WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgeons operating theatre

  1. Non-technical skills of surgeons and anaesthetists in simulated operating theatre crises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, A G; Hamidi, M; Lung, K; Tarola, C L; Tsao, M W; Scott, J W; Smink, D S; Yule, S

    2017-07-01

    Deficiencies in non-technical skills (NTS) have been increasingly implicated in avoidable operating theatre errors. Accordingly, this study sought to characterize the impact of surgeon and anaesthetist non-technical skills on time to crisis resolution in a simulated operating theatre. Non-technical skills were assessed during 26 simulated crises (haemorrhage and airway emergency) performed by surgical teams. Teams consisted of surgeons, anaesthetists and nurses. Behaviour was assessed by four trained raters using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) and Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) rating scales before and during the crisis phase of each scenario. The primary endpoint was time to crisis resolution; secondary endpoints included NTS scores before and during the crisis. A cross-classified linear mixed-effects model was used for the final analysis. Thirteen different surgical teams were assessed. Higher NTS ratings resulted in significantly faster crisis resolution. For anaesthetists, every 1-point increase in ANTS score was associated with a decrease of 53·50 (95 per cent c.i. 31·13 to 75·87) s in time to crisis resolution (P technical skills scores were lower during the crisis phase of the scenarios than those measured before the crisis for both surgeons and anaesthetists. A higher level of NTS of surgeons and anaesthetists led to quicker crisis resolution in a simulated operating theatre environment. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Nurse-surgeon object transfer: video analysis of communication and situation awareness in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkiakangas, Terhi; Weldon, Sharon-Marie; Bezemer, Jeff; Kneebone, Roger

    2014-09-01

    One of the most central collaborative tasks during surgical operations is the passing of objects, including instruments. Little is known about how nurses and surgeons achieve this. The aim of the present study was to explore what factors affect this routine-like task, resulting in fast or slow transfer of objects. A qualitative video study, informed by an observational ethnographic approach, was conducted in a major teaching hospital in the UK. A total of 20 general surgical operations were observed. In total, approximately 68 h of video data have been reviewed. A subsample of 225 min has been analysed in detail using interactional video-analysis developed within the social sciences. Two factors affecting object transfer were observed: (1) relative instrument trolley position and (2) alignment. The scrub nurse's instrument trolley position (close to vs. further back from the surgeon) and alignment (gaze direction) impacts on the communication with the surgeon, and consequently, on the speed of object transfer. When the scrub nurse was standing close to the surgeon, and "converged" to follow the surgeon's movements, the transfer occurred more seamlessly and faster (1.0 s). The smoothness of object transfer can be improved by adjusting the scrub nurse's instrument trolley position, enabling a better monitoring of surgeon's bodily conduct and affording early orientation (awareness) to an upcoming request (changing situation). Object transfer is facilitated by the surgeon's embodied practices, which can elicit the nurse's attention to the request and, as a response, maximise a faster object transfer. A simple intervention to highlight the significance of these factors could improve communication in the operating theatre. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Do Surgeons React?: A Retrospective Analysis of Surgeons' Response to Harassment of a Colleague During Simulated Operating Theatre Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, Hannah; Vega, Camila Vega; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    2017-07-24

    To assess and report on surgeons' ability to identify and manage incidences of harassment. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons is committed to driving out discrimination, bullying, harassment, and sexual harassment from surgical training and practice, through changing the culture of the workplace. To eradicate these behaviors, it is first critical to understand how the current workforce responds to these actions. A retrospective analysis of video data of an operating theatre simulation was conducted to identify how surgeons, from a range of experience levels, react to instances of harassment. Thematic analysis was used to categorize types of harassment and participant response characteristics. The frequency of these responses was assessed and reported. The type of participant response depended on the nature of harassment being perpetuated and the seniority of the participant. In the 50 instances of scripted harassment, active responses were enacted 52% of the time, acknowledgment responses 16%, and no response enacted in 30%. One senior surgeon also perpetuated the harassment (2%). Trainees were more likely to respond actively compared with consultants. It is apparent that trainees are more aware of instances of harassment, and were more likely to intervene during the simulated scenario. However, a large proportion of harassment was unchallenged. The hierarchical nature of surgical education and the surgical workforce in general needs to enable a culture in which the responsibility to intervene is allowed and respected. Simulation-based education programs could be developed to train in the recognition and intervention of discrimination, bullying, harassment and sexual harassment.

  4. A noise-reduction program in a pediatric operation theatre is associated with surgeon's benefits and a reduced rate of complications: a prospective controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Carsten R; Neis, Jan Philipp; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Grote, Gudela; Ure, Benno M

    2014-05-01

    We assessed the impact of a noise-reduction program in a pediatric operating theatre. Adverse effects from noise pollution in theatres have been demonstrated. In 156 operations spatially resolved, sound levels were measured before and after a noise-reduction program on the basis of education, rules, and technical devices (Sound Ear). Surgical complications were recorded. The surgeon's biometric (saliva cortisol, electrodermal activity) and behavioral stress responses (questionnaires) were measured and correlated with mission protocols and individual noise sensitivity. Median noise levels in the control group versus the interventional group were reduced by -3 ± 3 dB(A) (63 vs 59 dB(A), P 0.05). Spontaneous noise during pediatric operations attains the magnitude of a lawn mower and peaks resemble a passing truck. The sound intensity could be reduced by 50% by specific measures. This reduction was associated with a significantly lowered number of postoperative complications. The surgeon's benefits are idiosyncratic with "responders" experiencing marked improvements.

  5. Video prototype of the interactive operating theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    Building capture and access (C&A) applications for use in the operation theatre differs greatly from C&A applications built to support other settings e.g. meeting rooms or classrooms. Based on field studies of surgical operations, this paper explores how to design C&A applications for the operation...... theatre. Based on the findings from our field work, we have built the ActiveTheatre, a C&A prototype. ActiveTheatre is built to support collaboration in and around the operating theatre, to capture events instead of automatically capturing eve- rything, and to be integrated with existing applications...... already present in the operation theatre. The ActiveTheatre prototype has been developed in close co- operation with surgeons and nurses at a local hospital. The work on the proto- type and our initial evaluations have provided an insight into how to design, capture and access applications that are going...

  6. Surgeons' and trainees' perceived self-efficacy in operating theatre non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G; Altree, M; Field, J; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P; Babidge, W; Maddern, G J

    2015-05-01

    An important factor that may influence an individual's performance is self-efficacy, a personal judgement of capability to perform a particular task successfully. This prospective study explored newly qualified surgeons' and surgical trainees' self-efficacy in non-technical skills compared with their non-technical skills performance in simulated scenarios. Participants undertook surgical scenarios challenging non-technical skills in two simulation sessions 6 weeks apart. Some participants attended a non-technical skills workshop between sessions. Participants completed pretraining and post-training surveys about their perceived self-efficacy in non-technical skills, which were analysed and compared with their performance in surgical scenarios in two simulation sessions. Change in performance between sessions was compared with any change in participants' perceived self-efficacy. There were 40 participants in all, 17 of whom attended the non-technical skills workshop. There was no significant difference in participants' self-efficacy regarding non-technical skills from the pretraining to the post-training survey. However, there was a tendency for participants with the highest reported self-efficacy to adjust their score downwards after training and for participants with the lowest self-efficacy to adjust their score upwards. Although there was significant improvement in non-technical skills performance from the first to second simulation sessions, a correlation between participants' self-efficacy and performance in scenarios in any of the comparisons was not found. The results suggest that new surgeons and surgical trainees have poor insight into their non-technical skills. Although it was not possible to correlate participants' self-belief in their abilities directly with their performance in a simulation, in general they became more critical in appraisal of their abilities as a result of the intervention. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Numerical simulation of the impact of surgeon posture on airborne particle distribution in a turbulent mixing operating theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Afshari, Alireza; Karimipanah, Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •Airborne particles released from surgical team members are major sources of surgical site infections. •Effect of surgeon’s posture on particle distribution within the surgical area is not well known and documented. •Mobile laminar units were investigated as an addition to conventional...... turbulent-mixing operating theatre. •With proper work practice, the laminar units reduced the airborne bacteria concentration down to an acceptable level. •Lower source strength in general resulted from a high protective clothing system reduce the bacteria concentration.......Highlights •Airborne particles released from surgical team members are major sources of surgical site infections. •Effect of surgeon’s posture on particle distribution within the surgical area is not well known and documented. •Mobile laminar units were investigated as an addition to conventional...

  8. Operating Theatre Planning and Scheduling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Vanberkel, P.T.; Hall, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we present a number of approaches to operating theatre planning and scheduling. We organize these approaches hierarchically which serves to illustrate the breadth of problems confronted by researchers. At each hierarchicalplanning level we describe common problems, solution

  9. Music and communication in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Sharon-Marie; Korkiakangas, Terhi; Bezemer, Jeff; Kneebone, Roger

    2015-12-01

    To observe the extent and the detail with which playing music can impact on communication in the operating theatre. According to the cited sources, music is played in 53-72% of surgical operations performed. Noise levels in the operating theatre already exceed World Health Organisation recommendations. There is currently a divide in opinions on the playing of music in operating theatres, with few studies conducted and no policies or guidance provided. An ethnographic observational study of teamwork in operating theatres through video recordings. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis approaches were used. This study was conducted between 2012-2013 in the UK. Video recordings of 20 operations over six months in two operating theatres were captured. The recordings were divided into music and non-music playing cases. Each case was logged using a request/response sequence identified through interactional analysis. Statistical analysis, using a χ(2) , explored the difference between the proportion of request repetitions and whether music was playing or not. Further interactional analysis was conducted for each request repetition. Request/response observations (N = 5203) were documented. A chi-square test revealed that repeated requests were five times more likely to occur in cases that played music than those that did not. A repeated request can add 4-68 seconds each to operation time and increased tensions due to frustration at ineffective communication. Music played in the operating theatre can interfere with team communication, yet is seldom recognized as a potential safety hazard. Decisions around whether music is played and around the choice of music and its volume, are determined largely by surgeons. Frank discussions between clinicians, managers, patients and governing bodies should be encouraged for recommendations and guidance to be developed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Influence of music on operation theatre staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Shyjumon; Ahmed, Shafiq; Mammen, Kim J; John, George Mathews

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the perception of influence of music among surgeons, anesthesiologist and nurses in our hospital as well as to critically evaluate whether music can be used as an aid in improving the work efficiency of medical personnel in the operation theatre (OT). A prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 100 randomly selected subjects were interviewed, which included 44 surgeons, 25 anesthesiologists and 31 nurses. Statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) Windows Version 16 software was used for statistical evaluation. Most of the OT medical personnel were found to be aware of the beneficial effects of music, with 87% consenting to the playing of music in the OT. It was also found that most participants agreed to have heard music on a regular basis in the OT, while 17% had heard it whenever they have been to the OT. Majority of the respondent's preferred playing music in the OT which helped them relax. It improved the cognitive function of the listeners and created a sense of well being among the people and elevated mood in them. Music helped in reducing the autonomic reactivity of theatre personnel in stressful surgeries allowing them to approach their surgeries in a more thoughtful and relaxed manner. Qualitative, objective and comprehensive effect of specific music types varied with different individuals. Music can aid in improving the work efficiency of medical personnel in the OT. The study has reinforced the beneficial effects of playing music in the OT outweighing its deleterious outcomes.

  11. Influence of music on operation theatre staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyjumon George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the perception of influence of music among surgeons, anesthesiologist and nurses in our hospital as well as to critically evaluate whether music can be used as an aid in improving the work efficiency of medical personnel in the operation theatre (OT. Materials and Methods: A prospective, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 100 randomly selected subjects were interviewed, which included 44 surgeons, 25 anesthesiologists and 31 nurses. Statistical package for social sciences (SPSS Windows Version 16 software was used for statistical evaluation. Results: Most of the OT medical personnel were found to be aware of the beneficial effects of music, with 87% consenting to the playing of music in the OT. It was also found that most participants agreed to have heard music on a regular basis in the OT, while 17% had heard it whenever they have been to the OT. Conclusions: Majority of the respondent′s preferred playing music in the OT which helped them relax. It improved the cognitive function of the listeners and created a sense of well being among the people and elevated mood in them. Music helped in reducing the autonomic reactivity of theatre personnel in stressful surgeries allowing them to approach their surgeries in a more thoughtful and relaxed manner. Qualitative, objective and comprehensive effect of specific music types varied with different individuals. Music can aid in improving the work efficiency of medical personnel in the OT. The study has reinforced the beneficial effects of playing music in the OT outweighing its deleterious outcomes.

  12. The cost of trauma operating theatre inefficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, W W; Sabharwal, S; Johannsson, H; Bhattacharya, R; Gupte, C M

    2016-05-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is currently facing a financial crisis with a projected deficit of £2billion by the end of financial year 2015/16. As operating rooms (OR) are one of the costliest components in secondary care, improving theatre efficiency should be at the forefront of efforts to improve health service efficiency. The objectives of this study were to characterize the causes of trauma OR delays and to estimate the cost of this inefficiency. A 1-month prospective single-centre study in St. Mary's Hospital. Turnaround time (TT) was used as the surrogate parameter to measure theatre efficiency. Factors including patient age, ASA score and presence of surgical and anaesthetic consultant were evaluated to identify positive or negative associations with theatre delays. Inefficiency cost was calculated by multiplying the time wasted with staff capacity costs and opportunity costs, found to be £24.77/minute. The commonest causes for increased TT were delays in sending for patients (50%) and problems with patient transport to the OR (31%). 461 min of delay was observed in 12 days, equivalent to loss of £951.58/theatre/day. Non-statistically significant trends were seen between length of delays and advancing patient age, ASA score and absence of either a senior clinician or an anaesthetic consultant. Interestingly, the trend was not as strong for absence of an anaesthetic consultant. This study found delays in operating TT to represent a sizable cost, with potential efficiency savings based on TT of £347,327/theatre/year. Further study of a larger sample is warranted to better evaluate the identified trends.

  13. Radiation dose to surgeons in theatre | van der Merwe | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements of accumulated dose to specific anatomical regions of a neurosurgeon, gastroenterologist and orthopaedic surgeon performing fluoroscopy on 39 patients undergoing treatment for back pain, 7 for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures, and 48 for ...

  14. Rethinking theatre in modern operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Robin; Manias, Elizabeth

    2005-03-01

    Metaphor is a means through which a widely accepted meaning of a word is used in a different context to add understanding that would otherwise be difficult to conceive. Through etymological and metaphorical associations, we contend that aspects of "theatre" are still relevant in the modern operating rooms and that the use of dramaturgical metaphors can add another layer of understanding about the social reality in this setting. We begin by exploring the historical roots and derivation of the word theatre as it applied to anatomical dissection and surgery. Briefly, we touch on the work of Erving Goffman and examine how his work has been used by others to explore aspects of operating room nursing. Then, drawing on data from a postmodern ethnographic study that has been used to examine communication in operating room nursing, four dramaturgical metaphors are used to illustrate the argument. They are drama, the script and learning the lines, the show must go on, and changing between back stage and front stage. To conclude, the small amount of previously published literature on this topic is compared and contrasted, and the relevance of using dramaturgical metaphors to understand modern operating rooms is discussed. Being able to distinguish between the inherent drama in operating room work and the dramatic realisation of individuals who work within, can help operating room nurses to think differently about, and perhaps re-evaluate their social situation and how they function within it.

  15. A novel method of personnel cooling in an operating theatre environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casha, Aaron R; Manché, Alexander; Camilleri, Liberato; Gauci, Marilyn; Grima, Joseph N; Borg, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    An optimized theatre environment, including personal temperature regulation, can help maintain concentration, extend work times and may improve surgical outcomes. However, devices, such as cooling vests, are bulky and may impair the surgeon's mobility. We describe the use of a low-cost, low-energy 'bladeless fan' as a personal cooling device. The safety profile of this device was investigated by testing air quality using 0.5- and 5-µm particle counts as well as airborne bacterial counts on an operating table simulating a wound in a thoracic operation in a busy theatre environment. Particle and bacterial counts were obtained with both an empty and full theatre, with and without the 'bladeless fan'. The use of the 'bladeless fan' within the operating theatre during the simulated operation led to a minor, not statistically significant, lowering of both the particle and bacterial counts. In conclusion, the 'bladeless fan' is a safe, effective, low-cost and low-energy consumption solution for personnel cooling in a theatre environment that maintains the clean room conditions of the operating theatre. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Capital planning for operating theatres based on projecting future theatre requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jennifer A; Tyler, Peter; Jayasinha, Hirani; Meleady, Kathleen T; Jones, Neill

    2011-05-01

    During 2006, NSW and ACT Health Departments jointly engaged KPMG to develop an Operating Theatre Requirements' Projection Model and an accompanying planning guideline. A research scan was carried out to identify drivers of surgical demand, theatre capacity and theatre performance, as well as locating existing approaches to modelling operating theatre requirements for planning purposes. The project delivered a Microsoft Excel-based model for projecting future operating theatre requirements, together with an accompanying guideline for use of the model and interpretation of its outputs. It provides a valuable addition to the suite of tools available to Health staff for service and capital planning. The model operates with several limitations, largely due to being data dependent, and the state and completeness of available theatre activity data. However, the operational flexibility built into the model allows users to compensate for these limitations, on a case by case basis, when the user has access to suitable, local data. The design flexibility of the model means that updating the model as improved data become available is not difficult; resulting in revisions being able to be made quickly, and disseminated to users rapidly.

  17. [Safer operating theatre: easier said than done].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, C J

    2008-10-18

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate recently changed its approach to quality of care and patient safety from a reactive to a firmly proactive style. In two reports, the current perioperative processes in Dutch hospitals were scrutinised. Despite a highly-motivated workforce, the inspectorate detected a lack of standardisation, incomplete or inaccessible patient data, poor adherence to hygiene standards and gaps during transfer of care in both the preoperative and intraoperative stages ofsurgery. The inspectorate mandates rapid implementation of various new patient safety approaches, including the use of checklists, 'time-outs' before the start of surgery, double checking of intravenous drugs and improved compliance with hygiene standards, as well as a strict definition of roles and responsibilities of team members. Implementation will require major changes within the processes and culture of operating theatres in Dutch hospitals. Such a change is unlikely to be completed within the short timeframe allowed by the inspectorate.

  18. High-quality remote interactive imaging in the operating theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimstead, Ian J.; Avis, Nick J.; Evans, Peter L.; Bocca, Alan

    2009-02-01

    We present a high-quality display system that enables the remote access within an operating theatre of high-end medical imaging and surgical planning software. Currently, surgeons often use printouts from such software for reference during surgery; our system enables surgeons to access and review patient data in a sterile environment, viewing real-time renderings of MRI & CT data as required. Once calibrated, our system displays shades of grey in Operating Room lighting conditions (removing any gamma correction artefacts). Our system does not require any expensive display hardware, is unobtrusive to the remote workstation and works with any application without requiring additional software licenses. To extend the native 256 levels of grey supported by a standard LCD monitor, we have used the concept of "PseudoGrey" where slightly off-white shades of grey are used to extend the intensity range from 256 to 1,785 shades of grey. Remote access is facilitated by a customized version of UltraVNC, which corrects remote shades of grey for display in the Operating Room. The system is successfully deployed at Morriston Hospital, Swansea, UK, and is in daily use during Maxillofacial surgery. More formal user trials and quantitative assessments are being planned for the future.

  19. Ergonomic Aspects of Transport of Patient through the Operating Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Rafał

    2017-10-01

    One of the most crucial decisions to be made while designing and re-modernizing an operating theatre is selecting a method of transporting the patient through the hospital’s spatial arrangement. This decision, while irrelevant at first thought, implies numerous project and functional consequences. Designing an operating theatre within a hospital is related to numerous specialist requirements with an aim of minimizing the risk of microbiological contamination. Surgeries conducted on the operating theatre take place within sterile areas, usually within a protection area provided with laminar air flow. Furthermore, currently in Poland, there are applicable rules requiring to have entrances secured with tract locks leading towards the operational rooms for hospital personnel, patients as well as hospital equipment and materials. Such construction of an operating theatre provides the necessity of applying detailed procedures of transporting the patient, who in most cases is not able to reach the surgery on his or her own. In operating theatres functioning during the last decades, the operating tables were most often fixed to the floor. This resulted in the need to relocate the patient, who is ready for surgery, for several times. The consequences of this included risks related shock due to the relocations for the patient as well as physical overload for the medical staff. The aim of hereby article is to present modern designer solutions providing the opportunity to enhance ergonomics of using the operating theatre.

  20. Attitudes to teamwork and safety among Italian surgeons and operating room nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that surgical team members' attitudes about safety and teamwork in the operating theatre may play a role in patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess attitudes about teamwork and safety among Italian surgeons and operating room nurses. Fifty-five surgeons and 48 operating room nurses working in operating theatres at one hospital in Italy completed the Operating Room Management Attitudes Questionnaire (ORMAQ). Results showed several discrepancies in attitudes about teamwork and safety between surgeons and operating room nurses. Surgeons had more positive views on the quality of surgical leadership, communication, teamwork, and organizational climate in the theatre than operating room nurses. Operating room nurses reported that safety rules and procedures were more frequently disregarded than the surgeons. The results are only partially aligned with previous ORMAQ surveys of surgical teams in other countries. The differences emphasize the influence of national culture, as well as the particular healthcare system. This study shows discrepancies on many aspects in attitudes to teamwork and safety between surgeons and operating room nurses. The findings support implementation and use of team interventions and human factor training. Finally, attitude surveys provide a method for assessing safety culture in surgery, for evaluating the effectiveness of training initiatives, and for collecting data for a hospital's quality assurance programme.

  1. [Conception, realization and analysis of a modern operating theatre workplace for ENT surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, G; Aries, F; Abri, O; Dietz, A; Meixensberger, J; Lüth, T

    2010-11-01

    The requirements of ENT (ear, nose and throat) surgery, i. e. operating theatre, have changed dramatically in recent years, e. g. by high definition video endoscopy, navigation, neuromonitoring, intraoperative imaging, navigated and navigation-controlled instruments and intraoperative imaging and video documentation. For this reason a specialized operating theatre is necessary for ENT. The aim of this work was to compare this operating theatre with the previous standard. The scientific basis of this work represents a surgical workflow analysis. Over 200 completely documented operations in conventional operating theatres were available for comparison. In addition the log files of the medical technical devices, software analysis modules of the clinical documentation and ergonomics questionnaires (NASA TLX standard) were available. In the period from 1(st) June 2009 to 31(st) September 2009 a total of 139 standard procedures (9 different ENT surgeons) were analyzed in the new ly integrated operating theatre system "Surgical Deck1-ENT". In the newly developed operating theatre system four work areas are specified: preparation area, technical cockpit, surgical cockpit and anesthesia cockpit. The medical technical components are permanently installed. The surgical cockpit incorporates five permanently arranged monitors, two main screens, two navigation screens and a surgical dashboard. A suitable high definition video routing system is installed and procedure-specific light profiles are developed. Documentation is automatically carried out in the picture archive and communication system (PACS). The comparison to the conventional operating theatre system the slot time was reduced from 73.8 min to 65.6 min (-11%), the preoperative time was reduced on average by 31% (8 min) per case and the documentation time was decreased on average by 6 min (67%). The interaction steps of the surgeon with the system were reduced by 70% (from 17 to 5 steps). No significant differences in

  2. Self moving patients to the operation theatre - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Anna Pernilla; Rovsing, Marie Louise; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire was develo......The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with walking to the operation theatre instead of being driven in a bed or wheel chair, and to identify the need for information. In total, 75 patients (aged 15-83 years) participated in the study. A questionnaire...... was developed for this study with two focus areas: "Satisfaction with walking instead of being driven" and "Satisfaction with information". In total, 93pct. reported, that it was a good experience to be allowed to walk to the operation theatre, prior to their surgery. About the same proportion found...

  3. The systems approach to error reduction: factors influencing inoculation injury reporting in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Jayne; Jordan, Sue

    2013-11-01

    To examine the frequency of, and factors influencing, reporting of mucocutaneous and percutaneous injuries in operating theatres. Surgeons and peri-operative nurses risk acquiring blood-borne viral infections during surgical procedures. Appropriate first-aid and prophylactic treatment after an injury can significantly reduce the risk of infection. However, studies indicate that injuries often go unreported. The 'systems approach' to error reduction relies on reporting incidents and near misses. Failure to report will compromise safety. A postal survey of all surgeons and peri-operative nurses engaged in exposure prone procedures in nine Welsh hospitals, face-to-face interviews with selected participants and telephone interviews with Infection Control Nurses. The response rate was 51.47% (315/612). Most respondents reported one or more percutaneous (183/315, 58.1%) and/or mucocutaneous injuries (68/315, 21.6%) in the 5 years preceding the study. Only 54.9% (112/204) reported every injury. Surgeons were poorer at reporting: 70/133 (52.6%) reported all or >50% of their injuries compared with 65/71 nurses (91.5%). Injuries are frequently under-reported, possibly compromising safety in operating theatres. A significant number of inoculation injuries are not reported. Factors influencing under-reporting were identified. This knowledge can assist managers in improving reporting and encouraging a robust safety culture within operating departments. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The productive operating theatre and lean thinking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasivisvanathan, R; Chekairi, A

    2014-11-01

    The concept of 'lean thinking' first originated in the manufacturing industry as a means of improving productivity whilst maintaining quality through eliminating wasteful processes. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how the principles of 'lean thinking' are relevant to healthcare and the operating theatre, with reference to our own institutional experience.

  5. Unsettled teamwork: communication and learning in the operating theatres of an urban hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, Jeff; Korkiakangas, Terhi; Weldon, Sharon-Marie; Kress, Gunther; Kneebone, Roger

    2016-02-01

    To explore the unsettling effects of increased mobility of nurses, surgeons and other healthcare professionals on communication and learning in the operating theatre. Increasingly, healthcare professionals step in and out of newly formed transient teams and work with colleagues they have not met before, unsettling previously relatively stable team work based on shared, local knowledge accumulated over significant periods of close collaboration. An ethnographic case study was conducted of the operating theatre department of a major teaching hospital in London. Video recordings were made of 20 operations, involving different teams. The recordings were systematically reviewed and coded. Instances where difficulties arose in the communication between scrub nurse and surgeons were identified and subjected to detailed, interactional analysis. Instrument requests frequently prompted clarification from the scrub nurse (e.g. 'Sorry, what did you want?'). Such requests were either followed by a relatively elaborate clarification, designed to maximize learning opportunities, or a by a relatively minimal clarification, designed to achieve the immediate task at hand. Significant variation exists in the degree of support given to scrub nurses requesting clarification. Some surgeons experience such requests as disruptions, while others treat them as opportunities to build shared knowledge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun

    2013-01-01

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities

  7. Novel utilization of 3D technology and the hybrid operating theatre: Peri-operative assessment of posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation using cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun [The Prince Charles Hospital, Rode Road, Chermside, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-06-15

    A patient with a medial and posterior dislocation of the right sterno-clavicular (SC) joint and displacement of the trachea and brachiocephalic artery by the medial head of the clavicle underwent general anaesthetic in the operating theatre for an open reduction procedure. The surgeon initially attempted a closed reduction, but this required imaging to check SC alignment. The patient was transferred to an adjacent hybrid operating theatre for imaging. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, which successfully demonstrated a significant reduction in the dislocation of the SC joint. The trachea and brachiocephalic artery were no longer compressed or displaced. This case study demonstrates an alternative to the patient being transferred to the medical imaging department for multi-slice CT. It also describes a novel use of the hybrid operating theatre and its CBCT capabilities.

  8. SIMULATION OF AIR-CONDITIONNED OPERATING THEATRES

    OpenAIRE

    El Gharbi , N.; Benzaoui , A ,

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A hospital is a place where we find simultaneously people whose health state is weakened, or vulnerable, and pathogenic microorganisms able to worsen their health. The quality of the air in a hospital must be in conformity with precise criteria in such buildings in everyday usage, and in particular in the areas of the buildings where some risks of specific pollution exist such as in operating rooms. In this paper, we present a modelisation and three dimensional numeric...

  9. Safety in the Operating Theatre | a Multi Factor Approach for Patients and Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauben, L.S.G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the advances in high-tech technology in the operating theatre, the increased number of persons involved, and the increased complexity of surgical procedures, medical errors are inflicted. To answer the main question: How to improve patient safety in the operating theatre during surgery? this

  10. [Evaluation of radiation exposure of personnel in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre using the new real-time dosimetry system "dose aware"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M C; Strauss, A; Pflugmacher, R; Nähle, C P; Pennekamp, P H; Burger, C; Wirtz, D C

    2014-08-01

    There is a positive correlation between operation time and staff exposure to radiation during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy. Due to harmful effects of exposure to long-term low-dose radiation for both the patient and the operating team it should be kept to a minimum. AIM of this study was to evaluate a novel dosimeter system called Dose Aware® (DA) enabling radiation exposure feedback of the personal in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre in real-time. Within a prospective study over a period of four month, DA was applied by the operation team during 104 orthopaedic and trauma operations in which the C-arm fluoroscope was used in 2D-mode. During ten operation techniques, radiation exposure of the surgeon, the first assistant, the theatre nurse and the anaesthesiologist was evaluated. Seventy-three operations were analysed. The surgeon achieved the highest radiation exposure during dorsolumbar spinal osteosynthesis, kyphoplasty and screw fixation of sacral fractures. The first assistant received a higher radiation exposure compared to the surgeon during plate osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures (157 %), intramedullary nailing of pertrochanteric fractures (143 %) and dorsolumbar spinal osteosynthesis (240 %). During external fixation of ankle fractures (68 %) and screw fixation of sacral fractures (66 %) radiation exposure of the theatre nurse exceeded 50 % of the surgeon's radiation exposure. During plate osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures (157 %) and intramedullary splinting of clavicular fractures (115 %), the anaesthesiologist received a higher radiation exposure than the surgeon. The novel dosimeter system DA provides real-time radiation exposure feedback of the personnel in an orthopaedic and trauma operation theatre for the first time. Data of this study demonstrate that radiation exposure of the personnel depends on the operation type. The first assistant, the theatre nurse and the anaesthesiologist might be

  11. Operating room scheduling and surgeon assignment problem under surgery durations uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Tianyi; Luo, Shuai; Xu, Dan

    2017-12-29

    Scientific management methods are urgently needed to balance the demand and supply of heath care services in Chinese hospitals. Operating theatre is the bottleneck and costliest department. Therefore, the surgery scheduling is crucial to hospital management. To increase the utilization and reduce the cost of operating theatre, and to improve surgeons' satisfaction in the meantime, a practical surgery scheduling which could assign the operating room (OR) and surgeon for the surgery and sequence surgeries in each OR was provided for hospital managers. Surgery durations were predicted by fitting the distributions. A two-step mixed integer programming model considering surgery duration uncertainty was proposed, and sample average approximation (SAA) method was applied to solve the model. Durations of various surgeries were log-normal distributed respectively. Numerical experiments showed the model and method could get good solutions with different sample sizes. Real-life constraints and duration uncertainty were considered in the study, and the model was also very applicable in practice. Average overtime of each OR was reducing and tending to be stable with the number of surgeons increasing, which is a discipline for OR management.

  12. The lived experiences of operating theatre scrub nurses learning technical scrub skills 'I'm doing this right, aren't I? Am I doing this right?'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Eleanor J; Fotis, Theo

    2018-01-01

    Operating theatre scrub nurses (OTSNs) are not required to have undertaken a secondary or specialist post-registration theatre qualification to work in the operating theatre (OT) setting in the UK. From the systematic review there is only very limited literature or research in how technical scrub skills are acquired. This study explores the lived experiences of OTSNs learning technical scrub skills. The study employed the qualitative methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data was collected from six participating OTSNs using semi-structured interviews. Four superordinate themes emerged: How technical scrub skills are established, Gatekeepers, How the learner feels whilst learning and, Reflections of the experienced scrub nurse. The study found that the experiences of OTSNs learning technical scrub skills are varied and a variety of teaching and learning methods are utilised. These experiences were influenced by the team, mentor and surgeon within the OT environment. Lived experiences were also influenced by organisational structure and service pressures within the NHS.

  13. The surgeon and his tools-the case for a focused orthopaedic theatre induction programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Shaun KS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction programme for trainee doctors in the UK generally do not focus on the surgical aspects of their jobs. In this context we decided to conduct a telephonic survey among the hospitals belonging to three orthopaedic training regions in the UK from the point of view of the diversity of instrumentations and implants used for index procedures. Results We chose four index trauma & orthopaedic procedures (Total hip replacement, total knee replacement, intramedullary nailing and external fixator systems for long bone fractures. A telephonic survey was done in six NHS trust hospitals which were part of an orthopaedic training rotation (2 from England, 2 from Wales and 2 from Scotland. In total there were 39 different instrumentation systems for these 4 index procedures in the 6 trusts (see table 1. These comprise 12 Total hip replacement (THR systems, 14 total knee replacement (TKR systems, 9 intra-medullary nailing systems, and 4 external fixator systems. The number of different systems for each trust ranged from 7 to 19. There is a vast array of implants and instrumentation systems in each trust, as highlighted by our survey. The surgical tools are not the same in each hospitals. This situation is more complicated when trainees move to new hospitals as part of training rotations. Table 1 Number of implants/instrumentations used in each of the 6 UK trusts (3 training regions. IMPLANT E1 E2 W1 W2 S1 S2 Total Knee Replacement 4 5 2 4 3 2 Total Hip Replacement 3 4 3 6 3 3 Intramnedullary nailing 2 1 1 6 2 3 External fixators 2 3 2 2 1 1 TOTAL 11 13 8 18 9 9 E = England, W = Wales, S = Scotland Conclusion In view of this we feel that more focused theatre based induction programmes for higher surgical trainees is advocated in each hospital trust so trainees can familiarise themselves with the tools available to them. This could include discussion with the consultants and senior theatre staff along with representatives from the

  14. Non-technical skills of the operating theatre scrub nurse: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lucy; Flin, Rhona

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a report of a review to identify the non-technical (cognitive and social) skills used by scrub nurses. Recognition that failures in non-technical skills contributed to accidents in high-risk industries led to the development of research programmes to study the role of cognition and social interactions in operational safety. Recently, psychological research in operating theatres has revealed the importance of non-technical skills in safe and efficient performance. Most of the studies to date have focused on anaesthetists and surgeons. On-line sources and university library catalogues, publications of the Association for Perioperative Practice, National Association of Theatre Nurses and Association of Peri-Operative Registered Nurses were searched in 2007. Studies were included in the review if they presented data from scrub nurses on one or more of their non-technical skills. These findings were examined in relation to an existing medical non-technical skills framework with categories of communication, teamwork, leadership, situation awareness and decision-making. Of 424 publications retrieved, 13 were reviewed in detail. Ten concerned communication and eight of those also had data on teamwork. In 11 papers teamwork was examined, and one focused on nurses' situation awareness, teamwork and communication. None of the papers we reviewed examined leadership or decision-making by scrub nurses. Further work is needed to identify formally the non-technical skills which are important to the role of scrub nurse and then to design training in the identified non-technical skills during the education and development of scrub nurses.

  15. Perioperative nurses' experiences of communication in a multicultural operating theatre: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Judy; Isaacs, Anton Neville; Ellender, Isabel

    2016-02-01

    To explore the lived experiences of perioperative nurses in a multicultural operating theatre in Melbourne, Australia. Multiculturalism has become the norm in the health workforce of several developed countries due mostly to immigration. Within an operating theatre setting where good communication is paramount, the presence of nurses and doctors from multiple cultures and different training backgrounds could pose a major challenge. Using a qualitative research methodology underpinned by phenomenology, we interviewed fourteen nurses from different sections of an operating theatre. From the lived experiences of the participants, difficulties in communication emerged as the major theme. Difficulties in communication affected patient care and the working atmosphere. In addition, social integration appeared to improve communication. Addressing the needs of patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in the operating theatre continues to be challenging. However, developing a sense of camaraderie and fostering good relationships between staff through regular social gatherings can improve communication and the working atmosphere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgeons' vision rewarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Surgeons and clinical staff, theatre circulation and scrub personnel, and anaesthetists, as well as the estates and facilities team at Kent's Maidstone Hospital, have worked with specialist supplier of integrated audio, video, and instrumentation systems for the operating room, Olympus Medical, to develop what is claimed is among the UK's most advanced operating theatres yet built for laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie discussed the project with Amir Nisar, the surgeon who championed efforts to get the facility built, and Olympus Medical national sales manager, systems integration, James Watts.

  17. Reducing the carbon footprint of the operating theatre: a multicentre quality improvement report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southorn, T; Norrish, A R; Gardner, K; Baxandall, R

    2013-06-01

    Currently, there are very few provisions for recycling in theatres. We measured the weight of clinical waste for several orthopaedic operations. This waste was then examined and sorted into domestic waste and clinical waste. With staff education it is possible to reduce the amount of clinical waste generated by the operating theatre by roughly 50%. A greater awareness of disposal options leads to a reduction in waste disposed of by incineration.

  18. Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Kidd, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview Background Communication programmes are well established in nurse education. The focus of programmes is most often on communicating with patients with less attention paid to inter-professional communication or skills essential for working in specialised settings. Although there are many anecdotal reports of communication within the operating theatre, there are few empirical studies. This paper explores communication behaviours for effective practice in the operating theatre as perceived by nurses and serves as a basis for developing training. Methods A focus group interview was conducted with seven experienced theatre nurses from a large London teaching hospital. The interview explored their perceptions of the key as well as unique features of effective communication skills in the operating theatre. Data was transcribed and thematically analysed until agreement was achieved by the two authors. Results There was largely consensus on the skills deemed necessary for effective practice including listening, clarity of speech and being polite. Significant influences on the nature of communication included conflict in role perception and organisational issues. Nurses were often expected to work outside of their role which either directly or indirectly created barriers for effective communication. Perceptions of a lack of collaborative team effort also influenced communication. Conclusion Although fundamental communication skills were identified for effective practice in the operating theatre, there were significant barriers to their use because of confusion over clarity of roles (especially nurses' roles) and the implications for teamwork. Nurses were dissatisfied with several aspects of communication. Future studies should explore the breadth and depth of this dissatisfaction in other operating theatres, its impact on morale and importantly on patient safety

  19. The quality of operative note taking: an audit using the Royal College of Surgeons Guidelines as the gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayah, A; Agada, F O; Gunasekaran, S; Jassar, P; England, R J A

    2007-04-01

    To assess the quality of operative note keeping and compare the results with the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) of England guidelines 'Good Surgical Practice' as the gold standard. ENT Department at Hull Royal Infirmary, University Hospital. A hundred consecutive operative notes were selected between November 2005 and January 2006. The documentation of the operative notes in each case was compared with the RCS of England guidelines. All surgeons were made aware of the results of the first cycle and the guidelines were made available in all ENT theatres in the form of a printed aide-memoir. A second audit cycle was then carried out prospectively between April and June 2006. The results demonstrated a change in practice in key areas. The 1st cycle results showed the documentation of patient identification (94%), name of surgeon (98%) and clearly written postoperative instructions (94%). However, surgeons performed suboptimally at recording the name of assistant (82%), operative diagnosis (46%), the incision type (87%) and the type of wound closure (83%). After introducing the aide-memoir, the second cycle demonstrated a change in practice with 100% documentation in most of the assessed parameters except that the time of surgery and the type of surgery (emergency or elective) were not adequately recorded. We recommend that all surgical departments should have the RCS guidelines as an aide-memoir in theatres to enhance the quality and standardise operative note recording.

  20. Effectiveness and efficiency of the two trolley system as an infection control mechanism in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuisawana, Viliame

    2009-11-01

    A good infection control manager understands the need to prevent a complete cycle of infection. The Infection Control Working Group Manual of Fiji, emphasised that the Cycle of Infection is the series of stage in which infection is spread. Operating theatres have infection control protocols. Most equipments and instruments used in operating theatre circulate within the theatre. The theatre trolleys are a main component in managing an operating theatre but the least recognised. This paper reviews the effectiveness and efficiency of the current two-trolley system as an infection control mechanism in theatre. The paper will discuss infection control using the current trolley system in relation to the layout of Labasa Hospital operating theatre, human resource, equipment standard and random swab results. The following are random swab results of theatre equipments taken by the Infection Control Nurse from 2006 to 2008. The Labasa Hospital Infection Committee have discouraged random swab sample from mid 2008 based on new guidelines on infection control. The two trolley system, in which an allocated outside trolley transports patients from the ward to a semi-sterile area in theatre. The inside trolley which transports the patient to the operating table. The two trolley system means more trolleys, extra staffs for lifting, additional handling of very sick patients, congestion and delay in taking patients to operating table in theatres should be considered. The one-trolley system in theatre greatly reduces the chances of manually lifting patients, thus reducing the risk of patient injury from fall and risk of back injuries to nurses. There are other evident based practices which can compliment the one trolley system for an effective infection control mechanism in theatres. The Fiji Infection Control Manual (2002) emphases the importance of regularly cleaning the environment and equipments in theatre but there is never a mention about using a two trolley system as an

  1. Listen while you work? The attitude of healthcare professionals to music in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, A A; Wright, A P; Haneef, J H S; Jones, A

    2014-09-01

    Although the playing of music is commonplace in the operating theatre, there is nothing in the literature examining whether staff feel this is beneficial. Questionnaires were distributed amongst a random selection of staff in practice at a district general hospital: medical staff from a range of surgical specialities, anaesthetists, and all grades of perioperative staff (nurse/operating department practitioners/healthcare assistants) were encouraged to participate. There were 121 health professionals in total working in the operating theatres. The authors compared the responses to each question amongst the respondents, to check for the tendency to correlate. Out of the 52 health professionals who responded, 36 stated that music is played in their theatre either every day, or two to three times a week. Only five respondents felt that this was too often. Fifteen percent of medical staff were of the opinion that the nursing staff controlled the choice of music. Nursing staff were almost evenly split in thinking that nursing staff, surgical staff and the whole theatre team controlled the choice of music. The majority of both nursing and medical staff felt that they enjoyed their work more and performed better when music was played in theatre. The study concluded that the majority of theatre staff found listening to music while they work a positive experience. The potential for music to have a distracting or detrimental effect on a minority of individuals should always be considered.

  2. Music in the operating theatre: opinions of staff and patients of a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makama, J G; Ameh, E A; Eguma, S A

    2010-12-01

    The role of music during surgery has been studied, including its effect on theatre staff, users and patients. However, little attention has been paid to its application especially in our environment. It was a prospective study, involving theatre staff, users, and patients. Their opinions on acceptability and the role of music in operating theatre were determined. Information was obtained by questionnaire. There were 162 respondents; age range 25 to 76 years (median age 39). There were 109 (67.2%) males and 53 (32.7%) female. One hundred and forty five (89.5%) respondents agree that music should be played in the operating theatre. One fifty eight, (97.5%) considered low tone of music to be most appropriate in the theatre while 3(1.9%), and 1(0.6%) considered moderate and high tone respectively to be most appropriate. One hundred and sixteen, (71.6%) preferred jazz music while 19(11.7%) reggae, 11(6.8%) African music, 13 (8.0%) others (not specify), 2 (1.2%) classical, and 1(0.6%) Irish folk. The majority of the respondents were aware of the role of music in terms of its anxiolytic effect, reduction of stress and enhancement of performance when familiar music is played. Music in the operating theatre has immeasurable effects. It can prevent distraction, minimize annoyance, reduce stress and diminish the anxiety of patients, staff and users.

  3. A garment for use in the operating theatre: the effect upon bacterial shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankert, J; Zijlstra, J B; Lubberding, H

    1979-02-01

    In operating theatres the air is mainly contaminated with bacteria shed from the human skin. The emission of bacteria can be prevented by wearing clothing of impervious material, while normal cotton clothing does not decrease the shedding of bacteria. In this study shedding of viable bacteria from 20 test-persons wearing an operating theatre suit, composed of 65% polyester and 35% cotton (Diolen), was investigated in a test-chamber and compared with that when normal clothing was worn. The use of this operating-theatre suit resulted in a significant reduction (50--75%) in the number of bacteria-carrying particles in the air of the test-chamber and in an operating room when everyone present wore this suit. A combination of the suit with knee-high boots showed a further reduction in the dispersal of colony forming units. The dispersion from female subjects wearing an operating-theatre frock was significantly higher than when wearing an operating-theatre suit.

  4. Effect of Individual Surgeons and Anesthesiologists on Operating Room Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Ruben P A; van Veen-Berkx, Elizabeth; Kazemier, Geert; Eijkemans, Marinus J C

    BACKGROUND:: Variability in operating room (OR) time causes overutilization and underutilization of the available ORs. There is evidence that for a given type of procedure, the surgeon is the major source of variability in OR time. The primary aim was to quantify the variability between surgeons and

  5. Making the invisible visible--operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; Bisholt, Birgitta; Nilsson, Jan; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe operating theatre nurses' (OTNs') perceptions of caring in perioperative practice. A qualitative descriptive design was performed. Data were collected with interviews were carried out with fifteen strategically selected operating theatre nurses from different operating theatres in the middle of Sweden. A phenomenographic analysis was used to analyse the interviews. The findings show that operating theatre nurses' perceptions of caring in perioperative practice can be summarised in one main category: To follow the patient all the way. Two descriptive categories emerged: To ensure continuity of patient care and keeping a watchful eye. The operating theatre nurses got to know the patient and as a result became responsible for the patient. They protected the patient's body and preserved patient dignity in perioperative practice. The findings show different aspects of caring in perioperative practice. OTNs wanted to be more involved in patient care and follow the patient throughout the perioperative nursing process. Although OTNs have the ambition to make the care in perioperative practice visible, there is today a medical technical approach which promotes OTNs continuing to offer care in secret. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. COMPARISON OF TWO METHODS OF OPERATING THEATRE PLANNING: APPLICATION IN BELGIAN HOSPITAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sondes CHAABANE; Nadine MESKENS; Alain GUINET; Marius LAURENT

    2008-01-01

    Operating Theatre is the centre of the hospital management's efforts. It constitutes the most expensive sector with more than 10% of the intended operating budget of the hospital. To reduce the costs while maintaining a good quality of care, one of the solutions is to improve the existent planning and scheduling methods by improving the services and surgical specialty coordination or finding the best estimation of surgical case durations. The other solution is to construct an effective surgical case plan and schedule. The operating theatre planning and scheduling is the two important steps, which aim to make a surgical case programming with an objective of obtaining a realizable and efficient surgical case schedule. This paper focuses on the first step, the operating theatre planning problem. Two planning methods are introduced and compared. Real data of a Belgian university hospital "Tivoli" are used for the experiments.

  7. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards and transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. We videorecorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire) was correlated with surgeon behavior (Surgical Leadership Inventory) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (range 2.38 to 2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (range 1.98 to 3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3 times more information-sharing behaviors (p leadership and its impact on team performance in the operating room. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development, therefore, has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgeons' Leadership Styles and Team Behavior in the Operating Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Yung; Parker, Sarah Henrickson; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Arriaga, Alexander F; Peyre, Sarah E; Corso, Katherine A; Roth, Emilie M; Yule, Steven J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of leadership is recognized in surgery, but the specific impact of leadership style on team behavior is not well understood. In other industries, leadership is a well-characterized construct. One dominant theory proposes that transactional (task-focused) leaders achieve minimum standards, whereas transformational (team-oriented) leaders inspire performance beyond expectations. Study Design We video-recorded 5 surgeons performing complex operations. Each surgeon was scored on the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, a validated method for scoring transformational and transactional leadership style, by an organizational psychologist and a surgeon-researcher. Independent coders assessed surgeons' leadership behaviors according to the Surgical Leadership Inventory and team behaviors (information-sharing, cooperative, and voice behaviors). All coders were blinded. Leadership style (MLQ) was correlated with surgeon behavior (SLI) and team behavior using Poisson regression, controlling for time and the total number of behaviors, respectively. Results All surgeons scored similarly on transactional leadership (2.38-2.69), but varied more widely on transformational leadership (1.98-3.60). Each 1-point increase in transformational score corresponded to 3× more information-sharing behaviors (psupportive behaviors (pleadership and its impact on team performance in the OR. As in other fields, our data suggest that transformational leadership is associated with improved team behavior. Surgeon leadership development therefore has the potential to improve the efficiency and safety of operative care. PMID:26481409

  9. El acoso psicológico en los quirófanos. Mobbingin operating theatres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Azzollini

    2005-12-01

    develop an inadequate communication style, allowing the show up of the psychological harassment towards the no medical staff. c Privates institutions allowed the development of both, more inadequate communicational style and more psychological harassment. A control list was built in order to remark the surgeon's communicational style during an operation, 30 surgeons of each institution had to answer a personal survey. The data had been analysed by descriptive statistic and bivariated analyses had been made to prove the hypothesis. The results proof that mobbing is a generalised way of communicational style inside the operation theatre. The more affected were the cardiovascular surgeons. It's likely to happen in private institutions, in people who are not head of department.

  10. Pre-surgery briefings and safety climate in the operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Jon; Bleakley, Alan; Hobbs, Adrian; Coombes, Lee

    2011-08-01

    In 2008, the WHO produced a surgical safety checklist against a background of a poor patient safety record in operating theatres. Formal team briefings are now standard practice in high-risk settings such as the aviation industry and improve safety, but are resisted in surgery. Research evidence is needed to persuade the surgical workforce to adopt safety procedures such as briefings. To investigate whether exposure to pre-surgery briefings is related to perception of safety climate. Three Safety Attitude Questionnaires, completed by operating theatre staff in 2003, 2004 and 2006, were used to evaluate the effects of an educational intervention introducing pre-surgery briefings. Individual practitioners who agree with the statement 'briefings are common in the operating theatre' also report a better 'safety climate' in operating theatres. The study reports a powerful link between briefing practices and attitudes towards safety. Findings build on previous work by reporting on the relationship between briefings and safety climate within a 4-year period. Briefings, however, remain difficult to establish in local contexts without appropriate team-based patient safety education. Success in establishing a safety culture, with associated practices, may depend on first establishing unidirectional, positive change in attitudes to create a safety climate.

  11. Ergonomics in the operating room: protecting the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Peter L; McKinney, Jessica; Adams, Sonia R

    2013-01-01

    To review elements of an ergonomic operating room environment and describe common ergonomic errors in surgeon posture during laparoscopic and robotic surgery. Descriptive video based on clinical experience and a review of the literature (Canadian Task Force classification III). Community teaching hospital affiliated with a major teaching hospital. Gynecologic surgeons. Demonstration of surgical ergonomic principles and common errors in surgical ergonomics by a physical therapist and surgeon. The physical nature of surgery necessitates awareness of ergonomic principles. The literature has identified ergonomic awareness to be grossly lacking among practicing surgeons, and video has not been documented as a teaching tool for this population. Taking this into account, we created a video that demonstrates proper positioning of monitors and equipment, and incorrect and correct ergonomic positions during surgery. Also presented are 3 common ergonomic errors in surgeon posture: forward head position, improper shoulder elevation, and pelvic girdle asymmetry. Postural reset and motion strategies are demonstrated to help the surgeon learn techniques to counterbalance the sustained and awkward positions common during surgery that lead to muscle fatigue, pain, and degenerative changes. Correct ergonomics is a learned and practiced behavior. We believe that video is a useful way to facilitate improvement in ergonomic behaviors. We suggest that consideration of operating room setup, proper posture, and practice of postural resets are necessary components for a longer, healthier, and pain-free surgical career. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Can statisticians beat surgeons at the planning of operations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Paul; Meester, Reinier; van Ophem, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The planning of operations in the Academic Medical Center is primarily based on the assessments of the length of the operation by the surgeons. We investigate whether duration models employing the information available at the moment the planning is made, offer a better alternative. Our empirical

  13. Can statisticians beat surgeons at the planning of operations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, P.; Meester, R.; van Ophem, H.

    2011-01-01

    The planning of operations in the Academic Medical Center is primarily based on the assessments of the length of the operation by the surgeons. We investigate whether duration models employing the information available at the moment the planning is made, offer a better alternative. Our empirical

  14. Psychophysical workload in the operating room: primary surgeon versus assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Annika; Fenger, Sebastian; Neubert, Sebastian; Weippert, Matthias; Kreuzfeld, Steffi; Stoll, Regina

    2015-07-01

    Working in the operating room is characterized by high demands and overall workload of the surgical team. Surgeons often report that they feel more stressed when operating as a primary surgeon than in the function as an assistant which has been confirmed in recent studies. In this study, intra-individual workload was assessed in both intraoperative functions using a multidimensional approach that combined objective and subjective measures in a realistic work setting. Surgeons' intraoperative psychophysiologic workload was assessed through a mobile health system. 25 surgeons agreed to take part in the 24-hour monitoring by giving their written informed consent. The mobile health system contained a sensor electronic module integrated in a chest belt and measuring physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR), breathing rate (BR), and skin temperature. Subjective workload was assessed pre- and postoperatively using an electronic version of the NASA-TLX on a smartphone. The smartphone served as a communication unit and transferred objective and subjective measures to a communication server where data were stored and analyzed. Working as a primary surgeon did not result in higher workload. Neither NASA-TLX ratings nor physiological workload indicators were related to intraoperative function. In contrast, length of surgeries had a significant impact on intraoperative physical demands (p NASA-TLX sum score (p < 0.01; η(2) = 0.287). Intra-individual workload differences do not relate to intraoperative role of surgeons when length of surgery is considered as covariate. An intelligent operating management that considers the length of surgeries by implementing short breaks could contribute to the optimization of intraoperative workload and the preservation of surgeons' health, respectively. The value of mobile health systems for continuous psychophysiologic workload assessment was shown.

  15. Towards a model of surgeons' leadership in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson Parker, Sarah; Yule, Steven; Flin, Rhona; McKinley, Aileen

    2011-07-01

    There is widespread recognition that leadership skills are essential for effective performance in the workplace, but the evidence detailing effective leadership behaviours for surgeons during operations is unclear. Boolean searches of four on-line databases and detailed hand search of relevant references were conducted. A four stage screening process was adopted stipulating that articles presented empirical data on surgeons' intraoperative leadership behaviours. Ten relevant articles were identified and organised by method of investigation into (i) observation, (ii) questionnaire and (iii) interview studies. This review summarises the limited literature on surgeons' intraoperative leadership, and proposes a preliminary theoretically based structure for intraoperative leadership behaviours. This structure comprises seven categories with corresponding leadership components and covers two overarching themes related to task- and team-focus. Selected leadership theories which may be applicable to the operating room environment are also discussed. Further research is required to determine effective intraoperative leadership behaviours for safe surgical practice.

  16. A longitudinal study of the incidence of pressure sores and the associated risks and strategies adopted in Italian operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfone, Giampiera; Marzoli, Ilaria; Quattrin, Rosanna; Fabbro, Carmen; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-02-01

    To explore the incidence of intraoperative pressure sores, the associated risk factors and the preventive strategies adopted by nurses, we adopted a longitudinal study in a 900-bed teaching hospital with multiple operating theatres, located in the North of Italy. Patients who underwent major surgery were evaluated four times: at the moment of operating theatre admission, at operating theatre discharge, and on their third and sixth postoperative day. Of the patients included (n = 102) who had an average age of 62.3 years (range 20-87), 12.7% (13/102) developed a pressure ulcer in the operating theatre; 46.1% (6/13) of these ulcers were still present on the third postoperative day. Some health conditions (diabetes mellitus, cardiac diseases) and intra-operative factors (lying on the operating table for more than 6.15 hours, intraoperative hypothermia) are associated with the occurrence of pressure sores.

  17. Operating lists are created by rational algorithms and use of power. What can a social scientific view offer surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Carsten; Grote, Gudela; Geyer, Siegfried; Ametowobla, Dzifa

    2017-02-01

    Algorithms for surgical operation planning are evidence-based. However, choices sometimes have to be made between medically equal solutions e.g. for staffing of sought-after operations. Such decisions are heavily influenced by micropolitics and power. The article examines the array of highly manipulated processes around operation theatre allocation of convenient time slots or staff, which play out in various ways in all of the world's main regional surgical cultures. Essay supported by empiric data from an ethnographic power-analysis targeted to senior executive surgeons. Operations were categorized into "Interesting" (i.e. career-promoting) and "Uninteresting" (i.e. routine) operations. Fifty nine executives responded. Only one respondent contested the categorization of operations into Interesting and Uninteresting. The two categories were staffed according to significantly different criteria (p academic investigation into the typically tacit micro-political mechanisms in List-making. Developing such research further may potentially concern the practice and outcome of surgery.

  18. Game theory: applications for surgeons and the operating room environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, David W; Tsai, Mitchell; Kadry, Bassam; Souba, Wiley W

    2012-11-01

    Game theory is an economic system of strategic behavior, often referred to as the "theory of social situations." Very little has been written in the medical literature about game theory or its applications, yet the practice of surgery and the operating room environment clearly involves multiple social situations with both cooperative and non-cooperative behaviors. A comprehensive review was performed of the medical literature on game theory and its medical applications. Definitive resources on the subject were also examined and applied to surgery and the operating room whenever possible. Applications of game theory and its proposed dilemmas abound in the practicing surgeon's world, especially in the operating room environment. The surgeon with a basic understanding of game theory principles is better prepared for understanding and navigating the complex Operating Room system and optimizing cooperative behaviors for the benefit all stakeholders. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Randomized clinical trial of immersive virtual reality tour of the operating theatre in children before anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J-H; Park, S-J; Park, J-W; Kim, J-W; Yoo, H-J; Kim, T-W; Hong, J S; Han, S-H

    2017-11-01

    A virtual reality (VR) tour of the operating theatre before anaesthesia could provide a realistic experience for children. This study was designed to determine whether a preoperative VR tour could reduce preoperative anxiety in children. Children scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized into a control or VR group. The control group received conventional information regarding anaesthesia and surgery. The VR group watched a 4-min video showing Pororo, the famous little penguin, visiting the operating theatre and explaining what is in it. The main outcome was preoperative anxiety, assessed using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-YPAS) before entering the operating theatre. Secondary outcomes included induction compliance checklist (ICC) and procedural behaviour rating scale (PBRS) scores during anaesthesia. A total of 69 children were included in the analysis, 35 in the control group and 34 in the VR group. Demographic data and induction time were similar in the two groups. Children in the VR group had a significantly lower m-YPAS score than those in the control group (median 31·7 (i.q.r. 23·3-37·9) and 51·7 (28·3-63·3) respectively; P anxiety and increasing compliance during induction of anaesthesia in children undergoing elective surgery. Registration number: UMIN000025232 (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Transforming a conventional theatre into a gynaecological endoscopy unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasakis, E; Protopapas, A; Daskalakis, G; Papadakis, M; Milingos, S; Antsaklis, A

    2007-01-01

    Most minimally invasive procedures are now performed in operating rooms that were originally designed for traditional open surgery. We designed an endoscopic theatre based on our experience with special features specific for gynaecological endoscopy. We designed a detailed plan with an architect's aid of a gynaecological unit (based on a Greek presidential decree published in 1991). The space utilized was that of a conventional theatre. With the architectural plan we anticipated every area needed in a gynaecological endoscopic theatre. A twin theatre was considered appropriate in order for the surgical team to operate alternatively in one theatre while the other is being cleaned and prepared for use. The design of a unit dedicated to gynaecologic laparoscopy is a multidisciplinary task where the endoscopic surgeon undertakes an active and prominent role. It is a project with great benefits and rewards for all parties involved. We present our design for evaluation.

  1. Cost Analysis of Operation Theatre Services at an Apex Tertiary Care Trauma Centre of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Kumar, Subodh; Vij, Aarti; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Operating room services are one of the major cost and revenue-generating centres of a hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of operating department services depends on the resources consumed and the unit costs of those resources. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of operation theatre services at Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi. The study was carried out at the operation theatre department of Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC), AIIMS from April 2010 to March 2011 after obtaining approval from concerned authorities. This study was observational and descriptive in nature. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of operation theatre (OT) services. Cost was calculated under two heads; as capital and operating cost. Annualised cost of capital assets was calculated according to the methodology prescribed by the World Health Organization and operating costs were taken on actual basis; thereafter, per day cost of OT services was obtained. The average number of surgeries performed in the trauma centre per day is 13. The annual cost of providing operating room services at JPNATC, New Delhi was calculated to be 197,298,704 Indian rupees (INR) (US$ 3,653,679), while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 22,626.92 (US$ 419). Majority of the expenditures were for human resource (33.63 %) followed by OT capital cost (31.90 %), consumables (29.97 %), engineering maintenance cost (2.55 %), support services operating cost (1.22 %) and support services capital cost (0.73 %). Of the total cost towards the provisioning of OT services, 32.63 % was capital cost while 67.37 % is operating cost. The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 54).

  2. Teaching and learning in the operating theatre: a framework for trainers and advanced trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S; China, S

    2010-04-01

    Surgical training of 'advanced trainees' in Obstetrics and Gynaecology currently occurs in a rather unstructured fashion. This is even more complicated by reduced training time of doctors necessitated by the European working time directive. Teaching and learning in theatre is a combination of art and science. This paper attempts to address the issues hampering effective theatre training and suggests ways to overcome them. The 'operating theatre' plan includes a needs assessment of trainees, goal setting and instructional methodologies. Various learning styles could potentially be adopted, although it might be difficult to choose a learning style suitable for a particular trainee. Additionally, team working skills and experiential learning need to be facilitated.

  3. Accreditation and quality approach in operating theatre departments: the French approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudée, M

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, French health establishments are subjected to a process of evaluating the quality of care, called "accreditation". This process was controlled by ANAES, which, after January 1st, 2005 became the Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS). The accreditation is characterized by a dual process of self-assessment and external audit, leading to four levels of accreditation. In spite of requiring a time-consuming methodology, this approach provides an important means of consolidating the development of the quality approach and re-stimulating the compliance of establishments with standards of safety and vigilance. The professional teams of many French operating theatre departments have been able to use the regulatory and restricting framework of accreditation to organize quality approaches specific to the operative system, supported by the organizational structures of the department such as the operating suite committee, departmental boards and the steering group. Based on quality guidelines including a commitment from the manager and operating suite committee, as well as a quality flow chart and a quality system, these teams describe the main procedures for running the operating theatre. They also organize the follow-up of incidents and undesirable events, along with the risks and points to watch. Audits of the operative system are planned on a regular basis. The second version of the accreditation process considerably reinforces the assessment of professional practices by evaluating the relevance, the risks and the methods of managing care for pathologies. It will make it possible to implement assessments of the health care provided by operating theatre departments and will reinforce the importance of search for quality.

  4. Simulation-based Advance Patient Scheduling of Operating Theatres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Stidsen, Thomas Jacob Riis; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2017-01-01

    Daily scheduling of surgical operations is a complicated and recurrent problem in the literature on health care optimization. In this study, we present an often overlooked approach to this problem that incorporates a rolling and overlapping planning horizon. The basis of our modeling approach is ...

  5. [Difficulties in implementing a surgical check list in operating theatres].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Aledo, Víctor; Da Silva, ZeNewton Andre; Saturno, Pedro J; Grau-Polan, Marina; Carrillo-Alcaraz, Andrés

    2012-03-01

    To assess the level of implementation and the factors associated with the compliance to the surgical check list (SCL) proposed by the WHO, in surgery departments in public hospitals in the Murcia Region of Spain. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted using a random, non-proportional, and stratified sample in each hospital. The sample size was established as 10 cases per centre, with a total of 90 surgical operations. The data analysis included the percentage of compliance of the variables of interest (presence of an SCL and the compliance to it, complete, by sections and by items) at regional level, according to hospital, hospital groups, depending on the size; the type of anaesthesia (local, regional or general); the work shift (morning or afternoon); as well as the age and sex of the surgery patients. The check list was found in the medical records in 75 cases (83.33%; confidence interval [CI]: 78.7% - 87.5%), and complied with in full in 25 cases (27.8%; 95% CI: 18.5% - 37.0%). The percentage of items complied with was 70.1% (95% CI: 67.9%-72.2%). The percentage compliance varied by hospital, from 35.8% to 98.9%. The logistic regression analysis showed significance in the variables such as, the size of the hospital (the list was more likely to be complied with in small and medium hospitals) and operations with local anaesthetic as a negative predictive factor of compliance. The SCL is used, but is not always complied with, and not homogeneously in all its sections. There is also significant variation between the public hospitals in the Murcia Region of Spain. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. A combined teamwork training and work standardisation intervention in operating theatres: controlled interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lauren; Pickering, Sharon P; Hadi, Mohammed; Robertson, Eleanor; New, Steve; Griffin, Damian; Collins, Gary; Rivero-Arias, Oliver; Catchpole, Ken; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Teamwork training and system standardisation have both been proposed to reduce error and harm in surgery. Since the approaches differ markedly, there is potential for synergy between them. Controlled interrupted time series with a 3 month intervention and observation phases before and after. Operating theatres conducting elective orthopaedic surgery in a single hospital system (UK Hospital Trust). Teamwork training based on crew resource management plus training and follow-up support in developing standardised operating procedures. Focus of subsequent standardisation efforts decided by theatre staff. Paired observers watched whole procedures together. We assessed non-technical skills using NOTECHS II, technical performance using glitch rate and compliance with WHO checklist using a simple quality tool. We measured complication and readmission rates and hospital stay using hospital administrative records. Before/after change was compared in the active and control groups using two-way ANOVA and regression models. 1121 patients were operated on before and 1100 after intervention. 44 operations were observed before and 50 afterwards. Non-technical skills (p=0.002) and WHO compliance (pteamwork and system improvement causes marked improvements in team behaviour and WHO performance, but not technical performance or outcome. These findings are consistent with the synergistic hypothesis, but larger controlled studies with a strong implementation strategy are required to test potential outcome effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. [Microbial air purity in hospitals. Operating theatres with air conditioning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulski, Adam; Szczotko, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of air conditioning control for microbial contamination of air inside the operating theatres equipped with correctly working air-conditioning system. This work was based on the results of bacteria and fungi concentration in hospital air obtained since 2001. Assays of microbial air purity conducted on atmospheric air in parallel with indoor air demonstrated that air filters applied in air-conditioning systems worked correctly in every case. To show the problem of fluctuation of bacteria concentration more precisely, every sequences of single results from successive measure series were examined independently.

  8. From the novel to the cinema and the theatre: autofiction’s theoretical operativeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Casas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present article is to confirm the operativeness of the notion of autofiction with regard to artistic manifestations other than the novel, especially the cinema and the theatre. These productions (with their particularities raise new challenges for the study of the author’s fictional representation: the problematic identification between author, director, actor and character (since this identity is not always complete or exact, and also the rhetorical procedures particular to its spectacular dimension (which appeal not only to the image but also to the word open unexplored paths for reflection.

  9. Surgical smoke - a health hazard in the operating theatre: a study to quantify exposure and a survey of the use of smoke extractor systems in UK plastic surgery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D S; O'Neill, J K; Powell, R J; Oliver, D W

    2012-07-01

    Surgeons and operating theatre personnel are routinely exposed to the surgical smoke plume generated through thermal tissue destruction. This represents a significant chemical and biological hazard and has been shown to be as mutagenic as cigarette smoke. It has previously been reported that ablation of 1 g of tissue produces a smoke plume with an equivalent mutagenicity to six unfiltered cigarettes. We studied six human and 78 porcine tissue samples to find the mass of tissue ablated during 5 min of monopolar diathermy. The total daily duration of diathermy use in a plastic surgery theatre was electronically recorded over a two-month period. On average the smoke produced daily was equivalent to 27-30 cigarettes. Our survey of smoke extractor use in UK plastic surgery units revealed that only 66% of units had these devices available. The Health and Safety Executive recommend specialist smoke extractor use, however they are not universally utilised. Surgical smoke inhalation is an occupational hazard in the operating department. Our study provides data to quantify this exposure. We hope this evidence can be used together with current legislation to make the use of surgical smoke extractors mandatory to protect all personnel in the operating theatre. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Prevention of adverse effects in latex allergic patients: organizing a latex safe operating theatre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonalumi, Sabrina; Barbonaglia, Patrizia; Bertocchi, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In 2001 the General Health Direction of Region Lombardia approved (decree n. 22303) a guideline for the prevention of latex allergic reactions in patients and health care workers. This document provides general recommendations in order to standardize behaviors in regional health care facilities. The reason is due to a rise in the incident of reactions to latex products in the last 20 years. Nowadays the prevalence is higher in certain risk groups (subjected to frequent and repeated exposures) rather than the general population. The aim of the project was to organize a latex safe operating theatre in the Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena of Milan (Fondazione) and to standardize behaviors in order to prevent adverse effects in latex allergic patients. Thanks to the literature review and the creation of a multidisciplinar team, we produced a protocol. Therefore, we requested manufacturers the certification of the latex content of their products. Results and conclusion. When latex allergic patients need to undergone surgery in our hospital, a latex safe operating theatre is organized by personnel following a multidisciplinar protocol. No allergic reactions were experienced during surgical procedures after the creation of an environment as free as possible from latex contamination. The project will involve an emergency room, one room or more of a ward and of the outpatients department.

  11. Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dallolio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological contamination of operating theatres and the lack of adherence to best practices by surgical staff represent some of the factors affecting Surgical Site Infections (SSIs. The aim of the present study was to assess the microbiological quality of operating settings and the staff compliance to the SSI evidence-based control measures. Ten operating rooms were examined for microbiological contamination of air and surfaces, after cleaning procedures, in “at rest” conditions. Furthermore, 10 surgical operations were monitored to assess staff compliance to the recommended practices. None of the air samples exceeded microbiological reference standards and only six of the 200 surface samples (3.0% were slightly above recommended levels. Potentially pathogenic bacteria and moulds were never detected. Staff compliance to best practices varied depending on the type of behaviour investigated and the role of the operator. The major not compliant behaviours were: pre-operative skin antisepsis, crowding of the operating room and hand hygiene of the anaesthetist. The good environmental microbiological quality observed is indicative of the efficacy of the cleaning-sanitization procedures adopted. The major critical point was staff compliance to recommended practices. Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, aimed at improving the organisation of work so as to facilitate compliance to operative protocols.

  12. Social structures in the operating theatre: how contradicting rationalities and trust affect work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydenfält, Christofer; Johansson, Gerd; Larsson, Per Anders; Akerman, Kristina; Odenrick, Per

    2012-04-01

    This article is a report of a study of how healthcare professionals involved in surgery orientate themselves to their common task, and how this orientation can be affected by the social and organizational context. Previous research indicates that surgical teams are not as cohesive as could be expected and that communication failures frequently occur. However, little is known about how these problems are related to their social, cultural and organizational context. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 healthcare professionals, representing all personnel categories of the surgical team. During the interview, a virtual model, visualizing a real operating theatre, was used to facilitate reflection. The interviews were conducted in 2009. Themes were created from the interviews, with a focus on similarities and differences. An activity analysis was conducted based on the themes. Poor team functionality and communication failures in the operating theatre can to some degree be explained by differences in activity orientation between professions and by insufficient support from social and organizational structures. Differences in activity orientation resulted in different views between professional groups in their perceptions of work activities, resulting in tension. Insufficient support resulted in communication thresholds that inhibited the sharing of information. Organizing work to promote cross-professional interaction can help the creation of social relations and norms, providing support for a common view. It can also help to decrease communication thresholds and establish stronger relations of trust. How this organization structure should be developed needs to be further investigated. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Influence of median surgeon operative duration on adverse outcomes in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Bradley N; Bacal, Daniel; Krell, Robert W; Birkmeyer, John D; Birkmeyer, Nancy J O; Finks, Jonathan F

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that prolonged operative time adversely affects surgical outcomes. However, whether faster surgeons have better outcomes is unclear, as a surgeon׳s speed could reflect skill and efficiency, but may alternatively reflect haste. This study evaluates whether median surgeon operative time is associated with adverse surgical outcomes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. We performed a retrospective cohort study using statewide clinical registry data from the years 2006 to 2012. Surgeons were ranked by their median operative time and grouped into terciles. Multivariable logistic regression with robust standard errors was used to evaluate the influence of median surgeon operative time on 30-day surgical outcomes, adjusting for patient and surgeon characteristics, trainee involvement, concurrent procedures, and the complex interaction between these variables. A total of 16,344 patients underwent surgery during the study period. Compared to surgeons in the fastest tercile, slow surgeons required 53 additional minutes to complete a gastric bypass procedure (median [interquartile range] 139 [133-150] versus 86 [69-91], Ppatient characteristic only, slow surgeons had significantly higher adjusted rates of any complication, prolonged length of stay, emergency department visits or readmissions, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). After further adjustment for surgeon characteristics, resident involvement, and the interaction between these variables, slow surgeons had higher rates of any complication (10.5% versus 7.1%, P=.039), prolonged length of stay (14.0% versus 4.4%, P=.002), and VTE (0.39% versus .22%, P<.001). Median surgeon operative duration is independently associated with adjusted rates of certain adverse outcomes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Improving surgeon efficiency while operating may reduce operative time and improve the safety of bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by

  14. Music in the operating theatre: opinions of staff and patients of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The role of music during surgery has been studied, including its effect on theatre staff, users and patients. However, little attention has been paid to its application especially in our environment. Methods: It was a prospective study, involving theatre staff, users, and patients. Their opinions on acceptability and the ...

  15. Safety in the operating theatre--a transition to systems-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Thomas G; Porter, Michael P; Maier, Ronald V

    2013-03-01

    All surgeons want the best, safest care for their patients, but providing this requires the complex coordination of multiple disciplines to ensure that all elements of care are timely, appropriate, and well organized. Quality-improvement initiatives are beginning to lead to improvements in the quality of care and coordination amongst teams in the operating room. As the population ages and patients present with more complex disease pathology, the demands for efficient systematization will increase. Although evidence suggests that postoperative mortality rates are declining, there is substantial room for improvement. Multiple quality metrics are used as surrogates for safe care, but surgical teams--including surgeons, anaesthetists, and nurses--must think beyond these simple interventions if they are to effectively communicate and coordinate in the face of increasing demands.

  16. Monitoring the anaesthetist in the operating theatre - professional competence and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, J

    2017-01-01

    This article about competence and patient safety in anaesthesia was inspired by a statement in the 2015 AAGBI guidelines on monitoring during anaesthesia: 'the presence of an appropriately trained and experienced anaesthetist is important for patient safety during anaesthesia'. The review starts with a structured description of competence, presenting five dimensions of it; the first two dimensions are identical with the two classical attributes of competence, practical skills and theoretical knowledge. Concerning skills, the value of aiming for a high level of proficiency early in a traning programme is pointed out, and deliberate practice is given as an example of a pedagogical model where aiming for excellence is a core idea. For theoretical knowledge, the value of a deep approach to learning physiology and basic sciences is stressed. The third dimension (anaesthetists' non-technical skills), represents skills necessary for good team-work in the operating theatre. The two last dimensions of competence are the understanding of work and intuitive expert knowing. Understanding work means being aware of what the work is about, appreciating the different aspects of the anaesthetist's job. Intuitive expert knowing, lastly, concerns the tacit dimension of knowledge and skills, which enables professional experts to quickly find a working solution for most clinical problems. The final part of the review is about the 'when' and 'how' of competence assessment. The main message is the importance of assessing the competence of clinically active anaesthetists regularly during their whole career. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Briefing and debriefing in the cardiac operating room. Analysis of impact on theatre team attitude and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyros, Sotiris C; Javangula, Kalyana C; Adluri, Rajeshwara Krishna Prasad; O'Regan, David J

    2010-01-01

    Error in health services delivery has long been recognised as a significant cause of inpatient morbidity and mortality. Root-cause analyses have cited communication failure as one of the contributing factors in adverse events. The formalised fighter pilot mission brief and debrief formed the basis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) crew resource management (CRM) concept produced in 1979. This is a qualitative analysis of our experience with the briefing-debriefing process applied to cardiac theatres. We instituted a policy of formal operating room (OR) briefing and debriefing in all cardiac theatre sessions. The first 118 cases were reviewed. A trouble-free operation was noted in only 28 (23.7%) cases. We experienced multiple problems in 38 (32.2%) cases. A gap was identified in the second order problem solving in relation to instrument repair and maintenance. Theatre team members were interviewed and their comments were subjected to qualitative analysis. The collaborative feeling is that communication has improved. The health industry may benefit from embracing the briefing-debriefing technique as an adjunct to continuous improvement through reflective learning, deliberate practice and immediate feedback. This may be the initial step toward a substantive and sustainable organizational transformation.

  18. Planning for success: desired characteristics of special operations surgeons, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Barrett H; Alderman, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Selection criteria for Special Operations Forces (SOF) physicians are often unclear to potential candidates without prior SOF experience. To date, no published career resource exists to guide the careers of physicians interested in becoming a SOF surgeon. Using a survey tool, desirable characteristics and personal attributes were identified that can be used to inform candidate career decisions and better prepare them for a future position in Special Operations. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey instrument was developed and distributed to current Army SOF Command Surgeons for further distribution to subordinate surgeons. RESULTS were analyzed as a cohort and by subordinate command. Respondents consisted of current SOF Surgeons. Uniformly, the individual characteristics most strongly desired are professionalism, being a team player, and leadership. Possessing or obtaining Airborne and Flight Surgeon qualifications prior to consideration for a surgeon position was highly desired. Residency training within Family Medicine or Emergency Medicine constituted the vast majority of specialty preference. Understanding which characteristics and attributes are desirable to current surgeons and commanders can aid physicians interested in SOF surgeon positions. Using this study and future studies can guide career planning and foster the selection of ideally trained physicians who will operate at the tip of the spear. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of the Army, the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. 2012.

  19. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... registrars operated on 23% (137/600) of all and 15% (56/365) of technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. The latter had a higher re-operation rate within 6 months, compared with the rate when more experienced surgeons were present. In logistic regression analysis combining age, gender, American...

  20. What factors influence attending surgeon decisions about resident autonomy in the operating room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Reed G; George, Brian C; Meyerson, Shari L; Bohnen, Jordan D; Dunnington, Gary L; Schuller, Mary C; Torbeck, Laura; Mullen, John T; Auyang, Edward; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Choi, Jennifer; Choti, Michael; Endean, Eric; Foley, Eugene F; Mandell, Samuel; Meier, Andreas; Smink, Douglas S; Terhune, Kyla P; Wise, Paul; DaRosa, Debra; Soper, Nathaniel; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fryer, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Educating residents in the operating room requires balancing patient safety, operating room efficiency demands, and resident learning needs. This study explores 4 factors that influence the amount of autonomy supervising surgeons afford to residents. We evaluated 7,297 operations performed by 487 general surgery residents and evaluated by 424 supervising surgeons from 14 training programs. The primary outcome measure was supervising surgeon autonomy granted to the resident during the operative procedure. Predictor variables included resident performance on that case, supervising surgeon history with granting autonomy, resident training level, and case difficulty. Resident performance was the strongest predictor of autonomy granted. Typical autonomy by supervising surgeon was the second most important predictor. Each additional factor led to a smaller but still significant improvement in ability to predict the supervising surgeon's autonomy decision. The 4 factors together accounted for 54% of decision variance (r = 0.74). Residents' operative performance in each case was the strongest predictor of how much autonomy was allowed in that case. Typical autonomy granted by the supervising surgeon, the second most important predictor, is unrelated to resident proficiency and warrants efforts to ensure that residents perform each procedure with many different supervisors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the surgical skills of trainees in the operating theatre: a prospective observational study of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, J D; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Crossley, J

    2011-01-01

    To compare user satisfaction and acceptability, reliability and validity of three different methods of assessing the surgical skills of trainees by direct observation in the operating theatre across a range of different surgical specialties and index procedures. A 2-year prospective, observational study in the operating theatres of three teaching hospitals in Sheffield. The assessment methods were procedure-based assessment (PBA), Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Non-technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS). The specialties were obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) and upper gastrointestinal, colorectal, cardiac, vascular and orthopaedic surgery. Two to four typical index procedures were selected from each specialty. Surgical trainees were directly observed performing typical index procedures and assessed using a combination of two of the three methods (OSATS or PBA and NOTSS for O&G, PBA and NOTSS for the other specialties) by the consultant clinical supervisor for the case and the anaesthetist and/or scrub nurse, as well as one or more independent assessors from the research team. Information on user satisfaction and acceptability of each assessment method from both assessor and trainee perspectives was obtained from structured questionnaires. The reliability of each method was measured using generalisability theory. Aspects of validity included the internal structure of each tool and correlation between tools, construct validity, predictive validity, interprocedural differences, the effect of assessor designation and the effect of assessment on performance. Of the 558 patients who were consented, a total of 437 (78%) cases were included in the study: 51 consultant clinical supervisors, 56 anaesthetists, 39 nurses, 2 surgical care practitioners and 4 independent assessors provided 1635 assessments on 85 trainees undertaking the 437 cases. A total of 749 PBAs, 695 NOTSS and 191 OSATSs were performed. Non-O&G clinical supervisors and

  2. [Validation of knowledge acquired from experience: opportunity or threat for nurses working in operating theatres?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvat-Bouëdec, Cécile

    2005-06-01

    The law n 2002-73, dated 17 January 2002, of social modernisation, as it is called, reformed continuing professional training in France. It established a new system of professional certification, the validation of the knowledge acquired from experience (VAE in French). Since 2003, the Health Ministry has been studying a project to set up the VAE for health professions, among which, in particular, the profession of the state registered nurse working in operating theatres (IBODES in French). A state diploma sanctions the training enabling to practise this profession. In the future, the VAE will open a new access way to this diploma. Does this evolution constitute a threat for the profession, and a risk or an opportunity for individual people? The aim of this thesis is to characterise the impacts of the VAE on the IBODE profession and its current system of training. Two sociological and educational approaches are comforted by a field survey. A historical background of the IBODE profession develops the evolution of the caring practices, and presents the evolution of the training systems. A sociological approach enables to analyse the vocational focus of the IBODE on looking at functionalist theories. Therefore, the study enables to think that the VAE will have no consequences on the vocational focus of the IBODE. The VAE is then the object of an educational approach within the context of continuing professional training. The topics on which it could apply and the resistances it causes are studied. Some examples are taken within other Ministries. This study shows that the VAE involves an adaptation of training centres. The VAE constitutes a genuine opportunity for the IBODE profession. However, to manage its setting up in a delicate human context, the field professionals should be involved as early as possible in the reflection initiated by the Ministry.

  3. Challenging authority during a life-threatening crisis: the effect of operating theatre hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydor, D T; Bould, M D; Naik, V N; Burjorjee, J; Arzola, C; Hayter, M; Friedman, Z

    2013-03-01

    Effective operating theatre (OT) communication is important for team function and patient safety. Status asymmetry between team members may contribute to communication breakdown and threaten patient safety. We investigated how hierarchy in the OT team influences an anaesthesia trainee's ability to challenge an unethical decision by a consultant anaesthetist in a simulated crisis scenario. We prospectively randomized 49 postgraduate year (PGY) 2-5 anaesthesia trainees at two academic hospitals to participate in a videotaped simulated crisis scenario with a simulated OT team practicing either a hierarchical team structure (Group H) or a non-hierarchical team structure (Group NH). The scenario allowed trainees several opportunities to challenge their consultant anaesthetist when administering blood to a Jehovah's Witness. Three independent, blinded raters scored the performances using a modified advocacy-inquiry score (AIS). The primary outcome was the comparison of the best-response AIS between Groups H vs NH. Secondary outcomes included the comparison of best AIS by PGY and the percentage in each group that checked and administered blood. The AIS did not differ between the groups (P=0.832) but significantly improved from PGY2 to PGY5 (P=0.026). The rates of checking blood (92% vs 76%, P=0.082) and administering blood (62% vs 57%, P=0.721) were high in both groups but not significantly different between the groups. This study did not show a significant effect of OT team hierarchical structure on trainee's ability to challenge authority; however, the results are concerning. The challenges were suboptimal in quality and there was an alarming high rate of blood checking and administration in both groups. This may reflect lack of training in appropriately and effectively challenging authority within the formal curriculum with implications for patient safety.

  4. Air sampling procedures to evaluate microbial contamination: a comparison between active and passive methods in operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Christian; Marcotrigiano, Vincenzo; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2012-08-02

    Since air can play a central role as a reservoir for microorganisms, in controlled environments such as operating theatres regular microbial monitoring is useful to measure air quality and identify critical situations. The aim of this study is to assess microbial contamination levels in operating theatres using both an active and a passive sampling method and then to assess if there is a correlation between the results of the two different sampling methods. The study was performed in 32 turbulent air flow operating theatres of a University Hospital in Southern Italy. Active sampling was carried out using the Surface Air System and passive sampling with settle plates, in accordance with ISO 14698. The Total Viable Count (TVC) was evaluated at rest (in the morning before the beginning of surgical activity) and in operational (during surgery). The mean TVC at rest was 12.4 CFU/m3 and 722.5 CFU/m2/h for active and passive samplings respectively. The mean in operational TVC was 93.8 CFU/m3 (SD = 52.69; range = 22-256) and 10496.5 CFU/m2/h (SD = 7460.5; range = 1415.5-25479.7) for active and passive samplings respectively. Statistical analysis confirmed that the two methods correlate in a comparable way with the quality of air. It is possible to conclude that both methods can be used for general monitoring of air contamination, such as routine surveillance programs. However, the choice must be made between one or the other to obtain specific information.

  5. Air sampling procedures to evaluate microbial contamination: a comparison between active and passive methods in operating theatres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoli Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since air can play a central role as a reservoir for microorganisms, in controlled environments such as operating theatres regular microbial monitoring is useful to measure air quality and identify critical situations. The aim of this study is to assess microbial contamination levels in operating theatres using both an active and a passive sampling method and then to assess if there is a correlation between the results of the two different sampling methods. Methods The study was performed in 32 turbulent air flow operating theatres of a University Hospital in Southern Italy. Active sampling was carried out using the Surface Air System and passive sampling with settle plates, in accordance with ISO 14698. The Total Viable Count (TVC was evaluated at rest (in the morning before the beginning of surgical activity and in operational (during surgery. Results The mean TVC at rest was 12.4 CFU/m3 and 722.5 CFU/m2/h for active and passive samplings respectively. The mean in operational TVC was 93.8 CFU/m3 (SD = 52.69; range = 22-256 and 10496.5 CFU/m2/h (SD = 7460.5; range = 1415.5-25479.7 for active and passive samplings respectively. Statistical analysis confirmed that the two methods correlate in a comparable way with the quality of air. Conclusion It is possible to conclude that both methods can be used for general monitoring of air contamination, such as routine surveillance programs. However, the choice must be made between one or the other to obtain specific information.

  6. Physician Engagement in Improving Operative Supply Chain Efficiency Through Review of Surgeon Preference Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Lara F B; Smith, Katherine A; Curlin, Howard

    To reduce operative costs involved in the purchase, packing, and transport of unnecessary supplies by improving the accuracy of surgeon preference cards. Quality improvement study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Gynecologic surgery suite of an academic medical center. Twenty-one specialized and generalist gynecologic surgeons. The preference cards of up to the 5 most frequently performed procedures per surgeon were selected. A total of 81 cards were distributed to 21 surgeons for review. Changes to the cards were communicated to the operating room charge nurse and finalized. Fourteen surgeons returned a total of 48 reviewed cards, 39 of which had changes. A total of 109 disposable supplies were removed from these cards, at a total cost savings of $767.67. The cost per card was reduced by $16 on average for disposables alone. Three reusable instrument trays were also eliminated from the cards, resulting in savings of approximately $925 in processing costs over a 3-month period. Twenty-two items were requested by surgeons to be available on request but were not routinely placed in the room at the start of each case, at a total cost of $6,293.54. The rate of return of unused instruments to storage decreased after our intervention, from 10.1 to 9.6 instruments per case. Surgeon preference cards serve as the basis for economic decision making regarding the purchase, storing, packing, and transport of operative instruments and supplies. A one-time surgeon review of cards resulted in a decrease in the number of disposable and reusable instruments that must be stocked, transported, counted in the operating room, or returned, potentially translating into cost savings. Surgeon involvement in preference card management may reduce waste and provide ongoing cost savings. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dissecting Attending Surgeons' Operating Room Guidance: Factors That Affect Guidance Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong Phoenix; Williams, Reed G; Smink, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    The amount of guidance provided by the attending surgeon in the operating room (OR) is a key element in developing residents' autonomy. The purpose of this study is to explore factors that affect attending surgeons' decision making regarding OR guidance provided to the resident. We used video-stimulated recall interviews (VSRI) throughout this 2-phase study. In Phase 1, 3 attending surgeons were invited to review separately 30 to 45 minute video segments of their prerecorded surgical operations to explore factors that influenced their OR guidance decision making. In Phase 2, 3 attending surgeons were observed and documented in the OR (4 operations, 341min). Each operating surgeon reviewed their videotaped surgical performance within 5 days of the operation to reflect on factors that affected their decision making during the targeted guidance events. All VSRI were recorded. Thematic analysis and manual coding were used to synthesize and analyze data from VSRI transcripts, OR observation documents, and field notes. A total of 255 minutes of VSRI involving 6 surgeons and 7 surgical operations from 5 different procedures were conducted. A total of 13 guidance decision-making influence factors from 4 categories were identified (Cohen's κ = 0.674): Setting (case schedule and patient morbidity), content (procedure attributes and case progress), resident (current competency level, trustworthiness, self-confidence, and personal traits), and attending surgeon (level of experience, level of comfort, preferred surgical technique, OR training philosophy, and responsibility as surgeon). A total of 5 factors (case schedule, patient morbidity, procedure attributes, resident current competency level, and trustworthiness) influenced attending surgeons' pre-OR guidance plans. "OR training philosophy" and "responsibility as surgeon" were anchor factors that affected attending surgeons' OR guidance decision-making patterns. Surgeons' OR guidance decision making is a dynamic process

  8. Foundations for teaching surgeons to address the contributions of systems to operating room team conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David A; Lingard, Lorelei; Boehler, Margaret L; Espin, Sherry; Schindler, Nancy; Klingensmith, Mary; Mellinger, John D

    2013-09-01

    Prior research has shown that surgeons who effectively manage operating room conflict engage in a problem-solving stage devoted to modifying systems that contribute to team conflict. The purpose of this study was to clarify how systems contributed to operating room team conflict and clarify what surgeons do to modify them. Focus groups of circulating nurses and surgeons were conducted at 5 academic medical centers. Narratives describing the contributions of systems to operating room conflict and behaviors used by surgeons to address those systems were analyzed using the constant comparative approach associated with a constructivist grounded theory approach. Operating room team conflict was affected by 4 systems-related factors: team features, procedural-specific staff training, equipment management systems, and the administrative leadership itself. Effective systems problem solving included advocating for change based on patient safety concerns. The results of this study provide clarity about how systems contribute to operating room conflict and what surgeons can do to effectively modify these systems. This information is foundational material for a conflict management educational program for surgeons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Air sampling methods to evaluate microbial contamination in operating theatres: results of a comparative study in an orthopaedics department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, C; Tafuri, S; Montenegro, L; Cassano, M; Notarnicola, A; Lattarulo, S; Montagna, M T; Moretti, B

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the level of microbial contamination of air in operating theatres using active [i.e. surface air system (SAS)] and passive [i.e. index of microbial air contamination (IMA) and nitrocellulose membranes positioned near the wound] sampling systems. Sampling was performed between January 2010 and January 2011 in the operating theatre of the orthopaedics department in a university hospital in Southern Italy. During surgery, the mean bacterial loads recorded were 2232.9 colony-forming units (cfu)/m(2)/h with the IMA method, 123.2 cfu/m(3) with the SAS method and 2768.2 cfu/m(2)/h with the nitrocellulose membranes. Correlation was found between the results of the three methods. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 12 of 60 operations (20%) with the membranes, five (8.3%) operations with the SAS method, and three operations (5%) with the IMA method. Use of nitrocellulose membranes placed near a wound is a valid method for measuring the microbial contamination of air. This method was more sensitive than the IMA method and was not subject to any calibration bias, unlike active air monitoring systems. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Primal Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alec

    1976-01-01

    Defines primal therapy as an approach to growth and change the goal of which is to rediscover the real self, the natural child. Relates this concept to primal theatre where an effort is made to express on stage what rarely occurs in life and what is usually hidden. Basic processes for primal theatre workshops are discussed. For availability see CS…

  11. The impact of surgery on global climate: a carbon footprinting study of operating theatres in three health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Andrea J; Lillywhite, Robert; Brown, Carl J

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is a major global public health priority. The delivery of health-care services generates considerable greenhouse gas emissions. Operating theatres are a resource-intensive subsector of health care, with high energy demands, consumable throughput, and waste volumes. The environmental impacts of these activities are generally accepted as necessary for the provision of quality care, but have not been examined in detail. In this study, we estimate the carbon footprint of operating theatres in hospitals in three health systems. Surgical suites at three academic quaternary-care hospitals were studied over a 1-year period in Canada (Vancouver General Hospital, VGH), the USA (University of Minnesota Medical Center, UMMC), and the UK (John Radcliffe Hospital, JRH). Greenhouse gas emissions were estimated using primary activity data and applicable emissions factors, and reported according to the Greenhouse Gas Protocol. Site greenhouse gas evaluations were done between Jan 1 and Dec 31, 2011. The surgical suites studied were found to have annual carbon footprints of 5 187 936 kg of CO 2 equivalents (CO 2 e) at JRH, 4 181 864 kg of CO 2 e at UMMC, and 3 218 907 kg of CO 2 e at VGH. On a per unit area basis, JRH had the lowest carbon intensity at 1702 kg CO 2 e/m 2 , compared with 1951 kg CO 2 e/m 2 at VGH and 2284 kg CO 2 e/m 2 at UMMC. Based on case volumes at all three sites, VGH had the lowest carbon intensity per operation at 146 kg CO 2 e per case compared with 173 kg CO 2 e per case at JRH and 232 kg CO 2 e per case at UMMC. Anaesthetic gases and energy consumption were the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Preferential use of desflurane resulted in a ten-fold difference in anaesthetic gas emissions between hospitals. Theatres were found to be three to six times more energy-intense than the hospital as a whole, primarily due to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning requirements. Overall, the carbon footprint of surgery in the

  12. Consequences and potential problems of operating room outbursts and temper tantrums by surgeons

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, George B.; Wille, Rosanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anecdotal tales of colorful temper tantrums and outbursts by surgeons directed at operating room nurses and at times other health care providers, like residents and fellows, are part of the history of surgery and include not only verbal abuse but also instrument throwing and real harassment. Our Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Nancy Epstein, has made the literature review of “Are there truly any risks and consequences when spine surgeons mistreat their predominantly female OR nursing staff/c...

  13. Best practice: surgeon driven application in pelvic operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krueger Thilo B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In applied biomedical engineering and medical industry the transfer of established technology towards customers’ needs is essential for successful development and therefore business opportunities. In chronological order, we can show the transfer of scientific results of neurophysiological research into an existing neuromonitoring system and product which can be used by non-experts in medical technology in the operating room environment. All neurophysiology functions were realized in an intuitive graphical user interface. To stimulate the autonomous nerves, a specialized parameter paradigm was used, different from motor nerve stimulation. In the background, a complex signal processing algorithm recorded smooth muscle and bladder manometry data in synchronized time and automatically detected neurophysiological signals. The acquired data was then presented in real-time. With this effort a complex scientific task could be simplified to a Yes/No statement to the end-user. Beside all the reduction of complexity, the scientific challenge was still obtained, as raw-data is still possible to be recorded.

  14. Increase in Operator's Sympathetic Nerve Activity during Complicated Hepatobiliary Surgery: Evidence for Surgeons' Mental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Hayashida, Naomi; Kuba, Sayaka; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Togo, Michita; Katayama, Noritada; Takamura, Noboru; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Surgeons often experience stress during operations. The heart rate variability (HRV) is the variability in the beat-to-beat interval, which has been used as parameters of stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mental stress of surgeons before, during and after operations, especially during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Additionally, the parameters were compared in various procedures during the operations. By frequency domain method using electrocardiograph, we measured the high frequency (HF) component, representing the parasympathetic activity, and the low frequency (LF)/HF ratio, representing the sympathetic activity. In all 5 cases of PD, the surgeon showed significantly lower HF component and higher LF/HF during operation, indicating predominance of sympathetic nervous system and increased stress, than those before the operation (p operation. Out of the 4 LDLT cases, the value of HF was decreased in two and the LF/HF increased in three cases (p operation compared to those before the operation. In all cases, the value of HF was decreased and/or the LF/HF increased significantly during the reconstruction of the vessels or bile ducts than during the removal of the liver. Thus, sympathetic nerve activity increased during hepatobiliary surgery compared with the level before the operation, and various procedures during the operations induced diverse changes in the autonomic nervous activities. The HRV analysis could assess the chronological changes of mental stress by measuring the autonomic nervous balances.

  15. Backstage in the theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J; Timmons, S

    2000-10-01

    Observations undertaken in the operating theatre suggested that the social environment, and certain forms of staff behaviour could be explained using the space analysis developed by Erving Goffman (1969) in The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life. In the study reported in this paper the theatre department was found to be a strongly 'backstage' area. However, it was also found that there were limits to this analysis, and these are explained within this article. Some practical suggestions as to how this analysis might be helpful in the management of health care institutions and the education of health care professionals are made.

  16. Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Jacobsen, Steffen; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal...... Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should...

  17. Using a videogame to facilitate nursing and medical students' first visit to the operating theatre. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Blanco, Ángel; Torrente, Javier; Fernández-Manjón, Baltasar; Ruiz, Pedro; Giner, Manuel

    2017-08-01

    First experiences in the operating theatre with real patients are always stressful and intimidating for students. We hypothesized that a game-like simulation could improve perceptions and performance of novices. A videogame was developed, combining pictures and short videos, by which students are interactively instructed on acting at the surgical block. Moreover, the game includes detailed descriptive information. After playing, students are given feedback on their performance. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 132 nursing and medical students with no previous experience in surgery. Sixty two (47.0%) were allocated to a control group (CG) and 70 (53.0%) to an experimental group (EG). Subjects in EG played the game the day prior to their first experience in the theatre; CG had no access to the application. On the day after their experience at surgery, all students filled in a questionnaire in a 7-point Likert format collecting subjective data about their experience in the surgical block. Four constructs related to students' feelings, emotions and attitudes were measured through self-reported subjective scales, i.e. C1: fear to make mistakes, C2: perceived knowledge on how to behave, C3: perceived errors committed, and C4: attitude/behaviour towards patients and staff. The main research question was formulated as follows: do students show differences in constructs C1-C4 by exposure to the game? EG reported statistically significant higher scores on the four aspects measured than CG (p<0.05; Mann-Whitney U tests; Cohen's d standardized effect size d1=0.30; d2=1.05; d3=0.39; d4=0.49). Results show clear evidence that the exposure to the game-like simulation had a significant positive effect on all the constructs. After their first visit to the theatre, students in EG showed less fear (C1) and also perceived to have committed fewer errors (C3), while they showed higher perceived knowledge (C2) and a more collaborative attitude (C4). Copyright © 2017

  18. Outcomes of Concurrent Operations: Results From the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jason B; Berian, Julia R; Ban, Kristen A; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Angelos, Peter; Matthews, Jeffrey B; Hoyt, David B; Hall, Bruce L; Ko, Clifford Y

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether concurrently performed operations are associated with an increased risk for adverse events. Concurrent operations occur when a surgeon is simultaneously responsible for critical portions of 2 or more operations. How this practice affects patient outcomes is unknown. Using American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data from 2014 to 2015, operations were considered concurrent if they overlapped by ≥60 minutes or in their entirety. Propensity-score-matched cohorts were constructed to compare death or serious morbidity (DSM), unplanned reoperation, and unplanned readmission in concurrent versus non-concurrent operations. Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to account for the clustered nature of the data while controlling for procedure and case mix. There were 1430 (32.3%) surgeons from 390 (77.7%) hospitals who performed 12,010 (2.3%) concurrent operations. Plastic surgery (n = 393 [13.7%]), otolaryngology (n = 470 [11.2%]), and neurosurgery (n = 2067 [8.4%]) were specialties with the highest proportion of concurrent operations. Spine procedures were the most frequent concurrent procedures overall (n = 2059/12,010 [17.1%]). Unadjusted rates of DSM (9.0% vs 7.1%; P < 0.001), reoperation (3.6% vs 2.7%; P < 0.001), and readmission (6.9% vs 5.1%; P < 0.001) were greater in the concurrent operation cohort versus the non-concurrent. After propensity score matching and risk-adjustment, there was no significant association of concurrence with DSM (odds ratio [OR] 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-1.21), reoperation (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.40), or readmission (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.99-1.29). In these analyses, concurrent operations were not detected to increase the risk for adverse outcomes. These results do not lessen the need for further studies, continuous self-regulation and proactive disclosure to patients.

  19. Operative and consultative proportions of neurosurgical disease worldwide: estimation from the surgeon perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Michael C; Rattani, Abbas; Baticulon, Ronnie E; Faruque, Serena; Johnson, Walter D; Dempsey, Robert J; Haglund, Michael M; Alkire, Blake C; Park, Kee B; Warf, Benjamin C; Shrime, Mark G

    2018-05-11

    OBJECTIVE The global magnitude of neurosurgical disease is unknown. The authors sought to estimate the surgical and consultative proportion of diseases commonly encountered by neurosurgeons, as well as surgeon case volume and perceived workload. METHODS An electronic survey was sent to 193 neurosurgeons previously identified via a global surgeon mapping initiative. The survey consisted of three sections aimed at quantifying surgical incidence of neurological disease, consultation incidence, and surgeon demographic data. Surgeons were asked to estimate the proportion of 11 neurological disorders that, in an ideal world, would indicate either neurosurgical operation or neurosurgical consultation. Respondent surgeons indicated their confidence level in each estimate. Demographic and surgical practice characteristics-including case volume and perceived workload-were also captured. RESULTS Eighty-five neurosurgeons from 57 countries, representing all WHO regions and World Bank income levels, completed the survey. Neurological conditions estimated to warrant neurosurgical consultation with the highest frequency were brain tumors (96%), spinal tumors (95%), hydrocephalus (94%), and neural tube defects (92%), whereas stroke (54%), central nervous system infection (58%), and epilepsy (40%) carried the lowest frequency. Similarly, surgery was deemed necessary for an average of 88% cases of hydrocephalus, 82% of spinal tumors and neural tube defects, and 78% of brain tumors. Degenerative spine disease (42%), stroke (31%), and epilepsy (24%) were found to warrant surgical intervention less frequently. Confidence levels were consistently high among respondents (lower quartile > 70/100 for 90% of questions), and estimates did not vary significantly across WHO regions or among income levels. Surgeons reported performing a mean of 245 cases annually (median 190). On a 100-point scale indicating a surgeon's perceived workload (0-not busy, 100-overworked), respondents selected a

  20. Spine surgeon's kinematics during discectomy, part II: operating table height and visualization methods, including microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-05-01

    Surgeon spine angle during surgery was studied ergonomically and the kinematics of the surgeon's spine was related with musculoskeletal fatigue and pain. Spine angles varied depending on operation table height and visualization method, and in a previous paper we showed that the use of a loupe and a table height at the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum are optimal for reducing musculoskeletal loading. However, no studies have previously included a microscope as a possible visualization method. The objective of this study is to assess differences in surgeon spine angles depending on operating table height and visualization method, including microscope. We enrolled 18 experienced spine surgeons for this study, who each performed a discectomy using a spine surgery simulator. Three different methods were used to visualize the surgical field (naked eye, loupe, microscope) and three different operating table heights (anterior superior iliac spine, umbilicus, the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum) were studied. Whole spine angles were compared for three different views during the discectomy simulation: midline, ipsilateral, and contralateral. A 16-camera optoelectronic motion analysis system was used, and 16 markers were placed from the head to the pelvis. Lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, cervical lordosis, and occipital angle were compared between the different operating table heights and visualization methods as well as a natural standing position. Whole spine angles differed significantly depending on visualization method. All parameters were closer to natural standing values when discectomy was performed with a microscope, and there were no differences between the naked eye and the loupe. Whole spine angles were also found to differ from the natural standing position depending on operating table height, and became closer to natural standing position values as the operating table height increased, independent of the visualization method

  1. Surgeons' and surgical trainees' acute stress in real operations or simulation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Konstantinos; Larentzakis, Andreas; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2017-12-01

    Acute stress in surgery is ubiquitous and has an immediate impact on surgical performance and patient safety. Surgeons react with several coping strategies; however, they recognise the necessity of formal stress management training. Thus, stress assessment is a direct need. Surgical simulation is a validated standardised training milieu designed to replicate real-life situations. It replicates stress, prevents biases, and provides objective metrics. The complexity of stress mechanisms makes stress measurement difficult to quantify and interpret. This systematic review aims to identify studies that have used acute stress estimation measurements in surgeons or surgical trainees during real operations or surgical simulation, and to collectively present the rationale of these tools, with special emphasis in salivary markers. A search strategy was implemented to retrieve relevant articles from MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases. The 738 articles retrieved were reviewed for further evaluation according to the predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thirty-three studies were included in this systematic review. The methods for acute stress assessment varied greatly among studies with the non-invasive techniques being the most commonly used. Subjective and objective tests for surgeons' acute stress assessment are being presented. There is a broad spectrum of acute mental stress assessment tools in the surgical field and simulation and salivary biomarkers have recently gained popularity. There is a need to maintain a consistent methodology in future research, towards a deeper understanding of acute stress in the surgical field. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ¿Es posible tener un incendio en un quirófano? Is it possible to have a fire in an operating theatre?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Agún González

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Podemos pensar que un quirófano es el Sancta Sanctorum de un Hospital, el sitio más "seguro" dentro del entorno más controlado, en todos los aspectos. Pero, es un hecho contrastado, aunque no siempre difundido, que los incendios en quirófano existen y suelen ser por causas internas al propio quirófano. Durante una intervención quirúrgica tenemos una posibilidad de sufrir un incendio en el momento más peligroso de la vida de un paciente y crear una situación de emergencia en un área crítica. Los objetivos de esta investigación son: - Incidir en la posibilidad de tener un incendio en quirófano. - Analizar las posibilidades del riesgo. - Detectar conductas y elementos peligrosos. - Analizar las medidas preventivas a adoptar.We might think that an operating theatre is the sanctum sanctorum of a Hospital. The 'safest' place within a very much controlled environment in all aspects. But it is a contrasted fact, although not always published, that fires in operating theatres exist and that they are normally caused by situations in the operating theatre itself. During an operation there is the possibility of having a fire in the most dangerous moment for the life of a patient and in the most critical zones of a hospital. The objectives of this research are the following: - To emphasize the possibility of fire in an operating theatre - To analyse the possibilities of risk - To detect hazardous elements and behaviour - To analyse the preventive measures to be adopted

  3. TRADITIONAL CANISTER-BASED OPEN WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM VERSUS CLOSED SYSTEM: HAZARDOUS EXPOSURE PREVENTION AND OPERATING THEATRE STAFF SATISFACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, M; Patel, N; MacLellan, D M; Millard, N

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to blood and body fluids is a major concern to health care professionals working in operating rooms (ORs). Thus, it is essential that hospitals use fluid waste management systems that minimise risk to staff, while maximising efficiency. The current study compared the utility of a 'closed' system with a traditional canister-based 'open' system in the OR in a private hospital setting. A total of 30 arthroscopy, urology, and orthopaedic cases were observed. The closed system was used in five, four, and six cases, respectively and the open system was used in nine, two, and four cases, respectively. The average number of opportunities for staff to be exposed to hazardous fluids were fewer for the closed system when compared to the open during arthroscopy and urology procedures. The open system required nearly 3.5 times as much staff time for set-up, maintenance during procedures, and post-procedure disposal of waste. Theatre staff expressed greater satisfaction with the closed system than with the open. In conclusion, compared with the open system, the closed system offers a less hazardous and more efficient method of disposing of fluid waste generated in the OR.

  4. A new mechatronic assistance system for the neurosurgical operating theatre: implementation, assessment of accuracy and application concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachinger, Jens; Bumm, Klaus; Wurm, Jochen; Bohr, Christopher; Nissen, Urs; Dannenmann, Tim; Buchfelder, Michael; Iro, Heinrich; Nimsky, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    To introduce a new robotic system to the field of neurosurgery and report on a preliminary assessment of accuracy as well as on envisioned application concepts. Based on experience with another system (Evolution 1, URS Inc., Schwerin, Germany), technical advancements are discussed. The basic module is an industrial 6 degrees of freedom robotic arm with a modified control element. The system combines frameless stereotaxy, robotics, and endoscopy. The robotic reproducibility error and the overall error were evaluated. For accuracy testing CT markers were placed on a cadaveric head and pinpointed with the robot's tool tip, both fully automated and telemanipulatory. Applicability in a clinical setting, user friendliness, safety and flexibility were assessed. The new system is suitable for use in the neurosurgical operating theatre. Hard- and software are user-friendly and flexible. The mean reproducibility error was 0.052-0.062 mm, the mean overall error was 0.816 mm. The system is less cumbersome and much easier to use than the Evolution 1. With its user-friendly interface and reliable safety features, its high application accuracy and flexibility, the new system is a versatile robotic platform for various neurosurgical applications. Adaptations for different applications are currently being realized. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Plastic surgeons' self-reported operative infection rates at a Canadian academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wendy Ky; Kaur, Manraj Nirmal; Thoma, Achilleas

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection rates are of great interest to patients, surgeons, hospitals and third-party payers. While previous studies have reported hospital-acquired infection rates that are nonspecific to all surgical services, there remain no overall reported infection rates focusing specifically on plastic surgery in the literature. To estimate the reported surgical site infection rate in plastic surgery procedures over a 10-year period at an academic hospital in Canada. A review was conducted on reported plastic surgery surgical site infection rates from 2003 to 2013, based on procedures performed in the main operating room. For comparison, prospective infection surveillance data over an eight-year period (2005 to 2013) for nonplastic surgery procedures were reviewed to estimate the overall operative surgical site infection rates. A total of 12,183 plastic surgery operations were performed from 2003 to 2013, with 96 surgical site infections reported, corresponding to a net operative infection rate of 0.79%. There was a 0.49% surgeon-reported infection rate for implant-based procedures. For non-plastic surgery procedures, surgical site infection rates ranged from 0.04% for cataract surgery to 13.36% for high-risk abdominal hysterectomies. The plastic surgery infection rate at the study institution was found to be site infection rates. However, these results do not report patterns of infection rates germane to procedures, season, age groups or sex. To provide more in-depth knowledge of this topic, multicentre studies should be conducted.

  6. Achilles tenotomy as an office procedure and current practising trends among New Zealand orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Lewis; Wickham, Angus; Walker, Cameron; Knudsen, Joshua

    2018-05-18

    Percutaneous Achilles tenotomy (PAT) is performed during the final phase of casting with Ponseti method. Several settings have been proposed as venues for this procedure, however it is increasingly being performed in theatre under a general anaesthetic (GA). General anaesthesia, however, is expensive and not without risks. The purpose of the present study was to compare results of outpatient releases to theatre releases, and assess current practising trends among orthopaedic surgeons. Retrospective comparison of patients with idiopathic clubfoot managed by Ponseti method who had Achilles tenotomy performed in outpatient clinic and in theatre. Surveys were sent to all POSNZ members to determine current practising trends in New Zealand. Parental satisfaction surveys were performed. Comparative cost analysis was performed using hospital billing information. The current study includes 64 idiopathic congenital clubfeet (19 bilateral cases). PAT was performed on 26 clubfeet under local anaesthetic in an outpatient setting, and 33 clubfeet under GA in a theatre setting. There was no significant difference for post-operative complications, or recurrence (p=0.67). Those in theatre group were exposed to a greater number of general anaesthetics before the age of four. Among practising New Zealand paediatric orthopaedic surgeons, 77.78% perform this in theatre under general anaesthesia, while only 22.22% perform PAT in outpatient clinic. The main barriers included concerns regarding pain control, concerns regarding incomplete release, concerns regarding distress to family and concerns regarding sterility. Parental satisfaction surveys found pain management to be excellent. Financial data was analysed and indicative costs were $6,061 NZD per procedure in theatre, compared to $378 NZD per procedure in clinic. PAT performed in a clinic setting is both safe and efficacious with results comparative to that performed in theatre. There was no difference in post-operative

  7. Consequences and potential problems of operating room outbursts and temper tantrums by surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, George B; Wille, Rosanne L

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotal tales of colorful temper tantrums and outbursts by surgeons directed at operating room nurses and at times other health care providers, like residents and fellows, are part of the history of surgery and include not only verbal abuse but also instrument throwing and real harassment. Our Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Nancy Epstein, has made the literature review of "Are there truly any risks and consequences when spine surgeons mistreat their predominantly female OR nursing staff/colleagues, and what can we do about it?," an assigned topic for members of the editorial board as part of a new category entitled Ethical Note for our journal. This is a topic long overdue and I chose to research it. There is no medical literature to review dealing with nurse abuse. To research this topic, one has to involve business, industry, educational institutions, compliance standards and practices, and existing state and federal laws. I asked Dr. Rosanne Wille to co-author this paper since, as the former Dean of Nursing and then Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at a major higher educational institution, she had personal experience with compliance regulations and both sexual harassment and employment discrimination complaints, to make this review meaningful. A review of the existing business practices and both state and federal laws strongly suggests that although there has not been any specific legal complaint that is part of the public record, any surgeon who chooses to act out his or her frustration and nervous energy demands by abusing co-workers on the health care team, and in this case specifically operating room personnel, is taking a chance of making legal history with financial outcomes which only an actual trial can predict or determine. Even more serious outcomes of an out-of-control temper tantrum and disruptive behavior can terminate, after multiple hearings and appeals, in adverse decisions affecting hospital privileges. Surgeons who abuse other

  8. Optimization and planning of operating theatre activities: an original definition of pathways and process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Simone; Corradi, Luca; de Ville de Goyet, Jean; Iannucci, Marina; Porro, Ivan; Rosso, Nicola; Tanfani, Elena; Testi, Angela

    2015-05-17

    The Operating Room (OR) is a key resource of all major hospitals, but it also accounts for up 40% of resource costs. Improving cost effectiveness, while maintaining a quality of care, is a universal objective. These goals imply an optimization of planning and a scheduling of the activities involved. This is highly challenging due to the inherent variable and unpredictable nature of surgery. A Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN 2.0) was used for the representation of the "OR Process" (being defined as the sequence of all of the elementary steps between "patient ready for surgery" to "patient operated upon") as a general pathway ("path"). The path was then both further standardized as much as possible and, at the same time, keeping all of the key-elements that would allow one to address or define the other steps of planning, and the inherent and wide variability in terms of patient specificity. The path was used to schedule OR activity, room-by-room, and day-by-day, feeding the process from a "waiting list database" and using a mathematical optimization model with the objective of ending up in an optimized planning. The OR process was defined with special attention paid to flows, timing and resource involvement. Standardization involved a dynamics operation and defined an expected operating time for each operation. The optimization model has been implemented and tested on real clinical data. The comparison of the results reported with the real data, shows that by using the optimization model, allows for the scheduling of about 30% more patients than in actual practice, as well as to better exploit the OR efficiency, increasing the average operating room utilization rate up to 20%. The optimization of OR activity planning is essential in order to manage the hospital's waiting list. Optimal planning is facilitated by defining the operation as a standard pathway where all variables are taken into account. By allowing a precise scheduling, it feeds the process of

  9. Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David; Lingard, Lorelei; Boehler, Margaret L; Espin, Sherry; Klingensmith, Mary; Mellinger, John D; Schindler, Nancy

    2011-09-01

    Conflict management has been identified as an essential competence for surgeons as they work in operating room (OR) teams; however, the optimal approach is unclear. Social science research offers two alternatives, the first of which recommends that task-related conflict be managed using problem-solving techniques while avoiding relationship conflict. The other approach advocates for the active management of relationship conflict as it almost always accompanies task-related conflict. Clarity about the optimal management strategy can be gained through a better understanding of conflict transformation, or the inter-relationship between conflict types, in this specific setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate conflict transformation in OR teams in order to clarify the approach most appropriate for an educational conflict management programme for surgeons. A constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted to explore the phenomenon of OR team conflict. Narratives were collected from focus groups of OR nurses and surgeons at five participating centres. A subset of these narratives involved transformation between and within conflict types. This dataset was analysed. The results confirm that misattribution and the use of harsh language cause conflict transformation in OR teams just as they do in stable work teams. Negative emotionality was found to make a substantial contribution to responses to and consequences of conflict, notably in the swiftness with which individuals terminated their working relationships. These findings contribute to a theory of conflict transformation in the OR team. There are a number of behaviours that activate conflict transformation in the OR team and a conflict management education programme should include a description of and alternatives to these behaviours. The types of conflict are tightly interwoven in this setting and thus the most appropriate management strategy is one that assumes that both types of conflict will exist and

  10. Development of a web based monitoring system for safety and activity analysis in operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosini, Francesco; Miniati, Roberto; Avezzano, Paolo; Cecconi, Giulio; Dori, Fabrizio; Gentili, Guido Biffi; Belardinelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The management and the monitoring of the operating rooms on the part of the general management have the objective of optimizing their use and maximizing the internal safety. The expenses owed to their safe use represent, besides reimbursements coming from the surgical activity, important factors for the analysis of the medical facility. Given that it is not possible to reduce the safety, it is necessary to develop supporting systems with the aim to enhance and optimize the use of the rooms. The developed analysis model of the operating rooms in this study is based on the specific performance indicators and allows the effective monitoring of both the parameters that influence the safety (environmental, microbiological parameters) and those that influence the efficiency of the usage (employment rate, delays, necessary formalities, etc.). This allows you to have a systematic dashboard on hand for all of the OTs and, thus, organize the intervention schedules and more appropriate improvements. A monitoring dashboard has been achieved, accessible from any platform and any device, capable of aggregating hospital information. The undertaken organizational modifications, through the use of the dashboard, have allowed for an average annual savings of 29.52 minutes per intervention and increase the use of the ORs of 5%. The increment of the employment rate and the optimization of the operating room have allowed for savings of around $299,88 for every intervention carried out in 2013, corresponding to an annual savings of $343,362,60. Integration dashboards, as the one proposed in this study as a prototype, represent a governance model of economically sustainable healthcare systems capable of guiding the hospital management in the choices and in the implementation of the most efficient organizational modifications.

  11. Attending Surgeons' Leadership Style in the Operating Room: Comparing Junior Residents' Experiences and Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissane-Lee, Nicole A; Yule, Steven; Pozner, Charles N; Smink, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on surgeons' nontechnical skills in the operating room (OR), especially leadership. In an attempt to identify trainee preferences, we explored junior residents' opinions about the OR leadership style of teaching faculty. Overall, 20 interns and 20 mid-level residents completed a previously validated survey on the style of leadership they encountered, the style they preferred to receive, and the style they personally employed in the OR. In all, 4 styles were explored; authoritative: leader makes decisions and communicates them firmly; explanatory: leader makes decisions promptly, but explains them fully; consultative: leader consults with trainees when important decisions are made, and delegative: leader puts the problem before the group and makes decisions by majority opinion. Comparisons were completed using chi-square analysis. Junior resident preference for leadership style of attending surgeons in the OR differed from what they encountered. Overall, 62% of residents encountered an authoritative leadership style; however, only 9% preferred this (p styles (41%). Preferences differed by postgraduate year. Although 40% of interns preferred a consultative style, 50% of mid-level residents preferred explanatory leadership. Junior resident preference of leadership style in the OR differs from what they actually encounter. This has the potential to create unwanted tension and may erode team performance. Awareness of this difference provides an opportunity for an educational intervention directed at both attendings and trainees. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Report from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database Workforce: clarifying the definition of operative mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, David M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Clarke, David R; Pasquali, Sara K; O'Brien, Sean M; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Meehan, Paul; McDonald, Donna E; Jacobs, Marshall L; Mavroudis, Constantine; Shahian, David M

    2013-01-01

    Several distinct definitions of postoperative death have been used in various quality reporting programs. Some have defined postoperative mortality as the occurrence of death after a surgical procedure when the patient dies while still in the hospital, while others have considered all deaths occurring within a predetermined, standardized time interval after surgery to be postoperative mortality. While mortality data are still collected and reported using both these individual definitions, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) believes that either approach alone may be inadequate. Accordingly, the STS prefers a more encompassing metric, Operative Mortality. Operative Mortality is defined in all STS databases as (1) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring during the hospitalization in which the operation was performed, even if after 30 days (including patients transferred to other acute care facilities); and (2) all deaths, regardless of cause, occurring after discharge from the hospital, but before the end of the 30th postoperative day. This article provides clarification for some uncommon but important scenarios in which the correct application of this definition may be challenging.

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Simulated Vitreoretinal Surgery to Prepare Surgeons for the Upcoming Intervention in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuchler, Svenja; Wagner, Clemens; Singh, Pankaj; Müller, Michael; Al-Dwairi, Rami; Benjilali, Rachid; Schill, Markus; Ackermann, Hanns; Bon, Dimitra; Kohnen, Thomas; Schoene, Benjamin; Koss, Michael; Koch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the virtual reality training simulator Eyesi to prepare surgeons for performing pars plana vitrectomies and its potential to predict the surgeons' performance. In a preparation phase, four participating vitreoretinal surgeons performed repeated simulator training with predefined tasks. If a surgeon was assigned to perform a vitrectomy for the management of complex retinal detachment after a surgical break of at least 60 hours it was randomly decided whether a warmup training on the simulator was required (n = 9) or not (n = 12). Performance at the simulator was measured using the built-in scoring metrics. The surgical performance was determined by two blinded observers who analyzed the video-recorded interventions. One of them repeated the analysis to check for intra-observer consistency. The surgical performance of the interventions with and without simulator training was compared. In addition, for the surgeries with simulator training, the simulator performance was compared to the performance in the operating room. Comparing each surgeon's performance with and without warmup trainingshowed a significant effect of warmup training onto the final outcome in the operating room. For the surgeries that were preceeded by the warmup procedure, the performance at the simulator was compared with the operating room performance. We found that there is a significant relation. The governing factor of low scores in the simulator were iatrogenic retinal holes, bleedings and lens damage. Surgeons who caused minor damage in the simulation also performed well in the operating room. Despite the large variation of conditions, the effect of a warmup training as well as a relation between the performance at the simulator and in the operating room was found with statistical significance. Simulator training is able to serve as a warmup to increase the average performance.

  14. Clinical Efficacy of Simulated Vitreoretinal Surgery to Prepare Surgeons for the Upcoming Intervention in the Operating Room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Deuchler

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of the virtual reality training simulator Eyesi to prepare surgeons for performing pars plana vitrectomies and its potential to predict the surgeons' performance.In a preparation phase, four participating vitreoretinal surgeons performed repeated simulator training with predefined tasks. If a surgeon was assigned to perform a vitrectomy for the management of complex retinal detachment after a surgical break of at least 60 hours it was randomly decided whether a warmup training on the simulator was required (n = 9 or not (n = 12. Performance at the simulator was measured using the built-in scoring metrics. The surgical performance was determined by two blinded observers who analyzed the video-recorded interventions. One of them repeated the analysis to check for intra-observer consistency. The surgical performance of the interventions with and without simulator training was compared. In addition, for the surgeries with simulator training, the simulator performance was compared to the performance in the operating room.Comparing each surgeon's performance with and without warmup trainingshowed a significant effect of warmup training onto the final outcome in the operating room. For the surgeries that were preceeded by the warmup procedure, the performance at the simulator was compared with the operating room performance. We found that there is a significant relation. The governing factor of low scores in the simulator were iatrogenic retinal holes, bleedings and lens damage. Surgeons who caused minor damage in the simulation also performed well in the operating room.Despite the large variation of conditions, the effect of a warmup training as well as a relation between the performance at the simulator and in the operating room was found with statistical significance. Simulator training is able to serve as a warmup to increase the average performance.

  15. Contemporary Black Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pearl

    The distinguishable black theatre in America, mirroring a distinguishable black experience, is an artistic product which demands audience involvement. Both the Afro-American oral tradition and the art of gesture are integral aspects of black theatre. In addition, the tragedy found black theatre is not tragedy in the classic sense, as blacks feel…

  16. Academic versus Clinical Productivity of Cardiac Surgeons in the State of New York: Who Publishes More and Who Operates More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Carlo Maria; Gaudino, Mario; Vardas, Panos N; Weber, Daniel J; Blitzer, David; Hameedi, Fawad; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Girardi, Leonard N

    2018-01-01

    We investigated whether/how cardiac surgeons can be productive both academically and clinically. Using online resources (New York State Adult Cardiac Surgery database, SCOPUS), we collected individual clinical volumes (operations performed/year), academic metrics (ongoing publications, role as author), practice setting, and seniority for all cardiac surgeons in the State of New York from 1994 to 2011. Over time, individual clinical volumes decreased (median operations/year: 193 in 1995 vs 126 in 2010; P published more worked at hospitals with higher clinical volumes (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.16; P publishing at all; ∼45 per cent operating less, but publishing a little; ∼15 per cent clinically very productive (operating as much as the nonpublishers) and publishing a lot; and ∼1 per cent operating the least, but publishing the most.

  17. Development of an On-Line Surgeon-Specific Operating Room Time Prediction System (Experience with the Michigan Surgical Monitors)

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Allan C.D.; Schmidt, Nancy M.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a micro-computer application for the on-line prediction of surgeon-specific operating room time using an IBM - PCXT is described. The reasons leading to the project, together with an assessment of the Condor 20 relational database management system as the basis for the application are discussed.

  18. The business of theatre and the theatre of business | Iji | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both of them operate on the maxim of utile et dulche (utility and entertainment). Both ideally shun entertainment-for-entertainment sake per se. In other words, the business of theatre emphasizes humanistic elements, while the theatre of business emphasizes monetary benefits predominantly. For instance, community and ...

  19. [Teamwork in the operating theatre: the German Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS-D) and its first application in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passauer-Baierl, S; Chiapponi, C; Bruns, C J; Weigl, M

    2014-12-01

    The quality of surgical teamwork contributes to performance of the operating theatre team, service quality and patient safety in surgery. Observational tools are a feasible and reliable way to capture and evaluate teamwork in the operating theatre (OT). We introduce the German version of the Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS-D) and present the first observational results from German OTs. Quality of surgical teamwork was assessed with observational teamwork assessment for surgery (OTAS-D). It evaluates five dimensions of OT teamwork: communication, coordination, cooperation/backup behaviour, leadership, and team monitoring/situation awareness. Each dimension is evaluated for each profession (surgical, nursing, and anaesthesia team) as well for each phase of the procedure (pre-, intra-, and post-operative). We observed n = 63 procedures, mainly in abdominal/general and orthopaedic surgery. Additionally, all OT team members scored their individual evaluation of the intra-operative teamwork (standardised 1-item questions). The OTAS-D evaluations showed meaningful results and differences for the OT professions as well as across the different phases of the procedures. Overall, a medium to good level of the OT teamwork was observed. There were no differences in regard to type of surgery (minimally invasive vs. open) or surgical specialties. With an increased coordination of the surgical team we observed a significantly increased cooperation of the nursing team (r = 0.36, p = 0.004). Concerning the OT staffs self-reports, the surgical and nursing teams reported higher scores for quality of surgical teamwork during the procedure than their anaesthesia team members. No significant relationships between observed quality of OT teamwork and self-reports were found. The German version of OTAS-D is a psychometrically robust method to capture the quality of teamwork in operating theatres. It enables the analyses of teamwork between the surgical

  20. Time and motion studies of National Health Service cataract theatre lists to determine strategies to improve efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Harry W; Myerscough, James; Borsci, Simone; Ni, Melody; O'Brart, David P S

    2017-11-24

    To provide a quantitative assessment of cataract theatre lists focusing on productivity and staffing levels/tasks using time and motion studies. National Health Service (NHS) cataract theatre lists were prospectively observed in five different institutions (four NHS hospitals and one private hospital). Individual tasks and their timings of every member of staff were recorded. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to investigate possible associations between individual timings and tasks. 140 operations were studied over 18 theatre sessions. The median number of scheduled cataract operations was 7 (range: 5-14). The average duration of an operation was 10.3 min±(SD 4.11 min). The average time to complete one case including patient turnaround was 19.97 min (SD 8.77 min). The proportion of the surgeons' time occupied on total duties or operating ranged from 65.2% to 76.1% and from 42.4% to 56.7%, respectively. The correlations of the surgical time to patient time in theatre was R 2 =0.95. A multiple linear regression model found a significant association (F(3,111)=32.86, P<0.001) with R 2 =0.47 between the duration of one operation and the number of allied healthcare professionals (AHPs), the number of AHP key tasks and the time taken to perform these key tasks by the AHPs. Significant variability in the number of cases performed and the efficiency of patient flow were found between different institutions. Time and motion studies identified requirements for high-volume models and factors relating to performance. Supporting the surgeon with sufficient AHPs and tasks performed by AHPs could improve surgical efficiency up to approximately double productivity over conventional theatre models. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. At most hospitals in the state of Iowa, most surgeons' daily lists of elective cases include only 1 or 2 cases: Individual surgeons' percentage operating room utilization is a consistently unreliable metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Jarvie, Craig; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-11-01

    Percentage utilization of operating room (OR) time is not an appropriate endpoint for planning additional OR time for surgeons with high caseloads, and cannot be measured accurately for surgeons with low caseloads. Nonetheless, many OR directors claim that their hospitals make decisions based on individual surgeons' OR utilizations. This incongruity could be explained by the OR managers considering the earlier mathematical studies, performed using data from a few large teaching hospitals, as irrelevant to their hospitals. The important mathematical parameter for the prior observations is the percentage of surgeon lists of elective cases that include 1 or 2 cases; "list" meaning a combination of surgeon, hospital, and date. We measure the incidence among many hospitals. Observational cohort study. 117 hospitals in Iowa from July 2013 through September 2015. Surgeons with same identifier among hospitals. Surgeon lists of cases including at least one outpatient surgical case, so that Relative Value Units (RVU's) could be measured. Averaging among hospitals in Iowa, more than half of the surgeons' lists included 1 or 2 cases (77%; P<0.00001 vs. 50%). Approximately half had 1 case (54%; P=0.0012 vs. 50%). These percentages exceeded 50% even though nearly all the surgeons operated at just 1 hospital on days with at least 1 case (97.74%; P<0.00001 vs. 50%). The cases were not of long durations; among the 82,928 lists with 1 case, the median was 6 intraoperative RVUs (e.g., adult inguinal herniorrhaphy). Accurate confidence intervals for raw or adjusted utilizations are so wide for individual surgeons that decisions based on utilization are equivalent to decisions based on random error. The implication of the current study is generalizability of that finding from the largest teaching hospital in the state to the other hospitals in the state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparison of the teamwork attitudes and knowledge of Irish surgeons and U.S Naval aviators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Paul; Ryan, Stephen; Keogh, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Poor teamwork skills are contributors to poor performance and mishaps in high risk work settings, including the operating theatre. A questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes towards, and knowledge of, Irish surgeons (n = 72) towards the human factors that contribute to mishaps and poor teamwork in high risk environments. The responses were compared to those obtained from U.S. Naval aviators (n = 552 for the attitude questions, and n = 172 for the knowledge test). U.S. Naval aviators were found to be significantly more knowledgeable, and held attitudes that were significantly more positive towards effective teamworking than the surgeons. Moreover, 78.9% of Senior House Officers and Registrars stated that junior personnel were frequently afraid to speak-up (compared with 31.3% of Consultants). Only 7.3% of surgeons stated that an adequate pre-operative brief team brief was frequently conducted, and only 15% stated that an adequate post-operative team brief was frequently conducted. It is suggested that the human factors training currently provided to surgeons in Ireland is a positive first step. However, there is a need to stress the importance of assertiveness in juniors, listening in seniors, and more reinforcement of good teamworking behaviours in the operating theatre. Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. FINANCING THE THEATRE: THE ROLE OF MANAGEMENT AND THE STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bestvina Bukvić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available At a time when public funding of culture is being reduced and increasing attention is being paid to profitability, it is essential to apply an entrepreneurial mindset and management principles to the guidance and the financing of cultural institutions. This paper focuses on the theatre funding scheme and presents a survey analysing the structure of funding theatres in Croatia by weighting budgetary and commercial funding, as well as analyses possible measures to be implemented in order to improve the theatre funding model. A survey was conducted in 2015, which found that public theatres are predominantly funded by budgetary resources (62.14%, while the most important part of the revenue and income section of private theatres originates from selling their own products and services (43.99%. Theatres believe that budgetary resources still need to remain the dominant sources of funding, but in order to increase the level of operational excellence, a change of direction would be necessary towards one’s own resources, including donations and sponsorships. At the same time, better solutions in terms of increasing tax incentives and tax deductions for both donations and sponsorships would result in an increase in their importance in the financing of theatres. The impact of state action on the funding and operation of theatres is unquestionable, but in theatres there is a need for developing a working knowledge in the fields of management and entrepreneurship in order to gradually reduce dependence, particularly of public theatres, on state action.

  4. Thomas James Walker (1835-1916): Surgeon and general practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Martyn

    2018-02-01

    Thomas James Walker was a surgeon and general practitioner who worked in the city of Peterborough at a time when there were changes and innovations in the practice of medicine. After training in medicine and surgery at Edinburgh University, he qualified in London in 1857. He was a pioneer of laryngoscopy. He played an important role in introducing antiseptic surgery to the Peterborough Infirmary and was instrumental in the development of the operating theatre which opened in 1894. He was a philanthropist and collector of Roman and Saxon artefacts. In 1915, he was recognized as an outstanding member of the Peterborough community when he was offered the Freedom of the City.

  5. The Theatre at Halikarnassos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul; Isager, Signe

    2015-01-01

    In this article the physical remains of the theatre at Halikarnassos are described and some reflections are made on its date, which are followed by some thoughts on the architectural background for the creation of the circlebased design. In an appendix inscriptions from the theatre illuminating its...

  6. Surgeon point-of-view recording: Using a high-definition head-mounted video camera in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Kamal, Saurabh; Dave, Tarjani Vivek; Mishra, Kapil; Reddy, Harsha S; Della Rocca, David; Della Rocca, Robert C; Andron, Aleza; Jain, Vandana

    2015-10-01

    To study the utility of a commercially available small, portable ultra-high definition (HD) camera (GoPro Hero 4) for intraoperative recording. A head mount was used to fix the camera on the operating surgeon's head. Due care was taken to protect the patient's identity. The recorded video was subsequently edited and used as a teaching tool. This retrospective, noncomparative study was conducted at three tertiary eye care centers. The surgeries recorded were ptosis correction, ectropion correction, dacryocystorhinostomy, angular dermoid excision, enucleation, blepharoplasty and lid tear repair surgery (one each). The recorded videos were reviewed, edited, and checked for clarity, resolution, and reproducibility. The recorded videos were found to be high quality, which allowed for zooming and visualization of the surgical anatomy clearly. Minimal distortion is a drawback that can be effectively addressed during postproduction. The camera, owing to its lightweight and small size, can be mounted on the surgeon's head, thus offering a unique surgeon point-of-view. In our experience, the results were of good quality and reproducible. A head-mounted ultra-HD video recording system is a cheap, high quality, and unobtrusive technique to record surgery and can be a useful teaching tool in external facial and ophthalmic plastic surgery.

  7. Factors which influence the cardiac surgeon's decision not to operate on patients referred for consideration of surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprakasam Rajesh

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to document what proportion of patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery are turned down, the reasons given for not operating and also to evaluate what happens to those patients who do not undergo surgery. Methods 382 elective patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery to one of six consultant cardiac surgeons at Wythenshawe Hospital during a one year period from were included in the study. Data for those patients who underwent an operation were collected prospectively in a cardiac surgery database. The case notes of those patients who did not undergo an operation were reviewed to establish reasons given by surgeons for not operating. Patients were followed up to determine vital status at the end of the study period. Results 333 (87.2% patients underwent an operation and 49 (12.8% did not. 68% of patients turned down were thought to be too high-risk. 14% of patients did not fulfill symptomatic or prognostic criteria for surgery and in 8% of patients coronary artery surgery was thought ineffective due to poor distal vessels. 6% of patients declined an operation and 4% were thought to be more suitable for coronary angioplasty. Patients turned down for surgery had more renal dysfunction (p = 0.017, respiratory disease (p Conclusion 12.8% of patients referred for consideration of cardiac surgery did not undergo an operation. Two thirds of patients not accepted for surgery were thought too high risk. Those patients who did not undergo an operation had a significantly worse mortality.

  8. Electronic remote blood issue combined with a computer-controlled, automated refrigerator for major surgery in operating theatres at a distance from the transfusion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlicchi, Franco; Pacilli, Pasqua; Bragliani, Arianna; Rapuano, Silvia; Dini, Daniele; Vincenzi, Daniele

    2018-02-01

    The difficulty of supplying red blood cells within an adequate time to patients undergoing surgery is a known problem for transfusion services, particularly if the operating theater is located at some distance from the blood bank. The consequences frequently are that more blood is ordered than required; several units are allocated and issued; and unused units must be returned to the blood bank. Some sparse reports have demonstrated that remote blood issue systems can improve the efficiency of issuing blood. This study describes a computer-controlled, self-service, remote blood-release system, combined with an automated refrigerator, installed in a hospital at which major surgery was performed, located 5 kilometers away from the transfusion service. With this system, red blood cell units were electronically allocated to patients immediately before release, when the units actually were needed. Two 2-year periods, before and after implementation of the system, were compared. After implementation of the system, the ratio of red blood cell units returned to the transfusion service was reduced from 48.9% to 1.6% of the issued units (8852 of 18,090 vs. 182 of 11,152 units; p blood cell units was observed, probably mainly due to changes in the number and complexity of surgical procedures. No transfusion errors occurred in the two periods. The current results demonstrate that the remote blood-release system is safe and useful for improving the efficiency of blood issue for patients in remote operating theatres. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Tracheostomy After Operations for Congenital Heart Disease: An Analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, Christopher W; Benneyworth, Brian D; Turrentine, Mark; Wallace, Amelia S; Hornik, Christoph P; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-06-01

    Information concerning tracheostomy after operations for congenital heart disease has come primarily from single-center reports. We aimed to describe the epidemiology and outcomes associated with postoperative tracheostomy in a multi-institutional registry. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Database (2000 to 2014) was queried for all index operations with the adverse event "postoperative tracheostomy" or "respiratory failure, requiring tracheostomy." Patients with preoperative tracheostomy or weighing less than 2.5 kg undergoing isolated closure of patent ductus arteriosus were excluded. Trends in tracheostomy incidence over time from January 2000 to June 2014 were analyzed with a Cochran-Armitage test. The patient characteristics associated with operative mortality were analyzed for January 2010 to June 2014, including deaths occurring up to 6 months after transfer of patients to long-term care facilities. From 2000 to 2014, the incidence of tracheostomy after operations for congenital heart disease increased from 0.11% in 2000 to a high of 0.76% in 2012 (p tracheostomy. The median age at operation was 2.5 months (25th, 75th percentile: 0.4, 7). Prematurity (n = 165, 26%), genetic abnormalities (n = 298, 46%), and preoperative mechanical ventilation (n = 275, 43%) were common. Postoperative adverse events were also common, including cardiac arrest (n = 131, 20%), extracorporeal support (n = 87, 13%), phrenic or laryngeal nerve injury (n = 114, 18%), and neurologic deficit (n = 51, 8%). The operative mortality was 25% (n = 153). Tracheostomy as an adverse event of operations for congenital heart disease remains rare but has been increasingly used over the past 15 years. This trend and the considerable mortality risk among patients requiring postoperative tracheostomy support the need for further research in this complex population. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Talking About Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod; Lindelof, Anja Mølle

    2015-01-01

    Taking as its starting point the Nordic cultural policy debates surrounding audience development, which concentrate either on reaching out to new target groups or on artistic quality, this article suggests that the focus on the audience’s experience of theatre performances has thus far been...... underdeveloped. Through qualitative audience investigations, this article shows how talking about theatre offers a method by which to explore theatre experiences from an audience perspective, and thus provides invaluable knowledge for theatres and cultural politicians in search of larger and broader audiences....... The analysis discusses audience experience with regard to the sensory, the artistic and the symbolic level of two specific Swedish-Danish performances, thereby demonstrating how this approach offers a useful tool for theatrical institutions engaged in audience development....

  11. Reducing bacterial contamination in an Orthopedic Theatre ventilated by natural ventilation, in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephanie; Palmer, Rish; Phillipo, Edward; Chipungu, Geoffrey

    2016-05-31

    All surgical procedures have the potential for infection and some of the main sources are contamination from airborne particles, theatre personnel and the theatre environment.  There is strong evidence that the use of ultra-clean air flow systems in orthopedic operating theatres reduces the incidence of deep sepsis after surgery. In the developing world however, this is often an unrealistic solution. The aim of this study was to establish baseline levels of contamination in a working orthopedic theatre, at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. To feedback results to the theatre team, promote infection prevention discussion and work with the team to implement workable and realistic goals to improve the intra-operative environment. Samples were collected from theatre equipment available at the time of surgery, from theatre water and theatre air using passive air sampling techniques. Samples were immediately transferred to the Central Microbiology Laboratory for culture on basic culture media. Bacterial contamination of theatre equipment, intra-operative theatre air and water was detected. Results were discussed with the theatre and infection prevention team who were receptive to feedback with regards to infection prevention strategies and keen to develop simple measures which could be put in place to change practice. In this setting, we suggest that implementing workable and realistic goals such as, establishing baseline rates of bacterial contamination and introduction of strict protocols for asepsis and theatre etiquette, may reduce bacterial contamination rates and subsequent intra-operative infection in the absence of expensive engineering solutions.

  12. Surgical specimen handover from the operating theatre to laboratory-Can we improve patient safety by learning from aviation and other high-risk organisations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Peter A; Brands, Marieke T; Caldwell, Lucy; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Turley, Nic; Foley, Susie; Rahimi, Siavash

    2018-02-01

    Essential communication between healthcare staff is considered one of the key requirements for both safety and quality care when patients are handed over from one clinical area to other. This is particularly important in environments such as the operating theatre and intensive care where mistakes can be devastating. Health care has learned from other high-risk organisations (HRO) such as aviation where the use of checklists and human factors awareness has virtually eliminated human error and mistakes. To our knowledge, little has been published around ways to improve pathology specimen handover following surgery, with pathology request forms often conveying the bare minimum of information to assist the laboratory staff. Furthermore, the request form might not warn staff about potential hazards. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the factors involved in human error and introduce a novel checklist that can be readily completed at the same time as the routine pathology request form. This additional measure enhances safety, can help to reduce processing and mislabelling errors and provides essential information in a structured way assisting both laboratory staff and pathologists when handling head and neck surgical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of perioperative inefficiency on neurosurgical theatre efficacy: A 15-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ameya S; Parker, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Effective utilisation of operating theatre time is an important issue in neurosurgery. There is a commonly held belief amongst surgeons that throughput of theatre is decreasing secondary to worsening perioperative delays. The aim of this paper is to explore some of the factors that lead to delays in the perioperative period by determining whether there has been a trend in the increasing length of case time over a fifteen-year period. Case notes of all elective patients who consented for surgery between January 1998 and the end of 2012 were reviewed. Only patients who underwent elective surgery were included. Variables recorded included transit time from the ward to theatre, anaesthetic time, surgical time and time spent in recovery. These were compared over the 15-year period to look for apparent trends. The total number of patients who consented for elective surgery at our institution between January 1998 and December 2012 was 6760. The mean anaesthetic time considering all operations performed was 43 mins each over the 15-year period. Anaesthetic time was deemed to be trending upwards from 1998 where the mean time was 27 -60 mins in December 2012, thus reflecting an increase of 33 mins. The mean surgical times over the 15-year period were 131 mins. However in 1998, mean surgical time was 127 mins compared with 133 mins in 2012. For the operations analysed, anaesthetic time seems to be increasing and has effectively doubled over a 15-year period. Surgical time and non-clinical time are shown to be virtually constant. This delays the overall theatre list and increases the cancellation rate. For compensating this, changes need to be made when allocating resources to both elective and emergency theatres. Staff recruitment needs to be assessed and internal audits need to be conducted within institutions to analyse ways to optimise the throughput of an operation theatre. If these principles are not adhered to, it will have a negative impact as our populations, and

  14. The cataract national data set electronic multi-centre audit of 55,567 operations: case-mix adjusted surgeon's outcomes for posterior capsule rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, J M; Taylor, H; Qureshi, K; Smith, R; Johnston, R L

    2011-08-01

    To develop a methodology for case-mix adjustment of surgical outcomes for individual cataract surgeons using electronically collected multi-centre data conforming to the cataract national data set (CND). Routinely collected anonymised data were remotely extracted from electronic patient record (EPR) systems in 12 participating NHS Trusts undertaking cataract surgery. Following data checks and cleaning, analyses were carried out to risk adjust outcomes for posterior capsule rupture rates for individual surgeons, with stratification by surgical grade. A total of 406 surgeons from 12 NHS Trusts submitted data on 55,567 cataract operations between November 2001 and July 2006 (86% from January 2004). In all, 283 surgeons contributed data on >25 cases, providing 54,319 operations suitable for detailed analysis. Case-mix adjusted results of individual surgeons are presented as funnel plots for all surgeons together, and separately for three different grades of surgeon. Plots include 95 and 99.8% confidence limits around the case-mix adjusted outcomes for detection of surgical outliers. Routinely collected electronic data conforming to the CND provides sufficient detail for case-mix adjustment of cataract surgical outcomes. The validation of these risk indicators should be carried out using fresh data to confirm the validity of the risk model. Once validated this model should provide an equitable approach for peer-to-peer comparisons in the context of revalidation.

  15. 281 Technical Theatre Practice in Nigerian University Theatres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. It is a proven fact that visual design in the theatre is an important aspect of ... training courses. Talent runs out so fast, it runs dry quickly in the ... personnel's or theatre managers in charge of these theatres. For the ... human society.

  16. Rescuing the Regent Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Blake

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Melbourne’s Regent and Plaza theatres opened in Collins Street in 1929. For more than forty years, these grand picture palaces were among Melbourne’s most treasured cinemas, favourites together with the Capitol Theatre in Swanston Street and the State Theatre in Flinders Street. Often called ‘palaces of dreams’, they were part of a glamorous entertainment era, when a night out at the movies was an event, and an afternoon matinee was a treat. Not even the Regent’s two-year closure, as a result of the fire that destroyed the auditorium in 1945, could dampen the enthusiasm of its Melbourne audiences. By the 1960s, however, the grand picture palaces were no longer in vogue and were becoming uneconomical to run. The State Theatre closed in 1962 and was later converted into two theatres. The Capitol closed in 1964, but when it re-opened eighteen months later a shopping arcade had been built in the lower part of the auditorium. After investigating the option of converting the Regent into two theatres, its owner, Hoyts, opted to develop a smaller multi-cinema complex in Bourke Street instead. The company sold the Regent and Plaza theatres to the City of Melbourne in 1969 and in 1970 the doors of the Regent and Plaza closed for what many people thought was the last time. Melbourne City Council bought the Regent and Plaza in order to control development around the site of the proposed City Square on the corner of Swanston and Collins Streets. The theatres seemed destined to fall victim to the wrecker’s ball. But if the 1960s was the decade of development, the 1970s was the decade of preservation. Protests against the demolition of historic buildings occurred around Australia, often with the controversial support of the building unions. The architectural profession debated the issues of preservation versus development of dynamic modern buildings. Both the State and Federal Governments were forced to introduce legislation to protect the nation

  17. Developing a model of competence in the operating theatre: psychometric validation of the perceived perioperative competence scale-revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Polit, Denise F; Hamlin, Lois; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of the Revised Perioperative Competence Scale (PPCS-R). There is a lack of a psychometrically tested sound self-assessment tools to measure nurses' perceived competence in the operating room. Content validity was established by a panel of international experts and the original 98-item scale was pilot tested with 345 nurses in Queensland, Australia. Following the removal of several items, a national sample that included all 3209 nurses who were members of the Australian College of Operating Room Nurses was surveyed using the 94-item version. Psychometric testing assessed content validity using exploratory factor analysis, internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, and construct validity using the "known groups" technique. During item reduction, several preliminary factor analyses were performed on two random halves of the sample (n=550). Usable data for psychometric assessment were obtained from 1122 nurses. The original 94-item scale was reduced to 40 items. The final factor analysis using the entire sample resulted in a 40 item six-factor solution. Cronbach's alpha for the 40-item scale was .96. Construct validation demonstrated significant differences (pperceived competence scores relative to years of operating room experience and receipt of specialty education. On the basis of these results, the psychometric properties of the PPCS-R were considered encouraging. Further testing of the tool in different samples of operating room nurses is necessary to enable cross-cultural comparisons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Managing risk and expected financial return from selective expansion of operating room capacity: mean-variance analysis of a hospital's portfolio of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes

    2003-07-01

    Surgeons using the same amount of operating room (OR) time differ in their achieved hospital contribution margins (revenue minus variable costs) by >1000%. Thus, to improve the financial return from perioperative facilities, OR strategic decisions should selectively focus additional OR capacity and capital purchasing on a few surgeons or subspecialties. These decisions use estimates of each surgeon's and/or subspecialty's contribution margin per OR hour. The estimates are subject to uncertainty (e.g., from outliers). We account for the uncertainties by using mean-variance portfolio analysis (i.e., quadratic programming). This method characterizes the problem of selectively expanding OR capacity based on the expected financial return and risk of different portfolios of surgeons. The assessment reveals whether the choices, of which surgeons have their OR capacity expanded, are sensitive to the uncertainties in the surgeons' contribution margins per OR hour. Thus, mean-variance analysis reduces the chance of making strategic decisions based on spurious information. We also assess the financial benefit of using mean-variance portfolio analysis when the planned expansion of OR capacity is well diversified over at least several surgeons or subspecialties. Our results show that, in such circumstances, there may be little benefit from further changing the portfolio to reduce its financial risk. Surgeon and subspecialty specific hospital financial data are uncertain, a fact that should be taken into account when making decisions about expanding operating room capacity. We show that mean-variance portfolio analysis can incorporate this uncertainty, thereby guiding operating room management decision-making and reducing the chance of a strategic decision being made based on spurious information.

  19. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database to social security data to examine survival after cardiac operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; Edwards, Fred H; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Morales, David L S; Gammie, James S; Sanchez, Juan A; Haan, Constance K; Badhwar, Vinay; George, Kristopher M; O'Brien, Sean M; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Feehan, Kelly M; Han, Jane M; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Chitwood, W Randolph; Murray, Gordon F; Grover, Frederick L

    2011-07-01

    Long-term evaluation of cardiothoracic surgical outcomes is a major goal of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). Linking the STS Database to the Social Security Death Master File (SSDMF) allows for the verification of "life status." This study demonstrates the feasibility of linking the STS Database to the SSDMF and examines longitudinal survival after cardiac operations. For all operations in the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database performed in 2008 in patients with an available Social Security Number, the SSDMF was searched for a matching Social Security Number. Survival probabilities at 30 days and 1 year were estimated for nine common operations. A Social Security Number was available for 101,188 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting, 12,336 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement, and 6,085 patients undergoing isolated mitral valve operations. One-year survival for isolated coronary artery bypass grafting was 88.9% (6,529 of 7,344) with all vein grafts, 95.2% (84,696 of 88,966) with a single mammary artery graft, 97.4% (4,422 of 4,540) with bilateral mammary artery grafts, and 95.6% (7,543 of 7,890) with all arterial grafts. One-year survival was 92.4% (11,398 of 12,336) for isolated aortic valve replacement (95.6% [2,109 of 2,206] with mechanical prosthesis and 91.7% [9,289 of 10,130] with biologic prosthesis), 86.5% (2,312 of 2,674) for isolated mitral valve replacement (91.7% [923 of 1,006] with mechanical prosthesis and 83.3% [1,389 of 1,668] with biologic prosthesis), and 96.0% (3,275 of 3,411) for isolated mitral valve repair. Successful linkage to the SSDMF has substantially increased the power of the STS Database. These longitudinal survival data from this large multi-institutional study provide reassurance about the durability and long-term benefits of cardiac operations and constitute a contemporary benchmark for survival after cardiac operations. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by

  20. Organisational Theatre and Polyphony

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matula, Linda; Badham, Richard; Meisiek, Stefan

    This paper details the conditions leading up to and influencing an organisational theatre intervention as part of an organisational change program at a newly established cancer clinic. The paper explores the social and political interactions and negotiations shaping the structure and conditions...... of the organisational theatre event. It focuses in particular on the alignments and clashes between the different human resource voices in defining the ‘surface’ formal purpose for the intervention and the embeddedness of such interactions and negotiations in ‘deeper’ cultural and social conditions. The paper provides...... the first in-depth longitudinal study of shaping and negotiation of an organisational theatre event and the ways in which it is influenced by a polyphonic multivocality and takes the form of selective and partial forms of harmonious expression in establishing meaningful cooperation. The paper reveals...

  1. Operating theatre ventilation systems and microbial air contamination in total joint replacement surgery: results of the GISIO-ISChIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, A; Auxilia, F; Barchitta, M; Cristina, M L; D'Alessandro, D; Mura, I; Nobile, M; Pasquarella, C

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown a higher rate of surgical site infections in hip prosthesis implantation using unidirectional airflow ventilation compared with turbulent ventilation. However, these studies did not measure the air microbial quality of operating theatres (OTs), and assumed it to be compliant with the recommended standards for this ventilation technique. To evaluate airborne microbial contamination in OTs during hip and knee replacement surgery, and compare the findings with values recommended for joint replacement surgery. Air samplings were performed in 28 OTs supplied with unidirectional, turbulent and mixed airflow ventilation. Samples were collected using passive sampling to determine the index of microbial air contamination (IMA). Active sampling was also performed in some of the OTs. The average number of people in the OT and the number of door openings during the sampling period were recorded. In total, 1228 elective prosthesis procedures (60.1% hip and 39.9% knee) were included in this study. Of passive samplings performed during surgical activity in unidirectional airflow ventilation OTs (U-OTs) and mixed airflow OTs (M-OTs), 58.9% and 87.6% had IMA values >2, respectively. Of samplings performed during surgical activity in turbulent airflow OTs (T-OTs) and in turbulent airflow OTs with the surgical team wearing Steri-Shield Turbo Helmets (TH-OTs), 8.6% and 60% had IMA values ≤ 2, respectively. Positive correlation was found between IMA values and the number of people in the OT and the number of door openings (P systems always provide acceptable airborne bacterial counts. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Standard guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgery theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, definition, rationale and scope: Dermatologists in India are now increasingly performing surgical and cosmetic procedures in their practice. This calls for minimum standards at the national level with the main focus of patient safety and hence the guidelines for setting up a dermatosurgical theatre. Facility: The dermatosurgery theatre can be created in either physician′s clinic, or a hospital depending on the procedure to be performed. The dermatosurgery theatre requires careful planning with regards to - location, dimension, shell design, lighting, electrical requirements, operation table, chair, trolley, surgical instruments, sterilization of devices, asepsis and advanced life support. Apart from physical considerations, other considerations including theatre etiquettes, consent for surgery, safety of dermatosurgeon, theatre staff and lastly biomedical waste management should be looked into. These issues are discussed in detail in the recommendations.

  3. Robotic mitral valve operations by experienced surgeons are cost-neutral and durable at 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyan, Garrett; Wei, Lawrence M; Althouse, Andrew; Roberts, Harold G; Schauble, Drew; Murashita, Takashi; Cook, Chris C; Rankin, J Scott; Badhwar, Vinay

    2018-04-12

    Robotic mitral valve surgery has potential advantages in patient satisfaction and 30-day outcome. Cost concerns and repair durability limit wider adoption of robotic technology. This study examined detailed cost differences between robotic and sternotomy techniques in relation to outcomes and durability following robotic mitral program initiation. Between April 2013 and October 2015, 30-day and 1-year outcomes of 328 consecutive patients undergoing robotic or sternotomy mitral valve repair or replacement by experienced surgeons were examined. Multivariable logistic regression informed propensity matching to derive a cohort of 182 patients. Echocardiographic follow-up was completed at 1 year in all robotic patients. Detailed activity-based cost accounting was applied to include direct, semidirect, and indirect costs with special respect to robotic depreciation, maintenance, and supplies. A quantitative analysis of all hospital costs was applied directly to each patient encounter for comparative financial analyses. Mean predicted risk of mortality was similar in both the robotic (n = 91) and sternotomy (n = 91) groups (0.9% vs 0.8%; P > .431). The total costs of robotic mitral operations were similar to those of sternotomy ($27,662 vs $28,241; P = .273). Early direct costs were higher in the robotic group. There was a marked increase in late indirect cost with the sternotomy cohort related to increased length of stay, transfusion requirements, and readmission rates. Robotic repair technique was associated with no echocardiographic recurrence greater than trace to only mild regurgitation at 1 year. Experienced mitral surgeons can initiate a robotic program in a cost-neutral manner that maintains clinical outcome integrity as well as repair durability. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dance Theatre of Harlem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Angelica

    1983-01-01

    Describes the emergence of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, which has united both aesthetic excellence and social purpose/community involvement since its founding in 1971. Reveals how current government policies have endangered its funding. Offers a critique of several productions, which showed a new emphasis on technique. (DMM)

  5. Theatre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Farley, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    The articles in this volume place special emphasis on significant forms of traditional Indian theatre about which relatively little has been written. They represent, for the most part, the work of relatively young and unknown scholars on the threshold of their careers. Each article was selected for inclusion either because it probed deeply into…

  6. Ergonomic assessment of the posture of surgeons performing endoscopic transurethral resections in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sökeland Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During transurethral endoscopic prostate and bladder operations the influence of an ergonomic redesign of the arrangement of the operation equipment - including the introduction of a video-assisted resection method ('monitor endoscopy' instead of directly viewing onto the operation area via the endoscope ('direct endoscopy' - was studied with respect to the postures of the surgeons. Methods Postures were analysed on the basis of video recordings of the surgeons performed in the operation theatre during live operations and subsequent visual posture estimation executed by an observer. In particular, head, trunk and arm positions were assigned to posture categories according to a newly developed posture classification schema. 10 urological operations with direct endoscopy and 9 with monitor endoscopy were included. Results Application of direct endoscopy coincides with distinct lateral and sagittal trunk and head inclinations, trunk torsion and strong forearm and upper arm elevations of the surgeons whereas operations with monitor endoscopy were performed with an almost upright head and trunk and hanging arms. The disadvantageous postures observed during direct endoscopy are mainly caused by the necessity to hold the endoscope continuously in close contact with the eye. Conclusion From an ergonomic point of view, application of the video-assisted resection method should be preferred in transurethral endoscopic operations in order to prevent awkward postures of the surgeons and to limit muscular strain and fatigue. Furthermore, the application of the monitor method enables the use of a chair equipped with back support and armrests and benefits the reduction of postural stress.

  7. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection: a case controlled study of contamination of theatre clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandan, Indu; Bowker, Karen E; Bannister, Gordon C; Soar, Jasmeet

    2011-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the most important causes of healthcare associated infections (HCAI), accounting for 20% of all HCAIs. Surgical site infections affect 1% of joint replacement operations. This study was designed to assess whether theatre clothing is contaminated more inside or outside the theatre suite. Petri dishes filled with horse blood agar were pressed on theatre clothes at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours to sample bacterial contamination in 20 doctors whilst working in and outside the theatre suite. The results showed that there was greater bacterial contamination when outside the theatre suite at 2 hours. There were no differences in the amount of contamination at 4, 6 and 8 hours. This study suggests that the level of contamination of theatre clothes is similar both inside and outside the theatre setting.

  8. Surgeon point-of-view recording: Using a high-definition head-mounted video camera in the operating room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the utility of a commercially available small, portable ultra-high definition (HD camera (GoPro Hero 4 for intraoperative recording. Methods: A head mount was used to fix the camera on the operating surgeon′s head. Due care was taken to protect the patient′s identity. The recorded video was subsequently edited and used as a teaching tool. This retrospective, noncomparative study was conducted at three tertiary eye care centers. The surgeries recorded were ptosis correction, ectropion correction, dacryocystorhinostomy, angular dermoid excision, enucleation, blepharoplasty and lid tear repair surgery (one each. The recorded videos were reviewed, edited, and checked for clarity, resolution, and reproducibility. Results: The recorded videos were found to be high quality, which allowed for zooming and visualization of the surgical anatomy clearly. Minimal distortion is a drawback that can be effectively addressed during postproduction. The camera, owing to its lightweight and small size, can be mounted on the surgeon′s head, thus offering a unique surgeon point-of-view. In our experience, the results were of good quality and reproducible. Conclusions: A head-mounted ultra-HD video recording system is a cheap, high quality, and unobtrusive technique to record surgery and can be a useful teaching tool in external facial and ophthalmic plastic surgery.

  9. Is surgeon intuition equivalent to models of operative complexity in determining the surgical approach for nephron sparing surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: RENAL nephrometry score was associated with surgical approach intuitively chosen by an experienced surgeon, but the presence of adherent perinephric fat did not correlate with decision-making.

  10. When Theatre of the Oppressed Becomes Theatre of the Oppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    On 6 February 2008, a deliberative theatre experiment was held at the "National Archives of Quebec". Inspired by the democratic virtues of public deliberation but preoccupied with its blind spots, Forum Theatre was used as a deliberative medium to initiate discussion about the social tensions between the homeless and other dwellers of…

  11. Exploring Power with Object Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryöppy, Merja; Ylirisku, Salu; Knutz, Eva

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores Object Theatre as an approach to address power in design. We understand power as a relational activity that emerges and is upheld through particular ways of relating (Elias, 1991; Stacey, 2007). The spontaneity in participant actions through Object Theatre exercises renders pr...

  12. Emancipatory Theatre and Performative Didactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venke Aure

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on several years of empirical observation, gathered from theatre practice, in which Karin B. Bjerkestrand and Anna Songe-Møller developed what is known as “Solidarity Forum Theatre” (SFT, a form of applied drama. This theatre form is based primarily on the Brazilian, Augusto Boal’s, Theatre of the Oppressed (Boal, 2006. Bjerkestrand and Songe-Møller used and further developed Boal’s theatre principle in a collaboration with various immigrant groups and drama-/theatre students. The intention has been to use the liberating potential into which this form of theatre invites us. In this article, Bjerkestrand and Songe-Møller present the theoretical groundwork, the underlying principles, and examples of SFT in action. Some of the participants’ own stories have been used to concretize the liberating aspect that arose in the theatre experiences. In relation to this Solidarity Forum Theatre practice, science theorist and art educator Venke Aure presents epistemological and didactic reflections.

  13. Bagatelle about translated theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Puppa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, there is nothing in common, no harmony, between audience and stage, in particular, between language spoken out of the theatre and language pronounced on stage, in a way that playwrights often are compelled to invent their own language. In fact, Italian theater lacks a precise code of traditions able to shape the organic ground of recitation itself. These questions allow the author to reflect about theatrical language as in, for example, the case of a Venetian company that performs Danilo Kiš’ play, Consigli a un giovane scrittori, or the revision, among others, of the syncretic Esperanto used by Eugenio Barba.

  14. Customization of a tool to assess Danish surgeons´ non-technical skills in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Lyk-Jensen, Helle Teglgaard; Dieckmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Errors in surgery often stem from failure related to non-technical skills such as communication and teamwork. Tools for training and assessment of non-technical skills are needed to ensure safe surgery. The aim of this study was to customize the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) rating...

  15. Surgeon-performed ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todsen, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Surgeons are increasingly using ultrasonography (US) in their clinical management of patients. However, US is a very user-dependent imaging modality and proper skills of the US operator are needed to ensure quality in patient care. This thesis explores the validity evidence for assessment...

  16. A Native American Theatre Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kent R.

    1973-01-01

    The ceremonial rituals American Indians have practiced for centuries are uncontestable testimony to how strongly they respond to theatre. These rituals, a pure and functional form of dramatic art, are practiced today by a Native American theater group. (FF)

  17. Theatre Tempus Tic Tac

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A serious but comical look at time: How long is a quarter of an hour when you’re falling asleep in your theatre seat? What is a minute of silence for a deaf person? What are three minutes for an egg? On the stage an actor covers in one hour (no more, no less!) the questions that are almost bound to arise when we talk about time: linear time/ circular time, absolute time/relative time, history of time measurement, instant/duration, scientific time/conscious time, irreversibility of time, notion of space time… The points of view from which these subjects are explored are varied (as befits such a deep subject!): philosophy, mathematics, history, physics, literature, etc... Thursday, 19 June 2008 at 8.00 p.m. Tempus Tic Tac The Vue sur la mer company with Roland Depauw, produced by Stéphane Verrue The Globe, first floor No specialist knowledge required. Entrance free. To reserve call + 41 (0) 22 767 76 76 http://www...

  18. The hybrid theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Ron

    2008-02-01

    Ever since the first movie picture house was opened, experiencing the unique cinematic experience has constantly evolved. Technological advances continually guarantee that more changes will happen to create the ultimate cinematic experience. Cinema has been reincarnated time after time, from the first hand cranked silent movie to the modern day Digital Cinema. The technology used to depict the story changes; along with that change is the human thirst for a better transformation, for a more enjoyable, more encompassing, more believable, more immersive, yet simultaneously a more bewitching, entertainment experience. "In this volatile business of ours, we can ill afford to rest on our laurels, even to pause in retrospect. Times and conditions change so rapidly that we must keep our aim constantly focused on the future." --Walt Disney. 1 It has been said that "content is king". By itself, that implies a disservice to the technology that supports it. Without the technology, the content could not exist. In today's digital society; a movie can be downloaded to a handheld playback device the moment it is released. Offering these services at a cheap rate would enable studios to stay ahead of the curve, virtually eliminate video piracy and create the ability to deliver first class uncompromised content. It's only a matter of time when new released movies would be distributed this way too and people are given the choice to view in the comfort of their own homes, hand held device or view at a local theatre.

  19. Evaluation Lessons from a Theatre Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.; Bridges, Keith; Mattingly, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Charter Theatre is a small professional theatre in Washington, DC. Its mission is to develop and produce new plays. Like other organizations, Charter Theatre wants to be accountable. Its members saw early the need for evaluation--a repeatable process to assure the quality of their work, and have infused their development process with evaluation.…

  20. Starting a Community Musical Theatre Orchestra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Burke

    2007-01-01

    Musical theatre is one of the great genres of music, yet very few community theatres use live music to accompany their productions. Sadly, many community theatres that formerly employed pit orchestras are replacing them with electronic music. Some producers would welcome live music, but they worry about the potential cost. There are so many…

  1. Recalling Memories Through Reminiscence Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Gürgens Gjærum

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study how a reminiscence theatre production develops dramaturgically, and to discuss what impact it has on the participants who take part in the project “The aged as a resource”. The theatre performance Number Our Days is visually and verbally presented and interpreted in this article. The reader also gets an opportunity to look at film extracts from the performance in electronic form. The theoretical framing is based on a performative mindset, Ryum’s dramaturgic model, Ranciere’s view on the emancipated spectator, Turner and Behrndt’s devising theatre universe, Saldana’s ethnodrama method and Ricoeur’s perspective of the capable and relational human being who builds their own narrative identity through communication.

  2. Observing Precautions against Cutaneous Injuries by Theatre Workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following injury, 78.7% (37) of operating room workers cleaned the wound with antiseptic and covered with dressing. 8.5% (4) cleaned the wound and left it open while10.6% (5) did nothing about any injuries sustained. Conclusion: Theatre workers need to change their present casual attitude towards taking preventive ...

  3. The Kaplan-Meier theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Survival probabilities are not straightforward toobtain when observation periods of individuals differ in length. The Kaplan–Meier theatre is a classroom activity, which starts by a data collection exercise where students imagine sailing on the Titanic. Several students ‘fall in the water’ where....... The Kaplan–Meier method assumes that censored individuals have the same survival chances as the individuals who are still observed. During the Kaplan–Meier theatre, students perform a clever algorithm (Efron 1967), which translates the assumption into action and results in the Kaplan–Meier estimate...

  4. Risk assessment of accidental exposure of surgeons to blood during orthopedic surgery. Are we safe in surgical gloves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Timler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze tears in sterile surgical gloves used by surgeons in the operating theatre of the Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery Department, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Łódź, Poland Materials and Method. This study analyzes tears in sterile surgical gloves used by surgeons by ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes. 1,404 gloves were collected from 581 surgical procedures. All gloves were tested immediately following surgery using the test method described in Standard EN455–1 (each glove was inflated with 1,000 ± 50 ml of water and observed for leaks for 2–3 min.. Results. Analysis of tears took into consideration the role of medical personnel (operator, first assistant, second assistant during surgical procedure, the type of procedure according to ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes, and the elective or emergency nature of the procedure. The results of the study show that these factors have a significant influence on the risk of glove tears. Significant differences were observed in tear frequency and tear location depending on the function performed by the surgeon during the procedure. Conclusion. The study proved that the role performed by the surgeon during the procedure (operator, first assistant, second assistant has a significant influence on the risk of glove tearing. The role in the procedure determines exposure to glove tears. Implementing a double gloving procedure in surgical procedures or using single gloves characterized by higher tear resistance should be considered.

  5. Stagecoach Theatre Schools: England's Franchised Musical Theatre Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Ruth Beall

    2001-01-01

    Describes how a student at Stagecoach (a private arts school), by securing the lead role in the film "Billy Elliot," encouraged other British boys to enroll in ballet and dance classes as well as Stagecoach Theatre Arts Schools. Present locations and international links for Stagecoach schools. Describes how the Stagecoach schools are run…

  6. Loch ness, special operations executive and the first surgeon in paradise: Robert Kenneth Wilson (26.1.1899-6.6.1969).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, David A K

    2007-12-01

    Lieutenant Colonel Robert Kenneth Wilson (1899-1969) was a surgeon who fought in both world wars and joined the Special Operations Executive parachuting behind enemy lines into Holland, France and Borneo, the last mission being with Australian forces (Semut II). He was an expert on firearms and gave opinion on ballistics at the Old Bailey during the 1930s. He also wrote a definitive text on automatic pistols with editions published in 1943 and 1975. He was an Edinburgh Fellow (1926), who had a practice in general surgery and gynaecology in Queen Anne Street during the 1930s. He took the famous 1934 'surgeon's photo' of the Loch Ness monster that was not admitted to be a hoax until 1994. After World War II, he became the first surgical specialist to work in the public service of the then Territory of Papua and New Guinea (1950-1956), where he wrote several papers on surgical topics. He married Gwen (1924), the daughter of Henrietta Gulliver, an Australian painter. They had two sons, Richard and Phillip. After practice he retired to Melbourne where he died of carcinoma oesophagus.

  7. Science Theatre as dissemination of environmental awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana; Kastberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    hides behind this label? Is this concept at all new? The purpose of this article is threefold: 1) to describe Science Theatre in terms of typology with specific focus on environmental subjects, 2) to address Science Theatre as a borderline meeting place (agora or arena) between science and theatre 3......A community project with the intention of developing specific communication on environmental issues for children age 3-7 allies with a theatre artist and storyteller. The result is a meeting between science and theatre. Theatre, with its borderline praxis between entertainment and reflection...... offered a precious opportunity to deliver difficult scientific or social issues within the environmental mindset to such youngsters, an opportunity well exploited and well received. But what makes Science Theatre an obvious choice in order to communicate natural sciences or environmental issues? What...

  8. Children's Comprehension of Live Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jeanne; Fitch, Marguerite

    Two studies investigate the way in which children make sense of a play and the visual, aural, and psychological components of theatre which contribute to this comprehension. In the first study, 32 fifth graders saw "Don Quixote of La Mancha." In the second study, 45 third graders saw "Monkey, Monkey" (about the Chinese Monkey King). The day after…

  9. Signature Pedagogy in Theatre Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornetsky, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Critique in undergraduate theatre programs is at the heart of training actors at all levels. It is accepted as the signature pedagogy and is practiced in multiple ways. This essay defines critique and presents the case for why it is used as the single most important way that performers come to understand the language, values, and discourse of the…

  10. COOPERATIVE PROFESSIONALISM IN THEATRE ARTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theatre production business as professionals as this will enhance the putting in of their best to .... and moving, of beveling issues that must be worked out, the resistance to change that .... boost their moral; give them sense of assurance of continuous fare treatment that they are .... Shaw, W.H. Business Ethnics. (Sixth edition.) ...

  11. Thinking ahead of the surgeon. An interview study to identify scrub nurses' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lucy; Flin, Rhona; Yule, Steven; Mitchell, Janet; Coutts, Kathy; Youngson, George

    2011-07-01

    Efforts to reduce adverse event rates in healthcare have revealed the importance of identifying the essential non-technical (cognitive and social) skills for safe and effective performance. Previous research on non-technical skills for operating theatre staff has concentrated on doctors rather than nursing professionals. The aim of the study was to identify the critical non-technical skills that are essential for safe and effective performance as an operating theatre scrub nurse. Experienced scrub nurses (n = 25) and consultant surgeons (n = 9) from four Scottish hospitals were interviewed using a semi-structured format. The protocols were designed to identify the main social and cognitive skills required by scrub nurses. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and independently coded to extract behaviours in order to produce a list of the main non-technical skills for safe and effective scrub nurse performance. The non-technical skills of situation awareness, communication, teamwork, task management and coping with stress were identified as key to successful scrub nurse task performance. Component sets of behaviours for each of these categories were also noted. The interviews with subject matter experts from scrub nursing and surgery produced preliminary evidence that situation awareness, communication, teamwork and coping with stress are the principal non-technical skills required for effective performance as a scrub nurse. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Anesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions about routine pre-operative testing in low-risk patients: application of the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) to identify factors that influence physicians' decisions to order pre-operative tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patey, Andrea M; Islam, Rafat; Francis, Jill J; Bryson, Gregory L; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2012-06-09

    Routine pre-operative tests for anesthesia management are often ordered by both anesthesiologists and surgeons for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was developed to investigate determinants of behaviour and identify potential behaviour change interventions. In this study, the TDF is used to explore anaesthesiologists' and surgeons' perceptions of ordering routine tests for healthy patients undergoing low-risk surgery. Sixteen clinicians (eleven anesthesiologists and five surgeons) throughout Ontario were recruited. An interview guide based on the TDF was developed to identify beliefs about pre-operative testing practices. Content analysis of physicians' statements into the relevant theoretical domains was performed. Specific beliefs were identified by grouping similar utterances of the interview participants. Relevant domains were identified by noting the frequencies of the beliefs reported, presence of conflicting beliefs, and perceived influence on the performance of the behaviour under investigation. Seven of the twelve domains were identified as likely relevant to changing clinicians' behaviour about pre-operative test ordering for anesthesia management. Key beliefs were identified within these domains including: conflicting comments about who was responsible for the test-ordering (Social/professional role and identity); inability to cancel tests ordered by fellow physicians (Beliefs about capabilities and social influences); and the problem with tests being completed before the anesthesiologists see the patient (Beliefs about capabilities and Environmental context and resources). Often, tests were ordered by an anesthesiologist based on who may be the attending anesthesiologist on the day of surgery while surgeons ordered tests they thought anesthesiologists may need (Social influences). There were also conflicting comments about the potential consequences associated with reducing testing, from negative

  13. The provision of surgical tracheostomies by maxillofacial surgeons in the UK: time for a dedicated tracheostomy team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, P; Elledge, R; Virdi, M K; Walton, G M

    2018-02-01

    Surgical tracheostomy is a commonly provided service by surgical teams for patients in intensive care where percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is contraindicated. A number of factors may interfere with its provision on shared emergency operating lists, potentially prolonging the stay in intensive care. We undertook a two-part project to examine the factors that might delay provision of surgical tracheostomy in the intensive care unit. The first part was a prospective audit of practice within the University Hospital Coventry. This was followed by a telephone survey of oral and maxillofacial surgery units throughout the UK. In the intensive care unit at University Hospital Coventry, of 39 referrals, 21 (53.8%) were delayed beyond 24 hours. There was a mean (standard deviation) time to delay of 2.2 days (0.9 days) and the most common cause of delay was surgeon decision, accounting for 13 (61.9%) delays. From a telephone survey of 140 units nationwide, 40 (28.4%) were regularly involved in the provision of surgical tracheostomies for intensive care and 17 (42.5%) experienced delays beyond 24 hours, owing to a combination of theatre availability (76.5%) and surgeon availability (47.1%). There is case for having a dedicated tracheostomy team and provisional theatre slot to optimise patient outcomes and reduce delays. We aim to implement such a move within our unit and audit the outcomes prospectively following this change.

  14. Beyond clinical priority: what matters when making operational decisions about emergency surgical queues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Anneke; Wu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Objective This paper describes the perceptions of operating theatre staff in Australia and The Netherlands regarding the influence of logistical or operational reasons that may affect the scheduling of unplanned surgical cases. It is proposed that logistical or operational issues can influence the priority determination of queue position of surgical cases on the emergency waiting list. Methods A questionnaire was developed and conducted in 15 hospitals across The Netherlands and Australia, targeting anaesthetists, managers, nurses and surgeons. Statistical analyses revolved around these four professional groups. Six hypotheses were then developed and tested based on the responses collected from the participants. Results There were significant differences in perceptions of logistics delay factors across different professional groups when patients were waiting for unplanned surgery. There were also significant differences among different groups when setting logistical priority factors for planning and scheduling unplanned cases. The hypotheses tests confirm these differences, and the findings concur with the paradigmatic differences mentioned in the literature. These paradigmatic differences among the four professional groups may explain some of the tensions encountered when making decisions about scheduling emergency surgical queues, and therefore should be taken into consideration for management of operating theatres. Conclusions Queue positions of patients waiting for unplanned surgery, or emergency surgery, are determined by medical clinicians according to clinicians' indication of clinical priority. However, operating theatre managers are important in facilitating smooth operations when planning for emergency surgeries. It is necessary for surgeons to understand the logistical challenges faced by managers when requesting logistical priorities for their operations. What is known about the topic? Tensions exist about the efficient use of operating theatres and

  15. PCNL - a comparative study in nonoperated and in previously operated (open nephrolithotomy/pyelolithotomy patients - a single-surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Re-procedure in patients with history of open stone surgery is usually challenging due to the alteration in the retroperitoneal anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of open renal surgery on the efficacy and morbidity of subsequent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From March 2009 until September 2010, 120 patients underwent PCNL. Of these, 20 patients were excluded (tubeless or bilateral simultaneous PCNL. Of the remaining 100, 55 primary patients were categorized as Group 1 and the remaining (previous open nephrolithotomy as Group 2. Standard preoperative evaluation was carried out prior to intervention, Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v. 11 with the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test. A p-value < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS: Both groups were similar in demographic profile and stone burden. Attempts to access the PCS was less in Group 1 compared to Group 2 (1.2 + 1 2 vs 3 + 1.3 respectively and this was statistically significant (p < 0.04. However, the mean operative time between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.44. Blood transfusion rate was comparable in the two groups (p = 0.24. One patient in Group 2 developed hemothorax following a supra-11th puncture. Remaining complications were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSION: Patients with past history of renal stone surgery may need more attempts to access the pelvicaliceal system and have difficulty in tract dilation secondary to retroperitoneal scarring. But overall morbidity and efficacy is same in both groups.

  16. Popular Theatre: A Useful Process for Adult Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Reid A.

    1996-01-01

    Four types of theatre uses in adult education are theatre for education, for development, for conscientization, and popular theatre. The latter involves a group's interpretive study of its own social, economic, cultural, and political conditions, leading to collective action. (SK)

  17. Gustav Shpet's Literary and Theatre Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Tihanov, Galin

    2007-01-01

    In his paper, "Gustav Shpet's Literary and Theatre Theory," Galin Tihanov introduces Shpet's theoretical work on literature and theatre, until recently little studied. Neither has been sufficient attention paid to Shpet's overall presence on the Russian cultural scene in the 1910s-1930s. As a result, our knowledge and appreciation of the scope of his writings and the variety of Russian literary and theatre life in the first third of the twentieth century have remained less rich and well-infor...

  18. Russian Drama and Theatre in Education: "Perestroika" and "Glasnost" in Moscow Theatres for Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water, Manon van de

    2004-01-01

    Russian theatre for young audiences has had a long tradition of professional, state subsidised theatre, with a strong educational function specifically for young people. The primary task of the "tiuz" ("teatriunogo zritelia," theatre of the young spectator) was to contribute to the ideological and aesthetic education for future Soviet citizens. To…

  19. Drama/Theatre in Education and Theatre as an Academic Discipline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similar ambiguities also surround the nature, meaning and functions of drama as an educational tool. Scholars, literate and non-literate alike can hardly differentiate between drama and theatre; relationship between drama/theatre as a discipline and drama as tool for learning; the relevance of Theatre Arts as an academic ...

  20. Modelling Preference Heterogeneity for Theatre Tickets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldin, Andrea; Bille, Trine

    2018-01-01

    This article analyses the behavioural choice for theatre tickets using a rich data set for 2010–2013 from the sale system of the Royal Danish National Theatre. A consumer who decides to attend a theatre production faces multiple sources of price variation that involves a choice by the consumer...... among different ticket alternatives. Three modelling approaches are proposed in order to model ticket purchases: conditional logit with socio-demographic characteristics, nested logit and latent class. These models allow us explicitly to take into account consumers’ preference heterogeneity with respect...... of behaviour in the choice of theatre ticket....

  1. Systematic review of measurement tools to assess surgeons' intraoperative cognitive workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, R D; Ngo-Howard, M C; Boskovski, M T; Zenati, M A; Yule, S J

    2018-04-01

    Surgeons in the operating theatre deal constantly with high-demand tasks that require simultaneous processing of a large amount of information. In certain situations, high cognitive load occurs, which may impact negatively on a surgeon's performance. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the different methods used to assess surgeons' cognitive load, and a critique of the reliability and validity of current assessment metrics. A search strategy encompassing MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, PROSPERO and the Cochrane database was developed to identify peer-reviewed articles published from inception to November 2016. Quality was assessed by using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). A summary table was created to describe study design, setting, specialty, participants, cognitive load measures and MERSQI score. Of 391 articles retrieved, 84 met the inclusion criteria, totalling 2053 unique participants. Most studies were carried out in a simulated setting (59 studies, 70 per cent). Sixty studies (71 per cent) used self-reporting methods, of which the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) was the most commonly applied tool (44 studies, 52 per cent). Heart rate variability analysis was the most used real-time method (11 studies, 13 per cent). Self-report instruments are valuable when the aim is to assess the overall cognitive load in different surgical procedures and assess learning curves within competence-based surgical education. When the aim is to assess cognitive load related to specific operative stages, real-time tools should be used, as they allow capture of cognitive load fluctuation. A combination of both subjective and objective methods might provide optimal measurement of surgeons' cognition. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [The surgeon and deontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucila, Antanas

    2002-01-01

    The aim of study is to recall surgeons deontological principles and errors. The article demonstrates some specific deontological errors, performed by surgeon on patients and his colleagues; points out painful sequela of these errors as well. CONCLUSION. The surgeon should take in account deontological principles rigorously in routine daily practice.

  3. Ethnographic Findings in the Organizational Theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Torquet, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    ’ to inhabitants. We explore how theatre improvisation can convey such findings and thus support the provoking role that ethnography may play in organizations. Based on the study of two theatre sessions, we will articulate the importance of balance between playful and serious, of explorative discussion......, and of supportive event planning and space layout to achieve audience engagement....

  4. Negotiating the relationship between theatre and policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod

    The autonomy of the theatrical field is influenced by the political field which aims not only to enhance the societal value of theatre but also to protect autonomy. Examples from different European countries will illustrate that this paradoxical relationship between theatre and policy can...

  5. Teaching the Total Language with Readers Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jess A., Jr.

    Reading, writing, speech assignments for special education classes, English as a second language and many other classroom projects can be taught through the involvement created by Readers Theatre. Readers Theatre is the presentation of dialogue-type material in play form. The actors hold the script as they move through it and a narrator's voice…

  6. Readers Theatre plus Comprehension and Word Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chase; Stokes, Faida; Rasinski, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Readers Theatre has been used to introduce critical issues, promote fluency among English learners and non-English learners, teach vocabulary, and integrate content in the classroom. Previous studies of Readers Theatre application have demonstrated an increase in student reading fluency, motivation, and confidence. The focus of this systemic…

  7. 1 COMMUNITY THEATRE AND DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Alex C Asigbo

    that this type of theatre is usually not seen as popular or mainstream theatre .... and Cobin (2007) view qualitative research as research that is not produced by ... In-depth interviews were one of the key methods of data collection employed in ...

  8. Facilitating Learning Spaces in Forum Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the extent to which forum theatre interventions can support non-hierarchical approaches to learning, development and change management initiatives in organisations. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with theatre consultancies, actors/facilitators,…

  9. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, Victoria

    2017-11-01

    'What's the point in doing that?' This is often the response given to those saying they are undertaking education outside of work hours. Many do not see their role in theatre as just a job, but now want a career which means extra studying. Ideally this needs to be in advance so they are one step ahead for when an opportunity arises. Career opportunities and education go hand in hand together, and so it is difficult to discuss one without mentioning the other to some degree. We need education to access career opportunities, but we also need career routes to help drive education forward.

  10. Postdramatic Theatre, 12 years later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Thies Lehmann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This text takes stock of the twelve years of emergence of the practice and term Postdramatic and some of its developments and issues in the performing arts. It discusses the changes through which the contemporary scene has gone since 1999 and consequently the changes we should consider when reading and analysing the concept of postdramatic; among them, the focus on collaborative work; new relations between theatre and society; the focus on dance; and the return of words. Finally, the text raises the question of whether or not the term postdramatic should be reconsidered.

  11. Theatre Education: a proposal for systematization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Francisco VIEITES GARCÍA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the centuries, a diverse set of educational practices gave rise to the field of theatre education, which has been enjoying a growing importance in many countries. In Spain the idea of a theatre education that went beyond the training of theatre artists did not come to gain a similar position to that which it occupies in the countries of our cultural area, despite its potential. However, the recent integration of the colleges of dramatic art in the European Higher Education Area, together with the presence in the curriculum of a basic training area called «pedagogy» requires the consideration of the educational field where the specialists in theatre pedagogy are expected to develop their educational practice. With this paper we offer a theoretical overview of the field of theatre education and a systematization of it, with clear implications for a specific research from a scientific perspective but also in the training of trainers.

  12. Construct and criterion validity testing of the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) behaviour assessment tool using videos of simulated operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, S; Gupta, A; Gazarian, D; Geraghty, A; Smink, D S; Beard, J; Sundt, T; Youngson, G; McIlhenny, C; Paterson-Brown, S

    2018-05-01

    Surgeons' non-technical skills are an important part of surgical performance and surgical education. The most widely adopted assessment tool is the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) behaviour rating system. Psychometric analysis of this tool to date has focused on inter-rater reliability and feasibility rather than validation. NOTSS assessments were collected from two groups of consultant/attending surgeons in the UK and USA, who rated behaviours of the lead surgeon during a video-based simulated crisis scenario after either online or classroom instruction. The process of validation consisted of assessing construct validity, scale reliability and concurrent criterion validity, and undertaking a sensitivity analysis. Central to this was confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the structure of the NOTSS taxonomy. Some 255 consultant surgeons participated in the study. The four-category NOTSS model was found to have robust construct validity evidence, and a superior fit compared with alternative models. Logistic regression and sensitivity analysis revealed that, after adjusting for technical skills, for every 1-point increase in NOTSS score of the lead surgeon, the odds of having a higher versus lower patient safety score was 2·29 times. The same pattern of results was obtained for a broad mix of surgical specialties (UK) as well as a single discipline (cardiothoracic, USA). The NOTSS tool can be applied in research and education settings to measure non-technical skills in a valid and efficient manner. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Lack of sensitivity of staffing for 8-hour sessions to standard deviation in daily actual hours of operating room time used for surgeons with long queues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Dexter, Franklin

    2009-06-01

    At multiple facilities including some in the United Kingdom's National Health Service, the following are features of many surgical-anesthetic teams: i) there is sufficient workload for each operating room (OR) list to almost always be fully scheduled; ii) the workdays are organized such that a single surgeon is assigned to each block of time (usually 8 h); iii) one team is assigned per block; and iv) hardly ever would a team "split" to do cases in more than one OR simultaneously. We used Monte-Carlo simulation using normal and Weibull distributions to estimate the times to complete lists of cases scheduled into such 8 h sessions. For each combination of mean and standard deviation, inefficiencies of use of OR time were determined for 10 h versus 8 h of staffing. When the mean actual hours of OR time used averages standard deviation and relative cost of over-run to under-run. When mean > or = 8 h 50 min, 10 h staffing has higher OR efficiency. For 8 h 25 min standard deviation of 60 min and relative cost of over-run to under-run of 2.0 versus (b) 8 h 48 min for normal, standard deviation of 0 min and relative cost ratio of 1.50. Although the simplest decision rule would be to staff for 8 h if the mean workload is standard deviation 60 min, and relative cost ratio of 2.00, the inefficiency of use of OR time would be 34% larger if staffing were planned for 8 h instead of 10 h. For surgical teams with 8 h sessions, use the following decision rule for anesthesiology and OR nurse staffing. If actual hours of OR time used averages or = 8 h 50 min, plan 10 h staffing. For averages in between, perform the full analysis of McIntosh et al. (Anesth Analg 2006;103:1499-516).

  14. Technology Evaluation Report 17. Videoconferencing in Theatre and Performance Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Childs

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports in this series have indicated the growing acceptance of video-conferencing in education delivery. The current report compares a series of video-conferencing methods in an activity requiring precision of expression and communication: theatre and performance studies. The Accessing and Networking with National and International Expertise (ANNIE project is a two-year project undertaken jointly by the University of Warwick and the University of Kent at Canterbury, running from March 2001 to March 2003. The project's aim is to enhance students' learning experience in theatre studies by enabling access to research-based teaching and to workshops led by practitioners of national and international standing. Various technologies have been used, particularly ISDN video-conferencing, computer-mediated conferencing, and the Internet. This report concludes that video-conferencing methods will gain acceptance in education, as academic schools themselves are able to operate commonly available technology the assistance of specialised service units.

  15. Operative management and outcomes in 103 AAST-OIS grades IV and V complex hepatic injuries: trauma surgeons still need to operate, but angioembolization helps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Juan A; Roldán, Gustavo; Petrone, Patrizio; Rojo, Esther; Tillou, Areti; Kuncir, Eric; Demetriades, Demetrios; Velmahos, George; Murray, James; Shoemaker, William C; Berne, Thomas V; Chan, Linda

    2003-04-01

    American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) Organ Injury Scale (OIS) grades IV and V complex hepatic injuries are highly lethal. Our objectives were to review experience and identify predictors of outcome and to evaluate the role of angioembolization in decreasing mortality. This was a retrospective 8-year study of all patients sustaining AAST-OIS grades IV and V hepatic injuries managed operatively. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The main outcome measure was survival. The study included 103 patients, with a mean Revised Trauma Score of 5.61 +/- 2.55 and a mean Injury Severity Score of 33 +/- 9.5. Mechanism of injury was penetrating in 80 (79%) and blunt in 23 (21%). Emergency department thoracotomy was performed in 21 (25%). AAST grade IV injuries occurred in 51 (47%) and grade V injuries occurred in 52 (53%). Mean estimated blood loss was 9,414 mL. Overall survival was 43%. Adjusted overall survival rate after emergency department thoracotomy patients were excluded was 58%. Results stratified to AAST-OIS injury grade were as follows: grade IV, 32 of 51 (63%); grade V, 12 of 52 (23%); grade IV versus grade V (p Trauma Score (adjusted p hepatic veins (adjusted p hepatic injuries.

  16. Postdramatic Theatre of Director Christoph Marthaler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina R. Shevchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the main tendencies of modern European theatre represented in the creativity of a famous Swiss director Christoph Marthaler. Drama and theatre of the end of the 20th – the beginning of the 21st century were exposed to radical transformation. This change has been reflected in the theory of postdramatic theatre. A contemporary theatre is becoming more visual. Nowadays natural theatrical synthesis of various arts – visual, plastic, verbal, musical becomes an intersection of all kinds of artistic and medial practices as it has never been before. The new drama and theatre decline mimesis as the main principle of attitude to reality, they do not depict and do not reflect life, but strive to create a magic and/or ritual space of performative living and a special type of communication with audience. These peculiarities of modern theatre get a vivid evocation in the works of Christoph Marthaler. Having entered into theatre from music, the director creates his own unique language of art. The article proves that Marthaler’s works are an individual model of postdramatic theatre. The author concludes that its main distinctive feature is to blur the border between musical and dramatic performance. Marthaler does not stage the play – the images appear from musical phrases, fleeting impressions, observations and dramatic improvisations. The analysis enables to claim that the theatre in a real process of performance replaces the mimetic acting today. The applied principles of drama analysis can be used in studying of the other contemporary postdramatic theatre’s models.

  17. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Liability Surgeons as Advocates Surgeons and Bundled Payment Models Surgeons as Institutional Employees Our Changing Health Care ... Lung Operation After Your Operation Your Discharge and Recovery Complete Video After Your Operation Guidance for after ...

  18. The Democratic Potential of Theatre Talks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod

    2014-01-01

    approach to a target-oriented approach to audience development in which the content of the performance should be matched with certain audience segments. And fourth, the article points to an outcome of the experience related to the challenging of one own view point and thus expanding ones horizon....... of democratization of culture and the democracy theory by James S. Fishkin. The analysis is based on the empirical material of 31 theatre talks carried through as a part of an audience development project and is focused on four different aspects of the democratic potential of theatre: First, how the theatre talks...

  19. Theatre

    CERN Multimedia

    Théâtre les 50

    2010-01-01

    MARIONNETTES Compagnie Stella Rossa   Dimanche 12 décembre à 15h et 17h Costanza Solari vient enchanter les grands et les petits à partir de 3 ans avec 4 histoires   Séance de 15 heures : « Une histoire de feu, une histoire de chaleur, une histoire de dragon » Il faut vite faire quelque chose pour réchauffer une grand-mère qui a froid. Après avoir tout essayé, la seule solution pour Mia sera de trouver un dragon qui veuille bien lui céder un peu de son feu… « La princesse et la balle d’or » Il arriva que la balle d’or, au lieu de revenir dans sa main, tomba sur le sol et roula tout droit dans l’eau. La princesse la suivit des yeux, mais la balle disparut : la fontaine était si profonde qu’on n’en voyait pas le fond… Séance de 17 heures : « N...

  20. The Future Medical Science and Colorectal Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin

    2017-12-01

    Future medical technology breakthroughs will build from the incredible progress made in computers, biotechnology, and nanotechnology and from the information learned from the human genome. With such technology and information, computer-aided diagnoses, organ replacement, gene therapy, personalized drugs, and even age reversal will become possible. True 3-dimensional system technology will enable surgeons to envision key clinical features and will help them in planning complex surgery. Surgeons will enter surgical instructions in a virtual space from a remote medical center, order a medical robot to perform the operation, and review the operation in real time on a monitor. Surgeons will be better than artificial intelligence or automated robots when surgeons (or we) love patients and ask questions for a better future. The purpose of this paper is looking at the future medical science and the changes of colorectal surgeons.

  1. Dance Theatre of Harlem: Inspiring the Deprived

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Henry

    1976-01-01

    The Dance Theatre of Harlem, which includes both a school and a publicly performing dance company, is described from its inception by its artistic director, Arthur Mitchell, to its current activities. Budgets, student characteristics, and philosophy are discussed. (LBH)

  2. Research in Asian Theatre: An Indian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withey, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Establishes the need for more research in Indian drama and theatre. Describes curricular structure available to prepare to meet that need, defines areas of high potential for graduate research, and mentions resources that can aid the scholar. (RB)

  3. Surgeon-performed ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todsen, Tobias

    2017-11-01

    Surgeons are increasingly using ultrasonography (US) in their clinical management of patients. However, US is a very user-dependent imaging modality and proper skills of the US operator are needed to ensure quality in patient care. This thesis explores the validity evidence for assessment of competence in abdominal and head & neck ultrasonography using the Objective Structured Assessment of Ultrasound Skills (OSAUS) scale. With the use of Messick's unitary framework of validity, five sources of validity evidence were explored: test content, response processes, inter-nal structure, relations to other variables, and consequences. Research paper I examined validity evidence for the use of the OSAUS scale to assess physicians' abdominal point-of-care US competence in an experimental setting using patient cases with and without pathological conditions. The RESULTS provided validity evidence of the internal structure of the OSAUS scale and a deci-sion study predicted that four cases and two raters or five cases and one rater could ensure sufficient reliability in future test setups. The relation to other variables was supported by a signifi-cant difference in scores between US experience levels, and by a strong correlation between the OSAUS score and diagnostic accuracy. Research paper II explored the transfer of learning from formal point-of-care US training to performance on patients in a randomized controlled study. The RESULTS supported validity evi-dence regarding OSAUS scores' relation to other variables by demonstrating a significant discrimination in the progress of training-a more refined validity evidence than the relation to difference experience levels. The RESULTS showed that physicians could transfer the skills learned on an ultrasonography course to improved US performance and diagnostic accuracy on patients. However, the RESULTS also indicated that following an initial course, additional training is needed for physicians to achieve competence in US

  4. The Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI): a taxonomy and rating system for surgeons' intraoperative leadership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson Parker, Sarah; Flin, Rhona; McKinley, Aileen; Yule, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Surgeons must demonstrate leadership to optimize performance and maximize patient safety in the operating room, but no behavior rating tool is available to measure leadership. Ten focus groups with members of the operating room team discussed surgeons' intraoperative leadership. Surgeons' leadership behaviors were extracted and used to finalize the Surgeons' Leadership Inventory (SLI), which was checked by surgeons (n = 6) for accuracy and face validity. The SLI was used to code video recordings (n = 5) of operations to test reliability. Eight elements of surgeons' leadership were included in the SLI: (1) maintaining standards, (2) managing resources, (3) making decisions, (4) directing, (5) training, (6) supporting others, (7) communicating, and (8) coping with pressure. Interrater reliability to code videos of surgeons' behaviors while operating using this tool was acceptable (κ = .70). The SLI is empirically grounded in focus group data and both the leadership and surgical literature. The interrater reliability of the system was acceptable. The inventory could be used for rating surgeons' leadership in the operating room for research or as a basis for postoperative feedback on performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. From Mainstream Theatres to Synergy Theatre Project: Black Men's Participation in "Urban" Plays in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares how urban-themed black British playwriting can be understood within mainstream and applied theatre contexts. The paper first examines the focus of the mainstream theatre's education packs for productions of Kwame Kwei-Armah's "Elmina's Kitchen" and Roy Williams's "Fallout" before exploring how black men's…

  6. Theatre Safari in East Africa: An Exploration of Theatre in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P. William

    Six months of observation--at two universities, at a drama festival, and with several independent theatre companies--form the basis for this evaluation of theatre in Kenya, Africa. While Kenyan dramas deal with a variety of themes, the majority are topical rather than universal in their treatment of issues. In many, the emphasis is on the…

  7. Drama/Theatre in Education and Theatre as an Academic Discipline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-07

    Jul 7, 2013 ... Education is an instrument for national development …. Education .... all the other arts; music, dance, sound etcetera and drama inclusive. By elements of ... however, we respond simultaneously to the words, the movement of the actors, their .... Theatre-In-Education; Children's Theatre-Creative Dramatic,.

  8. The challenges of theatre workshop in Katsina-Ala and Oju Colleges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper recommends more funding by the College management for Theatre Arts Department, motivation of theatre Lecturers handling theatre workshop and making Theatre Arts a double major course among others to avert these challenges. Keywords: Theatre, theatre workshop, college of education, training and ...

  9. Observation of behavioural markers of non-technical skills in the operating room and their relationship to intra-operative incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Joey; Maran, Nikki; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2016-06-01

    The importance of non-technical skills in improving surgical safety and performance is now well recognised. Better understanding is needed of the impact that non-technical skills of the multi-disciplinary theatre team have on intra-operative incidents in the operating room (OR) using structured theatre-based assessment. The interaction of non-technical skills that influence surgical safety of the OR team will be explored and made more transparent. Between May-August 2013, a range of procedures in general and vascular surgery in the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh were performed. Non-technical skills behavioural markers and associated intra-operative incidents were recorded using established behavioural marking systems (NOTSS, ANTS and SPLINTS). Adherence to the surgical safety checklist was also observed. A total of 51 procedures were observed, with 90 recorded incidents - 57 of which were considered avoidable. Poor situational awareness was a common area for surgeons and anaesthetists leading to most intra-operative incidents. Poor communication and teamwork across the whole OR team had a generally large impact on intra-operative incidents. Leadership was shown to be an essential set of skills for the surgeons as demonstrated by the high correlation of poor leadership with intra-operative incidents. Team-working and management skills appeared to be especially important for anaesthetists in the recovery from an intra-operative incident. A significant number of avoidable incidents occur during operative procedures. These can all be linked to failures in non-technical skills. Better training of both individual and team in non-technical skills is needed in order to improve patient safety in the operating room. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Surgeon and Advocacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and how the hospital administration handles and resolves ... regard to having systems that improve patient care. Surgeons have been ... implementation of the Surgical safety checklist (9). ... aviation industry, has helped to streamline patient.

  11. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  12. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apply for Membership Membership Directory Pay Your Dues Industry Mailing List License & eBlast Communications Programs Advertise on ... Hotel Discount Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. ...

  13. Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Minimally Invasive Surgery and Therapy World. Nezhat’s History of Endoscopy In 2005 pioneering surgeon Dr. Camran Nezhat was awarded a fellowship by The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology to research and write this important ...

  14. Of dreams and palaces in the theatre within theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Rich Greer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This article offers an exploration of the relationship between two metaphysical concepts of human existence that are encapsulated in the titles of the two most canonical plays of Pedro Calderón de la Barca: La vida es sueño and El gran teatro del mundo. How these concepts are dramatized by means of the combination of dreams and theater within theatre in Las fortunas de Andromeda y Perseo, Darlo todo y no dar nada, and the Mojiganga de las visiones de la muerte is studied, as are the ideological implications that we can identify in his use of these dramatic formulations. Resumen:En este trabajo, se explora la relación entre los dos conceptos metafísicos de la existencia humana que encapsulan los títulos de las dos obras más canónicas de Pedro Calderón de la Barça: La vida en sueño y El gran teatro del mundo. Se examina cómo se dramatizan por medio de la combinación del sueño y el teatro dentro del teatro en Las fortunas de Andrómeda y Perseo, Darlo todo y no dar nada y la Mojiganga de las visiones de la muerte. Y se considera las implicaciones ideológicas que podemos identificar en estas formulaciones dramáticas en el Barroco español. 

  15. Patient-specific instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty does not match the pre-operative plan as assessed by intra-operative computer-assisted navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Corey; Sahni, Varun; Lustig, Sebastien; Parker, David A; Coolican, Myles R J

    2014-03-01

    The introduction of patient-specific instruments (PSI) for guiding bone cuts could increase the incidence of malalignment in primary total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement between one type of patient-specific instrumentation (Zimmer PSI) and the pre-operative plan with respect to bone cuts and component alignment during TKR using imageless computer navigation. A consecutive series of 30 femoral and tibial guides were assessed in-theatre by the same surgeon using computer navigation. Following surgical exposure, the PSI cutting guides were placed on the joint surface and alignment assessed using the navigation tracker. The difference between in-theatre data and the pre-operative plan was recorded and analysed. The error between in-theatre measurements and pre-operative plan for the femoral and tibial components exceeded 3° for 3 and 17% of the sample, respectively, while the error for total coronal alignment exceeded 3° for 27% of the sample. The present results indicate that alignment with Zimmer PSI cutting blocks, assessed by imageless navigation, does not match the pre-operative plan in a proportion of cases. To prevent unnecessary increases in the incidence of malalignment in primary TKR, it is recommended that these devices should not be used without objective verification of alignment, either in real-time or with post-operative imaging. Further work is required to identify the source of discrepancies and validate these devices prior to routine use. II.

  16. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. The Role of Advertising, Publicity and Public Relations in Theatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper notes that the usage of these marketing communication tools in theatre ... and public relations, plus other marketing tools in the promotional activities of theatres in Nigeria. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  18. Commerce and Entertainment in the Twente Virtual Theatre Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Kirner, C.; Kirner, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss research on a virtual theatre environment. The theatre has been built using VRML and therefore it can be accessed through World Wide Web. In the environment we employ several agents. The theatre allows navigation input through keyboard function keys and mouse, but there is

  19. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies is an annual publication, devoted to the advancement of research and knowledge in all areas of Theatre and Media Arts. The Editors are inspired by a need to assemble well – researched papers and reviews, which treat topical issues, in diverse areas of Theatre ...

  20. Jan Mukařovský and Theatre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2014), s. 122-136 ISSN 1803-845X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP406/10/1911 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Mukařovský, Jan * theatre * structuralism * theory of theatre * theatre criticism Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  1. Theatre and Cinema Architecture: A Guide to Information Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Richard

    This annotated bibliography cites works related to theatres, movie houses, opera houses, and dance facilities. It is divided into three parts: general references, theatre architecture, and cinema architecture. The part on general references includes bibliographies and periodicals. The second and main part of the guide, on theatre architecture,…

  2. The Sculptural Elements in Kwagh-Hir Popular Theatre: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kwagh-hir theatre is a dynamic theatre of the Tiv people of Central Nigeria. It is also a puppet theatre. It features both giant puppets (ubermeronmettes) and smaller ones which are manipulatable on mobile platforms. In addition to this, Kwagh –hir features masquerade displays of both animal and human representations, ...

  3. The "Invisible" Drama/Theatre in Education Curriculum in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Christopher Odhiambo

    2016-01-01

    This vignette presents the state of theatre in Education Kenya. The paper argues that though there are several theatre in education like practices, these have not been entrenched in the school curriculum. Theatre in Education finds expression and manifestations outside the mainstream school curriculum for instance in schools and colleges drama…

  4. From Republicans to Hacktivists: Recent Inclusion Initiatives in Canadian Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kirsty

    2017-01-01

    Could targeted inclusion initiatives press Canada's professional theatre community to tap the vast reserve of disabled people disenfranchised by its current practices? In 2015/2016, several long-standing professional institutions dedicated to fostering Canadian theatre joined with Canadian disability theatre artists in order to mark and understand…

  5. Concurrent Surgery and the Role of the Pediatric Attending Surgeon: Comparing Parents' and Surgeons' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jennie K; Ibarra, Christopher; Feinn, Richard S; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Carter, Cordelia W

    2018-06-01

    The common practice of performing concurrent or overlapping operations has been intensely scrutinized by lay media and academic press to investigate its safety and cost-effectiveness. However, there is little information about its use within the pediatric population. Even less is known about parents' expectations about the surgeon's role on the day of operation and how they align with those of pediatric surgeons and surgical trainees, despite the potential for significant discrepancies in expectations to erode trust and damage the physician-family relationship. A 5-point Likert-style survey was designed to characterize expectations about the degree of involvement by pediatric attending surgeons throughout a surgical case (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = neutral, 5 = strongly agree). The survey was administered to parents of pediatric patients undergoing elective operations during a 3-month interval at a single academic institution. The survey was also administered to surgeons and surgical residents at the same institution. Multivariate multiplicity-adjusted t-tests were used to identify significant differences between responders. One hundred and ten parents and 84 pediatric surgeons and trainees completed the survey. Parents' responses to the survey ranged from 4.15 to 4.89, compared with 2.75 to 4.86 from surgeons. The differences achieved statistical significance (p children. There is a significant mismatch between parents' expectations and those of pediatric surgeons about the role of the surgeon on the day of operation, with parents consistently expecting more direct involvement by the attending surgeon. These discrepancies can have implications for both parent/patient satisfaction and medical education. Copyright © 2018 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Augmented reality to the rescue of the minimally invasive surgeon. The usefulness of the interposition of stereoscopic images in the Da Vinci™ robotic console.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, Francesco; Buchs, Nicolas C; Pugin, François; Spaltenstein, Joël; Schiltz, Boris; Jung, Minoa; Hagen, Monika; Ratib, Osman; Morel, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    Computerized management of medical information and 3D imaging has become the norm in everyday medical practice. Surgeons exploit these emerging technologies and bring information previously confined to the radiology rooms into the operating theatre. The paper reports the authors' experience with integrated stereoscopic 3D-rendered images in the da Vinci surgeon console. Volume-rendered images were obtained from a standard computed tomography dataset using the OsiriX DICOM workstation. A custom OsiriX plugin was created that permitted the 3D-rendered images to be displayed in the da Vinci surgeon console and to appear stereoscopic. These rendered images were displayed in the robotic console using the TilePro multi-input display. The upper part of the screen shows the real endoscopic surgical field and the bottom shows the stereoscopic 3D-rendered images. These are controlled by a 3D joystick installed on the console, and are updated in real time. Five patients underwent a robotic augmented reality-enhanced procedure. The surgeon was able to switch between the classical endoscopic view and a combined virtual view during the procedure. Subjectively, the addition of the rendered images was considered to be an undeniable help during the dissection phase. With the rapid evolution of robotics, computer-aided surgery is receiving increasing interest. This paper details the authors' experience with 3D-rendered images projected inside the surgical console. The use of this intra-operative mixed reality technology is considered very useful by the surgeon. It has been shown that the usefulness of this technique is a step toward computer-aided surgery that will progress very quickly over the next few years. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  8. Stress in surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A; Duthie, H L; Young, H L; Peters, T J

    1990-10-01

    A sample of 1000 members of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland was circulated with a postal questionnaire relating to their occupational stressors, their type A coronary-prone behaviour and their mental health. Six hundred and seventy-two (67 per cent) useable forms were returned anonymously. The major individual stressors were: (1) the interference of the job with personal life, (2) general administration, and (3) the number of patients in clinics. Type A behaviour was similar to that of other professional groups. Surgeons showed mean scores significantly higher than the general population on two subscales of the mental health index (free-floating anxiety and hysterical anxiety). The findings for the few female surgeons (2 per cent) were similar to those in men but they did not exhibit raised free-floating anxiety levels.

  9. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, K.; Alyakov, M.; Vassileva, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/ shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens. (authors)

  10. Receive, Reorganize, Return: Theatre as Creative Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Sara; Braunschneider, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of theatre as a mode of creative scholarship, from the research involved in sketch creation to the presentation of that research to academic audiences. We particularly focus on a specific sketch developed by the CRLT Players--one that explores the consequences of subtle discrimination faced by women scientists in…

  11. Ibsen, Strindberg and the Intimate Theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1999-01-01

    Although television drama has existed for more than half a century and is now, in terms of audience participation, the dominant form of theatre, "there is as yet hardly any serious criticism of drama on television." Martin Esslin's statement ten years ago still holds true. Seeing it as a challenge,

  12. Shakespeare and Reader's Theatre: Fellow Traveling Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Gerald Lee

    2010-01-01

    Whether constructed on literary analysis models or inspired by conventional acting theories, Reader's Theatre performance techniques are an invaluable instructional tool available to teachers who want their students to see, hear and feel Shakespeare texts in classroom discussion and performance. These exercises are designed to promote both a…

  13. Family Fathers Lost in Theatre Paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    2008-01-01

    Diderot's influence on theatre is well known through The Paradox of Acting (Paradoxe sur le comédien). However, Diderot also wrote a few drames bourgeois, among which is The Family Father (Le Père de famille), which still in Diderot's days was edited in Copenhagen in French, and which in Danish...

  14. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  15. The Seeing Place: Talking Theatre and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Deborah; Bowman, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    A Professor of Medical Ethics and a theatre director, also mother and daughter, talk about health, illness, suffering, performance and practice. Using the lenses of ethical and performance theory, they explore what it means to be a patient, a spectator and a practitioner and cover many plays, texts and productions: Samuel Beckett's "Not…

  16. Modelling Preference Heterogeneity for Theatre Tickets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldin, Andrea; Bille, Trine

    This paper analyzes the behavioural choice for theatre tickets using a rich dataset for 2010-2013 from the sale system of the Royal Danish National Theatre. A consumer who decides to attend a theater production faces multiple sources of price variation that depends on: socio-economic characterist......This paper analyzes the behavioural choice for theatre tickets using a rich dataset for 2010-2013 from the sale system of the Royal Danish National Theatre. A consumer who decides to attend a theater production faces multiple sources of price variation that depends on: socio......-economic characteristics, quality of the seat, day of the performance and timing of purchase. Except for the first case, factors of price differentiation involves a choice by the consumer among different ticket alternatives. Two modelling approaches, namely multinomial logit (with socio-demographic characteristics......) and latent class are proposed in order to model ticket purchase behaviour. These models allow us explicitly to take into account consumers' preference heterogeneity with respect to the attributes associated to each ticket alternative In addition, the distribution of the willingness-to-pay (WTP) of choice...

  17. Participatory dramaturgy in theatre for development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pertinent questions on research in TfD. I argue in this paper that the devising process in TfD is an important stage which allows for participatory dramaturgy that is key to transformation. The next two sections of the paper will introduce the key terms; “Theatre for. Development” and “dramaturgy”. These will be followed by a ...

  18. Business knowledge in surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satiani, Bhagwan

    2004-07-01

    Surgeons and residents in training receive little, if any, formal education in the economic side of clinical practice during medical school or residency. As medical professionals face shrinking reimbursement, loss of control over health care decisions, and limited resources, surgical specialties must reevaluate the need to teach their members business survival skills. Before designing business related-teaching modules, educators must know the exact gaps in knowledge that exist among surgeons. This article reports a survey of 133 surgeons in the Midwest who were asked to rate their knowledge base in 11 business topics relevant to the practice of medicine. The survey showed that the average surgeon perceives himself or herself to be poorly equipped to understand basic financial accounting principles, financial markets, economics of health care, tools for evaluating purchases, marketing, budgets, antitrust and fraud and abuse regulations, and risk and return on investments. Armed with this data, teaching faculty, health care systems, and medical specialty societies should design business education seminars to better position surgical specialists and trainees to communicate with insurers, hospital administrators, health care organizations, and their own personal financial advisors.

  19. Risk of ionising radiation to trainee orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ishrat A; Kamalasekaran, Senthil; Fazal, M Ali

    2012-02-01

    We undertook this study to determine the amount of scattered radiation received by the primary surgeon, assistant and patient during dynamic hip screw fixation for proximal femoral fractures. Data was collected from fifty patients. Five registrars were included as operating surgeon and four senior house officers as assistant surgeon. Radiation was monitored by thermo luminescent dosimeters placed on the surgeon and assistant. The approximate distance of surgeon and assistant from the operative site was measured. A dosimeter on the unaffected hip of patients measured the radiation to the patient. The results show that the surgeon's dominant hand receives the highest dose of radiation and radiation exposure is dependent on the experience of the operator. Our study concludes that exposure to radiation during this procedure is well below the toxic levels; however greater awareness is needed for harmful effects of exposure to long term low dose radiation.

  20. Comparison of Complications and Surgical Outcomes of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Between Junior Attending Surgeons and Senior Attending Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Xiao, Lingyan; Xu, Leilei; Shi, Benlong; Qian, Bangping; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong

    2018-04-24

    To our knowledge, few studies have compared complications and surgical outcomes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) between junior attending surgeons and senior attending surgeons. To compare surgical strategies, complications, and outcomes of posterior corrective surgery for AIS between junior attending surgeons and senior attending surgeons. According to experience level of operation surgeons, the patients were assigned to 2 groups. Group A was the "junior surgeon" group. Group B was the "senior surgeon" group. The following parameters were compared between the 2 groups: age, sex, diagnosis, hospital of record, surgeon experience level, type of instrumentation, type of screws, estimated blood loss, duration of surgery, length of fusion, correction techniques, main curve correction, and thoracic kyphosis correction. A total of 132 patients with AIS were included in group A, whereas 207 were in group B. The translational technique was used more often in group A (P Senior surgeons used more monoaxial screws than junior surgeons (P senior group (P senior group had significant better correction rates of severe main curve (>70°) and thoracic kyphosis than the junior group (P Senior attending surgeons outperformed junior surgeons in blood loss control, thoracic kyphosis correction, and correction of severe curves. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgeons without borders: a brief history of surgery at Médecins Sans Frontières.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kathryn; Rosseel, Peter; Trelles, Miguel; Gielis, Pierre

    2010-03-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is a humanitarian organization that performs emergency and elective surgical services in both conflict and non-conflict settings in over 70 countries. In 2006 MSF surgeons departed on approximately 125 missions, and over 64,000 surgical interventions were carried out in some 20 countries worldwide. Historically, the majority of MSF surgical projects began in response to conflicts or natural disasters. During an emergency response, MSF has resources to set up major operating facilities within 48 h in remote areas. One of MSF strengths is its supply chain. Large pre-packaged surgical kits, veritable "operating theatres to go," can be readied in enormous crates and quickly loaded onto planes. In more stable contexts, MSF has also strengthened the delivery of surgical services within a country's public health system. The MSF surgeon is the generalist in the broadest sense and performs vascular, obstetrical, orthopaedic, and other specialized surgical procedures. The organization aims to provide surgical services only temporarily. When there is a decrease in acute needs a program will be closed, or more importantly, turned over to the Ministry of Health or another non-governmental organization. The long-term solution to alleviating the global burden of surgical disease lies in building up a domestic surgical workforce capable of responding to the major causes of surgery-related morbidity and mortality. However, given that even countries with the resources of the United States suffer from an insufficiency of surgeons, the need for international emergency organizations to provide surgical assistance during acute emergencies will remain for the foreseeable future.

  2. Solving the surgeon ergonomic crisis with surgical exosuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanglei; Hemming, Daniel; Luo, Ran B; Reynolds, Jessica; Delong, Jonathan C; Sandler, Bryan J; Jacobsen, Garth R; Horgan, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    The widespread adoption of laparoscopic surgery has put new physical demands on the surgeon leading to increased musculoskeletal disorders and injuries. Shoulder, back, and neck pains are among the most common complaints experienced by laparoscopic surgeons. Here, we evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a non-intrusive progressive arm support exosuit worn by surgeons under the sterile gown to reduce pain and fatigue during surgery. This is a prospective randomized crossover study approved by the Internal Review Board (IRB). The study involves three phases of testing. In each phase, general surgery residents or attendings were randomized to wearing the surgical exosuit at the beginning or at the crossover point. The first phase tests for surgeon manual dexterity wearing the device using the Minnesota Dexterity test, the Purdue Pegboard test, and the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) modules. The second phase tests the effect of the device on shoulder pain and fatigue while operating the laparoscopic camera. The third phase rates surgeon experience in the operating room between case-matched operating days. Twenty subjects were recruited for this study. Surgeons had the similar dexterity scores and FLS times whether or not they wore the exosuit (p value ranges 0.15-0.84). All exosuit surgeons completed 15 min of holding laparoscopic camera compared to three non-exosuit surgeons (p Exosuit surgeons experienced significantly less fatigue at all time periods and arm pain (3.11 vs 5.88, p = 0.019) at 10 min. Surgeons wearing the exosuit during an operation experienced significant decrease in shoulder pain and 85% of surgeons reported some form of pain reduction at the end of the operative day. The progressive arm support exosuit can be a minimally intrusive device that laparoscopic surgeons wear to reduce pain and fatigue of surgery without significantly interfering with operative skills or manual dexterity.

  3. Comparison of the time taken for localised breast surgery pre- and post-introduction of intra-operative digital specimen mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro do Nascimento, Vinicius; Bourke, Anita G

    2018-02-01

    More than half of the patients with an impalpable malignant breast lesion have a mammographically detected and imaged-guided localisation, which can be technically challenging for the breast surgeon. Specimen imaging is used to confirm successful excision of the localised index lesion and has improved the operating list efficiency resulting in a higher number of excisions per surgical list. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether introducing IDSM (intra-operative digital specimen mammography) saved operation time for localised breast surgery. A single-centre retrospective review was undertaken to compare the operation time (from incision to wound closure) taken for excision of 114 consecutive image-guided localised impalpable breast lesions, performed using departmental specimen radiography (DSR), 6 months prior to the introduction of IDSM (Hologic, Trident ® ) in March 2013, with the theatre time taken for excision of 121 consecutive image-guided localised impalpable breast lesions in the 6 months following introduction of IDSM. There was no significant difference in mean surgical time, which were 47.8 (±27.3) minutes in the CSR group and 48.8 (±25.7) minutes in the IDSM group. We were expecting to confirm a reduction in theatre time with the introduction of IDSM. Surprisingly, no difference in operating times was demonstrated. Factors that influenced the impact of IDSM included the proximity of the imaging department to the operating theatre. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Susan

    2017-07-01

    Never have there been such a vast number of career opportunities for all levels of staff within the perioperative environment including healthcare support workers, operating department practitioners and nurses.

  5. Political Theatre in Europe: East to West, 2007-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Shevtsova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    What political theatre may be in contemporary times and in what sense it is ‘political’ are the core issues of this article. Examples are chosen from within a restricted period, 2007 to 2014, but from a considerably wide space that starts from Eastern Europe – Russia, Romania, Hungary, Poland – and goes to Germany and France. These examples are principally productions by established ensemble theatre companies and they are framed by a brief discussion concerning independent theatres, ‘counter-...

  6. Readers Theatre : Dramatising environment issues for oral skills development

    OpenAIRE

    Paatrick Ng Chin Leong

    2009-01-01

    Readers Theatre was introduced to a class of Japanese students studying intermediate-level English in an international university in Japan. The aim of the study is to investingate whether Readers Theatre enhances the oral skills of Japanese students as they negotiate an environmental issue in English. In my presentation, I will demonstrate how Readers Theatre is implemented in class and the comments by students will be analysed and discussed during the presentation.

  7. Theatre as a Figure and a Place of Cultural Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Lidija Kapushevska-Drakulevska

    2014-01-01

    Cultural memory is the starting point for studying culture. Theatre, on the other hand, is a multidimensional play with memory; it is an emblem of a certain culture, and of the overall blending of various discourses within it. Hence the relation between theatre and memory is rather complex and multifaceted. Theatre is a medium synthesising text and performance, speech and gesture (play, acting), as well as establishing direct, at least doubly articulated communication: among the actors on sta...

  8. Assessment, surgeon, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John; Talati, Jamsheer

    2009-08-01

    An increasing public demand to monitor and assure the quality of care provided by physicians and surgeons has been accompanied by a deepening appreciation within the profession of the demands of self-regulation and the need for accountability. To respond to these developments, the public and the profession have turned increasingly to assessment, both to establish initial competence and to ensure that it is maintained throughout a career. Fortunately, this comes at a time when there have been significant advances in the breadth and quality of the assessment tools available. This article provides an overview of the drivers of change in assessment which includes the educational outcomes movement, the development of technology, and advances in assessment. It then outlines the factors that are important in selecting assessment devices as well as a system for classifying the methods that are available. Finally, the drivers of change have spawned a number of trends in the assessment of competence as a surgeon. Three of them are of particular note, simulation, workplace-based assessment, and the assessment of new competences, and each is reviewed with a focus on its potential.

  9. Effect of Obesity and Underweight Status on Perioperative Outcomes of Congenital Heart Operations in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults: An Analysis of Data From the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Kim, Sunghee; Hornik, Christoph P; Yerokun, Babatunde A; Matsouaka, Roland A; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Jonas, Richard A

    2017-08-22

    Extreme body mass index (BMI; either very high or very low) has been associated with increased risk of adverse perioperative outcome in adults undergoing cardiac surgery. The effect of BMI on perioperative outcomes in congenital heart disease patients has not been evaluated. A multicenter retrospective cohort study was performed studying patients 10 to 35 years of age undergoing a congenital heart disease operation in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015. The primary outcomes were operative mortality and a composite outcome (1 or more of operative mortality, major adverse event, prolonged hospital length of stay, and wound infection/dehiscence). The associations between age- and sex-adjusted BMI percentiles and these outcomes were assessed, with adjustment for patient-level risk factors, with multivariate logistic regression. Of 18 337 patients (118 centers), 16% were obese, 15% were overweight, 53% were normal weight, 7% were underweight, and 9% were severely underweight. Observed risks of operative mortality ( P =0.04) and composite outcome ( P obese subjects. Severely underweight BMI was associated with increased unplanned cardiac operation and reoperation for bleeding. Obesity was associated with increased risk of wound infection. In multivariable analysis, the association between BMI and operative mortality was no longer significant. Obese (odds ratio, 1.28; P =0.008), severely underweight (odds ratio, 1.29; P Obesity and underweight BMI were associated with increased risk of composite adverse outcome independently of other risk factors. Further research is necessary to determine whether BMI represents a modifiable risk factor for perioperative outcome. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. [Management abilities of the head surgeon: essential for survival!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, J

    2012-04-01

    Due to increased economic challenges in the management of hospitals head surgeons do not only need excellent surgical expertise but also significant management qualities. The personality of head surgeons should include authenticity, sincerity, fairness and the ability to cooperate. Visionary leadership, strategic thinking and strategic management of the personnel are further prerequisites for success. Besides good abilities in communication head surgeons need knowledge of the operating figures for interpretation. To keep up with the own capabilities time and self-management is essential. A survival as head surgeon is likely if these qualities and abilities exist.

  11. Cardiac Surgeons after Vacation: Refreshed or Rusty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Blayne; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; McClure, Andrew; Dubois, Luc; Nagpal, Dave

    2017-10-01

    Many surgeons describe feeling a bit out of practice when they return from a vacation. There have been no studies assessing the impact of surgeon vacation on patient outcomes. We used administrative data from the province of Ontario to identify patients who underwent a coronary artery bypass grafting. Using a propensity score, we matched patients who underwent their procedure immediately after their surgeon returned from vacation of at least 7 days (n = 1,161) to patients who were not operated immediately before or after a vacation period (n = 2,138). There was no significant difference in patient mortality (odds ratio: 1.23, p = 0.52), length of operation (relative risk [RR]: 1.00 p = 0.58), or intensive care unit/ hospital stay (RR: 0.97 p = 0.66/RR: 0.98 p = 0.54, respectively). There was not a significant change in risk of death, operative length, or hospital stay after a surgeon vacation.

  12. Asian Theatre: A Study Guide and Annotated Bibliography. "Theatre Perspectives" No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, James R., Ed.; Wichmann, Elizabeth, Ed.

    This study guide/bibliography is intended to help the English language reader find materials for the study of Asian theatre. Containing 1,348 entries, the guide is the most extensive bibliography published to date. The guide is organized by geographical area: an initial chapter on Asia is followed by chapters on each of 16 countries: Burma,…

  13. 28 The Theatre and Sustainable Human Development: Fumes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    comprise Theatre Arts, Music, Dance and Choreography and the ... mean the performance of a piece of real or imagined experience by .... theatre has been a vehicle for social interaction, for the moulding ... society, record activities and interpret happenings, it also has a .... people live on water, but die of cholera because.

  14. Aquatic theatre: women as performing audience | Abraye | Creative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic theatre is an art form that was established from the days of classical theatre. In Africa the art form exists in traditional communities and is occasionally exhibited during communal festivals or important visitation of high ranking government officers. In recent history, this form of festival art is beginning to gain popularity ...

  15. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Creative Artist is an annual publication devoted to the advancement of knowledge in all areas of Theatre and Media arts. Vol 11, No 1 (2017). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Aquatic theatre: women as performing audience ...

  16. High School Dinner Theatre: A Fun Way to Raise Funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Harvey

    Citing the success of commercial dinner theatres, this guide is designed to persuade high school drama teachers to try the idea and also to answer questions and help solve problems for those producing a dinner theatre for the first time. The six chapters cover choosing the place, the menu, and the play; ticket sales; advertising and publicity; and…

  17. The Living Archive as a strategy for a theatre laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    This paper emphasizes focus on the theatre laboratory in the perspective of the living archive as a performative tools for artistic self reflection within the work of the theatre laboratory, and as a tools for visions and strategies in aesthetics, identity and historiographical perspectives....

  18. Curriculum: The Contradictions in Theatre Education in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo Nogueira, Marcia; de Medeiros Pereira, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The history of arts education in Brazil is summarised, based on its contradictions. Some aspects of the Brazilian educational system and the National Curriculum Parameters are presented, in order to identify the predominant approach to theatre education. Three situations of the theatre education landscape in the state of Santa Catarina, southern…

  19. Theatre and laboratory workers' awareness of and safety practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The consistent use of barrier protection among theatre workers is low in this region, so also is hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination. We assessed the level of awareness of HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV), HBV vaccination and adoption of safety measures by theatre and laboratory workers. Methods: Structured ...

  20. Marginal Experiments: Peter Brook and Stepping out Theatre Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpin, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article juxtaposes the recent work of Peter Brook with a Bristol-based mental health service-user collective--Stepping Out Theatre Company. Informed by field-work with the company, this chapter explores the aesthetic and political relationship between professional, experimental theatre work and community-based performance practice. Drawing…

  1. EJOTMAS: Ekpoma Journal of Theatre and Media Arts: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contributor must be consistent in the use of either the MLA or APA style. Footnotes to the text should be avoided. All articles, correspondence and enquiries should be sent to: The Editor. EJOTMAS: Ekpoma Journal of Theatre and Media Arts. Department of Theatre and Media Arts,. Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo ...

  2. Moving Self: The Thread Which Bridges Dance and Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Lynn

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a study of the impact movement education has had on prospective dance and theatre practitioners--how they think about, perceive, and experience movement. The purpose is to discuss the concept "experience" as it relates to phenomena being considered during classes in dance improvisation and movement for theatre with the objective to…

  3. Visual Symbolism in Contemporary Theatre Directing in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This difference is cropped from the director's perception, conception, imaginative and creative impetus. Visual symbolism in the theatre as a medium traverse forms, textures, symbols, lines, lighting, circles and balance in creating an everlasting theatre experience. Visual symbolism is influenced by style, concept, forms, ...

  4. Interdisciplinary Teaching of Theatre and Human Rights in Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since spring 2012, the author has taught a 300-level Theatre and Human Rights class in the University of New Mexico Honors College. One of the centerpieces of honors education is careful research and thorough analysis of what is taught and why it is taught. In creating the honors class Theatre and Human Rights, the author explored how she would…

  5. The "Not Knowns": Memory, Narrative and Applied Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Colette; Dickenson, Sarah Jane; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2018-01-01

    This is an attempt to articulate and explore the relationship between the science of memory and the applied theatre project, "The Not Knowns." The project was a collaboration between theatre practitioners and a psychologist who worked together with a group of young people known, problematically, as the "not knowns" throughout…

  6. The Black Presence in London Theatre, 1974-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanback, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    Based on studies conducted by the Afro-Asian Committee of British Actors Equity and others, discusses the limited opportunities for minority actors in British theatre. Identifies plays in which Black performers were cast during the late 1970s and describes a number of fringe theatre groups which employ Black actors. (GC)

  7. A Brazilian theatre model meets Zulu performance conventions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In July 2002, Christopher Hurst supervised Mbongiseni Buthelezi, a postgraduate student in Drama and Performance Studies, who conducted a Prison Theatre project at the Medium B Prison (a men's maximum security prison) at Westville Prison in Durban. Buthelezi used theatre workshop techniques to create a play that ...

  8. The Contemporary Nigerian Theatre Practitioner in Search of Market ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using Play Theory of Mass Communication as its framework, this paper examines the position of the theatre artiste/practitioner in the context of Information Communication and Technology (ICT) and new media. It first attempts a study of the 'pre-independence' practitioners of theatre and drama as professionals, followed by ...

  9. Deviant service behavior : coming soon to a theatre near you?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, van W.; Peper, P.D.G.

    2008-01-01

    Deviant service behaviour (DSB) is examined among employees of a cinema chain in the Netherlands. Behaviours that were reported in interviews with 47 employees of one theatre were phrased as items and were used in a survey conducted in three other theatres of the same chain (n = 115). Virtually all

  10. Deviant service behaviour: Coming soon to a theatre near you?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, W.; Peper, P.

    2008-01-01

    Deviant service behaviour (DSB) is examined among employees of a cinema chain in the Netherlands. Behaviours that were reported in interviews with 47 employees of one theatre were phrased as items and were used in a survey conducted in three other theatres of the same chain (n = 115). Virtually all

  11. Training the theatre arts teacher in Nigerian colleges of education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article seeks to identify and proffer solutions to the problems confronting the theatre arts teacher training in Nigerian colleges of education. It also advances the prospects of effective theatre arts teacher training in the educational sector and the society at large. In doing these, the researcher adopts the interview, focus ...

  12. Solo-Surgeon Retroauricular Approach Endoscopic Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doh Young; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Jung, Kwang-Yoon

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of solo-surgeon retroauricular thyroidectomy. For solo-surgery, we used an Endoeye Flex Laparo-Thoraco Videoscope (Olympus America, Inc.). A Vitom Karl Storz holding system (Karl Storz GmbH & Co.) composed of several bars connected by a ball-joint system was used for fixation of endoscope. A snake retractor and a brain-spoon retractor were used on the sternocleidomastoid. Endoscopic thyroidectomy using the solo-surgeon technique was performed in 10 patients having papillary thyroid carcinoma. The mean patient age was 36.0 ± 11.1 years, and all patients were female. There were no postoperative complications such as vocal cord paralysis and hematoma. When compared with the operating times and volume of drainage of a control group of 100 patients who underwent surgery through the conventional retroauricular approach between May 2013 and December 2015, the operating times and volume of drainage were not significantly different (P = .781 and .541, respectively). Solo-surgeon retroauricular thyroidectomy is safe and feasible when performed by a surgeon competent in endoscopic thyroidectomy.

  13. Room acoustic investigation of actors’ positions and orientations for various theatre configurations in a moderate-sized drama theatre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Reyes, Berti; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The present study is concerned with optimum positions and orientations of theatre performers when acting off-stage in a moderate-sized theatre. It is a case study in which five theatre configurations of the drama theatre, a proscenium, an arena, and three extended stage configurations, have been ...... of speech intelligibility, the edge of the extended platform for the conventional and the boundary of the acting area for the arena and extended stage configurations are generally recommended.......The present study is concerned with optimum positions and orientations of theatre performers when acting off-stage in a moderate-sized theatre. It is a case study in which five theatre configurations of the drama theatre, a proscenium, an arena, and three extended stage configurations, have been...... numerically investigated after calibrating computer models with experimental data. An analysis of a human voice pattern in a free-field concluded that a speech in a range of the azimuth angle [50, 50] with respect to the performer’s frontal direction is equally loud in a statistical sense. As a consequence...

  14. Offer - La Comédie theatre

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The “La Comédie” theatre unveiled its programme for the season 2017–2018. We are delighted to share this brand new, rich and varied programme with you. The “La Comédie” theatre has various discounts for our members Buy 2 subscriptions for the price of 1 : 2 cards “Libertà” for CHF 240.- instead of CHF 480.- Cruise freely through the season with an 8-entry card valid for the shows of your choice. These cards are transferable and can be shared with one or more accompanying persons. 2 cards “Piccolo” for CHF 120 instead of CHF 240.- This card lets you discover 4 shows which are suitable for all audiences (offers valid while stock lasts) Benefit from a reduction of 20 % on a full price ticket during all the season: from CHF 40.- to CHF 24.- ticket instead of CHF 50.- to CHF 30.- depending on the show (Also valid for one accompanying person). Interested in one of these offers? Create an ac...

  15. American nuclear theatre, 1946-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetter, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation examines the American nuclear theatre - works that directly explore nuclear technology (weapons and energy). Background chapters describe the history of nuclear development, discourse, and strategy; the response of the arts; and the history of the American nuclear theatre, which began in 1946 and burgeoned after 1980. Five recent, representative productions - four stage dramas and one nonviolent symbolic action - are examined as theatrical strategies: Dead End Kids: a History of Nuclear Power (1980), by JoAnne Akalaitis/Mabour Mines; the Story of One Who Set Out to Study Fear (1981), by Peter Schumann/Bread and Puppet Theater; Factwino vs. Armageddonman (1982), by the San Francisco Mime Troupe ; Ashes, Ashes, We All Fall Down (1982), by Martha Beosing/At the Foot of the Mountain; and the Plowshares 8 events (1980-1984). All five productions were created collaboratively. All assaulted the boundaries between art and life. All were dialectical and tried to create a fundamental shift in consciousness about nuclear weapons. All suggested that the nuclear age is a new historical situation: war and business are interconnected with a new technology which makes possible the end of the world. Three productions employed historical images of mass death to provide emotional and moral comparisons. All finally called for each audience member to take responsibility for the current nuclear situation

  16. The surgeon and casemix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J A; Wallace, D

    1998-10-19

    Casemix funding has markedly increased surgeons' awareness of the economies of the activities they undertake. Surgery has become a major focus at all large public hospitals, because of its high earning potential, and this pressure to maximise funding could influence surgical practice. Casemix funding's emphasis on length of hospital stay has encouraged forward planning for earlier discharge after surgical procedures. Patients are now assessed in pre-admission clinics, educated about their condition and their hospital stay, and a plan formulated for their discharge and rehabilitation. Funding for major surgical procedures of long duration in patients with complex conditions should reflect the higher level of resource utilisation. Tertiary referral centres, because of their commitment to training and research and their more severely ill patient population, are less cost-effective and require funding to ensure their viability. The improved information that casemix generates should be used to evaluate outcomes and improve patient care; efficiency must not take precedence over quality of care and compassion.

  17. 'I was utterly mesmerised' : Audience experiences of different theatre types and genres in four European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilders, Marline; Toome, Hedi-Liis; Sorli, Maja; Szábo, Attila; Zijlstra, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the similarities and differences on how spectators experience theatre performances grouped along large, transnationally present types as Spoken Theatre, Dance Theatre, Musical Theatre and Kleinkunst. Our findings are based on the analysis of the extensive data collected by

  18. 'I was utterly mesmerised': Audience experiences of different theatre types and genres in four European cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilders, M.L.; Toome, H.-L.; Šorli, M.; Szabó, A.; Zijlstra, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the similarities and differences on how spectators experience theatre performances grouped along large, transnationally present types as Spoken Theatre, Dance Theatre, Musical Theatre and Kleinkunst. Our findings are based on the analysis of the extensive data collected by

  19. Specialization and the Current Practices of General Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Marquita R; Dodgion, Christopher M; Kwok, Alvin C; Hu, Yue-Yung; Havlena, Jeff A; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Kent, K Craig; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of specialization on the practice of general surgery has not been characterized. Our goal was to assess general surgeons’ operative practices to inform surgical education and workforce planning. Study Design We examined the practices of general surgeons identified in the 2008 State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) for three US states. Operations were identified using ICD-9 and CPT codes linked to encrypted physician identifiers. For each surgeon, total operative volume and the percentage of practice comprised of their most common operation were calculated. Correlation was measured between general surgeons’ case volume and the number of other specialists in a health service area. Results There were 1,075 general surgeons who performed 240,510 operations in 2008. The mean operative volume for each surgeon was 224 annual procedures. General surgeons performed an average of 23 different types of operations. For the majority of general surgeons, their most common procedure comprised no more than 30% of total practice. The most common operations, ranked by the frequency that they appeared as general surgeons’ top procedure, included: cholecystectomy, colonoscopy, endoscopy, and skin excision. The proportion of general surgery practice comprised of endoscopic procedures inversely correlated with the number of gastroenterologists in the health service area (Rho = - 0.50, p = 0.005). Conclusions Despite trends toward specialization, the current practices of general surgeons remain heterogeneous. This indicates a continued demand for broad-based surgical education to allow future surgeons to tailor their practices to their environment. PMID:24210145

  20. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Theatre as a Figure and a Place of Cultural Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Kapushevska-Drakulevska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cultural memory is the starting point for studying culture. Theatre, on the other hand, is a multidimensional play with memory; it is an emblem of a certain culture, and of the overall blending of various discourses within it. Hence the relation between theatre and memory is rather complex and multifaceted. Theatre is a medium synthesising text and performance, speech and gesture (play, acting, as well as establishing direct, at least doubly articulated communication: among the actors on stage on the one hand, and between the actors and the audience on the other. They are all subjects of theatrical memory. Theatre not only uses memory in order to create the plot, develop the characters or establish communication with the audience, but also becomes a figure of memory itself: a culturally modelled, socially mandated (iconic, narrative, etc. memory image (Assman. Additionally, theatre may be considered a place of memory, as well. But theatre is not a simple mnemonic of repeating reality—it is not merely a simulacrum, but also a quotation of reality; it does not aim to copy or memorise reality, but to represent it and interpret it critically. This is particularly true of the contemporary rough theatre of brutality.

  2. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...... symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...

  3. Interactive Multimedia Solutions Developed for the Opening of the New Stage of the Alexandrinsky Theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Borisov, Nikolay; Smolin, Artem; Stolyarov, Denis; Shcherbakov, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on teamwork by the National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (NRU ITMO) and the Aleksandrinsky Theatre in preparation of opening of the New Stage of the Alexandrinsky Theatre. The Russian State Pushkin Academy Drama Theatre, also known as the Alexandrinsky Theatre, is the oldest national theatre in Russia. Many famous Russian actors performed on the Alexandrinsky’s stage and many great directors. May 2013 marked the opening of the New St...

  4. Disparities between resident and attending surgeon perceptions of intraoperative teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butvidas, Lynn D; Anderson, Cheryl I; Balogh, Daniel; Basson, Marc D

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to assess attending surgeon and resident recall of good and poor intraoperative teaching experiences and how often these experiences occur at present. By web-based survey, we asked US surgeons and residents to describe their best and worst intraoperative teaching experiences during training and how often 26 common intraoperative teaching behaviors occur in their current environment. A total of 346 residents and 196 surgeons responded (51 programs; 26 states). Surgeons and residents consistently identified trainee autonomy, teacher confidence, and communication as positive, while recalling negatively contemptuous, arrogant, accusatory, or uncommunicative teachers. Residents described intraoperative teaching behaviors by faculty as substantially less frequent than faculty self-reports. Neither sex nor seniority explained these results, although women reported communicative behaviors more frequently than men. Although veteran surgeons and current trainees agree on what constitutes effective and ineffective teaching in the operating room, they disagree on how often these behaviors occur, leaving substantial room for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Thomas Vicary, barber-surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duncan P

    2006-05-01

    An Act of Parliament in 1540 uniting the barbers and surgeons to form the Barber-Surgeons' Company represented an important foundation stone towards better surgery in England. Thomas Vicary, who played a pivotal role in promoting this union, was a leading surgeon in London in the middle of the 16th century. While Vicary made no direct contribution to surgical knowledge, he should be remembered primarily as one who contributed much towards the early organization and teaching of surgery and to the consequent benefits that flowed from this improvement.

  6. 3D straight-stick laparoscopy versus 3D robotics for task performance in novice surgeons: a randomised crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Fevzi; Jan, Haider; Kent, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    The advent of three-dimensional passive stereoscopic imaging has led to the development of 3D laparoscopy. In simulation tasks, a reduction in error rate and performance time is seen with 3D compared to two-dimensional (2D) laparoscopy with both novice and expert surgeons. Robotics utilises 3D and instrument articulation through a console interface. Robotic trials have demonstrated that tasks performed in 3D produced fewer errors and quicker performance times compared with those in 2D. It was therefore perceived that the main advantage of robotic surgery was in fact 3D. Our aim was to compare 3D straight-stick laparoscopic task performance (3D) with robotic 3D (Robot), to determine whether robotic surgery confers additional benefit over and above 3D visualisation. We randomised 20 novice surgeons to perform four validated surgical tasks, either with straight-stick 3D laparoscopy followed by 3D robotic surgery or in the reverse order. The trial was conducted in two fully functional operating theatres. The primary outcome of the study was the error rate as defined for each task, and the secondary outcome was the time taken to complete each task. The participants were asked to perform the tasks as quickly and as accurately as possible. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21. The median error rate for completion of all four tasks with the robot was 2.75 and 5.25 for 3D with a P value performance time for completion of all four tasks with the robot was 157.1 and 342.5 s for 3D with a P value 3D robotic systems over 3D straight-stick laparoscopy, in terms of reduced error rate and quicker task performance time.

  7. 437 communicating climate change in africa through the theatre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The understanding is that humans need to be sensitized and people mobilized in a mass effort ... Keywords: Climate change, Environment, Communication, Development process, Theatre arts, ... beyond the media noise about the protocols of.

  8. Theatre and Pedagogy: Using Drama in Mental Health Nurse Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylko, Yolanda; Stickley, Theodore

    2003-01-01

    Describes how psychodrama, forum theatre, and other forms of drama can facilitate active learning, develop empathy and reflective skills, and foster emotional intelligence in nursing education. Contains 21 references. (SK)

  9. EJOTMAS: Ekpoma Journal of Theatre and Media Arts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJOTMAS) is committed to the promotion of scholarship in all the areas of Drama and Theatre, Media and Communication, Music and Dance, Performance Studies and other fields in the Arts and Humanities. Other websites associated with this journal: ...

  10. 1 Aquatic Theatre: Women as Performing Audience Sunday ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    audience relationship. Keywords: Aquatic theatre, women, performing audience, festival, ... "Fine and Performing Arts" in the book The Land and People of Rivers. State. .... Jefferson as saying in the New York Times that “there is something.

  11. THE THEATRE ARTIST'S DILEMMA IN THE TASK OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    dilemma and make effectual his contributions to re-branding society for meaning development to occur, especially in this .... The Nigerian movie industry provides template for furthering this discourse. .... A Handbook on Drama and Theatre.

  12. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  13. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  14. Conflict resolution: practical principles for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liz; Berger, David H; Awad, Samir S; Brandt, Mary L; Martinez, George; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2008-11-01

    Historically, surgeons have had little formal training in conflict resolution; however, there has been an increasing body of evidence that poor conflict resolution skills may have an adverse impact on patient outcomes and career advancement. Furthermore, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has recognized the importance of conflict resolution skills in resident training by mandating the training of communication skills and professionalism. These skills have often been taught in other professions, and surgeons may need to acquaint themselves with the literature from those fields. Conflict resolution techniques such as the 7-step model or principle-based conflict resolution can be applied to conflict in the operating room, wards, and among colleagues. We propose a model for conflict resolution by using the basic tools of the history and physical exam, a process well known to all physicians.

  15. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical decision making: how surgeons do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crebbin, Wendy; Beasley, Spencer W; Watters, David A K

    2013-06-01

    Clinical decision making is a core competency of surgical practice. It involves two distinct types of mental process best considered as the ends of a continuum, ranging from intuitive and subconscious to analytical and conscious. In practice, individual decisions are usually reached by a combination of each, according to the complexity of the situation and the experience/expertise of the surgeon. An expert moves effortlessly along this continuum, according to need, able to apply learned rules or algorithms to specific presentations, choosing these as a result of either pattern recognition or analytical thinking. The expert recognizes and responds quickly to any mismatch between what is observed and what was expected, coping with gaps in information and making decisions even where critical data may be uncertain or unknown. Even for experts, the cognitive processes involved are difficult to articulate as they tend to be very complex. However, if surgeons are to assist trainees in developing their decision-making skills, the processes need to be identified and defined, and the competency needs to be measurable. This paper examines the processes of clinical decision making in three contexts: making a decision about how to manage a patient; preparing for an operative procedure; and reviewing progress during an operative procedure. The models represented here are an exploration of the complexity of the processes, designed to assist surgeons understand how expert clinical decision making occurs and to highlight the challenge of teaching these skills to surgical trainees. © 2013 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Description of Mexican Cleft Surgeons' Experience With Foreign Surgical Volunteer Missions in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbrunner, Anna R; Kelley, Kristen D; Buckstaff, Taylor; McIntyre, Joyce K; Sigler, Alicia; Gosman, Amanda A

    2018-05-01

    Mexican cleft surgeons provide multidisciplinary comprehensive cleft lip and palate care to children in Mexico. Many Mexican cleft surgeons have extensive experience with foreign, visiting surgeons. The purpose of this study was to characterize Mexican cleft surgeons' domestic and volunteer practice and to learn more about Mexican cleft surgeons' experience with visiting surgeons. A cross-sectional validated e-mail survey tool was sent to Mexican cleft surgeons through 2 Mexican plastic surgery societies and the Asociación Mexicana de Labio y Paladar Hendido y Anomalías Craneofaciales, the national cleft palate society that includes plastic and maxillofacial surgeons who specialize in cleft surgery. We utilized validated survey methodology, including neutral fact-based questions and repeated e-mails to survey nonresponders to maximize validity of statistical data; response rate was 30.6% (n = 81). Mexican cleft surgeons performed, on average, 37.7 primary palate repairs per year with an overall complication rate of 2.5%; 34.6% (n = 28) of respondents had direct experience with patients operated on by visiting surgeons; 53.6% of these respondents performed corrective surgery because of complications from visiting surgeons. Respondents rated 48% of the functional outcomes of visiting surgeons as "acceptable," whereas 43% rated aesthetic outcomes of visiting surgeons as "poor"; 73.3% of respondents were never paid for the corrective surgeries they performed. Thirty-three percent of Mexican cleft surgeons believe that there is a role for educational collaboration with visiting surgeons. Mexican cleft surgeons have a high volume of primary cleft palate repairs in their domestic practice with good outcomes. Visiting surgeons may play an important role in Mexican cleft care through educational collaborations that complement the strengths of Mexican cleft surgeons.

  18. The Reconfiguration of the Theatre Space and the Relationship between Public and Private in the Case of Apartment Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Gabriela Lupu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article tackles the means of theatre space reconfiguration in the apartment theater (lorgean theater, simultaneously analyzing the relation between public and private specific to this form of art. Structured around both a theoretical analysis and a qualitative empirical investigation, this paper emphasizes the traits of the theatre space as component of an artistic product received by the audience, and its value in the process of artistic production, within the theatre sector. The case study of lorgean theater, including a participant observation and an individual interview, enables the understanding of these two aspects of the spatial configuration, emphasizing its hybrid nature in terms of spatial configuration and the public-private relation as well as the act of reappropriation of the domestic space through an alternative practice of theatre consumption.

  19. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stay Up to Date with ACS Association Management Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation ...

  20. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Up to Date with ACS Association Management JACS Jobs Events Find a Surgeon Patients and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation ...

  1. The lesser spotted pregnant surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, L C

    2017-10-19

    With more women entering surgical training, it will become more commonplace to encounter pregnant surgeons. This paper discusses the evidence for work-related risk factors as well as outlining the rights of a pregnant doctor. There are, in fact, very few real risks to pregnancy encountered as a surgeon, with the main risks involving standing or sitting for long periods and fatigue, which can be managed with support from the department. It is important for women in surgery to know that it is possible to continue their training while pregnant so they do not feel pressured into changing to a less demanding specialty or even leaving medicine entirely. It is also important for other professionals to understand the risks and choices faced by pregnant surgeons so that they can better support them in the workplace.

  2. Henry Head and the Theatre of Reverie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Watt-Smith

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1903, the neurologist Henry Head (1861-1940 embarked on a painful self-experiment, in which he severed the radial nerve of his left arm, and then charted the gradual and faltering return of sensitivity to the limb over the next four and a half years. To directly experience his own sensations, Head entered into a trance-like state of distraction or reverie he called a ‘negative attitude of attention’. This article explores Head’s peculiar technique for looking within, and argues that while introspection was an established strategy in psychological laboratories, Head’s reverie also resonated with techniques associated with actors and theatrical audiences during this period. Viewing psychological self-experimentation through the lens of theatre, this article makes visible aspects of Head’s embodied, affective laboratory encounters, often obscured in accounts of his experiment. At the same time, it proposes that the broader historical and cultural significance of Head’s experiment lies in his attempt to observe himself by producing states of inattention and reverie at will, mental ‘attitudes’ that were themselves the subject of a rapidly evolving debate in scientific and aesthetic circles at the turn of the twentieth century.

  3. Politics in the context of the “Opera question” in the national theatre before the first world war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Part of the history of the National Theatre in Belgrade in the decade before the First World War relates to processes of discontinuity in the professionalization and modernization of the musical section in this institution and its repertoire. It had to do with abrupt changes reflected in three short-lived phases: improvements in musical ensemble and opera performances (1906-1909, the annulment of these efforts and results with a return to the old repertoire, and then again a new beginning once more with a fresh attempt to establish the Opera (1913-14. These dynamics were affected by the social and political context. It was dependent on frequent changes of the Theatre’s management staff whose main representatives had mutually conflicting views on important questions concerning the functioning of their institution. Relations between them were strongly marked by contested political motives. Theatre managers were appointed by ministers of education who could also be relieved of their posts, and members of the management staff were always active in political parties. These facts acted as a decisive factor in their communication which was similar to the behaviour and customs of public political life where an opponent is seen as an enemy, not as a partner in solving common problems. Critical and polemical discourses on important aspects of organization and programme strategy of the Theatre were burdened by political rivalry which also found its place in discussions on the cultivation of music. Questions relating to music were considered in a declarative way, so that music was instrumentalized as a means of political empowerment. The facts about music in the National Theatre raise many issues related to aspects of modernization, national identification, transfers of „high“ and popular musical cultures as well as to other problems of social, historical and cultural contexts that were intertwined in the operation of the Theatre. The context of

  4. Latent risk factors in operating theatres and intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuzekom, Martie van

    2012-01-01

    The safety of an organization can be improved by investigating and correcting the many processes that shape performance at the “sharp end”. Errors do not occur of themselves, but arise within the context of the work environment. Where the environment is one that makes errors by individuals more

  5. Foreign Command of US Forces in Combined Theatre Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Violence Once Chamberlain had a speech memorized from Shakespeare and gave it proudly, the old man [his father] listening but not looking, and...and women are more like Joshua Chamberlain’s "killer angels" or "craving for peace" as in the Greek comedies of Aristophanes, the dichotomy has led many

  6. Perspectives of the surgeons, anaesthetists, and pharmacists on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-operative pain is best managed by a multi-disciplinary team approach. An extensive review of the literature indicated that little is known about the roles of surgeons, anaesthetists, and pharmacists regarding post-operative pain management in Ghana. Therefore, this study was undertaken in order to fully understand ...

  7. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  8. Methods of recording theatre activity across publicly funded hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, J

    2013-10-13

    A review of theatre activity in all Health Service Executive (HSE) hospitals in Cork and Kerry in 2008 required a manual extraction of theatre activity data from largely paper-based logbooks. A key data management recommendation suggested that "a standardised computerised theatre logbook system be developed in all hospitals in the region". HSE (2010) Reconfiguration of health services for Cork and Kerry-theatre utilisation review. ISBN 978-1-906218-54-6.

  9. Acting and Collecting: Imagining Asia through material culture and musical theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Thorley

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the link between Asian-inspired material culture and musical theatre through the collections of Anglo-Australian performer Herbert Browne (1895-1975). Brown played lead roles in 1920s Australian musical theatre productions of The Mikado and Chu Chin Chow and re-lived his connection with oriental theatre by collecting and responding to objects performatively in the Chinoiserie room of his Melbourne home. Oriental musical theatre blended exotic cultures and locales in visual...

  10. Moscow Theatre 1935 and 1970: This Is Where I Came In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Norris

    1971-01-01

    Compares findings of what is happening in Russian theatre today with what was being done in the 30's. Particularly discusses the work of Georgi Tovstonogov, Director of the Gorki Theatre in Leningrad, and Yuri Liubimov, Director of the Taganka Theatre in Moscow. (RB)

  11. The Praxis of Theatre for Development in Curbing Social Menace in Urban Slum in Lagos State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Olusola Smith

    2015-01-01

    Theatre for Development (TfD) is a special kind of Theatre practice that creates a platform for members of a specific community to respond to, and actively participate in issues relating to their social development through an engaging process of play and acting. The sole essence of this form of theatre is to sensitize, radicalize and conscientize…

  12. In Flesh and Bone: Bodily Image and Educational Patterns in Early Reformation Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, Luana

    2018-01-01

    From its very beginning, the Protestant Reformation adopted the theatre as one of its educational tools. Together with choral music, visual arts, and preaching, Luther, Melanchthon, Oekolampad, and other Reformers promoted both the cultivated school theatre and the popular street theatre in order to spread the new faith, create a community ethos,…

  13. Devising and Interdisciplinary Teaching: A Case Study in Collaboration between Theatre and Humanities Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Kristin; Brown, Rich

    2013-01-01

    We use an experimental course collaboration that occurred in the winter of 2012 as a case study for an approach to interdisciplinary collaboration between Theatre and Humanities courses, and we argue that the theatre methodology of "devising" can serve as a particularly rich locus for collaboration between Theatre students and other…

  14. Bus Journeys, Sandwiches and Play: Young Children and the Theatre Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Emma

    2018-01-01

    Theatre for Early Years (TEY) audiences is a relatively new and growing area of practice. This article arises from empirical research with a group of children aged three and four, who made repeat visits to watch TEY performances at Polka Theatre in London. Drawing on literature from education studies, theatre studies and cultural geography, this…

  15. Theatre elicitation integrating a participatory research tool in a mixed-method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerig, S.; Evers, S.J.T.M.; Krabbendam, L.

    2015-01-01

    The relation between theatre, or drama, and research is not novel which is illustrated by concepts such as role theory, theatre for development, or distancing in drama therapy. In various scientific fields theatre is used as a communicative and/or educative tool, however in the realm of childhood

  16. Supervision by a technically qualified surgeon affects the proficiency and safety of laparoscopic colectomy performed by novice surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Nobuki; Homma, Shigenori; Yoshida, Tadashi; Ohno, Yosuke; Kawamura, Hideki; Kamiizumi, You; Iijima, Hiroaki; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2018-01-01

    The use of laparoscopic colectomy is becoming widespread and acquisition of its technique is challenging. In this study, we investigated whether supervision by a technically qualified surgeon affects the proficiency and safety of laparoscopic colectomy performed by novice surgeons. The outcomes of 23 right colectomies and 19 high anterior resections for colon cancers performed by five novice surgeons (experience level of <10 cases) between 2014 and 2016 were assessed. A laparoscopic surgeon qualified by the Endoscopic Surgical Skill Qualification System (Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery) participated in surgeries as the teaching assistant. In the right colectomy group, one patient (4.3%) required conversion to open surgery and postoperative morbidities occurred in two cases (8.6%). The operative time moving average gradually decreased from 216 to 150 min, and the blood loss decreased from 128 to 28 mL. In the CUSUM charts, the values for operative time decreased continuously after the 18th case, as compared to the Japanese standard. The values for blood loss also plateaued after the 18th case. In the high anterior resection group, one patient (5.2%) required conversion to open surgery and no postoperative complication occurred in any patient. The operative time moving average gradually decreased from 258 to 228 min, and the blood loss decreased from 33 to 18 mL. The CUSUM charts showed that the values of operative time plateaued after the 18th case, as compared to the Japanese standard. In the CUSUM chart for blood loss, no distinguishing peak or trend was noted. Supervision by a technically qualified surgeon affects the proficiency and safety of laparoscopic colectomy performed by novice surgeons. The trainee's learning curve in this study represents successful mentoring by the laparoscopic surgeon qualified by the Endoscopic Surgical Skill Qualification System.

  17. Women surgeons in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppmann, Kathrin M; Palis, Bryan E; Goodnight, James E; Ho, Hung S; Troppmann, Christoph

    2009-07-01

    Women are increasingly entering the surgical profession. To assess professional and personal/family life situations, perceptions, and challenges for women vs men surgeons. National survey of American Board of Surgery-certified surgeons. A questionnaire was mailed to all women and men surgeons who were board certified in 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, or 2004. Of 3507 surgeons, 895 (25.5%) responded. Among these, 178 (20.3%) were women and 698 (79.7%) were men. Most women and men surgeons would choose their profession again (women, 82.5%; men, 77.5%; P = .15). On multivariate analysis, men surgeons (odds ratio [OR], 2.5) and surgeons of a younger generation (certified in 2000 or 2004; OR, 1.3) were less likely to favor part-time work opportunities for surgeons. Most of the surgeons were married (75.6% of women vs 91.7% of men, P women surgeons (OR, 5.0) and surgeons of a younger generation (OR, 1.9) were less likely to have children. More women than men surgeons had their first child later in life, while already in surgical practice (62.4% vs 32.0%, P women surgeons vs 79.4% of men surgeons (P women surgeons than men surgeons thought that maternity leave was important (67.8% vs 30.8%, P work (86.5% vs 69.7%, P Women considering a surgical career should be aware that most women surgeons would choose their profession again. Strategies to maximize recruitment and retention of women surgeons should include serious consideration of alternative work schedules and optimization of maternity leave and child care opportunities.

  18. 'From Start to Finnish': Handbook For Exporting A Theatre Play

    OpenAIRE

    Tanskanen, Milka; Mäkinen, Annemari

    2014-01-01

    Exporting Finnish culture is one of the themes the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture has carried out over the last few years. ‘From Start to Finnish’ project was a mission to strenghten the state of theatre export in Finland. In the project, government subsidised theatres in Finland export their plays to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the largest arts festival in the world. The thesis is product-based as the authors created a handbook to combine all the steps to be taken when expo...

  19. Save the mystery - staging specificity of Pina Bausch's dance theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Roszak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article are presented the fundamental determinants of the style of the theatre of Pina Bausch. Tanztheater Wuppertal performances delight with their totality and originality (stage design, costumes, the musical layer, textual layer. Montage, collage, acting based on improvisation - these are the means which are the pillars of Bausch's theatre. Tanztheater Wuppertal performances have reformed the modern ballet and created a new kind of performance based - apart from dance, movement and pantomime - on the realistic activities, routine behaviours, dialogues and singing.

  20. Musical theatre: the hazards of the performer's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jennie

    2015-03-01

    Being a musical theatre performer requires excellence in the combined skills of dancing, singing, and acting, and artists undergo rigorous training in these disciplines in order to achieve the professional standards expected by a discerning audience. However, the performer has more to do than just execute the choreography, vocal repertoire, and dialogue--he or she will also be navigating the often highly complex on-stage and off-stage areas which are fraught with hazards. This article seeks to highlight the challenges that lie beyond the visible part of the performance and to raise questions of how best to equip our musical theatre performers to safely negotiate these issues.

  1. Theatre of Presence - Antero Alli's Paratheatrical ReSearch Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    the oppression, decadence and corruption that has crucified and buried the poetic Imagination" (Antero Alli) This paper will try to unveil one of Antero Alli's paratheatrical experiments in overcoming the death of ritual in theatre. Orphans of Delirium is an intense, living ritual experience, "fluid" in its...... do not repeat ritual patterns but create them, bringing shots of presence into theatre by a dynamic and constant process of opening toward the vertical "sources." Nicoletta Isar is Associate professor at the Institute of Art History of Copenhagen University. Her main research is focused...

  2. An experience of science theatre: Earth Science for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes an experience of science theatre addressed to children of primary and secondary school, with the main purpose of explaining the Earth interior while raising awareness about natural hazard. We conducted the experience with the help of a theatrical company specialized in shows for children. Several performances have been reiterated in different context, giving us the opportunity of conducting a preliminary survey with public of different ages, even if the show was conceived for children. Results suggest that science theatre while relying on creativity and emotional learning in transmitting knowledge about the Earth and its hazard has the potential to induce in children a positive attitude towards the risks

  3. Safe surgery: how accurate are we at predicting intra-operative blood loss?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction Preoperative estimation of intra-operative blood loss by both anaesthetist and operating surgeon is a criterion of the World Health Organization\\'s surgical safety checklist. The checklist requires specific preoperative planning when anticipated blood loss is greater than 500 mL. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of surgeons and anaesthetists at predicting intra-operative blood loss. Methods A 6-week prospective study of intermediate and major operations in an academic medical centre was performed. An independent observer interviewed surgical and anaesthetic consultants and registrars, preoperatively asking each to predict expected blood loss in millilitre. Intra-operative blood loss was measured and compared with these predictions. Parameters including the use of anticoagulation and anti-platelet therapy as well as intra-operative hypothermia and hypotension were recorded. Results One hundred sixty-eight operations were included in the study, including 142 elective and 26 emergency operations. Blood loss was predicted to within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of cases. Consultant surgeons tended to underestimate blood loss, doing so in 43% of all cases, while consultant anaesthetists were more likely to overestimate (60% of all operations). Twelve patients (7%) had underestimation of blood loss of more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. Thirty per cent (n = 6\\/20) of patients requiring transfusion of a blood product within 24 hours of surgery had blood loss underestimated by more than 500 mL by both surgeon and anaesthetist. There was no significant difference in prediction between patients on anti-platelet or anticoagulation therapy preoperatively and those not on the said therapies. Conclusion Predicted intra-operative blood loss was within 500 mL of measured blood loss in 89% of operations. In 30% of patients who ultimately receive a blood transfusion, both the surgeon and anaesthetist significantly underestimate

  4. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  5. The effect of surgeon experience on outcomes of surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Pahys, Joshua M; Asghar, Jahangir; Yaszay, Burt; Marks, Michelle C; Bastrom, Tracey P; Lonner, Baron S; Shah, Suken A; Shufflebarger, Harry L; Newton, Peter O; Betz, Randal R; Samdani, Amer F

    2014-08-20

    Single-surgeon series investigating the learning curve involved in surgery for spinal deformity may be confounded by changes in technology and techniques. Our objective with this multicenter, prospective study was to present a cross-sectional analysis of the impact of surgeon experience on surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. All posterior-only surgical procedures for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis performed in the 2007 to 2008 academic year, with a minimum of two years of patient follow-up, were included. Two groups were created on the basis of surgeon experience: a young surgeons' group, which included patients of surgeons with less than five years of experience, and an experienced surgeons' group, which included patients of surgeons with five or more years of experience. Nine surgeons (four young and five experienced) operated on a total of one hundred and sixty-five patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The surgeons' experience ranged from less than one year to thirty-six years in practice. The two groups had similar preoperative curve-magnitude measurements, SRS-22 (Scoliosis Research Society-22) scores, and distribution by Lenke curve type. There were significant operative and postoperative differences. The young surgeons fused an average of 1.2 levels more than the experienced surgeons (p = 0.045). The mean intraoperative estimated blood loss (EBL) of the young surgeons' group was more than twice that of the experienced surgeons' group (2042 mL compared with 1013 mL; p self-image (p = 0.008), and function (p adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were significantly and positively correlated with surgeon experience. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  6. Social media and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, David A

    2013-03-01

    As the Internet has matured, social media has developed and become a part of our everyday life. Whether it is Facebook, YouTube, or LinkedIn, we now communicate with each other and the world in a very different manner. As physicians, and specifically colon and rectal surgeons, it is important that we understand this new technology, learn its limitations, and utilize it to foster growth of our practice, trade, and potentially result in better patient care.

  7. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  8. Per-operative vibration analysis: a valuable tool for defining correct stem insertion: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulier, Michiel; Pastrav, Cesar; Van der Perre, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Defining the stem insertion end point during total hip replacement still relies on the surgeon's feeling. When a custom-made stem prosthesis with an optimal fit into the femoral canal is used, the risk of per-operative fractures is even greater than with standard prostheses. Vibration analysis is used in other clinical settings and has been tested as a means to detect optimal stem insertion in the laboratory. The first per-operative use of vibration analysis during non-cemented custom-made stem insertion in 30 patients is reported here. Thirty patients eligible for total hip replacement with uncemented stem prosthesis were included. The neck of the stem was connected with a shaker that emitted white noise as excitation signal and an impedance head that measured the frequency response. The response signal was sent to a computer that analyzed the frequency response function after each insertion phase. A technician present in the operating theatre but outside the laminated airflow provided feed-back to the surgeon. The correlation index between the frequency response function measured during the last two insertion hammering sessions was >0.99 in 86.7% of the cases. In four cases the surgeon stopped the insertion procedure because of a perceived risk of fracture. Two special cases illustrating the potential benefit of per-operative vibration analysis are described. The results of intra-operative vibration analysis indicate that this technique may be a useful tool assisting the orthopaedic surgeon in defining the insertion endpoint of the stem. The development of a more user-friendly device is therefore warranted.

  9. Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Source Code The Surgeon General's Family Health History Initiative To help focus attention on the importance of ... health campaign, called the Surgeon General's Family History Initiative, to encourage all American families to learn more ...

  10. [Improving the surgeon's image: introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Tomoo

    2004-05-01

    The number of medical students who aspire to become surgeons has been decreasing in recent years. With a vicious spiral in the decreasing number and the growing deterioration of surgeons' working conditions, there is fear of deterioration of surgical care and subsequent disintegration of overall health care in Japan. The purpose of this issue is to devise a strategy for improving surgeons' image and their working conditions to attract future medical students. However, we cannot expect a quick cure for the problem of the decreasing number of applicants for surgery since this issue is deeply related to many fundamental problems in the health care system in Japan. The challenge for surgical educators in coming years will be to solve the problem of chronic sleep deprivation and overwork of surgery residents and to develop an efficient program to meet the critical educational needs of surgical residents. To solve this problem it is necessary to ensure well-motivated surgical residents and to develop an integrated research program. No discussion of these issues would be complete without attention to the allocation of scarce medical resources, especially in relation to financial incentives for young surgeons. The authors, who are conscientious representatives of this society, would like to highlight these critical problems and issues that are particularly relevant to our modern surgical practice, and it is our sincere hope that all members of this society fully recognize these critical issues in the Japanese health care system to take leadership in improving the system. With the demonstration of withholding unnecessary medical conducts we may be able to initiate a renewal of the system and eventually to fulfill our dreams of Japan becoming a nation that can attract many patients from all over the world. Furthermore, verification of discipline with quality control and effective surgical treatment is needed to avoid criticism by other disciplines for being a self

  11. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lung Operation After Your Operation Your Discharge and Recovery Complete Video After Your Operation Guidance for after ... Your Lung Operation Read Next Your Discharge and Recovery Back to Top Find A Surgeon Find A ...

  12. Toward a Synthesis of Science and Theatre Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMetz, Kaye

    2007-01-01

    The chasm between science the the arts has been hotly debated during the last century. History reveals that science and theatre arts (drama and dance) have shared a successful symbiosis that has benefited society for at least two millennia. This natural partnership continues to have positive effects on our culture by providing aesthetic…

  13. Biodun Jeyifo: The Yoruba Popular Travelling Theatre or Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no shortage of books on the market about African theatre, but the. Yoruba ... techniques of film inserts and recorded music to supplement the live performance. One ... This is partly a historical perspective, showing the relationship between Yoruba Opera ... becoming an increasingly dynamic force throughout Africa.

  14. Children's Interpretations of Computer-Animated Dinosaurs in Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a "virtual reality" production by the University of Kansas Theatre for Young People provided the opportunity to garner the perceptions and responses of child audiences as a descriptive study. Discusses students' perceptions of results. Provides little evidence of a "videocy" dimension of perceived reality, for it…

  15. Community theatre as instrument for community sensitisation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-28

    Mar 28, 2016 ... Agency (GIZ) in Cameroon, and is currently ... proposes strategies that could be deployed to effectively develop and establish ... traditional system, community theatre, environmental protection, sustainable economic development. ..... Some groups usually travel from place to place to carry out their activities,.

  16. The theatre artist's dilemma in the task of rebranding Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The theatre artist's dilemma in the task of rebranding Nigeria: Defining the modes of engagement. ... The project of re-branding Nigeria for positive development places the artist in a great dilemma seeing that the happenings in society form the content and subject matter of his/her work. Where the events in society are ...

  17. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies: Editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peer Review Process. Reviewers are drawn from the cream of Theatre and Communication/Media experts in the Nigerian University system and are remunerated at the rate of Two Thousand Naira per reviewed paper. Choice of reviewer is guided by theme or subject matter of each specific paper.

  18. Zulu Sofola and the Nigerian Theatre Influences and Traditions | Eni ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Sound Equipment Fabrication and Values in Nigerian Theatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main points of this paper is to discover ways of fabricating sound and sound effects equipment for theatrical productions in Nigeria have become of essence since most educational theatres cannot afford western sound and sound effects equipment. Even when available, they are old fashioned, compared to the ...

  20. Supply Chain Synchronization: Improving Distribution Velocity to the Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Figures ix List of Tables x I. Introduction 1 II. Literature Review 4...DISTRIBUTION VELOCITY TO THE THEATRE I. Introduction “When you do battle, even if you are winning, if you continue for a long time it will...jointvision/jvpub2.htm Accessed 9 March 2009. Lambert, Douglas M. Supply Chain Mangement : Processes, Partnerships, Performance. Jacksonville: The

  1. Political shifts and black theatre in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangoajane, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    Oral communication, especially through performance, has always been the basis through which Africans/blacks communicated. This became particularly so under apartheid given the fact that blacks were denied a voice, and theatre gave them that voice. The democratisation of South Africa has not only

  2. The Economics of Theatre/Entertainment Technology in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay therefore, discusses theatre technology and its attendant economic impact as business in Nigeria using Bradford Delong.s (2004) discourse on international capital mobility. Aspects of Delong.s position and David Throsby.s cultural capital theory form the theoretical base for this work. The essay is more situated ...

  3. Participatory theatre and mental health recovery: a narrative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrissen, Wenche; Stickley, Theo

    2018-01-01

    To identify the potential relationship between participation in theatre and mental health recovery. To give voice to the stories told by participants of Teater Vildenvei, a theatre company that has been part of the rehabilitation programme for mental health service users in Oslo since 1995. Twelve narrative interviews were conducted among participants of Teater Vildenvei, and the data were subject to a narrative analysis process following the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur and the specific methods of thematic, event and relational analysis as identified by Riessman. The narratives are considered in the theoretical light of the mental health recovery framework as identified by Leamy et al. Each participant had experienced a transformation in identity; the sense of belonging within the group was perceived as highly important to their mental health; engagement with the theatre company gives people something meaningful to do, a sense of hope and individuals feel empowered. This narrative inquiry gave opportunity for participants to elaborate on their stories of their engagement with Teater Vildenvei. It is through the richness of the data that the depth of the significance of meaning that people ascribe to their stories demonstrates the potential power of participatory theatre for mental health recovery. Because of its effects, people make life-changing and life-saving claims.

  4. The Era of Tadeusz Pawlikowski and Irish Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Keane

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tadeusz Pawlikowski was arguably Poland’s greatest theatre director of the fin de siècle. With stints as Theatre Manager in both Kraków and Lwów municipal theatres, Pawlikowski excelled in developing ensemble casts and cultivating audiences without kowtowing to popular tastes. He was also responsible for bringing many western plays to partitioned Poland, and indeed he oversaw theatrical premieres of Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw and John Millington Synge. This paper will look at the production and reception of these plays and will record how there was a growing conviction amongst Polish critics that Irish dramatists would soon make a towering impact on the age. That said, not all the productions were as successful as perhaps they should have been. When in Lwów, Pawlikowski attempted to flood the city with drama and this ambition entailed brief run-throughs and the shortening of texts in order to facilitate the learning of lines. Needless to say, there was little time for work on characterization. Consequently, it was often pointed out that performances had failed to bridge the cultural gap where a foreign piece was concerned. To this end, this paper will assess both the contribution of Tadeusz Pawlikowski to Irish theatre, and the reception and legacy of the productions which took place under his directorial guidance.

  5. Dance Theatre of Harlem--Theater Activity Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Intended to complement the New York City communication arts curriculum, this packet introduces young students, guided by the classroom teacher, to a dress rehearsal performance of the Dance Theatre of Harlem ballet company. The packet is one of a series in the "Early Stages" program, a joint effort of the Mayor's Office of Film, Theater…

  6. Lakota Sioux Indian Dance Theatre. Cuesheet for Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, John C.; And Others

    This performance guide provides students with an introduction to Lakota Sioux history and culture and to the dances performed by the Lakota Sioux Indian Dance Theatre. The Lakota Sioux believe that life is a sacred circle in which all things are connected, and that the circle was broken for them in 1890 by the massacre at Wounded Knee. Only in…

  7. Learning to Lead, Unscripted: Developing Affiliative Leadership through Improvisational Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Suzanne; Vough, Heather C.; Nickerson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We argue that improvisational theatre training creates a compelling experience of co-creation through interaction and, as such, can be used to build a distinctive kind of leadership skills. Theories of leadership as relational, collaborative or shared are in pointed contrast to traditional notions of an individual "hero leader" who possesses the…

  8. Identity, Knowledge and Participation: Health Theatre for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of the paper is to explore whether health theatre as a school-based health promotion initiative communicates relevant health knowledge to children and the interrelated processes of identity development, knowledge acquisition and participation. Development of the definition of "health identity" was a subsidiary…

  9. Theatre Review | Various Authors | Shakespeare in Southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelfth Night: The Port Elizabeth Shakespearean Festival, February 2004; Macbeth: Directed by Geoffrey Hyland, Maynardville Open Air Theatre, January to. February 2004; The Marowitz Hamlet: Directed by Floyed de Vaal for the University of. Stellenbosch Drama Department, July 2004; Bollywood Twelfth Night: Steven ...

  10. Theatre Reviews | Various Authors | Shakespeare in Southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Much Ado: Directed by Linda-Louise Swain. Mannville. 21 February-4 March 2006; Twelfth Night: Directed by Tamar Meskin and Tanya van der Walt. University of KwaZulu-Natal Drama and Performance Studies Programme. Pieter Scholtz Open Air Theatre. 27 May 2006. Shakespeare in Southern Africa Vol. 18 2006: pp.

  11. Silent Partners: Actor and Audience in Geese Theatre's "Journey Woman"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This essay considers the performance context and aesthetics of "Journey Woman", a play devised to initiate a week-long rehabilitative groupwork programme for female prisoners. Although Geese Theatre UK are one of the country's longest-established companies specialising in drama work within the criminal justice sector, this 2006 piece is…

  12. book review the cambridge guide to african ano caribbean theatre.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    looks good, and feels good. A question immediately presents itself: it this a ploy to divide up and profit from World Theatre, or is it a serious extension of an unfinished ... to redress the tendency to adopt a Eurocentric view the volume tolerates dated and slipshod work of a kind that. Journal ef.H1;1manities, Nos 819, 1994195.

  13. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460 Food... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by...

  14. The Nonwhite Woman Surgeon: A Rare Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Heather A; Nguyen, Thu-Hoai C; Co, Franka; Rosemurgy, Alexander S; Ross, Sharona B

    2015-01-01

    As of 2012, 39% of medical student graduates were nonwhite, yet very few nonwhite women graduates chose to become surgeons. To better understand issues regarding nonwhite women in surgery, an online survey was sent to surgeons across the United States. Results are based on self-reported data. Mean data are reported. A total of 194 surgeons (42% women) completed the survey; only 12% of responders were nonwhite. Overall, 56% of nonwhite women felt they earned less than what men surgeons earn for equal work. Nonwhite women surgeons earned less than what men surgeons ($224,000 vs. 351,000, p women surgeons ($285,000, p = 0.02) earned. Overall, 96% of nonwhite surgeons believed that racial discrimination currently exists among surgeons. The few nonwhite women surgeons in the United States recognize that they are paid significantly less than what other surgeons are paid. Inequitable remuneration and a discriminatory work environment encountered by nonwhite women surgeons must be addressed. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The world's best-known surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, A J

    1983-10-01

    Henry Norman Bethune was born in Ontario in 1890 and was to become the best-known physician in the world. Bethune, a thoracic surgeon, spent his professional life in Detroit and Montreal, with these periods separated by a year spent as a patient in a tuberculosis sanatorium. This was where his interest in pulmonary disease was stimulated. Pioneer thoracic surgeon, councillor to the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, artist, poet, polemist, conservative-turned-communist, iconoclast, and soldier, Bethune was a highly complex individual. Diverting his energies from surgery to social issues during the depression, Bethune participated in the Spanish Civil War, at which time he designed the world's first mobile blood transfusion unit. Eight months later, Bethune joined Mao Tse-tung's Eight Route Army in China. In 1939 he died of septicemia acquired from a sliver of infected bone while he was operating on a wounded Chinese patient. Bethune's fame today derives principally from the popularization of his accomplishments by Mao, whom he met once and who subsequently decreed that all in China should learn about him. Bethune's posthumous influence played an important role in the reopening of relations between China and the West.

  16. The Safety Prevention in the Theater Management and Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Take the operation and management experience as examples, the author discussed how to formulate a set of complete and effective equipment management system, operating rules, procedures and standards, as well as the safety prevention and control measures, according to the national or trade related laws and regulations and combining the operation and performance characteristics of theatre management, in order to ensure the safe operation of theatre and stage equipment.

  17. From Corporate Social Responsibility, through Entrepreneurial Orientation, to Knowledge Sharing: A Study in Cai Luong (Renovated Theatre) Theatre Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Luu Trong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the role of antecedents such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and entrepreneurial orientation in the chain effect to knowledge sharing among members of Cai Luong theatre companies in the Vietnamese context. Knowledge sharing contributes to the depth of the knowledge pool of both the individuals and the…

  18. Was the real Sherlock Holmes a pediatric surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the pioneering efforts of Joseph Bell, the model for Sherlock Holmes, in the surgical care of children during the antiseptic era. I reviewed biographies of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; the biography of Joseph Bell; his surgical textbook, Edinburgh Medical Journals; and the history of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children. Dr Bell was a colleague of Joseph Lister and one of the first surgeons to apply antiseptic methods to operations involving children. He was the surgeon appointed to the first surgical ward of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children; in that role, he cared for many children with surgical diseases. Dr Joseph Bell, by his compassion for children and his surgical skill, was indeed a pioneer pediatric surgeon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Productivity change of surgeons in an academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yuichi; Otake, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshihito; Oiso, Giichiro; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to calculate total factor productivity of surgeons in an academic year and to evaluate the effect of surgical trainees on their productivity. We analyzed all the surgical procedures performed from April 1 through September 30, 2013 in the Teikyo University Hospital. The nonradial and nonoriented Malmquist model under the variable returns-to-scale assumptions was employed. A decision-making unit is defined as a surgeon with the highest academic rank in the surgery. Inputs were defined as the number of physicians who assisted in surgery, and the time of surgical operation from skin incision to skin closure. The output was defined as the surgical fee for each surgery. April is the beginning month of a new academic year in Japan, and we divided the study period into April to June and July to September 2013. We computed each surgeon's Malmquist index, efficiency change, and technical change. We analyzed 2789 surgical procedures that were performed by 105 surgeons. The Malmquist index of all surgeons was significantly greater than 1 (p = 0.0033). The technical change was significantly greater than 1 (p productive in the beginning months of a new academic year. The main factor of this productivity loss is considered to be surgical training. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Thoracic Surgeons on Lung Cancer Patients’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning LI

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgeons are the direct decision-makers and performers in the surgical treatment of patients with lung cancer. Whether the differences among doctors affect the survival of patients is unclear. This study analyzed the five-year survival rates of different thoracic surgeries in patients undergoing surgery to assess the physician's impact and impact. Methods A retrospective analysis of five years between 2002-2007 in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, for surgical treatment of lung cancer patients. According to different surgeons grouping doctors to compare the basic information of patients, surgical methods, short-term results and long-term survival differences. Results A total of 712 patients treated by 11 experienced thoracic surgeons were included in this study. The patients have nosignificant difference with gender, age, smoking, pathological type between groups. There were significant differences in clinical staging, surgery type, operation time, blood transfusion rate, number of lymph node dissection, palliative resection rate, postoperative complications and perioperative mortality. There was a significant difference in five-year survival rates among patients treated by different doctors. This difference can be seen in all clinical stage analyzes with consistency. In the multivariate analysis, it was suggested that surgeon was an independent factor influencing the prognosis of patients. Conclusion Thoracic surgeon has a significant effect on the therapeutic effect of lung cancer patients.

  1. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels

    2015-01-01

    symmetrisation procedures were performed by plastic surgeons. Breast surgeons had sought more specific education, both international observerships and specific courses. In both groups of surgeons, the majority expressed that both tumour removal and reconstruction should be performed by doctors of their own...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  2. What’s in a name? The sense or non-sense of labelling puppets in contemporary Western theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Kruger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different terms can be use for puppet theatre: figure theatre, object theatre and animation theatre. Contemporary performances including puppets are nowadays often referred to as multimedia performances, crossover theatre and visual theatre. Some artists avoid the word “puppet” because of negative associations: close association with children and low status amongst the arts. Professional puppetry in many Western countries has evolved into a wide-ranging theatre form. Puppets traditionally used to be seen in isolation in performance and a distinct line could be drawn between puppet theatre and other forms of theatre, but the bonding with other art forms has diminished this segregation. As an artistic label, “puppet theatre” is perhaps not always appropriate as it does not acknowledge the artistic scope and complexity of an art work in which multiple visual and acoustic elements are applied, and this bonding raises questions about genre as a classification system.

  3. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You Want to Be a Surgeon Resident Resources Teaching Resources Online Guide to Choosing a Surgical Residency ... After Your Operation Your Discharge and Recovery Complete Video After Your Operation Guidance for after the operation ...

  4. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medical Student Core Curriculum ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Surgical Skills Curriculum Cancer Education Cancer Education ... Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation ...

  5. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Overview ACS-AEI Consortium Quarterly ACS Chapter News Cancer ... American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation ...

  6. Twelfth night of 1917 and the Moscow art theatre Twelfth night of 1917 and the Moscow art theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Ostrovsky

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available On 15 September, 1917, in a letter to Nemirovich-Danchenko, Stanislavsky renounced the stage of the Moscow Art Theatre: I cannot think about any other roles, because I will never be able to do anything, at least in the Moscow Art Theatre. Maybe in some other area or some other place I will be able to rise. Of course I do not mean in other theatres, but in the studios. Othello — free!...1 After the tragedy Stanislavsky had endured with Selo Stepanchikovo, he threw himself into Studio work. He started rehearsing Twelfth Night, a play he had put on at the Society of Art and Literature in 1897. The Studio production of Twelfth Night was played on 25 December 1917, two months to the day after the Revolution. A few months later, Nikolai Efros published a book about the First Studio. It was dedicated to The Cricket on the Hearth but the words Efros used to describe the atmosphere in which Dickens’s production had opened were equally suitable for Twelfth Night: ‘You remember what sort of days those were? On 15 September, 1917, in a letter to Nemirovich-Danchenko, Stanislavsky renounced the stage of the Moscow Art Theatre: I cannot think about any other roles, because I will never be able to do anything, at least in the Moscow Art Theatre. Maybe in some other area or some other place I will be able to rise. Of course I do not mean in other theatres, but in the studios. Othello — free!...1 After the tragedy Stanislavsky had endured with Selo Stepanchikovo, he threw himself into Studio work. He started rehearsing Twelfth Night, a play he had put on at the Society of Art and Literature in 1897. The Studio production of Twelfth Night was played on 25 December 1917, two months to the day after the Revolution. A few months later, Nikolai Efros published a book about the First Studio. It was dedicated to The Cricket on the Hearth but the words Efros used to describe the atmosphere in which Dickens’s production had opened

  7. Ritual, Myth and Tragedy: Origins of Theatre in Dionysian Rites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Berberovic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the deep, dark forests and in the lush green valleys, worshippers of Dionysus celebrated the eternal cycles of death and rebirth, symbolized in the sacred mask of the wild god. Drunk and intoxicated, wearing the mask of Dionysus, the actor is at once the shaman and the priest. Channeling the presence of the fearsome divinity, he drinks the sacred wine and eats the raw flesh of his prey. In this eternal moment, he becomes one with the god and the beast residing inside of him. Within Ancient Greek culture, the sacred rites of Dionysus have been appropriated and transformed to theatre performances. The shaman became the actor, the participants became the audience, the sacred altar became the stage. From myth as a ritual performance emerged the theatre of tragedy, in which the undying spirit of Dionysus, majestic and terrifying, speaks to us even today.

  8. ISLAMIC ELEMENTS IN TRADITIONAL INDONESIAN AND MALAY THEATRE

    OpenAIRE

    Ghulam-Sarwar Yousof

    2010-01-01

    From the earliest times, traditional theatre in Southeast Asia has been shaped by a wide range of religious and cultural influences—those deriving from animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, as well as from Chinese and western traditions. The overwhelming influences, especially of Hinduism, have had the tendency to obscure contributions from the Middle- and Near-East. The view that Islam, with rare exceptions, prohibits performing arts has resulted in a negligence of these arts forms in Muslim s...

  9. A Theatre Laboratory Approach to Pedagogy and Creativity: Odin Teatret and Group Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    This book considers the pedagogy of the theatre laboratory, focusing on seminal theatre group Odin Teatret. It provides a detailed discussion of the historical background to theatre laboratories, including their conception, before moving on to specific examples of how the work at Odin Teatret cro...... to establish inquiry-based learning laboratories, in order to re-think higher education. It will be an invaluable resource for students and academics working on performance, creativity studies and pedagogy...

  10. ISLAMIC ELEMENTS IN TRADITIONAL INDONESIAN AND MALAY THEATRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam-Sarwar Yousof

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available From the earliest times, traditional theatre in Southeast Asia has been shaped by a wide range of religious and cultural influences—those deriving from animism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, as well as from Chinese and western traditions. The overwhelming influences, especially of Hinduism, have had the tendency to obscure contributions from the Middle- and Near-East. The view that Islam, with rare exceptions, prohibits performing arts has resulted in a negligence of these arts forms in Muslim societies with the possible exception of Indonesia. This paper highlights significant elements of Islamic culture that have shaped Indonesian and Malay traditional theatre through the adaptation of borrowed genres such as taziya, as well as locally created styles of shadow play (wayang kulit and the doll-puppet theatre (wayang golek; the use of important themes from Islamic literature, in particular thosederived from Hikayat Amir Hamza; as well as esoteric interpretationsof certain episodes originally derived from pre-Islamic sources,including the Mahabharata, in terms of Sufism to make them both highly meaningful and acceptable to Muslim audiences.

  11. Role of the plastic surgeon in a cancer hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses and illustrates the complicated problems faced by the plastic surgeon in a cancer hospital. His patients are often weakened, both physically and psychologically, not only by the cancer itself, but also by extensive ablative surgery. The goal of the plastic surgeon is rehabilitation of the patient after he is cured of cancer. Good planning with the cancer surgeon before the ablative operation is very important, as is immediate repair, whenever possible. The simplest procedure with the fewest stages that can accomplish satisfactory repair in the shortest time should be chosen, as we can never, even after the most extensive cancer operation, be sure that no recurrence will appear. Partial surgical repair and the use of a prosthesis should be considered for complicated defects in old and weak patients. Postoperative radiation therapy, if indicated, can be given after the flap has healed into the defect but before the pedicle is separated. The plastic surgeon should always be aware that his most important goal is speedy and satisfactory rehabilitation of the patient

  12. [What Do Young Surgeons Want? Modern Requirements for Senior Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeth, Anjali A; Mille, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Due to the shortage of surgical specialists, the question arises as to what surgical residents want and how the fascination of general and visceral surgery may be highlighted. The surgical working group "Young Surgeons" (CAJC) of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) has organised and subdivided the aspects of an attractive surgical workplace and provides solutions. On the one hand, there is the structured and transparent residency which includes a defined curriculum, assistance of sub-steps during surgery, residency dialogues held on a regular basis, logbooks, the possibility of training and simulation in the clinic as well as permission to participate in further education and training. This has to go hand in hand with a "livable surgery" that is characterised by the compatibility of family and work, better planning of the routine in the clinic, a positive feedback culture, work-life balance, new work (time) models and more time for teaching and research. For many of these aspects, the head of surgery has to be the central role model to initiate structural changes in the clinic, especially as many of these key points may be easily implemented. In this way, the attraction of surgery can be rapidly enhanced and a "livable surgery" may be lived. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  14. Operation Open Heart in PNG, 1993-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefuarani, N; Vince, J; Hawker, R; Nunn, G; Lee, R; Crawford, M; Kevau, I H

    2007-10-01

    To report on the 'Operation Open Heart' (OOH) cardiac surgical program in Papua New Guinea (PNG). To document the short-term surgical outcome, the experience gained and the skill transfer from the visiting team members to their PNG counterparts. Analysis of the database compiled from the records of the patients who were operated on by the visiting cardiothoracic surgical team. Four hundred and seventy patients from all regions of the country received operations. Three hundred and thirty seven (72%) were children less than 12 years of age, 39 (8%) were between 12 and 18 years of age and 263 (56%) were females. One hundred and eighty five (40%) patients had open heart procedures. Complications were unremarkable and the short-term mortality was 1.9%. Clinical skills were transferred to, and experience was gained by national anaesthetists, surgeons, paediatricians, physicians and nurses from intensive and full nursing care units and the operating theatre. The program not only achieved a higher annual operation rate than previous programs but also had a lower mortality rate. It achieved its objective of service delivery and, to a considerable extent, its objective of skill transfer. There now is an established and active group of PNG doctors and nurses with the skills, experience and confidence to perform patent ductus repair safely and efficiently. The program is cheaper than its predecessors, and is less disruptive for parents, patients and families.

  15. Sources of pain in laparoendoscopic gynecological surgeons: An analysis of ergonomic factors and proposal of an aid to improve comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sa Ra; Shim, Sunah; Yu, Taeri; Jeong, Kyungah; Chung, Hye Won

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) offers cosmetic benefits to patients; however, surgeons often experience pain during MIS. We administered an ergonomic questionnaire to 176 Korean laparoscopic gynecological surgeons to determine potential sources of pain during surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that had a significant impact on gynecological surgeons' pain. Operating table height at the beginning of surgery and during the operation were significantly associated with neck and shoulder discomfort (P ergonomic solutions to reduce gynecological laparoscopic surgeons' pain. Based on our results, we propose the use of an ergonomic surgical step stool to reduce physical pain related to performing laparoscopic operations.

  16. The fluorescence theatre: a cost-effective device using theatre gels for fluorescent protein and dye screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, John R; Nordeste, Ricardo F; Charles, Trevor C

    2011-04-01

    Here we report a simple cost-effective device for screening colonies on plates for expression of the monomeric red fluorescent protein mRFP1 and the fluorescent dye Nile red. This device can be built from any simple light source, in our case a Quebec Colony Counter, and cost-effective theatre gels. The device can be assembled in as little as 20 min, and it produces excellent results when screening a large number of colonies.

  17. Practice patterns and job satisfaction in fellowship-trained endocrine surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinberg, Michael; Duh, Quan-Yang; Cisco, Robin M; Gosnell, Jessica E; Scholten, Anouk; Clark, Orlo H; Shen, Wen T

    2012-12-01

    Debates about the difficult job market for young endocrine surgeons are ongoing. This study aimed to analyze the practice patterns and work-related satisfaction levels of recently trained endocrine surgeons. An anonymous survey was utilized. Participants were divided into 3 groups: "Young" (5 years). Fifty-six of 78 surgeons (72%) responded to the survey. Time in practice ranged from 1 to 9 years (mean, 3.9 ± 0.28). Forty-five (80%) described their practice as academic. Participants performed 244.1 ± 17.8 operations within the last year; 75.4 ± 3.3% were endocrine cases. More surgeons in the "young" group have academic practices (92%) and joined established endocrine surgery groups (54%) versus older surgeons (67% and 42%; P = .05). Of surgeons in the "young" group, 4% started their own practice versus 33% in the "older" group (P = .04). Level of satisfaction with financial compensation (3.2 on a 4-point scale versus 2.9) and lifestyle (3.6 vs 3.1) was also higher in the younger group (P = .009). Despite widespread speculation about scarcity of academic jobs after fellowship, recently trained endocrine surgeons are more likely to practice in academic settings and join established endocrine surgery practices when compared with older surgeons. Overall satisfaction level is higher among recently trained surgeons. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Benchmarking surgeon satisfaction at academic health centers: a nationwide comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachman, D A

    1996-01-01

    Forty-six academic health centers (AHCs) belonging to the University HealthSystem consortium joined forces to compare the efficiency of their surgical services and to identify best practices. In addition to measures of operational performance, surgeon satisfaction with the surgical services provided was measured by using a standardized questionnaire. From hospital records, indicators of the efficiency of surgical services were collected in three main areas: scheduling, preoperative testing and assessment, and the intraoperative process. Responding to a mail questionnaire, a sample of surgeons rated their satisfaction with key aspects of surgical services including scheduling, operating room staff, and equipment/supplies. On the basis of a review of the operational measures and the survey results, high performers were identified. Site visits were made to several of these high performers to uncover the critical factors responsible for their success. The survey revealed distinct variations in surgeon satisfaction across the participating institutions. Numerical benchmarks were obtained for surgeon satisfaction with each key component of surgical services. Scheduling was the most important component of overall surgeon satisfaction, explaining 71% of the variance in the rating of overall satisfaction with surgical services. High operational efficiency and high surgeon satisfaction were not incompatible. Several of the participating institutions were able to achieve both. These results were disseminated to all of the participants at a national meeting as well as in written form. The surgeon satisfaction survey allowed the participants to establish benchmarks for surgeon satisfaction for each key component of the surgical services they receive. The site visits revealed several common characteristics of highly efficient surgical services. Taken by themselves, the participating institutions might have been reluctant to consider adopting these best practices for fear of

  19. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald J; Russell, Thomas; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence of burnout among American surgeons and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with surgeon burnout. : Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization that leads to decreased effectiveness at work. A limited amount of information exists about the relationship between specific demographic and practice characteristics with burnout among American surgeons. Members of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life (QOL). Burnout and QOL were measured using validated instruments. Of the approximately 24,922 surgeons sampled, 7905 (32%) returned surveys. Responders had been in practice 18 years, worked 60 hours per week, and were on call 2 nights/wk (median values). Overall, 40% of responding surgeons were burned out, 30% screened positive for symptoms of depression, and 28% had a mental QOL score >1/2 standard deviation below the population norm. Factors independently associated with burnout included younger age, having children, area of specialization, number of nights on call per week, hours worked per week, and having compensation determined entirely based on billing. Only 36% of surgeons felt their work schedule left enough time for personal/family life and only 51% would recommend their children pursue a career as a physician/surgeon. Burnout is common among American surgeons and is the single greatest predictor of surgeons' satisfaction with career and specialty choice. Additional research is needed to identify individual, organizational, and societal interventions that preserve and promote the mental health of American surgeons.

  20. Emptiness as Material for Devised Theatre Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Margaret

    2018-01-01

    The article examines the ways in which failure operated in the devising process with a colleague with learning disabilities. Themes of collaboration, co-creativity and power relations are set within the account of a process between the author and a research participant with learning and physical disabilities. The postdramatic device of failure…

  1. Nanotechnology tolls the bell for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Hajiliasgari, Fatemeh

    2013-06-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging discipline, having power to revolutionarize every scientific field to a very deep level which previously thought to be a science fiction. Having a great potential to beneficially change the way a disease is diagnosed, treated and prevented, nanotechnology practically impacts on state of the art healthcare technologies and plays a crucial role in changing the field of surgery. Surgeons are constantly looking for minimally invasive ways to treat their patients, as recovery is faster when a lesser trauma is inflicted upon a patient, scarring is lessened and there are usually fewer complications in the aftermath of the operation. Through nanotechnology, tiny biosensors could be constructed which could take these factors into account, thus shortening the patient recovery period and saving hospitals money, reducing infection rates within the hospital, reducing the waiting lists for operation and allowing doctors to treat more patients in the same period of time. This review employs a thematic analysis of online series of academic papers focuses on the potentials of nanotechnology in surgery, especially in plastic surgery and addresses the possible future prospects of nanotechnology in this field.

  2. Exposure of the orthopaedic surgeon to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Kiyonobu; Koga, Takamasa; Matsuzaki, Akio; Kido, Masaki; Satoh, Tetsunori [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Chikushi Hospital

    1995-09-01

    We monitored the amount of radiation received by surgeons and assistants during surgery carried out with fluoroscopic assistance. The radiation was monitored with the use of MYDOSE MINIX PDM107 made by Aloka Co. Over a one year period from Aug 20, 1992 to Aug 19, 1993, a study was undertaken to evaluate exposure of the groin level to radiation with or without use of the lead apron during 106 operation (Group-1). In another group, radiation was monitored at the breast and groin level outside of the lead apron during 39 operations (Group-2). In Group-1, the average exposure per person during one year was 46.0 {mu}SV and the average exposure for each procedure was 1.68 {mu}SV. The use of the lead apron affirmed its protective value; the average radiation dose at the groin level out-side of the apron was 9.11 {mu}SV, the measured dose beneath the apron 0.61 {mu}SV. The average dose of exposure to the head, breast at groin level outside of the lead apron, were 7.68 {mu}SV, 16.24 {mu}SV, 32.04 {mu}SV respectively. This study and review of the literature indicate that the total amount of radiation exposure during surgery done with fluoroscopic control remains well within maximum exposure limits. (author).

  3. Exposure of the orthopaedic surgeon to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kiyonobu; Koga, Takamasa; Matsuzaki, Akio; Kido, Masaki; Satoh, Tetsunori

    1995-01-01

    We monitored the amount of radiation received by surgeons and assistants during surgery carried out with fluoroscopic assistance. The radiation was monitored with the use of MYDOSE MINIX PDM107 made by Aloka Co. Over a one year period from Aug 20, 1992 to Aug 19, 1993, a study was undertaken to evaluate exposure of the groin level to radiation with or without use of the lead apron during 106 operation (Group-1). In another group, radiation was monitored at the breast and groin level outside of the lead apron during 39 operations (Group-2). In Group-1, the average exposure per person during one year was 46.0 μSV and the average exposure for each procedure was 1.68 μSV. The use of the lead apron affirmed its protective value; the average radiation dose at the groin level out-side of the apron was 9.11 μSV, the measured dose beneath the apron 0.61 μSV. The average dose of exposure to the head, breast at groin level outside of the lead apron, were 7.68 μSV, 16.24 μSV, 32.04 μSV respectively. This study and review of the literature indicate that the total amount of radiation exposure during surgery done with fluoroscopic control remains well within maximum exposure limits. (author)

  4. Best Practices During Hip Arthroscopy: Aggregate Recommendations of High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Asheesh; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Redmond, John M; Gerhardt, Michael B; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Stake, Christine E; Finch, Nathan A; Domb, Benjamin G

    2015-09-01

    To survey surgeons who perform a high volume of hip arthroscopy procedures regarding their operative technique, type of procedure, and postoperative management. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 27 high-volume orthopaedic surgeons specializing in hip arthroscopy to report their preferences and practices related to their operative practice and postoperative rehabilitation protocol. All participants completed the survey in person in an anonymous fashion during a meeting of the American Hip Institute. All surgeons perform hip arthroscopy with the patient in the supine position, accessing the central compartment of the hip initially, using intraoperative fluoroscopy. All surgeons perform labral repair (100%), with the majority performing labral reconstructions (77.8%) and gluteus medius repairs (81.5%). There is variability in the type of anchors used during labral repair. Most surgeons perform capsular closure in most cases (88.9%), inject either intra-articular cortisone or platelet-rich plasma at the conclusion of the procedure (59%), and prescribe a postoperative hip brace for some or all patients (59%). There is considerable variability in rehabilitation protocols. All surgeons routinely prescribe postoperative heterotopic ossification prophylaxis to their patients, with most surgeons (88.9%) prescribing a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication for 3 weeks. Forty percent of the respondents use the modified Harris Hip Score as the most important outcome measure. Consistent practices such as use of intraoperative fluoroscopy, heterotopic ossification prophylaxis, and labral repair skills were identified by surveying 27 hip arthroscopy surgeons at high-volume centers. Most of the surgeons performed routine capsular closure unless underlying conditions precluded capsular release or plication. The survey identified higher variability between surgeons regarding postoperative rehabilitation protocols and use of intra-articular pharmacologic injections at the

  5. Breast imaging: a surgeon's prospective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Anne M.; Comstock, Christopher; Hoh, Carl K.; Vera, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, gamma camera and intraoperative gamma detection, and computed tomography are employed in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. This paper summarizes the role of each modality from the perspective of the physician responsible for management of the patient's care. An understanding of an imaging modality's current role can provide insights into the design of new applications and diagnostic agents. Moreover, knowledge of the mechanism by which each modality provides clinical information can guide the design of new imaging methods that complement and add certainty to the patient's management. The reader should note the lack of molecular information provided by the current imaging methods. The perspective concludes with a request for an imaging technique that can measure the biologic aggressiveness of a woman's cancer. The surgeon notes that basing the formation of an image on a molecular process would be compatible with current medical practice, which utilizes molecular concepts to base medical decisions. In addition, molecular imaging will enable rapid translation between basic science and medical practice

  6. The Radiographer's multidisciplinary team role in theatre scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.; Widdowfield, M.; Cosson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiographers work in multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) to image intra-operatively using ionising radiation. The radiographer is responsible according to IR(ME)ER (2000) and IRR(99) regulations for advocating patient and theatre personnel safety. A comprehensive literature search revealed limited studies analysing the radiographer's experiences of utilising power to influence MDTs. Therefore the aim of the study was to explore the power relationships within different MDT scenarios. Method: A qualitative approach was adopted consisting of interviews exploring radiographers' experiences as 1) established Cardiology team members and 2) transient members of Orthopaedic teams. French and Raven's power bases were used as an a priori framework. Ethical approval was obtained prior to commencement. Sampling was purposive, following gatekeeper permission, and subsequent participation was voluntary. Thematic content analysis was undertaken following data collection. Findings and discussion: Perpetration of Legitimate Power was more frequently attempted in transient teams. However, there were more successful descriptions in established teams. Expert Power was reciprocated successfully in established teams but was context dependent in transient teams. Referent power was well used by participants, although the transient nature of teams did affect this. Job satisfaction was expressed by both groups, although evidence presented was more comprehensive in established teams. Conclusion: The social bases of power at play within two MDTs have been examined. It is unclear to what extent the team specialism has a role in the differences identified. Radiographers working in established teams may have greater job satisfaction and perpetrate power bases more effectively than radiographers serving in transient teams. - Highlights: • This is a qualitative study using a phenomenological approach. • The social bases of power are adopted as an a priori theoretical

  7. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitor...

  8. Improving surgeon utilization in an orthopedic department using simulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simwita YW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusta W Simwita, Berit I Helgheim Department of Logistics, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Purpose: Worldwide more than two billion people lack appropriate access to surgical services due to mismatch between existing human resource and patient demands. Improving utilization of existing workforce capacity can reduce the existing gap between surgical demand and available workforce capacity. In this paper, the authors use discrete event simulation to explore the care process at an orthopedic department. Our main focus is improving utilization of surgeons while minimizing patient wait time.Methods: The authors collaborated with orthopedic department personnel to map the current operations of orthopedic care process in order to identify factors that influence poor surgeons utilization and high patient waiting time. The authors used an observational approach to collect data. The developed model was validated by comparing the simulation output with the actual patient data that were collected from the studied orthopedic care process. The authors developed a proposal scenario to show how to improve surgeon utilization.Results: The simulation results showed that if ancillary services could be performed before the start of clinic examination services, the orthopedic care process could be highly improved. That is, improved surgeon utilization and reduced patient waiting time. Simulation results demonstrate that with improved surgeon utilizations, up to 55% increase of future demand can be accommodated without patients reaching current waiting time at this clinic, thus, improving patient access to health care services.Conclusion: This study shows how simulation modeling can be used to improve health care processes. This study was limited to a single care process; however the findings can be applied to improve other orthopedic care process with similar operational characteristics. Keywords: waiting time, patient, health care process

  9. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Advancements in minimally invasive surgery have led to increases in popularity of single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) and natural orifice translumenal surgery (NOTES(®); American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy [Oak Brook, IL] and Society of American...... Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons [Los Angeles, CA]) due to their postulated benefits of better cosmesis, less pain, and quicker recovery. This questionnaire-based study investigated Danish surgeons' attitudes toward these new procedures. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A 26-item questionnaire was developed...... and distributed electronically via e-mail to a total of 1253 members of The Danish Society of Surgeons and The Danish Society of Young Surgeons. RESULTS: In total, 352 (approximately 30%) surgeons completed the questionnaire, 54.4% were over 50 years of age, and 76.6% were men. When choosing surgery, the most...

  10. Colorectal Surgery Fellowship Improves In-hospital Mortality After Colectomy and Proctectomy Irrespective of Hospital and Surgeon Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraidaridis, Julia T; Hashimoto, Daniel A; Chang, David C; Bordeianou, Liliana G; Kunitake, Hiroko

    2018-03-01

    General surgery residents are increasingly pursuing sub-specialty training in colorectal (CR) surgery. However, the majority of operations performed by CR surgeons are also performed by general surgeons. This study aimed to assess in-hospital mortality stratified by CR training status after adjusting for surgeon and hospital volume. The Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative system database was used to identify all patients who underwent colectomy/proctectomy from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2014, in the state of New York. Operations performed by board-certified CR surgeons were identified. The relationships between CR board certification and in-hospital mortality, in-hospital complications, length of stay, and ostomy were assessed using multivariate regression models. Two hundred seventy thousand six hundred eighty-four patients underwent colectomy/proctectomy over the study period. Seventy-two thousand two hundred seventy-nine (26.7%) of operations were performed by CR surgeons. Without adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, in-hospital mortality was lower for those undergoing colectomy/proctectomy by a CR surgeon (OR 0.49, CI 0.44-0.54, p = 0.001). After controlling for hospital and surgeon volume, the odds of inpatient mortality after colectomy/proctectomy for those operated on by CR surgeons weakened to 0.76 (CI 0.68-0.86, p = 0.001). Hospital and surgeon volume accounted for 53% of the reduction in in-hospital mortality when CR surgeons performed colectomy/proctectomy. Patients who underwent surgery by a CR surgeon had a shorter inpatient stay (0.8 days, p = 0.001) and a decreased chance of colostomy (OR 0.86, CI 0.78-0.95, p accounting for hospital and surgeon volume.

  11. [Pierre Mornard (1883-1929), unrecognized plastic surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2017-02-01

    Many operations of aesthetic surgery were described between 1920 and 1930. Several French surgeons are recognized as pioneers of the speciality. Pierre Mornard (1883-1929) published numerous articles of plastic and aesthetic surgery between 1925 and 1929 the date of his death. The articles were illustrated with drawings of surgery he had practiced. He described in 1929 the first abdominoplasty with umbilical transposition. Pierre Mornard can be considered a pioneer of aesthetic surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Ján Jamnický’s Ten Days with Soviet Theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindovská Nadežda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Art was perceived in the Soviet Union as a part of ideology and propaganda aimed not only at the domestic environment but also at foreign countries. State cultural policy was presented through a series of magnificent meetings and shows, to which also participants from abroad were invited. In the 1930s Moscow was the venue of several theatre festivals, which were attended by Czechoslovak theatre makers. In 1936 it was also attended by Ján Jamnický, the novice theatre director of the Slovak National Theatre in Bratislava. The Slovak theatre maker saw a lot of inspiring productions and experienced the initial period of a campaign aimed at suppressing the freedom of artistic expression. He became a witness to the twilight of Russian theatre avant-garde. The present paper describes the theatre experiences of Ján Jamnický in the Soviet Union and their impact on his life, production and style of direction. It points to a series of overlooked facts which are necessary for a complete understanding of the historical and artistic context of Soviet theatre and Jamnický’s journey.

  13. Theatre for Change: An Analysis of Two Performances by Women in Mundemba Sub-Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyi-Tang, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Contends that theatre has the power to induce oppressors to change their attitudes permanently towards the groups they oppress. Describes theatrical performances by women in Mundemba Sub-Division, Cameroon, which created lasting changes in men's attitudes. Concludes that theatre calls for sociocultural and economic changes and it has the power to…

  14. Holding Talks : Ola Rotimi and the Theatre of the Absurd | Ebewo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with the intention of determining its relevance to African theatrical praxis and its effect on the developing Nigerian audiences. The paper concludes that African dramatists should be cautious in their theatrical experiments in order not to render the theatre “deadly.” Keywords: theatre of the absurd, Ola Rotimi, Holding Talks, ...

  15. Political Conscientisation through Street Theatre: A Study with Reference to "Kalyanasaugadhikam"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldhose, Adakkaravayalil Yoyakky

    2014-01-01

    Theatre occupies a significant place in any revolutionary political strategy that has as its objective a radical transformation of society. This paper attempts to make a thematic and structural analysis of the Malayalam street play "Kalyanasaugadhikam" written by Anil Nadakavu in 2009 and performed by Manisha Theatres, Thadiyankovil,…

  16. The Ignorant Facilitator: Education, Politics and Theatre in Co-Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Aladgem, Shulamith

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the book "The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation" by the French philosopher, Jacques Rancière. Its intention is to study the potential contribution of this text to the discourse of applied theatre (theatre in co-communities) in general, and the role of the facilitator in particular. It…

  17. Best before...? The Dutch theatre sound archive between shelf-life and "functional memory"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franzen, R.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the institutionalization of phonic theatre memories at the example of the historical Dutch theatre sound archive, founded in 1965 and at the time known under the name «Theater Klank en Beeld». After decades of collecting and archiving, the collection was rendered dysfunctional,

  18. A State of Health? Constructive Dialogue and the Rhythms of International Youth Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This article examines youth theatre as a mode of promoting public dialogue within situations of political tension or conflict. It reflects on the author's own experience of trying unsuccessfully to find a framework to evaluate an European Union supported theatre project, youth/art/peace/network, which took place in Austria, Israel and Palestine in…

  19. SMEs, IT, and the Third Space: Colonization and Creativity in the Theatre Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie E.; Kendall, Kenneth E.

    We examine how small and medium-sized, professional, nonprofit performing arts theatres in the US can improve the strategic use of information technology (IT), as well as other aspects of theatre management for large, commercial theatre productions in the West End of London and on Broadway in New York City. In this article we use the epistemology of the third space developed by Bhabha (1994) and extended by Frenkel (2008). Although both authors were discussing knowledge transfer, we use their conceptualizations to characterize and explore more deeply the transfer process of culture (and thereby useful practices and worthwhile lessons) from small and medium-sized professional, nonprofit theaters to large-scale commercial theatres. We include a discussion of Nonaka’s (1991) concept of ba, and how it relates to the third space. We specifically employ the metaphor of the third space developed by Bhabha (1994) to critique and understand the verbal and nonverbal cultural transmissions between small and large theatres. One of our contributions is to use the conceptualization and metaphor of the third space to understand the complex exchanges and relationships between small to medium-sized nonprofit professional theatres and large commercial theatres, and to identify what large commercial productions can learn from nonprofit theatres from these exchanges.

  20. Performative Criminology and the “State of Play” for Theatre with Criminalized Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Merrill

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article applies feminist theory with cultural criminology to explore the role of theatre in the lives of criminalized women. Theatre initiatives for criminalized populations are growing worldwide, and so we are seeking to better understand how these two realms intersect. This article is based on a case study which was conducted at the Clean Break Theatre Company in London, England in the summer of 2013. We explore some of the emerging themes, which took shape from a thematic analysis. First we describe how theatre can be used as a lens into the experiences of criminalized women, and then as a tool for growth in their lives. The role of environment at Clean Break, and the role of voice from practicing theatre in a women-only environment are then discussed. Lastly, the roles of transformation and growth overall for the participants are explored in relation to their experiences with theatre practices. This article works to understand how theatre practices can elevate and adapt cultural criminology into a new form of imaginative criminology, and questions how we can embrace this form of engagement between theatre and criminology within a Canadian context.

  1. Theatre Curriculum in the US: A Great Tasting Sandwich on Stale Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This essay considers the role that local control, poverty, access and policy play in providing drama/theatre education opportunities to students in the US. It examines how state and federal initiatives shape and determine the curriculum. While there are studies that suggest robust theatre education in the US, these findings are complicated when…

  2. A Search for the Sources of Excellence: Applying Contemporary Management Theory to Theatre Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tom; White, Donald D.

    A study was conducted to learn about the effective practice of theatre through the application of research methods developed in studies involving other types of organizations. Successful and unsuccessful play directors, as determined by evaluations of their plays in the Southwest Region of the American College Theatre Festival, were surveyed to…

  3. Myths and Metaphors from the Mall: Critical Teaching and Everyday Life in Undergraduate Theatre Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley, Anne

    2001-01-01

    Offers a theoretical basis for undergraduate theatre studies that stresses the participation, democratization, and popularization that are necessary to sustain the arts in American society. Argues that the curriculum should be reoriented to emphasize theatre's functional value by building on students' already acquired and practiced aesthetic…

  4. Projecting surgeon supply using a dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin P; Knapton, Andy; Sheldon, George F; Meyer, Anthony; Ricketts, Thomas C

    2013-05-01

    To develop a projection model to forecast the head count and full-time equivalent supply of surgeons by age, sex, and specialty in the United States from 2009 to 2028. The search for the optimal number and specialty mix of surgeons to care for the United States population has taken on increased urgency under health care reform. Expanded insurance coverage and an aging population will increase demand for surgical and other medical services. Accurate forecasts of surgical service capacity are crucial to inform the federal government, training institutions, professional associations, and others charged with improving access to health care. The study uses a dynamic stock and flow model that simulates future changes in numbers and specialty type by factoring in changes in surgeon demographics and policy factors. : Forecasts show that overall surgeon supply will decrease 18% during the period form 2009 to 2028 with declines in all specialties except colorectal, pediatric, neurological surgery, and vascular surgery. Model simulations suggest that none of the proposed changes to increase graduate medical education currently under consideration will be sufficient to offset declines. The length of time it takes to train surgeons, the anticipated decrease in hours worked by surgeons in younger generations, and the potential decreases in graduate medical education funding suggest that there may be an insufficient surgeon workforce to meet population needs. Existing maldistribution patterns are likely to be exacerbated, leading to delayed or lost access to time-sensitive surgical procedures, particularly in rural areas.

  5. Retention of Mohs surgeons in academic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shali; Mina, Mary Alice; Brown, Marc D; Zwald, Fiona O

    2015-08-01

    Retention of academic Mohs surgeons is important for the growth of this specialty and teaching of residents and students. To examine factors that influence retention of Mohs surgeons in academics and to better understand reasons for their departure. A survey was electronically distributed to academic Mohs surgeons in the American College of Mohs Surgery, asking them to rate the importance of several variables on their decision to remain in academia. Private practice Mohs surgeons who had left academics were also surveyed. Two hundred thirty-six dermatologic surgeons completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent work full time in academics, and approximately 7% work part time. The top reasons for practicing in the academic setting are intellectual stimulation, teaching opportunities, and collaboration with other university physicians and researchers. Seventy-one percent of respondents reported they would stay in academics, 7% indicated they would not, and 22% were unsure. Unfair compensation, inadequate support staff, poor leadership, increased bureaucracy, and decreased autonomy were top reasons that may compel a Mohs surgeon to leave. Opportunities for intellectual stimulation, collaboration, and teaching remain the main draw for academic Mohs surgeons. A supportive environment, strong leadership, and establishing fair compensation are imperative in ensuring their stay.

  6. Surgeon Participation in Early Accountable Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Matthew J; Graves, Amy J; Buntin, Melinda B; Richards, Michael R; Penson, David F

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to characterize the landscape of surgeon participation in early accountable care organizations (ACOs) and to identify specialty-, organization-, and market-specific factors associated with ACO participation. Despite rapid deployment of alternative payment models (APMs), little is known about the prevalence of surgeon participation, and key drivers behind surgeon participation in APMs. Using data from SK&A, a research firm, we evaluated the near universe of US practices to characterize ACO participation among 125,425 US surgeons in 2015. We fit multivariable logistic regression models to characterize key drivers of ACO participation, and more specifically, the interaction between ACO affiliation and organizational structure. Of 125,425 US surgeons, 27,956 (22.3%) participated in at least 1 ACO program in 2015. We observed heterogeneity in participation by subspecialty, with trauma and transplant reporting the highest rate of ACO enrollment (36% for both) and plastic surgeons reporting the lowest (12.9%) followed by ophthalmology (16.0%) and hand (18.6%). Surgeons in group practices and integrated systems were more likely to participate relative to those practicing independently (aOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.50, 1.64; aOR 4.87, 95% CI 4.68, 5.07, respectively). We observed a statistically significant interaction (P organization. Model-derived predicted probabilities revealed that, within each specialty, surgeons in integrated health systems had the highest predicted probabilities of ACO and those practicing independently generally had the lowest. We observed considerable variation in ACO enrollment among US surgeons, mediated at least in part by differences in practice organization. These data underscore the need for development of frameworks to characterize the strategic advantages and disadvantages associated with APM participation.

  7. Gay theatre, AIDS, and taboo: reconsidering Robert Chesley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrila, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Theatre was among the first popular culture forms to address HIV/AIDS and did so memorably in such works as The Normal Heart, As Is, Love! Valor! Compassion!, and March of the Falsettos. As a response to criticisms of stage dramas focusing on HIV/AIDS in the main as undifferentiated and melodramatic, the author suggests critical consideration of two works by playwright Robert Chesley. In her analysis of Night Sweats and Jerker, the author argues Chesley offers an alternative perspective that is both liberatory and sex-positive.

  8. Amazing Acrobatics of Language: The Theatre of Yussef El Guindi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneka Esch-van Kan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of minority rights movements and literatures of migration within the last century’s history of the humanities, no light has been shed so far on the life and arts of Arab Americans. While there is a tradition of Arab American writers and poets, it is often claimed that ‘Arab American Theatre’ was born on September 11. This article will start from general reflections on the development and forms of Arab American theatre in the United States and will in its main body concentrate on the works of Egyptian-born playwright Yussef El Guindi.

  9. Augmented reality for the surgeon: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jang W; Chen, Robert E; Kim, Esther J; Akinduro, Oluwaseun O; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Han, Phillip K; Si, Phong; Freeman, William D; Diaz, Roberto J; Komotar, Ricardo J; Pirris, Stephen M; Brown, Benjamin L; Bydon, Mohamad; Wang, Michael Y; Wharen, Robert E; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2018-04-30

    Since the introduction of wearable head-up displays, there has been much interest in the surgical community adapting this technology into routine surgical practice. We used the keywords augmented reality OR wearable device OR head-up display AND surgery using PubMed, EBSCO, IEEE and SCOPUS databases. After exclusions, 74 published articles that evaluated the utility of wearable head-up displays in surgical settings were included in our review. Across all studies, the most common use of head-up displays was in cases of live streaming from surgical microscopes, navigation, monitoring of vital signs, and display of preoperative images. The most commonly used head-up display was Google Glass. Head-up displays enhanced surgeons' operating experience; common disadvantages include limited battery life, display size and discomfort. Due to ergonomic issues with dual-screen devices, augmented reality devices with the capacity to overlay images onto the surgical field will be key features of next-generation surgical head-up displays. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Conference of Theatre Leaders on March 29–30, 1917: Discussion on the Fates of the Russian Theatre in the Age of Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDEEV P.N.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the understudied but important event in the history of Russian theatre in the age of revolution – the conference of theatre leaders, held on March 29–30, 1917 in the Winter Palace. The study is aimed at determining the circle of participants, highlighting the discussed issues, evaluating the overall significance of the conference in the history of Russian theatre. In the process of research the author used a number of new archival materials, the most important of which are the recordings of the meeting of March 30 (found by the author in the collections of the St. Petersburg State Museum of Theatre and Music and introduced to the scientific world for the first time. On the basis of these recordings, as well as other archival materials and publicistic articles, the author managed to determine the circle of theatre leaders who participated in the conference. They include such outstanding representatives of the Russian theater as V.E. Meyerhold, M.M. Fokin, A.I. Sumbatov-Yuzhin and L.V. Sobinov. They discussed the responsibilities of self-government, elected by the actors, the rights of the theatre commissars, the pursuit of Moscow scene to achieve the maximum independence from Petrograd as well as the functions of the assistant commissar of the Provisional Government of the former Ministry of the Court. The question about the possible involvement of Soviet Workers and Soldiers in the development of theatrical reforms provoked lively debates (the proposal was not supported by the majority of the participants. The final resolution of the conference stated the demand of the “autonomy” for state theatres. The significance of the conference consists primarily in the fact that it revealed some common intentions of theatre leaders as well as contradictions on a number of issues, many of which were raised for the first time at this conference and were continually discussed throughout the revolution.

  11. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Participate Resources Webinars for Young Surgeons YFA E-News YFA Advocacy Essay Contest Resident and Associate ... ACS Leader International Exchange Scholar Program Resources RAS E-News Medical Students Operation Giving Back Operation Giving ...

  12. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Careers at ACS Careers at ACS About ACS Career Types Working at ACS ... ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD ...

  13. Digital Footprint of Neurological Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Gupta, Raghav; Shah, Aakash; Madill, Evan; Prabhu, Arpan V; Agarwal, Nitin

    2018-05-01

    Patients are increasingly turning to online resources to inquire about individual physicians and to gather health information. However, little research exists studying the online presence of neurosurgeons across the country. This study aimed to characterize these online profiles and assess the scope of neurosurgeons' digital identities. Medicare-participating neurologic surgeons from the United States and Puerto Rico were identified using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Physician Comparable Downloadable File. Each physician was characterized by his or her medical education, graduation year, city of practice, gender, and affiliation with an academic institution. Using a Google-based custom search tool, the top 10 search results for each physician were extracted and categorized as 1 of the following: 1) physician, hospital, or healthcare system controlled, 2) third-party or government controlled, 3) social media-based, 4) primary journal article, or 5) other. Among the physicians within the CMS database, 4751 self-identified as being neurosurgeons, yielding a total of 45,875 uniform resource locator search results pertinent to these physicians. Of the 4751 neurosurgeons, 2317 (48.8%) and 2434 (51.2%) were classified as academic and nonacademic neurosurgeons, respectively. At least 1 search result was obtained for every physician. Hospital, healthcare system, or physician-controlled websites (18,206; 39.7%) and third-party websites (17,122; 37.3%) were the 2 most commonly observed domain types. Websites belonging to social media platforms accounted for 4843 (10.6%) search results, and websites belonging to peer-reviewed academic journals accounted for 1888 (4.1%) search results. The frequency with which a third-party domain appeared as the first search result was higher for nonacademic neurosurgeons than for academic neurosurgeons. In general, neurosurgeons lacked a controllable online presence within their first page of Google Search results

  14. Lifelong Learning for the Hand Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-09-01

    Hand surgeons are faced with the impossible task of mastering a rapidly expanding pool of knowledge and surgical techniques. Dedication to lifelong learning is, therefore, an essential component of delivering the best, most up-to-date care for patients. Board certification, participation in continuing medical education and maintenance of certification activities, and attendance at national meetings are essential mechanisms by which hand surgeons may foster the acquisition of essential knowledge and clinical skills, This article highlights the history, current status, and emerging needs in continuing medical education for the hand surgeon. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outlier experienced surgeon's performances impact on benchmark for technical surgical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Henn, Patrick J; Neary, Paul C; Senagore, Anthony J; Marcello, Peter W; Bunting, Brendan P; Seymour, Neal E; Satava, Richard M

    2018-03-23

    Training in medicine must move to an outcome-based approach. A proficiency-based progression outcome approach to training relies on a quantitative estimation of experienced operator performance. We aimed to develop a method for dealing with atypical expert performances in the quantitative definition of surgical proficiency. In study one, 100 experienced laparoscopic surgeons' performances on virtual reality and box-trainer simulators were assessed for two similar laparoscopic tasks. In study two, 15 experienced surgeons and 16 trainee colorectal surgeons performed one simulated hand-assisted laparoscopic colorectal procedure. Performance scores of experienced surgeons in both studies were standardized (i.e. Z-scores) using the mean and standard deviations (SDs). Performances >1.96 SDs from the mean were excluded in proficiency definitions. In study one, 1-5% of surgeons' performances were excluded having performed significantly below their colleagues. Excluded surgeons made significantly fewer correct incisions (mean = 7 (SD = 2) versus 19.42 (SD = 4.6), P 4 SDs for time to complete the procedure and >6 SDs for path length. After their exclusions, experienced surgeons' performances were significantly better than trainees for path length: P = 0.031 and for time: P = 0.002. Objectively assessed atypical expert performances were few. Z-score standardization identified them and produced a more robust quantitative definition of proficiency. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Is the data quality of current theatre information systems satisfactory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-02-17

    Feb 17, 2006 ... information systems satisfactory to monitor individual surgeons' activity? POSTGRADUATE TRAINING. L Verity, MRCOG, Consultant. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro, Cornwall, UK. D Byrne, FRCOG, Consultant. J M Jenkins, FRCOG, Consultant Senior Lecturer.

  17. Assessing the Impact of Surgeon Experience on Urinary Continence Recovery After Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: Results of Four High-Volume Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Nicola; Di Trapani, Ettore; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Umari, Paolo; Buffi, Nicolò Maria; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Mottrie, Alexander; Gaboardi, Franco; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto; Suardi, Nazareno

    2017-09-01

    To test the impact of surgeon experience on urinary continence (UC) recovery after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). The study included 1477 consecutive patients treated with RARP by four surgeons between 2006 and 2014. UC recovery was defined as being completely dry over a 24-hour period at follow-up. Surgeon experience was coded as the total number of RARP performed by the surgeon before the patient's operation. Multivariable analysis tested the association between surgeon experience and UC recovery. Covariates consisted of patient age, Charlson comorbidity index, preoperative International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain (IIEF-EF), nerve-sparing surgery (none vs unilateral vs bilateral), and preoperative risk groups (low- vs intermediate- vs high risk). The number of cases performed by each surgeon was 541, 413, 411, and 112, respectively. Median follow-up was 24 months (inter-quartile range: 18, 40). The UC recovery rate at 1 year after surgery was 82%. At multivariable analyses, surgeon experience represented an independent predictor of UC recovery (hazard ratio: 1.02, p < 0.001). The surgical learning curve was similar among surgeons, moving linearly from ∼60% of UC rate at the initial cases to almost 90% after more than 400 procedures. In patients undergoing RARP, surgeon experience is a significant predictor of UC recovery. The surgical learning curve of UC recovery does not reach a plateau even after more than 100 cases, suggesting a continuous improvement of the surgical technique. These findings deserve attention for patient counseling and future comparative studies evaluating functional outcomes after RARP.

  18. Surgeon specialization and use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W.F.; Laud, Purushuttom W.; Sparapani, Rodney A.; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is the standard of care for axillary staging in clinically node-negative breast cancer patients. It is not known whether SLNB rates differ by surgeon expertise. If surgeons with less breast cancer expertise are less likely to offer SLNB to clinically node-negative patients, this practice pattern could lead to unnecessary axillary lymph node dissections (ALND) and lymphedema. OBJECTIVE To explore potential measures of surgical expertise (including a novel objective specialization measure – percentage of a surgeon’s operations devoted to breast cancer determined from claims) on the use of SLNB for invasive breast cancer. DESIGN Population-based prospective cohort study. Patient, tumor, treatment and surgeon characteristics were examined. SETTING California, Florida, Illinois PARTICIPANTS Elderly (65+ years) women identified from Medicare claims as having had incident invasive breast cancer surgery in 2003. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Type of axillary surgery performed. RESULTS Of the 1,703 women treated by 863 different surgeons, 56% underwent an initial SLNB, 37% initial ALND and 6% no axillary surgery. The median annual surgeon Medicare volume of breast cancer cases was 6 (range: 1.5–57); the median surgeon percentage of breast cancer cases was 4.6% (range: 0.7%–100%). After multivariable adjustment of patient and surgeon factors, women operated on by surgeons with higher volumes and percentages of breast cancer cases had a higher likelihood of undergoing SLNB. Specifically, women were most likely to undergo SLNB if operated on by high volume surgeons (regardless of percentage) or by lower volume surgeons with a high percentage of cases devoted to breast cancer. In addition, membership in the American Society of Breast Surgeons (OR 1.98, CI 1.51–2.60) and Society of Surgical Oncology (OR 1.59, CI 1.09–2.30) were independent predictors of women undergoing an initial SLNB. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Patients treated

  19. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Internet and the paediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, M; Inumpudi, A; Mitra, D K

    1998-12-01

    The Internet, which has truly united the world, is an extensive network of inter-linked computers storing immense bytes of information that can be accessed by anyone, transcending all barriers. The paediatric surgery Internet consists of exponentially growing material that deals with information specifically for paediatric surgeons and patients of the paediatric age group. We reviewed the methods available to take advantage of this network to enable busy paediatric surgeons to accrue the benefits easily and efficiently rather than be lost in the information ocean by surfing individually. By getting connected to the Internet, the paediatric surgeon gains enormous information that can be useful for patient care. The Internet has revolutionised scientific publications by virtue of its fast and accurate transmission of manuscripts. Paediatric surgeons can send manuscripts by this channel and also access journals, obviating the inherent lag period of communication by post.

  1. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech (Katrine Tholstrup Pedersen), Katrine Tholstrup

    in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...... put the patients at a higher risk of complications, and on the longer term there is an increasing risk for the surgeon to develop chronic musculoskeletal pain that will disable him/her to perform his/her job. Therefore, surgeons’ musculoskeletal health is of vital importance and must be considered...... alongside patient safety. The present literature study supports the need for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individually designed training program for surgeons performing MIS....

  2. Income, productivity, and satisfaction of breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendorf, David C; Helmer, Stephen D; Osland, Jacqueline S; Tenofsky, Patty L

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how the practice patterns of breast surgeons affect their income and job satisfaction. A 19-question survey regarding practice patterns and income and job satisfaction was mailed to all active US members of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. There were 772 responses. An increasing percentage of breast care was associated with lower incomes (P=.0001) and similar income satisfaction (P=.4517) but higher job satisfaction (P=.0001). The increasing proportion of breast care was also associated with fewer hours worked per week (P=.0001). Although incomes were lower in surgeons with a higher proportion of their practice in breast care, income satisfaction was not affected. Although cause and effect relationships between income and breast surgery are difficult to establish, several trends do emerge. Most significantly, we found that dedicated breast surgeons have higher job satisfaction ratings and similar income satisfaction despite lower incomes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-11-01

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 650 nm Laser stimulated dating from Side Antique Theatre, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doğan, M.; Meriç, N.

    2014-01-01

    Samples were taken from the archeological excavation site, which was at the backs of the Side Antique Theatre. Samples were taken from under the base rock in this area. Polymineral fine grains were examined to determine the ages of the sediments. Samples gathered from the Side Antique Theatre were investigated through using the SAR method. Firstly, one part of the samples were evaluated by using conventional IRSL reading head model of (ELSEC-9010) which is infrared (880±80 nm) stimulation source with Schott BG39 filter. The IRSL age dating with feldspar minerals, gives a number of overestimated or underestimated age values as a result. A new reading head was proposed with the following configuration attachments for overestimation of equivalent dose rates. Measurements were done with this newly designed red laser stimulating reading head which works with Elsec 9010 OSL age dating system. SAR measurements were performed by (650±10 nm) red laser light source with two Schott BG3 filters. With usage of the new designed reading head; closer results were obtained in comparision with the Antique Theatre′s expected age range. Fading rates were taken into consideration and these corrections were also handled for true age results. - Highlights: • Polymineral fine grain feldspar minerals were used for dating. • Two different reading heads were used to determine equivalent doses. • IR stimulated (880 nm) and laser stimulated (650 nm) dating results were compared

  5. Mommy dances: Theatre for the very young as artistic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Hovik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses different approaches to artistic research based on her own research project involving several closely related theatre performances for young children. Key to the project is the development of a form of dance theatre in which the child audience is given the opportunity to actively participate and interact with the performers. The dramatic structure of the improvised dance concert Mamma Danser (2011 alternates between a common focus, an individual, “own” focus and a “multifocus”. The article discusses what implications this may have for the children, the performers and the researching artist. In scientific research a clear focus and a reflective perspective are often seen as crucial for the result, while in artistic processes more intuitive and improvised approaches are employed, consequently providing a different type of knowledge. Such knowledge, which is not readily accessible through the “outsider" perspective of hermeneutic interpretation, becomes evident by setting different interpretations and perspectives in dialogue with each other and with the performers’ own bodily experiences. Henk Borgdorff’s separation between an interpretive, an instrumental, and a performative research perspective is applied to provide a comprehensive picture of the process of creating artistic performances for young children. In conclusion, the author maintains that this research project demonstrates the possibility of creating common art experiences in which both adults and children take part in reciprocal interaction and improvisation.

  6. Is Theatre Under the Influence of New Media?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Podmaková

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper poses questions concerning the extent of direct or indirect impact of new media on the concept of a theatrical production and on the perception of a concret theatrical performance. Using examples of theatrical preoductions, the author divided the impact of media into several areas. One of them is the insertion of film clips into a theatrical performance or simultaneous large screen projections of what is happening on stage. The second area concerns (indirect effect of new media on the currentness of the testimony of theatre-makers, such as, for instance, the projection of TV news that accentuate the impact of everydayness on the aesthetic perception of an audience. One should not discount the side effects of the media that entered the theatre, such as the effect of TV series on the social media popularity of actors. Therefore, when actors perform on stage, the audiences are inclined to perceive them as TV-series characters rather than dramatic characters.

  7. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Plastic Surgeon at Work and Play: Surgeon Health, Practice Stress, and Work-Home Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Michael L

    2016-10-01

    Plastic surgeon wellness encompasses physical and mental health, considered in the context of practice stress. In addition, the challenges of work-home balance can lead to substantial negative impact on the surgeon, family, staff, and patients. The data-driven impact of each of these three components with personal vignettes, both individually and collectively, is presented by Michael Bentz, MD as the 2016 presidential address of American Association of Plastic Surgeons.

  9. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  10. Reporting individual surgeon outcomes does not lead to risk aversion in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratzis, A; Thatcher, A; Bath, M F; Sidloff, D A; Bown, M J; Shakespeare, J; Sayers, R D; Imray, C

    2017-02-01

    INTRODUCTION Reporting surgeons' outcomes has recently been introduced in the UK. This has the potential to result in surgeons becoming risk averse. The aim of this study was to investigate whether reporting outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery impacts on the number and risk profile (level of fitness) of patients offered elective treatment. METHODS Publically available National Vascular Registry data were used to compare the number of AAAs treated in those centres across the UK that reported outcomes for the periods 2008-2012, 2009-2013 and 2010-2014. Furthermore, the number and characteristics of patients referred for consideration of elective AAA repair at a single tertiary unit were analysed yearly between 2010 and 2014. Clinic, casualty and theatre event codes were searched to obtain all AAAs treated. The results of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) were assessed. RESULTS For the 85 centres that reported outcomes in all three five-year periods, the median number of AAAs treated per unit increased between the periods 2008-2012 and 2010-2014 from 192 to 214 per year (p=0.006). In the single centre cohort study, the proportion of patients offered elective AAA repair increased from 74% in 2009-2010 to 81% in 2013-2014, with a maximum of 84% in 2012-2013. The age, aneurysm size and CPET results (anaerobic threshold levels) for those eventually offered elective treatment did not differ significantly between 2010 and 2014. CONCLUSIONS The results do not support the assumption that reporting individual surgeon outcomes is associated with a risk averse strategy regarding patient selection in aneurysm surgery at present.

  11. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation ... facs.org Copyright © 1996-2018 by the American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL 60611-3295 | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use

  12. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  13. Towards a 20th Century History of Relationships between Theatre and Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Sofia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers some preliminary reflections in view of a 20th century theatre-and-neuroscience history. Up to now, the history of the 20th century theatre has been too fragmentary and irregular, missing out on the subterranean links which, either directly or indirectly, bound different experiences. The article aims to put in evidence the recurrent problems of these encounters. The hypothesis of the essay concerns the possibility of gathering and grouping a great part of the relationships between theatre and neuroscience around four trajectories: the physiology of action, the physiology of emotions, ethology, and studies on the spectator’s perception.

  14. "I don´t like puppets!“ : reasons and inspiration for founding object theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Kalda, Kadri

    2012-01-01

    The topic of my thesis is founding object theatre. The ground for object theatre was perfect to come into being in the 1980´s. There were mainly two reasons and a lot of inspiration for it. One of the biggest reasons was the puppetry back then, the puppets had mostly form of little humans, who were pedagogical very correct. Object theatre pioneers wanted to take distance from it. Secondly was the matter of mass producing and mass consuming trough what people after World War II wanted to feel ...

  15. Accompanying role of hepato-biliary-pancreas surgeon in urological surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Nanashima

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present case reports demonstrated the accompanying surgical support from hepato-biliary-pancreas (HBP surgeons for urological surgery to secure operative safety because HBP surgeons are well experienced in dissecting techniques for mobilization of the liver or pancreas. We experienced 9 consecutive patients who underwent nephrectomy, adrenectomy or resection of retroperitoneal tumors by urological surgeons. Cardiovascular intervention was also required in cases of long tumor thrombus into the vena cava. Cases: All patients had no severe co-existing diseases except the main tumor. Reverse T-shape incision was performed in 7 cases and thoracolaparotomy in two. Dissection and mobilization at the site of severe compression by the urinary tumors were performed in three cases. Partial liver resection was performed for testicular liver metastases in two, and right hepatectomy for right renal cancer was performed in one. Encircling the vena cava and preparation of transection for tumor thrombi were performed in three, and among these, cardiovascular intervention was necessary in two because of extension into the right atrium. During admission, all patient outcomes were uneventful without severe complications. We herein showed the representative two cases of combined surgery. Discussion: and conclusion The point of this case report is the coordination between each surgeon and anesthesiologist under precise perioperative planning or management. The role of HBP surgeons is to provide information as a specialist on the operative field for urological or cardiovascular surgery to achieve operative safety. Keywords: Hepato-biliary-pancreas surgeon, Joint surgery, Urology

  16. Surgical "buy-in": the contractual relationship between surgeons and patients that influences decisions regarding life-supporting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Margaret L; Bradley, Ciaran T; Brasel, Karen J

    2010-03-01

    There is a general consensus by intensivists and nonsurgical providers that surgeons hesitate to withdraw life-sustaining therapy on their operative patients despite a patient's or surrogate's request to do so. The objective of this study was to examine the culture and practice of surgeons to assess attitudes and concerns regarding advance directives for their patients who have high-risk surgical procedures. A qualitative investigation using one-on-one, in-person interviews with open-ended questions about the use of advance directives during perioperative planning. Consensus coding was performed using a grounded theory approach. Data accrual continued until theoretical saturation was achieved. Modeling identified themes and trends, ensuring maximal fit and faithful data representation. Surgical practices in Madison and Milwaukee, WI. Physicians involved in the performance of high-risk surgical procedures. None. We describe the concept of surgical "buy-in," a complex process by which surgeons negotiate with patients a commitment to postoperative care before undertaking high-risk surgical procedures. Surgeons describe seeking a commitment from the patient to abide by prescribed postoperative care, "This is a package deal, this is what this operation entails," or a specific number of postoperative days, "I will contract with them and say, 'look, if we are going to do this, I am going to need 30 days to get you through this operation.'" "Buy-in" is grounded in a surgeon's strong sense of responsibility for surgical outcomes and can lead to surgeon unwillingness to operate or surgeon reticence to withdraw life-sustaining therapy postoperatively. If negotiations regarding life-sustaining interventions result in treatment limitation, a surgeon may shift responsibility for unanticipated outcomes to the patient. A complicated relationship exists between the surgeon and patient that begins in the preoperative setting. It reflects a bidirectional contract that is assumed by

  17. Young transplant surgeons and NIH funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesbe, M J; Sung, R S; Segev, D L

    2011-02-01

    Transplant surgeons have historically been instrumental in advancing the science of transplantation. However, research in the current environment inevitably requires external funding, and the classic career development pathway for a junior investigator is the NIH K award. We matched transplant surgeons who completed fellowships between 1998 and 2004 with the NIH funding database, and also queried them regarding research effort and attitudes. Of 373 surgeons who completed a fellowship, only 6 (1.8%) received a K award; of these, 3 subsequently obtained R-level funding. An additional 5 individuals received an R-level grant within their first 5 years as faculty without a K award, 3 of whom had received a prior ASTS-sponsored award. Survey respondents reported extensive research experience during their training (78.8% spent median 24 months), a high proportion of graduate research degrees (36%), and a strong desire for more research time (78%). However, they reported clinical burdens and lack of mentorship as their primary perceived barriers to successful research careers. The very low rate of NIH funding for young transplant surgeons, combined with survey results that indicate their desire to participate in research, suggest institutional barriers to access that may warrant attention by the ASTS and the transplant surgery community. ©2010 The Authors Journal compilation©2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations.

  20. Project Muskan : Social responsibility of the plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exact statistics are not available, Indian plastic surgeons see around 7,00,000-8,00,000 burn admissions annually with around 10,00,000 cleft patients yet to be operated. In spite of this voluminous load, India does not have national health programs for the various deformities Indian plastic surgeons typically treat. As Plastic Surgeons, it is our social responsibility to treat these patients and bring ′ muskan ′ (smile in Hindi back into their lives. Project Muskan was initiated as an innovative model for targeting these patients and is probably one of its kind in the field of plastic surgery in our country. It is unique because it is a perfect collaboration of government institutions, a Non Government Organization (NGO, and cooperative sectors providing free health care at the doorstep. Identification of the patients was done with the help of the extensive milk dairy network in the state of Gujarat. Provision of transport and other facilities was done by the NGOs and quality health care provision was taken care of by the government hospital. Project Muskan started from a single village but now covers around 3000 villages and tribal areas of Gujarat. It is a system that can be easily reproducible in all hospitals and has reestablished the faith of the common man in government institutes.

  1. Preoperative and Postoperative Nomograms Incorporating Surgeon Experience for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Michael W.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Yu, Changhong; Bianco, Fernando J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Eastham, James A.; Klein, Eric A.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Pontes, Jose Edson; Scardino, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Accurate preoperative and postoperative risk assessment has been critical for counseling patients regarding radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. In addition to other treatment modalities, neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapies have been considered. The growing literature suggested that the experience of the surgeon may affect the risk of prostate cancer recurrence. The purpose of this study was to develop and internally validate nomograms to predict the probability of recurrence, both preoperatively and postoperatively, with adjustment for standard parameters plus surgeon experience. METHODS The study cohort included 7724 eligible prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy by 1 of 72 surgeons. For each patient, surgeon experience was coded as the total number of cases conducted by the surgeon before the patient’s operation. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were developed to predict recurrence. Discrimination and calibration of the models was assessed following bootstrapping methods, and the models were presented as nomograms. RESULTS In this combined series, the 10-year probability of recurrence was 23.9%. The nomograms were quite discriminating (preoperative concordance index, 0.767; postoperative concordance index, 0.812). Calibration appeared to be very good for each. Surgeon experience seemed to have a quite modest effect, especially postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Nomograms have been developed that consider the surgeon’s experience as a predictor. The tools appeared to predict reasonably well but were somewhat little improved with the addition of surgeon experience as a predictor variable. PMID:19156928

  2. National Theatre of China's Romeo and Juliet and Its Rituals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Lim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the “Chinese-ness” of this brand new production of Romeo and Juliet by the National Theatre of China, from a ritual perspective. Three main areas were discussed. Firstly, this play has got several religious connotations. The absence of religion in this play’s setting is relevant to China’s current high percentage of atheists. Despite that, several religions, such as Buddhism, Daoism and Christianity, are mentioned in this play. Secondly, the play has also incorporated several Chinese culture and traditions. The use of bicycles as one of the main props can be linked to the cultural significance of bicycles in China. The play also incorporated other cultural and traditional elements such as wedding customaries in China, Xinjiang dance, as well as the Chinese tongue twisters. Finally, the play has incorporated multiple Brechtian moments. Perhaps the Brechtian moments can lead audience to think about the current religious and cultural developments in modern China.

  3. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Stein J.; Teunis, Teun; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Spoor, Andy B.; Chauhan, Aakash; Shafritz, Adam B.; Wasterlain, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Neviaser, Andrew S.; Schmidt, Andrew; Nelson, Andy; Miller, Anna N.; Kristan, Anze; Apard, Thomas; Berner, Arne; Ilyas, Asif; Jubel, Axel; Jost, Bernhard; Babis, George; Watkins, Barry; Kreis, Barbara; Nolan, Betsy M.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Wills, Brian P. D.; Barreto, Camilo Jose Romero; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Spath, Catherine; Zalavras, Charalampos; Cassidy, Charles; Garnavos, Christos; Moreno-Serrano, Constanza L.; Rodner, Craig; Klostermann, Cyrus; Osei, Daniel A.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Drosdowech, Darren; Edelstein, David M.; Eygendaal, Denise; Verbeek, Diederik O. F.; Doornberg, Job N.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schep, Niels; Kloen, Peter; Haverlag, Robert; Schepers, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. (1) Are surgeons more likely to recommend surgery when choosing for

  4. Does surgeon volume matter in the outcome of endoscopic inguinal hernia repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köckerling, F; Bittner, R; Kraft, B; Hukauf, M; Kuthe, A; Schug-Pass, C

    2017-02-01

    For open and endoscopic inguinal hernia surgery, it has been demonstrated that low-volume surgeons with fewer than 25 and 30 procedures, respectively, per year are associated with significantly more recurrences than high-volume surgeons with 25 and 30 or more procedures, respectively, per year. This paper now explores the relationship between the caseload and the outcome based on the data from the Herniamed Registry. The prospective data of patients in the Herniamed Registry were analyzed using the inclusion criteria minimum age of 16 years, male patient, primary unilateral inguinal hernia, TEP or TAPP techniques and availability of data on 1-year follow-up. In total, 16,290 patients were enrolled between September 1, 2009, and February 1, 2014. Of the participating surgeons, 466 (87.6 %) had carried out fewer than 25 endoscopic/laparoscopic operations (low-volume surgeons) and 66 (12.4 %) surgeons 25 or more operations (high-volume surgeons) per year. Univariable (1.03 vs. 0.73 %; p = 0.047) and multivariable analysis [OR 1.494 (1.065-2.115); p = 0.023] revealed that low-volume surgeons had a significantly higher recurrence rate compared with the high-volume surgeons, although that difference was small. Multivariable analysis also showed that pain on exertion was negatively affected by a lower caseload <25 [OR 1.191 (1.062-1.337); p = 0.003]. While here, too, the difference was small, the fact that in that group there was a greater proportion of patients with small hernia defect sizes may have also played a role since the risk in that group was higher. In this analysis, no evidence was found that pain at rest [OR 1.052 (0.903-1.226); p = 0.516] or chronic pain requiring treatment [OR 1.108 (0.903-1.361); p = 0.326] were influenced by the surgeon volume. As confirmed by previously published studies, the data in the Herniamed Registry also demonstrated that the endoscopic/laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery caseload impacted the outcome. However

  5. 243 The Challenges of Theatre Workshop in Katsina-Ala and Oju ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    recommends more funding by the College management for Theatre. Arts Department ... exploring and expressing human feelings and predicaments. This is because .... atmosphere where talents and creativity is built in students, fostering ...

  6. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies - Vol 3, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strategies for the development of tourism and theatre industries in Nigeria: Rivers state perspective · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. HL Bell-Gam ...

  7. Creative Artist: A Journal of Theatre and Media Studies - Vol 7, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articulation of women and gender issues in drama and theatre from classical Greece to post independence Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. R Ode, PA Tse, 32-62 ...

  8. Measurements of surgeons' exposure to ionizing radiation dose during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Boram; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Chung, Chin Youb

    2012-06-15

    Measurement of radiation dose from C-arm fluoroscopy during a simulated intraoperative use in spine surgery. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate scatter radiation doses to specific organs of surgeons during intraoperative use of C-arm fluoroscopy in spine surgery and to provide practical intraoperative guidelines. There have been studies that reported the radiation dose of C-arm fluoroscopy in various procedures. However, radiation doses to surgeons' specific organs during spine surgery have not been sufficiently examined, and the practical intraoperative radioprotective guidelines have not been suggested. Scatter radiation dose (air kerma rate) was measured during the use of a C-arm on an anthropomorphic chest phantom on an operating table. Then, a whole body anthropomorphic phantom was located besides the chest phantom to simulate a surgeon, and scatter radiation doses to specific organs (eye, thyroid, breast, and gonads) and direct radiation dose to the surgeon's hand were measured using 4 C-arm configurations (standard, inverted, translateral, and tube translateral). The effects of rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient and of a thyroid shield were also evaluated. Scatter radiation doses decreased as distance from the patient increased during C-arm fluoroscopy use. The standard and translateral C-arm configurations caused lower scatter doses to sensitive organs than inverted and tube translateral configurations. Scatter doses were highest for breast and lowest for gonads. The use of a thyroid shield and rotating the surgeon's head away from the patient reduced scatter radiation dose to the surgeon's thyroid and eyes. The direct radiation dose was at least 20 times greater than scatter doses to sensitive organs. The following factors could reduce radiation exposure during intraoperative use of C-arm; (1) distance from the patient, (2) C-arm configuration, (3) radioprotective equipments, (4) rotating the surgeons' eyes away from the patient, and (5) avoiding

  9. Introduction [to special issue] Women in Asian theatre: conceptual, political, and aesthetic paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Madhavan, Arya

    2015-01-01

    A conference titled Women in Asian Theatre was held at the University of Lincoln in September 2013, and papers from that gathering form the core of this issue. The rationale in organizing the conference was to explore differences across Asia and note that theories from Western feminists do not necessarily transfer to Asian models. This conference was a first step toward mapping histories of the female in Asian theatre, and this is a line of inquiry that deserves more attention. Arya Madhav...

  10. Framing effects: The impact of framing on copresence in virtual theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Unterman, Benjamin Asher

    2017-01-01

    Virtual theatre (enacted dramatic narrative performed live online) is an emerging form of theatrical mediation. One of the biggest challenges faced by this growing media practice is the management of audience experience. This thesis attempts to address the uncertainty around virtual theatre audiences by focusing on the framing of performances that take place in virtual worlds. Strategic approaches to framing and audience preparation are suggested based on literature-based research, case studi...

  11. Orthopedic surgeons' knowledge regarding risk of radiation exposition: a survey analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçer, Nejat; Kuyucu, Ersin; Sayar, Şafak; Polat, Gökhan; Erdil, İrem; Tuncay, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the knowledge levels of orthopedic surgeons working in Turkey about the uses and possible risks of fluoroscopy and assess methods for preventing radiation damage. A questionnaire with a total of 12 questions was sent to 1121 orthopedic surgeons working in Turkey. The questionnaire evaluated participants' knowledge about the uses and risks of fluoroscopy and methods for preventing damage. One thousand and twenty-four orthopedic surgeons were found to be suitable for inclusion in the study. The effects of fluoroscopy on patients were not assessed in our study. The data obtained were statistically evaluated. Of the surveyed surgeons, 313 (30%) had used fluoroscopy in over 50% of their operations. The average number of fluoroscopy shots per case was 54.5. A lead apron was the most commonly used (88%) protection from the harmful effects of radiation. Fluoroscopy shots were performed with the help of operating room personnel (86%). A dosimeter was used 5% of the time. According to the survey results, the need for fluoroscopy was very high in orthopedic surgery. However, orthopedic surgeons have inadequate knowledge about the uses and risks of fluoroscopy and methods for preventing damage. Therefore, we believe that training on this topic should be provided to all orthopedic surgeons. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  12. The impact of positive and negative intraoperative surgeons' leadership behaviors on surgical team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barling, Julian; Akers, Amy; Beiko, Darren

    2018-01-01

    The effects of surgeons' leadership on team performance are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the simultaneous effects of transformational, passive, abusive supervision and over-controlling leadership behaviors by surgeons on surgical team performance. Trained observers attended 150 randomly selected operations at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Observers recorded instances of the four leadership behaviors enacted by the surgeon. Postoperatively, team members completed validated questionnaires rating team cohesion and collective efficacy. Multiple regression analyses were computed. Data were analyzed using the complex modeling function in MPlus. Surgeons' abusive supervision was negatively associated with psychological safety (unstandardized B = -0.352, p leadership (unstandardized B = -0.230, p leadership behaviors on intraoperative team performance. Significant effects only surfaced for negative leadership behaviors; transformational leadership did not positively influence team performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Percy MacKaye’s Civic Theatre: a Pioneer in Theatre Animation and the Pedagogy of Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel F. Vieites

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first two decades of the 20th century the career of Percy MacKaye becomes especially relevant. As a brilliant American scholar and playwright, he formulated a plan for the organization of the theatre that aimed at promoting the social, cultural and educational potential of a theatrical praxis based on the active participation of people, linked to community development. In this paper, born of a critical reading of his theoretical work, we show how the educational, cultural and artistic uses of theatrical practice promoting a constructive leisure, have in MacKaye’s essays a precedent on theoretical and practical grounds. His proposals are still relevant considering today’s challenges, among which it stands out the creation of spaces for meeting and interaction where the community may meet, recognize and recreate itself. His essays become even more significant considering old problems such as the «arrangement of the theatres» and the status of theater education, formulated by enlightened thinkers such as Jovellanos or Moratín, which two centuries later still await an appropriate solution. We close the paper with a set of conclusions where specific proposals concerning those old issues are made. How to reference this article Vieites, M. F. (2016. El teatro cívico de Percy MacKaye: un pionero en la animación teatral y la pedagogía del ocio. Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, 3(1, 421-442. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/ete.2016.003.001.20

  14. Skill accreditation system for laparoscopic gastroenterologic surgeons in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Taizo; Kitajima, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    The Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery (JSES) has established an Endoscopic Surgical Skill Qualification System and started examination in 2004. Non-edited videotapes were assessed by two judges in a double-blinded fashion with strict criteria. Two kinds of criteria, namely common and procedure-specific, were prepared. The common criteria were designed to evaluate set-ups, autonomy of the operator, display of the surgical field, recognition of surgical anatomy, co-operation of the surgical team. The procedure-specific criteria were made to assess the operation in a step-by-step fashion. In total, out of 1.114 surgeons who were assessed by this qualification system over a period of four years, 537 (48.2%) have been accredited. The qualification rate in each surgical field has remained at the same level of 40 to 50% to date. Inter-rater agreement of two judges was low at 0.31 in the first year, but improved with revision of the criteria and consensus meetings. Surgeons assessed by this system as qualified experienced less frequent complications when compared to those who failed. This system has impacted on the improvement and standardization of laparoscopic surgery in Japan.

  15. Assessment of Educational Environment of Surgical Theatre at a Teaching Hospital of a Saudi University: Using Surgical Theatre Educational Environment Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Faisal Al-Qahtani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to determine how medical interns perceive the important factors of the learning environment the surgical theatre at the teaching hospital of the medical school, University of Dammam (UoD. The study also investigated the relationships between the learning environment and academic achievements. Finally, it determined the role and significance of gender on the above perceptions and relationships.Methods: The Surgical Theatre Educational Environment Measure (STEEM was used to identify the perceptions of interns on the most important factors prevalent in the surgical theatre as an educational environment. STEEM was administered to all interns during the period of June-September 2009. Ninety-one out of 145 students completed the questionnaire representing a response rate of 63%. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Version 17.Results: The STEEM was shown to be internally consistent for the assessment of the overall educational environment in the surgical theatre of UoD. The overall STEEM mean score was 110. For male and female students, the mean scores were 114 and 107 respectively. There were statistically significant gender differences in the perceptions of "learning opportunities" and "teaching and training". Females rated these subscales lower than males. There were no significant associations between academic achievements and perceptions of the educational environment.Conclusion: The interns perceived the learning environment of the surgical theatre as less than satisfactory. In comparison with the males; the perception of the females was less positive, particularly in the areas of learning opportunities, and teaching and training. The study also revealed some other problematic areas in the learning environment of surgical theatre of the teaching hospital of UoD. The results imply that there is much room for improvement. They also indicate that

  16. Improving time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Impact of the introduction of an emergency theatre

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French-O’Carroll, F

    2017-01-01

    Hip fractures are a major cause of morbidity and mortality1. Surgery performed on the day of or after admission is associated with improved outcome2,3. An audit cycle was performed examining time to surgery for hip fracture patients. Our initial audit identified lack of theatre space as one factor delaying surgery. A dedicated daytime emergency theatre was subsequently opened and a re-audit was performed to assess its impact on time to surgery. Following the opening of the theatre, the proportion of patients with a delay to hip fracture surgery greater than 36 hours was reduced from 49% to 26% with lack of theatre space accounting for 23% (3 of 13) of delayed cases versus 28.6% (9 of 32) previously. 44% of hip fracture surgeries were performed in the emergency theatre during daytime hours, whilst in-hospital mortality rose from 4.6% to 6%. We conclude that access to an emergency theatre during daytime hours reduced inappropriate delays to hip fracture surgery.

  17. Popular theatre and nonformal education in the Third World: Five strands of experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ross

    1985-09-01

    Popular theatre is gaining increasing attention in the Third World as a tool for popular education and community organizing. It finds expression in a number of forms including drama, music dance, puppetry and poetry and is performed for — and often by — ordinary peasants and workers. Popular theatre is used as a means of bringing people together, building confidence and solidarity, stimulating discussion, exploring alternative options for action, and building a collective commitment to change: starting with people's urgent concerns and issues, it encourages reflection on these issues and possible strategies for change. Popular theatre, however, is not a unified discipline. It is used by different groups for different interests, ranging from a technocratic, message-oriented `domestication theatre' at one end of the spectrum to a process of consciousness-raising, organization-building and struggle at the other end. Five main strands of popular theatre can be distinguished: (a) the struggle for national liberation; (b) mass education and rural extension; (c) community or participatory development; (d) `conscientization' or popular education; and (e) popular education and organizing. At its best, popular theatre is not an isolated performance or a cathartic experience, but part of an ongoing process of education and organizing, aimed at overcoming oppression and dependence, and at securing basic rights.

  18. Successful linking of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database to Social Security data to examine the accuracy of Society of Thoracic Surgeons mortality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; O'Brien, Sean M; Shahian, David M; Edwards, Fred H; Badhwar, Vinay; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Sanchez, Juan A; Morales, David L; Prager, Richard L; Wright, Cameron D; Puskas, John D; Gammie, James S; Haan, Constance K; George, Kristopher M; Sheng, Shubin; Peterson, Eric D; Shewan, Cynthia M; Han, Jane M; Bongiorno, Phillip A; Yohe, Courtney; Williams, William G; Mayer, John E; Grover, Frederick L

    2013-04-01

    The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database has been linked to the Social Security Death Master File to verify "life status" and evaluate long-term surgical outcomes. The objective of this study is explore practical applications of the linkage of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database to Social Securtiy Death Master File, including the use of the Social Securtiy Death Master File to examine the accuracy of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons 30-day mortality data. On January 1, 2008, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database began collecting Social Security numbers in its new version 2.61. This study includes all Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database records for operations with nonmissing Social Security numbers between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, inclusive. To match records between the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database and the Social Security Death Master File, we used a combined probabilistic and deterministic matching rule with reported high sensitivity and nearly perfect specificity. Between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database collected data for 870,406 operations. Social Security numbers were available for 541,953 operations and unavailable for 328,453 operations. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, the 30-day mortality rate was 17,757/541,953 = 3.3%. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File identified 16,565 cases of suspected 30-day deaths (3.1%). Of these, 14,983 were recorded as 30-day deaths in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database (relative sensitivity = 90.4%). Relative sensitivity was 98.8% (12,863/13,014) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring before discharge and 59.7% (2120/3551) for suspected 30-day deaths occurring after discharge. Linkage to the Social Security Death Master File confirms the accuracy of

  19. Human factors in surgery: from Three Mile Island to the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addessi, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Luca; Volpe, Andrea; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, PierFrancesco

    2009-01-01

    Human factors is a definition that includes the science of understanding the properties of human capability, the application of this understanding to the design and development of systems and services, the art of ensuring their successful applications to a program. The field of human factors traces its origins to the Second World War, but Three Mile Island has been the best example of how groups of people react and make decisions under stress: this nuclear accident was exacerbated by wrong decisions made because the operators were overwhelmed with irrelevant, misleading or incorrect information. Errors and their nature are the same in all human activities. The predisposition for error is so intrinsic to human nature that scientifically it is best considered as inherently biologic. The causes of error in medical care may not be easily generalized. Surgery differs in important ways: most errors occur in the operating room and are technical in nature. Commonly, surgical error has been thought of as the consequence of lack of skill or ability, and is the result of thoughtless actions. Moreover the 'operating theatre' has a unique set of team dynamics: professionals from multiple disciplines are required to work in a closely coordinated fashion. This complex environment provides multiple opportunities for unclear communication, clashing motivations, errors arising not from technical incompetence but from poor interpersonal skills. Surgeons have to work closely with human factors specialists in future studies. By improving processes already in place in many operating rooms, safety will be enhanced and quality increased.

  20. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at ACS ACS and Veterans Diversity at ACS ... and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation ...

  1. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgeon Specific Registry Trauma Education Trauma Education Trauma Education Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma Advanced Trauma Life Support Advanced Trauma Operative Management Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma Disaster Management and Emergency ...

  2. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACS ACS and Veterans Diversity at ACS ... and Family Contact My Profile Shop ( 0 ) Cart Donate American College of Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation ...

  3. The ERATO project and its contribution to our understanding of the acoustics of ancient Greek and Roman theatres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Nielsen, Martin Lisa

    2006-01-01

    the acoustics of the open air theatres and compare to the smaller, originally roofed theatres, also called odea (from Greek: Odeion, a hall for song and declamation with music). The method has been to make computer models of the spaces, first as the exist today, and adjust the acoustical data for surface...... of the spaces. The acoustical simulations have given a lot of interesting information about the acoustical qualities, mainly in the Roman theatres, but the earlier Greek theatre has also been studied in one case (Syracusa in Italy). It is found that the Roman open-air theatres had very high clarity of sound......, but the sound strength was quite low. In contrast, the odea had reverberation time like a concert hall, relatively low clarity, and high sound strength. Thus, the acoustical properties reflect the original different purposes of the buildings, the theatre intended mainly for plays (speech) and the Odeon mainly...

  4. Performing Desistance: How Might Theories of Desistance From Crime Help Us Understand the Possibilities of Prison Theatre?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Linda; Day, Andrew; Balfour, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Despite the ubiquity of theatre projects in prisons there has been little (published) discussion of the application of theatre to the theories of criminology or rehabilitation of offenders, and scant examination of the potential for criminological theories to inform theatre practice in criminal justice settings. This article seeks to address this deficit and argues that positioning prison theatre within the discipline of positive criminology, specifically contemporary theories of desistance from crime, provides a theoretical framework for understanding the contribution that prison theatre might be making in the correctional setting. Through a review of related literature, the article explores how prison theatre may be motivating offenders toward the construction of a more adaptive narrative identity and toward the acquisition of capabilities that might usefully assist them in the process of desisting from crime. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. In surgeons performing cardiothoracic surgery is sleep deprivation significant in its impact on morbidity or mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Leila; Asfour, Victoria; McCormack, David; Attia, Rizwan

    2014-09-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: is there a difference in cardiothoracic surgery outcomes in terms of morbidity or mortality of patients operated on by a sleep-deprived surgeon compared with those operated by a non-sleep-deprived surgeon? Reported search criteria yielded 77 papers, of which 15 were deemed to represent the best evidence on the topic. Three studies directly related to cardiothoracic surgery and 12 studies related to non-cardiothoracic surgery. Recommendations are based on 18 121 cardiothoracic patients and 214 666 non-cardiothoracic surgical patients. Different definitions of sleep deprivation were used in the studies, either reviewing surgeon's sleeping hours or out-of-hours operating. Surgical outcomes reviewed included: mortality rate, neurological, renal, pulmonary, infectious complications, length of stay, length of intensive care stay, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic-cross-clamp times. There were no significant differences in mortality or intraoperative complications in the groups of patients operated on by sleep-deprived versus non-sleep-deprived surgeons in cardiothoracic studies. One study showed a significant increase in the rate of septicaemia in patients operated on by severely sleep-deprived surgeons (3.6%) compared with the moderately sleep-deprived (0.9%) and non-sleep-deprived groups (0.8%) (P = 0.03). In the non-cardiothoracic studies, 7 of the 12 studies demonstrated statistically significant higher reoperation rate in trauma cases (P sleep deprivation in cardiothoracic surgeons on morbidity or mortality. However, overall the non-cardiothoracic studies have demonstrated that operative time and sleep deprivation can have a significant impact on overall morbidity and mortality. It is likely that other confounding factors concomitantly affect outcomes in out-of-hours surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  6. The razor's edge: Australian rock music impairs men's performance when pretending to be a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Daisy; Burton, Thomas Mw; Williamon, Aaron

    2016-12-12

    Over the past few decades there has been interest in the role of music in the operating theatre. However, despite many reported benefits, a number of potentially harmful effects of music have been identified. This study aimed to explore the effects of rock and classical music on surgical speed, accuracy and perceived distraction when performing multiorgan resection in the board game Operation. Single-blind, three-arm, randomised controlled trial. Imperial Festival, London, May 2016. Members of the public (n = 352) aged ≥ 16 years with no previous formal surgical training or hearing impairments. Participants were randomised to listen through noise-cancelling headphones to either the sound of an operating theatre, rock music or classical music. Participants were then invited to remove three organs from the board game patient, Cavity Sam, using surgical tweezers. Time taken (seconds) to remove three organs from Cavity Sam; the number of mistakes made in performing the surgery; and perceived distraction, rated on a five-point Likert-type scale from 1 (not at all distracting) to 5 (very distracting). Rock music impairs the performance of men but not women when undertaking complex surgical procedures in the board game Operation, increasing the time taken to operate and showing a trend towards more surgical mistakes. In addition, classical music was associated with lower perceived distraction during the game, but this effect was attenuated when factoring in how much people liked the music, with suggestions that only people who particularly liked the music of Mozart found it beneficial. Rock music (specifically Australian rock music) appears to have detrimental effects on surgical performance. Men are advised not to listen to rock music when either operating or playing board games.

  7. Integrating Laser Scanner and Bim for Conservation and Reuse: "the Lyric Theatre of Milan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utica, G.; Pinti, L.; Guzzoni, L.; Bonelli, S.; Brizzolari, A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper underlines the importance to apply a methodology that integrates the Building Information Modeling (BIM), Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and the Laser Scanner tool in conservation and reuse projects. As it is known, the laser scanner technology provides a survey of the building object which is more accurate rather than that carried out using traditional methodologies. Today most existing buildings present their attributes in a dispersed way, stored and collected in paper documents, in sheets of equipment information, in file folders of maintenance records. In some cases, it is difficult to find updated technical documentation and the research of reliable data can be a cost and time-consuming process. Therefore, this new survey technology, embedded with BIM systems represents a valid tool to obtain a coherent picture of the building state. The following case consists in the conservation and reuse project of Milan Lyric Theatre, started in 2013 from the collaboration between the Milan Polytechnic and the Municipality. This project first attempts to integrate these new techniques which are already professional standards in many other countries such as the US, Norway, Finland, England and so on. Concerning the methodology, the choice has been to use BIM software for the structured analysis of the project, with the aim to define a single code of communication to develop a coherent documentation according to rules in a consistent manner and in tight schedules. This process provides the definition of an effective and efficient operating method that can be applied to other projects.

  8. Choosing a Surgeon: An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Selection of a Gender Affirmation Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettner, Randi; Ettner, Frederic; White, Tonya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Selecting a healthcare provider is often a complicated process. Many factors appear to govern the decision as to how to select the provider in the patient-provider relationship. While the possibility of changing primary care physicians or specialists exists, decisions regarding surgeons are immutable once surgery has been performed. This study is an attempt to assess the importance attached to various factors involved in selecting a surgeon to perform gender affirmation surgery (GAS). It was hypothesized that owing to the intimate nature of the surgery, the expense typically involved, the emotional meaning attached to the surgery, and other variables, decisions regarding choice of surgeon for this procedure would involve factors other than those that inform more typical healthcare provider selection or surgeon selection for other plastic/reconstructive procedures. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed to individuals who had undergone GAS and individuals who had undergone elective plastic surgery to assess decision-making. Results: The results generally confirm previous findings regarding how patients select providers. Conclusion: Choosing a surgeon to perform gender-affirming surgery is a challenging process, but patients are quite rational in their decision-making. Unlike prior studies, we did not find a preference for gender-concordant surgeons, even though the surgery involves the genital area. Providing strategies and resources for surgical selection can improve patient satisfaction.

  9. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, Massoome; Ebrahimi, Mandana; Kaviani, Ahmad; Hashemi, Esmat; Montazeri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS) and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P < 0.01). There were no associations between BCS practice and the other variables studied. The most frequent reasons for not performing BCS were uncertainty about conservative therapy results (46%), uncertainty about the quality of available radiotherapy services (32%), and the probability of patients' non-compliance in radiotherapy (32%). The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance)

  10. Variations in Practice Patterns among Neurosurgeons and Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Management of Spinal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Manzar; Nasir, Sadaf; Moed, Amber; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2011-12-01

    This is a case series. We wanted to identify variations in the practice patterns among neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons for the management of spinal disorders. Spinal disorders are common in the clinical practice of both neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons. It has been observed that despite the availability of various guidelines, there is lack of consensus among surgeons about the management of various disorders. A questionnaire was distributed, either directly or via e-mail, to the both the neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons who worked at 5 tertiary care centers within a single region of Korea. The surgeons were working either in private practice or in academic institutions. The details of the questionnaire included demographic details and the specialty (orthopedic/neurosurgeon). The surgeons were classified according to the level of experience as up to 5 years, 6-10 years and > 10 years. Questions were asked about the approach to lumbar discectomy (fragmentectomy or aggressive disc removal), using steroids for treating discitis, the fusion preference for spondylolisthesis, the role of an orthosis after fusion, the preferred surgical approach for spinal stenosis, the operative approach for spinal trauma (early within 72 hours or late > 72 hours) and the role of surgery in complete spinal cord injury. The data was analyzed using SPSS ver 16. p-values neurosurgeons and 10 were orthopedic surgeons. Statistically significant differences were observed for the management of spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, using an orthosis after fusion, the type of lumbar discectomy and the value of surgical intervention after complete spinal cord injury. Our results suggest that there continues to exist a statistically significant lack of consensus among neurosurgeons and orthopedic spine surgeons when considering using an orthosis after fusion, the type of discectomy and the value of intervention after complete spinal injury.

  11. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration advanced surgery between 1889 and 1950.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bruce Evan

    2015-03-01

    To meet the need for qualified anesthetists, American surgeons recruited nurses to practice anesthesia during the Civil War and in the latter half of the 19th century. The success of this decision led them to collaborate with nurses more formally at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. During the 1890s, Alice Magaw refined the safe administration of ether. Florence Henderson continued her work improving the safety of ether administration during the first decade of the 20th century. Safe anesthesia enabled the Mayo surgeons to turn the St. Mary's Hospital into a surgical powerhouse. The prominent surgeon George Crile collaborated with Agatha Hodgins at the Lakeside Hospital in Cleveland to introduce nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Nitrous oxide/oxygen caused less cardiovascular depression than ether and thus saved the lives of countless trauma victims during World War I. Crile devised "anoci-association," an outgrowth of nitrous oxide/oxygen anesthesia. Hodgins' use of anoci-association made Crile's thyroid operations safer. Pioneering East Coast surgeons followed the lead of the surgeons at Mayo. William Halsted worked closely with Margaret Boise, and Harvey Cushing worked closely with Gertrude Gerard. As medicine became more complex, collaboration between surgeons and nurse anesthetists became routine and necessary. Teams of surgeons and nurse anesthetists advanced thoracic, cardiovascular, and pediatric surgery. The team of Evarts Graham and Helen Lamb performed the world's first pneumonectomy. Surgeon-nurse anesthetist collaboration seems to have been a uniquely American phenomenon. This collaboration facilitated both the "Golden Age of Surgery" and the profession we know today as nurse anesthesia.

  12. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  13. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2017-07-01

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  14. Brunch and debate on theatre and quantum physics

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    The "Comédie de Genève" theatre is organizing a brunch on Sunday 18 January to accompany the play "Kaïros, sisyphes et zombies" which is playing from 15 to 25 January. Michel Cassé, astrophysicist and Director of Research at the Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) in Paris, will come to debate with the play’s director, Oskar Gómez Mata, and the entire Kaïros team on the topic of "Théâtre – physique quantique: enquête sur le réel". While the parents take part in the "debate-brunch", the children can have fun with activities organized by "la Bulle d’Air" musical association. Sunday 18 January The brunch starts at 11:30 followed by the debate at 12:30, "la Bulle d’Air" activities will run from 12:30 to 14:00. La Comédie de Genève, 6 bd des Philosophes, 1205 Geneva Entry with brunch: 18 CHF (15 CHF for members). Entry without brunch: 10 CHF Animation for the children: free.

  15. Atom Surprise: Using Theatre in Primary Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ran; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2011-10-01

    Early exposure to science may have a lifelong effect on children's attitudes towards science and their motivation to learn science in later life. Out-of-class environments can play a significant role in creating favourable attitudes, while contributing to conceptual learning. Educational science theatre is one form of an out-of-class environment, which has received little research attention. This study aims to describe affective and cognitive learning outcomes of watching such a play and to point to connections between theatrical elements and specific outcomes. "Atom Surprise" is a play portraying several concepts on the topic of matter. A mixed methods approach was adopted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes of children (grades 1-6) from two different school settings who watched the play. Data were gathered using questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Analysis suggested that in both schools children's knowledge on the topic of matter increased after the play with younger children gaining more conceptual knowledge than their older peers. In the public school girls showed greater gains in conceptual knowledge than boys. No significant changes in students' general attitudes towards science were found, however, students demonstrated positive changes towards science learning. Theatrical elements that seemed to be important in children's recollection of the play were the narrative, props and stage effects, and characters. In the children's memory, science was intertwined with the theatrical elements. Nonetheless, children could distinguish well between scientific facts and the fictive narrative.

  16. The theatre, (art and science: between amazement and applause!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Fruguglietti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been countless innovations in the realm of science museology after the foundation of the Exploratorium of San Francisco and of the Ontario Science Center of Toronto with, among other things, the introduction of the exhibits hands-on, the use of new technologies and the arrival of virtuality.But most of all a new dialogue was launched, also as a form of transformation of reality. And what is drama but fiction and transformation of reality?This statement is the basis for the belief that museums and the theatre should continue, if not even start, a path to move closer, so as to make their languages work at the service of each other.A dialogical interaction which is difficult (as both languages and their interpreters crave for superiority, strong (the place for communication becomes multi-channel, but necessary (in view of a systemic approach of science communication.It is necessary especially to build an all-encompassing museum to fully play a sociological role of study, interpretation and determination of human society.

  17. LRN, ERN:, & BERN @ Wireless Integrating the Sciences (WITS) Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, L.; Campbell, B.; Foody, M.; Klitsner, D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a call to action for a learning tool that would work to best teach Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), the NASA Goddard team will partner with the inventor of Bop It!, an interactive game of verbs and following instructions; and Global Imagination, the developers of Magic Planet. In this paper Decision-making Orbital Health! (DOH!) will be described as a game derived from the basic functions necessary for Bop lt!, a familiar game. that will ask the educational audience to respond to changing commands to Bop It!, Twist It!, and Squeeze It! The success of the new version of the game, will be that the Earth will be making these commands from Dynamic Planet, and the crowd assembled can play wirelessly. Wireless Integrating The Sciences (WITS) Theatre : A balanced approach will describe how the communities local to Goddard and perhaps San Francisco will develop curriculum that helps kids teach kids with an engaging game and a STEM message. The performing arts will be employed to make it entertaining and appropriate to the size of the gathering, and the students educational level.

  18. Meeting Increasing Demands for Rural General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, Mary C; Bowers, Howard E; Campbell, Damon M; Parikh, Priti P; Woods, Randy J

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic assessment of the effective surgical workforce recommends 27,300 general surgeons in 2030; 2,525 more than are presently being trained. Rural shortages are already critical and there has been insufficient preparation for this need. A literature review of the factors influencing the choice of rural practice was performed. A systematic search was conducted of PubMed and the Web of Science to identify applicable studies in rural practice, surgical training, and rural general surgery. These articles were reviewed to identify the pertinent reports. The articles chosen for review are directed to four main objectives: 1) description of the challenges of rural practice, 2) factors associated with the choice of rural practice, 3) interventions to increase interest and preparation for rural practice, and 4) present successful rural surgical practice models. There is limited research on the factors influencing surgeons in the selection of rural surgery. The family practice literature suggests that physicians are primed for rural living through early experience, with reinforcement during medical school and residency, and retained through community involvement, and personal and professional satisfaction. However, more research into the factors drawing surgeons specifically to rural surgery, and keeping them in the community, is needed.

  19. A Worldwide Survey on Peyronie's Disease Surgical Practice Patterns Among Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; Wang, Run; Ralph, David; Levine, Laurence; Brock, Gerald

    2018-04-01

    Despite published guidelines on Peyronie's disease (PD), there are limited data on actual surgical practice among surgeons. To evaluate the surgical practice patterns in PD among surgeons from different continents and members of various sexual medicine societies. An anonymous survey on various pre-, intra-, and postoperative aspects of PD surgical care was distributed in printed format during International Society of Sexual Medicine meetings and as an online survey to International Society of Sexual Medicine members. 390 surgeons responded to the survey, with great variations in pre-, intra-, and postoperative strategies in PD surgical care. Most surgeons performed fewer than 10 penile plications and 10 graft surgeries per year. Modified Nesbit plication was the preferred option by most surgeons. Surgeons who received fellowship training were more likely to perform autologous than allograft surgery (odds ratio = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.13-2.82, P = .01). The use of penile color duplex ultrasound was inconsistently performed, with higher-volume surgeons (ie, >20 cases operated a year) more likely to use this diagnostic modality (odds ratio = 70.18, 95% CI = 20.99-234.6, P worldwide survey study has the potential to assist in the formation of a new practice guideline and serve as the basis for future prospective multinational studies. This is one of the largest surveys on PD practice and, to our knowledge, the only survey conducted across various sexual medicine societies, with the inclusion of many high-volume and experienced PD surgeons. This also is the 1st study to comprehensively evaluate many key aspects in surgical practice patterns for PD. However, the categorization on the questionnaire used in this survey was not designed to allow for direct comparison given the possibility of some surgeons with dual society memberships, reporting biases, large CIs in outcomes, different patient demographics, and cultural acceptance. There is great variation in surgical

  20. The pioneering contribution of italian surgeons to skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priola, Stefano M; Raffa, Giovanni; Abbritti, Rosaria V; Merlo, Lucia; Angileri, Filippo F; La Torre, Domenico; Conti, Alfredo; Germanò, Antonino; Tomasello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The origin of neurosurgery as a modern, successful, and separate branch of surgery could be dated back to the end of the 19th century. The most important development of surgery occurred in Europe, particularly in Italy, where there was a unique environment, allowing brilliant open-minded surgeons to perform, with success, neurosurgical operations. Neurosurgery began at the skull base. In everyday practice, we still pay tribute to early Italian neuroanatomists and pioneer neurosurgeons who represented a starting point in a new, obscure, and still challenging field of medicine and surgery during their times. In this paper, we report at a glance the contributions of Tito Vanzetti from Padua (1809-1888), for his operation on a destructive skull base cyst that had, indeed, an intracranial expansion; of Davide Giordano (1864-1954) from Venice, who described the first transnasal approach to the pituitary gland; and, most importantly, of Francesco Durante from Messina (1844-1934), who was the first surgeon in the history of neurosurgery to successfully remove a cranial base meningioma. They carried out the first detailed reported surgical excision of intracranial lesions at the skull base, diagnosed only through clinical signs; used many of the advances of the 19th century; and conceived and performed new operative strategies and approaches. Their operations were radical enough to allow the patient to survive the surgery and, in the case of Durante, for the first time, to obtain more than 12 years of good survival at a time when a tumor of this type would have been fatal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgeon Reliability for the Assessment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis on MRI: The Impact of Surgeon Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marawar, Satyajit V; Madom, Ian A; Palumbo, Mark; Tallarico, Richard A; Ordway, Nathaniel R; Metkar, Umesh; Wang, Dongliang; Green, Adam; Lavelle, William F

    2017-01-01

    Treating surgeon's visual assessment of axial MRI images to ascertain the degree of stenosis has a critical impact on surgical decision-making. The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the impact of surgeon experience on inter-observer and intra-observer reliability of assessing severity of spinal stenosis on MRIs by spine surgeons directly involved in surgical decision-making. Seven fellowship trained spine surgeons reviewed MRI studies of 30 symptomatic patients with lumbar stenosis and graded the stenosis in the central canal, the lateral recess and the foramen at T12-L1 to L5-S1 as none, mild, moderate or severe. No specific instructions were provided to what constituted mild, moderate, or severe stenosis. Two surgeons were "senior" (>fifteen years of practice experience); two were "intermediate" (>four years of practice experience), and three "junior" (< one year of practice experience). The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was calculated to assess inter-observer reliability. Seven MRI studies were duplicated and randomly re-read to evaluate inter-observer reliability. Surgeon experience was found to be a strong predictor of inter-observer reliability. Senior inter-observer reliability was significantly higher assessing central(p<0.001), foraminal p=0.005 and lateral p=0.001 than "junior" group.Senior group also showed significantly higher inter-observer reliability that intermediate group assessing foraminal stenosis (p=0.036). In intra-observer reliability the results were contrary to that found in inter-observer reliability. Inter-observer reliability of assessing stenosis on MRIs increases with surgeon experience. Lower intra-observer reliability values among the senior group, although not clearly explained, may be due to the small number of MRIs evaluated and quality of MRI images.Level of evidence: Level 3.

  2. Supply and Demand Analysis of the Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon Workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielatycki, John A; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Mir, Hassan R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate recent trends in the orthopaedic trauma workforce and to assess whether supply of orthopaedic trauma surgeons (OTS) matches the demand for their skills. Supply estimated using Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) membership and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons census data. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures reported by American College of Surgeons verified trauma centers in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) was used as a surrogate of demand. Because surrogates were used, the annual rate of change in OTA membership versus rate of change in operative injuries per NTDB center was compared. From 2002 to 2012, reported operative pelvic and acetabular injuries increased by an average of 21.0% per year. The number of reporting trauma centers increased by 27.2% per year. The number of OTA members increased each year except in 2009, with mean annual increase of 9.8%. The mean number of orthopaedic surgeons per NTDB center increased from 7.98 to 8.58, an average of 1.5% per year. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures per NTDB center decreased from 27.1 in 2002 to 19.03 in 2012, down 2.0% per year. In the United States, from 2002 to 2012, the number of OTS trended upward, whereas operative pelvic and acetabular cases per reporting NTDB center declined. These trends suggest a net loss of such cases per OTS over this period.

  3. Acting and Collecting: Imagining Asia through material culture and musical theatre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Thorley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the link between Asian-inspired material culture and musical theatre through the collections of Anglo-Australian performer Herbert Browne (1895-1975. Brown played lead roles in 1920s Australian musical theatre productions of The Mikado and Chu Chin Chow and re-lived his connection with oriental theatre by collecting and responding to objects performatively in the Chinoiserie room of his Melbourne home. Oriental musical theatre blended exotic cultures and locales in visually spectacular productions which bore little resemblance to reality. The taste for escapist fiction in the theatre took place against a backdrop of museum collecting which aimed to reproduce authentic Asian and Other cultures. In this paper, I draw on French philosopher Merleau-Ponty’s observations on the relationship between thought and the body’s interaction with space to interpret the influence of Browne’s theatricality on collecting choices. From this perspective, objects materialize particular understandings of the world which originate in the body and the body’s performative engagement with space.

  4. The practice of the “ Theatre of the oppressed” from an ethnological perspective. A dialogue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Frontino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During a Theatre of the Oppressed Seminar the Kuringa explained: “I look at reality, take a step back and create a reality with understanding. I observe, I analyse, I create an Image of the Reality to go back to discuss about Reality”. (Field notes Could we put in relation the creation process of theatre with ethnographic research? What could come out? There are many intersections as interesting critique points which can be relevant for both. My understanding of ethnographic research, political and collaborative, brought me to the following methodological questionings. I observed theatre practice participating at the activities of a theatre group for six months. I presented my analysis and interpretation to the participants and I did interviews to deepen specific themes. The inputs collected are not objective ones and the results does not aim to be definitive but to reflect on questions of contemporary social science. We move and observe the space on the not clearly definable borders between arts, science and politics. My point of view is that this perspective from “inside” the borders makes the discussion interesting. To me as a scholar the re-thinking of the methodology of anthropological research appears as a must. The goal is to contribute to discussion about collaborative ethnography. The dialogue between theatre of the Oppressed and ethnography is interesting and needs to be explored further and the concept “dialogue” needs specific critical attention.

  5. Current trends in chaperone use by plastic and reconstructive surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Umar; Barta, Ruth J; Kim, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    There is a paucity of literature regarding the use of chaperones by surgeons when examining patients. Use of a chaperone not only makes the patient comfortable but also potentially protects the surgeon from perceived misconduct. This is especially true for plastic surgeons who examine sensitive areas commonly. The purpose of this study was to determine the current trends in chaperone use by plastic surgeons when examining patients. A 23-question online survey was sent to all members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Data collected online were analyzed using Student t test and Pearson χ test. A P use by plastic surgeons during all examinations of patients was 30%. This rate increased up to 60% while examining sensitive areas. Male surgeons reported a higher frequency of chaperone use than female surgeons (P use compared to reconstructive surgeons (P = 0.001). Similarly, surgeons who had been in practice for more than 20 years reported a higher rate of chaperone use compared to surgeons in practice for less than 20 years (P = 0.032). Sixty-one (7.6%; 56 male and 5 female) surgeons reported being accused of inappropriate behavior by patients, of whom 49 (80%) did not have a chaperone present. There was no significant difference among male and female surgeons in rates of being accused of inappropriate behavior (7.9% vs 4.2%, P = 0.19). There was a higher rate of chaperone use by male plastic surgeons, surgeons with more than 20 years experience, and cosmetic surgeons. Despite the difference in chaperone use between the sexes, both had similar rates of being accused of inappropriate behavior during examinations by patients, and although these incidents were quite low, most had no chaperone present during those examinations.

  6. Power Dynamics in Applied Theatre: Interrogating the Power of the University-Based TfD Facilitator--the UZ Theatre and CARE Zimbabwe's Zvishavane/Mberengwa NICA Project and SSFP as Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Owen; Chivandikwa, Nehemiah

    2014-01-01

    One of the central tenets in applied theatre is the ability to confront issues of "power" and "powerlessness." Indeed, success or lack thereof in applied theatre projects is often adjudged against the ability or the extent to which these projects are, or have been able to "empower" the "powerless." In this…

  7. Outcomes following major emergency gastric surgery: the importance of specialist surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, O A; McGlone, E R; Mercer, S J; Somers, S S; Toh, S K C

    2015-01-01

    The increasing subspecialisation of general surgeons in their elective work may result in problems for the provision of expert care for emergency cases. There is very little evidence of the impact of subspecialism on outcomes following emergency major upper gastrointestinal surgery. This prospective study investigated whether elective subspecialism of general surgeon is associated with a difference in outcome following major emergency gastric surgery. Between February 1994 and June 2010, the data from all emergency major gastric procedures (defined as patients who underwent laparotomy within 12 hours of referral to the surgical service for bleeding gastroduodenal ulcer and/or undergoing major gastric resection) was prospectively recorded. The sub-specialty interest of operating surgeon was noted and related to post-operative outcomes. Over the study period, a total of 63 major gastric procedures were performed of which 23 (37%) were performed by specialist upper gastrointestinal (UGI) consultants. Surgery performed by a specialist UGI surgeon was associated with a significantly lower surgical complication (4% vs. 28% of cases; p=0.04) and in-patient mortality rate (22% vs. 50%; p=0.03). Major emergency gastric surgery has significantly better clinical outcomes when performed by a specialist UGI surgeon. These results have important implications for provision of an emergency general surgical service. Copyright© Acta Chirurgica Belgica.

  8. A Study on Musculoskeletal Disorders and Personal and Occupational Risk Factors among Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tirgar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Surgery is a high risk profession owing to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. Fine and precise operations cause surgeons to adopt prolonged fixed posture. As there is limited information in this region, the purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of MSDs and personal and occupational risk factors among surgeons in Babol (a northern city in Iran. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 45 surgeons during 2011 using a questionnaire in three parts including: Demographic and occupational data, Nordic standardized musculoskeletal disorders questionnaire (NMQ, and Body Discomfort Assessment technique. The working posture during operation was assessed by Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistical indexes and chi- square test, and a p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: According to the data, the mean of work experience was 19.9±6 years, and the mean of work hours was 54.2±14 (ranged 20-80 hours per week. Ninety five percent of surgeons reported experiencing one or more MSDs symptoms during the previous year. Neck pain (66.7% and low back pain (LBP (51% was the more frequent reported complaint. The results showed a significant statistical difference between LBP with weekly regular exercise and work experience. Conclusion: The results indicate that MSDs are the common problems among the surgeons and they are at risk because of their personal and occupational conditions. So, ergonomics interventions in order to prevent MSDs are recommended.

  9. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To canvass the perceptions of SA general surgeons regarding certain aspects of their training. Methods. An electronic postal survey was conducted. All general surgeons on the Association of Surgeons of South Africa database were requested to complete a structured questionnaire. Four Likert scale items were ...

  10. HISTORICAL NOTE JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON) John Hunter FRS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JOHN HUNTER (SURGEON). John Hunter FRS (13 February 1728-16 October 1793) was a Scottish surgeon, one of the most distinguished scientists and surgeons of his day. He was an early advocate of careful observation and scientific method in medicine. He was the husband of Anne Hunter, a teacher, friend and ...

  11. Patient Attitudes Toward Orthopedic Surgeon Ownership of Related Ancillary Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Paul H; Cross, Michael B; Johnson, Staci R; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Nunley, Ryan M; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-08-01

    Physician ownership of businesses related to orthopedic surgery, such as surgery centers, has been criticized as potentially leading to misuse of health care resources. The purpose of this study was to determine patients' attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses. We surveyed 280 consecutive patients at 2 centers regarding their attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses using an anonymous questionnaire. Three surgeon ownership scenarios were presented: (1) owning a surgery center, (2) physical therapy (PT), and (3) imaging facilities (eg, Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner). Two hundred fourteen patients (76%) completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that it is ethical for a surgeon to own a surgery center (73%), PT practice (77%), or imaging facility (77%). Most (>67%) indicated that their surgeon owning such a business would have no effect on the trust they have in their surgeon. Although >70% agreed that a surgeon in all 3 scenarios would make the same treatment decisions, many agreed that such surgeons might perform more surgery (47%), refer more patients to PT (61%), or order more imaging (58%). Patients favored surgeon autonomy, however, believing that surgeons should be allowed to own such businesses (78%). Eighty-five percent agreed that patients should be informed if their surgeon owns an orthopedic-related business. Although patients express concern over and desire disclosure of surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses, the majority believes that it is an ethical practice and feel comfortable receiving care at such a facility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. How surgeons make decisions when the evidence is inconclusive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Osterman, A. Lee; Spoor, A. B.; van der Zwan, A. L.; Shrivastava, Abhay; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Aida, E. Garcia G.; Aita, M. A.; Castillo, Alberto Pérez; Marcus, Alexander; Ladd, Amy; Terrono, Andrew L.; Gutow, Andrew P.; Schmidt, Andrew; Wang, Angela A.; Eschler, Anica; Miller, Anna N.; Wikerøy, Annette K. B.; Barquet, Antonio; Armstrong, April D.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Bedi, Asheesh; Shyam, Ashok K.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Jubel, Axel; Babst, Reto H.; Nolan, Betsy M.; Arciero, Bob; Bremer, Vanden; Bamberger, Brent; Peterson, Bret C.; Crist, Brett D.; Cross, Brian J.; Badman, Brian L.; Henley, C. Noel; Ekholm, Carl; Swigart, Carrie; Manke, Chad; Zalavras, Charalampos; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Cassidy, Charles; Cornell, Charles; Getz, Charles L.; Metzger, Charles; Wilson, Chris; Heiss, Christian; Perrotto, Christian J.; Wall, Christopher J.; Walsh, Christopher J.; Garnavos, Christos; Jiang, Chunyan; Lomita, Craig; Torosian, Craig M.; Rikli, Daniel A.; Whelan, Daniel B.; Wascher, Daniel C.; Hernandez, Daniel; Polatsch, Daniel; Beingessner, Daphne; Drosdowech, Darren; Tate, David E.; Hak, David; Rowland, David J.; Kalainov, David M.; Nelson, David; Weiss, David; McKee, Desirae M.; van Deurzen, D. F. G.; Endrizzi, Donald; Erol, Konul; Overbeck, Joachim P.; Baer, Wolfgang; Schwab, Eckart; Maza, Edgardo Ramos; Harvey, Edward; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Preloggler, Elisabeth; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Shin, Eon K.; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Kaplan, Thomas D.; Beeres, F. J. P.; Suarez, Fabio; Fernandes, C. H.; Cayón, Fidel Ernesto Cayón; Dolatowski, Filip Celestyn; Martin, Fischmeister; Sierra, Francisco Javier Aguilar; Lopez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Walter, Frank; Seibert, Franz Josef; Baumgaertel, Fred; Frihagen, Frede; Fuchs, P. C.; Huemer, Georg M.; Kontakis, George; Athwal, George S.; Dyer, George S. M.; Thomas, George; Kohut, Georges; Williams, Gerald; Hernandez, German Ricardo; Caro, Gladys Cecilia Zambrano; Garrigues, Grant; Merrell, Greg; DeSilva, Gregory; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Regazzi, Gustavo; de Azevedo, Gustavo Borges Laurindo; Ruggiero, Gustavo Mantovani; Helling, H. J.; MccUtchan, Hal; Goost, Hans; Kreder, Hans J.; Hasenboehler, Paula M.; Routman, Howard D.; van der Heide, Huub; Kleinlugtenbelt, I.; McGraw, Iain; Harris, Ian; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Mohammad; Lin, Ines C.; Iossifidis, A.; Andrew, J.; Trenholm, I.; Goslings, J. Carel; Wiater, J. Michael; Choueka, Jack; Ahn, Jaimo; Kellam, James; Biert, Jan; Pomerance, Jay; Johnson, Jeff W.; Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Yao, Jeffrey; Watson, Jeffry T.; Giuffre, Jennifer L.; Hall, Jeremy; Park, Jin-Young; Fischer, Jochen; Murachovsky, Joel; Howlett, John; McAuliffe, John; Evans, John P.; Taras, John; Braman, Jonathan; Hobby, Jonathan L.; Rosenfeld, Jonathan; Boretto, Jorge; Orbay, Jorge; Rubio, Jorge; Ortiz, Jose A.; Abboud, Joseph; Conflitti, Joseph M.; Vroemen, Joseph P. A. M.; Adams, Julie; Clarke, J. V.; Kabir, K.; Chivers, Karel; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Segalman, Keith; Lee, Kendrick; Eng, Kevin; Chhor, Kimberlly S.; Ponsen, K. J.; Jeray, Kyle; Marsh, L.; Poelhekke, L. M. S. J.; Mica, Ladislav; Borris, Lars C.; Halperin, Lawrence; Weiss, Lawrence; Benson, Leon; Elmans, Leon; de Mendonca, Leonardo Alves; Rocha, Leonardo; Katolik, Leonid; Lattanza, Lisa; Taitsman, Lisa; Guenter, Lob; Catalano, Louis; Buendia, Luis Antonio; Austin, Luke S.; Palmer, M. Jason; de Vries, M. R.; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Abdel-Ghany, Mahmoud I.; van de Sande, M. A. J.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Rizzo, Marco; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Pirpiris, Marinis; Baratz, Mark; Lazarus, Mark D.; Boyer, Martin; Richardson, Martin; Kastelec, Matej; Mormino, Matt; Budge, Matthew D.; Turina, Matthias; Wood, Megan M.; Baskies, Michael; Baumgaertner, Michael; Behrman, Michael; Hausman, Michael; Jones, Michael; LeCroy, Michael; Moskal, Michael; Nancollas, Michael; Prayson, Michael; Grafe, Michael W.; Kessler, Michael W.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Mckee, Mike; Merchant, Milind; Tyllianakis, Minos; Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis; Chen, Neal C.; Saran, Neil; Wilson, Neil; Shortt, Nicholas L.; Schep, Niels; Rossiter, Nigel; Lasanianos, N. G.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos; Weiss, Noah D.; Harvey, Norah M.; van Eerten, P. V.; Melvanki, Parag; McCulloch, Patrick T.; Martineau, Paul A.; Appleton, Paul; Guidera, Paul; Levin, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter; Evans, Peter J.; Jebson, Peter; Kloen, Peter; Krause, Peter; Brink, Peter R. G.; Peters, J. H.; Blazar, Philip; Streubel, Philipp N.; Inna, Prashanth; Prashanth, S.; Solanki, Punita V.; Wang, Qiugen; Quell, M.; Benafield, R. Bryan; Haverlag, R.; Peters, R. W.; Varma, Rajat; Nyszkiewicz, Ralf; Costanzo, Ralph M.; de Bedout, Ramon; Ranade, Ashish S.; Smith, Raymond Malcolm; Abrams, Reid; Fricker, Renato M.; Omid, Reza; Barth, Richard; Buckley, Richard; Jenkinson, Richard; GIlbert, Richard S.; Page, Richard S.; Wallensten, Richard; Zura, Robert D.; Feibel, Robert J.; Gray, Robert R. L.; Tashijan, Robert; Wagenmakers, Robert; Pesantez, Rodrigo; van Riet, Roger; Norlin, Rolf; Pfeifer, Roman; Liem, Ronald; Kulick, Roy G.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Shatford, Russell; Klinefelter, Ryan; Calfee, Ryan P.; Moghtaderi, Sam; Sodha, Samir; Sprujt, Sander; Kakar, Sanjeev; Kaplan, Saul; Duncan, Scott; Kluge, Sebastian; Rodriguez-Elizalde, Sebastian; Checchia, Sergio L.; Rowinski, Sergio; Dodds, Seth; Hurwit, Shep; Sprengel, K.; van der Stappen, W. A. H.; Kronlage, Steve; Belded, Steven; Morgan, Steven J.; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Hilliard, Stuart; Gosens, Taco; Sasaki, Takashi; Taleb, C.; Pritsch, Tamir; Tosounidis, Theodoros; Wyrick, Theresa; DeCoster, Thomas; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Stackhouse, Thomas G.; Hughes, Thomas; Wright, Thomas; Ly, Thuan V.; Havenhill, Timothy G.; Omara, Timothy; Siff, Todd; McLaurin, Toni M.; Wanich, Tony; Rueger, Johannes M.; Vallim, Frederico C. M.; Sabesan, Vani J.; Nikolaou, Vasileios S.; Knoll, Victoria D.; Telang, Vidyadhar; Iyer, Vishwanath M.; Jokhi, Vispi; Batson, W. Arnnold; Willems, W. Jaap; Smith, Wade R.; Belangero, William Dias; Wolkenfelt, J.; Weil, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    To address the factors that surgeons use to decide between 2 options for treatment when the evidence is inconclusive. We tested the null hypothesis that the factors surgeons use do not vary by training, demographics, and practice. A total of 337 surgeons rated the importance of 7 factors when

  13. Global plastic surgeons images depicted in motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Se Jin; Park, Sowhey; Hwang, Kun

    2013-03-01

    Motion pictures are made to entertain and enlighten people, but they are viewed differently by different people. What one considers to be a tearjerker may induce giggles in another. We have gained added interest in this because our professional pictures contain plastic surgery in their venue. We have recently reviewed 21 motion pictures that were made from 1928 to 2006 and that includes plastic surgical procedures in their content. As a habit, we tried to analyze them from a surgical point of view. About one third (35.7%) of the patients were criminals, whereas 14.3% of them were spies. One third of the procedures were done by illegitimate "surgeons," whereas a quarter of the procedures (25%) were performed by renowned surgeons. Surgeons who were in love with the patients did the rest (25%) of the operations. The complication rate was 14.3%; the surgery was successful in 85.7% of cases, but were the patients happy with the results? This was not the case in the movies. Only 7.7% were happy; 14.5 % of them were eminently unhappy. Why the discrepancy? It is difficult to analyze the minds of the people in the film, but considering that the majority of the characters in the films were rather unsavory, one may deduce that a crooked mind functions differently. Motion pictures have advanced greatly in the past several decades with the advent of improved mechanical and electronic devices, and plastic surgery as also advanced in tandem. This surgical field has become a common procedure in our daily life. It is readily available and mostly painless. However, the public sees it in only one way, that is, that the performing physicians are highly compensated. Very few consider the efforts and the suffering that accompanies each and every surgical procedure as it is performed. Perhaps, it is too much to hope for a day that will come when we will see a film that portrays the mental anguish that accompanies each and every procedure the plastic surgeon makes.

  14. Impact of laparoscopic surgery training laboratory on surgeon's performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Fabio C M; Barbosa, Joao Arthur B A; Marchini, Giovanni S

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been replacing the open standard technique in several procedures. Similar or even better postoperative outcomes have been described in laparoscopic or robot-assisted procedures when compared to open surgery. Moreover, minimally invasive surgery has been providing less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalization, and thus a faster return to daily activities. However, the learning curve required to obtain laparoscopic expertise has been a barrier in laparoscopic spreading. Laparoscopic surgery training laboratory has been developed to aid surgeons to overcome the challenging learning curve. It may include tutorials, inanimate model skills training (box models and virtual reality simulators), animal laboratory, and operating room observation. Several different laparoscopic courses are available with specific characteristics and goals. Herein, we aim to describe the activities performed in a dry and animal-model training laboratory and to evaluate the impact of different kinds of laparoscopic surgery training courses on surgeon’s performance. Several tasks are performed in dry and animal laboratory to reproduce a real surgery. A short period of training can improve laparoscopic surgical skills, although most of times it is not enough to confer laparoscopic expertise for participants. Nevertheless, this short period of training is able to increase the laparoscopic practice of surgeons in their communities. Full laparoscopic training in medical residence or fellowship programs is the best way of stimulating laparoscopic dissemination. PMID:27933135

  15. GILBERT'S SYNDROME - A CONCEALED ADVERSITY FOR PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Ahsan; Sabir, Sabir; Ashlaq, Muhammad; Farooq, Umer; Khan, Muhammad Zatmar; Khan, Faisal Yousaf

    2015-01-01

    Gilbert's syndrome (often abbreviated as GS) is most common hereditary cause of mild unconjugated (indirect) hyperbilirubinemia. Various studies have been published depicting clinical and pharmacological effects of Gilbert's syndrome (GS). However GS as a sign of precaution for physician and surgeons has not been clearly established. A systematic study of the available literature was done. Key words of Gilbert's syndrome, hyperbilirubinemia and clinical and pharmacological aspects of GS were searched using PubMed as search engine. Considering the study done in last 40 years, 375 articles were obtained and their abstracts were studied. The criterion for selecting the articles for through study was based on their close relevance with the topic. Thus 40 articles and 2 case reports were thoroughly studied. It was concluded that Gilbert's syndrome has immense clinical importance because the mild hyperbilirubinemia can be mistaken for a sign of occult, chronic, or progressive liver disease. GS is associated with lack of detoxification of few drugs. It is related with spherocytosis, cholithiasis, haemolytic anaemia, intra-operative toxicity, irinotecan toxicity, schizophrenia and problems in morphine metabolism. It also has profound phenotypic effect as well. The bilirubin level of a GS individual can rise abnormally high in various conditions in a person having Gilbert's syndrome. This can mislead the physicians and surgeons towards false diagnosis. Therefore proper diagnosis of GS should be ascertained in order to avoid the concealed adversities of this syndrome.

  16. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errani, C; Kreshak, J; Ruggieri, P; Alberghini, M; Picci, P; Vanel, D

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Popular Theatre for Science Engagement: Audience Engagement with Human Cloning Following a Production of Caryl Churchill's "A Number"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkers, Martina; Orthia, Lindy A.

    2016-01-01

    Research into the role of fiction in engaging people with science is a growing area, but a little studied medium in this respect is "popular theatre," or non-pedagogic theatre that exists primarily as a work of art. This study investigated audience engagement with human cloning issues after seeing a performance of Caryl Churchill's 2002…

  18. From local to global--an overview of the Croatian National Theatre in the era of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjak, Ana

    2012-09-01

    The article offers an overview of the Croatian National Theatre research. It comes in two parts. The first examines the position theatre in the era of globalization, while the second focuses on the Croatian National Theatre, in the era of globalization, in the context of specific social and national interests, as well as within the limits of the national possibilities. What emerges in this overview is a feel for how complex the field of theatre research is in Croatia, given its specific position since there are four National Theatres in a country of approximately 4 million people. Also, local budgets and the lack of strategical plan and programme for culture in general represent a sort of limitation. The article ends with two conclusions: a) the Croatian National Theatres in the effort to go global experience primarily different economic status; b) the article draws attention to the present and future challenges that the Croatian National Theatres are faced with, posed by issues such as correlation between globalization and theatre.

  19. An Allegory of Addiction Recovery: Exploring the Performance of "Eumenides" by Aeschylus, as Adapted by 18 ANO Theatre Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zontou, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of the "Eumenides," as adapted and performed by 18 ANO theatre group. 18 ANO is the theatre group of the Drug dependence treatment unit 18 ANO of Attica's Psychiatric Hospital, which is based in Athens, Greece. Each year 18 ANO organises performances in the wider community with the aim of promoting…

  20. Replacing the Sofa with the Spotlight: Interrogating the Therapeutic Value of Personal Testimony within Community-Based Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Julie Salverson, a Canadian scholar-practitioner, has long challenged the assumption that personal storytelling within Community-Based Theatre is necessarily therapeutic. Salverson critiques an "aesthetic of injury," arguing that theatre practitioners have foregrounded personal narratives in a way that reinscribes a "victim…