WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgeons managed care

  1. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Charles L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  2. Trauma Collaborative Care Intervention: Effect on Surgeon Confidence in Managing Psychosocial Complications After Orthopaedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Stephen T; Carroll, Eben A; Gary, Joshua L; McKinley, Todd O; OʼToole, Robert V; Sietsema, Debra L; Castillo, Renan C; Frey, Katherine P; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Huang, Yanjie; Collins, Susan C J; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-08-01

    The impact of the Trauma Collaborative Care (TCC) program on surgeon confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae of orthopaedic trauma was evaluated as part of a larger prospective, multisite, cluster clinical trial. We compared confidence and perceived resource availability among surgeons practicing in trauma centers that implemented the TCC program with orthopaedic trauma surgeons in similar trauma centers that did not implement the TCC. Prospective cohort design. Level-I trauma centers. Attending surgeons and fellows (N = 95 Pre and N = 82 Post). Self-report 10-item measure of surgeon confidence in managing psychosocial issues associated with trauma and perceived availability of support resources. Analyses, performed on the entire sample and repeated on the subset of 52 surgeons who responded to the survey at both times points, found surgeons at intervention sites experienced a significantly greater positive improvement (P < 0.05) in their (1) belief that they have strategies to help orthopaedic trauma patients change their psychosocial situation; (2) confidence in making appropriate referrals for orthopaedic trauma patients with psychosocial problems; and (3) belief that they have access to information to guide the management of psychosocial issues related to recovery. Initial data suggest that the establishment of the TCC program can improve surgeons' perceived availability of resources and their confidence in managing the psychosocial sequelae after injury. Further studies will be required to determine if this translates into beneficial patient effects. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  3. The future of orthopaedics in the United States: an analysis of the effects of managed care in the face of an excess supply of orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R; Thurston, N K

    2000-03-01

    Recent technological advances in orthopaedic surgery have propelled both the volume of surgical cases and their complexity, resulting in increased costs, which should naturally result in higher incomes for surgeons. However, the transition from a fee-for-service model of physician compensation to a managed care model has resulted in major shifts in economic resource allocation. An economic model of this market based on imperfect competition shows that these changes have shifted market power from surgeons to the managed care organizations. Our model predicts that practicing surgeons will retire earlier, medical students will begin to select other specialties, and innovation will be slowed. Antitrust laws limit surgeons' ability to combat this trend through meaningful collective bargaining, creating the potential for future shortages as the baby boom generation reaches retirement age and the demand for orthopaedic services increases dramatically.

  4. Do acute-care surgeons follow best practices for breast abscess management? A single-institution analysis of 325 consecutive cases.

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    Barron, Alison Unzeitig; Luk, Stephen; Phelan, Herb A; Williams, Brian H

    2017-08-01

    The breast surgery community has adopted needle aspiration as the standard of care for breast abscesses, which have a size less than 5 cm on ultrasound, no skin changes, and fewer than 5 days of symptoms. Our acute-care surgery (ACS) service manages all breast abscess consults at our urban safety-net hospital. We undertook this descriptive study to identify the rate of operative incisions and drainage performed by ACS surgeons which were not compatible with best practices for breast abscess management. We performed a retrospective review of the electronic health records of all patients on whom the ACS service was consulted for a breast abscess at our urban safety-net hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. We collected data on patient demographics, breast skin characteristics, length of symptoms, ultrasound results, and treatment modality. A total of 325 patients with breast abscesses were evaluated by ACS, of whom 21 met the breast community's indications for needle aspiration. Of the overall 325 subject sample, 281 (86.5%) underwent incision and drainage (I&D), and 44 (13.5%) underwent bedside needle aspiration. Of the 281 patients that underwent I&D, 269 (95.7%) met the breast surgery community's indications for I&D due to either skin changes (n = 90, 33.5%), abscess >5 cm on ultrasound (n = 88, 32.7%), or symptoms >5 days (n = 238, 88.5%). Of the 44 patients that underwent needle aspiration, only 9 (20.5%) met the current practice indications for aspiration. Of the 44 patients that underwent aspiration, 28 (63.6%) failed and went on to have an operation. The majority of these failed aspirations had symptoms >5 days (23 patients, 82.1%) or had skin changes at presentation (1 patient, 3.6%) or an abscess >5 cm on ultrasound (5 patients, 17.9%). As judged by best practices promulgated by the breast surgery community, ACS surgeons do not show excessive rates of operative I&D of breast abscess and in fact seem to overutilize needle aspiration

  5. Health care delivery and the training of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, L D

    1993-09-01

    Most countries have mastered the art of cost containment by global budgeting for public expenditure. It is not as yet clear whether the other option, managed care, or managed competition will accomplish cost control in America. Robert Evans, a Canadian health care expert, remains skeptical. He says, "HMO's are the future, always have been and always will be." With few exceptions, the amount spent on health care is not a function of the system but of the gross domestic product per person. Great Britain is below the line expected for expenditure, which may be due to truly impressive waiting lists. The United States is above the line, which is probably related to the overhead costs to administer the system and the strong demand by patients for prompt and highly sophisticated diagnostic measures and treatments. Canada is on the line, but no other country has subscribed to the Canadian veto on private insurance. Reform or changes are occurring in all countries and will continue to do so. For example, we are as terrified of managed care in Canada as you are of our brand of socialized insurance. We distrust practice by protocol just as you abhor waiting lists. From my perspective as a surgeon, I envision an ideal system that would cover all citizens, would maintain choice of surgeon by patients, would provide mechanisms for cost containment that would have the active and continuous participation of the medical profession, and would provide for research and development. Any alteration in health care delivery in the United States that compromises biomedical research and development will be a retrogressive, expensive step that could adversely affect the health of nations everywhere. Finally, a continuing priority of our training programs must be to ensure that the surgeon participating in this system continues to treat each patient as an individual with concern for his or her own needs.

  6. [Management abilities of the head surgeon: essential for survival!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, J

    2012-04-01

    Due to increased economic challenges in the management of hospitals head surgeons do not only need excellent surgical expertise but also significant management qualities. The personality of head surgeons should include authenticity, sincerity, fairness and the ability to cooperate. Visionary leadership, strategic thinking and strategic management of the personnel are further prerequisites for success. Besides good abilities in communication head surgeons need knowledge of the operating figures for interpretation. To keep up with the own capabilities time and self-management is essential. A survival as head surgeon is likely if these qualities and abilities exist.

  7. Surgeon commitment to trauma care decreases missed injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Chia-Ju; Chan, Hon-Man; Lee, Wei-Che; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Cheng, Yuan-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries sustain an important issue concerning patient safety and quality of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of surgeon commitment to trauma care on missed injuries. We hypothesised that surgeons committed to the trauma service has less missed injuries than surgeons not committed to the trauma service would have. By retrospective analysis of 976 adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at an urban, university-based trauma centre. Missed injuries were compared between two groups; in group 1 the patients were evaluated and treated by the surgeons who were committed to the trauma service and in group 2 the patients were evaluated and treated by surgeons practicing mainly in other specialties. Patients had significantly lower rates of missed major or life-threatening injuries when treated by group 1 surgeons. Logistic regression model revealed significant factors associated with missed major or life-threatening injuries including ISS and groups in which patients were treated by different group surgeons. Physicians will perform better when they are trained and interested in a specific area than those not trained, or even not having any particular interest in that specific area. Surgeons committed to the trauma service had less missed injuries in severely injured patients, and it is vital to improve patient safety and quality of care for trauma patients. Staff training and education for assessing severely injured patients and creating an open culture with detection and reduction of the potential for error are important and effective strategies in decreasing missed injuries and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors determining the patients' care intensity for surgeons and surgical nurses: a conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Vermeulen, Hester; Nieveen van Dijkum, Els J M; Gouma, Dirk J; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2015-09-18

    Surgeons and nurses sometimes perceive a high workload on the surgical wards, which may influence admission decisions and staffing policy. This study aimed to explore the relative contribution of various patient and care characteristics to the perceived patients' care intensity and whether differences exist in the perception of surgeons and nurses. We invited surgeons and surgical nurses in the Netherlands for a conjoint analysis study through internet and e-mail invitations. They rated 20 virtual clinical scenarios regarding patient care intensity on a 10-point Likert scale. The scenarios described patients with 5 different surgical conditions: cholelithiasis, a colon tumor, a pancreas tumor, critical leg ischemia, and an unstable vertebral fracture. Each scenario presented a mix of 13 different attributes, referring to the patients' condition, physical symptoms, and admission and discharge circumstances. A total of 82 surgeons and 146 surgical nurses completed the questionnaire, resulting in 4560 rated scenarios, 912 per condition. For surgeons, 6 out of the 13 attributes contributed significantly to care intensity: age, polypharmacy, medical diagnosis, complication level, ICU-stay and ASA-classification, but not multidisciplinary care. For nurses, the same six attributes contributed significantly, but also BMI, nutrition status, admission type, patient dependency, anxiety or delirium during hospitalization, and discharge type. Both professionals ranked 'complication level' as having the highest impact. The differences between surgeons and nurses on attributes contributing to care intensity may be explained by differences in professional roles and daily work activities. Surgeons have a medical background, including technical aspects of their work and primary focus on patient curation. However, nurses are focused on direct patient care, i.e., checking vital functions, stimulating self-care and providing woundcare. Surgeons and nurses differ in their perception of

  9. Day-care hypospadias surgery: Single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharam V.V.S.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the results of the early discharge of children after hypospadias repair with an indwelling catheter. Materials and Methods: To facilitate early the discharge of children after hypospadias repair, the author adopted the technique of draining the indwelling urinary catheter into diapers in children undergoing this operation. Home catheter care was taught to the mother; the dressings and catheters were subsequently managed in the outpatient clinic. Results: Over a 2-year period, 43 children were managed by this technique and were sent home within 24-48 h after the operation with an indwelling catheter. Minor problems requiring outpatient visits to the surgeon occurred in nine (20% children after discharge from the hospital. All the nine children were successfully managed as outpatients and no child required rehospitalisation. The catheter remained in position for 5 days in all the children. The overall results were satisfactory with an acceptable (7% fistula rate. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the duration of the hospital stay of children after hypospadias repair without compromising on the final results.

  10. Role of ENT Surgeon in Managing Battle Trauma During Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajguru, Renu

    2013-01-01

    With technological improvements in body armour and increasing use of improvised explosive devices, it is the injuries to head, face and neck are the cause for maximum fatalities as military personnel are surviving wounds that would have otherwise been fatal. The priorities of battlefield surgical treatment are to save life, eyesight and limbs and then to give the best functional and aesthetic outcome for other wounds. Modern day battlefields pose unique demands on the deployed surgical teams and management of head and neck wounds demands multispecialty approach. Optimal result will depend on teamwork of head and neck trauma management team, which should also include otolaryngologist. Data collected by various deployed HFN surgical teams is studied and quoted in the article to give factual figures. Otorhinolaryngology becomes a crucial sub-speciality in the care of the injured and military otorhinolaryngologists need to be trained and deployed accordingly. The otolaryngologist's clinical knowledge base and surgical domain allows the ENT surgeon to uniquely contribute in response to mass casualty incident. Military planners need to recognize the felt need and respond by deploying teams of specialist head and neck surgeons which should also include otorhinolaryngologists.

  11. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

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    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  12. Certificate-of-Need regulation in outpatient surgery and specialty care: implications for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Salvatore J; Comstock, Matthew; Kuzon, William M

    2005-09-15

    For plastic surgeons, independent development of outpatient surgical centers and specialty facilities is becoming increasingly common. These facilities serve as important avenues not only for increasing access and efficiency but in maintaining a sustainable, competitive specialty advantage. Certificate of Need regulation represents a major hurdle to plastic surgeons who attempt to create autonomy in this fashion. At the state level, Certificate of Need programs were initially established in an effort to reduce health care costs by preventing unnecessary capital outlays for facility expansion (i.e., managing supply of health care resources) in addition to assisting with patient safety and access to care. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of Certificate of Need regulations on health care costs, patient safety, and access to care and to discuss specific implications of these regulations for plastic surgeons. Within Certificate of Need states, these regulations have done little, if anything, to control health care costs or affect patient safety. Presently, Certificate of Need effects coupled with recent provisions in the Medicare Modernization Act banning development of specialty hospitals may restrict patient access to ambulatory surgical and specialty care. For the plastic surgeon, these effects not only act as an economic barrier to entry but can threaten the efficiencies gained from providing surgical care in an ambulatory setting. An appreciation of these effects is critical to maintaining specialty autonomy and access to fiscal policy.

  13. The Affordable Care Act: a primer for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenny T; Israel, Jacqueline S; Poore, Samuel O; Rao, Venkat K

    2014-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, sometimes referred to as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It represents the most extensive overhaul of the country's health care system since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The Affordable Care Act has two goals. The first goal is to reduce the uninsured population in the United States. Key elements to covering the uninsured include the following: (1) expanding Medicaid coverage for low-income individuals and (2) establishing health insurance marketplaces for moderate-income individuals with subsidies and tax cuts in an effort to make health insurance more affordable. The second goal of the Affordable Care Act is to address concerns about quality and the overall cost of U.S. health care. It is imperative that plastic surgeons thoroughly understand the impact that the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly have on the country, on our patients, and on our clinical practices. Plastic surgery will see many changes in the future. This will include an overall increase in the number of insured patients, a push toward joining accountable care organizations, and a shift in payment systems to bundled reimbursement for episodes of care. In this article, the authors describe how these changes are likely to occur and what plastic surgeons must do to be part of the change.

  14. Clinical features and management of equine post operative ileus (POI): Survey of Diplomates of the American Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, D; Hudson, N P H; Elce, Y A; Blikslager, A; Divers, T J; Handel, I G; Tremaine, W H; Pirie, R S

    2016-11-01

    A recent survey of European Colleges (European College of Equine Internal Medicine [ECEIM] and European College of Veterinary Surgeons [ECVS]) revealed the different strategies implemented by, and some of the challenges facing, European clinicians presented with cases of post operative ileus (POI). It was concluded that further comparative analysis of opinions, canvassed from additional colleges of equine veterinary specialism worldwide, would provide valuable additional insight into current POI knowledge on a more global scale. To report and compare the current strategies favoured by American veterinary specialists when managing POI in horses that underwent emergency colic surgery. Cross-sectional survey. Electronic invitations were sent to 814 Large Animal specialists, including 3 colleges: the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC). The response rate was 14% (115/814). The majority of respondents (68%) reported an estimated prevalence range of POI of 0-20%. The presence of reflux on nasogastric intubation was the main criterion used to define POI. A lesion involving the small intestine was considered the main risk factor for POI. Anti-inflammatory drugs, intravenous (i.v.) fluids and antimicrobial drugs were the primary strategies used when managing POI. Flunixin meglumine and i.v. lidocaine were the drugs most commonly used in the treatment of horses with POI. Supplementary management strategies targeted mainly the prevention of post operative adhesions, infection and inflammation. There is a lack of consensus on the clinical definition of POI. Prospective and objective clinical assessment of the effectiveness of the different strategies contained within this and the European survey is necessary in order to identify a standardised approach to the management of equine POI. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  15. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  16. Orthopedic surgeons' attitudes to osteoporosis investigation and management after minimal trauma fracture (MTF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Wurf, Jane; McGirr, Joe; Seal, Alexa; Harding, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    A study of orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis found they believe follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important; responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management lies with primary health care and current communication systems are poor. The investigation and treatment of osteoporosis after minimal trauma fracture (MTF) is regarded as sub-optimal. There is strong evidence of the benefit of identifying and treating osteoporosis after MTF, and there has been discussion of the possible role that orthopedic surgeons might play in the management of osteoporosis after MTF. The study surveyed orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine their attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis, the role health professionals should play, and the communication and co-ordination of follow-up care. A survey was developed and piloted prior to being posted to 69 orthopedic surgeons asking for their opinions about the general management of osteoporosis, and the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in dealing with osteoporosis following an MTF. Responses were received from 42 participants (60.8%) with the majority of respondents agreeing that it is important to treat osteoporosis following MTF. Less than 15% of respondents felt that it was their responsibility to initiate discussion or treatment or investigation after MTF. No respondent felt that the coordination of osteoporosis care was good and 45% stated it was poor. Communication after discharge is mostly left to the hospital (30%), while 20% stated they did not follow up at all. This study shows that many rural orthopedic surgeons believe that follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important, that responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management of osteoporosis lies with primary health care and the current communication systems are poor.

  17. The changing health care marketplace: current industry trends, new provider organizational structures, and effects on plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, L M

    1998-09-01

    Current market forces are driving the health care industry in new directions. The managed care industry is currently undergoing a market shakeout, as manifested by consolidation, increased competition, and lower profits. Medicare is fighting to remain solvent by lowering fees paid to providers, driving patients into managed care plans, and cracking down on billing irregularities. For providers, the combined effect of these trends is lower fees, increased risk-sharing, and increased overhead. Plastic surgeons face new demands in this environment. They must increase their efficiency and form new alliances with other providers. These alliances allow plastic surgeons to maintain a steady stream of patients, to manage risk, to negotiate more lucrative contracts with managed care organizations, and to increase efficiency. To achieve these alliances, plastic surgeons must alter the organizational structure of their practices. Several corporate practice models are becoming more prevalent; these include large group practices, physician practice management companies, and integrated delivery systems. Each structure has advantages for plastic surgeons, but each also requires plastic surgeons to trade varying degrees of financial and professional autonomy for market strength.

  18. [Management Competence in Leading Positions in Clinical Surgery - What Does a Surgeon Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, W; Meyer, F

    2016-12-01

    Background: Surgeons, more than other specialists, are required to combine high medical expertise with management competence. This is due to changing environments, new demands with respect to quality, the ongoing discussion on increased performance in the context of questionable target agreements, an increasing tendency of university hospitals and other departments and clinics to recruit leading personnel in medicine with management competence, but also to the understanding of one's own role and surgeons' distinguished public reputation. Aim: This narrative review describes the changing environments for surgeons in leading positions in hospitals and provides an overview on the practical use of management skills in surgery. In addition, it advises on how to acquire management competence and presents an educational concept appropriate for surgeons in leading positions. Key points: 1. The management of new challenges in the healthcare system - also in clinical surgery - requires management skills, which are indispensable for a surgeon in a leading position. 2. Management skills in surgery comprise aspects such as communication ability, social competence, cooperation and leadership skills, knowledge on business administration aspects and legal certainty. 3. The necessary knowledge can be acquired in courses leading to a certificate (e.g. "MHM® Medical Hospital Manager") or by earning a "Master of Business Administration" (MBA). Conclusion: Management competence is essential in leading positions in clinical surgery today. The use of these skills is challenging in daily practice. Successfully applied, management competence not only guarantees comprehensive patient care and leadership of employees, but also provides satisfaction in leading positions of a surgical department. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Building Effective Partnerships Between Vascular Surgeons and Podiatric Physicians in the Effective Management of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Timothy; Chaer, Rabih A; Salvo, Nichol L

    2016-07-01

    Both vascular surgeons and podiatric physicians care for patients with diabetic foot ulcerations (DFUs), one of today's most challenging health-care populations in the United States. The prevalence of DFUs has steadily increased, along with the rising costs associated with care. Because of the numerous comorbidities affecting these patients, it is necessary to take a multidisciplinary approach in the management of these patients. Such efforts, primarily led by podiatric physicians and vascular surgeons, have been shown to effectively decrease major limb loss. Establishing an interprofessional partnership between vascular surgery and podiatric medicine can lead to an improvement in the delivery of care and outcomes of this vulnerable patient population.

  20. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  1. Training future surgeons for management roles: the resident-surgeon-manager conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Waël C; Mulder, David S; Fried, Gerald M; Elhilali, Mostafa; Khwaja, Kosar A

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate that senior surgical residents would benefit from focused training by professionals with management expertise. Although managerial skills are recognized as necessary for the successful establishment of a surgical practice, they are not often emphasized in traditional surgical residency curricula. DESIGN Senior residents from all surgical subspecialties at McGill University were invited to participate in a 1-day management seminar. Precourse questionnaires aimed at evaluating the residents' perceptions of their own managerial knowledge and preparedness were circulated. The seminar was then given in the form of interactive lectures and case-based discussions. The questionnaires were readministered at the end of the course, along with an evaluation form. Precourse and postcourse data were compared using the Freeman-Halton extension of the Fisher exact test to determine statistical significance (P < .05). SETTING McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 43 senior residents. RESULTS Before the course, the majority of residents (27 of 43 [63%]) thought that management instruction only happened "from time to time" in their respective programs. After the course, 15 residents (35%) felt that management topics were "well addressed," and 19 (44%) felt that management topics have been "very well addressed" (P < .01). Residents noted a significant improvement in their ability to perform the following skills after the course: giving feedback, delegating duties, coping with stress, effective learning, and effective teaching. On the ensemble of all managerial skills combined, 26 residents (60%) rated their performance as "good" or "excellent" after the course vs only 21 (49%) before the course (P = .02). Residents also noted a statistically significant improvement in their ability to perform the managerial duties necessary for the establishment of a surgical practice. CONCLUSIONS Surgical residency programs

  2. Unconscious race and class bias: its association with decision making by trauma and acute care surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Freischlag, Julie A; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have found that unconscious biases may influence physicians' clinical decision making. The objective of our study was to determine, using clinical vignettes, if unconscious race and class biases exist specifically among trauma/acute care surgeons and, if so, whether those biases impact surgeons' clinical decision making. A prospective Web-based survey was administered to active members of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Participants completed nine clinical vignettes, each with three trauma/acute care surgery management questions. Race Implicit Association Test (IAT) and social class IAT assessments were completed by each participant. Multivariable, ordered logistic regression analysis was then used to determine whether implicit biases reflected on the IAT tests were associated with vignette responses. In total, 248 members of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma participated. Of these, 79% explicitly stated that they had no race preferences and 55% stated they had no social class preferences. However, 73.5% of the participants had IAT scores demonstrating an unconscious preference toward white persons; 90.7% demonstrated an implicit preference toward upper social class persons. Only 2 of 27 vignette-based clinical decisions were associated with patient race or social class on univariate analyses. Multivariable analyses revealed no relationship between IAT scores and vignette-based clinical assessments. Unconscious preferences for white and upper-class persons are prevalent among trauma and acute care surgeons. In this study, these biases were not statistically significantly associated with clinical decision making. Further study of the factors that may prevent implicit biases from influencing patient management is warranted. Epidemiologic study, level II.

  3. Curative to palliative care-transition and communication issues: Surgeons perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Suryanarayana Deo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition of a cancer patient from curative to palliative stage is one of the most difficult and challenging phases of cancer care both from patient and physician point of view. Most of the time the treating surgeons are expected to facilitate this transition but due to a number of reasons surgeons often fail to fulfill this crucial responsibility. This article highlights the various issues involved in the transition phase from a surgeons perspective.

  4. Curative to palliative care-transition and communication issues: surgeons perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana Deo, Sv; Thejus, T

    2013-05-01

    Transition of a cancer patient from curative to palliative stage is one of the most difficult and challenging phases of cancer care both from patient and physician point of view. Most of the time the treating surgeons are expected to facilitate this transition but due to a number of reasons surgeons often fail to fulfill this crucial responsibility. This article highlights the various issues involved in the transition phase from a surgeons perspective.

  5. The patient protection and Affordable Care Act: a primer for hand surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkinson, Joshua M; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-08-01

    The Affordable Care Act is the largest and most comprehensive overhaul of the United States health care industry since the inception of the Medicare and Medicaid. Contained within the 10 titles are a multitude of provisions that will change how hand surgeons practice medicine and how they are reimbursed. It is imperative that surgeons are equipped with the knowledge of how this law will affect all physician practices and hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outcome Management in Cardiac Surgery Using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Gallardo, Bret E; Speir, Alan M; Ad, Niv

    2016-09-01

    Health care reform has helped streamline patient care and reimbursement by encouraging providers to provide the best outcome for the best value. Institutions with cardiac surgery programs need a methodology to monitor and improve outcomes linked to reimbursement. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database (STSND) is a tool for monitoring outcomes and improving care. This article identifies the purpose, goals, and reporting system of the STSND and ways these data can be used for benchmarking, linking outcomes to the effectiveness of treatment, and identifying factors associated with mortality and complications. We explain the methodology used at Inova Heart and Vascular Institute, Falls Church, Virginia, to perform outcome management by using the STSND and address our performance-improvement cycle through discussion of data collection, analysis, and outcome reporting. We focus on the revision of clinical practice and offer examples of how patient outcomes have been improved using this methodology.

  7. [Recommendations on the relationship between surgeons and anesthesiologists as part of the health care team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Surgeon and anesthesiologist work as a team. Physicians of different but complementary specialties, they work jointly in the management of the patient during the pre, per and postoperative periods, with the main objective of ensuring the best quality of care and the greatest safety. However, the unprecedented development of new technologies during the last decades, deeply modified the conditions of exercise of these two specialities. Thus, the practice of anaesthesia is not only necessary for performing the surgical act, but also for diagnostic and therapeutic techniques using high technologies. So, from a traditional partner of the surgeon, the anesthetist became the privileged collaborator of a great number of specialists. Within these teams, the anesthetist must achieve his/her task in all independence, as stated in the Lebanese Code of Ethics. I will try in this message to point out the responsibilities of each of the two partners in this joint practice. The practice of a shared activity, in the same place, for the benefit of the patient, requires a preliminary definition of roles, in the mutual respect of competencies and responsibilities of each specialist, based on the respect of the rules edicted in the Code of Ethics.

  8. Surgeon-performed point-of-care ultrasound in severe eye trauma: Report of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Balac, Korana; Bhatia, Chetana Anand

    2016-01-01

    The indications of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in the management of multiple trauma patients have been expanding. Although computed tomography (CT) scan of the orbit remains the gold standard for imaging orbital trauma, ultrasound is a quick, safe, and portable tool that can be performed bedside. Here we report two patients who had severe eye injuries with major visual impairment where surgeon-performed POCUS was very useful. One had a foreign body injury while the other had blunt trauma. POCUS was done using a linear probe under sterile conditions with minimum pressure on the eyes. Ultrasound showed a foreign body at the back of the left eye globe touching the eye globe in the first patient, and was normal in the second patient. Workup using CT scan, fundsocopy, optical coherence tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbits confirmed these findings. The first patient had vitreous and sub retinal haemorrhage and a full thickness macular hole of the left eye, while the second had traumatic optic neuropathy. POCUS gave accurate information concerning severe eye injuries. Trauma surgeons and emergency physicians should be trained in performing ocular ultrasound for eye injuries.

  9. Surgical management of acute cholecystitis. Results of a nation-wide survey among Spanish surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Josep M; Nve, Esther; Jimeno, Jaime; Guirao, Xavier; Figueras, Joan; Arias-Díaz, Javier

    2014-10-01

    There is a wide variability in the management of acute cholecystitis. A survey among the members of the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC) analyzed the preferences of Spanish surgeons for its surgical management. The majority of the 771 responders didn't declare any subspecialty (41.6%), 21% were HPB surgeons, followed by colorectal and upper-GI specialities. Early cholecystectomy during the first admission is the preferred method of management of 92.3% of surgeons, but only 42.7% succeed in adopting this practice. The most frequent reasons for changing their preferred practice were: Patients not fit for surgery (43.6%) and lack of availability of emergency operating room (35.2%). A total of 88.9% perform surgery laparoscopically. The majority of AEC surgeons advise index admission cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis, although only half of them succeed in its actual implementation. There is room for improvement in the management of acute cholecystitis in Spanish hospitals.

  10. Educating surgeons for the new golden hours: honing the skills of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Joan L

    2005-04-01

    All surgeons should maintain a lifetime commitment to education and learning. Those who already are in practice need to make the effort to obtain or refresh their education in basic competencies in palliative care and to provide a measured balance between philosophy and practical skills. Many resources and teaching tools are available to assist in this continuing process: surgical peers (and peers from other medical specialties),journals, textbooks, CME conferences, surgical governance and educational organizations, and palliative care websites. A tremendous summary article on palliative care education for surgeons was published recently in JACS[24]. Surgeons must be competent in the following palliative care skills:communication, holistic patient evaluation, control of pain and symptoms,understanding legal/ethical issues, withdrawing care, and the continuum of acute to chronic to terminal care. If they cannot attend to all of these areas individually, they need to be aware of the local, regional, and national resources that are available to assist the patient (or their surrogate decision maker) and themselves in the end-of-life arena. Consultations and referrals should be accomplished in such a manner that the patient does not feel abandoned by his/her surgeon at such a critical point in his/her life. Practicing surgeons also must be involved actively in the education of resident and medical students in didactic and clinical situations. Most importantly, they must model the appropriate behaviors for their charges personally, whether it be in the consultation room breaking bad news compassionately or at the bedside easing the path to the next world. In these golden hours, the educated surgeon who wields new and mighty resources can be the greatest champion of the patient who is at the end of life.

  11. Plastic surgeons and the management of trauma: from the JFK assassination to the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Edward A; Hollier, Larry H; Lin, Samuel J

    2013-11-01

    The fiftieth anniversary of the death by assassination of President John Kennedy is an opportunity to pay homage to his memory and also reflect on the important role plastic surgeons have played in the management of trauma. That reflection included a hypothetical scenario, a discussion of the surgical treatment of Kennedy (if he survived) and Governor Connally. The scenario describes the management of cranioplasty in the presence of scalp soft-tissue contracture, reconstruction of the proximal trachea, reconstitution of the abdominal wall, and restoration of a combined radius and soft-tissue defect. The development of diagnostic and therapeutic advances over the past 50 years in the care of maxillofacial trauma is described, including the evolution of imaging, timing of surgery, and operative techniques. Finally, contemporary measures of triage in situations involving mass casualties, as in the Boston Marathon bombings, complete the dedication to President Kennedy.

  12. [Quality Management in Medicine: What the Surgeon Needs to Know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtel, M; Roßmüller, T; Frommhold, K

    2016-10-01

    Quality management (QM) is a method used in the field of economics that was adopted late by the medical sector. The coincidence of quality management and what is referred to as economisation in medicine frequently leads to QM being - incorrectly - perceived as part of the economisation problem rather than as part of its solution. Quality assurance defines and observes key performance indicators for the achievement of quality objectives. QM is a form of active management that intends to systematically exclude the effects of chance. It is supposed to enable those in charge of an institution to deal with complex processes, to influence them and achieve quality even under unfavourable circumstances. Clearly defined written standards are an important aspect of QM and allow for 80 % of patients to be treated faster and less labour-intensively and thus to create more capacity for the individual treatment of the 20 % of patients requiring other than routine care. Standards provide a framework to rely on for department heads and other staff alike. They reduce complexity, support processes in stress situations and prevent inconsistent decisions in the course of treatment. Document management ensures transparent and up-to-date in-house standards and creates continuity. Good documents are short, easy to use, and, at the same time, comply with requirements. Specifications describe in-house standards; validation documents provide a forensically sound documentation. Quality management has a broad impact on an institution. It helps staff reflect on their daily work, and it initiates a reporting and auditing system as well as the systematic management of responses to surveys and complaints. Risk management is another aspect of QM; it provides structures to identify, analyse, assess and modify risks and subject them to risk controlling. Quality management is not necessarily associated with certification. However, if certification is intended, it serves to define requirements

  13. Differences between endocrinologists and endocrine surgeons in management of the solitary thyroid nodule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Ryan, Simon A; Lisewski, Dean

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is not known whether management of the solitary thyroid nodule differs between endocrinologists and endocrine surgeons. METHODS: A questionnaire containing a hypothetical case (a 42-year-old euthyroid woman with a 2-x-3-cm solitary thyroid nodule) and 13 clinical variations was sent...... to endocrinologists and endocrine surgeons in Australia. RESULTS: The response rate was 51%, including 122 endocrinologists and 48 endocrine surgeons. For the index case, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) and ultrasonography were widely used by both groups, but thyroid...... Thyroid Association members (predominantly endocrinologists) demonstrated considerable international differences in management. CONCLUSION: There are clinically significant differences between Australian endocrinologists and endocrine surgeons in management of the solitary thyroid nodule...

  14. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient’s needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry. How to cite this article Wali A, Siddiqui TM, Khan R, Batool K. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):372-378. PMID:28127171

  15. Disaster management among pediatric surgeons: preparedness, training and involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Nikunj K; Behar, Solomon; Nager, Alan L; Dorey, Fred; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2008-01-01

    Contemporary events in the United States (eg, September 2001, school shootings), Europe (eg, Madrid train bombings), and the Middle East have raised awareness of mass casualty events and the need for a capable disaster response. Recent natural disasters have highlighted the poor preparation and infrastructure in place to respond to mass casualty events. In response, public health policy makers and emergency planners developed plans and prepared emergency response systems. Emergency response providers include first responders, a subset of emergency professionals, including firemen, law enforcement, paramedics, who respond to the incident scene and first receivers, a set of healthcare workers who receive the disaster victims at hospital facilities. The role of pediatric surgeons in mass casualty emergency response plans remains undefined. The authors hypothesize that pediatric surgeons' training and experience will predict their willingness and ability to be activated first receivers. The objective of our study was to determine the baseline experience, preparedness, willingness, and availability of pediatric surgeons to participate as activated first receivers. After institutional review board approval, the authors conducted an anonymous online survey of members of the American Pediatric Surgical Association in 2007. The authors explored four domains in this survey: (1) demographics, (2) disaster experience and perceived preparedness, (3) attitudes regarding responsibility and willingness to participate in a disaster response, and (4) availability to participate in a disaster response. The authors performed univariate and bivariate analyses to determine significance. Finally, the authors conducted a logistic regression to determine whether experience or preparedness factors affected the respondent's availability or willingness to respond to a disaster as a first receiver The authors sent 725 invitations and received 265 (36.6 percent) completed surveys. Overall, the

  16. Online Doctor Reviews: Do They Track Surgeon Volume, a Proxy for Quality of Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacopulos, Michael; Sheets, Virgil; Thurston, Irish; Brooks, Kendra; Puccia, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasingly, consumers are accessing the Internet seeking health information. Consumers are also using online doctor review websites to help select their physician. Such websites tally numerical ratings and comments from past patients. To our knowledge, no study has previously analyzed whether doctors with positive online reputations on doctor review websites actually deliver higher quality of care typically associated with better clinical outcomes and better safety records. Objective For a number of procedures, surgeons who perform more procedures have better clinical outcomes and safety records than those who perform fewer procedures. Our objective was to determine if surgeon volume, as a proxy for clinical outcomes and patient safety, correlates with online reputation. Methods We investigated the numerical ratings and comments on 9 online review websites for high- and low-volume surgeons for three procedures: lumbar surgery, total knee replacement, and bariatric surgery. High-volume surgeons were randomly selected from the group within the highest quartile of claims submitted for reimbursement using the procedures’ relevant current procedural terminology (CPT) codes. Low-volume surgeons were randomly selected from the lowest quartile of submitted claims for the procedures’ relevant CPT codes. Claims were collated within the Normative Health Information Database, covering multiple payers for more than 25 million insured patients. Results Numerical ratings were found for the majority of physicians in our sample (547/600, 91.2%) and comments were found for 385/600 (64.2%) of the physicians. We found that high-volume (HV) surgeons could be differentiated from low-volume (LV) surgeons independently by analyzing: (1) the total number of numerical ratings per website (HV: mean = 5.85; LV: mean = 4.87, P<.001); (2) the total number of text comments per website (HV: mean = 2.74; LV: mean = 2.30, P=.05); (3) the proportion of glowing praise/total comments

  17. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  18. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-01-31

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Improving Quality Metric Adherence to Minimally Invasive Breast Biopsy among Surgeons Within a Multihospital Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoe, Judy A; Greer, Danielle M; Ihde, Sue E; Bares, Diane A; Mikkelson, Wendy M; Weese, James L

    2015-09-01

    Minimally invasive breast biopsy (MIBB) is the procedure of choice for diagnosing breast lesions indeterminate for malignancy. Multihospital health care systems face challenges achieving systemwide adherence to standardized guidelines among surgeons with varying practice patterns. This study tested whether providing individual feedback about surgeons' use of MIBB to diagnose breast malignancies improved quality metric adherence across a large health care organization. We conducted a prospective matched-pairs study to test differences (or lack of agreement) between periods before and after intervention. All analytical cases of primary breast cancer diagnosed during 2011 (period 1) and from July 2012 to June 2013 (period 2) across a multihospital health care system were reviewed for initial diagnosis by MIBB or open surgical biopsy. Open surgical biopsy was considered appropriate care only if MIBB could not be performed for reasons listed in the American Society of Breast Surgeons' quality measure for preoperative diagnosis of breast cancer. Individual and systemwide results of adherence to the MIBB metric during period 1 were sent to each surgeon in June 2012 and were later compared with period 2 results using McNemar's test of marginal homogeneity for matched binary responses. Forty-six surgeons were evaluated on use of MIBB to diagnose breast cancer. In period 1, metric adherence for 100% of cases was achieved by 37 surgeons, for a systemwide 100% compliance rate of 80.4%. After notification of individual performance, 44 of 46 surgeons used MIBB solely or otherwise appropriate care to diagnose breast cancer, which improved systemwide compliance to 95.7%. Providing individual and systemwide performance results to surgeons can increase self-awareness of practice patterns when diagnosing breast cancer, leading to standardized best-practice care across a large health care organization. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Managed health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  1. Management of medical records: facts and figures for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Amit; Bali, Deepika; Iyer, Nageshwar; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2011-09-01

    Medical records are the document that explains all detail about the patient's history, clinical findings, diagnostic test results, pre and postoperative care, patient's progress and medication. If written correctly, notes will support the doctor about the correctness of treatment. Inspite of knowing the importance of proper record keeping in India, it is still in the initial stages. Medical records are the one of the most important aspect on which practically almost every medico-legal battle is won or lost. This article discusses the various aspect of record maintenance.

  2. [Effectiveness of co-management between orthopaedic surgeons and internists for inpatient elders with hip fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizaur-Utrilla, Alejandro; Calduch Broseta, Juan V; Miralles Muñoz, Francisco A; Segarra Soria, Mar; Díaz Castellano, Manuel; Andreu Giménez, Lucio

    2014-11-07

    Hip fracture is a common injury in elder patients who have comorbidities, and it increases the risk of morbimortality. They could benefit from co-management (CM) between orthopaedic surgeons and internists. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of this CM. Prospective study of 138 patients over 64 years with hip fracture treated with CM care and one-year of follow-up. The control group was a cohort of 153 patients with similar criteria who had been treated with conventional care. Several pre- and postsurgical variables, complications, and potential risk factors for mortality were analyzed. The Charlson index, mental test, Katz and SF-12 quality of life questionnaires, and Merle D'Aubigné hip score were used. Surgical delay was lower in the CM cohort (P=.001). The rates of complications and readmissions were similar in both cohorts. The average stay was lower (P=.001) in the CM cohort. In-hospital and 3-month mortality were similar, but it was lower in the CM cohort at 6 (P=.04) and 12 months (P=.03). In both cohorts, gender, number of comorbidities, ASA score, Charlson index or surgery type were not predictors of mortality. Surgical delay>2 days was a predictor in the CM cohort, whereas age was a predictor in the control cohort. The final functional outcomes were similar in both cohorts. Our results show the effectiveness of this CM to reduce surgical delay, hospital stay and mortality at 6 months. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Health care marketing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P D

    1979-01-01

    Health Care Marketing Management is the process of understanding the needs and the wats of a target market. Its purpose is to provide a viewpoint from which to integrate the analysis, planning, implementation (or organization) and control of the health care delivery system.

  4. Unfolding the Remarkable Orthopedic Surgeon. How to unleash the quest for excellence and the sense of caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Philippe; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Orthopedic surgery is a challenging profession, both at the diagnostic and therapeutic level. Successful treatment of patients requires teamwork with different stakeholders, with various personalities and motives. Coping with the stress of the quest for the ultimate surgical result might not be easy for everyone. While some surgeons see their activities as a job or at best as a career, others who face similar difficulties seem to respond to a higher calling. They are the ones striving for continuous improvement and excellence, and are committed to serving their patients with a deep sense of caring. In this article, we introduce a surgeon typology based on these two variables. We also introduce global coaching as a novel approach to help surgeons on this potentially transformational journey. We focus on the qualities that global coaching can help to develop as well as briefly mention some of the models and tools that can be called upon. Evidence from the Harvard Grant longitudinal study confirms that humans continue to develop during their adulthood and suggests that the following hypothesis is likely to be accurate: remarkable surgeons committed to technical excellence and caring deeply for their patients are likely to be most successful both in their careers and in their lives. If necessary, surgeons have a chance, a choice and a responsibility to change course, to reconnect with their profession and to establish more intimate relationships with their patients, colleagues as well as in their personal lives. By growing into becoming remarkable surgeons, they will serve others as well as themselves.

  5. Does the surgeon still have a role to play in the diagnosis and management of lymphomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Anju

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the course of the past 40 years, there have been a significant number of changes in the way in which lymphomatous disease is diagnosed and managed. With the advent of computed tomography, there is little role for staging laparotomy and the surgeon's role may now more diagnostic than therapeutic. Aims To review all cases of lymphoma diagnosed at a single institution in order determine the current role of the surgeon in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma. Patients and methods Computerized pathology records were reviewed for a five-year period 1996 to 2000 to determine all cases of lymph node biopsy (incisional or excisional in which tissue was obtained as part of a planned procedure. Cases of incidental lymphadenopathy were thus excluded. Results A total of 297 biopsies were performed of which 62 (21% yielded lymphomas. There were 22 females and 40 males with a median age of 58 years (range: 19–84 years. The lymphomas were classified as 80% non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 18% Hodgkin's lymphoma and 2% post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Diagnosis was established by general surgeons (n = 48, ENT surgeons (n = 9, radiologists (n = 4 and ophthalmic surgeons (n = 1. The distribution of excised lymph nodes was: cervical (n = 23, inguinal (n = 15, axillary (n = 11, intra-abdominal (n = 6, submandibular (n = 2, supraclavicular (n = 2, periorbital (n = 1, parotid (n = 1 and mediastinal (n = 1. Fine needle aspiration cytology had been performed prior to biopsy in only 32 (52% cases and had suggested: lymphoma (n = 10, reactive changes (n = 13, normal (n = 5, inadequate (n = 4. The majority (78% of cervical lymph nodes were subjected to FNAC prior to biopsy whilst this was performed in only 36% of non-cervical lymphadenopathy. Conclusion The study has shown that lymphoma is a relatively common cause of surgical lymphadenopathy. Given the limitations of FNAC, all suspicious lymph nodes should be biopsied following FNAC even

  6. Expected and Unexpected Consequences of the Affordable Care Act: The Impact on Patients and Surgeons-Pro and Con Arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Marek; Armstrong, John H; Clark, Clancy; Marcus, Stuart G; Sacks, Lee; Moser, A James; Reid-Lombardo, K Marie

    2016-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), called the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or "ObamaCare" for short, was enacted in 2010. The Public Policy and Advocacy Committee of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract (SSAT) hosted a debate with an expert panel to discuss the ACA and its impact on surgical care after the first year of patient enrollment. The purpose of this debate was to focus on the impact of ACA on the public and surgeons. At the core of the ACA are insurance industry reforms and expanded coverage, with a goal of improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs of care. We have observed supportive and opposing views on ACA. Nonetheless, we will witness major shifts in health care delivery as well as restructuring of our relationship with payers, institutions, and patients. With the rapidly changing health care landscape, surgeons will become key members of health systems and will likely need to lead transition from solo-practice to integrated care systems. The full effects of the ACA remain unrealized, but its implementation has begun to change the map of the American health care system and will surely impact the practice of surgery. Herein, we provide a synopsis of the "pro" and "con" arguments for the expected and unexpected consequences of the ACA on society and surgeons.

  7. Healthcare reimbursement models and orthopaedic trauma: will there be change in patient management? A survey of orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihejirika, Rivka C; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Thakore, Rachel V; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Obremskey, William T; Mir, Hassan R; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-02-01

    Healthcare reimbursement models are changing. Fee-for-service may be replaced by pay-for-performance or capitated care. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential changes in orthopaedic trauma surgery patient management based on potential shifts in policy surrounding readmission and reimbursement. An e-mail survey consisting of 3 case-based scenarios was delivered to 375 orthopaedic surgeons. Five options for management of each case were provided. Each of the 3 cases was presented in 3 different healthcare settings: scenario A, our current healthcare setting; scenario B, in which 90-day reoperation or readmission would not be reimbursed; and scenario C, in which a capitated healthcare structure paid a fixed amount per patient. The response rate was 40.3% with 151 surgeons completing the survey. A 71.1% of the respondents were in private practice settings, whereas 28.3% were in academic centers. In each case, there was significant increase in the respondents' choice to transfer patients to tertiary care centers under both the capitated and penalization systems as compared with the current fee-for-service model. This survey is the first of its kind to demonstrate through case-based scenarios that a healthcare system with readmission penalties and capitated reimbursement models may lead to a significant increase in transfer of complex orthopaedic trauma patients to tertiary care centers. Physicians should be encouraged to continue evidence-based medicine instead of making decisions due to finances, and other avenues of healthcare savings should be explored to decrease patient transfer rates with healthcare changes.

  8. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  9. Managing as blended care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1994-09-01

    As part of a research project on managerial work based on a new model of the roles, the head nurse of a hospital unit was observed during a working day. Her work is described, with reference especially to the roles of leading, linking, controlling, and doing. Conclusions are drawn about the advantages of a craft style of management as opposed to the more traditional "boss" or professional styles. The author also discusses what those in general management can learn from those in nursing management, which seems best practiced out in the open, on one's feet, as a kind of blended care.

  10. Osteoporotic Fracture Program management: who should be in charge? A comparative survey of knowledge in orthopaedic surgeons and internists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbi, R; Aghamirsalim, M

    2013-10-01

    Osteoporosis has been described as a progressive skeletal disorder until a patient experiences a fragility fracture. The number of patients with osteoporotic fractures is increasing at an exponential rate. Orthopaedic surgeons, most of the time, first clinicians seen by patients at the time of fracture, do not routinely consider osteoporosis management. Therefore, we compared the knowledge of orthopaedic surgeons and internists regarding medical treatment required: which group would have more abilities to keep patients with osteoporotic fractures under management? We hypothesize that internists may have more abilities to assess and treat osteoporosis for patients with osteoporotic fractures; therefore, referring these patients to this specialized team for post-fracture medical consultation is required. A questionnaire composed of seven closed questions was administered to 4700 orthopaedic surgeons and internists. This question list addressed the orthopaedic surgeons' and internists' knowledge in managing patients with osteoporotic fractures. The questions were designed in a way to cover the topics of diagnosis, treatment, and approach to an osteoporotic patient with osteoporotic fractures. In this survey, 3431 respondents were included. Only 118 (fewer than 10%) orthopaedic surgeons would order bone mineral densitometry (BMD) in osteoporotic fractures in contrast to 1544 (79%) internists. Approximately 1485 (76%) internists against 487 (33%) orthopaedic surgeons prescribe proper dosage of calcium and vitamin D. Typical orthopaedic surgeon is not naturally inclined to manage patients with osteoporotic fractures. The existing management gap between the occurrence of an osteoporotic fracture and the identification and treatment of osteoporosis requires multifaceted intervention. Improved communication between orthopaedic surgeons and internists may reduce this gap between fracture occurrence and osteoporosis management. Level III prospective diagnostic study

  11. Managed care and economic dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, J E

    1996-09-01

    Over the past several decades, health care delivery in the United States evolved in an environment lacking marketplace constraints. The unforeseen result was the current health care crisis--uncontrolled costs, shrinking access, and redundant technological capabilities. Managed care is a strategy to impose fiscal constraints on health care delivery. A diagrammatic analysis of the economic dynamics between consumers and producers in an open marketplace is compared with that of patients, providers, and payers under the health care scheme that produced the health care crisis and under managed care. Patient demands, expectations, and needs for health care are not subject to fiscal constraint under managed care since the dislinkage between consumer and payer still exits. Managed care does not impose true open marketplace fiscal constraints on health care delivery. Furthermore, any solution to the US health care crisis that used true marketplace fiscal constraints would necessitate fundamental changes in societal values concerning individual rights to health care.

  12. Otolaryngology Consult Carts: Maximizing Patient Care, Surgeon Efficiency, and Cost Containment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Mark C; Royer, Allison K

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an otolaryngology consult cart system to ensure prompt delivery to the bedside of all the unique equipment and medications required for emergent and urgent otolaryngology consults. An otolaryngology practice responsible for emergency room and hospital consult coverage sought to create a cart containing all equipment, medications, and supplies for otolaryngology consults. Meetings with hospital administration and emergency room, nursing, pharmacy, central processing, and operating room staff were held to develop a system for the emergent delivery of the cart to the needed location, sterilization and restocking of equipment between uses, and appropriate billing of supplies. Two months were required from conception to implementation. All equipment was purchased new, including flexible scopes and headlights. The cart is sterilized, restocked, and maintained by central processing after each use. The equipment is available to handle all airway emergencies as well as all common otolaryngology consults and is delivered bedside in less than 5 minutes. The development of a self-contained otolaryngology consult cart requires coordination with a wide variety of hospital departments. This system, while requiring initial monetary and time investment, has resulted in improved patient care, cost containment, and surgeon convenience. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Types of Managed Care Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Email Print Share Types of Managed Care Plans Page Content Article Body ​Managed care plans have ... to any deductible you must meet. High Deductible Plans (HDP): HDPs, also known as consumer directed health ...

  14. Managed care under siege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R A

    1999-10-01

    Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) are frequently criticized for their marketing mistakes. Often that criticism is leveled against an implicit benchmark of an ideal competitive market or an ideal system of government provision. But any accurate assessment in the choice of health care organizations always requires a comparative measure of error rates. These are high in the provision of health care, given the inherent uncertainties in both the cost and effectiveness of treatment. But the continuous and rapid evolution of private health care mechanisms is, in the absence of regulation, more likely to secure access and contain costs than any system of government regulation. State regulation is subject to the risk of capture and to the sluggish and acquisitive behavior of state run monopolies. The proposed fixes for the MCOs (rights to specialists, access to physicians outside the network, guaranteed emergency room access) are likely, when imposed from without, to cost more than they are worth. The long-term risk is that markets will fail under regulation, paving the way for greater losses from massive government control of the health care delivery system.

  15. Surgeon-Reported Needs for Improved Training in Identifying and Managing Free Flap Compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Catherine; D'Hondt, Veerle; Marshall, Alexandra H; Binhammer, Paul; Lipa, Joan; Snell, Laura

    2017-07-01

    Background This study examined the need for improved training in the identification and management of free flap (FF) compromise and assessed a potential role for simulated scenario training. Methods Online needs assessment surveys were completed by plastic surgeons and a subsample with expertise in microsurgery education participated in focus groups. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and mixed qualitative methods. Results In this study, 77 surgeons completed surveys and 11 experts participated in one of two focus groups. Forty-nine (64%) participants were educators, 65 and 45% of which reported having an insufficient volume of FF cases to adequately teach the management and identification of compromise, respectively. Forty-three percent of educators felt that graduating residents are not adequately prepared to manage FF compromise independently. Exposure to normal and abnormal FF cases was felt to be critical for effective training by focus group participants. Experts identified low failure rates, communication issues, and challenging teaching conditions as current barriers to training. Most educators (74%) felt that simulated scenario training would be "very useful" or "extremely useful" to current residents. Focus groups highlighted the need for a widely accepted algorithm for re-exploration and salvage on which to base the development of a training adjunct consisting of simulated scenarios. Conclusion Trainee exposure to FF compromise is inadequate in existing plastic surgery programs. Early exposure, high case volume, and a standardized algorithmic approach to management with a focus on decision making may improve training. Simulated scenario training may be valuable in addressing current barriers. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns in surgical management of bicuspid aortopathy: a survey of 100 cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subodh; Yanagawa, Bobby; Kalra, Sameer; Ruel, Marc; Peterson, Mark D; Yamashita, Michael H; Fagan, Andrew; Currie, Maria E; White, Christopher W; Wai Sang, Stephane Leung; Rosu, Cristian; Singh, Steve; Mewhort, Holly; Gupta, Nandini; Fedak, Paul W M

    2013-11-01

    Clinical practice guidelines have been established for surgical management of the aorta in bicuspid aortic valve disease. We hypothesized that surgeons' knowledge of and attitudes toward bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy influence their surgical approaches. We surveyed cardiac surgeons to probe the knowledge of, attitudes toward, and surgical management of bicuspid aortopathy. A total of 100 Canadian adult cardiac surgeons participated. Fifty-two percent of surgeons believed that the mechanism underlying aortic dilation in those with bicuspid aortic valve was due to an inherent genetic abnormality of the aorta, whereas only 2% believed that altered valve-related processes were involved in this process. Only a minority (15%) believed that bicuspid valve leaflet fusion type is associated with a unique pattern of aortic dilatation aortic phenotype. Sixty-five percent of surgeons recommended echocardiographic screening of first-degree relatives of patients with bicuspid aortic valve. Most surgeons (61%) elected to replace the aorta when the diameter is 45 mm or greater at the time of valve surgery. Fifty-five percent of surgeons surveyed suggested that in the absence of concomitant valvular disease, they would recommend ascending aortic replacement at a threshold of 50 mm or greater. Approximately one third of surgeons suggested that they would elect to replace a mildly dilated ascending aorta (40 mm) at the time of valve surgery. The most common surgical approach (61%) for combined valve and aortic surgery was aortic valve replacement and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta, and only a minority suggested the use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and open distal anastomosis. More aggressive approaches were favored with greater surgeon experience, and when circulatory arrest was chosen, the majority (68%) suggested they would use antegrade cerebral perfusion. In the setting of aortic insufficiency and a dilated aorta, 42% of surgeons suggested that they

  17. Access of Patients With Lumbar Disc Herniations to Spine Surgeons: The Effect of Insurance Type Under the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandasivam, Nidharshan S; Wiznia, Daniel H; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Save, Ameya V; Grauer, Jonathan N; Pelker, Richard R

    2017-08-01

    Prospective cohort study. To determine the effects of insurance type (Medicaid vs. a specific private insurance) on patient access to spine surgeons for lumbar disc herniation as measured by (A) acceptance of insurance, (B) need for a referral, and (C) wait time for appointment. Limited studies have been conducted to examine the issue of patient access to spine surgeons based on different insurance types (Medicaid vs. a specific private insurance), especially in relation to the Medicaid expansion that resulted from the Affordable Care Act. Appointment success rates, the need for a referral, and waiting periods were compared between Medicaid and a specific private insurance for patients needing an evaluation for a herniated lumbar disc. The waiting period was studied in the context of comparing states that have expanded Medicaid eligibility to ones that have not, and the surgical training of the spine surgeon (orthopaedic surgeons vs. neurosurgeons). Appointment success rate for patients seeking access to lumbar spine care was significantly higher for patients with BlueCross insurance (95.0%) versus patients with Medicaid insurance (0.8%) (P <0.001). The need for referrals was significantly higher for patients with Medicaid insurance (93.3%) versus patients with BlueCross insurance (4.2%) (P <0.001). Among BlueCross patients, wait times were longer in Medicaid-expanded states. However, the same trend was not seen among patients with Medicaid insurance. Patients with Medicaid were less successful at scheduling an appointment and faced more barriers to care, such as the need for a referral, compared with the private insurance studied. In the states with expanded Medicaid, wait times for appointments were longer for BlueCross patients, but were not longer for patients with Medicaid insurance. Overall, this study suggests that increased coverage resulting from Medicaid expansion does not necessarily equate to increased access to care. 2.

  18. Bilateral simultaneous anterior cruciate ligament injury: a case report and national survey of orthopedic surgeon management preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Saadat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear is a common injury seen by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. However, a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury is extremely rare and has been reported only three times in the literature. We present a young female skier with simultaneous bilateral ACL tears that were managed with staged ACL reconstruction. We then conducted a nationwide survey (United States to determine the prevalence of simultaneous bilateral ACL tear and preferred management strategies by sports medicine orthopedic surgeons. Sports medicine fellowship directors were contacted and asked to send an 8-item survey to colleagues (sports medicine fellowship trained surgeons asking about overall number of ACL reconstructions performed, number of bilateral simultaneous ACL injuries seen and optimal management strategies of such an injury. Out of 43 responses, only 22 (51.2% surgeons had seen a bilateral simultaneous ACL injury. Of these, 16 (76.2% preferred staged reconstruction. Graft choice was mixed between autograft and allograft, but a large majority preferred either patellar tendon autograft (58% or hamstring autograft (41% were the most common choice. Staged reconstruction is the treatment of choice by surgeons surveyed in our study.

  19. Medicaid Managed Care Structures and Care Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas H; Feinstein, James A; Agrawal, Rishi

    2017-09-01

    Child enrollment in Medicaid managed care (MMC) has expanded dramatically, primarily through state mandates. Care coordination is a key metric in MMC evaluation because it drives much of the proposed cost savings and may be associated with improved health outcomes and utilization. We evaluated the relationships between enrollment in 2 MMC structures, primary care case management (PCCM) and health maintenance organization (HMO) and access to and receipt of care coordination by children. Using data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health and the Medicaid Statistical Information System state data mart, we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the relationships between fee-for-service, PCCM or HMO enrollment, and access to and receipt of care coordination. State-level univariate analyses and individual and state multilevel multivariable analyses evaluated correlations between MMC enrollment and care coordination, controlling for demographic characteristics and state financing levels. In univariate and multilevel multivariable analyses, the PCCM penetration rate was significantly associated with increased access to care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.23, P = .034) and receipt of care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37, P = .02). The HMO penetration rate was significantly associated with lower access to care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 0.85, P = .05) and receipt of care coordination (adjusted odds ratio: 0.71, P coordination may be more effective in PCCM than HMO structures. States should consider care coordination outcomes when structuring their Medicaid programs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Atrial Fibrillation Following Surgical Management of Ischemic Heart Disease; One Year, Single Center, Single Surgeon Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Barış Durukan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia following bypasssurgery with significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. The aim of this studyis to determine the incidence and timing of atrial fibrillation, identify the risk factors coveringpreoperative and intraoperative periods, evaluate rate of return to sinus rhythm by disharge, andexplore the impact on postoperative outcomes in a large group of patients operated in a singlecenter by a single surgeon.Patients and Methods: Between January 2011 and January 2012, 418 patients on preoperativesinus rhythm were operated for ischemic heart disease and associated complications (left ventricleaneurysm repair and ischemic mitral insufficiency in a single center, by a single surgeon.The preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables were studied.Results: The mean age of the patients were 61.92 ± 10.05, and 77.5% were male. Atrial fibrillationdeveloped in 68 (16.3% patients. The incidence peaked at second day. Patients with atrialfibrillation were older (p< 0.001. Gender, preoperative comorbidities, ejection fraction, left atrialdiameter, preoperative beta-blocker use, leukocyte count, type of operation and intraoperativevariables did not affect its occurence. Intensive care unit and hospital length of stay were longer(p< 0.05. 95.5% (n= 65 of patients were in normal sinus rhythm at discharge.Conclusion: Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a popular subject with unknowns and controversialresults which may lead to wrong interpretations. We believe that every center has its own risk factors related with the population of that region. Discussion will last, but simple precautions and close monitoring will help to minimizeadverse outcomes.

  1. Perception of differences between trauma care and other surgical emergencies: results from a national survey of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, T J; Kuby, A M; Unfred, C; Young, H L; Gamelli, R L

    1994-12-01

    A national sample of 2500 surgeons was surveyed. Thirteen variables were analyzed to ascertain perceived differences between trauma care and other surgical emergencies, as well as to identify factors contributing to a preferential reluctance to treat trauma. The response rate was 60%. Trauma was perceived as most likely to occur at inconvenient times by 67% of respondents, more often complex (44%), and more demanding of specialized knowledge (39%). Trauma was viewed as less likely to be reimbursed by 35% and most often litigious by 30%. Fewer respondents perceived differences for risk of exposure to lethal pathogens and violence (26% and 9%) and personal or professional rewards (25%). Surgeons who prefer to treat trauma view it as more often demanding of specialized knowledge and more complex than other surgical emergencies. Surgeons who prefer not to treat trauma or take trauma call perceive it as never personally or professionally rewarding, more often disruptive to personal life, emotionally taxing, litigious, and inconvenient compared with other emergencies. Perception of dissimilar reimbursement and personal health risk are less often associated factors. Perceived differences in the litigious nature of cases are not based on fact. We conclude that the individual degree of reluctance or enthusiasm for trauma care in comparison with other emergencies is influenced by perception, personality, and myth rather than by logic and facts.

  2. Managing acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  3. Surgeons' and Trauma Care Physicians' Perception of the Impact of the Globalization of Medical Education on Quality of Care in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrone, Lacey N; Isquith-Dicker, Leah N; Huaman Egoavil, Eduardo; Rodriguez Castro, Manuel J A; Allagual, Alfredo; Revoredo, Fernando; Mock, Charles N

    2017-03-01

    The globalization of medical education-the process by which trainees in any region gain access to international training (electronic or in-person)-is a growing trend. More data are needed to inform next steps in the responsible stewardship of this process, from the perspective of trainees and institutions at all income levels, and for use by national and international policymakers. To describe the impact of the globalization of medical education on surgical care in Peru from the perspective of Peruvian surgeons who received international training. Observational study of qualitative interviews conducted from September 2015 to January 2016 using grounded theory qualitative research methods. The study was conducted at 10 large public institutions that provide most of the trauma care in Lima, Peru, and included urban resident and faculty surgery and trauma care physicians. Access to international surgical rotations and medical information. Outcome measures defining the impact of globalization on surgical care were developed as part of simultaneous data collection and analysis during qualitative research as part of a larger project on trauma quality improvement practices in Peru. Fifty qualitative interviews of surgeons and emergency medicine physicians were conducted at 10 hospitals, including multiple from the public and social security systems. A median of 4 interviews were conducted at each hospital, and fewer than 3 interviews were conducted at only 1 hospital. From the broader theme of globalization emerged subthemes of an eroded sense of agency and a perception of inadequate training on the adaptation of international standards as negative effects of globalization on surgical care in Peru. Access to research funds, provision of incentives for acquisition of advanced clinical training, increased expectations for patient outcomes, and education in quality improvement skills are ways in which globalization positively affected surgeons and their patients in Peru

  4. Peri-Operative Management of Older Adults with Cancer—The Roles of the Surgeon and Geriatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Mary Parks

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Optimal surgical management of older adults with cancer starts pre-operatively. The surgeon plays a key role in the appropriate selection of patients and procedures, optimisation of their functional status prior to surgery, and provision of more intensive care for those who are at high risk of post-operative complications. The literature, mainly based on retrospective, non-randomised studies, suggests that factors such as age, co-morbidities, pre-operative cognitive function and intensity of the surgical procedure all appear to contribute to the development of post-operative complications. Several studies have shown that a pre-operative geriatric assessment predicts post-operative mortality and morbidity as well as survival in older surgical cancer patients. Geriatricians are used to working in multidisciplinary teams that assess older patients and make individual treatment plans. However, the role of the geriatrician in the surgical oncology setting is not well established. A geriatrician could be a valuable contribution to the treatment team both in the pre-operative stage (patient assessment and pre-operative optimisation and the post-operative stage (patient assessment and treatment of medical complications as well as discharge planning.

  5. Accounting for graduate medical education production of primary care physicians and general surgeons: timing of measurement matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Stephen; Burke, Matthew; Phillips, Robert; Teevan, Bridget

    2011-05-01

    Legislation proposed in 2009 to expand GME set institutional primary care and general surgery production eligibility thresholds at 25% at entry into training. The authors measured institutions' production of primary care physicians and general surgeons on completion of first residency versus two to four years after graduation to inform debate and explore residency expansion and physician workforce implications. Production of primary care physicians and general surgeons was assessed by retrospective analysis of the 2009 American Medical Association Masterfile, which includes physicians' training institution, residency specialty, and year of completion for up to six training experiences. The authors measured production rates for each institution based on physicians completing their first residency during 2005-2007 in family or internal medicine, pediatrics, or general surgery. They then reassessed rates to account for those who completed additional training. They compared these rates with proposed expansion eligibility thresholds and current workforce needs. Of 116,004 physicians completing their first residency, 54,245 (46.8%) were in primary care and general surgery. Of 683 training institutions, 586 met the 25% threshold for expansion eligibility. At two to four years out, only 29,963 physicians (25.8%) remained in primary care or general surgery, and 135 institutions lost eligibility. A 35% threshold eliminated 314 institutions collectively training 93,774 residents (80.8%). Residency expansion thresholds that do not account for production at least two to four years after completion of first residency overestimate eligibility. The overall primary care production rate from GME will not sustain the current physician workforce composition. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  6. Mentoring surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    From time immemorial mentoring has been the angular stone sustaining the building of medical and surgical education. Good teachers are not necessarily good mentors, and good mentors are not always good teachers. A combination of both is very plausible and should be encouraged. Today, the qualities of a good mentor, in our case the surgeon-mentor, should include respect, time, commitment, trust, determination, encouragement, patience, and opportunity for independence. The mentee would need to respond to similar virtues of trust, encouragement, and respect. The reciprocal consideration of equally divided roles would be clearly desirable. Recognizing the importance of a good mentor and making this role the priority of medical schools would enhance our ability to form better professionals. It would certainly promote professionalism, better patient care, and research.

  7. Current Practices Regarding Perioperative Management of Patients With Fracture on Antiplatelet Therapy: A Survey of Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pean, Christian A; Goch, Abraham; Christiano, Anthony; Konda, Sanjit; Egol, Kenneth

    2015-12-01

    There continues to be controversy over whether operative delay is necessary for patients on antiplatelet therapy, particularly for elderly patients with hip fractures. This study sought to assess current clinical practices of orthopedic surgeons regarding perioperative management of these patients. A 12-question, Web-based survey was distributed to orthopedic surgeons via e-mail. Questions regarding timing of surgery assumed patients were on antiplatelet therapy and assessed attitudes toward emergent and nonemergent orthopedic cases as well as operative delay for specific closed fracture types. Responses were compared using unpaired, 2-tailed Student t tests for continuous variables and Pearson chi-square tests with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for categorical variables. Statistical significance was defined as a P value antiplatelet therapy with closed hip fractures did not require operative delay. Surgeons who opted for surgical delay in hip fractures were more likely to delay surgery in other lower extremity fracture types (OR = 16.4, 95% CI 4.48-60.61, P antiplatelet therapy. Over a quarter of surgeons continue to opt for surgical delay in patients with hip fracture. This survey highlights the need to formulate and better disseminate practice management guidelines for patients with fracture on antiplatelet therapy, particularly given the aging population in the United States.

  8. Management of acute dento-alveolar trauma--from the viewpoint of an oral surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J K

    2000-08-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons often deal with acute dento-alveolar trauma in hospital or practice surroundings. They are often called upon by dental colleagues to give their advice or help in a given situation of the acute trauma patient with dental or oral injuries. In this article, the practical viewpoints and clinical experiences of an oral surgeon are offered based upon many years of work in hospital emergency rooms around the world.

  9. DoSurgeons Have More Difficulties in the Hospital Care of Non-surgery Patients Than With Surgery Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Ruiz, Eduardo; Barbero Allende, José María; Melgar Molero, Virginia; Rebollar Merino, Ángela; García Sánchez, Marta; López Álvarez, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    A variable percentage of patients admitted to surgical departments are not operated on for several reasons. Our goal is to check if surgeons have more problems in caring for non-operated hospitalized patients than operated ones. We included all patients aged ≥ 14 years discharged in 2010 from General Surgery, Gynaecology, Urology, and Otolaryngology. The main variables were the length of stay, mortality, readmissions, and number of consultations/referrals requested to medical services. Secondary variables were age, sex, number of emergency admissions, total number of diagnoses, and the Charlson comorbidity index (ICh). Between 8.7% and 22.8% of patients admitted to these surgical departments are not operated on. The non-operated patients had a significantly higher stay, mortality, readmissions and consultations/referrals requests than operated ones, with significantly higher age (except Urology), number of diagnoses, emergency admissions and ICh (except Urology). Patients admitted to surgical departments and are not operated on have higher mortality, readmissions and consultation/referrals requests than those operated on, which may be due to their greater medical complexity and urgency of admission. This suggests a greater difficulty in their care by surgeons. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of Pediatric and General Orthopedic Surgeons? Approaches in Management of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Flexible Flatfoot: the Road to Clinical Consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Haj Zargarbashi; Hirbod Nasiri Bonaki; Shayan Zadegan; Taghi Baghdadi; Mohammad Hossein Nabian; Mehdi Ramezan Shirazi

    2017-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and flatfoot are common pediatric orthopedic disorders, being referred to and managed by both general and pediatric orthopedic surgeons, through various modalities. Our study aimed to evaluate their consensus and perspective disagreements in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the mentioned deformities. Forty participants in two groups of general orthopedic surgeons (GOS) (n=20) and pediatric orthopedic surgeons (POS) (n=20), were asked t...

  11. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care for You How to Use Apps and Social Media for Your Practice Why Participation in the STS ... STS_CTsurgery Surgeons Residents & Students Allied ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society ...

  12. Managed Care, Ethics, and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses issues of managed care and ethics and how they relate to counseling. Specifically reviews a recent article published in "The Counseling Psychologist" (2000). Explores implications for counselors and counselor educators. (Author/GCP)

  13. Structuring managed care joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L

    1995-08-01

    Providers that undertake joint ventures to secure managed care contracts must understand the important governance, operational, legal, and political issues involved. Careful planning in all these areas can help ensure that the joint venture will meet its goals and avoid problems such as inappropriately negotiated contracts and legal violations.

  14. Total quality management issues in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of total quality management (TQM) in health care has gone on in parallel with the growth of managed care. What is the interaction between the two? Key issues are the ascendance of cost control over quality in many areas, erosion of employee commitment and loyalty, and a short-run orientation. Associated with this is an emphasis on organizational learning rather than learning by autonomous professionals. Both TQM and managed care acknowledge the dynamic nature of clinical processes and the ability and responsibility of both institutions and clinicians to improve their processes. Both are consistent with efforts to identify and implement best practices. However, these similarities should not mask fundamental differences. Continuous improvement must shift its focus from avoiding unnecessary variation to facilitating rapid organizational learning and institutionalizing mass customization into the delivery of health services.

  15. Pain management in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Girbes, Armand

    2013-10-01

    The core challenge of pain management in neurocritical care is to keep the patient comfortable without masking or overlooking any neurological deterioration. Clearly in patients with a neurological problem there is a conflict of clinical judgement and adequate pain relief. Here we review the presentation, assessment, and development of pain in the clinical spectrum of patients with associated neurological problems seen in a general intensive care setting. Many conditions predispose to the development of chronic pain. There is evidence that swift and targeted pain management may improve the outcome. Importantly pain management is multidisciplinary. The available non-invasive, pharmacological, and invasive treatment strategies are discussed.

  16. Inadequate reimbursement for care management to primary care offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Alexanders, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health; however, primary care practices are often challenged to identify revenue to pay for it. This study explored the impact of direct reimbursement on the provision of care management in a primary care physician organization. Using data on expenses and health plan reimbursement during the initial 16 months of care management implementation at 5 practices, we calculated the percentage of related costs that were covered by payments. Qualitative data from interviews with practice members were used to identify their perceived barriers to care management reimbursement and the impact of current reimbursement strategies on service delivery. Direct reimbursement for care management covered only 21% of the costs. Reimbursement varied by care manager background, patient diagnoses, insurer, and indication for the visit. Barriers to gaining reimbursement included patient resistance to copay, clinician hesitation to bill for care management visits (for fear the patient may receive a bill), differential reimbursement policies of insurers, and general lack of reimbursement for care management in many cases. Although practice-level quality improvement incentives were an alternative means of supporting care management, because these incentives were not directly tied to the service of care management, they were used for other activities ultimately supporting patient care. This study highlights the need for sufficient reimbursement to initiate and maintain care management for patients in primary care as proposed for service reforms under the Affordable Care Act. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  17. Restricted duty hours for surgeons and impact on residents quality of life, education, and patient care: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Roman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Work-hour limitations have been implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME in July 2003 in order to minimize fatigue related medical adverse events. The effects of this regulation are still under intense debate. In this literature review, data of effects of limited work-hours on the quality of life, surgical education, and patient care was summarized, focusing on surgical subspecialities. Methods Studies that assessed the effects of the work-hour regulation published following the implementation of ACGME guidelines (2003 were searched using PubMed database. The following search modules were selected: work-hours, 80-hour work week, quality of life, work satisfaction, surgical education, residency training, patient care, continuity of care. Publications were included if they were completed in the United States and covered the subject of our review. Manuscrips were analysed to identify authors, year of publication, type of study, number of participants, and the main outcomes. Review Findings Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. Studies demonstrate that the residents quality of life has improved. The effects on surgical education are still unclear due to inconsistency in studies. Furthermore, according to several objective studies there were no changes in mortality and morbidity following the implementation. Conclusion Further studies are necessary addressing the effects of surgical education and studying the objective methods to assess the technical skill and procedural competence of surgeons. In addition, patient surveys analysing their satisfaction and concerns can contribute to recent discussion, as well.

  18. Military-civilian collaboration in trauma care and the senior visiting surgeon program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-27

    Trauma 2004;57:201-7. Rasmussen TE, Clouse WD, Jenkins DH, Peck MA, Eliason JL, Smith DL . The use of temporary vascular shunts as a damage control...adjunct in the management of wartime vascular injury. J Trauma 2006;61:8-15. Griffith ME, Lazarus DR, Mann PB, Boger JA, Hospenthal DR, Murray CK

  19. Legal implications of managed care arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, W A; Epstein, D M

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the 1980s, managed care was virtually nonexistent as a force in health care. Presently, 64 percent of employees in America are covered by managed care plans, including health maintenance organizations (20 percent) and preferred provider organizations (44 percent). In contrast, only 29 percent of employees were enrolled in managed care plans in 1988 and only 47 percent in 1991. To date, the primary reason for this incredible growth in managed care has been economic-market pressure to reduce health care costs. For the foreseeable future, political pressures are likely to fuel this growth, as managed care is at the center of President Clinton's national health care plan. Although there are numerous legal issues surrounding managed care, this article focuses primarily on antitrust implications when forming managed care entities. In addition, the corporate practice of medicine doctrine, certain tax issues, and the fraud and abuse laws are discussed.

  20. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Irving B

    2006-08-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in November 1939. He made many contributions to surgical care, particularly in the field of oncology. He attended to many famous people, including King George V and Sigmund Freud and was greatly honoured in his own milieu. He was named honorary surgeon and Sargent Surgeon to the king. In addition, he was a thoughtful individual who addressed problems in human behaviour, contradicting the stereotype of the contemporary surgeon.

  1. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  2. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  3. Managing depression in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kerry A.; Wolfe, Vicky V.; Fisman, Sandra; DePace, JoAnne; Steele, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ practice patterns for managing depression and mental health concerns among adolescent and adult patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING London, Ont, a mid-sized Canadian city. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty-three family physicians identified through the London and District Academy of Medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practice patterns for managing depression, including screening, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, shared care, and training needs. RESULTS Response rate was 63%. Family physicians reported spending a substantial portion of their time during patient visits (26% to 50%) addressing mental health issues, with depression being the most common issue (51% to 75% of patients with mental health issues). About 40% of respondents did routine mental health screening, and 60% screened patients with risk factors for depression. Shared care with mental health professionals was common (care was shared for 26% to 50% of patients). Physicians and patients were moderately satisfied with shared care, but were frustrated by long waiting lists and communication barriers. Most physicians provided psychotherapy to patients in the form of general advice. Differences in practice patterns were observed; physicians treated more adults than adolescents with depression, and they reported greater comfort in treating adults. Although 33% of physicians described using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), they reported having little training in CBT. Moderate interest was expressed in CBT training, with a preference for a workshop format. CONCLUSION Although 40% of family physicians routinely screen patients for mental health issues, depression is often not detected. Satisfaction with shared care can be increased through better communication with mental health professionals. Physicians’ management of adolescent patients can be improved by further medical training, consultation, and collaboration with mental health professionals

  4. Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehal, Kishwer S.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Latest advances in confocal microscopy of skin cancers toward guiding patient care: a Mohs surgeon's review and perspective About 350 publications worldwide have reported the ability of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) imaging to detect melanocytic skin lesions in vivo with specificity of 84-88% and sensitivity of 71-92%, and non-melanocytic skin lesions with specificity of 85-97% and sensitivity 100-92%. Lentigo maligna melanoma can be detected with sensitivity of 93% and specificity 82%. While the sensitivity is comparable to that of dermoscopy, the specificity is 2X superior, especially for lightly- and non-pigmented lesions. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is proving to be both highly sensitive and highly specific. Recent studies have reported that the ratio of equivocal (i.e., would have been biopsied) lesions to detected melanomas dropped by ~2X when guided by dermoscopy and RCM imaging, compared to that with dermoscopy alone. Dermoscopy combined with RCM imaging is now being implemented to guide noninvasive diagnosis (to rule out malignancy and biopsy) and to also guide treatment, with promising initial impact: thus far, about 3,000 patients have been saved from biopsies of benign lesions. These are currently under follow-up monitoring. With fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) mosaicing, residual basal cell carcinomas can be detected in Mohs surgically excised fresh tissue ex vivo, with sensitivity of 94-97% and specificity 89-94%. FCM mosaicing is now being implemented for guiding Mohs surgery. To date, about 600 Mohs procedures have been performed, guided with mosaicing, and with pathology being performed in parallel to confirm the final outcome. These latest advances demonstrate the promising ability of RCM and FCM to guide patient care.

  5. [New routines in orthopedics department yielded more efficient care and more satisfied patients. Physiotherapist and team make the first assessment in new visits to the spine surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Björn; Torstensson, Thomas

    2015-09-11

    There is a shortage of spine surgeons in Sweden. To guarantee the legal right to healthcare, many counties must hire doctors, with increasing costs. In our new out-patient department routine, the majority of the patients are examined by a physiotherapist at their first visit. History taking and clinical and radiographic examinations are discussed in a team conference, and possible candidates for spine surgery are selected for an appointment with a spine surgeon. Furthermore, the patients were more satisfied with the new routine and management plan.

  6. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  7. Managed care innovation and new product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C S; Schuster, T B

    1994-01-01

    This article explores recent innovative activity by managed care payor plans nationwide with particular emphasis on emerging, new relationships between the plans and their purchasers, enrollees, provider panels, and competitors. Because they already practice what advocates of health care reform are now preaching, many managed care plans are leading the charge to transform our health care delivery and financing systems.

  8. Identification and management of mental health issues by dermatologic surgeons: a survey of American Society for Dermatologic Surgery members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwer, David B; Spitzer, Jacqueline C; Sobanko, Joseph F; Beer, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologists have long been interested in mental health issues of their patients. Some psychosocial distress likely motivates the pursuit of cosmetic dermatologic treatments. However, a percentage of patients seeking treatment suffer from significant psychopathology, such as body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which may contraindicate treatment. To assess dermatologic surgeons' strategies for identification and management of mental health issues among patients seeking cosmetic procedures. A survey was sent to 2,855 practicing members of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery by e-mail. Two hundred sixty members completed the survey (9.1%). Approximately, 60% of respondents indicated that they ask new patients about psychiatric treatment history, and 92% reported that they have declined to provide a cosmetic treatment because of concerns about mental health status. Most (94%) indicated that they were aware of BDD, and 62% indicated that they refused to treat a patient believed to have BDD. Respondents estimated that 13% of new patients had BDD and 63% considered BDD to be a contraindication to treatment. Approximately 60% of dermatologic surgeons inquire about the mental health issues of their cosmetic patients. Most are aware of BDD, but less than two-thirds consider it a contraindication to treatment.

  9. Current practices in the management of malignant pleural effusions: a survey among members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarci, Marco; Caruana, Edward; Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan; Toker, Alper; Rocco, Gaetano

    2017-03-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) commonly complicates advanced malignancy and their exact management is still undefined. We undertook a survey to determine the current practice among members of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). A cross-sectional survey focused on the current practice of management of MPE was developed by the authors. The questions were outlined after a review of the literature and circulated in an Internet-based survey format. Computed tomography (125, 92%) and chest X-ray (106, 78%) are the most common imaging modalities performed in the initial evaluation. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for washout and pleurodesis (93, 68%) was reported as the preferred approach to patients with uncomplicated MPE. Sixty-one (45%) of the responding colleagues routinely use large bore chest tubes for draining malignant effusions. Forty-nine (35%) surgeons would not apply suction to the drainage system, whilst 50 (37%) would use -2 kPa or less. Talc (124, 91%) is the most commonly used sclerosing agent for pleurodesis in the context of malignant pleural effusion. The practice of 76 (56%) of the respondents is not informed by any clinical guidelines, whilst 60 (44%) reported adhering to the 2010 British Thoracic Society Pleural Disease Guideline. Seventy-one (52%) declared that the guidance was in need of updating or revision. This survey demonstrates the lacking adoption of the existing clinical guidance in this field, as well as the need for more contemporary guidelines for a better-informed practice. The ESTS Working Group on the management of MPE has been established for this purpose.

  10. Care management in nursing within emergency care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Juliane Tono de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Understand the conditions involved in the management of nursing care in emergency care units. Methodology. Qualitative research using the methodological framework of the Grounded Theory. Data collection occurred from September 2011 to June 2012 through semi-structured interviews with 20 participants of the two emergency care units in the city of Florianopolis, Brazil. Results. Hindering factors to care management are: lack of experience and knowledge of professionals in emergency services; inadequate number of professionals; work overload of emergency care units in the urgent care network; difficulty in implementing nursing care systematization, and need for team meetings. Facilitating factors are: teamwork; importance of professionals; and confidence of the nursing technicians in the presence of the nurse. Conclusion. Whereas the hindering factors in care management are related to the organizational aspects of the emergency care units in the urgency care network, the facilitating ones include specific aspects of teamwork.

  11. [New DVO guideline for osteoporosis management 2014 and its importance for trauma surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuerburg, C; Stumpf, U; Schmidmaier, R; Kammerlander, C; Pfeilschifter, J; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W

    2015-11-01

    Osteoporosis-associated fractures represent a growing challenge in the treatment of orthopedic patients. In November 2014 a new revision of the guidelines on osteoporosis by the German Osteology Society (Dachverband Osteologie DVO) was adopted, in which additional risk factors for fractures and further treatment options have been included. On the one hand the existing model used to diagnose osteoporosis and estimate a high fracture risk as a guidance for the use of specific anti-osteoporotic therapy in patients without a fragility fracture was maintained and further refined. On the other hand the guideline includes the option to initiate a specific osteoporosis therapy without a prior bone densitometry in patients with typical radiographs of a proximal femur fracture and higher grade vertebral fractures, suspicious for osteoporosis, depending on the overall clinical context. This may reduce the treatment gap of osteoporosis in Germany. In this paper the changes in the DVO guidelines 2014 on osteoporosis are summarized, focusing on the most important changes with practical relevance for orthopedic surgeons.

  12. Concussion in Sports: What Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Refakis, Christian; Storey, Eileen; Warner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A concussion is a relatively common sports-related injury that affects athletes of all ages. Although orthopaedic surgeons are not expected to replace sports medicine physicians and neurologists with regard to the management of concussions, orthopaedic surgeons, particularly those who are fellowship-trained in sports medicine, must have a current knowledge base of what a concussion is, how a concussion is diagnosed, and how a concussion should be managed. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of concussion so that they have a basic comprehension of this injury, which is at the forefront of the academic literature and North American media. This understanding will prepare orthopaedic surgeons to work in concert with and assist sports medicine physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists in providing comprehensive care for athletes with a concussion.

  13. The business acumen of Canadian plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, J A; Caputy, G G

    1995-08-01

    We as plastic surgeons are engrossed and consumed by our quest to optimize patient care. In so doing, we are often distracted by that aspect of our practice which has direct bearing on patient care yet for which we are the least prepared--the business aspect. The entire population of Canadian plastic surgeons was surveyed in an effort to establish real and perceived needs of this group with respect to the business management of their practices. The survey elicited demographic information, information on business educational background, interest, and current commitment in acquiring business knowledge, and a final category of questions dealing with how well these surgeons function as business managers. Of the 315 plastic surgeons surveyed, 122 (39 percent) responded, which, in and of itself, indicates an interest in this aspect of their practices. Twelve respondents were excluded from the study for various reasons. Eighty of the 110 remaining respondents (72 percent) used a hospital-integrated facility for both emergency and elective outpatient procedures. Eighty-four of the 110 respondents (76 percent) indicated that 10 percent of their hours per week of inpatient booked operating time was canceled. Ninety-three percent of respondents felt that a business course to familiarize surgeons with common business situations and areas of personal finance would be beneficial. Few were previously educated in business, and similarly, few had great ongoing interest in business, although the majority of respondents used publications specifically dealing with financial matters (provided by the Canadian Medical Association). Twenty-three percent of respondents saw themselves in a growing role as businesspeople; 24 percent felt this dual role was enjoyable, while 29 percent felt this role was forced on them. A total of 21 percent of respondents did not see themselves as businesspeople at all. The six basic functions of a manager (planning, acquiring, organizing, actuating

  14. Evolution of the management of ranulas: change in a single surgeon's practice 2001-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, A; Holden, A; McGurk, M

    2016-11-01

    Excision of the sublingual gland is the traditional cure for ranulas, but is invasive with considerable morbidity. We report techniques that have been developed to minimise this by targeting their specific pathophysiology, which include an intraoral approach to plunging ranulas, and gland-preserving selective excision with a highly conservative suture technique for simple ranulas. Fifty-four ranulas in 53 (20 male and 33 female, mean age 29 (range 7-57) years) consecutive patients were treated by a single surgeon between 2001-14 and their records reviewed retrospectively. Their personal details, operations, types of ranula, and outcomes were recorded. Follow up was for a minimum of six months without recurrent disease before discharge. Of the 54 ranulas treated, 26 had standard traditional sublingual gland excision (17 simple and 9 plunging), nine simple ranulas were selectively excised, 10 were treated with the new suture technique, and nine plunging ranulas were aspirated, after which they were ligated and the sublingual gland excised. Two of the 10 treated by the new suture technique had residual ranulas. The procedure was repeated in both cases, and one had a small residual ranula for which further intervention was declined. One complication developed after excision of a plunging ranula using the traditional intraoral and extraoral approaches, and two developed after aspiration of the sac, ligation, and excision of the gland. Traditional excision of simple ranulas was followed by three complications, but none were reported after simple ranulas had been treated with selective excision or suture. Minimally invasive techniques offer cure, with a lower risk of morbidity.

  15. The role of the multidisciplinary health care team in the management of patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Rybczynski, Meike; Vogler, Marina; Mir, Thomas S; Schüler, Helke; Kutsche, Kerstin; Rosenberger, Georg; Detter, Christian; Bernhardt, Alexander M; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Kölbel, Tilo; Debus, E Sebastian; Schroeder, Malte; Linke, Stephan J; Fuisting, Bettina; Napp, Barbara; Kammal, Anna Lena; Püschel, Klaus; Bannas, Peter; Hoffmann, Boris A; Gessler, Nele; Vahle-Hinz, Eva; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Thomalla, Götz; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Ohm, Gunda; Neumann, Stefan; Benninghoven, Dieter; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, severe, chronic, life-threatening disease with multiorgan involvement that requires optimal multidisciplinary care to normalize both prognosis and quality of life. In this article, each key team member of all the medical disciplines of a multidisciplinary health care team at the Hamburg Marfan center gives a personal account of his or her contribution in the management of patients with MFS. The authors show how, with the support of health care managers, key team members organize themselves in an organizational structure to create a common meaning, to maximize therapeutic success for patients with MFS. First, we show how the initiative and collaboration of patient representatives, scientists, and physicians resulted in the foundation of Marfan centers, initially in the US and later in Germany, and how and why such centers evolved over time. Then, we elucidate the three main structural elements; a team of coordinators, core disciplines, and auxiliary disciplines of health care. Moreover, we explain how a multidisciplinary health care team integrates into many other health care structures of a university medical center, including external quality assurance; quality management system; clinical risk management; center for rare diseases; aorta center; health care teams for pregnancy, for neonates, and for rehabilitation; and in structures for patient centeredness. We provide accounts of medical goals and standards for each core discipline, including pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists, cardiologists, human geneticists, heart surgeons, vascular surgeons, vascular interventionists, orthopedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and nurses; and of auxiliary disciplines including forensic pathologists, radiologists, rhythmologists, pulmonologists, sleep specialists, orthodontists, dentists, neurologists, obstetric surgeons, psychiatrist/psychologist, and rehabilitation specialists. We conclude that a multidisciplinary health care team is a means

  16. The role of the multidisciplinary health care team in the management of patients with Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Rybczynski, Meike; Vogler, Marina; Mir, Thomas S; Schüler, Helke; Kutsche, Kerstin; Rosenberger, Georg; Detter, Christian; Bernhardt, Alexander M; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Kölbel, Tilo; Debus, E Sebastian; Schroeder, Malte; Linke, Stephan J; Fuisting, Bettina; Napp, Barbara; Kammal, Anna Lena; Püschel, Klaus; Bannas, Peter; Hoffmann, Boris A; Gessler, Nele; Vahle-Hinz, Eva; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Thomalla, Götz; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Ohm, Gunda; Neumann, Stefan; Benninghoven, Dieter; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, severe, chronic, life-threatening disease with multiorgan involvement that requires optimal multidisciplinary care to normalize both prognosis and quality of life. In this article, each key team member of all the medical disciplines of a multidisciplinary health care team at the Hamburg Marfan center gives a personal account of his or her contribution in the management of patients with MFS. The authors show how, with the support of health care managers, key team members organize themselves in an organizational structure to create a common meaning, to maximize therapeutic success for patients with MFS. First, we show how the initiative and collaboration of patient representatives, scientists, and physicians resulted in the foundation of Marfan centers, initially in the US and later in Germany, and how and why such centers evolved over time. Then, we elucidate the three main structural elements; a team of coordinators, core disciplines, and auxiliary disciplines of health care. Moreover, we explain how a multidisciplinary health care team integrates into many other health care structures of a university medical center, including external quality assurance; quality management system; clinical risk management; center for rare diseases; aorta center; health care teams for pregnancy, for neonates, and for rehabilitation; and in structures for patient centeredness. We provide accounts of medical goals and standards for each core discipline, including pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists, cardiologists, human geneticists, heart surgeons, vascular surgeons, vascular interventionists, orthopedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and nurses; and of auxiliary disciplines including forensic pathologists, radiologists, rhythmologists, pulmonologists, sleep specialists, orthodontists, dentists, neurologists, obstetric surgeons, psychiatrist/psychologist, and rehabilitation specialists. We conclude that a multidisciplinary health care team is a means

  17. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  18. An overview of Medicaid managed care litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, S; Teitelbaum, J; Kirby, C; Priebe, L; Klement, T

    1998-11-01

    Since the enactment of Medicaid in 1965, states have had the option of offering beneficiaries enrollment in managed care arrangements. With the advent of mandatory managed care reaching millions of beneficiaries (including a growing proportion of disabled recipients), the amount and scope of litigation involving Medicaid managed care plans can be expected to grow. A review of the current litigation regarding Medicaid managed care reveals two basic types of lawsuits: (1) those that challenge the practices of managed care companies under various federal and state laws that safeguard consumer rights, protect health care quality, and prohibit discrimination; and (2) suits that assert claims arising directly under the Medicaid statute and implementing regulations, as well as claims related to Constitutional safeguards that undergird the program. Lawsuits asserting claims arising under Medicaid tend to raise two basic questions: (1) the extent to which enrollment in a Medicaid managed care plan alters existing Medicaid beneficiary rights and state agency duties under federal or state Medicaid law; and (2) the extent to which managed care companies, as agents of the state, act under "color of law" (i.e., undertaking to perform official duties or acting with the imprimatur of state authority). Additionally, states might see an increase in litigation brought by prospective and current contractors who assert that they have been wrongfully denied contracts or improperly penalized for poor performance. These assertions may involve claims that are grounded in federal and state law, the Medicaid statute, and the Constitution. Moreover, in light of the consumer protection elements of the managed care reforms contained in the Balanced Budget Act, future managed care litigation may focus on the manner in which companies carry out states' obligations toward managed care enrollees. Resolution of Medicaid managed care cases involves the application of general principles of

  19. Managing risk and expected financial return from selective expansion of operating room capacity: mean-variance analysis of a hospital's portfolio of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes

    2003-07-01

    Surgeons using the same amount of operating room (OR) time differ in their achieved hospital contribution margins (revenue minus variable costs) by >1000%. Thus, to improve the financial return from perioperative facilities, OR strategic decisions should selectively focus additional OR capacity and capital purchasing on a few surgeons or subspecialties. These decisions use estimates of each surgeon's and/or subspecialty's contribution margin per OR hour. The estimates are subject to uncertainty (e.g., from outliers). We account for the uncertainties by using mean-variance portfolio analysis (i.e., quadratic programming). This method characterizes the problem of selectively expanding OR capacity based on the expected financial return and risk of different portfolios of surgeons. The assessment reveals whether the choices, of which surgeons have their OR capacity expanded, are sensitive to the uncertainties in the surgeons' contribution margins per OR hour. Thus, mean-variance analysis reduces the chance of making strategic decisions based on spurious information. We also assess the financial benefit of using mean-variance portfolio analysis when the planned expansion of OR capacity is well diversified over at least several surgeons or subspecialties. Our results show that, in such circumstances, there may be little benefit from further changing the portfolio to reduce its financial risk. Surgeon and subspecialty specific hospital financial data are uncertain, a fact that should be taken into account when making decisions about expanding operating room capacity. We show that mean-variance portfolio analysis can incorporate this uncertainty, thereby guiding operating room management decision-making and reducing the chance of a strategic decision being made based on spurious information.

  20. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of North Americans' opinions regarding surgeons consulting with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Noonan, Vanessa K; Bailey, Christopher S; Dvorak, Marcel F S; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-04-01

    Surgeon-industry conflict of interest (COI) has become a source of considerable interest. Professional medical societies, industry, and policy makers have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The objective of this study was to report on the opinions of individuals representing the general public regarding surgeon-industry consulting relationships. Web-based survey. Survey was administered using a "spine Web site," and opinions are collected on surgeon-industry consulting and regulation. Associations among responses to similar questions were assessed to ensure validity and subgroup analysis performed for respondent age, sex, education, insurance, employment, and patient status. Six hundred ten of 642 surveys had complete data. The sample population comprised more females and was older and more educated than the American population. About 80% of respondents felt it was ethical and either beneficial or of no influence to the quality of health care if surgeons were consultants for surgical device companies. Most felt disclosure of an industry relationship was important and paying surgeons royalties for devices, other than those they directly implant, would not affect quality of care. Respondents support multidisciplinary surgeon-industry COI regulation and trust doctors and their professional societies to head this effort. Despite the known potential negative impact of surgeon-industry COI on patient care, this study revealed that this does not seem to be reflected in the opinion of the general public. The respondents felt that disclosure is deemed one of the most important means of self-regulation and COI management, which is in agreement with current trends of most spine societies and journals that are increasing the stringency of disclosure policies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A managed care cycle provides contract oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Paul B; Messinger, Stephen F; Welter, Terri

    2002-03-01

    In response to poor payment performance by health plans, providers are realizing that managed care contracts require systematic, ongoing management rather than a periodic focus. An effective managed care cycle that encompasses strategy development, implementation of the strategy through contracting and operations, and monitoring of contract performance can accomplish this needed oversight. Each phase requires specialized management tools, skills, and staff. Because of the importance of managed care to the provider's financial viability, a wide range of persons should be involved in the managed care cycle, including the board of directors, business office staff, senior management, and finance staff. As providers embrace a more structured approach to managed care, they will increase their chances of receiving accurate contracted payments.

  2. Surgeons’ and Emergency Physicians’ Perceptions of Trauma Management and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemphill, Robin R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study objective was to determine whether surgeons and emergency medicine physicians (EMPs have differing opinions on trauma residency training and trauma management in clinical practice.Methods: A survey was mailed to 250 EMPs and 250 surgeons randomly selected.Results: Fifty percent of surgeons perceived that surgery exclusively managed trauma compared to 27% of EMPs. Surgeons were more likely to feel that only surgeons should manage trauma on presentation to the ED. However, only 60% of surgeons currently felt comfortable with caring for the trauma patient, compared to 84% of EMPs. Compared to EMPs, surgeons are less likely to feel that EMPs can initially manage the trauma patient (71% of surgeons vs. 92% of EMPs.Conclusion: EMPs are comfortable managing trauma while many surgeons do not feel comfortable with the complex trauma patient although the majority of surgeons responded that surgeons should manage the trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:144-149.

  3. Spirulina in health care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  4. Blogging and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvey, Donna; Alderman, Barbara; Todd, Andrew D

    2009-01-01

    The use of blogs in the workplace has emerged as a communication tool that can rapidly and simultaneously connect managers with their employees, customers, their peers, and other key stakeholders. Nowhere is this connection more critical than in health care, especially because of the uncertainty surrounding health care reform and the need for managers to have access to timely and authentic information. However, most health care managers have been slow to join the blogging bandwagon. This article examines the phenomenon of blogging and offers a list of blogs that every health care manager should read and why. This article also presents a simplified step-by-step process to set up a blog.

  5. [Quality Management for Surgeons: The Knowledge of Basic Contexts and Innovative Strategies Promotes the Competitiveness of Clinical Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Wolfgang

    2017-05-18

    Efficient quality management aiming to achieve high quality in patient care is crucial to the success of a surgery department. This requires the knowledge of relevant terms und contexts of quality management. Implementation remains difficult in the light of demographic change and skills shortage. If a hospital has an efficient internal quality management in place, this should be used as a supplementary instrument. Otherwise it is the (sole) task of a specialist department to ensure quality for patients, employees, and cooperative partners. This paper provides basic knowledge on quality management, risk management, and quality assurance in the context of relevant medical terms. It demonstrates new ways for implementation on the level of a surgery department, and introduces a new model of quality. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Future developments in health care performance management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance. Keywords: health care, lean management, clinical risk management, quality, health care processes

  7. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  8. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have

  9. Primary care quality management in Uzbekistan.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Baymirova, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Uzbek government has a central role in primary care quality management. On paper, many quality management structures and procedures exist. Now, primary care practice should follow, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO) – has shown. The results have bee

  10. Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic injections for painful shoulder conditions: comparisons among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and physical medicine and primary-care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skedros John G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic doses for injecting shoulder conditions were examined among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and primary-care sports medicine (PCSMs and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMRs physicians to provide data needed for documenting inter-group differences for establishing uniform injection guidelines. Methods 264 surveys, sent to these physicians in our tri-state area of the western United States, addressed corticosteroid/anesthetic doses and types used for subacromial impingement, degenerative glenohumeral and acromioclavicular arthritis, biceps tendinitis, and peri-scapular trigger points. They were asked about preferences regarding: 1 fluorinated vs. non-fluorinated corticosteroids, 2 acetate vs. phosphate types, 3 patient age, and 4 adjustments for special considerations including young athletes and diabetics. Results 169 (64% response rate, RR surveys were returned: 105/163 orthopaedic surgeons (64%RR, 44/77 PCSMs/PMRs (57%RR, 20/24 rheumatologists (83%RR. Although corticosteroid doses do not differ significantly between specialties (p > 0.3, anesthetic volumes show broad variations, with surgeons using larger volumes. Although 29% of PCSMs/PMRs, 44% rheumatologists, and 41% surgeons exceed "recommended" doses for the acromioclavicular joint, >98% were within recommendations for the subacromial bursa and glenohumeral joint. Depo-Medrol® (methylprednisolone acetate and Kenalog® (triamcinolone acetonide are most commonly used. More rheumatologists (80% were aware that there are acetate and phosphate types of corticosteroids as compared to PCSMs/PMRs (76% and orthopaedists (60%. However, relatively fewer rheumatologists (25% than PCSMs/PMRs (32% or orthopaedists (32% knew that phosphate types are more soluble. Fluorinated corticosteroids, which can be deleterious to soft tissues, were used with these frequencies for the biceps sheath: 17% rheumatologists, 8% PCSMs/PMRs, 37

  11. Managing Complaints in Multilingual Care Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Gunilla; Wadensjö, Cecilia; Plejert, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older person's complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and…

  12. Negotiating in a managed care world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Barbara F; Roettele, Steve

    2005-10-01

    Medical managed care, once thought to be a passing influence affecting large urban markets only, has proven to be a dominating factor in virtually every medical practice in the country. Discounted rates, steerage, utilization management, pay for performance, and other managed care strategies are likely to be a provider's reality for the foreseeable future. It is imperative that physicians develop negotiating skills and educate themselves about how to negotiate not only rates but also the other components discussed herein that ultimately determine the economic viability of a managed care agreement.

  13. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookbinder, Marilyn; McHugh, Marlene E

    2010-09-01

    There is a need for generalist- and specialist-level palliative care clinicians proficient in symptom management and care coordination. Major factors contributing to this need include changed disease processes and trajectories, improved medical techniques and diagnostic testing, successful screening for chronic conditions, and drugs that often prolong life. The rapid progressive illnesses and deaths that plagued the first half of the twentieth century have been replaced in the twenty-first century by increased survival rates. Conditions that require ongoing medical care beyond a year define the current chronic illness population. Long years of survival are often accompanied by a reduced quality of life that requires more medical and nursing care and longer home care. This article reviews the management of selected symptoms in palliative and end of life care.

  14. No exodus: physicians and managed care networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2006-05-01

    After remaining stable since 1996-97, the percentage of U.S. physicians who do not contract with managed care plans rose from 9.2 percent in 2000-01 to 11.5 percent in 2004-05, according to a national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While physicians have not left managed care networks in large numbers, this small but statistically significant increase could signal a trend toward greater out-of-pocket costs for patients and a decline in patient access to physicians. The increase in physicians without managed care contracts was broad-based across specialties and other physician and practice characteristics. Compared with physicians who have one or more managed care contracts, physicians without managed care contracts are more likely to have practiced for more than 20 years, work part time, lack board certification, practice solo or in two-physician groups, and live in the western United States. The study also found substantial variation in the proportion of physicians without managed care contracts across communities, suggesting that local market conditions influence decisions to contract with managed care plans.

  15. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Future developments in health care performance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to health care, such as lean management and risk management, can contribute to improving quality performance. Therefore, the opportunity to analyze them arises from studying their overlaps and links in order to identify possible synergies and to investigate the opportunity to develop an integrated methodology enabling improved performance.

  17. Using care plans to better manage multimorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark AJ Morgan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The health care for patients having two or more long-term medical conditions is fragmented between specialists, allied health professionals, and general practitioners (GPs, each keeping separate medical records. There are separate guidelines for each disease, making it difficult for the GP to coordinate care. The TrueBlue model of collaborative care to address key problems in managing patients with multimorbidity in general practice previously reported outcomes on the management of multimorbidities. We report on the care plan for patients with depression, diabetes, and/or coronary heart disease that was embedded in the TrueBlue study. Methods A care plan was designed around diabetes, coronary heart disease, and depression management guidelines to prompt implementation of best practices and to provide a single document for information from multiple sources. It was used in the TrueBlue trial undertaken by 400 patients (206 intervention and 194 control from 11 Australian general practices in regional and metropolitan areas. Results Practice nurses and GPs successfully used the care plan to achieve the guideline-recommended checks for almost all patients, and successfully monitored depression scores and risk factors, kept pathology results up to date, and identified patient priorities and goals. Clinical outcomes improved compared with usual care. Conclusion The care plan was used successfully to manage and prioritise multimorbidity. Downstream implications include improving efficiency in patient management, and better health outcomes for patients with complex multimorbidities.

  18. Using care plans to better manage multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mark Aj; Coates, Michael J; Dunbar, James A

    2015-01-01

    The health care for patients having two or more long-term medical conditions is fragmented between specialists, allied health professionals, and general practitioners (GPs), each keeping separate medical records. There are separate guidelines for each disease, making it difficult for the GP to coordinate care. The TrueBlue model of collaborative care to address key problems in managing patients with multimorbidity in general practice previously reported outcomes on the management of multimorbidities. We report on the care plan for patients with depression, diabetes, and/or coronary heart disease that was embedded in the TrueBlue study. A care plan was designed around diabetes, coronary heart disease, and depression management guidelines to prompt implementation of best practices and to provide a single document for information from multiple sources. It was used in the TrueBlue trial undertaken by 400 patients (206 intervention and 194 control) from 11 Australian general practices in regional and metropolitan areas. Practice nurses and GPs successfully used the care plan to achieve the guideline-recommended checks for almost all patients, and successfully monitored depression scores and risk factors, kept pathology results up to date, and identified patient priorities and goals. Clinical outcomes improved compared with usual care. The care plan was used successfully to manage and prioritise multimorbidity. Downstream implications include improving efficiency in patient management, and better health outcomes for patients with complex multimorbidities.

  19. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance, A Comparison...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care, Medicare Advantage, Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service Plans in three states with...

  20. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Managed care and the infectious diseases specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, A D; Slama, T G; Berman, S; Braun, P; Burke, J P; Cherney, A; Gross, P A; Harris, P; Reid-Hatton, M; Hoffman, R; Joseph, P; Lawton, S; Massanari, R M; Miller, Z I; Osheroff, W J; Poretz, D; Shalowitz, M; Simmons, B; Turner, J P; Wade, B; Nolet, B R

    1996-08-01

    There is growing demand to contain health care costs and to reassess the value of medical services. The traditional hospital, academic, and research roles of the infectious disease (ID) specialist are threatened, yet there is an increasing need for expertise because of growing antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens. Opportunities exist to develop and expand services for the care of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus and in infection control, epidemiology, outcomes research, outpatient intravenous therapy, and resource management. It is important for ID physicians to appreciate the principles involved in managed care and the areas in which ID services can be valuable. To be effective, physicians need to know about tools such as practice guidelines, physician profiling, outcomes monitoring, computerized information management, risk sharing, networking, and marketing, as well as related legal issues. With a positive attitude toward learning, application, and leadership, ID physicians can redefine their role and expand their services through managed care.

  2. 第一届全国脊柱外科青年医师暨脊柱脊髓护理学术论坛会议纪要%Conference summary of the ifrst National Academic Forum of Young Spine Surgeons (Spine and Spinal Cord Care Forum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 赵兴娥

    2014-01-01

    To further promote the academic exchanges of national young spine surgeons and nurses, the ifrst Academic Forum of National Young Spine Surgeons ( Spine and Spinal Cord Care Forum ) was held in Changsha on January 10-11, 2014, which was sponsored by the first Youth Commission and Nursing Group of Specialized Committee of Spine and Spinal Cord Injury of Chinese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine. It was organized by the department of spinal surgery of the second Xiangya hospital of central south university. About 300 spine surgery and nursing specialists, young technical experts and representatives in China attended this academic event. The topics about spine surgery and nursing as well as academical training of Chinese orthopedic surgeons, 3D printing technology in spine surgery, surgical treatment of thoracic ossiifcation of the posterior longitudinal ligament ( OPLL ) combined with thoracic spinal stenosis, management of orthopedic perioperative period, spinal cord injury rehabilitation, cervical spine, lower lumbar, minimally invasive technique and malformation were heatedly discussed in the forms of subject presentation and special report in this forum. It represented good spirits of national young spine surgeons and nurses in critical thinking and pursuing technological innovation and professional development. During the forum, the ifrst nursing group of specialized committee of spine and spinal cord injury of Chinese association of rehabilitation medicine was established. The academical level of national young spine surgeons and nurses would be advanced after such a successful conference.

  3. Future developments in health care performance management

    OpenAIRE

    Crema M; Verbano C

    2013-01-01

    Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Abstract: This paper highlights the challenges of performance management in health care, wherein multiple different objectives have to be pursued. The literature suggests starting with quality performance, following the sand cone theory, but considering a multidimensional concept of health care quality. Moreover, new managerial approaches coming from an industrial context and adapted to...

  4. Participative management in health care services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muller

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available The need and demand for the highest-quality management of all health care delivery activities requires a participative management approach. The purpose with this article is to explore the process of participative management, to generate and describe a model for such management, focusing mainly on the process of participative management, and to formulate guidelines for operationalisation of the procedure. An exploratory, descriptive and theory-generating research design is pursued. After a brief literature review, inductive reasoning is mainly employed to identify and define central concepts, followed by the formulation of a few applicable statements and guidelines. Participative management is viewed as a process of that constitutes the elements of dynamic interactive decision-making and problem-solving, shared governance, empowerment, organisational transformation, and dynamic communication within the health care organisation. The scientific method of assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation is utilised throughout the process of participative management.

  5. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  6. Total quality management in behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluyter, G V

    1998-01-01

    The literature on total quality management or continuous quality improvement in the behavioral health care field is just beginning to emerge. Although most of the evidence on its effectiveness remains anecdotal, it seems clear that it can work in behavioral health care organizations with strong leadership support and a long-term commitment.

  7. Primary care quality management in Slovenia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Verschuuren, M.; Pellny, M.; Bulc, M.

    2008-01-01

    Of all GPs in Slovenia 86% are not interested in activities to systematically improve care. A clear national quality policy, further education for care managers and financial incentives for GPs could change the picture, as NIVEL research – done on the initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO

  8. Using care plans to better manage multimorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Mark AJ Morgan; Coates, Michael J; Dunbar, James A

    2015-01-01

    Background The health care for patients having two or more long-term medical conditions is fragmented between specialists, allied health professionals, and general practitioners (GPs), each keeping separate medical records. There are separate guidelines for each disease, making it difficult for the GP to coordinate care. The TrueBlue model of collaborative care to address key problems in managing patients with multimorbidity in general practice previously reported outcomes on the managemen...

  9. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary option...

  10. Telemedicine and telepresence for trauma and emergency care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, R; Weinstein, R S; Porter, J M; Ziemba, M; Judkins, D; Ridings, D; Nassi, R; Valenzuela, T; Holcomb, M; Leyva, F

    2007-01-01

    The use of telemedicine is long-standing, but only in recent years has it been applied to the specialities of trauma, emergency care, and surgery. Despite being relatively new, the concept of teletrauma, telepresence, and telesurgery is evolving and is being integrated into modern care of trauma and surgical patients. This paper will address the current applications of telemedicine and telepresence to trauma and emergency care as the new frontiers of telemedicine application. The University Medical Center and the Arizona Telemedicine Program (ATP) in Tucson, Arizona have two functional teletrauma and emergency telemedicine programs and one ad-hoc program, the mobile telemedicine program. The Southern Arizona Telemedicine and Telepresence (SATT) program is an inter-hospital telemedicine program, while the Tucson ER-link is a link between prehospital and emergency room system, and both are built upon a successful existing award winning ATP and the technical infrastructure of the city of Tucson. These two programs represent examples of integrated and collaborative community approaches to solving the lack of trauma and emergency care issue in the region. These networks will not only be used by trauma, but also by all other medical disciplines, and as such have become an example of innovation and dedication to trauma care. The first case of trauma managed over the telemedicine trauma program or "teletrauma" was that of an 18-month-old girl who was the only survival of a car crash with three fatalities. The success of this case and the pilot project of SATT that ensued led to the development of a regional teletrauma program serving close to 1.5 million people. The telepresence of the trauma surgeon, through teletrauma, has infused confidence among local doctors and communities and is being used to identify knowledge gaps of rural health care providers and the needs for instituting new outreach educational programs.

  11. Managing diversity in the health care workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Newman Giger, J

    1999-03-01

    Cultural diversity is increasing in the United States as increasing numbers of minorities enter the United States from abroad, and cultural diversity is especially prevalent in the health care workplace. In fact, the health care professions are particularly interested in the presence of minorities among caregivers because this often enhances the cultural competence of care delivery. Nevertheless, subtle discrimination can still be found, and managers must be alert that such behavior is not tolerated. Use of the Giger-Davidhizar Cultural Assessment Model can provide managers with information needed to respond to diversity among staff appropriately.

  12. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  13. Job redesign and the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth J

    2007-01-01

    Health care supervisors and managers are often asked to redesign jobs in their departments. Frequently, little information accompanies the directive. This article lists sources of change in work and defines key terms. Also reviewed are factors that supervisors and managers can weigh in their redesigns. The article suggests actions aligned to common problems in the work environment. Finally, guidelines for a practical, step-by-step approach are provided. For health care supervisors and managers, the key to a successful job redesign is to achieve the unique balance of factors that matches the situation.

  14. Leadership philosophy of care home managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, Daniel; James, Ian Andrew

    Care home managers have a significant influence on staff morale and care delivery. Training methods underpinned by transformational leadership theory (TLT) have been used successfully to develop leaders in healthcare services. The aim of this preliminary study was to establish which aspects of TLT were apparent in care home managers' philosophies of leadership. A qualitative research design was used and 25 care home managers in the north-east of England took part. Participants were asked to provide their philosophies of leadership by completing a questionnaire; a thematic analysis of the responses was then conducted. Development of philosophy, enablement and interpersonal impact emerged as key themes. The findings suggested that elements of TLT were apparent in the participants' philosophies of leadership. However, the importance of gaining the support of senior management when attempting to apply a philosophy of eadership in practice was lacking. Aspects of TLT, such as supporting frontline employees to engage in education and establishing trust, were embedded in care home managers' philosophies. To develop leadership skills, managers may benefit from training programmes that involve both structured teaching and guided learning through experience.

  15. Total quality management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  16. Improving managed care value through customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Dennis J

    2002-06-01

    The ability of managed care providers to deliver high-quality customer service to managed care customers depends on their adoption of basic customer-service principles. To apply these principles effectively, providers need to understand and work to exceed the particular needs and expectations of these customers, which include boards of directors, senior executives, physicians, healthcare providers, clinical and patient financial services managers and staff, employers, brokers, and patients. Although these needs and expectations can be predicted to some extent, providers would be wise to implement regular surveys of customers and an open procedure for soliciting customer feedback about service issues. Better customer service for the broad range of managed care customers translates into higher levels of employer and patient satisfaction, which ultimately benefits providers.

  17. Hemophilia: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julie Ann

    2016-11-01

    Hemophilia will be encountered in the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's office. A thorough understanding of hemophilia is necessary to safely care for these patients. One must understand the severity of the patient's hemophilia as well as whether or not inhibitors are present. The patient's surgical management will be influenced by these two factors. In addition to the possible need to transfuse factors or desmopressin, special care must be taken perioperatively to avoid bleeding complications. This article reviews the overall management of hemophilia A and B as well as the specific perioperative management of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergent Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage for the General and Acute Care Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    uncommon, and is likely contributed to, at least in part, by the ability of healthy pregnant women to lose up one liter of blood acutely without a...the fetus), abnormal placentation (placenta previa, accreta or increta), oxytocin use, maternal obesity, and a distended uterus (from a large baby...patient [11]. A more accurate assessment of volume loss can be assessed by calculating the patient’s blood volume is (8.5-9% of a pregnant woman’s

  19. Multidisciplinary management of complex care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Deborah; Fuller, Jeffrey; Wagner, Scott; Friis, Leanne; Tyrell, Bill

    2009-02-01

    Rural and remote areas of Australia are facing serious health workforce shortages. Multidisciplinary teams are one way of making the most of the rural workforce. In this paper, the advantages of multidisciplinary care in terms of patient outcomes, clinician satisfaction and system efficiency are considered with reference to an innovative rural multidisciplinary model that highlights how these positive outcomes can be achieved. Ways of developing the capacity of the future workforce for work in multidisciplinary teams are discussed.

  20. Social media and your practice: navigating the surgeon-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; De Martino, Ivan; Fehring, Keith A; Sculco, Peter K

    2016-12-01

    Utilization of social media both in the private and professional arenas has grown rapidly in the last decade. The rise of social media use within health care can be viewed as the Internet-based corollary of the patient-centered care movement, in which patient perspectives and values are central to the delivery of quality care. For orthopedic surgeons and their practices, general-purpose online social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, are convenient platforms for marketing, providing patient education and generating referrals. Virtual health communities are used less frequently by orthopedic surgeons but provide forums for patient engagement and active surgeon-to-patient communication via blogs and ask-the-doctor platforms. This commentary reviews the current state of social media use in orthopedic practice, with particular emphasis on managing the extension of the surgeon-patient relationship online, including the unique practice risks social media poses, such as privacy concerns, potential liability, and time consumption.

  1. Dyspepsia management in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, JC; Arents, NLA; van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2003-01-01

    Background: Dyspepsia is common in western society. Prompt endoscopy is imperative in all patients with sinister symptoms or if symptoms first appear after the age of 50-55 years, but the optimal management of younger patients with uncomplicated dyspepsia is still open to debate. Methods: The litera

  2. Comparison of Pediatric and General Orthopedic Surgeons' Approaches in Management of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Flexible Flatfoot: the Road to Clinical Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarbashi, Ramin Haj; Bonaki, Hirbod Nasiri; Zadegan, Shayan Abdollah; Baghdadi, Taghi; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Shirazi, Mehdi Ramezan

    2017-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and flatfoot are common pediatric orthopedic disorders, being referred to and managed by both general and pediatric orthopedic surgeons, through various modalities. Our study aimed to evaluate their consensus and perspective disagreements in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the mentioned deformities. Forty participants in two groups of general orthopedic surgeons (GOS) (n=20) and pediatric orthopedic surgeons (POS) (n=20), were asked to answer an 8-item questionnaire on DDH and flexible flatfoot. The questions were provided with two- or multiple choices and a single choice was accepted for each one. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests was performed to compare the responses. For a neonate with limited hip abduction, hip ultrasonography was the agreed-upon approach in both groups (100% POS vs 71% GOS), and for its interpretation 79% of POS relied on their own whereas 73% of GOS relied on radiologist's report (P=0.002). In failure of a 3-week application of the Pavlik harness, ending it and closed reduction (57% POS vs. 41% GOS) followed by surgery quality assessment with CT scan (64% POS vs. 47% GOS) and without the necessity for avascular necrosis evaluation (79% POS vs. 73% GOS) were the choice measures. In case of closed reduction failure, open reduction via medial approach was the favorite next step in both groups (62% POS and 80% GOS). For the patient with flexible flat foot, reassurance was the choice plan of 79% of pediatric orthopedists. Our findings demonstrated significant disagreements among the orthopedic surgeons. This proposes insufficiency of high-level evidence.

  3. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. iGuide to plastic surgery: iPhone apps, the plastic surgeon, and the health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Anita Tanniru; Branford, Olivier Alexandre

    2012-07-01

    The growth in the adoption of smartphones among clinicians has been phenomenal. The demand for medical applications, or "apps," downloaded by smartphone users has led to the development of practical and educational apps for clinicians, medical students, and patients. In addition to being a valuable resource for the clinician, mobile technologies are revolutionizing the nature and delivery of health care services. This article summarizes the current trends in the smartphone market and explores the medical apps that are currently available.

  5. Understanding performance management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Lisa; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-02-13

    Purpose Principal-agent theory (PAT) has been used to understand relationships among different professional groups and explain performance management between organisations, but is rarely used for research within primary care. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether PAT can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care. Design/methodology/approach Purposive sampling was used to identify a range of general practices in the North-west of England. Interviews were carried out with directors, managers and clinicians in commissioning and regional performance management organisations and within general practices, and the data analysed using matrix analysis techniques to produce a case study of performance management. Findings There are various elements of the principal-agent framework that can be applied in primary care. Goal alignment is relevant, but can only be achieved through clear, strategic direction and consistent interpretation of objectives at all levels. There is confusion between performance measurement and performance management and a tendency to focus on things that are easy to measure whilst omitting aspects of care that are more difficult to capture. Appropriate use of incentives, good communication, clinical engagement, ownership and trust affect the degree to which information asymmetry is overcome and goal alignment achieved. Achieving the right balance between accountability and clinical autonomy is important to ensure governance and financial balance without stifling innovation. Originality/value The principal-agent theoretical framework can be used to attain a better understanding of performance management in primary care; although it is likely that only partial goal alignment will be achieved, dependent on the extent and level of alignment of a range of factors.

  6. VHA Support Service Center Primary Care Management Module (PCMM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Primary Care Management Module (PCMM) was developed to assist VA facilities in implementing Primary Care. PCMM supports both Primary Care and non-Primary Care...

  7. The knowledge management on the elderly care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arve, Seija; Ovaskainen, Païvi; Randelin, I.; Alin, Jouni; Rautava, Païvi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The elderly care pathway from the public health emergency unit to the university hospital and back home needs rationalising. Another purpose is to utilise the information of the electronic patient record system in care coordination. Theory The processed knowledge from the electronic patient record system enables the geriatric professionals to deal with the information of the elderly care pathway effectively and to develop the care in a patient-centred way. Methods All the 75-year-old or older patients who had visited the emergency unit of Turku health care centre were analysed. The data were collected from the Pegasos® electronic patient record system. The method used was time-series analysis. Statistical analyses were run on SAS System for Windows, release 9.1. Results Twenty-three thousand-three hundred and seventy-two older patients visited the emergency unit and 25% of them were referred to hospital, less to the Turku city hospital, more to the university hospital. The information of transitions into the local organisations could be followed, but there were many information gaps in transitions to the university hospital. Conclusion Older people are cared for in the university hospital too often. The expensive care begins at the emergency unit and leads to the long-term institutional care. The care pathway of older patients has to be based on professional capability, co-operation and knowledge management.

  8. Managing the myths of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Myths impede the effective management of health care, for example that the system is failing (indeed, that is a system), and can be fixed by detached social engineering and heroic leadership, or treating it more like a business. This field needs to reframe its management, as distributed beyond the "top"; its strategy as venturing, not planning; its organizing as collaboration beyond control, and especially itself, as a system beyond its parts.

  9. Variations in clinical decision-making between cardiologists and cardiac surgeons; a case for management by multidisciplinary teams?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess variations in decisions to revascularise patients with coronary heart disease between general cardiologists, interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons Design Six cases of coronary heart disease were presented at an open meeting in a standard format including clinical details which might influence the decision to revascularise. Clinicians (n = 53 were then asked to vote using an anonymous electronic system for one of 5 treatment options: medical, surgical (CABG, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI or initially medical proceeding to revascularisation if symptoms dictated. Each case was then discussed in an open forum following which clinicians were asked to revote. Differences in treatment preference were compared by chi squared test and agreement between groups and between voting rounds compared using Kappa. Results Surgeons were more likely to choose surgery as a form of treatment (p = 0.034 while interventional cardiologists were more likely to choose PCI (p = 0.056. There were no significant differences between non-interventional and interventional cardiologists (p = 0.13 in their choice of treatment. There was poor agreement between all clinicians in the first round of voting (Kappa 0.26 but this improved to a moderate level of agreement after open discussion for the second vote (Kappa 0.44. The level of agreement among surgeons (0.15 was less than that for cardiologists (0.34 in Round 1, but was similar in Round 2 (0.45 and 0.45 respectively Conclusion In this case series, there was poor agreement between cardiac clinical specialists in the choice of treatment offered to patients. Open discussion appeared to improve agreement. These results would support the need for decisions to revascularise to be made by a multidisciplinary panel.

  10. Interdisciplinary shock-room care: tasks for the radiologist from the viewpoint of the trauma surgeon; Interdisziplinaere Schockraumversorgung: Die Aufgaben der Radiologie aus unfallchirurgischer Sicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutschler, W.; Kanz, K.G. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Innenstadt der Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Efficient resuscitation of major trauma requests an interdisciplinary communication between trauma surgeons, anaesthesiologists and radiologists. Trauma outcome is significantly influenced by horizontal trauma team organisation and coherence to clinical algorithms, which allow fast diagnosis and intervention. A radiologist present on patients arrival in the trauma room provides a major impact on trauma care. Nevertheless optimal integration in the trauma team implies profound knowledge of the priorities of advanced trauma life support and trauma algorithms. His or her involvement is not limited to patient care only, also active participation in trauma room design, interdisciplinary algorithm development and trauma research are essential tasks for radiologists devoted to emergency radiology. Based on the pathophysiology of polytrauma and the structure of German trauma system, current concepts and proven clinical algorithms with special regard to the radiologist and his duties and tasks will are presented. (orig.) [German] Modernes Schockraummanagement mit dem Auftrag der zeitoptimierten Vernetzung diagnostischer und therapeutischer Handlungsablaeufe erfordert eine direkte Einbindung der Radiologie in das Schockraumteam im Sinne einer horizontalen Kommunikation zwischen Unfallchirurgie, Radiologie und Anaesthesie. Direkte Einbindung bedeutet dabei Einflussnahme auf Struktur- und Prozessqualitaet, Qualitaetsmanagement und interdisziplinaere Weiterentwicklung von Schockraumalgorithmen. Ausgehend von der Pathophysiologie des Polytraumas und der an Zeitgewinn orientierten Versorgungskette werden aktuelle diagnostische und therapeutische Algorithmen dargestellt und daraus die Aufgaben und Bedeutung der Radiologie im Schockraum abgeleitet. (orig.)

  11. Management of asthma in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honkoop, Pieter Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common non-communicable respiratory disease. In this thesis we analysed three different management strategies for adult patients with asthma in primary care. In the first, we targeted the currently recommended aim of ‘Controlled asthma’, which means patients experience hardly any symptom

  12. Treatment-resistant depression: managed care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John G

    2007-07-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) presents a unique challenge in managed care, requiring review of both the clinical and economic components of care. To review the TRD disease state as well as data supporting the various therapeutic options available for the treatment of persistent depression in managed care. While there is no consensus on the definition of TRD, persistent disease can generally be defined as depression that fails to respond to adequate treatment. When initial treatment is not effective or tolerable after 6 to 8 weeks of therapy, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) treatment guidelines recommend dose titration, augmentation, or switching. In the case of a therapy switch, the body of evidence suggests that selection of an agent with a different mechanism of action than the initial agent may be the most effective treatment. Furthermore, when patients maintain continuous therapy for the recommended treatment duration, outcomes are improved compared with patients who discontinue therapy early. As a result, the most effective treatment strategies promote improved patient compliance as well as the use of agents associated with a reduced incidence of premature discontinuation and therapy change early in the treatment program. While data supporting these clinically effective components of therapy exist, few data are available demonstrating the most cost-effective therapeutic options for TRD. This analysis suggests that managed care providers could benefit from a model that they can customize to evaluate the overall costeffectiveness of different strategies in the management of depression.

  13. Management of asthma in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honkoop, Pieter Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a common non-communicable respiratory disease. In this thesis we analysed three different management strategies for adult patients with asthma in primary care. In the first, we targeted the currently recommended aim of ‘Controlled asthma’, which means patients experience hardly any symptom

  14. Knowledge management: organizing nursing care knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane A; Willson, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Almost everything we do in nursing is based on our knowledge. In 1984, Benner (From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park, CA: Addison-Wesley; 1984) described nursing knowledge as the culmination of practical experience and evidence from research, which over time becomes the "know-how" of clinical experience. This "know-how" knowledge asset is dynamic and initially develops in the novice critical care nurse, expands within competent and proficient nurses, and is actualized in the expert intensive care nurse. Collectively, practical "know-how" and investigational (evidence-based) knowledge culminate into the "knowledge of caring" that defines the profession of nursing. The purpose of this article is to examine the concept of knowledge management as a framework for identifying, organizing, analyzing, and translating nursing knowledge into daily practice. Knowledge management is described in a model case and implemented in a nursing research project.

  15. Advances in migraine management: implications for managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodick, David W; Lipsy, Robert J

    2004-05-01

    Migraine headache is a disabling disease that poses a significant societal burden. Stratified care and early intervention are current strategies for migraine management. It has been shown that early treatment with triptans in select patients can improve treatment outcomes. Triptans are selective 5-HT receptor agonists that are specific and effective treatments in the management of migraine, and they meet the acute treatment goal of rapid relief with minimal side effects. Triptans are associated with improved quality of life. Factors such as speed of onset, need for a second triptan dose, and patient satisfaction should be considered in the selection of a specific triptan treatment. Appropriate treatment can decrease costs. The patient's migraine history and response to prior therapy should be considered when selecting acute treatment. Cost-effectiveness models can be used to understand the effect of treatment choices on health care budgets. The direct cost per migraine episode, driven primarily by the need for rescue medications, is important to include in economic models. All aspects of effectiveness (efficacy, tolerability, and cost) should be considered to reduce overall managed care expenditures for migraine treatment. The improved clinical profiles of the triptans provide substantial value to managed care organizations.

  16. Should health care managers adopt Theory Z?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranski, S R; Kwon, I W; Walker, W R; Unger, M

    1986-04-01

    Health care administrators should carefully consider the situations in which they apply management methods used in industry, since such methods may not be effective in motivating certain groups of hospital employees. Physicians, for example, may display little loyalty to the health care organization, even though as a group they exert significant influence on policies, standards, and administration. As a result, management styles such as Theory Z that focus on holistic concern, individual decision-making responsibility, and long-term employment guarantees may fail to interest them. Nurses also may be reluctant to commit themselves to an organization because of the high rate of turnover in their profession in recent years. Support staff, however, probably would be receptive to management techniques that offer security through long-term employment guarantees. Other factors necessary for the effective use of Theory Z industrial management techniques are a clear hierarchy with well-defined reporting relationships, moderately specialized career paths, and trust among employees that the organization's concern for their welfare is genuine. The key consideration, however, in applying any theory is that only those aspects which best serve the organization's needs should be adopted.

  17. Perceptions about the relative importance of patient care-related topics: a single institutional survey of its anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Thomas R; Barman, Joydip; Boudreaux, Arthur M; Jones, Keith A

    2016-03-22

    Persistently variable success has been experienced in locally translating even well-grounded national clinical practice guidelines, including in the perioperative setting. We have sought greater applicability and acceptance of clinical practice guidelines and protocols with our novel Perioperative Risk Optimization and Management Planning Tool (PROMPT™). This study was undertaken to survey our institutional perioperative clinicians regarding (a) their qualitative recommendations for (b) their quantitative perceptions of the relative importance of a series of clinical issues and patient medical conditions as potential topics for creating a PROMPT™. We applied a mixed methods research design that involved collecting, analyzing, and "mixing" both qualitative and quantitative methods and data in a single study to answer a research question. Survey One was qualitative in nature and asked the study participants to list as free text up to 12 patient medical conditions or clinical issues that they perceived to be high priority topics for development of a PROMPT™. Survey Two was quantitative in nature and asked the study participants to rate each of these 57 specific, pre-selected clinical issues and patient medical conditions on an 11-point Likert scale of perceived importance as a potential topic for a PROMPT™. The two electronic, online surveys were completed by participants who were recruited from the faculty in our Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine and Department of Surgery, and the cohort of hospital-employed certified registered nurse anesthetists. A total of 57 possible topics for a PROMPT™ was created and prioritized by our stakeholders. A strong correlation (r = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.89, P survey rating scores reported by the anesthesiologists/certified registered nurse anesthetists versus the surgeons. The quantitative survey displayed strong inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.92, P survey generated a comprehensive roster of clinical

  18. Better team management--better team care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, P; Powney, B

    1994-01-01

    Team building should not be a 'bolt-on' extra, it should be a well planned, integrated part of developing teams and assisting their leaders. When asked to facilitate team building by a group of NHS managers we developed a framework which enabled individual members of staff to become more effective in the way they communicated with each other, their teams and in turn within the organization. Facing the challenge posed by complex organizational changes, staff were able to use 3 training days to increase and develop their awareness of the principles of teamwork, better team management, and how a process of leadership and team building could help yield better patient care.

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Carol Yuan; John Oropello; Anthony Manasia; Roopa Kohli-Seth; Ernest Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Im...

  20. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  1. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  2. Managed care: how economic incentive reforms went wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Madison

    1997-12-01

    In its response to pressures to rationalize health care resource allocation, the American health care system has embraced managed care without concurrent comprehensive health care reform, either in the form of the centralized tax-based systems found in Europe and Canada or that of the Clinton reform plan. What survives is managed care without managed competition, employer mandates, or universal access. Two problems inherent in the incentive structure of managed care plans developed in the absence of comprehensive health care reform work against the public interest. First, sacrifices in terms of medical innovation and quality of care may not be offset by greater equity in the distribution of health care. Second, such managed care plans fail to address the need for long-term accountability.

  3. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  4. The role of the multidisciplinary health care team in the management of patients with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Kodolitsch Y

    2016-11-01

    health care team at the Hamburg Marfan center gives a personal account of his or her contribution in the management of patients with MFS. The authors show how, with the support of health care managers, key team members organize themselves in an organizational structure to create a common meaning, to maximize therapeutic success for patients with MFS. First, we show how the initiative and collaboration of patient representatives, scientists, and physicians resulted in the foundation of Marfan centers, initially in the US and later in Germany, and how and why such centers evolved over time. Then, we elucidate the three main structural elements; a team of coordinators, core disciplines, and auxiliary disciplines of health care. Moreover, we explain how a multidisciplinary health care team integrates into many other health care structures of a university medical center, including external quality assurance; quality management system; clinical risk management; center for rare diseases; aorta center; health care teams for pregnancy, for neonates, and for rehabilitation; and in structures for patient centeredness. We provide accounts of medical goals and standards for each core discipline, including pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists, cardiologists, human geneticists, heart surgeons, vascular surgeons, vascular interventionists, orthopedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and nurses; and of auxiliary disciplines including forensic pathologists, radiologists, rhythmologists, pulmonologists, sleep specialists, orthodontists, dentists, neurologists, obstetric surgeons, psychiatrist/psychologist, and rehabilitation specialists. We conclude that a multidisciplinary health care team is a means to maximize therapeutic success. Keywords: multidisciplinary, Marfan syndrome, health care, team, profession, sociology, management

  5. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  6. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Lu; WANG; Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors.They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army.However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy?It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can’t possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  7. The development of care management systems to achieve clinical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M

    1998-01-01

    With development of managed care markets, health care delivery systems face increasing clinical and financial risk. For an integrated delivery system to survive, strategies for clinical integration and care management are essential. CareMap tools, collaborative practice groups, and case management serve as the foundation to accomplish care management over the health continuum. Coordination of care, within an institution and across traditional health settings, to achieve the best clinical and cost outcomes is the goal. The article discusses strategies for clinical integration, categories for measurement of performance, and the need to incorporate automated solutions into the strategic business plan.

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel M. Bassily-Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases.

  9. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  10. Crafting the group: Care in research management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah R; Horst, Maja

    2015-06-01

    This article reports findings from an interview study with group leaders and principal investigators in Denmark, the United Kingdom and the United States. Taking as our starting point current interest in the need to enhance 'responsible research and innovation', we suggest that these debates can be developed through attention to the talk and practices of scientists. Specifically, we chart the ways in which interview talk represented research management and leadership as processes of caring craftwork. Interviewees framed the group as the primary focus of their attention (and responsibilities), and as something to be tended and crafted; further, this process required a set of affective skills deployed flexibly in response to the needs of individuals. Through exploring the presence of notions of care in the talk of principal investigators and group leaders, we discuss the relation between care and craft, reflect on the potential implications of the promotion of a culture of care and suggest how mundane scientific understandings of responsibility might relate to a wider discussion of responsible research and innovation.

  11. Evaluation of the indication for surgical extraction of third molars according to the oral surgeon and the primary care dentist. Experience in the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology at Barcelona University Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Fuster Torres, M. Angeles; Gargallo Albiol, Jordi; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Third molar extraction is the most frequent procedure in oral surgery. The present study evaluates the indication of third molar extraction as established by the primary care dentist (PCD) and the oral surgeon, and compares the justification for extraction with the principal reason for patient consultation. Patients and method: A descriptive study was made of 319 patients subjected to surgical removal of a third molar in the context of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology...

  12. Physicians and Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... in 2014, as reported by the Medical Group Management Association , was as ... may travel between their offices and hospitals to care for their patients. While on call, ...

  13. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  14. Loyalty in managed care: a leadership system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, C D

    2000-01-01

    Healthcare executives are given a comprehensive and integrated ten-step system to lead their organization toward stabilizing a financial base, improving profitability, and differentiating themselves in the marketplace. This executive guide to implementing loyalty-based leadership can be adapted and used on an immediate basis by healthcare leaders. This article is a useful resource for healthcare executives as they move to make loyalty an organizational resource. Effectively managing the often-fragmented forces of loyalty can produce a healthier bottom line and improve the commitment among key stakeholders within a managed care environment. A brief loyalty-based leadership practices survey is included to serve as a catalyst for leaders and their teams to strategically discuss loyalty and retention in their organization.

  15. The management of lipohypertrophy in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambridge, Kevin

    Lipohypertrophy has been a recognized complication of insulin therapy for many years, yet research shows that its prevalence in insulin-injecting patients with diabetes remains high. The problem for the patient is that the injection of insulin into a site of lipohypertrophy, although painless, may lead to erratic absorption of the insulin, with the potential for poor glycaemic control and unpredictable hypoglycaemia. Despite the important implications of this for diabetes control in insulin-injecting patients, there is a dearth of information and completed research into the condition. This article raises awareness of lipohypertrophy by reviewing the available literature on the prevention, identification and management of the condition from a nursing perspective. Recommendations for medical and nursing practice in diabetes care to improve prevention and management of lipohypertrophy are made.

  16. Recognition and management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome; a survey among Dutch surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.D. Strang; E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); R.A. Verhoeven (Roelof A.); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); Iah-Acs Study Group

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are relatively rare, but severe complications. Although many advances were made in recent years, the recognition and management remain subject of debate. The aim of this study was to determine the

  17. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ... Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ...

  18. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ...

  19. The role of managed care organizations in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaecher, Kenneth L

    2016-06-01

    In the United States, obesity is characterized as this century's greatest healthcare threat. The American Medical Association and several other large organizations now classify obesity as a disease. Several federal initiatives are in the planning stages, have been approved, or are being implemented to address the disease. Obesity poses challenges for all healthcare stakeholders. Diet and exercise often are insufficient to create the magnitude of change patients and their attending healthcare providers need. Managed care organizations (MCOs) have 3 tools that can help their members: health and wellness programs focusing on lifestyle changes, prescription weight-loss drugs, and bariatric surgical interventions. MCOs are addressing changes with national requirements and are responding to the availability of new weight-loss drugs to help their members achieve better health. A number of factors either deter or stimulate the progress of weight loss therapy. Understanding how MCOs are key to managing obesity at the local level is important for healthcare providers. It can help MCOs and individual healthcare providers develop and coordinate strategies to educate stakeholders and better manage overall care.

  20. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  1. Does managed care make a difference? Physicians' length of stay decisions under managed and non-managed care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, J.D. de; Westert, G.P.; Noetscher, C.M.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study we examined the influence of type of insurance and the influence of managed care in particular, on the length of stay decisions physicians make and on variation in medical practice. METHODS: We studied lengths of stay for comparable patients who are insured under managed or

  2. Surgeon compensation and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, K K; Walker, P M

    2000-06-01

    Financial incentives are the only form of compensation that will motivate surgeons at an academic health sciences center to perform the tasks outlined in the hospital's mission statement. A questionnaire divided into 5 sections: demographics, compensation, time allocation, benefits and incentives, and motivational factors. The Department of Surgery, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. All academic surgeons (N=64) practicing at The Toronto Hospital in July 1997. Of the 64 eligible mailed surveys, there were responses for 59. Of these 59 surgeons, 48 (81%) receive compensation through a fee-for-service method. However, only 32 (54%) of the surgeons prefer the fee-for-service method, while 18 (31%) prefer salary and 9 (15%) prefer an alternative system. On average, these academic surgeons spend 44% of their time teaching or performing research, for which they receive 14% of their total income. Of the motivational factors assessed, financial bonuses are a positive motivational factor for all "surgeon tasks." In addition, task-specific motivational factors were established for research, teaching, and operating, including research facilities, mentorship and prestige, and interesting case types, respectively. Surgeons are not appropriately renumerated for time spent on academic activities, and many would prefer an alternative form of compensation to the fee-for-service method. Knowledge that surgeons are receptive to tasks supporting the hospital's mission statement leads us to conclude that appropriate motivation can shape the activity of academic surgeons. Financial rewards ranked the highest as a motivational factor for all surgeon tasks; however, task-specific motivational factors were identified. Overall, multiple factors, specifically targeted to the individual, will serve to motivate. Thus, compensation packages based on individual preferences and personal motivational factors will be the most successful.

  3. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  4. Orthopaedic Surgeons as Clinical Leaders in the National Health Service, United Kingdom (NHS UK): Can the World Learn From Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Mustafa; Moulder, Elizabeth; Mohsen, Amr

    2015-07-01

    This article outlines some of the key concepts in leadership (both styles and theories) to provide a platform for further learning and to help the modern day orthopaedic surgeons to apply these concepts to their current practice. It is focused on two major aspects: management of medical organizations and effective twenty-first century care by surgeons through proper leadership guide and aimed in improving patient care outcomes. Practicing proper leadership skills based on evidence resulted in effective management of organization. Thus achieving patient's satisfaction.

  5. Patient care management as a global nursing concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Kathleen A

    2004-01-01

    Effective and efficient patient management is important in all health care environments because it influences clinical and financial outcomes as well as capacity. Design of care management processes is guided by specific principles. Roles (e.g., case management) and tools (e.g., clinical paths) provide essential foundations while attention to outcomes anchors the process.

  6. Survival strategies in the era of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, M L; Spirakes, A S

    1996-02-01

    The era of managed care has forced an unprecedented restructuring of the health care environment. As hospitals downsize in response, materiel managers should consider adopting strategies that may help ensure their survival, including innovative approaches to supply management and the development of individual responses that will best position them to succeed in this new reality.

  7. Preparing Psychotherapy Students for the New Demands of Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Catherine

    The wildly varying utilization and quality control practices that make up "managed care" make it difficult to generalize new rules and requirements. Information that can aid counselor trainees in understanding the demands of managed health care is presented. The text explores the following questions: (1) "What do managed care…

  8. Severe Vertex Epidural Hematoma in a Child: A Case Report of a Management without Expert Neurosurgical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Brévart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertex epidural hematomas (VEDHs are an uncommon situation and difficulties may be encountered in their diagnosis and management. This is more complicated when the surgical management has to be performed by general surgeons, not specialized in neurosurgery, in a remote location. It was in this context that we were brought to care in charge a 2-year-old boy who required a neurosurgical emergency rescue for a severe VEDH in Djibouti. Through the description of this case, we want to emphasize the value of developing a network of teleconsultation for the benefit of remote and isolated locations and learning basic techniques of emergency neurosurgery.

  9. Two similar cases of elderly women with moderate abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin: a surgeon's successful conservative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zumstein, Valentin; Bieg, Christian; Ackermann, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Patients presenting with abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum in radiological examination usually require emergency explorative laparoscopy or laparotomy. Pneumoperitoneum mostly associates with gastrointestinal perforation. There are very few cases where surgery can be avoided. We present 2 cases of pneumoperitoneum with unknown origin and successful conservative treatment. Both patients were elderly women presenting to our emergency unit, with moderate abdominal pain. There was neither medical intervention nor trauma in their medical history. Physical examination revealed mild abdominal tenderness, but no clinical sign of peritonitis. Cardiopulmonary examination remained unremarkable. Blood studies showed only slight abnormalities, in particular, inflammation parameters were not significantly increased. Finally, obtained CTs showed free abdominal gas of unknown origin in both cases. We performed conservative management with nil per os, nasogastric tube, total parenteral nutrition and prophylactic antibiotics. After 2 weeks, both were discharged home.

  10. The knowledge and practice of self-care management among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Self-care management in diabetic patients is crucial to control and prevent ... 4 levels of diabetes self-care knowledge and practices which are respectively diet, blood ..... glucose, improves insulin action, metabolism of proteins.

  11. Managing chronic conditions in a South African primary care context ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing chronic conditions in a South African primary care context: ... is an approach to motivating behaviour change in general health care settings. ... They had mixed experiences with skills for agenda setting and reducing resistance.

  12. Managed care contracting issues in integrated delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E E

    1996-01-01

    This article is a checklist for use by health care providers in reviewing proposed managed care contracting agreements. This checklist is not an exhaustive list, but is intended to be used as a framework for review.

  13. Influences on Case-Managed Community Aged Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David; Doyle, Colleen

    2016-10-01

    Case management has been widely implemented in the community aged care setting. In this study, we aimed to explore influences on case-managed community aged care practice from the perspectives of community aged care case managers. We conducted 33 semistructured interviews with 47 participants. We drew these participants from a list of all case managers working in aged care organizations that provided publicly funded case management program(s)/packages in Victoria, Australia. We used a multilevel framework that included such broad categories of factors as structural, organizational, case manager, client, and practice factors to guide the data analysis. Through thematic analysis, we found that policy change, organizational culture and policies, case managers' professional backgrounds, clients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and case management models stood out as key influences on case managers' practice. In the future, researchers can use the multilevel framework to undertake implementation research in similar health contexts.

  14. [Surgeons-anesthetists relations: From an individual responsibility of the surgeon to a shared responsibility with the anesthetist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip; Slim, Karem; Soulier, Laure; Theissen, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Throughout the perioperative period, anesthetists and surgeons jointly provide care for patients. The advances in medicine and surgery, the practice of perioperative quality medicine and the recent application of enhanced recovery program after surgery have necessitated strengthening the place of each in its area of expertise while developing the spirit team and communication. Thus, alongside the surgeon who was once considered the head of the surgical team, the anesthetist's role has been to consolidate for the management of the surgical patient and had his spot empower themselves in the eye of the patient with the birth an own contract with the patient (due in particular to the obligation to preanesthetic consultation by the decree of December 5, 1994). This has led to a new division of responsibility between these actors: jurisprudence has abandoned the exclusive responsibility of the surgeon, devoted own responsibility of the anesthetist with a division (if any) of responsibility between the anesthetist and the surgeon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Managing care in an integrated delivery system via an Intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamka, J D; Hughes, M; Mack, J; Hurwitz, M; Davis, F; Wood, D; Borten, K; Saal, A K

    1998-01-01

    The CareGroup Provider Service Network is a managed care contracting organization which provides central administrative services for over 1800 physicians and 200,000 managed care lives. Services include utilization management, disease management and credentialing for the entire network. The management model of the Provider Service Network empowers local physician groups with information and education. To meet the managed care information needs of the network, we implemented an intranet-based executive information system, PSNWeb, which retrieves data from a managed care data warehouse. The project required the integration of diverse technologies and development of a complex security/confidentiality infrastructure to deliver information to 8 major clinician groups, each with different information needs.

  16. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does managed care make a difference? Physicians' length of stay decisions under managed and non-managed care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we examined the influence of type of insurance and the influence of managed care in particular, on the length of stay decisions physicians make and on variation in medical practice. Methods We studied lengths of stay for comparable patients who are insured under managed or non-managed care plans. Seven Diagnosis Related Groups were chosen, two medical (COPD and CHF, one surgical (hip replacement and four obstetrical (hysterectomy with and without complications and Cesarean section with and without complications. The 1999, 2000 and 2001 – data from hospitals in New York State were used and analyzed with multilevel analysis. Results Average length of stay does not differ between managed and non-managed care patients. Less variation was found for managed care patients. In both groups, the variation was smaller for DRGs that are easy to standardize than for other DRGs. Conclusion Type of insurance does not affect length of stay. An explanation might be that hospitals have a general policy concerning length of stay, independent of the type of insurance of the patient.

  18. How managed care growth affects where physicians locate their practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, D; Escarce, J J

    2000-11-01

    Managed care has had a profound effect on physician practice. It has altered patterns in the use of physician services, and consequently, the practice and employment options available to physicians. But managed care growth has not been uniform across the United States, and has spawned wide geographic disparities in earning opportunities for generalists and specialists. This Issue Brief summarizes new information on how managed care has affected physicians' labor market decisions and the impact of managed care on the number and distribution of physicians across the country.

  19. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  20. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  1. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Scholars in Residence Clinical Trials Methods Course Health Services Research Methods Course Surgeon Specific Registry NSQIP Annual ... Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Gaza Strip Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey ...

  2. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  3. Palliative care case management in primary care settings: A nationwide survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G. van der; Deliens, L.; Watering, M. van de; Jansen, W.J.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In case management an individual or small team is responsible for navigating the patient through complex care. Characteristics of case management within and throughout different target groups and settings vary widely. Case management is relatively new in palliative care. Insight into the

  4. HIV/AIDS: occupational risk, attitude and behaviour of surgeons in southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, S N; Waboso, P; Ozumba, B C

    2005-05-01

    addition, 79.5% were of the view that infected patients should not be discriminated against in treatment, provided necessary protective materials are available. To ensure provision of these protective materials, 91% (n = 240) and 89.4% (n = 236) of the respondents favoured involvement of government and insurance agencies, respectively. In order to achieve a greater commitment from surgeons in developing countries towards caring for HIV-infected patients, there is a need for a comprehensive AIDS management package that would offer specific preventive and psychological training in care of HIV patients and provide requisite funds and resources.

  5. NETWORKS OF HEALTH CARE: A CHALLENGE TO SUS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dubow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a critical reflection, based on national law, scholarly, scientific, on the current development of Networks of Health Care, as a strategy for strengthening the Single Health System (SUS. Are weighted inefficiency of traditional ways of organizing care and management, the challenge of Network Health Care for comprehensive care and management mechanisms used in this process. The work provides subsidies for the care practices and health management are reflected, pointing strategies that result in disruptions of paradigms through a refocusing of attention in existing models. For networks of health care can be consolidated, is fundamental to political sensitivity of health managers with a commitment to build a new model of care, through the struggle to consolidate the SUS and the realization of the principles of universality, comprehensiveness and equity.

  6. Pharmacist credentialing in pain management and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juba, Katherine M

    2012-10-01

    A credential is documented evidence of a pharmacist's qualifications; while credentialing is the method used to acquire, confirm, determine, and document a pharmacist's qualifications to practice. Voluntary credentials are important in clinical pharmacy specialties to ensure proficiency in caring for patients with complex pharmacotherapy needs. This article discusses current and future pharmacy pain management and palliative care credentialing opportunities. Pharmacists wishing to pursue voluntary pain management and palliative care credentialing may elect to take a multidisciplinary pain credentialing exam offered by the American Society of Pain Educators (ASPE) or American Academy of Pain Management (AAPM) and/or complete an American Society of Health System Pharmacists (ASHP) Postgraduate Year 2 (PGY2) pain management and palliative care pharmacy residency. A palliative care credentialing exam is not currently available to pharmacists. Efforts are underway within the pharmacy profession to standardize the board certification process, design a pain and palliative certificate program, and create a specialty pain management and palliative care board certification examination.

  7. Care management actions in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Costa Fernandes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, from nurses’ speeches, the actions that enable care management in the Family Health Strategy.Methods: descriptive study with a qualitative approach conducted with 32 nurses of primary care. It was used a semistructuredinterview as the data collection technique. The methodological process of the collective subject discourse wasused to organize the data Results: from the nurses’ speeches one identified the categories: complementary relationshipbetween care and management; meeting with community health agents, a care management strategy in nurses’ work;health education activities such as a care management action and a health information system as an essential tool forcare Conclusion: it was possible to observe that nurses understood the importance of coordination and complementaritybetween the activities of the working process of care and management.

  8. Interprofessional non-technical skills for surgeons in disaster response: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Anneliese; Waxman, Bruce; Bacon, Andrew K; Smith, Julian; Kitto, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Natural disasters impose a significant burden on society. Current disaster training programmes do not place an emphasis on equipping surgeons with non-technical skills for disaster response. This literature review sought to identify non-technical skills required of surgeons in disaster response through an examination of four categories of literature: "disaster"; "surgical"; "organisational management"; and "interprofessional". Literature search criteria included electronic database searches, internet searches, hand searching, ancestry searching and networking strategies. Various potential non-technical skills for surgeons in disaster response were identified including: interpersonal skills such as communication, teamwork and leadership; cognitive strategies such flexibility, adaptability, innovation, improvisation and creativity; physical and psychological self-care; conflict management, collaboration, professionalism, health advocacy and teaching. Such skills and the role of interprofessionalism should be considered for inclusion in surgical disaster response training course curricula.

  9. Pain management improves care and revenue: an interview with ProCare Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F N; Walsh, C

    2000-01-01

    As provider and managed care organizations continue to look for better ways to control costs and improve patient outcomes, disease management programs are getting an increasing share of their attention. One often-over-looked area with significant potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance revenues is pain management. It has been estimated that at least 40 percent of senior citizens suffer from chronic pain, and as the population ages, the number of chronic pain sufferers will only increase. Pain management companies have been forming to meet the current and future demand for comprehensive pain management programs. One such company is ProCare Systems, a single-specialty physician practice management company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. HFM spoke with Fred N. Davis, MD, president and cofounder of ProCare Systems, and Cyndy Walsh, ProCare System's CEO, about pain management programs and the patient care and financial impact they can effect.

  10. [Contribution of military surgeons participants of the great patriotic war to solving the problem of rendering medical care to the wounded with lesions of blood vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, E P; Gliantsev, S P; Galik, N I

    2014-01-01

    review in the article are opinions and experience of outstanding academic military surgeons, participants of the Great Patriotic war: Burdenko N N., Kupriyanov P.A., Akhutin M.N., Banaitis A.I., Elansky N.N, Petrovsky B.V., and others. The methods they worked out and practically implemented made it possible to substantially improve the outcomes of gunshot wounds and vascular lesions.

  11. Federal Nursing Service Award. Impact of TriCare/managed care on total force readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, M A; Turkel, M C

    2001-04-01

    Mission readiness is dependent on a healthy total force and the response of military medical and nursing services. Managed care has become the norm in U.S. health care, including the Department of Defense Military Health System. Cost management, health maintenance organizations, and other health plans are defined as "managed care," an aggressive cost-control effort by health care purchasers and insurers to limit health care spending and services and advance a market-oriented, profit-driven system. The impact of managed care on mission readiness and retention of active and reserve personnel is and will continue to be profound. The purpose of this research was to conduct a qualitative, phenomenological study (life experiences) of TriCare/managed care to explore the impact and the meaning of the experience on total force mission readiness of the U.S. Air Force and how managed care has changed nursing practice. The results reveal the significance of the impact of TriCare/managed care on total force readiness by identifying, through themes, meta-themes, and a representative model, the negative effect that economics is having on active duty and reserve force health and well-being.

  12. Primary care referral management: a marketing strategy for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A D; Geoghegan, S S; Lundquist, S H; Cantone, J M; Krasnick, C J

    1990-06-01

    With increasing competition among hospitals, primary care referral development and management programs offer an opportunity for hospitals to increase their admissions. Such programs require careful development, the commitment of the hospital staff to the strategy, an integration of hospital activities, and an understanding of medical practice management.

  13. Effective population management practices in diabetes care - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Bellows, Jim; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    Of fifteen diabetes care management practices, our data indicate that high performance is most associated with provider alerts and more weakly associated with action plans and with guideline distribution and training. Lack of convergence in the literature on effective care management practices...

  14. Ethical Issues in Managed Care: Perspectives in Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belar, Cynthia D.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a reaction to Cooper and Gottlieb's (this issue) article titled, "Ethical Issues with Managed Care: Challenges Facing Counseling Psychology." Challenges that many issues addressed by Cooper and Gottlieb have been longstanding in the profession. Argues against the belief that the managed care environment is fraught with more ethical…

  15. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  16. Nurse leaders as managers of ethically sustainable caring cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Susanne; Koskinen, Camilla; Eriksson, Katie

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the distinctive foundations of the care culture and how nurse leaders (NL) can manage and strengthen these in a quest for ethically sustainable caring cultures. Sustainability presupposes an ethical leadership, a management of the good care and a well-educated staff, but research on NLs as managers of ethically sustainable caring cultures is not available. The study has a quantitative design with elements of a qualitative research approach. Data were collected through a web-based questionnaire sent to staff at eight selected units at a hospital in western Finland during September 2013; the reply rate was 32%. The data material was comprised of opinion questions, the ranking of values and two open-ended questions on lodestars in care and ethical principles in care work. NLs manage a care culture that rests on a solid foundation, where staff are co-creators of an ethically sustainable caring culture that includes good traditions for the praxis of care. NLs as managers are therefore responsible for realizing and passing on ethically sustainable caring cultures and creating prerequisites for staff's growth and development. The basis of good care, patient safety and sustainability is comprised of ethics with a respectful and dignified care that is evidence-based and economically stable. Through their management NLs have a responsibility to nurture and protect the core of caring and create contextual, professional and cultural prerequisites to maintain the core and art of caring as well as care staff's ethical and professional competence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Managing conscientious objection in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicclair, Mark R

    2014-09-01

    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's/surrogate's timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's timely access to health care services offered within the institution. (3) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if the accommodation will not impose excessive burdens on colleagues, supervisors, department heads, other administrators, or the institution. (4) Whenever feasible, health professionals should provide advance notification to department heads or supervisors. Formal review may not be required in all cases, but when it is appropriate, several recommendations are offered about standards and the review process. A key recommendation is that when reviewing an objector's reasons, contrary to what some have proposed, it is not appropriate to adopt an adversarial approach modelled on military review boards' assessments of requests for conscientious objector status. According to the approach recommended, the primary function of reviews of objectors' reasons is to engage them in a process of reflecting on the nature and depth of their objections, with the objective of facilitating moral clarity on the part of objectors rather than enabling department heads, supervisors, or ethics committees to determine whether conscientious objections are sufficiently genuine.

  18. Enhancing the primary care team to provide redesigned care: the roles of practice facilitators and care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin Fries; Machta, Rachel M; Meyers, David S; Genevro, Janice; Peikes, Deborah N

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to redesign primary care require multiple supports. Two potential members of the primary care team-practice facilitator and care manager-can play important but distinct roles in redesigning and improving care delivery. Facilitators, also known as quality improvement coaches, assist practices with coordinating their quality improvement activities and help build capacity for those activities-reflecting a systems-level approach to improving quality, safety, and implementation of evidence-based practices. Care managers provide direct patient care by coordinating care and helping patients navigate the system, improving access for patients, and communicating across the care team. These complementary roles aim to help primary care practices deliver coordinated, accessible, comprehensive, and patient-centered care.

  19. Measuring the savings from managed care: experience at Citibank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, M G; Sperling, K L

    1995-01-01

    In a leap of faith, Citibank in 1989 designed a point-of-service plan aimed at containing health care costs in the long term without sacrificing quality of care. In 1994 a study was undertaken to empirically evaluate whether these goals had been achieved. The study supported Citibank's overall managed care strategy, providing objective, quantifiable data that can lead to greater efficiencies.

  20. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  1. Challenges for Managed Care from 340B Contract Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Adam J

    2016-03-01

    The federal 340B Drug Pricing Program has expanded rapidly, with important yet still unmeasured impact on both managed care practice and policies. Notably, providers increasingly rely on external, contract pharmacies to extend 340B pricing to a broad set of patients. In 2014, 1 in 4 U.S. retail, mail, and specialty pharmacy locations acted as contract pharmacies for 340B-covered entities. This commentary discusses crucial ways in which 340B growth is affecting managed care pharmacy through formulary rebates, profits from managed care paid prescriptions, disruption of retail pharmacy networks, and reduced generic dispensing rates. Managed care should become more engaged in the discussion on how the 340B program should evolve and offer policy proposals to mitigate the challenges being encountered. There is also an urgent need for objective, transparent research on the 340B program's costs, benefits, and implications for managed care pharmacy and practice.

  2. Price elasticity and pharmaceutical selection: the influence of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Salkever, David S

    2003-07-01

    State Medicaid programs are turning increasingly to managed care to control expenditures, although the types of managed care programs in use have changed dramatically. Little is known about the influence of the shifting Medicaid managed care arena on treatment decisions. This paper investigates factors affecting the selection of treatments for depression by providers participating in either of two Medicaid managed care programs. Of particular interest is the influence of medication price on the choice of treatment, since one vehicle through which managed care organizations can reduce total expenditures is by increasing the price sensitivity of participating providers. We take a new approach by phrasing the problem as a discrete choice, using a nested multinomial logit model for the analyses. Contrary to earlier literature, we find some evidence that physicians in both programs do take price into consideration when selecting among treatment options. HMO providers in particular demonstrate increased price sensitivity in the two most commonly prescribed categories of antidepressants.

  3. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations.

  4. Surgeons and non-surgeons prefer haptic feedback of instrument vibrations during robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Jacqueline K; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2015-10-01

    Clinical robotic surgery systems do not currently provide haptic feedback because surgical instrument interactions are difficult to measure and display. Our laboratory recently developed a technology that allows surgeons to feel and/or hear the high-frequency vibrations of robotic instruments as they interact with patient tissue and other tools. Until now, this type of feedback had not been carefully evaluated by users. We conducted two human-subject studies to discover whether surgeons and non-surgeons value the addition of vibration feedback from surgical instruments during robotic surgery. In the first experiment, 10 surgeons and 10 non-surgeons (n = 20) used an augmented Intuitive da Vinci Standard robot to repeatedly perform up to four dry-lab tasks both with and without haptic and audio feedback. In the second experiment, 68 surgeons and 26 non-surgeons (n = 94) tested the same robot at a surgical conference: each participant spent approximately 5 min performing one or two tasks. Almost all subjects in both experiments (95 and 98 %, respectively) preferred receiving feedback of tool vibrations, and all subjects in the second experiment thought it would be useful for surgeons to have the option of such feedback. About half of the subjects (50, 60 %) preferred haptic and audio feedback together, and almost all the rest (45, 35 %) preferred haptic feedback alone. Subjects stated that the feedback made them more aware of tool contacts and did not interfere with use of the robot. There were no significant differences between the responses of different subject populations for any questions in either experiment. This study illustrates that both surgeons and non-surgeons prefer instrument vibration feedback during robotic surgery. Some participants found audio feedback useful but most preferred haptic feedback overall. This strong preference for tool vibration feedback indicates that this technology provides valuable tactile information to the surgeon.

  5. Medical Assistant-based care management for high risk patients in small primary care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by insurance data analysis. Intervention: We compared protocol-based care management including structured assessment, action planning......Background: Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk of potentially avoidable hospital admissions, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. Objective......: To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves patient care in patients at high risk of future hospitalization in primary care. Design: Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. Setting: 115 primary care practices in Germany. Patients: 2,076 patients with type 2...

  6. Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Jörgen; Eriksson, Andrea; Dellve, Lotta

    2016-03-01

    To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Leo Doyle, master surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellar, I

    2000-10-01

    On 3 March 1953 Leo Doyle died at the Mercy Hospital, Melbourne. The day before he died Leo Doyle had been operating at the Mercy Hospital when he took ill. Doyle's final illness was almost certainly the result of the severe aortic stenosis that had been developing over some years. His death at the relatively young age of 61 ended the career of a man described by Sir Gordon Gordon Taylor as the greatest technical surgeon that he had ever seen. In all likelihood Australian surgery will never see the likes of Doyle, a virtuoso surgeon, again. And yet to many of the surgeons who were Doyle's contemporaries and to those who followed him he remained somewhat of an enigma. Perhaps in some way the description of the great French surgeon Baron Dupuytren may also be applicable to Leo Doyle: known to all, loved by many, understood by few. By all accounts Leo Doyle's surgical repertoire knew no bounds. He operated with equal facility on the central nervous system, the head and neck, in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis and he was more than competent in gynaecology, urology and orthopaedics. In the latter part of his career he became, par excellence, a cancer surgeon. He was, arguably, Australia's first surgical oncologist. No procedure was deemed too complicated or demanding. Like some other superb technicians his judgement at times did not match his technical ability. Doyle was one of the first surgeons in Australia to perform hindquarter amputation and he helped to pioneer the operations of total gastrectomy and oesophagogastrectomy. An avid reader of the surgical literature, he possessed an enormous library which was matched by an equally large collection of surgical instruments. Unlike Devine he published relatively little. He was not a good clinical teacher, preferring to teach by example in the operating theatre. Although interested in music and the visual arts, surgery was his life.

  8. [Operative management and fracture care of the lower leg with the Ilizarov fixator in morbidly obese patients: literature review and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, J; Seybold, D; Baecker, H; Muhr, G; Graf, M

    2009-01-01

    Given the rising prevalence of obesity, surgeons and hospitals must become more familiar with the treatment and operative management of obese patients. Several additional pre- and postoperative considerations must be involved such as appropriate assessment of comorbidities and requirements for special equipment. There are still very few data regarding morbidly obese patients with BMIs >50 kg/m(2). After a general literature review of operative management of obese patients, we report on fracture care of the lower limb in such patients with custom-made Ilizarov ring fixators. We found them suited to bear enormous weight-loading but that associated comborbidities can limit successful fracture care.

  9. Pain management: lessons from palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, John P

    2013-01-01

    Reducing suffering and helping patients to control their symptoms are key components of palliative care. This commentary will offer a comprehensive definition of palliative care and will present a case history to illustrate how palliative care can benefit patients with chronic pain.

  10. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  11. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis L Kodner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each. It started during the first phase at Massachusetts General Hospital, a major academic medical centre in Boston, Massachusetts in collaboration with Massachusetts General Physicians Organisation. During the second phase, the programme expanded to two more affiliated sites in and around the Boston area, including a community hospital, as well as incorporated several modifications primarily focused on the management of transitions to post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities. At the close of the demonstration in July 2012, Mass General Massachusetts General Care Management Program became a component of a new Pioneer accountable care organisation (ACO. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program is focused on individuals meeting defined eligibility criteria who are offered care that is integrated by a case manager embedded in a primary care practice. The demonstration project showed substantial cost savings compared to fee-for-service patients served in the traditional Medicare system but no impact on hospital readmissions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program does not rest upon a “whole systems” approach to integrated care. It is an excellent example of how an innovative care co-ordination programme can be implemented in an existing health-care organisation without making fundamental changes in its underlying structure or the way in which direct patient care services are paid for. The accountable care organisation version of the Massachusetts General Care Management Program

  12. Is managed care restraining the adoption of technology by hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Núria; Seinfeld, Janice

    2008-07-01

    As health care costs increase, cost-control mechanisms become more widespread and it is crucial to understand their implications for the health care market. This paper examines the effect that managed care activity (based on the aim to control health care expenditure) has on the adoption of technologies by hospitals. We use a hazard rate model to investigate whether higher levels of managed care market share are associated with a decrease on medical technology adoption during the period 1982-1995. We analyze annual data on 5390 US hospitals regarding the adoption of 13 different technologies. Our results are threefold: first, we find that managed care has a negative effect on hospitals' technology acquisition for each of the 13 medical technologies in our study, and its effect is stronger for those technologies diffusing in the 1990s, when the managed care sector is at its largest. If managed care enrollment had remained at its 1984 level, there would be 5.3%, 7.3% and 4.1% more hospitals with diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy and cardiac technologies, respectively. Second, we find that the rise in managed care leads to long-term reductions in medical cost growth. Finally, we take into account that profitability analysis is one of the main dimensions considered by hospitals when deciding about the adoption of new technologies. In order to determine whether managed care affects technologies differently if they have a different cost-reimbursement ratio (CRR), we have created a unique data set with information on the cost-reimbursement for each of the 13 technologies and we find that managed care enrollment has a considerably larger negative effect on the adoption of less profitable technologies.

  13. Managed care and its impact on American urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1998-05-01

    America's health care is undergoing a revolution. A previous private, fee-for-service, delivery system chiefly centered around hospital specialty care is rapidly being replaced by a commercialized system of managed care, controlled by businessmen whose prime motive is profit. Increasing emphasis of these managed care organizations is upon primary physicians who function as gatekeepers. While this new commercialized method of health care has been attended with reductions in the previous omnipresent health care inflation our country has experienced for the past several decades, its impact on quality of care and patient choice of physician remain a great concern. Especially vulnerable in this new system are our nation's academic centers, which, burdened with responsibility for education and research, are at a disadvantage in the competitive cost-based bidding for managed care contracts. Urology work force issues and the number of urologists in our nation remain another concern for urologists as they compete for access to patients in this new highly competitive environment. In a 1995 survey of a cohort of urologists in seven states, the respondents reported 35.8% of gross income came from managed care contracts, 86% reported the need for preservice approval for many diagnostic and therapeutic undertakings, 87% reported an inability to refer complex cases outside the Managed Care Organization (MCO) network, and 23% reported they were required to retain patients for treatment who they would have otherwise referred to a more qualified urologist. The majority of American urologists are reporting dropping gross revenues and increasing overhead in their dealings with managed care contracts. The advent of managed care is being attended with dropping gross revenues, increasing overhead costs and interference with the practice patterns of American urologists.

  14. [Nursing management of wound care pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2007-06-01

    Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject.

  15. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with bette

  16. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with

  17. Essential case management services for young children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnick, C; Kronstadt, D; Klee, L

    1999-10-01

    A growing number of children in the United States are being placed into foster care. Past studies indicate that effective case manager interventions have helped foster families with a variety of different problems. This study enrolled a randomly selected sample of 130 children under age four who had been newly placed into foster care. The purpose of this study was to identify the services needed by foster care families and determine which services require the most case manager effort. Consistent with other research, many foster care children in this study exhibited developmental, medical and psychosocial concerns. Nevertheless, we found that it was services aimed at the foster care parents, rather than the foster care children, that required the most labor-intensive case management services.

  18. Embedding care management in the medical home: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Hay, Sherry; Prentice, Amy; Gwynne, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Care managers are playing increasingly significant roles in the redesign of primary care and in the evolution of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), yet their adoption within day-to-day practice remains uneven and approaches for implementation have been minimally reported. We introduce a strategy for incorporating care management into the operations of a PCMH and assess the preliminary effectiveness of this approach. A case study of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Family Medicine Center used an organizational model of innovation implementation to guide the parameters of implementation and evaluation. Two sources were used to determine the effectiveness of the implementation strategy: data elements from the care management informatics system in the health record and electronic survey data from the Family Medicine Center providers and care staff. A majority of physicians (75%) and support staff (82%) reported interactions with the care manager, primarily via face-to-face, telephone, or electronic means, primarily for facilitating referrals for behavioral health services and assistance with financial and social and community-based resources. Trend line suggests an absolute decrease of 8 emergency department visits per month for recipients of care management services and an absolute decrease of 7.5 inpatient admissions per month during the initial 2-year implementation period. An organizational model of innovation implementation is a potentially effective approach to guide the process of incorporating care management services into the structure and workflows of PCMHs.

  19. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannou François

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women and 14 care providers (6 women: 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers.

  20. Corporate social responsibility and the future health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2010-01-01

    The decisions and actions of health care managers are oftentimes heavily scrutinized by the public. Given the current economic climate, managers may feel intense pressure to produce higher results with fewer resources. This could inadvertently test their moral fortitude and their social consciousness. A study was conducted to determine what corporate social responsibility orientation and viewpoint future health care managers may hold. The results of the study indicate that future health care managers may hold patient care in high regard as opposed to profit maximization. However, the results of the study also show that future managers within the industry may continue to need rules, laws, regulations, and legal sanctions to guide their actions and behavior.

  1. The "Battle" of Managing Language Barriers in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Emma M; Valenzuela-Araujo, Doris; Zickafoose, Joseph S; Kieffer, Edith; DeCamp, Lisa Ross

    2016-02-18

    Providing safe and high-quality health care for children whose parents have limited English proficiency (LEP) remains challenging. Reports of parent perspectives on navigating language discordance in health care are limited. We analyzed portions of 48 interviews focused on language barriers from 2 qualitative interview studies of the pediatric health care experiences of LEP Latina mothers in 2 urban US cities. We found mothers experienced frustration with health care and reported suboptimal accommodation for language barriers. Six themes emerged relevant to health care across settings: the "battle" of managing language barriers, preference for bilingual providers, negative bias toward interpreted encounters, "getting by" with limited language skills, fear of being a burden, and stigma and discrimination experienced by LEP families. Parents' insights highlight reasons why effective language accommodation in health care remains challenging. Partnering with families to address the management of language barriers is needed to improve health care quality and safety for LEP patients and families.

  2. Self-Management Strategies for Stress and Anxiety Used by Nontreatment Seeking Veteran Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Tapio, Jennie; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2017-07-01

    in this sample. Strengths of the study include its novelty, our sample of non-treatment seeking Veteran primary care patients with current symptoms, and the open-ended format of the strategies questions. Limitations include reliance on self-report data, dichotomous response options for the perceived effectiveness item, limited number of potential correlates, and sampling from a single medical center. Overall, this research highlights the opportunity that health care providers have to engage primary care patients around self-management to determine what strategies they are using and how effective those strategies may be. Future directions include identification of the most effective and feasible self-management strategies for anxiety to facilitate promotion of evidence-based self-management among primary care patients. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Managed care, consumerism, preventive medicine: does a causal connection exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, John A; Xie, Yang

    2006-07-01

    Managed care plans, and HMOs in particular, have long touted that their emphasis is on preventive care, to avoid expensive illness later in life. However, few articles in the contemporary literature adequately address this claim. The available evidence seems to support that HMOs do, in fact, provide greater access to preventive services, but the limitations of this research are substantial. This article discusses the scientific evidence on the relationships between managed care arrangements and the implications for preventive care in the current era, emphasizing consumer choices and less-restrictive plan structures.

  4. Toward population management in an integrated care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Franklin W; McMurray, Stephen; Nissenson, Allen R

    2013-01-01

    Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will be the primary mechanism for achieving the dual goals of high-quality patient care at managed per capita costs. To achieve these goals in the newly emerging health care environment, the nephrology community must plan for and direct integrated delivery and coordination of renal care, focusing on population management. Even though the ESRD patient population is a complex group with comorbid conditions that may confound integration of care, the nephrology community has unique experience providing integrated care through ACO-like programs. Specifically, the recent ESRD Management Demonstration Project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the current ESRD Prospective Payment System with it Quality Incentive Program have demonstrated that integrated delivery of renal care can be accomplished in a manner that provides improved clinical outcomes with some financial margin of savings. Moving forward, integrated renal care will probably be linked to provider performance and quality outcomes measures, and clinical integration initiatives will share several common elements, namely performance-based payment models, coordination of communication via health care information technology, and development of best practices for care coordination and resource utilization. Integration initiatives must be designed to be measured and evaluated, and, consistent with principles of continuous quality improvement, each initiative will provide for iterative improvements of the initiative.

  5. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Managing high-risk patients: the Mass General care management programme

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis L. Kodner

    2015-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Care Management Program (Mass General CMP or CMP) was designed as a federally supported demonstration to test the impact of intensive, practice-based care management on high-cost Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries—primarily older persons—with multiple hospitalisations and multiple chronic conditions. The Massachusetts General Care Management Program operated over a 6-year period in two phases (3 years each). It started during the first phase at Massachusett...

  7. People deliver eye care: managing human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Odusote

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available People deliver health. Effective health care needs an efficient and motivated health workforce, which is the totality of individuals who directly or indirectly contribute to the promotion, protection and improvement of the health of the population.Community eye health is about providing eye health care to the people as close as possible to where they live and as much as possible at a price they can afford. It promotes people-centred care rather than the traditional disease-centred eye care services. In order to provide effective and efficient eye care services, we need an adequate number of well-qualified, well-motivated and equitably distributed eye health workers (EHWs.

  8. Becoming nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Marcellino de Melo Lanzoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to understand the experience of managing medical-surgical inpatient units in a general hospital, highlighting the meaning of being a nursing manager, with the intention to qualify and instrument nurses for caring management practice in this scenario. This is a Grounded Theory research, conducted from August 2010 to August 2012, through interviews with 19 participants from the nursing team, distributed in 3 sampling groups. From the analysis emerged the phenomenon “Becoming a nursing manager in the nested and complex border of caring and management dimension”. To exercise caring management, nurses use management instruments as essential tools, they become capable theoretically and enhances, based on his experience, professional skills and personal characteristics.  We conclude that competency mobilization beyond the clinical aspect is needed; allowing the use of management instruments to make caring viable and to improve relational and interactive processes.

  9. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation. A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years. From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds. The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided. PMID:26554805

  10. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-11-01

    Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation.A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years.From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds.The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided.

  11. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated......Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...

  12. The attitude and perceptions of work-life balance: a comparison among women surgeons in Japan, USA, and Hong Kong China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Kwong, Ava; Yorozuya, Kyoko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Numann, Patricia J; Sanfey, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore how women surgeons manage their work-life balance in three environmental and cultural settings. Members of the Japan Association of Women Surgeons (JAWS), the United States of America (US) based Association of Women Surgeons (AWS), and the Women's Chapter of the College of Surgeons of Hong Kong (WCHK) were surveyed. Among 822 women surgeons contacted, 252 responded (response rate 31.8 %; 55.5 % JAWS, 28.2 % AWS, and 25.3 % WCHK). Japanese women surgeons think that work is the number one priority, whereas US and Hong Kong China (HK) respondents think the number one priority is home life. Work satisfaction level was generally high among women surgeons in all countries; however, 19 % of US surgeons are somewhat dissatisfied with their work and 76.1 % think that men are treated more favorably than women at work. Whereas 51.6 % of Japanese women surgeons think that men are treated more favorably than women at home, at the same time they placed more importance on the role of women in the family. More than half of Japanese women surgeons are "uncertain" about their career path in the future, whereas 55.2/87.1 % of US/HK respondents are optimistic. All surgeons recommended expanding support for child rearing or nursing care during work hours, promoting a flexible work schedule and changing some of the older conventional ideas about gender role. It is essential to address women surgeons' concerns to enable them to have a clearer vision and a challenging career, and to be more certain about their personal and professional goals.

  13. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using...... business principles. Most states have insufficient experience in developing managed care plans for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities. Middle-aged adults with physical disabilities present their own constellation of health care issues that is not readily appreciated in health and social services...... research. This qualitative research examined the implications of Medicaid managed care by conducting in-depth interviews with a total of thirty respondents with physical disabilities in the age range of 45-64 years enrolled in a mandatory managed care program in the eastern seaboard of United States...

  14. Staged diabetes management. Toward an integrated model of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, R S; Etzwiler, D D; Strock, E; Peterson, K; McClave, C R; Meszaros, J F; Leigh, C; Owens, L W; Deeb, L C; Peterson, A

    1994-06-01

    This paper introduces a new and innovative approach to diabetes management in the primary-care setting. Staged diabetes management (SDM) represents a four-year effort to develop and test a data-based approach to diabetes management that could be easily adapted to a variety of health-care settings in which diabetes management is principally under the direction of primary-care physicians was limited access to specialists. After testing under controlled circumstances at the International Diabetes Center (Minneapolis, MN), SDM was subjected to substantial field trials under conditions that represent the scope and variety of primary-care practices in diabetes. The following represents the work of several investigators who independently undertook a review of SDM.

  15. Effects of managed care contracting on physician labor supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, A M; Thurston, N K

    2001-06-01

    We examine the effect of managed care contracting on physician labor supply for office-based medical practices. We extend the standard labor supply model to incorporate choices regarding the patient base. Empirical tests use data from the 1985 and 1988 national HCFA Physician Practice Costs and Income Surveys and InterStudy Managed Care Surveys. We use physician-level information on participation in managed care contracting to estimate changes in work hours. Managed care contracting is generally associated with lower physician work hours. However, accounting for motivations to participate in contracts and the extent of contracting, the effect on hours is reduced in magnitude and significance. We conclude that relying on broad aggregate measures for policy analysis will likely be misleading as underlying motivations and contracting incentives change over time.

  16. Medicaid Managed Care Penetration Rates and Expansion Enr...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid managed care penetration rates and expansion enrollment by state charts are composed annually by the Data and System Group (DSG) of the Centers for...

  17. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  18. Disabling health care? Medicaid managed care and people with disabilities in America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Medicaid, America's largest government-funded health insurance program, plays a pivotal role in providing health services to eight million adults with disabilities. Since the mid-1990s, many Medicaid programs have aggressively introduced managed care, which reconfigures service delivery using...... business principles. Most states have insufficient experience in developing managed care plans for Medicaid beneficiaries with disabilities. Middle-aged adults with physical disabilities present their own constellation of health care issues that is not readily appreciated in health and social services....... The purpose of the study was to understand their experiences in accessing physical health care services and to ascertain the effects of managed care on their health and well-being. This study found beneficiaries encounter numerous barriers in accessing preventative, treatment, and acute care services. Overall...

  19. Warfarin and Newer Agents: What the Oral Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Martin B; Swanson, Matthew T

    2016-11-01

    The new direct oral anticoagulants-dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban- have predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles and are alternatives to warfarin. However, many surgeons are wary of these drugs, as there is limited evidence on how to manage bleeding in patients taking them, and only recently has a specific antidote been developed to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Management of the newer agents requires careful adherence to primary measures of bleeding care, knowledge of their mechanism of action, and familiarity with the unapproved and untested reversal strategies that may be required in patients with life-threatening bleeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [The robotic surgeon training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Alessandro; Rossanese, Marta; Abbinante, Maria; Calandriello, Mattia; Kungulli, Afrovita; Giannarini, Gianluca; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The widespread robotic surgery in the world highlighted the relevance of the training programs for young urologists and residents. In the last years, urologic societies and some independent robotic surgeons strongly worked to standardize some general and specific training modules. Theoretical and practical sections of robotic training programs have been recently specified. The role of simulators, dry and wet laboratories, bedside assistance, and modular (step-by-step) training at console represent the most relevant elements of robotic surgeon training. Ideally, these didactic tools should be available in modern training centers. The development of structured robotic training programs should be considered as one of the priorities that the urologic community must take into account in the near future.

  1. Managing palliative care for adults with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Strachan, Patricia H; Brazil, Kevin; Marshall, Denise; Willison, Kathleen; Dolovich, Lisa; Taniguchi, Alan; Demers, Catherine

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the care processes experienced by community-dwelling adults dying from advanced heart failure, their family caregivers, and their health-care providers. A descriptive qualitative design was used to guide data collection, analysis, and interpretation. The sample comprised 8 patients, 10 informal caregivers, 11 nurses, 3 physicians, and 3 pharmacists. Data analysis revealed that palliative care was influenced by unique contextual factors (i.e., cancer model of palliative care, limited access to resources, prognostication challenges). Patients described choosing interventions and living with fatigue, pain, shortness of breath, and functional decline. Family caregivers described surviving caregiver burden and drawing on their faith. Health professionals described their role as trying to coordinate care, building expertise, managing medications, and optimizing interprofessional collaboration. Participants strove towards 3 outcomes: effective symptom management, satisfaction with care, and a peaceful death.

  2. Practice patterns of cataract surgeons at academic medical centers for the management of inadequate capsule support for intracapsular or sulcus intraocular lens placement during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Rebecca; Scott, Ingrid U; Tucker, Steven H; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Papachristou, George C

    2016-02-01

    To determine practice patterns with regard to intraocular lens (IOL) placement during cataract surgery when there is inadequate capsule support for intracapsular or sulcus IOL placement. Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Cross-sectional study of anonymous survey results. An online survey was e-mailed to the coordinators of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited ophthalmology residency programs with a request to forward to all faculty who perform cataract surgery. Sixty-seven (57.2%) of 117 confirmed survey recipients participated. Thirty-six (62.1%) said they felt comfortable placing scleral-fixated posterior chamber IOLs (PC IOLs) independently. Faced with inadequate capsule support, 58.6% would place a primary anterior chamber IOL (AC IOL), 29.3% would place a primary scleral-fixated PC IOL, and 5.3% would leave the patient aphakic for secondary scleral-fixated PC IOL placement. Surgeons not comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs were most likely to choose primary AC IOLs (77.3%). Surgeons comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs were more evenly divided between primary AC IOLs (47.2%) and scleral-fixated PC IOLs (41.7%). Among surgeons who favored primary scleral-fixated PC IOLs, 63.7% cited a decreased risk for long-term complications as their reason for IOL choice; 50.0% of surgeons who favored primary AC IOLs cited avoidance of a second surgery. In general, primary AC IOL placement was preferred in the setting of inadequate capsule support, although less so among surgeons who were comfortable placing scleral-fixated PC IOLs. Lack of comfort with scleral-fixated PC IOL placement suggests a potential unmet training need in residency and fellowship programs. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends in managed care contracting among U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, K; Campbell, C; Arrington, B

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the changing profile of hospitals initiating managed care contracts as of 1992. Based on statistical tests, early contractors rank higher on profitability, case mix, bed size, affiliation, and urban location. In contrast, recent and noncontractors are predominantly rural, freestanding hospitals with low case mix, low profitability, high subacute services, and government ownership. A number of lessons for the future are drawn and a stage-by-stage approach to studying managed care issues is proposed.

  4. Variability in orthopedic surgeon treatment preferences for nondisplaced scaphoid fractures: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Megan Carroll; Braunstein, Jake; Merenstein, Daniel; Neufeld, Steven; Narvaez, Michael; Friedland, Robert; Bruce, Katherine; Pfaff, Ashley

    2016-12-01

    The absence of a best practice treatment standard contributes to clinical variation in medicine. Often in the absence of evidence, a standard of care is developed and treatment protocols are implemented. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the standard of care for the treatment of nondisplaced scaphoid fractures is uniform among orthopedic surgeons. A survey of orthopedic surgeons actively practicing in the US or abroad was conducted to elicit preferred treatment strategies for nondisplaced scaphoid fractures. The surgeons were recruited at orthopedic conferences, clinical visits, and via email. The survey included demographic questions along with a short clinical vignette. The option for fracture management included surgical versus nonsurgical treatment. For those who chose nonsurgical treatment, type/duration of immobilization was recorded. Cost analysis was performed to estimate direct and indirect costs of various treatment options. A total of 494 orthopedic surgeons completed the survey. The preference for surgical treatment was preferred in 13% of respondents. Hand/upper extremity specialists were significantly more likely to operate compared with generalists (p = 0.0002). Surgeons younger than forty-five were nearly twice as likely to choose surgery (p = 0.01). There was no clear consensus on duration of immobilization as 30% of surgeons chose 6 weeks, 33% selected 8 weeks, and 27% opted for 12 weeks. Total cost of surgery was 49% greater than that of nonoperative treatment. With each additional week of immobilization for nonoperative treatment, the total costs of surgical treatment near that of nonoperative treatment. There exist clear trends in how specific demographic groups choose to treat the nondisplaced scaphoid fracture. Whether these trends are the result of generational gaps or additional subspecialty training remains difficult to determine, but there is need to pursue a more consistent approach that benefits the patients and the

  5. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  6. Ethics of managed care. Implications for group practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, D J

    1997-01-01

    The advent of managed care and the impact of an increasingly pluralistic, postmodern society need not mean abandoning standards of medical ethics embraced since Hippocrates. The time-honored relationship between patients and physicians remains of paramount importance. Ethical issues surrounding "universal" access and financial models that directly incentivize practices to withhold care are both addressed from a historical perspective.

  7. Relationship between chronic conditions and patient satisfaction with managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gines, M D; Pinto, L A; Gocka, L T; Legorreta, A P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of satisfaction among members with and without chronic health conditions (asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated plasma lipoprotein) in a large California managed care organization. One year's worth of member satisfaction survey data was analyzed. Results showed that a high percentage of members were satisfied with the health plan and with their access to care. Members with chronic conditions were significantly more satisfied with their access to care than were members without such conditions.

  8. Headache in primary care: how important is diagnosis to management?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Flynn, Norma; Ridsdale, Leone

    2002-01-01

    Headache is a common presentation in primary care. The classification of headache was overhauled by the International Headache Society (IHS) in 1988, and the past decade has seen rapid growth in the understanding of headache disorders. The IHS places particular importance on precise headache diagnosis. This paper discusses the relevance of such an approach to primary care. A review of the literature revealed a dearth of evidence regarding headache management in primary care settings. The evid...

  9. Managing in the trenches of consumer care: the challenges of understanding and initiating the advance care planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Kristin R; Aultman, Julie; Hazelett, Susan; Palmisano, Barbara; O'Neill, Anne; Ludwick, Ruth; Sanders, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    To better understand how community-based long-term care providers define advance care planning and their role in the process, we conducted 8 focus groups with 62 care managers (social workers and registered nurses) providing care for Ohio's Medicaid waiver program. Care managers shared that most consumers had little understanding of advance care planning. The care managers defined it broadly, including legal documentation, social aspects, medical considerations, ongoing communication, and consumer education. Care managers saw their roles as information providers, healthcare team members, and educators/coaches. Better education, resources, and coordination are needed to ensure that consumer preferences are realized.

  10. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  11. Management of patients during and after exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawn BP

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Barbara P Yawn1, Byron Thomashaw21Department of Research, Olmsted Medical Center, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Current treatments have failed to stem the continuing rise in health care resource use and fatalities associated with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Reduction of severity and prevention of new exacerbations are therefore important in disease management, especially for patients with frequent exacerbations. Acute exacerbation treatment includes short-acting bronchodilators, systemic corticosteroids, and antibiotics if bacterial infections are present. Oxygen and/or ventilatory support may be necessary for life-threatening conditions. Rising health care costs have provided added impetus to find novel therapeutic approaches in the primary care setting to prevent and rapidly treat exacerbations before hospitalization is required. Proactive interventions may include risk reduction measures (eg, smoking cessation and vaccinations to reduce triggers and supplemental pulmonary rehabilitation to prevent or delay exacerbation recurrence. Long-term treatment strategies should include individualized management, addressing coexisting nonpulmonary conditions, and the use of maintenance pharmacotherapies, eg, long-acting bronchodilators as monotherapy or in combination with inhaled corticosteroids to reduce exacerbations. Self-management plans that help patients recognize their symptoms and promptly access treatments have the potential to prevent exacerbations from reaching the stage that requires hospitalization.Keywords: COPD, beta-agonists, anticholinergics, self-management plan

  12. How to manage burns in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P C

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns.

  13. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  14. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  15. Managing severe burn injuries: challenges and solutions in complex and chronic wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers AD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alan D Rogers, Marc G Jeschke Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Encountered regularly by health care providers across both medical and surgical fields and an increasing socioeconomic burden globally, wound care is severely neglected. Practice is heavily influenced by anecdote rather than evidence-based protocols and industry-biased literature rather than robust randomized controlled trials. Burn units are well placed to address this considerable need, as a result of their infrastructure, their multispecialty staffing, and their need to evolve in light of the declining incidence of major burn injury in developed countries. The aim of this review is to evaluate some of the ideological and practical challenges facing wound practitioners and burn surgeons while managing chronic and complex wounds. It also includes an approach to wound assessment and how to conceptualize and implement dressing strategies and new and existing multimodal therapies. Keywords: negative pressure wound therapy, instillation, antiseptic solutions, dressings, multidisciplinary wound care, stem cells, surgery, autograft, allograft, reconstructive ladder

  16. Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erikssen Lars

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. Methods A Systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (all 1990–2006, Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2006, and grey literature from web based searching of web sites listed in the CCOHA Health Technology Assessment List Analysis used narrative analysis of findings of randomised and non-randomised trials, and observational and qualitative studies of patients with completed stroke in the primary care setting where care planning was undertaken by 1 a multi-disciplinary primary care team or 2 through shared care by primary and secondary providers. Results One thousand and forty-five citations were retrieved. Eighteen papers were included for analysis. Most care planning took part in the context of multidisciplinary team care based in hospitals with outreach to community patients. Mortality rates are not impacted by multidisciplinary care planning. Functional outcomes of the studies were inconsistent. It is uncertain whether the active engagement of GPs and other primary care professionals in the multidisciplinary care planning contributed to the outcomes in the studies showing a positive effect. There may be process benefits from multidisciplinary care planning that includes primary care professionals and GPs. Few studies actually described the tasks and roles GPs fulfilled and whether this matched what was presumed to be provided. Conclusion While multidisciplinary care planning may not unequivocally improve the care of patients with completed stroke, there may be process benefits such as improved task allocation between providers. Further study on the impact

  17. Emotion management in children′s palliative care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryl Zac Maunder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the emotional labor involved for nurses providing palliative care for children/young people living with life-limiting illnesses/conditions, and their families. It highlights the challenges nurses face in managing their emotion when caring for children/young people and their families, and explores strategies to enable nurses to cope with this aspect of their role without compromising their personal wellbeing. It suggests that emotional labor within nursing goes largely unrecorded, and remains undervalued by managers and health care services.

  18. Care for the case manager: balancing your wheel of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, D M

    1998-01-01

    The case manager's role in our complex health care system is demanding and draining without some self-reflective attention. The Wheel of Life is a key tool for individuals to assess how well they are leading a fully balanced life. The eight aspects of a balanced life--values, self-care, work, relationships, leisure, relaxation, exercise, and centering--are explained and discussed. A self-reflective activity is presented that encourages readers to assess their current life balance. This focused clarification of personal and professional life will facilitate a more fully balanced life with rewards for case managers as individuals, and for their family, clients, and the health care organization.

  19. Hypertension management in primary care in Belarus and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Rusovich, V.; Egorov, K.N.; Podpalov, V.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Both in Belarus and in the Netherlands, guidelines on the management of hypertension in primary care have been developed, including recommendations about detection, treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are meant to harmonize actual practice management of hypertension of improve the quality of c

  20. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  1. Maximizing efficiency on trauma surgeon rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniuk, Aliaksandr; Dickson, Barbara J; Mahoney, Sean; O'Mara, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Rounding by trauma surgeons is a complex multidisciplinary team-based process in the inpatient setting. Implementation of lean methodology aims to increase understanding of the value stream and eliminate nonvalue-added (NVA) components. We hypothesized that analysis of trauma rounds with education and intervention would improve surgeon efficacy. Level 1 trauma center with 4300 admissions per year. Average non-intensive care unit census was 55. Five full-time attending trauma surgeons were evaluated. Value-added (VA) and NVA components of rounding were identified. The components of each patient interaction during daily rounds were documented. Summary data were presented to the surgeons. An action plan of improvement was provided at group and individual interventions. Change plans were presented to the multidisciplinary team. Data were recollected 6 mo after intervention. The percent of interactions with NVA components decreased (16.0% to 10.7%, P = 0.0001). There was no change between the two periods in time of evaluation of individual patients (4.0 and 3.5 min, P = 0.43). Overall time to complete rounds did not change. There was a reduction in the number of interactions containing NVA components (odds ratio = 2.5). The trauma surgeons were able to reduce the NVA components of rounds. We did not see a decrease in rounding time or individual patient time. This implies that surgeons were able to reinvest freed time into patient care, or that the NVA components were somehow not increasing process time. Direct intervention for isolated improvements can be effective in the rounding process, and efforts should be focused upon improving the value of time spent rather than reducing time invested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anticoagulated patient management in primary care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Out-patients undergoing anticoagulant treatment are attended by nursing staff, working with doctors.To be able to provide adequate medical care, nurses must have the minimum knowledge and skills needed to work with the programme described in this article. These include basic and specific knowledge of anticoagulation. The correct functioning of the service will help provide an optimum control of the INR (International Normalized Ratio and reduce the complications of bleeding, both of which are the main objectives of the nursing care of these patients.

  3. Optimizing cardiothoracic surgery information for a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, T A; Matloff, J M

    1995-11-01

    The rapid change occurring in American healthcare is a direct response to rising costs. Managed care is the fastest growing model that attempts to control escalating costs through limitations in patient choice, the active use of guidelines, and placing providers at risk. Managed care is an information intensive system, and those providers who use information effectively will be at an advantage in the competitive healthcare marketplace. There are five classes of information that providers must collect to be competitive in a managed care environment: patient satisfaction, medical outcomes, continuous quality improvement, quality of the decision, and financial data. Each of these should be actively used in marketing, assuring the quality of patient care, and maintaining financial stability. Although changes in our healthcare system are occurring rapidly, we need to respond to the marketplace to maintain our viability, but as physicians, we have the singular obligation to maintain the supremacy of the individual patient and the physician-patient relationship.

  4. What are purchasers looking for in managed care quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, E H

    1993-01-01

    Spurred by competition and the growth of managed care, providers are seeking new approaches for satisfying the needs of health care purchases. Increasingly, these purchasers are focusing on the value of managed care arrangements, especially the degree to which they manage quality. Underlying the emerging focus on quality are concerns about "undercare," potential legal liability, and the economics of quality. Purchasers are sensitive to the quality of service and the experience of their patients, as well as the clinical quality of the care they receive, and many employers are now engaged in a systematic effort to assess both of these dimensions of quality. The emergence of national data banks, practice standards, and accreditation programs offers additional tools for strengthening provider accountability for quality.

  5. Changing guidelines of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and basic life support for general dental practitioners and oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadipelly, Srinivas; Neshangi, Srisha

    2015-06-01

    Every general dental practitioner and oral and maxillofacial surgeon needs a thorough knowledge of the diagnosis and management of medical emergencies. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most urgent of emergencies and diagnosis must be done as soon as possible. This paper discusses the importance of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation which forms the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), highlighting the important changes in the guidelines of CPR from the year 2000 to 2010, the basic sequence of performing CPR and also the role of defibrillation and the use of automated external defibrillators. Finally the five part chain of survival which is of utmost importance to dental health care professionals and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. All dental health care personnel and oral & maxillofacial surgeons should recognize the importance of the changes in the guidelines of CPR, be trained and allowed to use a properly maintained defibrillator, to respond to cardiac arrest victims.

  6. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe....... The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility...... study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide...

  7. Nutrition services in managed care: new paradigms for dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramee, S H

    1996-04-01

    Managed care systems are transforming the health care system in the United States. Dietitians will need to review practice opportunities in new and different settings, and develop additional skills to make a successful transition to the transformed health care environment. The shift in health care financing from a fee-for-service model to a capitated system will have the most dramatic impact on the profession. Not all the answers are available, but the focus for the future is clear--customer satisfaction, outcomes research, and cost-effective nutrition services.

  8. [Organizational context and care management by nurses at emergency care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, José Luis Guedes; Pestanab, Aline Lima; Higashi, Giovana Dorneles Callegaro; de Oliveira, Roberta Juliane Tono; Cassetari, Sônia da Silva Reis; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings attributed to the organizational context and the role of nurses in care management at emergency care units.This study was based on qualitative research and the Grounded Theory methodological framework. Data were collected from September 2011 to June 2012 by means of semi-structured interviews with 20 participants from two emergency care units (UPA) in southern Brazil, divided into three sample groups. The context is marked by constraints that hinder communication and interaction between professionals and the search of assistance by patients with demands that are not resolved at other levels of care. This scenario highlights the performance of nurses in the managerial dimension of their work, who assume the responsibility for managing care and coordinating professional actions in favour of improved care practices.

  9. What do you get when you cross an electrocuted lineman with a manager of health and safety and a plastic surgeon?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, J.

    2008-08-15

    This article discussed a program designed to ensure that workers in the electricity industry are given adequate protection and compensation for injuries that occur in the workplace. The program was designed after a worker at Hydro One was electrocuted while working on a transmission line in Ontario. The worker was denied benefits by the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) despite the fact that he continued to suffer severe pains in his spine and joints as a result of the 69,000 volt electrocution. The worker was told to make a log of his health status by Hydro One's manager of the health, safety, and environment department. The manager then developed a plan to implement a video-conferencing unit to provide access to doctors and neurologists. PC workstations were also used to access computed tomography (CT) images. Contact sheets were then created to provide contact information for electrical injury experts. A hospital in Ontario is now seeking to establish a Hydro One Chair in electrical injury. The chair will act as a program leader for electrical burn care and research. It was concluded that Canada currently has no centre of expertise for people who have sustained electrical injuries. 2 figs.

  10. Program management of telemental health care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkins, A

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine is a new adjunct to the delivery of health care services that has been applied to a range of health care specialties, including mental health. When prospective telemedicine programs are planned, telemedicine is often envisaged as simply a question of introducing new technology. The development of a robust, sustainable telemental health program involves clinical, technical, and managerial considerations. The major barriers to making this happen are usually how practitioners and patients adapt successfully to the technology and not in the physical installation of telecommunications bandwidth and the associated hardware necessary for teleconsultation. This article outlines the requirements for establishing a viable telemental health service, one that is based on clinical need, practitioner acceptance, technical reliability, and revenue generation. It concludes that the major challenge associated with the implementation of telemental health does not lie in having the idea or in taking the idea to the project stage needed for proof of concept. The major challenge to the widespread adoption of telemental health is paying sufficient attention to the myriad of details needed to integrate models of remote health care delivery into the wider health care system.

  11. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  12. Is the advanced trauma life support simulation exam more stressful for the surgeon than emergency department trauma care? O stress afeta cirurgiões durante o aprendizado tanto quanto na sua carreira profissional?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Quilici

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stress affects surgeons both during training and during professional activity. OBJECTIVE: To compare stress levels affecting surgical residents during the simulated initial assessment and management in the Advanced Trauma Life Support practical exam vs initial assessment and management of trauma patients in the emergency room. METHOD: Eighteen surgical residents were evaluated under basal conditions, during the Advanced Trauma Life Support simulation, and during emergency room initial care. Heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, and diastolic arterial pressure were measured. The Student t test was used to test for differences between means, with statistical significance declared when P OBJETIVO: Comparar os níveis de stress que afetam os residentes de cirurgia durante a avaliação inicial simulada nos cursos Advanced Trauma Life Support versus a avaliação do trauma do paciente na sala de emergência. MÉTODO: Dezoito residentes em cirurgia foram avaliados em condições basais no curso de Advanced Trauma Life Support e na sala de emergência. Foram medidas a freqüência cardíaca, pressões arterial sistólica e diastólica. ESTATÍSTICAS: Teste t do Estudante. Significantemente p<0.05. RESULTADOS: No início da avaliação no Advanced Trauma Life Support, a freqüência cardíaca e pressão arterial sistólica foram mais altas do que (e pressão arterial diastólica foi similar a os valores basais respectivos; no começo da avaliação na sala de emergência foram observadas respostas similares. No fim da avaliação no Advanced Trauma Life Support e na sala de emergência, os valores de freqüência cardíaca, pressão arterial sistólica e pressão arterial diastólica foram maiores do que no começo, exceto que a pressão arterial diastólica não variou significantemente durante a avaliação inicial na sala de emergência. Comparando os dois procedimentos, observa-se que o Advanced Trauma Life Support produziu eleva

  13. What health care managers do: applying Mintzberg's structured observation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Rebecka; Dellve, Lotta; Wikström, Ewa; Törnström, Linda

    2009-09-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first- and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first- and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective.

  14. An Application of Business Process Management to Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohsen M D

    The purpose of this article is to help health care facility managers and personnel identify significant elements of their facilities to address, and steps and actions to follow, when applying business process management to them. The ABPMP (Association of Business Process Management Professionals) life-cycle model of business process management is adopted, and steps from Lean, business process reengineering, and Six Sigma, and actions from operations management are presented to implement it. Managers of health care facilities can find in business process management a more comprehensive approach to improving their facilities than Lean, Six Sigma, business process reengineering, and ad hoc approaches that does not conflict with them because many of their elements can be included under its umbrella. Furthermore, the suggested application of business process management can guide and relieve them from selecting among these approaches, as well as provide them with specific steps and actions that they can follow. This article fills a gap in the literature by presenting a much needed comprehensive application of business process management to health care facilities that has specific steps and actions for implementation.

  15. Health care units and human resources management trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Adriana Maria; Ciampone, Maria Helena Trench; Santelle, Odete

    2013-02-01

    To identify factors producing new trends in basic health care unit management and changes in management models. This was a prospective study with ten health care unit managers and ten specialists in the field of Health in São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The Delphi methodology was adopted. There were four stages of data collection, three quantitative and the fourth qualitative. The first three rounds dealt with changing trends in management models, manager profiles and required competencies, and the Mann-Whitney test was used in the analysis. The fourth round took the form of a panel of those involved, using thematic analysis. The main factors which are driving change in basic health care units were identified, as were changes in management models. There was consensus that this process is influenced by the difficulties in managing teams and by politics. The managers were found to be up-to-date with trends in the wider context, with the arrival of social health organizations, but they are not yet anticipating these within the institutions. Not only the content, but the professional development aspect of training courses in this area should be reviewed. Selection and recruitment, training and assessment of these professionals should be guided by these competencies aligned to the health service mission, vision, values and management models.

  16. Formative evaluation of practice changes for managing depression within a Shared Care model in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Edwards, Jeanette; Steele, Angus

    2017-01-01

    Aim To investigate the implementation and initial impact of the Physician Integrated Network (PIN) mental health indicators, which are specific to screening and managing follow-up for depression, in three primary care practices with Shared Mental Health Care in Manitoba.

  17. Improving Chronic Care: Developing and testing disease-management interventions applied in COPD care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M.M. Lemmens (Karin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDisease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control health care costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the core elements of dis

  18. Geriatric co-management of proximal femur fractures: total quality management and protocol-driven care result in better outcomes for a frail patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel A; Kates, Stephen L; McCann, Robert M

    2008-07-01

    Hip fractures in older adults are a common event, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. Hip fractures have been previously described as a "geriatric, rather than orthopedic disease." Patients with this condition have a high prevalence of comorbidity and a high risk of complications from surgery, and for this reason, geriatricians may be well suited to improve outcomes of care. Co-management of hip fracture patients by orthopedic surgeons and geriatricians has led to better outcomes in other countries but has rarely been described in the United States. This article describes a co-managed Geriatric Fracture Center program that has resulted in lower-than-predicted length of stay and readmission rates, with short time to surgery, low complication rates, and low mortality. This program is based on the principles of early evaluation of patients, ongoing co-management, protocol-driven geriatric-focused care, and early discharge planning. This is a potentially replicable model of care that uses the expertise of geriatricians to optimize the management of a common and serious condition.

  19. Nursing management and organizational ethics in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlody, Ginger Schafer

    2007-02-01

    This article describes organizational ethics issues involved in nursing management of an intensive care unit. The intensive care team and medical center management have the dual responsibility to create an ethical environment in which to provide optimum patient care. Addressing organizational ethics is key to creating that ethical environment in the intensive care unit. During the past 15-20 yrs, increasing costs in health care, competitive markets, the effect of high technology, and global business changes have set the stage for business and healthcare organizational conflicts that affect the ethical environment. Studies show that critical care nurses experience moral distress and are affected by the ethical climate of both the intensive care unit and the larger organization. Thus, nursing moral distress may result in problems related to recruitment and retention of staff. Other issues with organizational ethics ramifications that may occur in the intensive care unit include patient safety issues (including those related to disruptive behavior), intensive care unit leadership style, research ethics, allocation of resources, triage, and other economic issues. Current organizational ethics conflicts are discussed, a professional practice model is described, and multidisciplinary recommendations are put forth.

  20. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  1. Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Schpero, William L; Schlesinger, Mark J; Trivedi, Amal N

    2017-06-27

    State Medicaid programs have increasingly contracted with insurers to provide medical care services for enrollees (Medicaid managed care plans). Insurers that provide these plans can exit Medicaid programs each year, with unclear effects on quality of care and health care experiences. To determine the frequency and interstate variation of health plan exit from Medicaid managed care and evaluate the relationship between health plan exit and market-level quality. Retrospective cohort of all comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans (N = 390) during the interval 2006-2014. Plan exit, defined as the withdrawal of a managed care plan from a state's Medicaid program. Eight measures from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set were used to construct 3 composite indicators of quality (preventive care, chronic disease care management, and maternity care). Four measures from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems were combined into a composite indicator of patient experience, reflecting the proportion of beneficiaries rating experiences as 8 or above on a 0-to-10-point scale. Outcome data were available for 248 plans (68% of plans operating prior to 2014, representing 78% of beneficiaries). Of the 366 comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans operating prior to 2014, 106 exited Medicaid. These exiting plans enrolled 4 848 310 Medicaid beneficiaries, with a mean of 606 039 beneficiaries affected by plan exits annually. Six states had a mean of greater than 10% of Medicaid managed care recipients enrolled in plans that exited, whereas 10 states experienced no plan exits. Plans that exited from a state's Medicaid market performed significantly worse prior to exiting than those that remained in terms of preventive care (57.5% vs 60.4%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, 0.3% to 5.5%]), maternity care (69.7% vs 73.6%; difference, 3.8% [95% CI, 1.7% to 6.0%]), and patient experience (73.5% vs 74.8%; difference, 1.3% [95% CI, 0.6% to 1

  2. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. [Management of pain in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Hamunen, Katri; Hirvonen, Outi

    2013-01-01

    Palliative pain management is usually successful, if the medication is strengthened in a stepwise manner in accordance with pain intensity, and initiation of a strong opioid is not delayed. Finding of a sufficiently effective dose of the opioid drug with simultaneous management of adverse effects requires continuous pain assessment and patient monitoring. In many cases it is possible to enhance analgesia by supplementing the medication with an antidepressant or an antiepileptic along with the opioid and paracetamol or the analgesic. Palliative radiotherapy will relieve tissue injury pain caused by bone metastases and soft tissue tumors as well as pain due to the possible nerve entrapments caused by them.

  4. Dementia Care: Confronting Myths in Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitch, Shirley M; Meadows, Charles; Patton-Tackett, Eva; Yingling, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    Every day, patients with dementia, their families, and their physicians face the enormous challenges of this pervasive life-changing condition. Seeking help, often grasping at straws, victims, and their care providers are confronted with misinformation and myths when they search the internet or other sources. When Persons with Dementia (PWD) and their caregivers believe and/or act on false information, proper treatment may be delayed, and ultimately damage can be done. In this paper, we review commonly misunderstood issues encountered in caring for PWD. Our goal is to equip Primary Care Practitioners (PCPs) with accurate information to share with patients and families, to improve the outcomes of PWD to the greatest extent possible. While there are innumerable myths about dementia and its causes and treatments, we are going to focus on the most common false claims or misunderstandings which we hear in our Internal Medicine practice at Marshall Health. We offer suggestions for busy practitioners approaching some of the more common issues with patients and families in a clinic setting.

  5. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  6. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  7. Psycotherapy, managed care, and the economy of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, J M

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the disclosure over the value of long-term psychotherapy in a managed-care system. Many managed-care companies define extended psychotherapy as superfluous. Those who defend psychotherapy respond that the restrictions imposed by managed care are misguided and potentially harmful. After briefly discussing the relevant literature, the points of contention between psychotherapy and managed care are examined from the perspective of narrative literary theory. The analysis highlights the contrasting narrative assumptions implied about the importance of the clinical interaction. Pointing out each side's use of point-of-view, narrative structure, and informational exchange, it is posited that beneath arguments that often focus on the commodities of time and money lie larger, conceptual differences. These stealthily serve to undermine the possibility of a rational debate. The paper concludes by asserting that psychotherapy and managed care assume incommensurate narratives of interaction when discussing the value of therapy. The terms of discourse must be expanded in order to account for the philosophical differences described. Several ways this might be accomplished are proposed.

  8. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  9. Exploring Space Management Goals in Institutional Care Facilities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankun

    2017-01-01

    Space management has been widely examined in commercial facilities, educational facilities, and hospitals but not in China's institutional care facilities. Poor spatial arrangements, such as wasted space, dysfunctionality, and environment mismanagement, are increasing; in turn, the occupancy rate is decreasing due to residential dissatisfaction. To address these problems, this paper's objective is to explore the space management goals (SMGs) in institutional care facilities in China. Systematic literature analysis was adopted to set SMGs' principles, to identify nine theoretical SMGs, and to develop the conceptual model of SMGs for institutional care facilities. A total of 19 intensive interviews were conducted with stakeholders in seven institutional care facilities to collect data for qualitative analysis. The qualitative evidence was analyzed through open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. As a result, six major categories as well as their interrelationships were put forward to visualize the path diagram for exploring SMGs in China's institutional care facilities. Furthermore, seven expected SMGs that were explored from qualitative evidence were confirmed as China's SMGs in institutional care facilities by a validation test. Finally, a gap analysis among theoretical SMGs and China's SMGs provided recommendations for implementing space management in China's institutional care facilities.

  10. 2017 American College of Rheumatology/American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Guideline for the Perioperative Management of Antirheumatic Medication in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases Undergoing Elective Total Hip or Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Susan M; Springer, Bryan; Guyatt, Gordon; Abdel, Matthew P; Dasa, Vinod; George, Michael; Gewurz-Singer, Ora; Giles, Jon T; Johnson, Beverly; Lee, Steve; Mandl, Lisa A; Mont, Michael A; Sculco, Peter; Sporer, Scott; Stryker, Louis; Turgunbaev, Marat; Brause, Barry; Chen, Antonia F; Gililland, Jeremy; Goodman, Mark; Hurley-Rosenblatt, Arlene; Kirou, Kyriakos; Losina, Elena; MacKenzie, Ronald; Michaud, Kaleb; Mikuls, Ted; Russell, Linda; Sah, Alexander; Miller, Amy S; Singh, Jasvinder A; Yates, Adolph

    2017-08-01

    This collaboration between the American College of Rheumatology and the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons developed an evidence-based guideline for the perioperative management of antirheumatic drug therapy for adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA) including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) undergoing elective total hip (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A panel of rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons specializing in hip and knee arthroplasty, and methodologists was convened to construct the key clinical questions to be answered in the guideline. A multi-step systematic literature review was then conducted, from which evidence was synthesized for continuing versus withholding antirheumatic drug therapy and for optimal glucocorticoid management in the perioperative period. A Patient Panel was convened to determine patient values and preferences, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology was used to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations, using a group consensus process through a convened Voting Panel of rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons. The strength of the recommendation reflects the degree of certainty that benefits outweigh harms of the intervention, or vice versa, considering the quality of available evidence and the variability in patient values and preferences. The guideline addresses the perioperative use of antirheumatic drug therapy including traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, biologic agents, tofacitinib, and glucocorticoids in adults with RA, SpA, JIA, or SLE who are undergoing elective THA or TKA. It provides recommendations regarding when to continue, when to withhold, and when to restart these medications, and the optimal perioperative dosing of glucocorticoids. The guideline includes 7 recommendations, all of which are conditional

  11. Introducing managed care to the medical school curriculum: effect on student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, T S; Baldor, R A; Casey, L M; Chuman, A; Lasser, D; Ehrlich, A; Gurwitz, J H

    1998-07-01

    In order to assess the effect of clinical training and didactic instruction on medical student attitudes toward managed care, we conducted a survey of all medical students at the midpoint of their third year clerkships at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The students were exposed to clinical training in managed care settings and a 2-day required course on the principles underlying managed care. The main outcome measures were student attitudes toward the concepts of managed care, managed care organizations, and future careers in managed care. Students also assessed the attitudes of medical faculty toward managed care. Attitudes of students with previous clinical training in managed care settings did not differ from those of students without such exposure toward the concepts underlying managed care or managed care organizations and were less positive about careers in managed care. Student responses before and after the 2-day course on managed care demonstrated that attitudes moved in a significantly positive direction. Seventy-one percent of students reported that the opinions they had heard from medical faculty about managed care were negative. Preparing medical students to practice medicine effectively in managed care settings will require focused attention on managed care issues in the medical school curriculum and the combined efforts of academic health centers and managed care organizations.

  12. Managing mechanistic and organic structure in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Managers at all levels in a health care organization must organize work to achieve the organization's mission and goals. This requires managers to decide the organization structure, which involves dividing the work among jobs and departments and then coordinating them all toward the common purpose. Organization structure, which is reflected in an organization chart, may range on a continuum from very mechanistic to very organic. Managers must decide how mechanistic versus how organic to make the entire organization and each of its departments. To do this, managers should carefully consider 5 factors for the organization and for each individual department: external environment, goals, work production, size, and culture. Some factors may push toward more mechanistic structure, whereas others may push in the opposite direction toward more organic structure. Practical advice can help managers at all levels design appropriate structure for their departments and organization.

  13. Pricing specialty carve-outs and disease management programs under managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPensee, K T

    1997-01-01

    The drive toward improved efficiency and effectiveness in health care has spawned disease management programs to address the needs of patients with certain conditions. These programs parallel traditional case management programs in monitoring patients, but disease management differs from case management in early assessment of patient risk, with proactive clinical interventions and educational efforts. The most comprehensive programs include a coordinated delivery system that can be "carved out" from other health care benefits. Pricing disease management can benefit from the analysis of detailed, disease-specific and community-specific data from public or private sources.

  14. Conflict across organizational boundaries: managed care organizations versus health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, R R; Wall, J A

    2001-08-01

    This research examined conflicts that occur across organizational boundaries, specifically between managed care organizations and health care providers. Using boundary spanning theory as a framework, the authors identified 3 factors in the 1st study (30 interviews) that influence this conflict: (a) organizational power, (b) personal status differences of the individuals handling the conflict, and (c) their previous interactions. These factors affected the individuals' behavioral responses or emotions, specifically anger. After developing hypotheses, the authors tested them in a 2nd study using 109 conflict incidents drawn from 9 different managed care organizations. The results revealed that organizational power affects behavioral responses, whereas status differences and previous negative interactions affect emotions.

  15. Administration to innovation: the evolving management challenge in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, A; Marnoch, G; McKee, L; Joshi, R; Reid, J

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the primary health-care team involving an increasingly diverse range of health care professionals is widely recognized as central to the pursuit of a primary care-led health service in the UK. Although GPs are formally recognized as the team leaders, there is little by way of policy prescription as to how team roles and relationships should be developed, or evidence as to how their roles have in fact evolved. Thus the notion of the primary health-care team while commonly employed, is in reality lacking definition with the current contribution of practice managers to the operation of this team being poorly understood. Focusing on the career backgrounds of practice managers, their range of responsibilities, and their involvement in innovation in general practice, presents a preliminary account of a chief scientist office-funded project examining the role being played by practice managers in primary health-care innovation. More specifically, utilizing data gained from the ongoing study, contextualizes the role played by practice managers in the primary health-care team. By exploring the business environment surrounding the NHS general practice, the research seeks to understand the evolving world of the practice manager. Drawing on questionnaire data, reinforced by qualitative data from the current interview phase, describes the role played by practice managers in differing practice contexts. This facilitates a discussion of a set of ideal type general practice organizational and managerial structures. Discusses the relationships and skills required by practice managers in each of these organizational types with reference to data gathered to date in the research.

  16. Time based management in health care system: The chosen aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kobza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-based management (TBM is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms. Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990 and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001–2011 have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary

  17. [Time based management in health care system: the chosen aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Joanna; Syrkiewicz-Świtała, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001-2011) have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary.

  18. Hypertension management: the primary care nursing role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ehsan Ullah

    2005-03-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic illness that is implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Practice nurses and the district nursing team have a major role to play in its management. In this article, current British Hypertension Society guidelines are presented and discussed with regards to their evidence base. Implications for nursing practice are highlighted.

  19. Managed care or managed inequality? A call for critiques of market-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylko-Bauer, Barbara; Farmer, Paul

    2002-12-01

    This review article critiques the growing dominance of market-based medicine in the United States against the background of existing problems with quality of care, rising costs, devaluation of doctor-patient relationships, and, especially, persistent inequalities of access and outcomes. It summarizes the present state of health care delivery by focusing on the concurrent trends of growth in managed care, expanding profits, increasing proportion of those uninsured, and widening racial, ethnic, and class disparities in access to care. Allowing market forces to dictate the shape of health care delivery in this country ensures that inequalities will continue to grow and modern medicine will become increasingly adept at managing inequality rather than managing (providing) care. The article challenges anthropology to become more involved in critiquing these developments and suggests how anthropologists can expand on and contextualize debates surrounding the market's role in medicine, here and abroad.

  20. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  1. [Management of technology and its influence on nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2007-01-01

    Currently, much nursing care adheres to a specific biomedical paradigm within the positivist framework. However, sometimes nursing care cannot be adapted to numerous human or vital conditions affecting our patients, their families or the environment in which nurses work. An specific example of these nursing interventions are those applied in intensive care units (ICU) where there is a large amount of technology and nursing care is specialized. Several questions that arise are whether the above-mentioned specialization is inherent to nurse care, whether technology management forms part of nursing care, whether this care has a non-nursing origin, and what is the source of nursing knowledge. The present article aims to provide basic knowledge to distinguish the nursing care performed in the ICU within the 2 predominant paradigms in current nursing: the biomedical and the holistic paradigms. The characteristics of nursing care in both paradigms are described and an integrated vision of these 2 paradigms and of nursing care with and without the use of technology is provided.

  2. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  3. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  4. Depression Care Management: Can Employers Purchase Improved Outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Rost

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen vendors are currently selling depression care management products to US employers after randomized trials demonstrate improved work outcomes. The research team interviewed 10 (71.4% of these vendors to compare their products to four key components of interventions demonstrated to improve work outcomes. Five of 10 depression products incorporate all four key components, three of which are sold by health maintenance organizations (HMOs; however, HMOs did not deliver these components at the recommended intensity and/or duration. Only one product delivered by a disease management company delivered all four components of care at the recommended intensity and duration. This “voltage drop,” which we anticipate will increase with product implementation, suggests that every delivery system should carefully evaluate the design of its depression product before implementation for its capacity to deliver evidence-based care, repeating these evaluations as new evidence emerges.

  5. Physician directed networks: the new generation of managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, T; O'Sullivan, D

    1996-07-01

    The external pressure to reduce cost while maintaining quality and services is moving the whole industry into a rapid mode of integration. Hospitals, vendors, MCOs, and now, physicians, are faced with the difficult decisions concerning how their operations will be integrated into the larger health care delivery system. These pressures have forced physicians to consolidate, build leverage, and create efficiencies to become more productive; thereby better positioning themselves to respond to the challenges and the opportunities that lie before them. This initial phase of consolidation has given many physicians the momentum to begin to wrestle back the control of health care and the courage to design the next generation of managed care: Physician Directed Managed Care. What will be the next phase? Perhaps, the next step will be fully-integrated specialty and multi-specialty groups leading to alternate delivery sites. "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." - Leo Tolstoy

  6. Management considerations in the care of elderly heart failure patients in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A; Boscart, Veronique M; McKelvie, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    Heart failure, a condition that affects up to 20% of older persons residing in long-term care facilities, is an important cause of morbidity, health service utilization and death. Effective and interprofessional heart failure care processes could potentially improve care, outcomes and quality of life and delay decline or hospital admission. This article reviews the clinical aspects of heart failure, and the challenges to the diagnosis and management of this condition in long-term care residents who are frail and are affected by multiple comorbidities.

  7. Multidisciplinary care and management selection in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Ayal A; Paly, Jonathan J; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-07-01

    The management of prostate cancer is complicated by the multitude of treatment options, the lack of proven superiority of one modality of management, and the presence of physician bias. Care at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic offers patients the relative convenience of consultation with physicians of multiple specialties within the confines of a single visit and appears to serve as a venue in which patients can be counseled regarding the risks and benefits of available therapies in an open and interactive environment. Physician bias may be minimized in such an environment, and patient satisfaction rates are high. Available data suggest that low-risk patients who are seen at a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic appear to select active surveillance in greater proportion. However, relatively few studies have investigated the other added value that multidisciplinary clinics provide to the patient or health care system, and therefore, additional studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary care in the management of patients with prostate cancer are needed.

  8. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  9. Facilities Management and Health Care at Home

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the new requirements that will be put upon the facilities management when the elderly are living longer in their own homes, in spite of illness, impairment and old age. For many reasons, especially demographic ones, this issue has come to the fore and since it has substantial political impact and considerably affects our living conditions, it will most certainly appear on the agenda of most Swedish housing companies in the near future. The growing number of inhabit...

  10. [The hospital perspective: disease management and integrated health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management is a transsectoral, population-based form of health care, which addresses groups of patients with particular clinical entities and risk factors. It refers both to an evidence-based knowledge base and corresponding guidelines, evaluates outcome as a continuous quality improvement process and usually includes active participation of patients. In Germany, the implementation of disease management is associated with financial transactions for risk adjustment between health care assurances [para. 137 f, Book V of Social Code (SGB V)] and represents the second kind of transsectoral care, besides a program designed as integrated health care according to para. 140 a ff f of Book V of Social Code. While in the USA and other countries disease management programs are made available by several institutions involved in health care, in Germany these programs are offered by health care insurers. Assessment of disease management from the hospital perspective will have to consider three questions: How large is the risk to compensate inadequate quality in outpatient care? Are there synergies in internal organisational development? Can the risk of inadequate funding of the global "integrated" budget be tolerated? Transsectoral quality assurance by valid performance indicators and implementation of a quality improvement process are essential. Internal organisational changes can be supported, particularly in the case of DRG introduction. The economic risk and financial output depends on the kind of disease being focussed by the disease management program. In assessing the underlying scientific evidence of their cost effectiveness, societal costs will have to be precisely differentiated from hospital-associated costs.

  11. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized. To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in comb...

  12. Marketing a managed care plan: achieving product differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, N C

    1996-01-01

    The health care marketplace is changing dramatically, even without federal reform measures. This is a volatile, yet promising, time to market a managed care plan. Before marketing the product, it is critical that the competition is thoroughly evaluated and consumer and employer needs are researched. The final product should be distinguishable from the competition and address market needs. Promotion can then begin, utilizing a proactive public relations and advertising campaign in addition to traditional methods of marketing.

  13. Breast Cancer Screening in a Low Income Managed Care Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer among the population of low income women who have incomes less than 200% of the national poverty level...34Journal for Health Care for the Poor and Underserved" (see appendix). Entitled "Difficulty in Reaching Low Income Women for Screening Mammography...useful insights for future program planning and research design. Keywords: screening mammography, low income , managed care and barriers Poverty is

  14. Managing organizational change: strategies for the female health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1990-07-01

    In responding to resistance to change in the current health care organization, the new female supervisor can learn to support her staff in encountering and accepting these changes. The strategies and skills discussed above are characteristic of a supervisory style that may naturally occur for women, but also can be incorporated into the leadership style of men in health care management today. Health care leaders of tomorrow must work from an androgynous framework in which the behavior patterns and responses of each gender are learned and used appropriately by both men and women. Sargent suggests that the best managers are androgynous and that this is the inevitable wave of the future. Whether man or woman, a supervisor should learn, accept, and use methods that are characteristic of both sexes to be successful in managing people. Women and men must learn from each other's strengths and share these diverse skills. Given that women now outnumber men in health care management positions and organizations are changing to a more nurturing environment, the androgynous supervisor will be the successful leader of the future. Finally, women in health care supervisory positions have the potential to bring change where it is badly needed. Women in these roles often have a system wide view of health care policy issues that recognizes less federal commitment to social programs. Many women in health care positions believe that the issues of children, women, the elderly, the poor, and the homeless need focused attention. The growing number of women in health care supervisory and leadership roles is an important factor in changing national health policy for the benefit of these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Overcoming resistance against managed care ? insights from a bargaining model

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Andree; Wein, Thomas; Zweifel, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Recent healthcare reforms have sought to increase efficiency by introducing managed care (MC) while respecting consumer preferences by admitting choice between MC and conventional care. This article proposes an institutional change designed to let German consumers choose between the two settings through directing payments from the Federal Health Fund to social health insurers (SHIs) or to specialized MC organizations (MCOs). To gauge the chance of success of this reform, a game involving a SH...

  16. Myasthenic crisis patients who require intensive care unit management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kimura, En; Maeda, Yasushi; Uchino, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to investigate predictive factors that necessitate intensive care in myasthenic crisis (MC). We retrospectively reviewed MC patients at our institution and compared ICU and ward management groups. Higher MG-ADL scale scores, non-ocular initial symptoms, infection-triggered findings, and higher MGFA classification were observed more frequently in the ICU group. In patients with these prognostic factors, better outcomes may be obtained with early institution of intensive care.

  17. Manager traits and quality-of-care performance in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aij, Kjeld Harald; Aernoudts, René L M C; Joosten, Gepke

    2015-07-06

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the leadership traits of chief executive officers (CEOs) on hospital performance in the USA. The effectiveness and efficiency of the CEO is of critical importance to the performance of any organization, including hospitals. Management systems and manager behaviours (traits) are of crucial importance to any organization because of their connection with organizational performance. To identify key factors associated with the quality of care delivered by hospitals, the authors gathered perceptions of manager traits from chief executive officers (CEOs) and followers in three groups of US hospitals delivering different levels of quality of care performance. Three high- and three low-performing hospitals were selected from the top and bottom 20th percentiles, respectively, using a national hospital ranking system based on standard quality of care performance measures. Three lean hospitals delivering intermediate performance were also selected. A survey was used to gather perceptions of manager traits (providing a modern or lean management system inclination) from CEOs and their followers in the three groups, which were compared. Four traits were found to be significantly different (alpha performing hospitals. The different perceptions between these two hospital groups were all held by followers in the low-performing hospitals and not the CEOs, and all had a modern management inclination. No differences were found between lean (intermediate-) and high-performing hospitals, or between high- and low-performing hospitals. These findings support a need for hospital managers to acquire appropriate traits to achieve lean transformation, support a benefit of measuring manager traits to assess progress towards lean transformation and lend weight to improved quality of care that can be delivered by hospitals adopting a lean system of management.

  18. [Organization of health services and tuberculosis care management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrêto, Anne Jaquelyne Roque; de Sá, Lenilde Duarte; Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Pinheiro, Patrícia Geórgia de Oliveira Diniz; de Farias, Nilma Maria Porto; Rodrigues, Débora Cezar de Souza; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2012-07-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the discourse of managers regarding the relationship between the organization of the health services and tuberculosis care management in a city in the metropolitan region of João Pessoa, State of Pernambuco. Using qualitative research in the analytical field of the French line of Discourse Analysis, 16 health workers who worked as members of the management teams took part in the study. The transcribed testimonials were organized using Atlas.ti version 6.0 software. After detailed reading of the empirical material, an attempt was made to identify the paraphrasic, polyssemic and metaphoric processes in the discourses, which enabled identification of the following discourse formation: Organization of the health services and the relation with TB care management: theory and practice. In the discourse of the managers the fragmentation of the actions of control of tuberculosis, the lack of articulation between the services and sectors, the compliance of the specific activities for TB, as well as the lack of strategic planning for management of care of the disease are clearly revealed. In this respect, for the organization of the health services to be effective, it is necessary that tuberculosis be considered a priority and acknowledged as a social problem in the management agenda.

  19. Developing consumer involvement in primary dental care. Report of a half-day seminar held at the Royal College of Surgeons of England on 15th September 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Batchelor, Paul; Johns, David J

    2009-01-01

    The seminar on developing consumer involvement in primary dental care, held during the morning of 15th September 2008, was a collaboration between the Lay Advisory Group and Research Committee of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) (FGDP[UK]). As Professor Mike Mulcahy (immediate past Dean of the Faculty) remarked during his address of welcome, it marked a new and exciting development in the Faculty's role in setting and maintaining professional standards for the benefit of patients. It brought together nearly 50 representatives of national bodies, such as the National Audit Office, consumer groups, the Faculty's Lay Advisory Group and Research Committee, the media and others. Many of the national bodies represented at the seminar had published reports on primary dental care during the last five years.

  20. Conflicts of interest with the hand surgeon's relationship with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelSignore, Jeanne L; Goodman, Murray J

    2012-01-01

    Many advances in hand surgery have been supported and enabled by the integral relationship that exists between the profession of hand surgery and industry. This relationship takes many forms, including medical education, development of new technology and methodology, research, and opportunities for patient education. As with all of these endeavors, the primary focus of both the physician and industry must be the care of the patient. When a collaborative relationship exists between physicians and industry, a conflict of interest is present and must be recognized as such and managed to avoid any detriment to patient care. Although the hand surgeon, the patient, and industry share the common interest of advancement of patient care, there does exist real and potential conflicts of interest, which are unavoidable, but not necessarily undesirable. Multiple guidelines exist to govern relationships between industry and physicians. The cooperative relationship between the physician and industry is not only helpful, but it can be critical to the advancement of and innovations in patient care. When properly managed, collaboration between the physician and industry can effectively achieve the common goal of serving the best interest of the patient. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe Cranioencephalic Trauma: Prehospital Care, Surgical Management and Multimodal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death in developed countries. It is estimated that only in the United States about 100,000 people die annually in parallel among the survivors there is a significant number of people with disabilities with significant costs for the health system. It has been determined that after moderate and severe traumatic injury, brain parenchyma is affected by more than 55% of cases. Head trauma management is critical is the emergency services worldwide. We present a review of the literature regarding the prehospital care, surgical management and intensive care monitoring of the patients with severe cranioecephalic trauma.

  2. NHS direct: managing demand for primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Annabelle L; Shepherd, Ifan D H

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers how NHS Direct is affecting demand for primary care in particular out-of-hours services from GPs. This is reviewed through a 3-year study of NHS Direct and HARMONI, the integrated telephone health helpline based in West London. It describes the policy background and development of the services on the site, and some of the outcomes of the HARMONI commissioned research to answer the question 'Has NHS Direct increased the workload for HARMONI doctors?'. The research adopted both a qualitative and quantitative approach using cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of the data collected. The analysis of the data reveals the issues as both complex and dynamic in nature. The research shows that while there has been no significant change to the total volume of activity, changes within patient groups notably the elderly and children, and in individual GP practices may be significant. In addition, the changes in organizational arrangements may influence significant changes in referral patterns such as GP out-of-hours visits. This was confirmed in the interview data indicating a link between the change in nurses' role from gatekeeper to patient advocate, which happened when they ceased to be employees of the part-time co-op and began to work instead for the 24 hours, 7 days a week NHS Direct service. The conclusions drawn are that behavioural and organizational changes are at least as significant as the evidence-based computerized decision support software in changing the demand for primary care. Further evidence cited is that a different demand pattern of calls was experienced by those local GPs not integrated into out-of-hours provision at NHS Direct West London at the time of the study.

  3. Influences on the career commitment of health-care managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrtle, Robert C; Chen, Duan-Rung; Liu, Caroline; Fahey, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    The health-care field is undergoing rapid and significant transformation. This transformation has led to the breakdown of traditional career paths for managers in the patient care segment of the industry. To our knowledge, there has not been a systematic examination of how these changes have impacted on the career commitment of managers in this segment of the industry. Building on previous research, we examine the effects of employment-related conditions and career experiences on the career commitment of these managers while controlling for the influence of individual characteristics. Specifically we assess the relationship between employment-related conditions, such as job security, position tenure, industry segment, management level and the extent to which their current position meets their career expectations, and their career experiences, including moving from a non-health-care management position, moving from a different health-care sector, their career stage, career patterns and their satisfaction with their career progression. We found that measures associated with the different employment-related experiences had a more significant influence on career commitment than those measures associated with different career experiences.

  4. Continuity in health care: lessons from supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijboom, Bert R; Bakx, Saskia J W G C; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    In health care, multidisciplinary collaboration is both indispensable and complicated. We discuss organizational problems that occur in situations where multiple health care providers are required to cooperate for patients with complex needs. Four problem categories, labelled as communication, patient safety, waiting times and integration are distinguished. Then we develop a supply chain perspective on these problems in the sense of discussing remedies according to supply chain management (SCM) literature. This perspective implies a business focus on inter-organizational conditions and requirements necessary for delivering health care and cure across organizational borders. We conclude by presenting some strategic and policy recommendations.

  5. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  6. Petroleum and Health Care: Evaluating and Managing Health Care's Vulnerability to Petroleum Supply Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Daniel; Bae, Jaeyong; Pierce, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Petroleum is used widely in health care—primarily as a transport fuel and feedstock for pharmaceuticals, plastics, and medical supplies—and few substitutes for it are available. This dependence theoretically makes health care vulnerable to petroleum supply shifts, but this vulnerability has not been empirically assessed. We quantify key aspects of petroleum use in health care and explore historical associations between petroleum supply shocks and health care prices. These analyses confirm that petroleum products are intrinsic to modern health care and that petroleum supply shifts can affect health care prices. In anticipation of future supply contractions lasting longer than previous shifts and potentially disrupting health care delivery, we propose an adaptive management approach and outline its application to the example of emergency medical services. PMID:21778473

  7. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad Samir H; Arabi Yaseen M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP...

  8. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaenglein, Andrea L; Pathy, Arun L; Schlosser, Bethanee J; Alikhan, Ali; Baldwin, Hilary E; Berson, Diane S; Bowe, Whitney P; Graber, Emmy M; Harper, Julie C; Kang, Sewon; Keri, Jonette E; Leyden, James J; Reynolds, Rachel V; Silverberg, Nanette B; Stein Gold, Linda F; Tollefson, Megha M; Weiss, Jonathan S; Dolan, Nancy C; Sagan, Andrew A; Stern, Mackenzie; Boyer, Kevin M; Bhushan, Reva

    2016-05-01

    Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults and can also be seen in children. This evidence-based guideline addresses important clinical questions that arise in its management. Issues from grading of acne to the topical and systemic management of the disease are reviewed. Suggestions on use are provided based on available evidence.

  9. [New model of professional self-management in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita-Guimet, A; Ortiz-Molina, J; Sitjar-Martínez de Sas, S; Sisó-Almirall, A; Menacho-Pascual, I; Sebastian-Montal, L

    2012-03-01

    To analyse the benefits of a new organisational model in Primary Care based on the empowerment of professional management compared to standard model (team led by medical director). To improve the quality of care, and patient and professional satisfaction. In February 2009 six family physician (FP) and four administrative staff met to create a self-management group to care for the 10,281 population assigned to them. The total catchment population of the Primary Care (PC) centre was 32,318. Additionally, between March and December 2010 three FP, seven nurses and two administrative staff, were included in the self-management group making the total population served by the self-management group of 16,368, compared to 15,950 patients seen using the standard model. The model gave priority to self-demand management, professional self-coverage, to reduce clinic bureaucracy, greater efficiency and participation in research and teaching. 1) Milestone in Pilot Phase (December-2008 to December-2009): increase in attended population, reduction in clinic visits, significant reduction in delay to be visited by a doctor; significant reduction of complementary tests (x-rays, laboratory tests); increase in use of generic drugs and reduction of expensive and new drugs without added value, and active participation in teaching and clinical trials. 2) Consolidation Phase (December-2010, compared to other professionals working in a standard model in the same centre): self-management group reported a lower percentage of clinic visits and a higher percentage of visits resolved through telephoning the clinic. Furthermore, the self-management group achieved better financial results than the control group (additional medical tests, pharmacy budget). The self-management group had improved job satisfaction compared to control group (measured by Professional Questionnaire QoL-35). The new model has increased professional satisfaction and may improve results in some health indicators

  10. [Geertz' Interpretive Theory and care management: visualizing nurses' social practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Adelina Giacomelli; Leite, Joséte Luzia; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical reflection on hospital nursing care management and Geertz' Interpretive Theory of Culture. We discuss some significant elements of culture in management, based on the theoretical reference frameworks of nursing, administration and anthropology. In these, the importance of cultural diversity is highlighted as an innovative resource to expand the vision of human integrity, valuing divergences, respect and sharing, which are important for nurses in the construction of their social practice.

  11. Language disparities and timely care for children in managed care Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Allison A; Semura, Jeanne I; McAninch-Dake, Rebecca J; Anderson, Nancy; Christakis, Dimitri A

    2008-07-01

    To examine the relationship of race/ethnicity, language, communication with providers, and interpreter use with timeliness of illness and routine care for children in managed care Medicaid. Cross-sectional study using data from the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey, which was administered to parents of children less than 15 years of age in Washington State managed care Medicaid in 2000. Predictors of interest were child's race/ethnicity, parent's primary language at home, difficulty communicating with the child's providers because of language, and need and use of interpreters. The primary outcomes were how often (always, usually, sometimes, or never) the child received illness and routine care as soon as wanted. Analyses used multivariate ordered logistic regression and model-based direct adjustment. A total of 5142 children were included. In adjusted analyses, children received illness and routine care significantly less often than wanted if the parent's primary language at home was not English; the parent ever had difficulty communicating with the provider; and the parent needed but did not always get an interpreter. Language barriers were associated with decreased timeliness of care for children in managed care Medicaid.

  12. Improving performance management for delivering appropriate care for patients no longer needing acute hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Christine; Henry, Effie

    2008-01-01

    The public, providers and policy-makers are interested in a service continuum where care is provided in the appropriate place. Alternate level of care is used to define patients who no longer need acute care but remain in an acute care bed. Our aims were to determine how subacute care and convalescent care should be defined in British Columbia (BC); how these care levels should be aligned with existing legislation to provide more consistent service standards to patients and what reporting requirements were needed for system planning and performance management. A literature review was conducted to understand the international trends in performance management, care delivery models and change management. A Canada-wide survey was carried out to determine the directions of other provinces on the defined issues and a BC survey provided a current state analysis of programming within the five regional health authorities (HAs). A provincial policy framework for subacute and convalescent care has been developed to begin to address the concerns raised and provide a base for performance measurement. The policy has been approved and disseminated to BC HAs for implementation. An implementation plan has been developed and implementation activities have been integrated into the work of existing provincial committees. Evaluation will occur through performance measurement. The benefits anticipated include: clear policy guidance for programme development; improved comparability of performance information for system monitoring, planning and integrity of the national acute care Discharge Abstracting Database; improved efficiency in acute care bed use; and improved equity of access, insurability and quality for patients requiring subacute and convalescent care. While a national reporting system exists for acute care in Canada, this project raises questions about the implications for this system, given the shifting definition of acute care as other care levels emerge. Questions are also

  13. Quality of management in the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgenhammar, E

    1990-01-01

    Quality of management is a necessary, yet not sufficient, prerequisite in quality of care. There are two main approaches to improved quality. One is the individualist approach, where the role of the manager is emphasized. The other is the contextual approach. Focus is on managerial prerequisites such as organizational structure, culture, participation in decision making, and use of management time. Individualist as well as contextualist approaches are presented. Each decade during the 20th century has had its own "pet theory" regarding what problems the manager should allocate time on. A study of 41 Nordic public health researchers illustrates that cost-benefit analysis is the best known of ten theories. Management ethics, with the manager as ideologist, is seen as particularly demanding on managerial creativity.

  14. Management strategies for palliative care: promoting quality, growth and opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, L H; Cetti, J

    2001-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, hospice in the United States evolved to provide end-of-life care for terminally ill patients. However, three major barriers exist, which limit access to hospice care. The first two, cultural and regulatory barriers, are not under the direct control of hospices, although programs can be adapted to minimize their influence. The third, management focus, is controlled by hospice programs and has the greatest influence on access to care and quality of care. Under the influence of the Medicare Hospice Benefit and the peer pressure of managed care, many hospice programs use reimbursability as at least one criterion for determination of coverage of services. The fear is that limited reimbursement will cause some services and therapies to bring the programs to financial ruin. This case study shows the outcome of changing management focus away from restrictive policies about therapies and patient selection toward management of productivity and working capital. Some programs have contributed to growth and stability; the revenue thus produced has supported the new innovations. San Diego Hospice is now growing more than 30 percent per year in spite of competition and a fairly flat death rate in the community. This growth is attributed to finding and meeting unmet needs and making all decisions based on the right thing to do. Every staff member understands and supports the mission. The many programs within the agency contribute to fulfillment of the goal to transform end-of-life care. They are presented here as an example of what can be done with mission-based management.

  15. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  16. Development of an allergy management support system in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flokstra - de Blok, Bertine MJ; van der Molen, Thys; Christoffers, Wianda A; Kocks, Janwillem WH; Oei, Richard L; Oude Elberink, Joanne NG; Roerdink, Emmy M; Schuttelaar, Marie Louise; van der Velde, Jantina L; Brakel, Thecla M; Dubois, Anthony EJ

    2017-01-01

    Background Management of allergic patients in the population is becoming more difficult because of increases in both complexity and prevalence. Although general practitioners (GPs) are expected to play an important role in the care of allergic patients, they often feel ill-equipped for this task. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an allergy management support system (AMSS) for primary care. Methods Through literature review, interviewing and testing in secondary and primary care patients, an allergy history questionnaire was constructed by allergists, dermatologists, GPs and researchers based on primary care and specialists’ allergy guidelines and their clinical knowledge. Patterns of AMSS questionnaire responses and specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE)-test outcomes were used to identify diagnostic categories and develop corresponding management recommendations. Validity of the AMSS was investigated by comparing specialist (gold standard) and AMSS diagnostic categories. Results The two-page patient-completed AMSS questionnaire consists of 12 (mainly) multiple choice questions on symptoms, triggers, severity and medication. Based on the AMSS questionnaires and sIgE-test outcome of 118 patients, approximately 150 diagnostic categories of allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, anaphylaxis, food allergy, hymenoptera allergy and other allergies were identified, and the corresponding management recommendations were formulated. The agreement between the allergy specialists’ assessments and the AMSS was 69.2% (CI 67.2–71.2). Conclusion Using a systematic approach, it was possible to develop an AMSS that allows for the formulation of diagnostic and management recommendations for GPs managing allergic patients. The AMSS thus holds promise for the improvement of the quality of primary care for this increasing group of patients. PMID:28352197

  17. Differences in nurse and surgeon perceptions of teamwork: implications for use of a briefing checklist in the OR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Brian T; West, Priscilla; Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D; Bagian, James P

    2010-06-01

    The quality of teamwork among health care professionals is known to affect patient outcomes. In the OR, surgeons report more favorable perceptions of communication during procedures and of teamwork effectiveness than do nurses. We undertook a quality improvement project in the Veterans Health Administration to confirm reported teamwork differences between perioperative nurses and surgeons and to examine the implications of these differences for improving practice patterns in the OR. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, which measures safety culture, including the quality of communication and collaboration among health care providers who routinely work together, was administered in 34 hospitals. Perioperative nurses who participated in the survey rated teamwork higher with other nurses than with surgeons, but surgeons rated teamwork high with each other and with nurses. On five of six communication and collaboration items, surgeons had a significantly more favorable perception than did perioperative nurses. To increase the likelihood of success when implementing the use of checklist-based crew resource management tools, such as the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist, project leaders should anticipate differences in perception between members of the different professions that must be overcome if teamwork is to be improved.

  18. Interprofessional non-technical skills for surgeons in disaster response: a qualitative study of the Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Anneliese; Waxman, Buce; Bacon, Andrew K; Smith, Julian; Peller, Jennifer; Kitto, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Interprofessional non-technical skills for surgeons in disaster response have not yet been developed. The aims of this study were to identify the non-technical skills required of surgeons in disaster response and training for disaster response and to explore the barriers and facilitators to interprofessional practice in surgical teams responding to disasters. Twenty health professionals, with prior experience in natural disaster response or education, participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews. A qualitative matrix analysis design was used to thematically analyze the data. Non-technical skills for surgeons in disaster response identified in this study included skills for austere environments, cognitive strategies and interprofessional skills. Skills for austere environments were physical self-care including survival skills, psychological self-care, flexibility, adaptability, innovation and improvisation. Cognitive strategies identified in this study were "big picture" thinking, situational awareness, critical thinking, problem solving and creativity. Interprofessional attributes include communication, team-player, sense of humor, cultural competency and conflict resolution skills. "Interprofessionalism" in disaster teams also emerged as a key factor in this study and incorporated elements of effective teamwork, clear leadership, role adjustment and conflict resolution. The majority of participants held the belief that surgeons needed training in non-technical skills in order to achieve best practice in disaster response. Surgeons considerring becoming involved in disaster management should be trained in these skills, and these skills should be incorporated into disaster preparation courses with an interprofessional focus.

  19. The health-care manager's guide to managing change in challenging times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, D N

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Bill Gates was a college dropout working for a four-member, fledgling company in New Mexico. Today, he is the richest man in America and the head of perhaps the most powerful company in recent corporate history. Ten years ago, managed health care was merely a concept discussed in academic and industry observer circles. Now it is a norm in almost every health-care organization nationally. Five years ago, health-care professionals in every discipline believed the maxim that, ¿as long as people get sick, health-care professionals will have jobs.¿ In 1995, health-care executives have alternately referred to the widescale process of laying off employees as reengineering, rightsizing, downsizing, or RIF (reduction in force). With this massive amount of change, both societally and professionally, health-care managers have been contending with the change management process. Although a breadth of concepts borrowed from other industries and a plethora of conceptual practicums have entered the health-care educational realm, a straightforward, immediately useful approach to managing change is probably more beneficial, as the need to manage change quickly and effectively becomes the paramount criterion for health-care management success in the second half of this decade of change. In this article we will explore the four areas where mistakes are made most frequently by leaders in the change process, and we will provide specific strategies to not only avoid these mistakes but moreover reduce resistance to change, activate positive action, and ultimately improve performance through optimum staff contribution. The four critical areas we will explore are the reasons for resistance to change, the management of the proactive phase of change, creating staff interdependence, and key leadership roles for change management.

  20. The transfer of a health insurance/managed care business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, John N; Goodman, George; Goroff, David B

    2007-01-01

    The owners of a health insurance/managed care business may want to sell that business for a variety of reasons. Health care provider systems may want to exit that business due to operating losses, difficulty in complying with regulations, the inherent conflict in operating that business as part of a provider system, or the desire to focus on being a health care provider. Health insurers/HMOs may want to sell all or a portion of their business due to operating losses, difficulty in servicing a particular market, or a desire to focus on other markets. No matter what reason prompts a seller to undertake a sale, a sale of health insurance/managed care business can be a complicated transaction involving a multitude of issues. This article will focus first on the ways in which such a sale may be structured. The article will then discuss some transactional issues that may arise in the negotiations for the sale of a health insurance/managed care business. The article will then focus on some particular legal issues that arise in each sale-e.g., antitrust, HIPAA, regulatory approvals, and charitable issues. Finally, this article will provide an overview of tax structuring considerations.

  1. Evolving strategies for optimal care management and plan benefit designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, John M

    2012-11-01

    As a prevalent, complex disease, diabetes presents a challenge to managed care. Strategies to optimize type 2 diabetes care management and treatment outcomes have been evolving over the past several years. Novel economic incentive programs (eg, those outlined in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 that tie revenue from Medicare Advantage plans to the quality of healthcare delivered) are being implemented, as are evidence-based interventions designed to optimize treatment, reduce clinical complications, and lower the total financial burden of the disease. Another step that can improve outcomes is to align managed care diabetes treatment algorithms with national treatment guidelines. In addition, designing the pharmacy benefit to emphasize the overall value of treatment and minimize out-of-pocket expenses for patients can be an effective approach to reducing prescription abandonment. The implementation of emerging models of care that encourage collaboration between providers, support lifestyle changes, and engage patients to become partners in their own treatment also appears to be effective.

  2. Update on the critical care management of severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Kevin R; Makley, Amy T; Kagan, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Care of the severely injured patient with burn requires correct diagnosis, appropriately tailored resuscitation, and definitive surgical management to reduce morbidity and mortality. Currently, mortality rates related to severe burn injuries continue to steadily decline due to the standardization of a multidisciplinary approach instituted at tertiary health care centers. Prompt and accurate diagnoses of burn wounds utilizing Lund-Browder diagrams allow for appropriate operative and nonoperative management. Coupled with diagnostic improvements, advances in resuscitation strategies involving rates, volumes, and fluid types have yielded demonstrable benefits related to all aspects of burn care. More recently, identification of comorbid conditions such as inhalation injury and malnutrition have produced appropriate protocols that aid the healing process in severely injured patients with burn. As more patients survive larger burn injuries, the early diagnosis and successful treatment of secondary and tertiary complications are becoming commonplace. While advances in this area are exciting, much work to elucidate immune pathways, diagnostic tests, and effective treatment regimens still remain. This review will provide an update on the critical care management of severe burns, touching on accurate diagnosis, resuscitation, and acute management of this difficult patient population.

  3. Medicaid Managed Care and Individuals with Disabilities: Status Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Richard; Braddock, David

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes information presented in the American Association on Mental Retardation's 1998 publication, "State of the States in Developmental Disabilities" (Braddock, Hemp, Parish, and Westrich), which reports data on the implementation of managed care for persons with developmental disabilities. A table summarizes information about enrollment of…

  4. The knowledge and practice of self-care management among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Self-care management in diabetic patients is crucial to control and ... knowledge and practice among 80 participants attending a diabetes clinic in ... problems 88.7% (n=71); retinopathy 15% (n=12); hypertension 23.7% (n=19) ...

  5. The Nurturing Teacher: Managing the Stress of Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti

    2010-01-01

    This book tackles the concerns of stressed teachers. Whether from nurturance suffering (stress related to caring for students) or from the piles of paperwork yet to be tackled, this text helps the reader sort through the causes of stress, the emotional, physical and social reactions to stress and how one can begin to plan a stress management plan.…

  6. Care-managers' professional choices: ethical dilemmas and conflicting expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønnessen, Siri; Ursin, Gøril; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2017-09-07

    Care-managers are responsible for the public administration of individual healthcare decisions and decide on the volume and content of community healthcare services given to a population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the conflicting expectations and ethical dilemmas these professionals encounter in their daily work with patients and to discuss the clinical implications of this. The study had a qualitative design. The data consisted of verbatim transcripts from 12 ethical reflection group meetings held in 2012 at a purchaser unit in a Norwegian city. The participants consist of healthcare professionals such as nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and social workers. The analyses and interpretation were conducted according to a hermeneutic methodology. This study is part of a larger research project. Two main themes emerged through the analyses: 1. Professional autonomy and loyalty, and related subthemes: loyalty to whom/what, overruling of decisions, trust and obligation to report. 2. Boundaries of involvement and subthemes: private or professional, care-manager or provider and accessibility. Underlying values and a model illustrating the dimensions of professional responsibility in the care-manager role are suggested. The study implies that when allocating services, healthcare professionals need to find a balance between responsibility and accountability in their role as care-managers.

  7. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Bibi, Salma; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-09-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care. Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population-level increases in practice use of CMPs over time. Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Over one-third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one-third of exnovators, while nurse

  8. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  9. Managing information technology human resources in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Sathiadev; Crow, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The health care sector has seen a major increase in the use of information technology (IT). The increasing permeation of IT into the enterprise has resulted in many non-IT employees acquiring IT-related skills and becoming an essential part of the IT-enabled enterprise. Health care IT employees work in a continually changing environment dealing with new specializations that are often unfamiliar to other personnel. The widespread use of outsourcing and offshoring in IT has introduced a third layer of complexity in the traditional hierarchy and its approach to managing human resources. This article studies 3 major issues in managing these human resources in an IT-enabled health care enterprise and recommends solutions to the problem.

  10. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  11. Primary care management of opioid use disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Nader, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To advise physicians on which treatment options to recommend for specific patient populations: abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance, or methadone maintenance. Sources of information PubMed was searched and literature was reviewed on the effectiveness, safety, and side effect profiles of abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, and methadone treatment. Both observational and interventional studies were included. Main message Both methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are substantially more effective than abstinence-based treatment. Methadone has higher treatment retention rates than buprenorphine-naloxone does, while buprenorphine-naloxone has a lower risk of overdose. For all patient groups, physicians should recommend methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone treatment over abstinence-based treatment (level I evidence). Methadone is preferred over buprenorphine-naloxone for patients at higher risk of treatment dropout, such as injection opioid users (level I evidence). Youth and pregnant women who inject opioids should also receive methadone first (level III evidence). If buprenorphine-naloxone is prescribed first, the patient should be promptly switched to methadone if withdrawal symptoms, cravings, or opioid use persist despite an optimal buprenorphine-naloxone dose (level II evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is recommended for socially stable prescription oral opioid users, particularly if their work or family commitments make it difficult for them to attend the pharmacy daily, if they have a medical or psychiatric condition requiring regular primary care (level IV evidence), or if their jobs require higher levels of cognitive functioning or psychomotor performance (level III evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is also recommended for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, such as the elderly, those taking high doses of benzodiazepines or other sedating drugs, heavy drinkers, those with a lower

  12. Diagnosing and managing psychosis in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Kate; Brain, Susannah; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2011-05-01

    Psychosis is broadly defined as the presence of delusions and hallucinations. It can be organic or functional. The former is secondary to an underlying medical condition, such as delirium or dementia, the latter to a psychiatric disorder, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The identification and treatment of psychosis is vital as it is associated with a 10% lifetime risk of suicide and significant social exclusion. Psychosis can be recognised by taking a thorough history, examining the patient's mental state and obtaining a collateral history. The history usually enables a distinction to be made between bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other causes. Early symptoms often include low mood, declining educational or occupational functioning, poor motivation, changes in sleep, perceptual changes, suspiciousness and mistrust. The patient's appearance, e.g. unkempt or inappropriately attired, may reflect their predominant mental state. There may be signs of agitation, hostility or distractibility. Speech may be disorganised and difficult to follow or there may be evidence of decreased speech. Mood may be depressed or elated or change rapidly. Patients may describe abnormal thoughts and enquiry into thoughts of suicide should be routine. Disturbances of thought such as insertion or withdrawal may be present along with perceptual abnormalities i.e. illusions, hallucinations. Insight varies during the course of a psychotic illness but should be explored as it has implications for management. All patients presenting with first episode psychosis for which no organic cause can be found should be referred to the local early intervention service. In patients with a known diagnosis consider referral if there is: poor response or nonadherence to treatment; intolerable side effects; comorbid substance misuse; risk to self or others.

  13. The effect of managed care on hospital marketing orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubeau, P R; Jantzen, R

    1998-01-01

    Marketing is a central activity of modern organizations. To survive and succeed, organizations must know their markets, attract sufficient resources, convert these resources into appropriate services, and communicate them to various consuming publics. In the hospital industry, a marketing orientation is currently recognized as a necessary management function in a highly competitive and resource-constrained environment. Further, the literature supports a marketing orientation as superior to other orientation types, namely production, product and sales. In this article, the results of the first national cross-sectional study of the marketing orientation of U.S. hospitals in a managed care environment are reported. Several key lessons for hospital executives have emerged. First, to varying degrees, U.S. hospitals have adopted a marketing orientation. Second, hospitals that are larger, or that have developed strong affiliations with other providers that involve some level of financial interdependence, have the greatest marketing orientation. Third, as managed care organizations have increased their presence in a state, hospitals have become less marketing oriented. Finally, contrary to prior findings, for-profit institutions are not intrinsically more marketing oriented than their not-for-profit counterparts. This finding is surprising because of the traditional role of marketing in non-health for-profit enterprises and management's greater emphasis on profitability. An area of concern for hospital executives arises from the finding that as managed care pressure increases, hospital marketing orientation decreases. Although a marketing orientation is posited to lead to greater customer satisfaction and improved business results, a managed care environment seems to force hospitals to focus more on cost control than on customer satisfaction. Hospital executives are cautioned that cost-cutting, the primary focus in intense managed care environments, may lead to short

  14. An evaluation of a managed care project from the patients perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, J.J.; Delnoij, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The American concept of managed care has found its way into European health care since the late nineties. The ultimate goal of managed care is to improve the efficiency of health care through promoting the quality of care and controlling the costs. A large Dutch health insurer initiated

  15. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  16. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  17. Care guides: employing nonclinical laypersons to help primary care teams manage chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Richard; Christianson, Jon; Wholey, Douglas R; White, Katie; Town, Robert; Lee, Suhna; Britt, Heather; Lund, Peter; Lukasewycz, Anya; Elumba, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Lay persons ("care guides") without previous clinical experience were hired by a primary care clinic, trained for 2 weeks, and assigned to help 332 patients and their providers manage their diabetes, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. One year later, failure by these patients to meet nationally recommended guidelines was reduced by 28%, P < .001. Improvement was seen in tobacco usage, blood pressure control, pneumonia vaccination, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, annual eye examinations, aspirin use, and microalbuminuria testing. Care guides served an average of 111 patients at an annual per patient cost of $392. Further testing of this model is warranted.

  18. [The importance of multidisciplinary foot-care services in the management of diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Xing-Wu; Zhao, Ji-Chun

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers are leading causes of hospitalization, for patients with diabetes mellitus, and also are the most important causes of amputation of the lower extremity in those patients, which contribute to the increased mortality and cardiovascular death. The incidence of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers shows increasing trend. Diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can be successfully treated only by the multidisciplinary foot-care services which provide more comprehensive and integrated care as compared to ordinary medical team or single specialist. Multidisciplinary foot-care services are provided by the team consist of: diabetologist, diabetes nurse, vascular surgeon, general surgeon, orthopedist, orthopaedic surgeon, podiatrist and orthotist, interventional radiologist and a radiology coordinator, microbiologist, psychologist, educators, shoemaker and rehabilitation team. Contrary to developed countries, multidisciplinary foot-care team has not been constructed in most centres in China. Diabetic education, appropriate foot care, early detection of risk factors of foot ulcers and early intervention are key components in the overall management of diabetic foot disorders and have assumed important roles in programs focused on amputation prevention. Prompt and aggressive treatments of diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers can often prevent an exacerbation of the problem and the potential need for amputation, which include correction of biomechanical abnormalities, infection control, serial debridement of ulcers, peripheral revascularization and wound coverage, etc. It is very important to construct a multidisciplinary diabetic foot care team to more effectively improve the survival and prognosis of patients with diabetic peripheral artery disease and diabetic foot ulcers with comprehensive treatments.

  19. 新医改背景下公立医院整形医师培养探索%Based on the new medical and health care system reform views in China of plastic surgeons training in public hospitals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翔宇; 舒茂国; 刘宗辉

    2016-01-01

    Objective:Under the ‘on deepening the medical and health care system reform views’ issued, ifrst time, it articulated clearly the basic medical and health care system as a public product to national peoples as the basic principles, establish aim of equal basic public health services, public hospitals as the center of the reform, promoting the transformation of government public service function and integration, and public medical and health care must adhere to the public-welfare nature. But plastic surgery is unconventional medicals. How to combine the health reform and the current training system to cultivate excellent plastic surgeon is a problem worthy of exploring.%《关于深化医药卫生体制改革的意见》的新医改文件,首次明确提出把基本医疗卫生制度作为公共产品向全民提供的基本改革原则,确立基本公共卫生服务均等化目标,并以公立医院改革为重心,促进政府服务性职能的进一步转变和整合,改革必须坚持公共医疗卫生的公益性质。但是整形外科非传统意义的医学,如何更好地结合医改政策及目前的培训体制来培养优秀的整形医师是目前值得探讨的问题。

  20. Integrative care for the management of low back pain: use of a clinical care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legendre Claire G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the treatment of chronic back pain, it has been theorized that integrative care plans can lead to better outcomes than those achieved by monodisciplinary care alone, especially when using a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and non-hierarchical team approach. This paper describes the use of a care pathway designed to guide treatment by an integrative group of providers within a randomized controlled trial. Methods A clinical care pathway was used by a multidisciplinary group of providers, which included acupuncturists, chiropractors, cognitive behavioral therapists, exercise therapists, massage therapists and primary care physicians. Treatment recommendations were based on an evidence-informed practice model, and reached by group consensus. Research study participants were empowered to select one of the treatment recommendations proposed by the integrative group. Common principles and benchmarks were established to guide treatment management throughout the study. Results Thirteen providers representing 5 healthcare professions collaborated to provide integrative care to study participants. On average, 3 to 4 treatment plans, each consisting of 2 to 3 modalities, were recommended to study participants. Exercise, massage, and acupuncture were both most commonly recommended by the team and selected by study participants. Changes to care commonly incorporated cognitive behavioral therapy into treatment plans. Conclusion This clinical care pathway was a useful tool for the consistent application of evidence-based care for low back pain in the context of an integrative setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00567333

  1. Treatment of Hip Dislocations and Associated Injuries: Current State of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Michael J; Bauer, Jennifer M; Mir, Hassan R

    2016-07-01

    Hip dislocations, most often caused by motor vehicle accidents or similar high-energy trauma, traverse a large subset of distinct injury patterns. Understanding these patterns and their associated injuries allows surgeons to provide optimal care for these patients both in the early and late postinjury periods. Nonoperative care requires surgeons to understand the indications. Surgical care requires the surgeon to understand the benefits and limitations of several surgical approaches. This article presents the current understanding of hip dislocation treatment, focusing on anatomy, injury classifications, nonoperative and operative management, and postinjury care.

  2. Acute stroke: postprocedural care and management of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Flávio Augusto; de Figueiredo, Marcelo Marinho; Silva, Gisele Sampaio

    2012-03-01

    Endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke is an important alternative to thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) for patients who present beyond the thrombolysis time window, those who are ineligible for rt-PA, or those who do not improve after intravenous rt-PA. These patients generally require special attention in the postprocedural period because, although not frequent, complications of endovascular procedures in acute ischemic stroke have the potential to be devastating. Neurocritical care is essential to reduce and appropriately treat complications after endovascular procedures. Neurointensivists and neurocritical care nurses are experts in both critical care and neurologic disorders and have special training to recognize early physiological derangements in patients presenting with acute stroke. Close attention to the serial neurological examination, blood pressure control, adequate management of glucose, temperature, and immediate identification of complications such as reocclusion and hemorrhagic transformation are key elements that exemplify the importance of postprocedural neurocritical care in acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Implementing an integrated care management program in community pharmacies: A focus on medication management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Megan G; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Brown, Patrick; Wines, Kristen; Shea, Christopher M; Pfeiffenberger, Trista M

    To describe the initiation of a community pharmacy medication management service within a statewide integrated care management program. One hundred twenty-three community and community health center pharmacies in 58 counties of North Carolina. Independent and community health center pharmacies offering medication management as part of an integrated care management program to Medicaid, Medicare, dually eligible Medicare-Medicaid, and NC Health Choice beneficiaries in North Carolina. Community pharmacies joined an enhanced service network created by Community Care of North Carolina to provide medication management services as part of an integrated care management program. During the first 3 months of the program, 41% of pharmacies consistently documented the medication management services. Interviews were conducted with pharmacists from the inconsistent pharmacies to drive program improvements. Pharmacists at 73 community and community health center pharmacies were interviewed. The majority of pharmacists reported that challenges in "initiating services" and "documenting" were due to increased intensity of service and documentation compared with Medicare Part D medication therapy management requirements. Program changes to improve participation included revision of documentation requirements, authorization of technicians to transcribe pharmacists' interventions, additional documentation templates, workflow consultations, and feedback on documentation quality. Community pharmacies are capable of providing medication management integrated with care management. Some pharmacies have more difficulty initiating new services in the current workflow landscape. To facilitate implementation, it is important to minimize administrative burden and provide mechanisms for direct feedback. Pharmacy owners, managers, and leaders in pharmacy policy can use these findings to aid implementation of new services in community pharmacies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association

  4. Managing Organized Insecurity: The Consequences for Care Workers of Deregulated Working Conditions in Elderly Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Ede

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Part-time work is more than twice as common among women than men in Sweden. New ways of organizing working hours to allow for more full-time jobs have been introduced for care workers in elderly care, which means unscheduled working hours based on the needs of the workplace. The aim of the study is to analyze how the organization of the unscheduled working hours affect employees’ daily lives and their possibility to provide care. The Classic Grounded Theory method was used in a secondary analysis of interviews with employees and managers in Swedish municipal elderly care. The implementation of unscheduled working hours plunged employees into a situation of managing organized insecurity. This main concern for the care workers involved a cyclic process of first having to be available for work because of economic and social obligations to the employer and the co-workers, despite sacrifices in the private sphere. Then, they had to be adaptable in relation to unknown clients and co-workers and to the employer, which means reduced possibilities to provide good care. Full-time jobs were thus created through requiring permanent staff to be flexible, which in effect meant eroded working conditions with high demands on employee adaptability. Solving the part-time problem in elderly care by introducing unscheduled working hours may in effect be counter-productive.

  5. A comprehensive approach to quality management of intensive care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Seetharaman; Dey, Prasanta Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive framework for improving intensive care unit performance. The study introduces a quality management framework by combining cause and effect diagram and logical framework. An intensive care unit was identified for the study on the basis of its performance. The reasons for not achieving the desired performance were identified using a cause and effect diagram with the stakeholder involvement. A logical framework was developed using information from the cause and effect diagram and a detailed project plan was developed. The improvement projects were implemented and evaluated. Stakeholders identified various intensive care unit issues. Managerial performance, organizational processes and insufficient staff were considered major issues. A logical framework was developed to plan an improvement project to resolve issues raised by clinicians and patients. Improved infrastructure, state-of-the-art equipment, well maintained facilities, IT-based communication, motivated doctors, nurses and support staff, improved patient care and improved drug availability were considered the main project outputs for improving performance. The proposed framework is currently being used as a continuous quality improvement tool, providing a planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating framework for the quality improvement measures on a sustainable basis. The combined cause and effect diagram and logical framework analysis is a novel and effective approach to improving intensive care performance. Similar approaches could be adopted in any intensive care unit. The paper focuses on a uniform model that can be applied to most intensive care units.

  6. Cold chain management practices of health care workers in primary health care facilities in Southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogboghodo, Esohe Olivia; Omuemu, Vivian Ossaidiom; Odijie, Oisedebame; Odaman, Ofure Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Vaccination has caused a dramatic reduction in the threat of diseases that were once widespread and often times fatal. The efficient practice of cold chain management is therefore key to ensuring that the benefits of vaccination are sustained. The objective of this study is to assess the practice of cold chain management among health workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed in this study. The study population consisted of registered nurses, auxiliary nurses and community health extension workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. The tool for data collection was pre-tested, structured self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate analysis between socio-demographic variables and practice of cold chain management was done. Binary logistic regression was also done to determine significant predictors of practice of cold chain management. The level of significance was set at p cold chain management. Significant determinants of practice of cold chain management were cold chain management training (p = 0.004), presence of functional refrigerators (p = 0.016), NPI supervision (p cold chain management among respondents was fair. All stakeholders should ensure they work collectively towards ensuring that favorable environments which would improve the practice among health workers are put in place. PMID:28761610

  7. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-09-10

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Saiful Ridhwan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of managing medical information has become very critical in the healthcare delivery system. Medical information nowadays are optimized towards serving different areas such as; diagnosing of diseases, planning and administration, treatment and monitoring of patient outcomes, services and costs. This article provides a review into various Health and Social Care systems which encompasses the Knowledge Management value. For analysis, more than 30 systems that are related to Health and Social Care were gathered via Internet research, only 20 of these systems were finally selected based on recent system development and popularity of the system.Keywords: Health Care, Knowledge, Knowledge Management, Social Care, systemdoi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4 How to cite this article:Ridhwan, M.S., and Oyefolahan, I.O. (2013. Knowledge Management System in Health & Social Care: Review on 20 Practiced Knowledge Management. The Asian Journal of Technology Management 6 (2: 92-101. Print ISSN: 1978-6956; Online ISSN: 2089-791X. doi:10.12695/ajtm.2013.6.2.4

  9. A SUSTAINABLE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM REQUIRES MANAGEMENT TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos Dimitros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to be the health care system sustainable , management transformations must be based on very precise diagnostic analysis that includes complete and current information. It is necessary to implement an information system that collects information in real time, that watches the parameters that significantly influence the sustainability of the system. Such an information system should point out a radiography(a scan of the system at some time under following aspects:: 1. An overview of system; 2 An overview of the economic situation; 3 A technical presentation ;4. A legal overview; 5. A social overview ; 6. A management overview .Based on these Xrays of the health system, it outlines a series of conclusions and recommendations together with a SWOT analysis that highlights the potential internal (strengths and weaknesses and external potential (opportunities and threats. Based on this analysis and recommendations, the management is going to redesign the system in order to be adapted to the changing environmental requirements. Management transformation is recommended to be by following steps. :1. The development of a new management system that would make a positive change in the health care system 2. Implementation of the new management system 3. Assessment of the changes

  10. Management of liver cirrhosis between primary care and specialists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignazio Grattagliano; Enzo Ubaldi; Leonilde Bonfrate; Piero Portincasa

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a practical, evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and management of liver cirrhosis by focusing on etiology, severity, presence of complications, and potential home-managed treatments. Relevant literature from 1985 to 2010 (PubMed) was reviewed. The search criteria were peer-reviewed full papers published in English using the following MESH headings alone or in combination: "ascites", "liver fibrosis","cirrhosis", "chronic hepatitis", "chronic liver disease","decompensated cirrhosis", "hepatic encephalopathy","hypertransaminasemia", "liver transplantation" and "portal hypertension". Forty-nine papers were selected based on the highest quality of evidence for each section and type (original, randomized controlled trial, guideline, and review article), with respect to specialist setting (Gastroenterology,Hepatology, and Internal Medicine) and primary care. Liver cirrhosis from any cause represents an emerging health issue due to the increasing prevalence of the disease and its complications worldwide. Primary care physicians play a key role in early identification of risk factors, in the management of patients for improving quality and length of life, and for preventing complications.Specialists, by contrast, should guide specific treatments, especially in the case of complications and for selecting patient candidates for liver transplantation. An integrated approach between specialists and primary care physicians is essential for providing better outcomes and appropriate home care for patients with liver cirrhosis.

  11. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  12. Nurses in abortion care: identifying and managing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Allyson; Fothergill, Anne

    2009-02-01

    The psychological impact of abortion on the women undergoing the procedure is well researched, but little is known about the potential psychological impact on nurses working in abortion care. The proportion of medical abortions in the UK is rising compared to surgical abortions. A recent research study found that being more directly involved in the procedure places more emotional demands on the nurses. This emotional labour required by nurses working in abortion care may increase their stress levels. This paper examines the potential increase in stress in nurses caused by medical abortions. A model of stress comprising stressors, moderators and stress outcomes was used as a framework for this examination. Research on abortion and mental health nursing was applied to managing stress in abortion care; this included coping mechanisms, prevention and intervention strategies. This showed that stress, burnout and coping are important issues in abortion care. On this basis, recommendations for practice have been formulated to inform practice for nurses and managers in abortion care.

  13. Nurse case managers: patient care implications at a Pakistani university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walani, Laila

    The role of the nurse in hospital is varied and some are choosing to incorporate more managerial and administrative skills into their clinical role. One such role is that of the nurse case manager (NCM). This particular role concentrates on involving the family and the patient in his or her own care, facilitation of the care plan, and open discussions between the patient, medics and nursing staff. NCMs in the author's hospital have made a remarkable contribution to patient care. It is a challenging and exceedingly demanding role in both developing and developed countries, but one that is increasingly important. The NCMs are involved in coordination, facilitation of core process and mobilization of resources, not only in hospital but at the patient's home. In this short introductory article the role of NCM is highlighted and the author discusses how this diverse role is concerned with patient care. NCMs work with multidisciplinary teams to enhance the patient's care process. Their attention is also given to cost reduction and clinical pathway management.

  14. A need for managed care in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufti, M H

    2000-04-01

    Is the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia getting value for money invested in health? Quality care is being provided throughout health facilities in the Kingdom, however there is minimal control of utilization in all health sectors, consequently leading to abuse and over utilization, particularly in the public sector. Managed care programs have proven effective in reducing unnecessary inpatient and ancillary service utilization by reducing use of expensive procedures and unnecessary, highly specialized services, and shifting to less expensive care options. Health maintenance organizations are the best example of a managed health care model; tracking good performance and cost savings averaging between 20-40% compared to more traditional health plans. Key features of health maintenance organizations include serving a defined population voluntarily enrolled in the health plan; assumption of contractual responsibility and financial risk by plan to provide a range of services, and payment of a fixed periodic payment by the enrollee, independent of the actual use of services. The key characteristic that distinguishes health maintenance organizations from other delivery systems is prepayment for the care that is provided. Preferred Provider Organizations offer discounts for services received from a selected set of physicians and hospitals. Services received by enrollees are not fully reimbursed from this selected list of providers. Preferred Provider Organizations use health maintenance organizations administrative processes for controlling costs but do not include some of the intrinsic cost and quality controls of health maintenance organizations. Review of several studies indicate that patients enrolled in prepaid group practices (managed care organizations) were hospitalized 15-40% less often than those enrolled in fee-for-service health plans.

  15. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  16. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence.

  17. Obesity, weight management, and health care costs: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Keith H

    2007-06-01

    Rational decision-making regarding health care spending for weight management requires an understanding of the cost of care provided to obese patients and the potential cost-effectiveness or cost savings of interventions. The purpose of this review is to assist health plans and disease management leaders in making informed decisions for weight management services. Among the review's findings, obesity and severe obesity are strongly and consistently associated with increased health care costs. The cost-effectiveness of obesity-related interventions is highly dependent on the risk status of the treated population, as well as the length, cost, and effectiveness of the intervention. Bariatric surgery offers high initial costs and uncertain long-term cost savings. From the perspective of a payor, obesity management services are as cost-effective as other commonly offered health services, though not likely to offer cost savings. Behavioral health promotion interventions in the worksite setting provide cost savings from the employer's perspective, if decreased rates of absenteeism are included in the analysis.

  18. Targeted temperature management in neurocritical care: Boon or bust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bindra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature management in neurocritical care is important and has gained due importance in recent years. Targeted temperature management (TTM includes deliberate reduction of core body temperature to a range of 32–34°C in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest after return of spontaneous circulation and also therapeutic hypothermia (33–35°C in normothermic patients or controlled normothermia (cooling patients to 37°C in hyperthermic patients. This review focuses on the practical aspects of cooling and temperature management in neurocritical care. An electronic search of Google Scholar, MEDLINE (OVID, EMBASE and the Cochrane library was performed. The physiological changes, potential side effects along with significant research and clinical applications in the field of temperature management are main highlights. Currently, the research evidence is available for TTM in adults following cardiac arrest, neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and raised intracranial pressure. Controlled normothermia in neurocritical care population is rapidly gaining popularity. However, data on disease specific therapeutic markers, therapeutic depth and duration and prognostication of this modality are limited. Overall in experienced hands, the technique is safe to execute without the major morbidity and a potential to improve the outcome. Though over the years, clinical applications are unable to consistently demonstrate its benefits, but TTM in neurological insult has become an established and promising concept.

  19. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making.

  20. Management of health care expenditure by soft computing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Goran; Jović, Srđan; Jovanović, Radomir; Aničić, Obrad

    2017-01-01

    In this study was managed the health care expenditure by soft computing methodology. The main goal was to predict the gross domestic product (GDP) according to several factors of health care expenditure. Soft computing methodologies were applied since GDP prediction is very complex task. The performances of the proposed predictors were confirmed with the simulation results. According to the results, support vector regression (SVR) has better prediction accuracy compared to other soft computing methodologies. The soft computing methods benefit from the soft computing capabilities of global optimization in order to avoid local minimum issues.

  1. Expanded managed care liability: what impact on employer coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Sage, W M; Gresenz, C R; Hensler, D R

    1999-01-01

    Policymakers are considering legislative changes that would increase managed care organizations' exposure to civil liability for withholding coverage or failing to deliver needed care. Using a combination of empirical information and theoretical analysis, we assess the likely responses of health plans and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) plan sponsors to an expansion of liability, and we evaluate the policy impact of those moves. We conclude that the direct costs of liability are uncertain but that the prospect of litigation may have other important effects on coverage decision making, information exchange, risk contracting, and the extent of employers' involvement in health coverage.

  2. [Management of onychocryptosis in primary care: A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Aguilar, K; Gutiérrez Pineda, F; Bozalongo de Aragón, E

    2013-09-01

    Onychocryptosis (ingrown toenail) is a condition commonly seen in Primary Care clinics. It is uncomfortable and restrictive for patients and has a high incidence in males between second and third decades of life. It is of unknown origin, with a number of predisposing triggering factors being involved. Treatment depends on the stage of the ingrown nail and the procedures may range from conservative to minor surgery that can be performed by the Primary Care physician in the health centre. We report the case of a 25-year onychocryptosis that did not respond to conservative management, and was extracted with partial matricectomy of the nail.

  3. Intelligently Managed Data: Achieving Excellence In Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2015-01-01

    Much information and clinical data are available in health care. Unfortunately, much of it is not available for clinical decision making and management support. Analytics within the context of health information technology (HIT) will provide a framework to bring better reasoning and intelligence to HIT and nursing care. The missing link is the people who will bring this forward into the everyday lives of clinical nurses and nurse executives. With better competencies among staff and leaders in nursing and more credentialed nursing informatics leaders in influential positions, nursing will be a full participant in the digital revolution which, along with analytics, will lead to intelligent and effective systems.

  4. Using customer input to improve managed care performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairey, M S; Baumruk, R W

    1995-01-01

    How do you get the information you need to manage your company's health care plans effectively? Consider a "customer satisfaction survey" that gathers data from the people who use the plans every day: employees. Make the data work for you when you negotiate costs, communicate key plan features, and look for ways to improve health care quality and upgrade the service you and your employees get from your health plans. American Express and the Chicago Health Plan Value Project (a unique group of 14 companies and 7 health plans) tried this approach, and they now expect a "win-win-win" situation all around.

  5. Total quality management and the Army health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffer, E K

    1991-10-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is the newest in a long line of magic formulas which have been touted as saviors for American industry and medicine. The author discusses the basic concepts of TQM and notes that much of it resembles philosophical beliefs long held by the medical community. TQM does offer many opportunities to refine old concepts and further those goals of quality care to which health care providers have always aspired. If, however, it becomes simply another codified bureaucracy, then a great deal of time and money will be invested for very little gain.

  6. Defense Health Care: Acquisition Process for TRICARE’s Third Generation of Managed Care Support Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Selection Team Roles and Responsibilities for TRICARE’s Contract Award Process 11 Figure 3: Timeline of Bid Protest Events for TRICARE’s North Region...14-195 TRICARE Managed Care Support Contracts Figure 2: Source Selection Team Roles and Responsibilities for TRICARE’s Contract Award Process

  7. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability.

  8. Nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method: support for nursing care management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Johanson da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: construct an explanatory theoretical model about nurses' adherence to the Kangaroo Care Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, based on the meanings and interactions for care management.METHOD: qualitative research, based on the reference framework of the Grounded Theory. Eight nurses were interviewed at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The comparative analysis of the data comprised the phases of open, axial and selective coding. A theoretical conditional-causal model was constructed.RESULTS: four main categories emerged that composed the analytic paradigm: Giving one's best to the Kangaroo Method; Working with the complexity of the Kangaroo Method; Finding (demotivation to apply the Kangaroo Method; and Facing the challenges for the adherence to and application of the Kangaroo Method.CONCLUSIONS: the central phenomenon revealed that each nurse and team professional has a role of multiplying values and practices that may or may not be constructive, potentially influencing the (discontinuity of the Kangaroo Method at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The findings can be used to outline management strategies that go beyond the courses and training and guarantee the strengthening of the care model.

  9. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family.

  10. Difficult airway management from Emergency Department till Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Debasis; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of "can ventilate but can't intubate" situation which was successfully managed in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit by the use of ProSeal laryngeal mask airway and Frova Intubating Introducer as bridging rescue devices. Use of appropriate technique while strictly following the difficult airway algorithm is the mainstay of airway management in unanticipated difficult airway situations. Although the multiple airway devices were used but each step took not more than 2 min and "don't struggle, skip to the next step principle" was followed. With the availability of many advanced airway management tools, the intensivists should have a training and experience along with preparedness in order to perform such lifesaving airway managements.

  11. Challenges encountered by critical care unit managers in the large intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgadi C. Matlakala

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in intensive care units (ICUs are exposed regularly to huge demands interms of fulfilling the many roles that are placed upon them. Unit managers, in particular, are responsible for the efficient management of the units and have the responsibilities of planning, organising, leading and controlling the daily activities in order to facilitate the achievement of the unit objectives.Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore and present the challenges encountered by ICU managers in the management of large ICUs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted at five hospital ICUs in Gauteng province, South Africa. Data were collected through individual interviews from purposively-selected critical care unit managers, then analysed using the matic coding.Results: Five themes emerged from the data: challenges related to the layout and structure of the unit, human resources provision and staffing, provision of material resources, stressors in the unit and visitors in the ICU.Conclusion: Unit managers in large ICUs face multifaceted challenges which include the demand for efficient and sufficient specialised nurses; lack of or inadequate equipment that goes along with technology in ICU and supplies; and stressors in the ICU that limit the efficiency to plan, organise, lead and control the daily activities in the unit. The challenges identified call for multiple strategies to assist in the efficient management of large ICUs.

  12. A population-based study of ambulatory and surgical services provided by orthopaedic surgeons for musculoskeletal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Aileen M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ongoing process of population aging is associated with an increase in prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions with a concomitant increase in the demand of orthopaedic services. Shortages of orthopaedic services have been documented in Canada and elsewhere. This population-based study describes the number of patients seen by orthopaedic surgeons in office and hospital settings to set the scene for the development of strategies that could maximize the availability of orthopaedic resources. Methods Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and Canadian Institute for Health Information hospital separation databases for the 2005/06 fiscal year were used to identify individuals accessing orthopaedic services in Ontario, Canada. The number of patients with encounters with orthopaedic surgeons, the number of encounters and the number of surgeries carried out by orthopaedic surgeons were estimated according to condition groups, service location, patient's age and sex. Results In 2005/06, over 520,000 Ontarians (41 per 1,000 population had over 1.3 million encounters with orthopaedic surgeons. Of those 86% were ambulatory encounters and 14% were in hospital encounters. The majority of ambulatory encounters were for an injury or related condition (44% followed by arthritis and related conditions (37%. Osteoarthritis accounted for 16% of all ambulatory encounters. Orthopaedic surgeons carried out over 140,000 surgeries in 2005/06: joint replacement accounted for 25% of all orthopaedic surgeries, whereas closed repair accounted for 16% and reductions accounted for 21%. Half of the orthopaedic surgeries were for arthritis and related conditions. Conclusion The large volume of ambulatory care points to the significant contribution of orthopaedic surgeons to the medical management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and injuries. The findings highlight that surgery is only one component of the work

  13. An internist's role in perioperative medicine: a survey of surgeons' opinions

    Science.gov (United States)

    PausJenssen, Lisa; Ward, Heather A; Card, Sharon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Literature exists regarding the perioperative role of internists. Internists rely on this literature assuming it meets the needs of surgeons without actually knowing their perspective. We sought to understand why surgeons ask for preoperative consultations and their view on the internist's role in perioperative medicine. Methods Survey of surgeons in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada regarding an internist's potential role in perioperative care. Results Fifty-nine percent responded. The majority request a preoperative consultation for a difficult case (83%) or specific problem (81%). While almost half feel that a preoperative consultation is to "clear" a patient for surgery, 33% disagree with this statement. The majority believe the internist should discuss risk with the patient. Aspects of the preoperative consultation deemed most important are cardiac medication optimization (93%), cardiac risk stratification (83%), addition of β-blockers (76%), and diabetes management (74%). Conclusion Surgeons perceive the most important roles for the internist as cardiac risk stratification and medication management. Areas of controversy identified amongst the surgeons included who should inform the patient of their operative risk, and whether the internist should follow the patient daily postoperatively. Unclear expectations have the potential to impact on patient safety and informed consent unless acknowledged and acted on by all. We recommend that internists performing perioperative consults communicate directly with the consulting physician to ensure that all parties are in accordance as to each others duties. We also recommend that the teaching of perioperative consults emphasizes the interdisciplinary communication needed to ensure that patient needs are not neglected when one specialty assumes the other will perform a function. PMID:18208614

  14. Operations research in intensive care unit management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jie; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2016-08-12

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a crucial and expensive resource largely affected by uncertainty and variability. Insufficient ICU capacity causes many negative effects not only in the ICU itself, but also in other connected departments along the patient care path. Operations research/management science (OR/MS) plays an important role in identifying ways to manage ICU capacities efficiently and in ensuring desired levels of service quality. As a consequence, numerous papers on the topic exist. The goal of this paper is to provide the first structured literature review on how OR/MS may support ICU management. We start our review by illustrating the important role the ICU plays in the hospital patient flow. Then we focus on the ICU management problem (single department management problem) and classify the literature from multiple angles, including decision horizons, problem settings, and modeling and solution techniques. Based on the classification logic, research gaps and opportunities are highlighted, e.g., combining bed capacity planning and personnel scheduling, modeling uncertainty with non-homogenous distribution functions, and exploring more efficient solution approaches.

  15. Surgeons' motivation for choice of workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Lena; Kristiansen, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2012-09-01

    To ensure qualified health care professionals at public hospitals in the future, it is important to understand which factors attract health care professionals to certain positions. The aim of this study was to explore motives for choosing employment at either public or private hospitals in a group of Danish surgeons, as well as to examine if organizational characteristics had an effect on motivation. Eight qualitative interviews were conducted with surgeons from both public and private hospitals sampled using the snowball method. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by means of phenomenological theory. Motivational factors such as personal influence on the job, the opportunity to provide the best possible patient care, challenging work tasks colleagues, and ideological reasons were emphasized by the surgeons as important reasons for their choice of employment. Motivational factors appeared to be strongly connected to the structure of the organization; especially the size of the organization was perceived to be essential. It is worth noting that salary, in contrast to the general belief, was considered a secondary benefit rather than a primary motivational factor for employment. The study revealed that motivational factors are multidimensional and rooted in organizational structure; i.e. organizational size rather than whether the organization is public or private is crucial. There is a need for further research on the topic, but it seems clear that future health care planning may benefit from taking into account the implications that large organizational structures have for the staff working within these organizations. not relevant. not relevant.

  16. [Case management. The nursing business of care or cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, B K; Duquette, A; Kérouac, S; Rouillier, L

    1992-01-01

    Less money spent on health services, cost-effectiveness, better productivity and more efficiency are some of the driving forces of contemporary "neo-liberalism" and political trends. How can nursing services and the profession's human values adapt in this difficult context? The authors describe the newest modality of patient care delivery system: nursing case management. They examine the factors and assumptions that led up to its development and point out the validity of asking some serious questions before embarking on the euphoria of case management.

  17. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient.

  18. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center.

  19. Pathologists' roles in clinical utilization management. A financing model for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J J; Liberman, A

    2000-03-01

    In ancillary or laboratory utilization management, the roles of pathologists have not been explored fully in managed care systems. Two possible reasons may account for this: pathologists' potential contributions have not been defined clearly, and effective measurement of and reasonable compensation for the pathologist's contribution remains vague. The responsibilities of pathologists in clinical practice may include clinical pathology and laboratory services (which have long been well-defined and are compensated according to a resource-based relative value system-based coding system), laboratory administration, clinical utilization management, and clinical research. Although laboratory administration services have been compensated with mechanisms such as percentage of total service revenue or fixed salary, the involvement of pathologists seems less today than in the past, owing to increased clinical workload and time constraints in an expanding managed care environment, especially in community hospital settings. The lack of financial incentives or appropriate compensation mechanisms for the services likely accounts for the current situation. Furthermore, the importance of pathologist-driven utilization management in laboratory services lacks recognition among hospital administrators, managed care executives, and pathologists themselves, despite its potential benefits for reducing cost and enhancing quality of care. We propose a financial compensation model for such services and summarize its advantages.

  20. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty: perspectives on nursing care and collaborative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, M W

    1995-01-01

    Historically, heart transplantation has served as the definitive treatment of choice for patients with end-stage heart failure. Unfortunately, heart transplantation is not available to all patients because of the scarcity of donor allografts and strict patient selection criteria. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is an experimental alternative to heart transplantation for the treatment of severe congestive heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. The procedure involves the use of an autologous latissimus dorsi muscle graft that is wrapped around the ventricles by pericardial attachment. The muscle graft is then stimulated by specialized synchronous train impulses from a cardiomyostimulator; the resultant muscle graft contractions provide support for ventricular function. This article describes collaborative, preoperative, immediate postoperative, and long-term management of patients receiving dynamic cardiomyoplasty. As members of the health care team, nurses are in a unique position to develop care standards and facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration for the care of this complex patient population.

  1. [Management and organization of ambulatory medical care in a district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Keune, H G; Miethe, D; Ringel, M; Szkibik, B

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is given of the management and organization of out-patient medical care in 15 districts and of the District Physician's responsibilities as well as the profile of a District Health Department. Compared to the situation of a decade ago, substantial changes in the territorial health organization have occurred (decentralization, formation of care areas, affiliation of small health facilities to bigger ones). The District Physician's scope of responsibility is increasingly determined by activities within the framework of the District Council, the proportion of organizational work has increased. In order to be able to fulfill his tasks the District Physician needs the support of a special Health Department. Skeleton regulations for out-patient medical care are necessary.

  2. Do-it-yourself managed care. Case study I: Randall's Medical Network. Case study II: Hershey's Managed Care Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Employers, who pay for much of the healthcare in this country, are not waiting for government to restructure the healthcare system. In this cover story, PROFILES examines how two firms formed their own managed care networks to control healthcare cost and quality, and what hospitals did to become players. By understanding the employer' point of view, hospital marketers can better anticipate their needs and develop a marketing strategy to form closer relationships with employers, provide quality care at a lower cost, and increase their market share.

  3. Patterns of care in the management of seminoma stage I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vossen, Carla Y; Horwich, Alan; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    -orchidectomy strategies in seminoma stage I patients has led to debates about whether the three strategies are equally effective and safe. The differences in interpretation of the data as well as the debates are likely to result in differences in treatment after orchidectomy in seminoma stage I patient management...... and countries that indicate the need for research into long-term relapse rates and long-term adverse effects to standardize and optimize care for seminoma stage I patients....

  4. New Public Management, Care and Struggles about Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2009-01-01

    New Public Management (NPM) is usually perceived as a homogeneous discourse. However, when we examine it by looking at micro-politics in municipalities and understand its consequences drawing on the voices of home helpers, the picture is more complex and ambiguous. NPM is seen as disciplining paid...... of resistance. The analysis applies feminist theories of recognition and care, and its findings are based on focus group interviews and feminist discourse analysis...

  5. Surgical complications and their implications for surgeons' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A; Faiz, O; Bicknell, C; Vincent, C

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare professionals can be seriously affected when they are involved in major clinical incidents. The impact of such incidents on staff is of particular relevance to surgery, as the operating room is one of the highest-risk areas for serious complications. This qualitative study aimed to assess the personal and professional impact of surgical complications on surgeons. This single time point study involved semistructured, individual interviews with general and vascular surgeons, consultants and senior registrars from two National Health Service organizations in London, UK. Twenty-seven surgeons participated. Many were seriously affected by major surgical complications. Surgeons' practice was also often affected, not always in the best interest of their patients. The surgeons' reactions depended on the preventability of the complications, their personality and experience, patient outcomes and patients' reactions, as well as colleagues' reactions and the culture of the institution. Discussing complications, deconstructing the incidents and rationalizing were the most commonly quoted coping mechanisms. Institutional support was generally described as inadequate, and the participants often reported the existence of strong institutional blame cultures. Suggestions for supporting surgeons in managing the personal impact of complications included better mentoring, teamwork approaches, blame-free opportunities for the discussion of complications, and structures aimed at the human aspects of complications. Those involved in the management of surgical services need to consider how to improve support for surgeons in the aftermath of major surgical incidents. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    of patients' increasing role in health care decision-making and provider selection, understanding the factors that influence patients' selection of a spine surgeon is important. 3.

  7. Primary care diabetes bundle management: 3-year outcomes for microvascular and macrovascular events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bloom, Jr, Frederick J; Yan, Xiaowei; Stewart, Walter F; Graf, Thomas R; Anderer, Tammy; Davis, Duane E; Pierdon, Stevem B; Pitcavage, James; Steele, Jr, Glenn D

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether a system of care with an all-or-none bundled measure for primary-care management of diabetes mellitus reduced the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications compared with usual care...

  8. [Evaluation of Nurse Demand Management in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugués Brugués, Alba; Peris Grao, Antoni; Pavón Rodríguez, Francisca; Mateo Viladomat, Enric; Gascón Ferret, Jordi; Flores Mateo, Gemma

    2016-03-01

    to evaluate the health outcomes of nurse demand management on unscheduled patients in a Primary Care Centre, following a clinical guide designed by the whole primary care team. Cross-sectional study. A primary care team from Castelldefels. Barcelona, Spain. A random sample of 558 patients requesting a consultation for the same day in a Primary Care setting, attended between May 1st, 2011 and January 31st, 2012. The guide includes 23 health problems that can be dealt by a nurse autonomously, 18 of them possibly requiring an emergency intervention, and shared decision with the physician. Each health problem is divided into three sections: a) a brief definition of the problem; b) an intervention algorithm; and c) nursing diagnoses of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for each health problem and a description of the possible nursing interventions. We studied 558 patients with a mean age of 42.5 years old (SD 17.7). The most commonly consulted problems were upper respiratory tract symptoms (19.4%), followed by nausea/vomiting (16.5%), and burns/wounds (12.5%). 73.3% of the problems were resolved autonomously by a nurse. 65,8% of the patients attended received health advice. Nurse demand management has shown to be highly effective at handling the conditions attended, while it provides a high percentage of health advice and education during consultations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Como o especialista em ortopedia e traumatologia avalia o atendimento ao trauma ortopédico no Brasil How do orthopedic surgeons rate the orthopedic trauma care in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Santos Silva

    2011-01-01

    Society database containing more than 7000 records. A structured query has been applied and the interview lasted around 25 minutes. RESULTS: 97% of interviewees dedicate part of his/her time to orthopedic trauma. 87% of all interviewees dedicate his/her time to more than one sub-specialty. The majority of orthopedic trauma patients comes from government insurance system (43%, while 41% of patients come from private insurance. 61% of all interviewees think that the quality of public health system could be rated as unsatisfactory. Northeast of Brazil is the place where the majority of patients are from public health system and where we have highest rates of dissatisfaction (85% related to available infrastructure for orthopedic trauma care. Half of all interviewed individuals have problems for getting private insurance authorization previously to a surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Orthopedic trauma is a specialty practiced by the vast majority of orthopedic surgeons in our country. Neither the infrastructure nor the salaries satisfy the majority or orthopedic surgeons dedicated to trauma care.

  10. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  11. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  12. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  14. Issues in Business and Medical Education: Brief Literature Review on Strategic Management of Health Care Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D.

    The literature on the use of strategic management principles by health care organizations is reviewed. After considering basic concepts of strategic management and managerial problems in nonprofit organizations, strategic planning and management of health care organizations are covered. Attention is directed to the health care environment,…

  15. Minnesota's fifteen-year romance. Managed care: lessons learned and survival approaches for hospitals and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, R L; Coombes, D H

    1990-01-01

    For the last 15 years, Minnesota has lived with managed care. The Minnesota story is important because it is a singularly unique example of the natural history of managed care in the United States, from the indemnity response to HMOs to PPOs to "open-ended" HMOs to comprehensive managed care.

  16. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early…

  17. Managing the physics of the economics of integrated health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zismer, Daniel K; Werner, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    The physics metaphor, as applied to the economics (and financial performance) of the integrated health system, seems appropriate when considered together with the nine principles of management framework provided. The nature of the integrated design enhances leaders' management potential as they consider organizational operations and strategy in the markets ahead. One question begged by this argument for the integrated design is the durability, efficiency and ultimate long-term survivability of the more "traditional" community health care delivery models, which, by design, are fragmented, internally competitive and less capital efficient. They also cannot exploit the leverage of teams, optimal access management or the pursuit of revenues made available in many forms. For those who wish to move from the traditional to the more integrated community health system designs (especially those who have not yet started the journey), the path requires: * Sufficient balance sheet capacity to fund the integration process-especially as the model requires physician practice acquisitions and electronic health record implementations * A well-prepared board13, 14 * A functional, durable and sustainable physician services enterprise design * A redesigned organizational and governance structure * Favorable internal financial incentives alignment design * Effective accountable physician leadership * Awareness that the system is not solely a funding strategy for acquired physicians, rather a fully -.. committed clinical and business model, one in which patient-centered integrated care is the core service (and not acute care hospital-based services) A willingness to create and exploit the implied and inherent potential of an integrated design and unified brand Last, it's important to remember that an integrated health system is a tool that creates a "new potential" (a physics metaphor reference, one last time). The design doesn't operate itself. Application of the management principles

  18. Risk Management for Point-of-Care Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is growing in popularity, and with this growth comes an increased chance of errors. Risk management is a way to reduce errors. Originally developed for the manufacturing industry, risk management principles have application for improving the quality of test results in the clinical laboratory. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), EP23-A Laboratory Quality Control based on Risk Management guideline, introduces risk management to the clinical laboratory and describes how to build and implement a quality control plan for a laboratory test. A simple, unit-use blood gas analyzer is utilized as an example for developing a laboratory quality control plan. The US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has revised the Clinical and Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) interpretive guidelines to provide a new quality control option, individualized quality control plans (IQCP), for decreasing the frequency of analyzing liquid controls from two levels each day of testing to manufacturer recommended frequencies in conjunction with a device’s built-in internal control processes and the risk of error when testing with that device. IQCPs have the advantage of allowing laboratories the flexibility to adopt alternative control processes in concert with traditional liquid controls to improve efficiency and cost effectiveness while providing optimal quality POCT results for patient care. PMID:27683462

  19. The effect of multidisciplinary team care on cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Ganiy Opeyemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the multidisciplinary team management of many medical conditions especially cancers has increasingly taken a prominent role in patient management in many hospitals and medical centres in the developed countries. In the United Kingdom, it began to gain prominence following the Calman-Heine report in 1995 which suggested that each Cancer Unit in a hospital should have in place arrangements for non-surgical oncological input into services, with a role for a non-surgical oncologist. The report further suggested that a lead clinician with a well established interest in cancer care should be appointed to organise and coordinate the whole range of cancer services provided within the Cancer Unit. Many people have argued that the multidisciplinary team management of patients has resulted in better care and improved survival. However, there are barriers to the optimal effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team. This paper aims to review various studies on the effectiveness of the multidisciplinary team in the management of cancer patients and also discuss some of the barriers to the multidisciplinary team.

  20. An innovative national health care waste management system in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toktobaev, Nurjan; Emmanuel, Jorge; Djumalieva, Gulmira; Kravtsov, Alexei; Schüth, Tobias

    2015-02-01

    A novel low-cost health care waste management system was implemented in all rural hospitals in Kyrgyzstan. The components of the Kyrgyz model include mechanical needle removers, segregation using autoclavable containers, safe transport and storage, autoclave treatment, documentation, recycling of sterilized plastic and metal parts, cement pits for anatomical waste, composting of garden wastes, training, equipment maintenance, and management by safety and quality committees. The gravity-displacement autoclaves were fitted with filters to remove pathogens from the air exhaust. Operating parameters for the autoclaves were determined by thermal and biological tests. A hospital survey showed an average 33% annual cost savings compared to previous costs for waste management. All general hospitals with >25 beds except in the capital Bishkek use the new system, corresponding to 67.3% of all hospital beds. The investment amounted to US$0.61 per capita covered. Acceptance of the new system by the staff, cost savings, revenues from recycled materials, documented improvements in occupational safety, capacity building, and institutionalization enhance the sustainability of the Kyrgyz health care waste management system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Managing managed care: habitus, hysteresis and the end(s) of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, S R; Lachicotte, W S

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we examine how clinicians at a community mental health center are responding to the beginnings of changes in the health care delivery system, changes that are designated under the rubric of "managed care." We describe how clinicians' attitudes about good mental health care are embodied in what sociologist Pierre Bourdieu calls their habitus, i.e., their professional habits and sense of good practice. Viewed in this light, their moral outrage and sense of threat, as well as their strategic attempts to resist or subvert the dictates of managed care agencies, become a function of what Bourdieu terms the hysteresis effect. The paper is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted by a team of researchers at the mental health and substance abuse service of a hospital-affiliated, storefront clinic which serves residents of several neighborhoods in a large northeastern city. Data consist primarily of observations of meetings and interviews with staff members. We describe four aspects of the clinicians' professional habitus: a focus on cases as narratives of character and relationship, an imperative of authenticity, a distinctive orientation towards time, and an ethic of ambiguity. We then chronicle practices that have emerged in response to the limits on care imposed by managed care protocols, which are experienced by clinicians as violating the integrity of their work. These are discussed in relation to the concept of hysteresis.

  2. Home-based Self-care: Understanding and Designing Pervasive Technology to Support Care Management Work at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo

    practices are investigated to (a) further understand the self-care management work in nonclinical settings, and (b) inform future design of pervasive healthcare technology that accounts for people’s perspectives on self-care and everyday life. First, we explore two selfcare practices of medication...... management and preventive self-monitoring to further study people’s perspectives on self-care both for health and illness. Second, we combine our initial studies with three additional studies of self-care practices: self-monitoring of pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and heart patients as well as home...... the self-care management work at home. People need to know which care activities to perform, when to perform them, how to proceed and why these are important. While at home, an active lifestyle and comorbidity not only challenge self-care activities but also the use of self-care technologies in non...

  3. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation.

  4. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  5. Choices: anger and anger management in rehabilitative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Pierce, Scott W; Gies, Cheryl E

    2013-01-01

    Violent acts are on rise and rehabilitation providers as caregivers may encounter anger on a daily basis. The purpose of this article is to discuss anger and describe anger management strategies based on behavioral interventions grounded in Choice Theory. Applying choice theory to anger is the belief that people are internally, not externally motivated, and that outside events do not make people do anything. Thus, what drives people's anger behaviors are internally developed notions of what is important and satisfying for them. Anger becomes a choice along with its management. Choosing strategies to manage anger are key to reducing the potential for angry emotions to escalate to the point of aggressive and violent acts that threaten caregivers and clients safety. Anger-free environments promote mental/physical health and establish elements of safe living and working environments in a variety of rehabilitative care settings. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    of experience. Two hundred forty-two (34%) members completed the survey. We found no differences between responders and nonresponders. Each survey item measured its own trait better than any of the other traits. Recognition of uncertainty (0.70) and confidence bias (0.75) had relatively high Cronbach alpha levels, meaning that the questions making up these traits are closely related and probably measure the same construct. This was lower for statistical understanding (0.48) and trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (0.37). Subsequently, combining each trait's individual questions, we calculated a 0 to 10 score for each trait. The mean recognition of uncertainty score was 3.2 ± 1.4. Recognition of uncertainty in daily practice did not vary by years in practice (0-5 years, 3.2 ± 1.3; 6-10 years, 2.9 ± 1.3; 11-20 years, 3.2 ± 1.4; 21-30 years, 3.3 ± 1.6 years; p = 0.51), but overconfidence bias did correlate with years in practice (0-5 years, 6.2 ± 1.4; 6-10 years, 7.1 ± 1.3; 11-20 years, 7.4 ± 1.4; 21-30 years, 7.1 ± 1.2 years; p coefficient, -0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.0 to -0.055; partial R(2), 0.021; p = 0.029), belief in God or any other deity/deities (β, -0.57; 95% CI, -1.0 to -0.11; partial R(2), 0.026; p = 0.015), greater confidence bias (β, -0.26; 95% CI, -0.37 to -0.14; partial R(2), 0.084; p definitive evidence. If patients want to be informed of the areas of uncertainty and surgeon-to-surgeon variation relevant to their care, it seems possible that a low recognition of uncertainty and surgeon confidence bias might hinder adequately informing patients, informed decisions, and consent. Moreover, limited recognition of uncertainty is associated with modifiable factors such as confidence bias, trust in orthopaedic evidence base, and statistical understanding. Perhaps improved statistical teaching in residency, journal clubs to improve the critique of evidence and awareness of bias, and acknowledgment of knowledge gaps at courses and

  7. Infectious disease management in primary care: perceptions of GPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röing Marta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to keep the level of antibiotic prescribing low to contain the development of resistant bacteria. This study was conducted to reveal new knowledge about how GPs think in relation to the prescribing of antibiotics - knowledge that could be used in efforts toward rational treatment of infectious diseases in primary care. The aim was to explore and describe the variations in GPs' perceptions of infectious disease management, with special reference to antibiotic prescribing. Methods Twenty GPs working at primary care centres in a county in south-west Sweden were purposively selected based on the strategy of including GPs with different kinds of experience. The GPs were interviewed and perceptions among GPs were analysed by a phenomenographic approach. Results Five qualitatively different perceptions of infectious disease management were identified. They were: (A the GP must help the patient to achieve health and well-being; (B the management must meet the GP's perceived personal, professional and organisational demands; (C restrictive antibiotic prescribing is time-consuming; (D restrictive antibiotic prescribing can protect the effectiveness of antibiotics; and (E patients benefit personally from restrictive antibiotic prescribing. Conclusions Restrictive antibiotic prescribing was considered important in two perceptions, was not an issue as such in two others, and was considered in one perception although the actual prescribing was greatly influenced by the interaction between patient and GP. Accordingly, to encourage restrictive antibiotic prescribing several aspects must be addressed. Furthermore, different GPs need various kinds of support. Infectious disease management in primary care is complex and time-consuming, which must be acknowledged in healthcare organisation and planning.

  8. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  9. Improving surgeon utilization in an orthopedic department using simulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simwita YW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusta W Simwita, Berit I Helgheim Department of Logistics, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Purpose: Worldwide more than two billion people lack appropriate access to surgical services due to mismatch between existing human resource and patient demands. Improving utilization of existing workforce capacity can reduce the existing gap between surgical demand and available workforce capacity. In this paper, the authors use discrete event simulation to explore the care process at an orthopedic department. Our main focus is improving utilization of surgeons while minimizing patient wait time.Methods: The authors collaborated with orthopedic department personnel to map the current operations of orthopedic care process in order to identify factors that influence poor surgeons utilization and high patient waiting time. The authors used an observational approach to collect data. The developed model was validated by comparing the simulation output with the actual patient data that were collected from the studied orthopedic care process. The authors developed a proposal scenario to show how to improve surgeon utilization.Results: The simulation results showed that if ancillary services could be performed before the start of clinic examination services, the orthopedic care process could be highly improved. That is, improved surgeon utilization and reduced patient waiting time. Simulation results demonstrate that with improved surgeon utilizations, up to 55% increase of future demand can be accommodated without patients reaching current waiting time at this clinic, thus, improving patient access to health care services.Conclusion: This study shows how simulation modeling can be used to improve health care processes. This study was limited to a single care process; however the findings can be applied to improve other orthopedic care process with similar operational characteristics. Keywords: waiting time, patient, health care process

  10. A Methodological Critique of the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Pronovost, Peter J; Shahian, David M; Safran, Dana Gelb; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Elliott, Marc N; Damberg, Cheryl L; Dimick, Justin B; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2016-05-09

    On July 14, 2015, ProPublica published its Surgeon Scorecard, which displays "Adjusted Complication Rates" for individual, named surgeons for eight surgical procedures performed in hospitals. Public reports of provider performance have the potential to improve the quality of health care that patients receive. A valid performance report can drive quality improvement and usefully inform patients' choices of providers. However, performance reports with poor validity and reliability are potentially damaging to all involved. This article critiques the methods underlying the Scorecard and identifies opportunities for improvement. Until these opportunities are addressed, the authors advise users of the Scorecard-most notably, patients who might be choosing their surgeons-not to consider the Scorecard a valid or reliable predictor of the health outcomes any individual surgeon is likely to provide. The authors hope that this methodological critique will contribute to the development of more-valid and more-reliable performance reports in the future.

  11. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  12. Forging community partnerships to improve health care: the experience of four Medicaid managed care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Rodin, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Some managed care organizations (MCOs) serving Medicaid beneficiaries are actively engaging in community partnerships to meet the needs of vulnerable members and nonmembers. We found that the history, leadership, and other internal factors of four such MCOs primarily drive that focus. However, external factors such as state Medicaid policies and competition or collaboration among MCOs also play a role. The specific strat­egies of these MCOs vary but share common goals: (1) improve care coordination, access, and delivery; (2) strengthen the community and safety-net infrastructure; and (3) prevent illness and reduce disparities. The MCOs use data to identify gaps in care, seek community input in designing interventions, and commit resources to engage community organiza­tions. State Medicaid programs can promote such work by establishing goals, priorities, and guidelines; providing data analysis and technical assistance to evaluate local needs and community engagement efforts; and convening stakeholders to collaborate and share best practices.

  13. Managing evidence-based health care: a diagnostic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, K; Pyne, T; Cowling, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness, and is based on a recent study incorporating clinicians, managers, and professional staff in four NHS Trusts in the North Thames Region. The gap framework is inspired by the gap model developed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman and Berry from their research into service quality and incorporates Dave Sackett's schema as well as a personal competency profile needed for the practice of evidence based health-care (EBHC). The paper highlights the four organisational and personal failures (gaps) which contribute to the fifth gap, namely the discrepancy between clinically relevant research evidence and its implementation in health care. To close the gaps, Trusts need to set the goal and tackle the cultural, organisational, attitudinal and more material aspects such as investment in the information infrastructure, education and training of doctors. Doctors need to go through a process from awareness to action facilitated through a combination of personal and organisational incentives and rewards as well as training in the requisite skills. Researchers should take steps to improve the quality of the evidence and its accessibility and purchasers should reinforce the use of EBHC by withdrawing funding for care which has proved to be ineffective, inappropriate or inferior.

  14. Managed care in workers' compensation: analysis of cost drivers and vendor selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiker, B

    1995-08-01

    1. Managed care for employee benefits provides a model of cost containment for workers' compensation; however, significant differences must be understood. 2. Purchasers of managed care services must perform an internal assessment to determine the cost drivers for workers' compensation. Managed care does not address all cost drivers. 3. A model for evaluating managed care vendors places them on a continuum of risk, similar to insurance risk, where a variety of cost containment strategies may be used together. 4. By reviewing seven key aspects of a managed care vendor, a purchaser can rate the vendor's ability to meet their needs.

  15. Technical elements, demonstration projects, and fiscal models in Medicaid managed care for people with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, T A; Walsh, K K; Criscione, T

    1997-08-01

    We presented a general model of the structure and functioning of managed care and described elements (provider networks, fiscal elements, risk estimation, case-mix, management information systems, practice parameters, and quality improvement) critical to service delivery for people with developmental disabilities. A number of technical elements of managed care systems were delineated and reviewed in relation to the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities. Several managed care demonstration projects were described and, finally, a multi-year hypothetical budget model, including long-term care, was presented as a framework for considering how managed care affects specific service structures. Implications for people with developmental disabilities were discussed.

  16. Integrated obesity care management system -implementation and research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Cyr-Tribble Denise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nearly 50% of Canadians are overweight and their number is increasing rapidly. The majority of obese subjects are treated by primary care physicians (PCPs who often feel uncomfortable with the management of obesity. The current research proposal is aimed at the development and implementation of an innovative, integrated, interdisciplinary obesity care management system involving both primary and secondary care professionals. Methods We will use both action and evaluative research in order to achieve the following specific objectives. The first one is to develop and implement a preceptorship-based continuing medical education (CME program complemented by a web site for physicians and nurses working in Family Medicine Groups (FMGs. This CME will be based on needs assessment and will be validated by one FMG using questionnaires and semi structured interviews. Also, references and teaching tools will be available for participants on the web site. Our second objective is to establish a collaborative intra and inter-regional interdisciplinary network to enable on-going expertise update and networking for FMG teams. This tool consists of a discussion forum and monthly virtual meetings of all participants. Our third objective is to evaluate the implementation of our program for its ability to train 8 FMGs per year, the access and utilization of electronic tools and the participants' satisfaction. This will be measured with questionnaires, web logging tools and group interviews. Our fourth objective is to determine the impact for the participants regarding knowledge and expertise, attitudes and perceptions, self-efficacy for the management of obesity, and changes in FMG organization for obesity management. Questionnaires and interviews will be used for this purpose. Our fifth objective is to deliver transferable knowledge for health professionals and decision-makers. Strategies and pitfalls of setting up this program will also be

  17. MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION IN HEALTH CARE AT THE REGIONAL LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. G. Totskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews topical issues of organization and management of innovative activity in the regional health care system.Objective. Development and scientific substantiation of a conceptual model of managing innovation in the regional health care system, introduction of institutional mechanisms for its implementation, and evaluation of their efficacy in using diagnosis and treatment technologies. Objectives of the study included reviewing the organization status and problems hampering the development, identification of prospects, and justification for appropriate changes in innovation in healthcare system and medical science at the regional level.Material and methods. To conduct a comprehensive assessment of the status and meet challenges of innovation promotion, a methodology for social-hygienic research was worked out including bibliographic and analytical methods, situational analysis, sociological and economic methods, expert assessment, methods for quality management system audit in accordance with ISO 19011:2002, IDEFO function modeling (RD IDEF0-2000, and organizational modeling. The study was based on the analysis of foreign and domestic literature, statistics, methods for managerial modeling, as well as management experience (including innovative methodological approaches gained by Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics named after Ya.L. Tsivyan which meets the requirements for a platform for research and innovative product reproduction, including research, clinical, organizational, and managerial aspects. Other facilities were considered in conjunction with the leading innovative platform.Results. The paper presents a scientifically based model of innovative medical environment with its elements as subjects, each with a set of functions. Conceptual model for management includes structuring (resource, processes, and quality management; application of international standards and strategic management mechanisms

  18. Medicaid Managed Care and the Health Care Utilization of Foster Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Makayla; Marton, James; Yelowitz, Aaron; Talbert, Jeffery

    2017-01-01

    A recent trend in state Medicaid programs is the transition of vulnerable populations into Medicaid managed care (MMC) who were initially carved out of such coverage, such as foster children or those with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the impact of the transition of foster children from fee-for-service Medicaid coverage to MMC coverage on outpatient health care utilization. There is very little empirical evidence on the impact of managed care on the health care utilization of foster children because of the recent timing of these transitions as well as challenges associated with finding data sets large enough to contain a sufficient number of foster children for such analysis. Using administrative Medicaid data from Kentucky, we use retrospective difference-in-differences analysis to compare the outpatient utilization of foster children transitioned to MMC in one region of the state with foster children in the rest of the state who remained in fee-for-service coverage. We find that the transition to MMC led to a 4 percentage point reduction in the probability of having any monthly outpatient utilization. We also estimate that MMC leads to a reduction in outpatient spending.

  19. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  20. The effect of managed care on use of health care services: results from two contemporaneous household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Partha; Li, Chenghui; Trivedi, Pravin K; Zimmer, David M

    2006-07-01

    This paper estimates treatment effects of managed care plans on the utilization of health care services using data from two contemporaneous, nationally representative household surveys from the USA. The paper exploits recent advances in simulation-based econometrics to take the endogeneity of enrollment into managed care plans into account and identify the causal relationship between managed care enrollment and utilization. Overall, results from the two surveys are remarkably similar, lending credibility to their external validity and to the econometric model and estimation methods. There is significant evidence of self-selection into managed care plans. After accounting for selection, an individual enrolled in an health maintenance organization (HMO) plan has 2 more visits to a doctor and has 0.1 more visits to the emergency room per year than would the same individual enrolled in a nonmanaged care plan.

  1. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Wiegers, T.A.; Friele, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients’ role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence fo

  2. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  3. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Saigal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted temperature management (TTM in today′s modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21 st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI, meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios.

  4. Management of health-care waste in Izmir, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Soysal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate health-care waste in the 18 districts of metropolitan municipality of the third biggest city in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 825 health institutions established in the 18 districts of Izmir metropolitan municipality, in 2007. The total amount of health-care waste collected was 4841 tons and 621 kilograms per patient's bed in 2007. Most of the medical wastes were collected from Konak, Karsiyaka and Bornova districts and were 2308, 272 and 1020 tons, respectively. Regarding to overpopulation, the number of health institutions in these districts are more than the number of health institutions in the other administrative districts. There was a statistically significant, positive correlation between the amount of health-care waste collected and population of the 18 districts (r = 0.79, p < 0.001, and number of beds/patients (r = 0.83, p < 0.001. To provide a safe health-care waste management metropolitan municipality must provide hazardous waste separation in health institutions, establish sterilization units for infectious waste, and provide the last storage of medical waste in completely different, safe and special areas apart from the municipal waste storage areas.

  5. Creativity and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauderer, Michael W L

    2009-01-01

    This Robert E. Gross lecture is an analysis of the concept of creativity and how it relates to the practice of surgery. The questions-why surgery and creativity are closely associated; what influences creativity; why we should be concerned about it; and, finally, what rewards it brings-are discussed. In a personal note, the author describes his approach to creativity, with simplification as a central theme. He presents 6 examples of his work and the lessons learned from this activity. He stresses the importance of fostering creativity in all institutions in which physicians are trained and the need to focus on medical students, residents, and fellows. The critical importance of identifying, nurturing, and protecting innovators, as well as the role of the mentor, is emphasized. Because creativity has a place in many settings and discovery encompasses a wide spectrum, the author provides multiple suggestions aimed at encouraging the participation of those providing surgical care in the fulfilling experience of creative activity and innovation.

  6. Diagnostic, therapeutic and health-care management protocol in thyroid surgery: a position statement of the Italian Association of Endocrine Surgery Units (U.E.C. CLUB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, L; De Crea, C; Bellantone, R; Brandi, M L; De Toma, G; Filetti, S; Miccoli, P; Pacini, F; Pelizzo, M R; Pontecorvi, A; Avenia, N; De Pasquale, L; Chiofalo, M G; Gurrado, A; Innaro, N; La Valle, G; Lombardi, C P; Marini, P L; Mondini, G; Mullineris, B; Pezzullo, L; Raffaelli, M; Testini, M; De Palma, M

    2016-08-01

    The diagnostic, therapeutic and health-care management protocol (Protocollo Gestionale Diagnostico-Terapeutico-Assistenziale, PDTA) by the Association of the Italian Endocrine Surgery Units (U.E.C. CLUB) aims to help treat the patient in a topical, rational way that can be shared by health-care professionals. This fourth consensus conference involved: a selected group of experts in the preliminary phase; all members, via e-mail, in the elaboration phase; all the participants of the XI National Congress of the U.E.C. CLUB held in Naples in the final phase. The following were examined: diagnostic pathway and clinical evaluation; mode of admission and waiting time; therapeutic pathway (patient preparation for surgery, surgical treatment, postoperative management, management of major complications); hospital discharge and patient information; outpatient care and follow-up. A clear and concise style was adopted to illustrate the reasons and scientific rationales behind behaviors and to provide health-care professionals with a guide as complete as possible on who, when, how and why to act. The protocol is meant to help the surgeon to treat the patient in a topical, rational way that can be shared by health-care professionals, but without influencing in any way the physician-patient relationship, which is based on trust and clinical judgment in each individual case. The PDTA in thyroid surgery approved by the fourth consensus conference (June 2015) is the official PDTA of U.E.C. CLUB.

  7. Overcoming resistance against managed care - insights from a bargaining model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Andree; Wein, Thomas; Zweifel, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Recent healthcare reforms have sought to increase efficiency by introducing managed care (MC) while respecting consumer preferences by admitting choice between MC and conventional care. This article proposes an institutional change designed to let German consumers choose between the two settings through directing payments from the Federal Health Fund to social health insurers (SHIs) or to specialized MC organizations (MCOs). To gauge the chance of success of this reform, a game involving a SHI, a MCO, and a representative insured (RI) is analyzed. In a "three-player/three-cake" game the coalitions {SHI, MCO}, {MCO, RI}, and {SHI, RI} can form. Players' possibility to switch between coalitions creates new outside options, causing the conventional bilateral Nash bargaining solution to be replaced by the so-called von Neumann-Morgenstern triple. These triples are compared to the status quo (where the RI has no threat potential) and related to institutional conditions characterizing Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland.

  8. Severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: Intensive care management of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Talawar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS is characterized by increased capillary permeability and fluid retention in the third space. It is generally a complication of assisted reproduction therapy (ART with exogenous gonadotropins, but cases with natural onset of OHSS have been reported. The massive extravascular exudation can cause tense ascites, pleural and pericardial effusion, hypovolemic shock, oliguria, electrolyte imbalance (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia, and hemoconcentration, with a tendency for hypercoagulability and risk of life-threatening thromboembolic complications. The patient can rarely develop multi-organ failure (adult respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure and death. With increasing use of ART, this syndrome may be seen more frequently in the intensive care unit (ICU, requiring multidisciplinary care. We report the management of two cases of severe OHSS, which required admission to the ICU in our hospital.

  9. [Perioperative management of transthoracic oesophagectomies : Fundamentals of interdisciplinary care and new approaches to accelerated recovery after surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertz, R; Drinhaus, H; Schedler, D; Bludau, M; Schröder, W; Annecke, T

    2016-06-01

    Locally advanced carcinomas of the oesophagus require multimodal treatment. The core element of curative therapy is transthoracic en bloc oesophagectomy, which is the standard procedure carried out in most specialized centres. Reconstruction of intestinal continuity is usually achieved with a gastric sleeve, which is anastomosed either intrathoracically or cervically to the remaining oesophagus. This thoraco-abdominal operation is associated with significant postoperative morbidity, not least because of a vast array of pre-existing illnesses in the surgical patient. For an optimal outcome, the careful interdisciplinary selection of patients, preoperative risk evaluation and conditioning are essential. The caseload of the centres correlates inversely with the complication rate. The leading surgical complication is anastomotic leakage, which is diagnosed endoscopically and usually treated with the aid of endoscopic procedures. Pulmonary infections are the most frequent non-surgical complication. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia and perfusion-orientated fluid management can reduce the rate of pulmonary complications. Patients are ventilated protecting the lungs and are extubated as early as possible. Oesophagectomies should only be performed in high-volume centres with the close cooperation of surgeons and anaesthesia/intensive care specialists. Programmes of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) hold further potential for the patient's quicker postoperative recovery. In this review article the fundamental aspects of the interdisciplinary perioperative management of transthoracic oesophagectomy are described.

  10. Do geography and resources influence the need for colostomy in Hirschsprung′s disease and anorectal malformations? A Canadian association of paediatric surgeons: Association of paediatric surgeons of Nigeria survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukman O. Abdur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This survey compared surgical management of Hirschsprung′s disease (HD and anorectal malformations (ARM in high and low resource settings. Materials and Methods: An online survey was sent to 208 members of the Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons (CAPS and the Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria (APSON. Results: The response rate was 76.8% with 127 complete surveys (APSON 34, CAPS 97. Only 29.5% of APSON surgeons had frozen section available for diagnosis of HD. They were more likely to choose full thickness rectal biopsy (APSON 70.6% vs. CAPS 9.4%, P < 0.05 and do an initial colostomy for HD (APSON 23.5% vs. CAPS 0%, P < 0.05. Experience with trans-anal pull-through for HD was similar in both groups (APSON 76.5%, CAPS 66.7%. CAPS members practising in the United States were more likely to perform a one-stage pull-through for HD during the initial hospitalization (USA 65.4% vs. Canada 28.3%, P < 0.05. The frequency of colostomy in females with vestibular fistula varied widely independent of geography. APSON surgeons were less likely to have enterostomal therapists and patient education resources. Conclusions: Local resources which vary by geographic location affect the management of HD and ARM including colostomy. Collaboration between CAPS and APSON members could address resource and educational needs to improve patient care.

  11. Linking outcomes management and practice improvement. Structured care methodologies: evolution and use in patient care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, L; Houston, S

    1999-01-01

    Structured care methodologies are tools that provide a comprehensive approach to patient care delivery. These tools have evolved in their application and purpose over the years. In many situations, multiple tools are needed to obtain the best outcomes for a patient. The presence of a SCM does not preclude clinical judgment. On the contrary, the fundamental purpose of any SCM is to assist practitioners in implementing practice patterns associated with good clinical judgment, research-based interventions, and improved patient outcomes. These tools support smooth operation and appropriate use of resources, establish a means of patient management across the continuum of care, facilitate collaboration among disciplines, reflect patient outcomes, and provide outcomes data. Data from SCMs permit benchmarking, comparison of pre-implementation and post-implementation outcomes, development of action plans for quality enhancement, identification of high-risk patients, identification of issues and problems in the system that require interventions, and the development of research protocols and studies. Structured care methodology development and implementation can be challenging, rewarding, and at times frustrating. When used appropriately, these tools can have a major impact on the standardization of care and the achievement of desired outcomes. However, individual patient needs may supersede adherence to a tool. The challenge then becomes one of balancing the unique needs of each patient and appropriate use of SCMs. Change comes slowly, but persistence pays off.

  12. Survey among critical care nurses and physicians about delirium management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, Peter; Dewes, Michael; Dubb, Rolf; Hermes, Carsten; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Krotsetis, Susanne; von Haken, Rebecca

    2017-05-18

    Delirium is a serious complication in patients in intensive care units. Previous surveys on delirium management in daily practice showed low adherence to published guidelines. To evaluate delirium management in nurses and physicians working in intensive care units in German-speaking countries and to identify related differences between nurses and physicians. The study used an open online survey with multiple-choice responses. An invitation for participation was spread via journals and electronic resources using a snowball system. Apart from recording socio-demographical characteristics, the survey collected data on delirium assessment, delirium-related processes, non-pharmacological prevention and treatment and barriers for implementation. Differences between nurses and physicians were tested by Fisher's exact test with sequential Bonferroni correction. The survey was conducted in autumn 2016, and 559 clinicians participated. More nurses than physicians reported screening for delirium. The majority of clinicians reported screening for delirium when this was suspected; more than 50% used validated instruments. Half of the clinicians had delirium-related structures implemented, such as two thirds reporting delirium-related processes. Most cited barriers were lack of time and missing knowledge about delirium and its assessment. With significant difference, physicians recommended more than nurses early removal of catheters and daily interprofessional goals for patients. In German-speaking countries, assessment of delirium needs further improvement, leading to accurate assessment. Delirium-related structures and processes appear to be implemented widely, with only a few differences between nurses and physicians. Nurses and physicians in this survey reported similar perceptions and attitudes towards management of delirium. Both professions need more knowledge and inter-professional training on when and how to use validated assessment instruments. © 2017 British

  13. Cardiac intensive care of the adult with congenital heart disease: basic principles in the management of common problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, James; Lanzberg, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Webb, Gary; Chang, Anthony C

    2011-07-01

    Although there has been an intense interest in the care of the adult with congenital heart disease (ACHD), these guidelines are usually not focused on the concepts of immediate postoperative care. The 2 most common perioperative complications are heart failure and atrial dysrhythmias. The broad etiological categories for ACHD and heart failure include primary pump failure (systolic dysfunction) and hypertrophy (diastolic dysfunction) of the right, left, or single ventricle. Some conditions with a pressure-loaded systemic right ventricle as well as patients with a functionally single ventricle may be particularly prone to develop heart failure; in others, right heart failure may occur in patients with Ebstein anomaly or with tetralogy of Fallot after corrective repair but with varying degrees of pulmonary insufficiency, and left heart failure can be a result of mitral or aortic insufficiency. The management of postoperative atrial tachycardia in the ACHD patient actually begins prior to surgery. Assessment of arrhythmia history, complete determination of risk, inducibility and arrhythmia substrate, preoperative planning of pacing sites, and optimal pacing strategies all assist to bring about optimal postoperative outcomes. Ideal perioperative care of the ACHD involves a multidisciplinary team of pediatric and adult cardiologists, pediatric and adult intensivists, cardiac surgeons, and nursing staff along with a myriad of adult subspecialists such as pulmonology, nephrology, endocrinology, and others including psychiatry.

  14. Facts that every vascular surgeon needs to know about the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes important aspects of the diabetic foot which the vascular surgeon needs to understand to efficiently manage the diabetic foot. Firstly, it emphasises the three main pathologies which come together in the diabetic foot, namely neuropathy, ischemia and immunopathy, the latter predisposing to infection. As a result of neuropathy, the signs and symptoms of tissue breakdown, infection and ischemia may be minimal. Nevertheless the pathology emanating from such clinical events proceeds rapidly without the body being aware of it and the end stage of tissue death and necrosis is quickly reached. It is important to have a prompt system of evaluation and intervention to prevent the rapid progression to necrosis. Thus, secondly, the paper describes a simple rapid assessment of the diabetic foot, which comprises inspection, palpation and sensory testing and leads on to a modern classification and staging of the diabetic foot. This classifies six subdivisions of the diabetic foot: foot with neuropathic ulceration, Charcot foot, neuroischemic foot, critically ischemic foot, acutely ischemic foot and renal ischemic foot and six stages in the natural history of each of these subdivisions: normal foot, high risk foot, ulcerated foot, infected foot, necrotic foot and unsalvageable foot. Thirdly, it describes modern management of the diabetic foot, emphazising wound care and revascularization within the context of a multidisciplinary care team that provides integrated care focused in a diabetic foot clinic, to which patients with diabetes should have easy and rapid access. Members of the team include podiatrist, nurse, orthotist, physician, radiologist and surgeons.

  15. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  16. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  17. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A computer science approach to managing security in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirelli, P; Braccini, G; Caramella, D; Coco, A; Fabbrini, F

    2002-09-01

    The security of electronic medical information is very important for health care organisations, which have to ensure confidentiality, integrity and availability of the information provided. This paper will briefly outline the legal measures adopted by the European Community, Italy and the United States to regulate the use and disclosure of medical records. It will then go on to highlight how information technology can help to address these issues with special reference to the management of organisation policies. To this end, we will present a modelling example for the security policy of a radiological department.

  19. Emerging trends in cancer care: health plans' and pharmacy benefit managers' perspectives on changing care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenapple, Rhonda

    2012-07-01

    Cancer care in the United States is being transformed by a number of medical and economic trends, including rising drug costs, increasing availability of targeted therapies and oral oncolytic agents, healthcare reform legislation, changing reimbursement practices, a growing emphasis on comparative effectiveness research (CER), the emerging role of accountable care organizations (ACOs), and the increased role of personalization of cancer care. To examine the attitudes of health plan payers and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) toward recent changes in cancer care, current cost-management strategies, and anticipated changes in oncology practice during the next 5 years. An online survey with approximately 200 questions was conducted by Reimbursement Intelligence in 2011. The survey was completed by 24 medical directors and 31 pharmacy directors from US national and regional health plans and 8 PBMs. All respondents are part of a proprietary panel of managed care decision makers and are members of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committees of their respective plans, which together manage more than 150 million lives. Survey respondents received an honorarium for completing the survey. The survey included quantitative and qualitative questions about recent developments in oncology management, such as the impact on their plans or PBMs of healthcare reform, quality improvement initiatives, changes in reimbursement and financial incentives, use of targeted and oral oncolytics, and personalized medicine. Respondents were treated as 1 group, because there were no evident differences in responses between medical and pharmacy directors or PBMs. Overall, survey respondents expressed interest in monitoring and controlling the costs of cancer therapy, and they anticipated increased use of specialty pharmacy for oncology drugs. When clinical outcomes are similar for oral oncolytics and injectable treatments, 93% prefer the oral agents, which are covered under the specialty tier by 59

  20. Career satisfaction among general surgeons in Canada: a qualitative study of enablers and barriers to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Chiu, Mary; Korabi, Bochra; Qureshi, Adnan; Nathens, Avery B; Kitto, Simon

    2012-11-01

    To understand what influences career satisfaction among general surgeons in urban and rural areas in Canada in order to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 general surgeons in 2010 who were members of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons and who currently practice in either an urban or rural area. Interviews explored factors contributing to career satisfaction, as well as suggestions for preventive, screening, or management strategies to support general surgery practice. Findings revealed that both urban and rural general surgeons experienced the most satisfaction from their ability to resolve patient problems quickly and effectively, enhancing their sense of the meaningfulness of their clinical practice. The supportive relationships with colleagues, trainees, and patients was also cited as a key source of career satisfaction. Conversely, insufficient access to resources and a perceived disconnect between hospital administration and clinical practice priorities were raised as key "systems-level" problems. As a result, many participants felt alienated from their work by these systems-level barriers that were perceived to hinder the provision of high-quality patient care. Career satisfaction among both urban and rural general surgeons was influenced positively by the social aspects of their work, such as patient and colleague relationships, as well as a perception of an increasing amount of control and autonomy over their professional commitments. The modern general surgeon values a balance between professional obligations and personal time that may be difficult to achieve given the current system constraints.

  1. The surgeon and the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    For many reasons pediatric surgeons have been asked to do all general and thoracic procedures in children. The profession has responded by training more, but the core of special cases requiring pediatric surgical expertise has not changed, and there is concern that the many surgeons now in training will not each do enough cases to attain and maintain operative expertise. This presentation examines the psychological, educational, and surgical literature on the development of expertise, especially operative expertise. From this I conclude that individual surgeon volume when gained in deliberate practice with a coach and with effort is essential, and that several technologies hold promise for allowing deliberate practice in simulation environments. I propose that in order to avoid a decline in pediatric surgical operative expertise we must reorganize pediatric surgical training and practice to align with Optimal Resources for Children's Surgery and the evolution of training in general surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient care and management: reduced skin integrity of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Sharon

    The development and deterioration of pressure ulcers are a frequent occurrence across all healthcare settings and specialties, posing daily challenges to the healthcare worker and unnecessary suffering to the patient. Reduced skin integrity occurs within those patients deemed high risk, particularly to the vulnerable areas such as the heel and ankle (American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), 1996). The incidence of pressure ulcers, alongside diabetes, vascular insufficiency and obesity, is on the increase, posing additional demands on current clinical resources; specialist clinics, debridement therapies and appropriate dressing management regimes. This article will focus on the heel and ankle in regards to reduced skin integrity and the positive introduction of an innovative dressing product as an adjunct to the overall care and management of this patient group.

  3. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  4. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [The surgeons civil responsibility insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, D

    2004-10-01

    After a short research in the field national insurances, the author analyses the professional physician insurance policy; the ambiguity and difficulty of contracts concerning the professional health activity of surgeon, whether as state employee or as independent professional are pointed put. With the introduction of the ministerial decree dated January 29,1992, the new labour agreement, the privacy law, the evolution of ''informed consent'', the esthetic injury concept, the safety regulations law and the administrative liability, surgeons must pay attention to draw up an insurance policy suitable to their profession.

  7. Perspectives of being spouse, parent, and surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Achieving a balance between one's career and personal life is a never-ending challenge. As a surgeon, add-on cases and double-booked clinics can lead to long hours at work and make availability for family time unpredictable. It may seem like the threat of interruption because of patient needs always loom. Disruptions to family time extend beyond the long hours spent in surgery and clinics. Inattentiveness at home because of the technology tethers that keep one available for constant questions and patient care issues can also distract from time spent with family. Although the practice of an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can involve unpredictable schedules and patient care issues, there are means of mitigating the chaos that can envelop one's personal life as a result of a chosen career track. Clear priorities and expectations in both personal and professional arenas can improve the work-life balance. Flexible jobs that allow for more time with family do exist. Negotiating for this flexibility and self-assurance in holding fast to personal ideals are important in achieving a successful balance.

  8. The management of care: a social and legal function of chilean nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ceballos-Vásquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this article is to reflect on the implication of the concept of management of nursing, making Latin-American countries that have incorporated the management of care aware of its norms and the chilean experience and the legal aspects that regulate the management of care are specifically presented.Development: To achieve this objective, a bibliographic revision of diverse mainstream magazines, texts and laws related to administration and Management of Care was carried out.Initially, the concept of management is analyzed with the purpose of comprehending why the nursing integrate it in its field of performance. To visualize later how some of the countries of Latin-America have incorporated it in their legal frameworks of management of Care care of nursing, and subsequently the experience of the Chilean chilean nursing with regard to the Management management of Care care is analyzed extensively.Conclusions: As final considerations it is indicated that the Management management of Care care is part of the social function of the nurses, for the daily work they are to perform incorporating the management, it would provide managing competencies and would permit the autonomous caretaking to these professionals. 

  9. What can the postanesthesia care unit manager do to decrease costs in the postanesthesia care unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, A; Glenn, D; Dexter, F

    1999-10-01

    The economic structure of the PACU dictates whether a cost-reducing intervention (e.g., reducing the length of time patients stay in the PACU) is likely to decrease hospital costs. Cost-reducing interventions, such as changes in medical practice patterns (e.g., to reduce PACU length of stay), only impact variable costs. How PACU nurses are paid (e.g., salaried v hourly) affects which strategies to decrease PACU staffing costs will actually save money. For example, decreases in PACU labor costs resulting from increases in the number of patients that bypass the PACU vary depending on how the staff is compensated. The choice of anesthetic drugs and the elimination of low morbidity side effects of anesthesia, such as postoperative nausea, are likely to have little effect on the peak numbers of patients in a PACU and PACU staffing costs. Because the major determinant of labor productivity in the PACU is hour-to-hour and day-to-day variability in the timing of admissions from the operating room, a more even inflow of patients into the PACU could be attained by appropriate sequencing of cases in the operating room suite (e.g., have long cases scheduled at the beginning of the day). However, this mathematically proven solution may not be desirable. Surgeons, for example, may not want to lose control over the order of their cases. Guidelines for analysis of past daily peak numbers of patients are provided that will provide data to predict the minimum adequate number of nurses needed. Though many managers already do this manually on an ad hoc basis statistical methods summarized in this article may increase the accuracy.

  10. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  11. General practitioner management of shoulder pain in comparison with rheumatologist expectation of care and best evidence: an Australian national survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Buchbinder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether current care for common shoulder problems in Australian general practice is in keeping with rheumatologist expectations and the best available evidence. METHODS: We performed a mailed survey of a random sample of 3500 Australian GPs and an online survey of all 270 rheumatologists in Australia in June 2009. Each survey included four vignettes (first presentation of shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy, acute rotator cuff tear in a 45 year-old labourer and early and later presentation of adhesive capsulitis. For each vignette, GPs were asked to indicate their management, rheumatologists were asked to indicate appropriate primary care, and we determined best available evidence from relevant Cochrane and other systematic reviews and published guidelines. RESULTS: Data were available for at least one vignette for 614/3500 (17.5% GPs and 64 (23.8% rheumatologists. For first presentation of rotator cuff tendinopathy, 69% and 82% of GPs and 50% and 56% rheumatologists would order a shoulder X-ray and ultrasound respectively (between group comparisons P = 0.004 and P<0001. Only 66% GPs and 60% rheumatologists would refer to an orthopaedic surgeon for the acute rotator cuff tear. For adhesive capsulitis, significantly more rheumatologists recommended treatments of known benefit (e.g. glucocorticoid injection (56% versus 14%, P<0.0001, short course of oral glucocorticoids (36% versus 6%, p<0.0001 and arthrographic distension of the glenohumeral joint (41% versus 19%, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: There is a mismatch between the stated management of common shoulder problems encountered in primary care by GPs, rheumatologist expectations of GP care and the available evidence.

  12. Was the real Sherlock Holmes a pediatric surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the pioneering efforts of Joseph Bell, the model for Sherlock Holmes, in the surgical care of children during the antiseptic era. I reviewed biographies of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; the biography of Joseph Bell; his surgical textbook, Edinburgh Medical Journals; and the history of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children. Dr Bell was a colleague of Joseph Lister and one of the first surgeons to apply antiseptic methods to operations involving children. He was the surgeon appointed to the first surgical ward of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children; in that role, he cared for many children with surgical diseases. Dr Joseph Bell, by his compassion for children and his surgical skill, was indeed a pioneer pediatric surgeon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

  14. Developing a Total Quality Management Model for Health Care Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Mosadegh Rad

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total quality management (TQM is a managerial practice to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, flexibility, and competitiveness of a business as a whole. However, in practice, these TQM benefits are not easy to achieve. Despite its theoretical promise and the enthusiastic response to TQM, recent evidence suggests that attempts to implement it are often unsuccessful. Many of these TQM programmes have been cancelled, or are in the process of being cancelled, as a result of the negative impact on profits. Therefore, there is a pressing need for a clinical approach to establishing TQM. Method: The aim of this article is therefore: “To identify the strengths and weakness of TQM, the logical steps towards TQM, and to develop a model so that health care organizations aiming at using TQM to achieve excellence can follow through easily”. Based on the research questions proposed in this study, the research strategies of a literature review, a questionnaire survey, semi-structured interviews, and a participatory action research were adopted in this study. For determining the success and barriers of TQM in health care organizations, a questionnaire survey has done in 90 health acre organizations in Isfahan Province, which implement TQM. The results of this survey were used for introducing a new model of TQM. This model will be developed via a semi-structured interview with at minimum 10 health care and quality managers. Then, through a participatory action research, this model will be implemented in 3 sites. At this time, the questionnaire survey has done and the model is introduced. Therefore, developing the model and its implementation will be done later. Results: In this survey, the mean score of TQM success was 3.48±0.68 (medium from 5 credits. Implementation of TQM was very low, low, medium, high and very high successful respectively in 3.6, 10.9, 21.8, 56.4 and 7.3 percent of health care organizations. TQM had the most effect on

  15. Critical Care Management of Cerebral Edema in Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Yoshua; Lo, Victor P; Lee, Kiwon

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral edema associated with brain tumors is extremely common and can occur in both primary and metastatic tumors. The edema surrounding brain tumors results from leakage of plasma across the vessel wall into the parenchyma secondary to disruption of the blood-brain barrier. The clinical signs of brain tumor edema depend on the location of the tumor as well as the extent of the edema, which often exceeds the mass effect induced by the tumor itself. Uncontrolled cerebral edema may result in increased intracranial pressure and acute herniation syndromes that can result in permanent neurological dysfunction and potentially fatal herniation. Treatment strategies for elevated intracranial pressure consist of general measures, medical interventions, and surgery. Alhough the definitive treatment for the edema may ultimately be surgical resection of the tumor, the impact of the critical care management cannot be underestimated and thus patients must be vigilantly monitored in the intensive care unit. In this review, we discuss the pathology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of patients presenting with cerebral edema. Imaging findings and treatment modalities used in the intensive care unit are also discussed.

  16. Collaborative care management for a pregnant woman with an ostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aukamp, Virginia; Sredl, Darlene

    2004-02-01

    Pregnant women with an ostomy face many challenges during the prenatal period. Although these challenges may be present, pregnancy in the ostomate is presented as a continuum of health and wellness in this article. Collaborative care professionals, especially nurses and midwives, are often the most accessible professional sources for health care information, but current research and information on this topic is sparse. Ostomy-related problems that may occur during pregnancy, include: intestinal obstruction, peristomal hernia, pouching problems, including the effect of nausea and vomiting on pouch hydration, stomal retraction, stenosis, or laceration, and stomal prolapse. Three types of ostomies are discussed: continent ileostomies, urostomies and colostomies. A description of the normal characteristic appearance of each is also included. Collaborative care from pre-conception through the post partum period is described with emphasis on teaching self-help techniques such as: special nutritional considerations, how to recognize potential problems, and how to fit and adapt appliances to the changing body form of the patient as the pregnancy progresses. Phenomenologic information about the pregnant ostomate's perceptions about her pregnancy experience is also presented. Psycho-prophylaxis methods of complementary therapy alternatives alleviating nausea and vomiting within pregnancy, as well as the pain of childbirth are also presented. Although nursing/midwifery management of a pregnant ostomy patient is a challenge, those challenges are surmountable and outcomes resemble those found in the general population.

  17. [Intercultural competence. Management of foreignness in intensive care medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, T

    2015-08-01

    Living in a multicultural society is characterized by different attitudes caused by a variety of religions and cultures. In intensive care medicine such a variety of cultural aspects with respect to pain, shame, bodiliness, dying and death is of importance in this scenario. To assess the importance of cultural and religious attitudes in the face of foreignness in intensive care medicine and nursing. Notification of misunderstandings and misinterpretations in communication and actions. An analysis of the scientific literature was carried out and typical intercultural conflict burden situations regarding the management of brain death, organ donation and end of life decisions are depicted. Specific attitudes are found in various religions or cultures regarding the change of a therapeutic target, the value of the patient's living will and the organization of rituals for dying. Intercultural conflicts are mostly due to misunderstandings, assessment differences, discrimination and differences in values. Intercultural competence is crucial in intensive care medicine and includes knowledge of social and cultural influences of different attitudes on health and illness, the abstraction from own attitudes and the acceptance of other or foreign attitudes.

  18. Informal care givers’ experiences with support in primary palliative care when a case manager is involved: a descriptive study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G.M. van der; Francke, A.L.; Deliens, L.; Jansen, W.J.J.; Vissers, K.C.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Case managers have been introduced in primary palliative care in the Netherlands; these are nurses with expertise in palliative care who offer support to patients and informal care givers. The case manager provides support in addition to the care provided by the home care nurse and gen

  19. Making it local: Beacon Communities use health information technology to optimize care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Amy; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Heider, Arvela; Kanger, Chatrian R; Lobach, David F; McWilliams, Lee; Polello, Jennifer M; Rein, Alison L; Schachter, Abigail A; Singh, Ranjit; Sorondo, Barbara; Tulikangas, Megan C; Turske, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    Care management aims to provide cost-effective, coordinated, non-duplicative care to improve care quality, population health, and reduce costs. The 17 communities receiving funding from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology through the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program are leaders in building and strengthening their health information technology (health IT) infrastructure to provide more effective and efficient care management. This article profiles 6 Beacon Communities' health IT-enabled care management programs, highlighting the influence of local context on program strategy and design, and describing challenges, lessons learned, and policy implications for care delivery and payment reform. The unique needs (eg, disease burden, demographics), community partnerships, and existing resources and infrastructure all exerted significant influence on the overall priorities and design of each community's care management program. Though each Beacon Community needed to engage in a similar set of care management tasks--including patient identification, stratification, and prioritization; intervention; patient engagement; and evaluation--the contextual factors helped shape the specific strategies and tools used to carry out these tasks and achieve their objectives. Although providers across the country are striving to deliver standardized, high-quality care, the diverse contexts in which this care is delivered significantly influence the priorities, strategies, and design of community-based care management interventions. Gaps and challenges in implementing effective community-based care management programs include: optimizing allocation of care management services; lack of available technology tailored to care management needs; lack of standards and interoperability; integrating care management into care settings; evaluating impact; and funding and sustainability.

  20. Integrating digital image management software for improved patient care and optimal practice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Jon C

    2006-06-01

    Photographic images provide vital documentation of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative results in the clinical dermatologic surgery practice and can document histologic findings from skin biopsies, thereby enhancing patient care. Images may be printed as part of text documents, transmitted via electronic mail, or included in electronic medical records. To describe existing computer software that integrates digital photography and the medical record to improve patient care and practice management. A variety of computer applications are available to optimize the use of digital images in the dermatologic practice.