the items for clarity and content, 29 of the initial 40 items were unanimously agreed upon and included in the questionnaire. A correlation of 0.51, which is significant beyond the 0.001 level, was obtained between the BFSAT and the FACT-C, indicating strong concurrent validity. The internal consistency and reliability was confirmed by coefficient alpha levels of 0.85, which matched the 0.85 coefficient alpha level for the FACT-C scale in this population. Factor analysis will be conducted when a larger sample size is available. CONCLUSION: Baseline reliability and validity have been established for the BFSAT. The BFSAT shows strong correlation with the FACT-C scale. Providing information regarding function and clinical outcome, the BFSAT complements the FACT-C in the evaluation of quality of life parameters among patients with colorectal cancer

  1. Radiation exposure to surgical staff during F-18-FDG-guided cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, P.A.; Hesse, B.; Chakera, A.H.; Schmidt, G.; Klausen, T.L.; Binderup, T.; Grossjohann, H.S.; Friis, E.; Hansen, C.P.; Kjaer, A.

    2008-01-01

    High-energy gamma probes have recently become commercially available, developed for 18 F-FDG probe-guided surgery. The radiation received by the staff in the operating room might limit the use of it, but has never been determined. We therefore wanted to measure the absorbed staff doses at operations where patients had received a preoperative injection of 18 F-FDG. Thirty-four patients with different cancers (breast cancer, melanoma, gastrointestinal cancers, respectively) were operated. At every operation the surgeon was monitored with a TLD tablet on his finger of the operating hand and a TLD tablet on the abdomen. The surgeon and anaesthesiologist were also monitored using electronic dosimeters placed in the trousers lining at 25 operations. The dose rate to the surgeon's abdominal wall varied between 7.5-13.2 μSv/h, depending on tumour location. The doses to the anaesthesiologists and the finger doses to the surgeon were much lower. About 350-400 MBq, i.e. ca. eight times higher activities than those used in the present study are supposed to be necessary for guiding surgery. It can be calculated from the body doses measured that a surgeon can perform between 150-260 h of surgery without exceeding permissible limits for professional workers. The radiation load to the operating staff will generally be so small that it does not present any limitation for FDG-guided surgery. However, it is recommended to monitor the surgical staff considering that the surgeon may be exposed to other radiation sources, and since the staff often includes women of child-bearing age. (orig.)

  2. Radiation dose reduction for patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma with complete response after initial induction chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liang Wang,1,2,* Xi-wen Bi,1,3,* Zhong-jun Xia,1,2 Hui-qiang Huang,1,3 Wen-qi Jiang,1,3 Yu-jing Zhang1,4 1State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, 2Department of Hematologic Oncology, 3Department of Medical Oncology, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Previous studies have found that radiotherapy (RT dose less than 50 Gy resulted in inferior outcomes for early stage extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL. Nowadays, induction chemotherapy (CT followed by RT consolidation is often used. For patients who get complete response (CR after CT, whether RT dose can be safely reduced or not remains unknown. This retrospective study compared the survival outcomes between patients who received higher dose (>50 Gy and lower dose (≤50 Gy RT after CR was attained by CT. One hundred and forty four patients of early stage ENKTL got CR after induction CT and received RT consolidation. Thirty-one patients received lower dose RT (median 46 Gy, range, 36–50 Gy, and 113 patients received higher dose RT (median 56 Gy, range, 52–66 Gy. In univariate survival analysis, age >60, local tumor invasion, and non-asparaginase-based CT were associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. However, there were no differences in PFS and OS between patients treated with higher and lower dose RT, which was confirmed in the multivariate survival analysis. Furthermore, reduced dose RT did not affect local control rate. Most common RT-related side effects were grade 1/2 mucositis and dermatitis, and the incidence rate of grade 3 mucositis or dermatitis was lower in patients treated with reduced dose RT (9.7% vs 15.0% for mucositis, and 6.5% vs 17.7% for dermatitis. In conclusion, this study found that RT dose could be safely reduced without

  3. Delayed radiation necrosis 7 years after gamma knife surgery for arteriovenous malformation. Two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Yatsushiro, Kazutaka; Arita, Kazunori; Hirahara, Kazuho; Uetsuhara, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman and a 55-year-old woman were treated with gamma knife surgery (GKS) for occipital arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Angiography confirmed complete nidus obliterations 2 years after GKS. However, both patients complained of chronic headache and visual symptoms from around 7 years after GKS. Magnetic resonance imaging showed round masses with or without cystic change surrounded by large areas of brain edema. Angiography also showed complete obliteration of AVM at this time. Extended corticosteroid treatment failed to control the edema. Both patients underwent total surgical removal of the mass. Visual disturbance and chronic headache improved postoperatively and the brain edema rapidly subsided. The histological diagnosis was radiation necrosis in both cases, attributed to the low conformity index and large 12-Gy volume due to usage of a large collimator for GKS. These cases of delayed radiation necrosis after GKS suggest that surgical removal of necrotic lesions is necessary for radiation necrosis intractable to medical treatment. (author)

  4. Effective treatment of Stage I uterine papillary serous carcinoma with high dose-rate vaginal apex radiation (192Ir) and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Bruce C.; Knisely, Jonathan P. S.; Kacinski, Barry M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Frank, Alex H.; Peschel, Richard E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Edraki, Babak; Kohorn, Ernest I.; Chambers, Setsuko K.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a morphologically distinct variant of endometrial carcinoma that is associated with a poor prognosis, high recurrence rate, frequent clinical understaging, and poor response to salvage treatment. We retrospectively analyzed local control, actuarial overall survival (OS), actuarial disease-free survival (DFS), salvage rate, and complications for patients with Federation International of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) (1988) Stage I UPSC. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis describes 38 patients with FIGO Stage I UPSC who were treated with the combinations of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, total abdominal hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO), with or without a surgical staging procedure. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with a combination of low dose-rate (LDR) uterine/vaginal brachytherapy using 226 Ra or 137 Cs and conventional whole-abdomen radiation therapy (WART) or whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Of 20 patients (10%) in this treatment group, 2 received cisplatin chemotherapy. Eighteen patients were treated with high dose-rate (HDR) vaginal apex brachytherapy using 192 Ir with an afterloading device and cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) chemotherapy (5 of 18 patients). Only 6 of 20 UPSC patients treated with combination LDR uterine/vaginal brachytherapy and conventional external beam radiotherapy underwent complete surgical staging, consisting of TAH/BSO, pelvic/para-aortic lymph node sampling, omentectomy, and peritoneal fluid analysis, compared to 15 of 18 patients treated with HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy. Results: The 5-year actuarial OS for patients with complete surgical staging and adjuvant radiation/chemotherapy treatment was 100% vs. 61% for patients without complete staging (p = 0.002). The 5-year actuarial OS for all Stage I UPSC patients treated with postoperative HDR vaginal apex brachytherapy and systemic chemotherapy was 94

  5. The effect of chemotherapy with or without radiation on the accuracy of MR imaging for evaluating tumor infiltration into the bladder wall in cases of advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazushige; Satou, Yuji; Nannri, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    Staging of tumor infiltration into the bladder wall is one of the critical points in decision-making for optimal treatment of invasive bladder cancer. We studied the correlation of MR findings with pathological diagnosis in cases of invasive bladder cancer which had been treated with chemotherapy, with or without radiation. Twenty-one patients (14 men and 7 women) with invasive bladder tumors who underwent either partial cystectomy or radical cystectomy were entered into the study. Eight cases had received chemotherapy after staging biopsy (Group A), 6 cases had undergone chemo-radiation therapy following staging biopsy (Group B), and 7 cases had received no adjuvant therapy except for staging biopsy preoperatively (Group C). All cases had MR imaging study before surgical treatment. The pathological stage was assessed by examining the whole layer of the resected bladder wall. Pathological diagnosis was pT0 in 4 cases, pT1 in 2 cases, pT2b in 5 cases, pT3a in 2 cases and pT3b in 8 cases. Staging with MR imaging was consistent with pathological findings in 14 of the 21 cases (66.7%), while MR imaging produced over-staging in 6 cases and under-staging in 1 case. Of the 6 cases with over-staging, 2 cases had received chemo-radiation therapy, 2 cases had received chemotherapy, and 2 cases had received staging biopsy alone preoperatively. The one case with under-staging had received chemo-radiation therapy preoperatively. The accuracy in staging with MR imaging was 75.0% (6/8), 50.0% (3/6), and 71.4% (5/7) in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Imaging study with MR is useful for the staging of invasive bladder cancer. However, care should be taken in the staging of invasive bladder tumors which have been treated with chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy, because inflammatory infiltration and/or fibrous change caused by the chemo-radiation make accurate staging with MR imaging difficult. (author)

  6. Local tumor control and cosmetic outcome following breast-conserving surgery and radiation up to a total dose of 56 Gy without boost in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayerl, A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival, local tumor control and cosmetic outcome after breast-conserving surgery followed by radiotherapy without boost irradiation. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study 270 breast cancer patients were treated with breast conserving surgery combined with a homogenous radiation of the tumor bearing breast up to a total dose of 56 Gy without local boost irradiation. Mean follow-up was 48 months. Local tumor control, side effects, cosmetic results and contentment with treatment were assessed using physical examinations and interviews based on a standardized questionnaire. Results: Cause-specific survival at 5 years after treatment was 88.3%, actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years was 76.1%. Within 23 to 78 months after treatment 12 patients suffered from ipsilateral breast recurrence. The actuarial freedom from local recurrence (single tumor manifestation) was 96.8% at 5 years after treatment, 89% at 10 years. The occurrence of local failures was not significantly correlated to tumor size, margins, grading, nodal status, age or lymphangiosis. 15.6% of the patients developed distant metastases. In all patients treatment was performed without interruption. Side effects were predominantly of mild degree, no severe side effects were detected. 73% of physicians and 81% of patients scored their cosmetic outcome as excellent or good. 93% of patients would again decide in favor of this procedure. Whereas, use of adjuvant chemotherapy as well as subcutaneous reconstruction of breast tissue did not significantly affect breast cosmesis, analysis demonstrated impaired cosmetic results related to a larger breast size. Conclusion: The data of this study show that tumor control achieved by breast conserving surgery in combination with a radiation technique up to a total dose of 56 Gy which omits boost irradiation is within the range of literature data. Side effects of the therapy were tolerable. The treatment displayed a good

  7. Radiation-recall myositis presenting as low-back pain (2010: 4b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heirwegh, Geert; Bruyeer, Eveline; Demaerel, Philippe; Renard, Marleen; Uyttebroeck, Anne

    2010-01-01

    We report on a patient with a history of Ewing sarcoma who underwent surgery and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He developed low-back pain 6 months after the end of the radiotherapy and during consolidation chemotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of myositis corresponding to the 'radiation-recall phenomenon', an inflammatory reaction of irradiated tissue. (orig.)

  8. Radiation-recall myositis presenting as low-back pain (2010: 4b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heirwegh, Geert [AZ Damiaanziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Oostende (Belgium); University Hospital K.U. Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Bruyeer, Eveline; Demaerel, Philippe [University Hospital K.U. Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Renard, Marleen; Uyttebroeck, Anne [University Hospital K.U. Leuven, Department of Paediatrics, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    We report on a patient with a history of Ewing sarcoma who underwent surgery and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He developed low-back pain 6 months after the end of the radiotherapy and during consolidation chemotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of myositis corresponding to the 'radiation-recall phenomenon', an inflammatory reaction of irradiated tissue. (orig.)

  9. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy followed by GDP chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Shengyu; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Changgong; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Puyuan; Sun, Yan; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-09-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and the majority of ENKTL cases are diagnosed at the localized stage. Radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has been used for localized ENKTL, but the optimal combination treatment modality and the best first-line chemotherapy regimen have not been defined. In this retrospective study, 44 patients with newly diagnosed, stages I/II ENKTL were enrolled and received intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 50-56 Gy) followed by GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The median number of chemotherapy cycles per patient was 4 (range, 2-6 cycles). At the end of treatment, the overall response rate was 95% (42/44), including 39 patients (89%) who attained complete response. Two patients developed systemic progression after IMRT. With a median follow-up of 37.5 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate and progression-free survival (PFS) rate were 85% (95% CI, 74 to 96%) and 77% (95% CI, 64 to 91%), respectively. Locoregional and systemic failure rates for this treatment were 9% (4/44) and 14% (6/44), respectively. The most common grades 3 to 4 adverse events included leukopenia (37%), neutropenia (34%), and mucositis (25%). No treatment-related deaths were observed. This study suggested high efficacy and low toxicity of IMRT followed by GDP regimen chemotherapy for newly diagnosed stage I/II ENKTL patients. These results require further investigation in prospective trials.

  10. Timing of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) following breast conserving surgery (BCS) for patients with node-positive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallgren, A; Bernier, J; Gelber, RD; Roncadin, M; Joseph, D; Castiglione, M

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of delaying RT until after different durations of initial courses of CT for pts with node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From 7/86-4/93, the IBCSG enrolled 1475 eligible node-positive pre- and perimenopausal pts in Trial 6 and 1212 eligible node-positive postmenopausal pts in Trial 7. Pts in Trial 6 were randomized to receive one of four treatments: (1) CMF x 6 cycles (1 cycle=28 days; cyclophosphamide 100 mg/m{sup 2} orally days 1-14; methotrexate 40 mg/m{sup 2} iv. days 1 and 8; 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2} iv days 1 and 8); (2) CMF x 6 cycles followed by single cycles at months 9, 12 and 15; (3) CMF x 3 cycles; (4) CMF x 3 followed by single cycles at months 6, 9 and 12. Pts in Trial 7 were randomized to receive one of four treatments: (5) tamoxifen (TAM: 20 mg daily) plus CMF x 3 cycles, months 1,2,3; (6) TAM plus CMF x 3 plus single cycles of CMF at months 9, 12 and 15; (7) TAM alone for five yrs; (8) TAM plus single cycles of CMF at months 9, 12 and 15. The randomizations were stratified according to type of surgery; 434 pts in Trial 6 (29%) and 285 pts in Trial 7 (24%) had breast conserving surgery and are the subjects of this report. Pts were randomized to receive RT to the conserved breast AFTER completing the initial block of CT if assigned; i.e. month 7 for arms 1 and 2; month 4 for arms 3 and 4; month 4 for arms 5 and 6; month 1 for arms 7 and 8. 24% of pts in Trial 6 and 27% of pts in Trial 7 had four or more axillary lymph nodes involved. Possible prognostic factors including age, estrogen receptor status, nodal status and tumor size were balanced across randomized groups. Four-year actuarial total failure rates (failure at any site), risks of developing distant metastases (DM) (at any time during observation), and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. To avoid potential bias due to competing causes of failure, only patients who could be followed for at least 4 years

  11. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancers treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; DelRowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In reported retrospective and non-randomized trials for esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival than whites but the patient population, method, quality and time periods of treatment differ. We reviewed the patient database of the combined modality arm of RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma protocol to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Materials and Methods: The chemotherapy (CT) consisted of Cisplatin, 75 mg/m 2 during the first day of the first radiation treatment (RT) and then the first day of weeks, 5, 8, and 11. In addition, 5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m 2 was given also the first day of radiotherapy and over 4 days and this 4 day cycle was repeated weeks 5, 8, and 11. 50 Gy was given to the esophagus as follows: 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 3 weeks (30 Gy), followed by a local boost of 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 2 weeks (20 Gy). 139 patients were entered into the combined modality arm of RT+CT. Nine patients were not evaluated in the analysis because 7 were deemed ineligible and 2 had incomplete data. This left 130 patients analyzable: 61 were initially randomized to the RT+CT arm and 69 were later registered to this arm when the RT only arm was closed due to poor survival (10% RT only vs 36% RT+CT alive at 2 years). Five additional patients were not included because their racial background was classified as 'other' and six patients were scheduled for, but did not receive any chemotherapy, leaving 119 patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites, evaluated in this report. The following pretreatment characteristics were analyzed using the Cox regression model: Race (black vs white); Histology (squamous vs adenocarcinoma; Age ( 5 cm vs 77% for whites. When analyzing dysphagia, only 3% of blacks had unrestricted diets vs 33% of whites. Nearly half (49%) of blacks could tolerate liquids only, whereas only 30% of whites were liquid-restricted. Only 14% of blacks had less than a 10 lb

  12. A case of fat necrosis with ulceration after breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Yuki; Kijima, Yuko; Hirata, Munetsugu; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Arima, Hideo; Nakajo, Akihiro; Hiraki, Tsubasa; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    An 82 year-old woman was diagnosed with right breast cancer, and partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed in another hospital. Lateral subcutaneous fat was mobilized and used to fill mammary gland defect. Two months after surgery, she received postoperative radiation therapy and endocrine therapy. Two years and six months after surgery, induration of the left breast was marked and skin redness appeared. It then became exposed, and the lesion was diagnosed as fat necrosis and abscess the core needle biopsy. Conservative observation was then conducted. Pain developed and pus exudatation continued from the necrotic tissue. Two years and nine months after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for treatment. Deformity, induration with a fistula, and skin redness were found in the surgically treated and irradiated right breast. The lesion was diagnosed as fat necrosis based on several imaging examinations. Simple mastectomy was performed for pain reduction and to treat the continuous fistula leakage. Since the mass showed firm adhesion with the major pectoral muscle, a part of the muscle was excised. Histology revealed necrotic fat and an abscess with a skin fistula, but not malignancy. The endocrine therapy has been continued, and she has survived without recurrent disease for a year and eight months since surgery. (author)

  13. Prospective Phase II Study of Brachytherapy Boost as a Component of Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-SAYED, M.E.; EL-TAHER, Z.H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to assess the response rate and toxicity profile in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer using brachytherapy (BT) boost following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), concomitant with chemotherapy as a component of the neoadjuvant treatment. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective phase II study of neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who presented to the department of radiation oncology, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Seventeen patients had been included in the study. Radiation therapy was given as: phase I,45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of EBRT, followed by brachytherapy boost (within one week after the end of EBRT) using high dose rate iridium 192 (Ir 192 ) aiming at 800 c Gy given in 2 fractions (each 400 c Gy) separated by 1 week. All patients received the same concomitant chemotherapy in the form of Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin. The clinical and pathological response rates, together with the toxicity profile were assessed. Results: Seventeen patients had been studied; the majority (14; 82%) were males, while 3 only (18%) were females, their mean age was 57.4 years. All patients had low anterior resection (LAR). The clinical response rate, assessed by digital rectal examination ± endoscopy examination 4 weeks after the end of EBRT and BT, revealed that complete clinical response (cCR) was noted in 3 patients (18%), clinical partial response (cPR) in 14 patients (82%); while the pathological response rate was: complete pathological response (pCR) in 8 patients (47%), pathological partial response (pPR) in 9 patients (53%). The toxicity profile showed that grade III radiation proctitis was seen in one patient (6%), grade III dermatitis in 2 (12%), while no patients developed grade III cystitis. For chemotherapy toxicities, three patients (18%) developed grade III nausea and/or vomiting, 2 (12%) developed grade III diarrhea. Conclusion

  14. Evaluating contextual processing in diffusion MRI: application to optic radiation reconstruction for epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal M W Tax

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning.

  15. [A case report-advanced pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasuike, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Yamada, Masaharu; Minami, Yukiko; Ezumi, Koji; Kashiwazaki, Masaki; Fujimoto, Takayoshi

    2008-11-01

    We report a case of advanced pancreatic cancer with liver and lung metastases that was well controlled over one year by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion in an outpatient setting. The patient was a 74-year-old woman. Chief complaints were back pain and anorexia. She was diagnosed with pancreas cancer with liver and lung metastases at the time of first visit. We started systemic chemotherapy with gemcitabine 1 g/body and 5-FU 1 g/body alternately every other week on an outpatient basis. At 1.5 months (M) after initiation of chemotherapy, we started radiation therapy to the main tumor at a total dose of 40 Gy. After radiation, chemotherapy was resumed. As a result, the size of the main tumor decreased but metastatic liver tumors got larger. Then we changed to combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy (gemcitabine and 5-FU) and hepatic arterial infusion (5-FU weekly). Liver metastases almost disappeared after 7.5 M. Despite all these treatments, however, the number of metastatic lung tumors increased. The patient was hospitalized for 15 M and died after 17 M. We focused on and succeeded in the prolongation of lifetime and maintenance of QOL by combination therapy with systemic chemotherapy, radiation and hepatic arterial infusion therapy.

  16. Severe radiation morbidity in carcinoma of the cervix: impact of pretherapy surgical staging and previous surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Bruce A.; Hempling, Ronald E.; Piver, M. Steven; Baker, Trudy R.; McAuley, Michael; Driscoll, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to delineate the factors which (a) contribute to an increase in the severe, radiation induced complication rate and (b) have a significant effect on survival in patients with International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) Stage I-IVA cervical cancer undergoing pretherapy surgical staging. Methods and Materials: From 1971-1991, 189 patients underwent pretherapy surgical staging via a retroperitoneal approach (67) or transperitoneal approach (122). Seventy-nine patients had previously experienced a laparotomy. Patients subsequently received a median of 85 Gy to point A. In patients receiving paraaortic radiation, a median of 45 Gy was administered. One hundred and thirty-two (69.8%) patients received hydroxyurea as a radiation sensitizer. Results: Pretherapy surgical evaluation revealed that 21 of 89 (23.6%) Stage II patients and 32 of 85 (37.6%) Stage III patients had paraaortic lymph node metastases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis detailed the significant factors favorably influencing the radiation-induced complication rate to be a retroperitoneal approach of pretherapy surgical staging and no previous laparotomy. Survival was significantly prolonged in patients receiving hydroxyurea, evaluated via a retroperitoneal incision, with negative paraaortic lymph nodes, and with an early stage of disease. Conclusion: A retroperitoneal approach to pretherapy surgical staging and absence of previous surgery reduced the incidence of subsequent radiation-induced complications. Despite improvements in the detection of occult disease, prolonged survival is impaired when the therapeutic measures currently available are used

  17. Radiation therapy rather than prior surgery reduces extent of resection during endonasal endoscopic reoperation for craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Iyan; Forbes, Jonathan A; Ordóñez-Rubiano, Edgar G; Avendano-Pradel, Rafael; La Corte, Emanuele; Anand, Vijay K; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2018-07-01

    Radiation therapy is often advocated for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma following surgical resection to prevent local recurrence. However, radiation therapy is not always effective and may render tumors more difficult to remove. If this is the case, patients may benefit more from reoperation if gross total resection can be achieved. Nevertheless, there is little data on the impact of radiation on reoperations for craniopharyngioma. In this study, we sought to analyze whether a history of previous radiation therapy (RT) affected extent of resection in patients with recurrent craniopharyngiomas subsequently treated with reoperation via endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA). The authors reviewed a prospectively acquired database of EEA reoperations of craniopharyngiomas over 13 years at Weill Cornell, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. All procedures were performed by the senior author. The operations were separated into two groups based on whether the patient had surgery alone (group A) or surgery and RT (group B) prior to recurrence. A total of 24 patients (16 male, 8 female) who underwent surgery for recurrent craniopharyngioma were identified. The average time to recurrence was 7.64 ± 4.34 months (range 3-16 months) for group A and 16.62 ± 12.1 months (range 6-45 months) for group B (p < 0.05). The average tumor size at recurrence was smaller in group A (1.85 ± 0.72 cm; range 0.5-3.2) than group B (2.59 ± 0.91 cm; range 1.5-4.6; p = 0.00017). Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 91% (10/11) of patients in group A and 54% (7/13) of patients in group B (p = 0.047). There was a near significant trend for higher average Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score at last follow-up for group A (83 ± 10.6) compared with group B (70 ± 16.3, p = 0.056). While RT for residual or recurrent craniopharyngioma may delay time to recurrence, ability to achieve GTR with additional surgery is reduced. In the case of

  18. Final report of Intergroup Trial 0122 (ECOG PE-289, RTOG 90-12): Phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy and high-dose radiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, Bruce D.; Neuberg, Donna; Kelsen, David P.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Ginsberg, Robert J.; Pajak, Thomas; Salter, Merle; Benson, Al

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy plus high-dose radiation therapy in patients with local/regional squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients with clinical Stage T1-4N0-1M0 squamous cell carcinoma were entered on a prospective single-arm study, of which 38 were eligible. Patients received 3 monthly cycles of 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /24 h x 5 days) and cisplatin (100 mg/m 2 day 1; neoadjuvant segment) followed by 2 additional monthly cycles of 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /24 h x 5 days) and cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 day 1) plus concurrent 6480 cGy (combined modality segment). The median follow-up in surviving patients was 59 months. Results: For the 38 eligible patients, the primary tumor response rate was 47% complete, 8% partial, and 3% stable disease. The first site of clinical failure was 39% local/regional and 24% distant. For the total patient group, there were 6 deaths during treatment, of which 9% (4/45) were treatment related. The median survival was 20 months. Actuarial survival at 3 years was 30%, and at 5 years, 20%. Conclusion: This intensive neoadjuvant approach does not appear to offer a benefit compared with conventional doses and techniques of combined modality therapy. However, high dose radiation (6480 cGy) appears to be tolerable, and is being tested further in Intergroup Trial INT 0123

  19. The role of quantitative estrogen receptor status in predicting tumor response at surgery in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jacques; Gandhi, Sonal; Li, Nim; Lu, Fang-I; Trudeau, Maureen

    2017-07-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) negative (-) breast cancer (BC) patients have better tumor response rates than ER-positive (+) patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). We conducted a retrospective review using the institutional database "Biomatrix" to assess the value of quantitative ER status in predicting tumor response at surgery and to identify potential predictors of survival outcomes. Univariate followed by multivariable regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between quantitative ER and tumor response assessed as tumor size reduction and pathologic complete response (pCR). Predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified using a cox proportional hazards model (CPH). A log-rank test was used to compare RFS between groups if a significant predictor was identified. 304 patients were included with a median follow-up of 43.3 months (Q1-Q3 28.7-61.1) and a mean age of 49.7 years (SD 10.9). Quantitative ER was inversely associated with tumor size reduction and pCR (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00, p = 0.027 and 0.98 95% CI 0.97-0.99, p Quantitative ER status is inversely associated with tumor response in BC patients treated with NCT. A cut-off of 60 and 80% predicts best the association with tumor size reduction and pCR, respectively. Therefore, patients with an ER status higher than the cut-off might benefit from a neoadjuvant endocrine therapy approach. Patients with pCR had better survival outcomes independently of their tumor phenotype. Further prospective studies are needed to validate the clinical utility of quantitative ER as a predictive marker of tumor response.

  20. Does Intraoperative Systematic Bacterial Sampling During Complete Cytoreductive Surgery (CRS) with Hyperthermic Intraoperative Peritoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) Influence Postoperative Treatment? A New Predictive Factor for Postoperative Abdominal Infectious Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazza, Marie; Schwarz, Lilian; Coget, Julien; Frebourg, Noelle; Wood, Gregory; Huet, Emmanuel; Bridoux, Valérie; Veber, Benoit; Tuech, Jean-Jacques

    2016-12-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an emerging curative treatment option for patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. It has a long-term survival benefit but is associated with high rates of morbidity, ranging from 12 % to 65 %, mainly due to infectious complications. We sought to evaluate the clinical relevance of routine intraoperative bacteriological sampling following CRS/HIPEC. Between November 2010 and December 2014, every patients receiving CRS/HIPEC were included. Three samples were routinely collected from standardized locations for intraperitoneal rinsing liquid bacteriological analysis (RLBA) after completion of HIPEC. The clinical and surgical features, bacteriological results, and short-term outcomes were retrospectively reviewed. The overall mortality and morbidity rates were 5 and 45 %, respectively. Among the 75 included patients, 40 % (n = 30) had at least one positive bacterial culture. Risk factors for a positive culture were colorectal resection (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 3.072, 95 % CI 1.843-8.004; p = 0.009) and blood loss >1000 mL (HR = 4.272, 95 % CI 1.080-18.141; p = 0.031). Among 26 (35 %) patients with abdominal infectious complications, 13 (17 %) experienced isolated complications. A positive RLBA result was independently associated with abdominal infectious complications (HR = 5.108, 95 % CI 1.220-16.336; p = 0.024) and isolated abdominal infectious complications (HR = 4.199, 95 % CI 1.064-15.961; p = 0.04). Forty percent of the RLBA samples obtained following CRS/HIPEC tested positive for bacteria. Bacterial sampling of rinsing liquid should be systematically performed. An aggressive and immediate antibiotic strategy needs to be evaluated.

  1. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in patients undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy following surgery for high-grade glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Background: Tumour hypoxia is associated with disease progression and resistance to therapy. High grade cerebral gliomas have a poor outcome despite advancements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) concentrates in hypoxic cells and is associated with tumour grade in gliomas. The aim of this study was to compare the patterns of uptake of 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FMISO PET post-surgery with MRI and areas of recurrence post-radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with high grade cerebral glioma were recruited into this prospective study. All patients had post-surgical, pre-radiotherapy 18F-FDG, 18F-FMISO and MRI scans, which were all repeated 4-6 weeks post-completion to radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up clinically three monthly and re-imaged if indicated. Results: Ten patients were enrolled in this study, mean age 62 years (range 55-69 years), who all had pre-radiotherapy scans performed. Seven patients had scans done pre- and post-radiotherapy, with 3 patients with only pre-therapy scans. Nine patients had significant FMISO uptake and 8 patients demonstrated abnormal FDG uptake. The areas of FMISO uptake on pre-radiotherapy scans correlated with the most abnormal areas of contrast-enhancement on pre-treatment MRI and areas of locally recurrent disease on post-treatment MRI in eight patients. Nine patients had locally recurrent disease on follow-up MRI. FMISO was more predictive of tumour recurrence compared to FDG. Conclusion: Post-surgical 18F-FMISO PET in patients with cerebral glioma is more predictive of areas of recurrent disease compared to 18F-FDG PET.

  2. Management of locally recurrent soft-tissue sarcoma after prior surgery and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Mylin A.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Butler, Charles E.; Feig, Barry W.; Cormier, Janice N.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Pisters, Peter W.; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome and treatment toxicity after wide local re-excision (WLE), with or without additional radiation therapy, for patients with isolated first local recurrence of soft-tissue sarcoma arising within a previously irradiated field. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 62 consecutive patients. All patients underwent prior resection and external beam radiation. For recurrent disease, 25 patients were treated with WLE alone, and 37 patients were treated with WLE and additional radiation (45- 64 Gy). In 33 patients, the radiation was delivered via an afterloaded brachytherapy, single-plane implant. Results: The 5-year disease specific and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 65% and 73%, respectively. Local control (LC) at 5 years was 51%, and on multivariate analysis, a positive surgical resection margin (p< 0.001) was associated with a lower rate of LC. Reirradiation was not associated with improved LC; however complications requiring outpatient or surgical management were more common in patients who had undergone reirradiation (80% vs. 17%, p < 0.001). Amputation was also more common in the subgroup of patients who underwent extremity reirradiation (35% with radiation vs. 11% without, p = 0.05), although only one amputation was performed to resolve a treatment complication. Conclusion: Conservative surgery alone results in LC in a minority of patients who have failed locally after previous excision and external beam radiation. Although selection biases and small patient numbers confound the analysis, local treatment intensification with additional radiation does not clearly improve outcome after surgical excision alone, and is associated with an increase in complications

  3. Radiation therapy for pre-sacral recurrence of rectal carcinoma following primary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Shunji; Yokoyama, Suguru; Kirita, Maruyuki; Katou, Yasuharu; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Between April 2002 and December 2005, we treated 15 patients who were suffering from pre-sacral recurrence of rectal cancer with or without liver metastases, using multi-portal irradiation and oral intake of tegafur-uracil (UFT) (300 mg/day), to assess pain relief and local control. Radiation therapy was given 2.1 to 2.4 Gy daily fractions, and total tumor dose was set up at a landmark of 66 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks (time-dose-fractionation (TDF)=115, corresponding to 70 Gy), varying by recurrent tumor volume. The follow-up time was ranged from 3 to 37 months (median=14.7 months), and median survival was 14.8 months. Pain remission time was 3 to 36 months (median=10.4 months). No severe morbidity which induced by radiation therapy was observed in follow-up duration. The median survival has become unfavorite, but the multi-portal irradiation of high dose delivery is useful for improvement of quality of life (QOL) and beneficial as a palliative therapy. To improvement of local control and prognosis, combined modality with more effective regimen of chemotherapy is expected. (author)

  4. Utilization of special computerized tomography and nuclear medicine techniques for quality control and for the optimization of combined precision chemotherapy and precision radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, A.L. Jr.; Wirtanen, G.W.; Chien, I.-C.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of precision (selective, intra-arterial) chemotherapy and precision radiotherapy can be used for advanced pancreatic, biliary tract, and sarcomatous malignancies. There were some remarkable responses, but also a few poor responses and even some morbidity. Accordingly, methods are developed of pre-selecting those patients whose tumors are likely to respond to such therapy, as well as methods for improving the therapeutic ratio by the rational optimization of combined therapy. Specifically, clinical tumor blood flow characteristics (monitored with nuclear medicine techniques) may provide useful criteria for such selection. The authors also evaluate qualitatively the drug distribution or exposure space with specialized color-coded computerized tomography images, which demonstrate spatially dependent enhancement of intra-arterial contrast in tumor and in adjacent normal tissues. Such clinical data can improve the quality control aspects of intra-arterial chemotherapy administration, as well as the possibility of achievement of a significant therapeutic ratio by the integration of precision chemotherapy and precision radiation therapy. (Auth.)

  5. The Combined Effects of Pulsed Magnetic Radiation (Diapulse) and Chemotherapy on Tumor Bearing Mice. The Measurement of Rodent Palatal Explants as a Device for Measurement of the Biologic Effects of Nonionic Radiation (EMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelson, W.; West, B.; Depaola, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    Simultaneous treatment utilizing pulsed radiowave and cancer chemotherapy significantly extended the life span of mice with Lewis lung transplanted carcinoma. In comparison with nontreated controls, the combination of hydroxyurea and whole body nonionizing EM radiation (at 27.12 MHz) produced differential enhancement of longevity depending on hydroxyurea combined with highest power output achieved by pulsing the radiation 600 times per second; at a 3.9% duty cycle, peak watts = 975 produced the mean extension of life 67% greater than that of the group treated with hydroxyurea alone.

  6. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities in long-term survivors of childhood cancer: effects of treatment with chemotherapy and radiation to the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, N.; Toth, B.B.; Hoar, R.E.; Ried, H.L.; Sullivan, M.P.; McNeese, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-eight long-term survivors of childhood cancer were evaluated for dental and maxillofacial abnormalities. Forty-five patients had received maxillofacial radiation for lymphoma, leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, and miscellaneous tumors. Forty-three of the 45 patients and the remaining 23 who had not received maxillofacial radiation also received chemotherapy. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities were detected in 37 of the 45 (82%) radiated patients. Dental abnormalities comprised foreshortening and blunting of roots, incomplete calcification, premature closure of apices, delayed or arrested tooth development, and caries. Maxillofacial abnormalities comprised trismus, abnormal occlusal relationships, and facial deformities. The abnormalities were more severe in those patients who received radiation at an earlier age and at higher dosages. Possible chemotherapeutic effects in five of 23 patients who received treatment for tumors located outside the head and neck region comprised acquired amelogenesis imperfecta, microdontia of bicuspid teeth, and a tendency toward thinning of roots with an enlarged pulp chamber. Dental and maxillofacial abnormalities should be recognized as a major consequence of maxillofacial radiation in long-term survivors of childhood cancer, and attempts to minimize or eliminate such sequelae should involve an effective interaction between radiation therapists, and medical and dental oncologists

  7. The presence of proliferative breast disease with atypia does not significantly influence outcome in early-stage invasive breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowble, B.; Hanlon, A.L.; Patchefsky, A.; Freedman, G.; Hoffman, J.P.; Sigurdson, E.R.; Goldstein, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of the benign background breast-tissue change of atypical hyperplasia (AH) on outcome in patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and sixty women with Stage I--II breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiation from 1982-1994 had pathologic assessment of their background adjacent benign breast tissue. The median follow-up was 5.6 years (range 0.1-15). The median age was 55 years (range 24-88). Of these, 23% had positive axillary nodes; 25% received adjuvant chemotherapy (CMF or CAF) with (9%) or without (17%) tamoxifen. Of the total, 24% received adjuvant tamoxifen alone. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 131 patients with atypical hyperplasia (ductal, 99 patients; lobular, 20 pts; and type not specified, 12 pts), and 329 patients with no proliferative changes or proliferative changes without atypia. Result: A statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for method of detection, primary tumor size, presence of lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), pathologic nodal status, region(s) treated with radiation, and type of adjuvant therapy. Patients with atypical hyperplasia (AH) had smaller primary tumors (T1 80% vs. 70%) more often detected solely by mammography (51% vs. 36%) with negative axillary nodes (87% vs. 73%) and radiation treatment to the breast only (93% vs. 78%). LCIS was observed in 9% of the patients with AH and 3% of those without AH. Patients with AH more often received tamoxifen alone (32% vs. 21%), rather than chemotherapy (15% vs. 29%). There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups for race, age, menopausal status, family history, histology, histologic subtype DCIS when present, the presence or absence of an extensive intraductal component, final margin status, estrogen or progesterone receptor status, use of re-excision, or total radiation dose to the

  8. Changes in the relative risk and sites of central nervous system metastasis with effective combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, R.; Cox, J.D.; Holoye, P.Y.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Prolongation of survival of patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung with current effective systemic therapy has been accompanied by a marked increase in the frequency of relapse in the central nervous system (CNS). Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was shown to reduce the frequency of brain metastasis, but there was no increased short-term survival. Therefore, the necessity for PCI early in the course of treatment has been questioned, especially for patients with extensive disease. From January 1974 through March 1982, 205 patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were treated at the Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals. None had clinical, radioisotopic, or computed tomographic evidence of brain metastasis. Eighty-two patients received radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but no PCI; 123 patients received combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy with PCI. The cumulative probability of brain metastasis without PCI was 36% at 12 months and 47% at 24 months; the probabilities were 6 and 10%, respectively with PCI. The 24-month probability of brain metastasis in patients with limited disease and no PCI was 45%; for those with extensive disease, it was 47%. No patient presented with extracranial central nervous system (ECNS) metastasis and no one without PCI developed it. Twelve patients who received PCI developed ECNS metastasis; the cumulative probabilities rose to 14% at 12 months and 22% at 24 months. The increased frequency of ECNS involvement has led to a phase I trial of PCI followed by six cycles of combination chemotherapy, without maintenance chemotherapy, followed by irradiation of the chest and spinal cord for patients with complete response

  9. Surgery for two cases with markedly impaired QOL(Quality of Life) of radiation enterocolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Tadaaki; Tanishima, Satoru; Sato, Masahiko; Yanagisawa, Terumasa; Yoshino, Masaaki; Takatsuka, Jun

    1996-01-01

    Two cases of radiation enterocolitis with markedly impaired QOL for a long period were reported. Case 1: A 61 years old female. She received 60 Gy irradiation post hysterectomy and ovariectomy due to uterine cancer at the age of 39 y. She suffered from fecal incontinence and anal pain at 58 y, was diagnosed to have radiation colitis. She was hospitalized due to neurosis, anal pain and hypertension at 59 y. She received nephrostomy due to hydronephrosis and ureterostenosis at 60 y, and colostomy and ileal conduit formation due to anal pain and dyschezia. Case 2: A 70 years old female who received 60 Gy irradiation post surgery similar to case 1 at the age of 61 y. She suffered from ileus, intestinal retention and hydronephrosis thereafter. She was hospitalized due to metastasis of the cancer to sacred bone, and received further 40 Gy radiation therapy at the age of 65 y. Up to the present, she received several operations such as ileostomy, nephrostomy and hemorrhoids excision. It is important for surgeons to understand the actual QOL of patients with radiation enterocolitis. (K.H.)

  10. Surgery for two cases with markedly impaired QOL(Quality of Life) of radiation enterocolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Tadaaki; Tanishima, Satoru; Sato, Masahiko; Yanagisawa, Terumasa; Yoshino, Masaaki; Takatsuka, Jun [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    Two cases of radiation enterocolitis with markedly impaired QOL for a long period were reported. Case 1: A 61 years old female. She received 60 Gy irradiation post hysterectomy and ovariectomy due to uterine cancer at the age of 39 y. She suffered from fecal incontinence and anal pain at 58 y, was diagnosed to have radiation colitis. She was hospitalized due to neurosis, anal pain and hypertension at 59 y. She received nephrostomy due to hydronephrosis and ureterostenosis at 60 y, and colostomy and ileal conduit formation due to anal pain and dyschezia. Case 2: A 70 years old female who received 60 Gy irradiation post surgery similar to case 1 at the age of 61 y. She suffered from ileus, intestinal retention and hydronephrosis thereafter. She was hospitalized due to metastasis of the cancer to sacred bone, and received further 40 Gy radiation therapy at the age of 65 y. Up to the present, she received several operations such as ileostomy, nephrostomy and hemorrhoids excision. It is important for surgeons to understand the actual QOL of patients with radiation enterocolitis. (K.H.)

  11. Impact of the Radiation Boost on Outcomes After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Colin; Anderson, Penny R.; Li Tianyu; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Goldstein, Lori J.; Swaby, Ramona; Denlinger, Crystal; Dushkin, Holly; Nicolaou, Nicos; Freedman, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the impact of radiation tumor bed boost parameters in early-stage breast cancer on local control and cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 3,186 women underwent postlumpectomy whole-breast radiation with a tumor bed boost for Tis to T2 breast cancer from 1970 to 2008. Boost parameters analyzed included size, energy, dose, and technique. Endpoints were local control, cosmesis, and fibrosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate actuarial incidence, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine independent predictors of outcomes on multivariate analysis (MVA). The median follow-up was 78 months (range, 1-305 months). Results: The crude cosmetic results were excellent in 54%, good in 41%, and fair/poor in 5% of patients. The 10-year estimate of an excellent cosmesis was 66%. On MVA, independent predictors for excellent cosmesis were use of electron boost, lower electron energy, adjuvant systemic therapy, and whole-breast IMRT. Fibrosis was reported in 8.4% of patients. The actuarial incidence of fibrosis was 11% at 5 years and 17% at 10 years. On MVA, independent predictors of fibrosis were larger cup size and higher boost energy. The 10-year actuarial local failure was 6.3%. There was no significant difference in local control by boost method, cut-out size, dose, or energy. Conclusions: Likelihood of excellent cosmesis or fibrosis are associated with boost technique, electron energy, and cup size. However, because of high local control and rare incidence of fair/poor cosmesis with a boost, the anatomy of the patient and tumor cavity should ultimately determine the necessary boost parameters.

  12. Increased Plasma Levels of Danger-Associated Molecular Patterns Are Associated With Immune Suppression and Postoperative Infections in Patients Undergoing Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guus P. Leijte

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDanger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs can elicit immune responses and may subsequently induce an immune-suppressed state. Previous work showed that increased plasma levels of DAMPs are associated with immune suppression and increased susceptibility toward infections in trauma patients. Like trauma, major surgical procedures, such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC, are also thought to cause profound DAMP release. Furthermore, the incidence of postoperative infections in these patients, ranging from 10 to 36%, is very high compared to that observed in patients undergoing other major surgical procedures. We hypothesized that the double hit of surgical trauma (CRS in combination with HIPEC causes excessive DAMP release, which in turn contributes to the development of immune suppression. To investigate this, we assessed DAMP release in patients undergoing CRS-HIPEC, and investigated its relationship with immune suppression and postoperative infections.MethodsIn 20 patients undergoing CRS-HIPEC, blood was obtained at five time points: just before surgery (baseline, after CRS, after HIPEC, at ICU admission, and 1 day after surgery. Circulating levels of DAMPs [heat shock protein (HSP70, high mobility group box (HMGB1, S100A12, S100A8/S100A9, nuclear (nDNA, mitochondrial (mtDNA, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of unscheduled cell death], and cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and MCP-1] were measured. The extent of immune suppression was determined by measuring HLA-DR gene expression and ex vivo leukocytic cytokine production capacity.ResultsPlasma levels of DAMPs (maximum fold increases of HSP70: 2.1 [1.5–2.8], HMGB1: 5.9 [3.2–9.8], S100A8/S100A9: 3.6 [1.8–5.6], S100A12: 2.6 [1.8–4.3], nDNA 3.9 [1.0–10.8], LDH 1.7 [1.2–2.5], and all measured cytokines increased profoundly following

  13. Oncologists’ Perspectives on Consolidation Radiation Treatment after Chemotherapy for Lymphomas: A Survey Study by the Lymphoma Working Committee of the Turkish Oncology Group (TOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Barista, Ibrahim; Paydas, Semra; Nayir, Erdinc; Karakas, Yusuf

    2017-11-26

    In this study, we aimed to determine the perspectives of medical and radiation oncologists regarding consolidation radiotherapy in patients with a complete response after chemotherapy for Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The survey was designed to identify demographic and occupational features of medical and radiation oncologists and their views on application of consolidation radiotherapy in their clinical practices, as based on a five-point Likert scale (never, rarely, sometimes, often, and always). The study covered 263, out of 935, physicians working in the oncology field as either medical or radiation oncologists; the rate of return on the invitations to participate was 28%. The majority of the participants were male radiation oncologists, with a duration of between 5 and 10 years of work as a university hospital official, and the mean age was 38 ± 14 (years). Although the most commonly followed international guidelines were NCCN, among the physicians, the majority of the respondents suggested that the guidelines were unclear regarding recommendations for consolidative radiotherapy. The administered dose for consolidative radiotherapy in lymphoma patients was indicated as 40 Gy by 49% of all the physicians and the most common cause of hesitancy concerning consolidative radiation treatment was the risk of secondary malignancies as a long-term adverse effect (54%). In conclusion, we suggest that medical oncologists could be most active in the treatment of lymphoma through a continuous training program about lymphomas and current national guidelines. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Radiation protection in dental X-ra