WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgeon general warning

  1. Caution: Alcohol Advertising and the Surgeon General's Alcohol Warnings May Have Adverse Effects on Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Deborah J.; Snyder, Leslie B.

    A study investigated the effects of the newly introduced Surgeon General's alcohol warnings and advertisements on college students. One hundred fifty-nine undergraduates in communication sciences at the University of Connecticut viewed slides of alcohol products, with or without advertisements and warnings. Following the viewings, subjects filled…

  2. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  3. [General surgeons and varicose vein surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cuenca, Germán; Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, Jose Luis

    2009-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a highly prevalent condition, with significant health and economic repercussions. Although important therapeutic developments have been introduced in recent years, the majority are dealt with by general surgeons in national health hospitals. These surgeons do not have the required and continuous training, and continue to perform classic surgery techniques. Also, their presence at scientific, organisational meetings and training is almost nil. We present an update on developments in phlebology, and tapping into the preliminary results of a national survey, we reflect on the current status of phlebology and beyond for those general surgeons who should have a role in this field.

  4. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  5. Perfil profesional del cirujano general: Professional profile General surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Hernández Varea

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El perfil del egresado es un elemento clave para confección del currículo, y constituye el modelo de las características, conocimientos y habilidades que se aspira formar en el futuro cirujano. Dicho perfil debe responder a las necesidades sociales, permitir la planificación del proceso docente-educativo y concretar la relación universidad-sociedad. En el presente artículo se analizan, a partir de la situación actual, los antecedentes históricos del modelo de formación del especialista en cirugía general, la definición de cirugía general, los principales cambios internacionales en el modelo de formación de cirujanos y las funciones generales que se deben considerar en el perfil profesional del cirujano y su cumplimiento en el programa de cirugía.Graduate profile is a key element to make the curriculum, and it is a representation of the possible features, knowledges, and abilities in the future surgeon. Such profile must to account for social needs, to allow the planning of teaching-educational process, and to stay exactly the university-society relation. In present paper, from a current situation, are analyzed the historical backgrounds of training model of general surgery specialist, general surgery definition, the main international changes in the training model of surgeon, and its fulfillment in surgery program.

  6. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  7. H1N1 Message from the Acting Surgeon General

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-13

    In this podcast, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Steven Galson discusses what you can do to protect yourself from H1N1 flu.  Created: 5/13/2009 by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/13/2009.

  8. Surgeon General's Workshop on Health Promotion and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The following report contains all of the recommendations of the working group on oral health that met during the Surgeon General's Workshop on Health Promotion and Aging, March 20-23, 1988, in Washington, DC, under the direction of Surgeon General C. Everett Koop and a number of leaders in geriatrics and gerontology. The working group was composed of 17 specialists, including Frank Martin, technical manager; Scott Presson, reporter; James Beck, chairman; and group members Ronald Ettinger, Jean Frazier, Mary Alice Gaston, Helen Gift, Neville Gilmore, Marc Heft, H. Asuman Kiyak, James Marshall, Roseann Mulligan, Linda Niessen, Vincent Rogers, Michele Saunders, Ruth Seigler, and Hongying Wang. The report also includes dental-related recommendations made by the working groups on medication, preventive health services, alcohol, physical fitness and exercise, injury prevention, mental health, smoking cessation, and nutrition. Eight workshops have been sponsored by the surgeon general since his appointment to office in 1981; this workshop was the first to focus on dentistry and aging.

  9. U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Crackdown on E-Cig Use in Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162443.html U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Crackdown on E-Cig ... product among American teens, according to a new U.S. Surgeon General's report that calls for a crackdown ...

  10. Brief communication "Landslide Early Warning System: toolbox and general concepts"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Intrieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We define landslide Early Warning Systems and present practical guidelines to assist end-users with limited experience in the design of landslide Early Warning Systems (EWSs.

    In particular, two flow chart-based tools coming from the results of the SafeLand project (7th Framework Program have been created to make them as simple and general as possible and in compliance with a variety of landslide types and settings at single slope scale. We point out that it is not possible to cover all the real landslide early warning situations that might occur, therefore it will be necessary for end-users to adapt the procedure to local peculiarities of the locations where the landslide EWS will be operated.

  11. Colorectal surgeons teaching general surgery residents: current challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Connie C; Chow, Christopher J; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-09-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's teaching environment is one of the most important legacies that surgical educators can leave for the coming generation. Faculty role modeling and the process of socializing residents is highlighted. We review the American College of Surgeons' Code of Professional Conduct, summarize some of the current strategies for teaching and assessing professionalism, and reflect on principles of motivation that apply to resident training both for the trainee and the trainer.

  12. Ureteral inguinal hernia: an uncommon trap for general surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Zarif; Al-habbal, Yahya; Hassen, Sayed

    2017-01-01

    Inguinal hernias involving the ureter, a retroperitoneal structure, is an uncommon phenomenon. It can occur with or without obstructive uropathy, the latter posing a trap for the unassuming general surgeon performing a routine inguinal hernia repair. Ureteral inguinal hernia should be included as a differential when a clinical inguinal hernia is diagnosed concurrently with unexplained hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract infection particularly in a male. The present case describes a patient with a known ureteroinguinal hernia who proceeded to having a planned hernia repair and ureteric protection. The case is a reminder that when faced with an unexpected finding such an indirect sliding inguinal hernia, extreme care should be taken to ensure that no structures are inadvertently damaged and that a rare possibility is the entrapment of the ureter in the inguinal canal. PMID:28275027

  13. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... the data had been presented reflecting different institutions (without necessarily ... is no formal training in clinical governance to equip graduating surgeons for a ... shifting healthcare landscape, in SA and globally. Martin D ...

  14. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  15. A First Hard Look at the Surgeon General's Report on Television and Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Douglass; Strickland, Stephen

    In March of 1972 the Aspen Program on Communications and Society convened a meeting which brought together the Surgeon General, staff members connected with the Surgeon General's Report on Television and Violence, and social scientists. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate the Report, which had just been issued. This conference report…

  16. 30 CFR 75.1103-3 - Automatic fire sensor and warning device systems; minimum requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic fire sensor and warning device...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1103-3 Automatic fire sensor and warning device systems; minimum requirements; general. Automatic fire sensor and warning device systems installed in belt haulageways of...

  17. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Charles L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  18. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. Methods The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. Results A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p < 0.03) from the converging learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. Conclusions We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents. PMID:20591159

  19. Learning styles of medical students, general surgery residents, and general surgeons: implications for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Paul T; de Gara, Chris

    2010-06-30

    Surgical education is evolving under the dual pressures of an enlarging body of knowledge required during residency and mounting work-hour restrictions. Changes in surgical residency training need to be based on available educational models and research to ensure successful training of surgeons. Experiential learning theory, developed by David Kolb, demonstrates the importance of individual learning styles in improving learning. This study helps elucidate the way in which medical students, surgical residents, and surgical faculty learn. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory, which divides individual learning styles into Accommodating, Diverging, Converging, and Assimilating categories, was administered to the second year undergraduate medical students, general surgery resident body, and general surgery faculty at the University of Alberta. A total of 241 faculty, residents, and students were surveyed with an overall response rate of 73%. The predominant learning style of the medical students was assimilating and this was statistically significant (p learning style found in the residents and faculty. The predominant learning styles of the residents and faculty were convergent and accommodative, with no statistically significant differences between the residents and the faculty. We conclude that medical students have a significantly different learning style from general surgical trainees and general surgeons. This has important implications in the education of general surgery residents.

  20. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General ... use Why is it important to know my family medical history? Your family medical history is a ...

  1. 21 CFR 369.9 - General warnings re accidental ingestion by children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General warnings re accidental ingestion by... OVER-THE-COUNTER SALE Definitions and Interpretations § 369.9 General warnings re accidental ingestion... possibility of accidental ingestion of drugs, it is not only suggested but is recommended that one of these...

  2. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Connie; Chow, Christopher; Rothenberger, David

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training...

  3. Information retrieval patterns and needs among practicing general surgeons: a statewide experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Shelstad, K R; Clevenger, F W

    1996-01-01

    Information retrieval has progressed from a reliance on traditional print sources to the modern era of computer databases and online networks. Surgeons, many from remote areas not served by professional medical libraries, must develop and maintain skills in information retrieval and management in both electronic and standard formats. One hundred thirty-three New Mexico general surgeons were surveyed to identify their information-seeking patterns in five areas: retrieval purposes, retrieval so...

  4. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy: cancer practice by general surgeons in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Esmat

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There appear to be geographical differences in decisions to perform mastectomy or breast conserving surgery for early-stage breast cancer. This study was carried out to evaluate general surgeons' preferences in breast cancer surgery and to assess the factors predicting cancer practice in Iran. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to 235 general surgeons chosen from the address list of the Iranian Medical Council. The questionnaire elicited information about the general surgeons' characteristics and about their work experience, posts they have held, number of breast cancer operations performed per year, preferences for mastectomy or breast conserving surgery, and the reasons for these preferences. Results In all, 83 surgeons returned the completed questionnaire. The results indicated that only 19% of the surgeons routinely performed breast conserving surgery (BCS and this was significantly associated with their breast cancer case load (P Conclusion The findings indicate that Iranian surgeons do not routinely perform BCS as the first and the best treatment modality. Further research is recommended to evaluate patients' outcomes after BCS treatment in Iran, with regard to available radiotherapy facilities and cultural factors (patients' compliance.

  5. Colorectal Surgeons Teaching General Surgery Residents: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Connie C.; Chow, Christopher J.; Rothenberger, David A

    2012-01-01

    Effective teaching for general surgery residents requires that faculty members with colorectal expertise actively engage in the education process and fully understand the current context for residency training. In this article, we review important national developments with respect to graduate medical education that impact resident supervision, curriculum implementation, resident assessment, and program evaluation. We argue that establishing a culture of respect and professionalism in today's...

  6. [Abdominal compartment syndrome: survey on the awareness of Portuguese general surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sílvia; Gomes, Aline; Graça, Susana; Ferreira, António; Fernandes, Gonçalo; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Alexandre; Fernandes, Paula; Castelões, Paula; Maciel, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) is a clinical entity recognized for over a century, but only recently its risk criteria, monitorization and treatment have been defined by the World Society of the Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The general surgeon's involvement is vital since this syndrome is common in surgical patients and because its treatment may culminate in a laparostomy. 250 questionnaires of 17 questions were distributed among general surgeons attending the XXVIII Portuguese Congress of Surgery. The data were analyzed using SPSS® v16. We received 36,4% (91) of the delivered questionnaires, most of which from male surgeons (63,7%), from central hospitals (75,8%), working 42 h per week (70.3%), whose average of age was 38 years. About half of the respondents received training in Intensive Care Units. All surgeons had already heard about measuring the Intra- abdominal Pressure (IAP), which was being performed at 89% of their hospitals. About 40% of surgeons only admitted intra-abdominal hypertension above 20 mmHg (only 22% indicated the correct value of 12 mmHg). 36,3% of surgeons suggested that a decompressive laparostomy must be carried out for primary ACS if IAP greater then 20 mmHg with new organ failure; 36.3% favoured the "Vacuum-pack"-like system, and 56% only re-operate the patients "as needed". 48,4% of surgeons had already performed decompressive laparostomy, 66% of which had residence training in a ICU (p = 0,005). Respondents also pointed an average mortality related to ACS of 81% without laparostomy, and a reduction to 38,5% after performing that procedure. Only 26% of the surgeons were aware of the WSACS consensus definitions and recommendations, of those, 83% had already performed a laparostomy (Pdivulgation.

  7. Information retrieval patterns and needs among practicing general surgeons: a statewide experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelstad, K R; Clevenger, F W

    1996-10-01

    Information retrieval has progressed from a reliance on traditional print sources to the modern era of computer databases and online networks. Surgeons, many from remote areas not served by professional medical libraries, must develop and maintain skills in information retrieval and management in both electronic and standard formats. One hundred thirty-three New Mexico general surgeons were surveyed to identify their information-seeking patterns in five areas: retrieval purposes, retrieval sources, barriers to access, techniques used, and continuing education needs. Ninety-nine (74.4%) surgeons responded to the survey. Ninety-five percent utilize professional meetings, the medical literature, and physician colleagues as information sources. Only 17% utilize the outreach services of the state's only medical school library. Common retrieval barriers were practice demands (71%), isolation from medical schools (30%), computer illiteracy (28%), and rural environment (25%). Continuing education topics related to information management would be valuable to 61% of the surgeons. Sixty-nine percent believe their current ability to access biomedical information is adequate, despite most frequently accessing their personal libraries for information related to decision-making or patient management. These data suggest that, despite significant information needs, surgeons have not embraced newer forms of information retrieval. It is imperative that surgeons acquire and maintain modern information retrieval skills as a means of remaining up-to-date in their profession. Professional surgical organizations and medical librarians should collaborate on these continuing education ventures.

  8. Drunk Driving. Surgeon General's Workshop. Proceedings (Washington, D.C., December 14-16, 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus Associates.

    This volume presents solutions, recommendations, and strategies in eleven interrelated areas considered at the Surgeon General's Workshop on Drunk Driving held in Washington, D.C. in December of 1988. Lists of the members of the Workshop Planning Committee and members of the federal advisory group on follow-up activities for the workshop are…

  9. Canadian Hepatitis C Look-Back Investigation to Detect Transmission from an Infected General Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Dawar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In February 2007, a general surgeon in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, tested positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV. The surgeon’s infection onset date could not be determined; however, episodic hepatic enzyme elevations were first detected in November 2004 and again in February 2007. HCV transmission during surgery, alhough rare, has been documented. A phased look-back HCV screening program was conducted to detect HCV transmission from this surgeon to patients who underwent the highest-risk procedures in the three years before his positive test.

  10. General Consumer Awareness of Warnings Regarding the Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtsu,Tadahiro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, the liquor industry in Japan has strived to address alcohol-related problems through initiatives such as warnings in the various media. In this study, we conducted an Internet-based questionnaire survey to examine general consumer awareness of such warnings, and the media by which they are conveyed, on the consumption of alcoholic beverages. A total of 985 subjects (males:487, females:498 in age groups ranging from 20s to 70s responded (response rate:22.4%. The awareness rates for warnings regarding underage drinking, drunk driving, and drinking during pregnancy, and those for messages encouraging moderation in drinking, were 96.4%, 83.7%, 59.6%, and 45.5%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for habitual alcohol consumption demonstrated significant gender- and/or age-based differences in the rates of awareness of warnings and the media publicizing them. For example, the odds ratio of awareness among women of warnings against underage drinking was significantly higher than that of awareness among men. Issues that must be addressed in the future include:(1 increasing public awareness about messages regarding drinking during pregnancy and drinking in moderation;(2 reviewing the wording of warnings to make them more effective;and (3 devising and employing, on a regular basis, more effective means of transmitting messages in consideration of gender and age.

  11. Implantation of peritoneal catheters by laparotomy: nephrologists obtained similar results to general surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo CA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cesar A Restrepo, Carlos Alberto Buitrago, Cielo Holguin Division of Nephrology, Department of Health Sciences, Caldas University, Caldas, ColombiaPurpose: To analyze the complications and costs of minilaparotomies performed by a nephrologist (group A compared with conventional laparotomies performed by a surgeon (group B for peritoneal catheter implantation.Setting: Two university hospitals (Santa Sofia and Caldas in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.Methods: The study included stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients, with indication of renal replacement therapy, who were candidates for peritoneal dialysis and gave informed consent for a peritoneal catheter implant. Minilaparotomies were performed by a nephrologist in a minor surgery room under local anesthesia. Conventional laparotomies were performed by a surgeon in an operating room under general anesthesia.Results: Two nephrologists inserted 157 peritoneal catheters, and seven general surgeons inserted 185 peritoneal catheters. The groups had similar characteristics: the mean age was 55 years, 49.5% were men, and the primary diagnoses were diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and unknown etiology. The implant was successful for 98.09% of group A and 99.46% of group B. There was no procedure-related mortality. The most frequent complications in the first 30 days postsurgery in group A versus group B, respectively, were: peritonitis (6.37% versus 3.78%, exit-site infection (3.82% versus 2.16%, tunnel infection (0% versus 0.54%, catheter entrapment by omentum (1.27% versus 3.24%, peritoneal effluent spillover (1.91% versus 2.16%, draining failure (4.46% versus 6.49%, hematoma (0% versus 1.08%, catheter migration with kinking (3.18% versus 2.70%, hemoperitoneum (1.27% versus 0%, and hollow viscera accidental puncture (1.91% versus 0.54%. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of complications between groups. In 2013, the cost of a surgeon-implanted peritoneal

  12. Comparison of surgical outcomes among infants in neonatal intensive care units treated by pediatric surgeons versus general surgeons: The need for pediatric surgery specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Sung

    2017-01-31

    This study compared the outcomes of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units by pediatric surgeons and by general surgeons. This was a retrospective study of infants who underwent surgery in neonatal intensive care units between 2010 and 2014. A total of 227 patients were included. Of these patients, 116 were operated on by pediatric surgeons (PS) and 111 were operated on by general surgeons (GS). The outcome measures were the overall rate of operative complications, unplanned reoperation, mortality rate, length of stay, operative time, and number of total number of operative procedures. The overall operative complication rate was higher in the GS group compared with the PS group (18.7% vs. 7.0%, p=0.0091). The rate of unplanned reoperations was also higher in the GS group (10.8% vs. 3.5%, p=0.0331). The median operation time (90min vs. 75min, p=0.0474) and median length of stay (24days vs. 18days, p=0.0075) were significantly longer in the GS group. The adjusted odd ratios of postoperative complications for GS were 2.9 times higher than that of PS (OR 2.90, p=0.0352). The operative quality and patient outcomes of the PS group were superior to those of the GS group. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-06-01

    Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and "other," which comprised mostly hand surgery.

  14. Role of the General Surgeon in the Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Charcot Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellés Dechent, Rafael; Rueda Alcárcel, Camilo; Primo Romaguera, Vicent; Martínez Caamaño, Asunción; Asencio Arana, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    The Charcot foot (CF) consists of a progressive deterioration of the bones and joints, most common in diabetic patients with advanced neuropathy. The great problem is that can be confused with other processes, delaying the diagnosis and specific treatment. The aim is to analyze the cases of CF diagnosed in our hospital and especially to highlight the role of the general surgeon. Retrospective study of all registered cases diagnosed of CF between the diabetic population of our Department of Health. A review of the literature was performed. From 2008 to 2012, there 7 cases of CF were diagnosed (prevalence 1:710). Two of the patients were diagnosed erroneously of cellulitis. The average time of delay in the diagnosis was 10 weeks (minimum 1, maximum 24). The initial treatment was immobilization of the extremity. Once the edema was eliminated, an offload orthesis was placed according to Sanders's anatomical classification. Evolution was favorable in 5 patients, 1 patient needed amputation, and other one died of acute cardiac pathology. The CF is a more frequent pathology than we believe. The general surgeon is the fundamental prop in the diagnosis and initial treatment. Before the presence of inflammation and edema of the foot in a patient with diabetes and severe neuropathy, once cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and TVP are ruled out, Charcot neuroarthropathy should be considered. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Joseph Lovell, MD (1788-1836): First US army surgeon general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    Joseph Lovell, trained in medicine at Harvard and in military medicine/surgery by the War of 1812, became the first Surgeon General to sit on the reorganised army staff at the tender age of 29 in 1818. With a keen intellect, medical acumen, and wartime experiences for his tools and a close supporting relationship with Commanding General Jacob Jennings Brown and Secretary of War John C Calhoun (1728-1850), Lovell constructed an efficient and effective organisational and administrative framework for the new Medical Department of the US Army. Moreover, he not only redefined the role of the American military physician but also established the professional dignity, respectability and value of the medical officer among line officers and staff. Lovell's 18-year tenure came to an abrupt end, but the operational framework he created became both foundation and legacy for his successors.

  16. Does general surgery residency prepare surgeons for community practice in British Columbia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hamish

    2009-01-01

    Background Preparing surgeons for clinical practice is a challenging task for postgraduate training programs across Canada. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a single surgeon entering practice was adequately prepared by comparing the type and volume of surgical procedures experienced in the last 3 years of training with that in the first year of clinical practice. Methods During the last 3 years of general surgery training, I logged all procedures. In practice, the Medical Services Plan (MSP) of British Columbia tracks all procedures. Using MSP remittance reports, I compiled the procedures performed in my first year of practice. I totaled the number of procedures and broke them down into categories (general, colorectal, laparoscopic, endoscopic, hepatobiliary, oncologic, pediatric, thoracic, vascular and other). I then compared residency training with community practice. Results I logged a total of 1170 procedures in the last 3 years of residency. Of these, 452 were performed during community rotations. The procedures during residency could be broken down as follows: 392 general, 18 colorectal, 242 laparoscopic, 103 endoscopic, 85 hepatobiliary, 142 oncologic, 1 pediatric, 78 thoracic, 92 vascular and 17 other. I performed a total of 1440 procedures in the first year of practice. In practice the break down was 398 general, 15 colorectal, 101 laparoscopic, 654 endoscopic, 2 hepatobiliary, 77 oncologic, 10 pediatric, 0 thoracic, 70 vascular and 113 other. Conclusion On the whole, residency provided excellent preparation for clinical practice based on my experience. Areas of potential improvement included endoscopy, pediatric surgery and “other,” which comprised mostly hand surgery. PMID:19503663

  17. Career satisfaction among general surgeons in Canada: a qualitative study of enablers and barriers to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Chiu, Mary; Korabi, Bochra; Qureshi, Adnan; Nathens, Avery B; Kitto, Simon

    2012-11-01

    To understand what influences career satisfaction among general surgeons in urban and rural areas in Canada in order to improve recruitment and retention in general surgery. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 general surgeons in 2010 who were members of the Canadian Association of General Surgeons and who currently practice in either an urban or rural area. Interviews explored factors contributing to career satisfaction, as well as suggestions for preventive, screening, or management strategies to support general surgery practice. Findings revealed that both urban and rural general surgeons experienced the most satisfaction from their ability to resolve patient problems quickly and effectively, enhancing their sense of the meaningfulness of their clinical practice. The supportive relationships with colleagues, trainees, and patients was also cited as a key source of career satisfaction. Conversely, insufficient access to resources and a perceived disconnect between hospital administration and clinical practice priorities were raised as key "systems-level" problems. As a result, many participants felt alienated from their work by these systems-level barriers that were perceived to hinder the provision of high-quality patient care. Career satisfaction among both urban and rural general surgeons was influenced positively by the social aspects of their work, such as patient and colleague relationships, as well as a perception of an increasing amount of control and autonomy over their professional commitments. The modern general surgeon values a balance between professional obligations and personal time that may be difficult to achieve given the current system constraints.

  18. Comparison of pediatric appendectomy outcomes between pediatric surgeons and general surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ido; Mazeh, Haggi; Levy, Yair; Karavani, Gilad; Ghanem, Muhammad; Armon, Yaron; Vromen, Amos; Eid, Ahmed; Udassin, Raphael

    2013-04-01

    Appendectomy is the most common urgent procedure in children, and surgical outcomes may be affected by the surgeon's experience. This study's aim is to compare appendectomy outcomes performed by pediatric surgeons (PSs) and general surgery residents (GSRs). A retrospective review of all patients younger than 16y treated for appendicitis at two different campuses of the same institution during the years 2008-2009 was performed. Appendectomies were performed by PS in one campus and GSR in the other. Primary end points included postoperative morbidity and hospital length of stay. During the study period, 246 (61%) patients were operated by senior GSR (postgraduate year 5-7) versus 157 (39%) patients by PS. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics at presentation to the emergency room and the rate of appendeceal perforation (11% versus 15%, P=0.32), and noninfectious appendicitis (5% versus 5% P=0.78) also was similar. Laparoscopic surgery was performed more commonly by GSR (16% versus 9%, P=0.02) with shorter operating time (54±1.5 versus 60±2.1, P=0.01). Interestingly, the emergency room to operating room time was shorter for GSR group (419±14 versus 529±24min, P<0.001). The hospital length of stay was shorter for the GSR group (4.0±0.2 versus 4.5±0.2, P=0.03), and broad-spectrum antibiotics were used less commonly (20% versus 53%, P<0.0001) and so was home antibiotics continuation (13% versus 30%, P<0.0001). Nevertheless, postoperative complication rate was similar (5% versus 7%, P=0.29) and so was the rate of readmissions (2% versus 5%, P=0.52). The results of this study suggest that the presence of a PS does not affect the outcomes of appendectomies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Awat; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Hosseini, Mohsen; Parsa-Yekta, Zohreh; Jamali, Jamshid

    2011-12-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population. This cross-sectional interview-based survey investigated 2,500 people aged 18 years and over, as a representative sample of Tehran population. Latent class regression was applied for analyzing data. A small (18.8%) proportion of the respondents had high level of knowledge, and 54.5% had moderate awareness, and 26.7% had low level of awareness. Most effective predictors for awareness were educational attainment, sex, and marital status. The findings suggest that the overall level of knowledge about warning signs of cancer among the public is low, particularly about some specific signs. Accordingly, educational and intervention programmes, with special attention placed on particular at-risk populations, to increase awareness about the disease leading to its early diagnosis are needed.

  20. Pattern of traumatic brain injury treated by general surgeons in a tertiary referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Shankar Das; Karmakar, Nisith Chandra; Sengupta, Ritankar; SenGupta, Tamal Kanti; Ray, Debasis; Basus, Shibaji

    2013-09-01

    The number of polytrauma patient with associated brain injury or commonly referred as 'head injury' has increased tremendously in recent times courtesy to road traffic accident or other causes. This prospective observational study was conducted in patients of head injury admitted through emergency in the department of general surgery in NRS Medical College, Kolkata during the year 2011 to determine the pattern of head injury patients admitted and nature of intervention. A total number of 3861 patients were admitted in a single year. Obviously this represents the tip of the iceburg. Traumatic brain injury was the highest in the age group of 31-40 years (33.5%) followed by 21-30 years (29.1%) in the most fruitful phase of life. The traumatic brain injury death was more common in males. The maximum number of cases was from rural areas ie, farmers and labours. To minimise the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, rigid enforcement of traffic rules and imparting road safety education to school children. Despite valiant efforts and advancement in medical sciences and infrastructure in the form of neurosurgery departments and trauma care units to cope with the changing world of trauma, there still remains a huge responsibility and a definite part to be played by the general surgeons to manage head injury patient even in tertiary hospitals.

  1. The 2014 Surgeon General's report: commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Report of the Advisory Committee to the US Surgeon General and updating the evidence on the health consequences of cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberg, Anthony J; Shopland, Donald R; Cummings, K Michael

    2014-02-15

    The question of whether cigarette smoking was associated with lung cancer was central to the expansion of epidemiology into the study of chronic diseases in the 1950s. The culmination of this era was the 1964 report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General, a landmark document that included an objective synthesis of the evidence of the health consequences of smoking according to causal criteria. The report concluded that cigarette smoking was a cause of lung cancer in men and sufficient in scope that "remedial action" was warranted at the societal level. The 2014 Surgeon General's report commemorates the 50th anniversary of the 1964 report. The evidence on the health consequences of smoking has been updated many times in Surgeon General's reports since 1964. These have summarized our increasingly greater understanding of the broad spectrum of the deleterious health effects of exposure to tobacco smoke across most major organ systems. In turn, this evidence has been translated into tobacco control strategies implemented to protect the public's health. The Surgeon General report process is an enduring example of evidence-based public health in practice. Substantial progress has been made, but cigarette smoking remains one of the most pressing global health issues of our time.

  2. General surgeon's antibiotic stewardship: Climbing the Rogers Diffusion of Innovation Curve-Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizan, Chantelle; Phee, Jaewon; Boardman, Charlotte; Khera, Goldie

    2017-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to establish concordance of general surgeon's prescribing practice with local IV-oral antibiotic guidelines. The secondary aim was to evaluate the effect of introducing educational antibiotic measures. The Rogers Diffusion of Innovation Model was used to explore the adoption of antibiotic stewardship practices. In this prospective, cohort study, data was collected on 100 pre and 100 post awareness intervention programme patients. The educational intervention comprised raising awareness of a) the guidelines b) pre-intervention results c) introducing an IV-oral antibiotic prompt sheet. The concordance with local guidelines was compared between pre- and post-intervention groups using Fisher's Exact Test or Pearson's Chi Test (SPSS Statistics V22). The concordance of general surgical doctors with local IV-oral antibiotic guidelines was poor and did not improve significantly following the awareness intervention programme. There was no uptake of the antibiotic prompt sheet. There was a trend towards increase in the number of patients switched from IV to oral antibiotics at 48-72 h and significant increase (p review IV antibiotics. Antibiotic governance measures failed to inspire even an initial group of innovators to use the antibiotic prompt sheets. It appears educational measures are effective in improving prescribing behavior and intent amongst a group of early adopters, but this fails to reach a critical mass. In order to improve antibiotic governance and embark upon the Rogers Diffusion of Innovation Curve, more must be done to engage general surgical doctors in timely, judicious antibiotic prescribing. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention of orofacial clefts caused by smoking: implications of the Surgeon General's report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein, Margaret A; Devine, Owen; Grosse, Scott D; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2014-11-01

    According to the 2014 Surgeon General's Report, smoking in early pregnancy can cause orofacial clefts. We sought to examine the implications of this causal link for the potential prevention of orofacial clefts in the United States. Using published data on the strength of the association between orofacial clefts and smoking in early pregnancy and the prevalence of smoking at the start of pregnancy, we estimated the attributable fraction for smoking as a cause of orofacial clefts. We then used the prevalence of orofacial clefts in the United States to estimate the number of orofacial clefts that could be prevented in the United States each year by eliminating exposure to smoking during early pregnancy. We also estimated the financial impact of preventing orofacial clefts caused by maternal smoking based on a published estimate of attributable healthcare costs through age 10 for orofacial clefts. The estimated attributable fraction of orofacial clefts caused by smoking in early pregnancy was 6.1% (95% uncertainty interval 4.4%, 7.7%). Complete elimination of smoking in early pregnancy could prevent orofacial clefts in approximately 430 infants per year in the United States, and could save an estimated $40.4 million in discounted healthcare costs through age 10 for each birth cohort. Understanding the magnitude of the preventable burden of orofacial clefts related to maternal smoking could help focus smoking cessation efforts on women who might become pregnant. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessing Awareness Level about Warning Signs of Cancer and its Determinants in an Iranian General Population

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the awareness level about warning signs of cancer and its determinants in an Iranian general population. This cross-sectional interview-based survey investigated 2,500 people aged 18 years and over, as a representative sample of Tehran population. Latent class regression was applied for analyzing data. A small (18.8%) proportion of the respondents had high level of knowledge, and 54.5% had moderate awareness, and 26.7% had low level of awareness. M...

  5. General versus vascular surgeon: impact of a vascular fellowship on clinical practice, surgical case load, and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Randall W

    2010-02-01

    An applicant shortage for vascular surgery (VS) residencies exists despite an increase in available training positions created to meet the growing demands for vascular surgeons. After 3 years of practice as an American Board of Surgery (ABS)-certified/board-eligible general surgeon, the author of this study attended an accredited 1-year VS training fellowship and received an ABS certificate of Added Qualifications in VS. The purpose of this review was to investigate the implications completing a vascular fellowship has had on VS procedure patterns, vascular procedure competency, clinical practice, career, and lifestyle with the aim of attracting trainees to the field of VS. The author's operative logs were reviewed retrospectively to summarize vascular procedures performed before and after the vascular fellowship. Statistical analysis was performed comparing the types and volume of vascular procedures before and after the vascular fellowship. Changes in professional career and personal life also were examined. The author performed 401 vascular procedures during 2.8 years as a general surgeon. In the first 3.4 years after the vascular fellowship, vascular procedure volume increased to 1563. The mean number of vascular procedures performed per year increased from 143.2 as a general surgeon to 459.7 as a vascular surgeon. The three major differences in vascular procedures occurring after the vascular fellowship were (1) a threefold increase in the number of vascular procedures performed, (2) a shift from major open to venous and endovascular procedures, and (3) an increase in case complexity. Specializing in VS also has resulted in increased career opportunities, more career satisfaction, a direct financial benefit, and more flexibility for lifestyle and family. Because of these positive changes, the author encourages medical students and residents interested in VS to explore the specialty early, seek vascular surgeons to serve as mentors, and enter one of the new VS

  6. Changing guidelines of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and basic life support for general dental practitioners and oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadipelly, Srinivas; Neshangi, Srisha

    2015-06-01

    Every general dental practitioner and oral and maxillofacial surgeon needs a thorough knowledge of the diagnosis and management of medical emergencies. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most urgent of emergencies and diagnosis must be done as soon as possible. This paper discusses the importance of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation which forms the guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), highlighting the important changes in the guidelines of CPR from the year 2000 to 2010, the basic sequence of performing CPR and also the role of defibrillation and the use of automated external defibrillators. Finally the five part chain of survival which is of utmost importance to dental health care professionals and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. All dental health care personnel and oral & maxillofacial surgeons should recognize the importance of the changes in the guidelines of CPR, be trained and allowed to use a properly maintained defibrillator, to respond to cardiac arrest victims.

  7. Comparison of Pediatric and General Orthopedic Surgeons? Approaches in Management of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Flexible Flatfoot: the Road to Clinical Consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramin Haj Zargarbashi; Hirbod Nasiri Bonaki; Shayan Zadegan; Taghi Baghdadi; Mohammad Hossein Nabian; Mehdi Ramezan Shirazi

    2017-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and flatfoot are common pediatric orthopedic disorders, being referred to and managed by both general and pediatric orthopedic surgeons, through various modalities. Our study aimed to evaluate their consensus and perspective disagreements in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the mentioned deformities. Forty participants in two groups of general orthopedic surgeons (GOS) (n=20) and pediatric orthopedic surgeons (POS) (n=20), were asked t...

  8. The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking: What It Means to You. A Guide to Action for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Stephen; Beazley, Hamilton; Fine, Theodora

    2007-01-01

    The Surgeon General, the Nation's top public health officer, is appointed by the President of the United States to help protect and promote the health of the Nation. The recently published "Surgeon General's Call to Action To Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking" [ED496083] highlights underage alcohol use as a major public health and…

  9. Practice patterns and perceptions of margin status for breast conserving surgery for breast carcinoma: National Survey of Canadian General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrics, Peter J; Gordon, Maggie; Cornacchi, Sylvie D; Farrokhyar, Forough; Ramsaroop, Amanda; Hodgson, Nicole; Quan, May Lynn; Wright, Francis; Porter, Geoffrey

    2012-12-01

    We surveyed Canadian General Surgeons to examine decision-making in early stage breast cancer. A modified Dillman Method was used for this mail survey of 1443 surgeons. Practice patterns and factors that influence management choices for: preoperative assessment, definition of margin status, surgical techniques and recommendations for re-excision were assessed. The response rate was 51% with 41% treating breast cancer. Most (80%) were community surgeons, with equal distribution of low/medium/high volume and years of practice categories. Approximately 25% of surgeons "sometimes or frequently" performed diagnostic excisional biopsies while 90% report "frequently" or "always" performing preoperative core biopsies. There was marked variation in defining negative and close margins, in the use of intra-operative margin assessment techniques and recommendations for re-excision. Responses revealed significant variation in attitudes and practices. These findings likely reflect an absence of consensus in the literature and potential gaps between best evidence and practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. If the data contradict the theory, throw out the data: Nicotine addiction in the 2010 report of the Surgeon General

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frenk Hanan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reports of US Surgeon General on smoking are considered the authoritative statement on the scientific state of the art in this field. The previous report on nicotine addiction published in 1988 is one of the most cited references in scientific articles on smoking and often the only citation provided for specific statements of facts regarding nicotine addiction. In this commentary we review the chapter on nicotine addiction presented in the recent report of the Surgeon General. We show that the nicotine addiction model presented in this chapter, which closely resembles its 22 years old predecessor, could only be sustained by systematically ignoring all contradictory evidence. As a result, the present SG's chapter on nicotine addiction, which purportedly "documents how nicotine compares with heroin and cocaine in its hold on users and its effects on the brain," is remarkably biased and misleading.

  11. If the data contradict the theory, throw out the data: Nicotine addiction in the 2010 report of the Surgeon General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Hanan; Dar, Reuven

    2011-05-19

    The reports of US Surgeon General on smoking are considered the authoritative statement on the scientific state of the art in this field. The previous report on nicotine addiction published in 1988 is one of the most cited references in scientific articles on smoking and often the only citation provided for specific statements of facts regarding nicotine addiction. In this commentary we review the chapter on nicotine addiction presented in the recent report of the Surgeon General. We show that the nicotine addiction model presented in this chapter, which closely resembles its 22 years old predecessor, could only be sustained by systematically ignoring all contradictory evidence. As a result, the present SG's chapter on nicotine addiction, which purportedly "documents how nicotine compares with heroin and cocaine in its hold on users and its effects on the brain," is remarkably biased and misleading.

  12. Reducing Tobacco Use. A report of the Surgeon General. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-22

    This report of the Surgeon General on smoking and health, Reducing Tobacco Use, appears at a time of considerable upheaval in the arena of tobacco use control and prevention. Legal and legislative efforts to protect children from tobacco initiation and to diminish the prevalence of smoking among adults are in a state of flux, with some important gains and some sobering setbacks. Major changes in the public stance of the tobacco industry have evoked a reevaluation of strategies for controlling and preventing tobacco uptake. Enormous monetary settlements have provided the resources to fuel major new comprehensive antitobacco efforts, but the ultimate cost and benefit of these resources are still to be determined. Into this changing landscape, the report introduces an assessment of information about the value and efficacy of the major approaches that have been used--educational, clinical, regulatory, economic, and comprehensive--to reduce tobacco use. The report evaluates the scientific evidence for each approach, attempts to place the approaches in the larger context of tobacco control, and provides a vision of the trajectory for tobacco use prevention and control based on these available tools. Thus, although our knowledge about tobacco control remains imperfect, we know more than enough to act now. Widespread dissemination of the approaches and methods shown to be effective in each modality and especially in combination would substantially reduce the number of young people who will become addicted to tobacco, increase the success rate of young people and adults trying to quit using tobacco, decrease the level of exposure of nonsmokers to environmental tobacco smoke, reduce the disparities related to tobacco use and its health effects among different population groups, and decrease the future health burden of tobacco-related disease and death in this country. These achievable improvements parallel the health objectives set forth in Healthy People 2010, the national

  13. Umbilical endometriosis mimicking as papilloma to general surgeons: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Singh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionCutaneous or umbilical endometriosis is a rare entity that isoften overlooked because of chronic abdominal pain. Wepresent a case of umbilical hernia that presented to thegeneral surgeons due to chronic abdominal pain and nodulein the umbilicus, which was clinically diagnosed as umbilicalpapilloma.Case presentationA 48-year old multiparous Caucasian woman presented withpainful nodule in the umbilicus for two and half years. Thenodule was excised and the histopathological diagnosis wasumbilicus endometriosis.ConclusionUmbilical endometriosis is a very rare disease but should beconsidered as a differential diagnosis in women presentingwith umbilical swelling.

  14. [What do general, abdominal and vascular surgeons need to know on plastic surgery - aspects of plastic surgery in the field of general, abdominal and vascular surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damert, H G; Altmann, S; Stübs, P; Infanger, M; Meyer, F

    2015-02-01

    There is overlap between general, abdominal and vascular surgery on one hand and plastic surgery on the other hand, e.g., in hernia surgery, in particular, recurrent hernia, reconstruction of the abdominal wall or defect closure after abdominal or vascular surgery. Bariatric operations involve both special fields too. Plastic surgeons sometimes use skin and muscle compartments of the abdominal wall for reconstruction at other regions of the body. This article aims to i) give an overview about functional, anatomic and clinical aspects as well as the potential of surgical interventions in plastic surgery. General/abdominal/vascular surgeons can benefit from this in their surgical planning and competent execution of their own surgical interventions with limited morbidity/lethality and an optimal, in particular, functional as well as aesthetic outcome, ii) support the interdisciplinary work of general/abdominal/vascular and plastic surgery, and iii) provide a better understanding of plastic surgery and its profile of surgical interventions and options.

  15. Accounting for graduate medical education production of primary care physicians and general surgeons: timing of measurement matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petterson, Stephen; Burke, Matthew; Phillips, Robert; Teevan, Bridget

    2011-05-01

    Legislation proposed in 2009 to expand GME set institutional primary care and general surgery production eligibility thresholds at 25% at entry into training. The authors measured institutions' production of primary care physicians and general surgeons on completion of first residency versus two to four years after graduation to inform debate and explore residency expansion and physician workforce implications. Production of primary care physicians and general surgeons was assessed by retrospective analysis of the 2009 American Medical Association Masterfile, which includes physicians' training institution, residency specialty, and year of completion for up to six training experiences. The authors measured production rates for each institution based on physicians completing their first residency during 2005-2007 in family or internal medicine, pediatrics, or general surgery. They then reassessed rates to account for those who completed additional training. They compared these rates with proposed expansion eligibility thresholds and current workforce needs. Of 116,004 physicians completing their first residency, 54,245 (46.8%) were in primary care and general surgery. Of 683 training institutions, 586 met the 25% threshold for expansion eligibility. At two to four years out, only 29,963 physicians (25.8%) remained in primary care or general surgery, and 135 institutions lost eligibility. A 35% threshold eliminated 314 institutions collectively training 93,774 residents (80.8%). Residency expansion thresholds that do not account for production at least two to four years after completion of first residency overestimate eligibility. The overall primary care production rate from GME will not sustain the current physician workforce composition. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  16. Evaluation of Effective Factors on the Clinical Performance of General Surgeons in Tehran University of Medical Science, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Mohamadi, Efat; najafpour, Zhila; Yousefinezhadi, Taraneh; Forootan, Sara; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Existence of doctors with high performance is one of the necessary conditions to provide high quality services. There are different motivations, which could affect their performance. Recognizing Factors which effect the performance of doctors as an effective force in health care centers is necessary. The aim of this article was evaluate the effective factors which influence on clinical performance of general surgery of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Methods: This is a cross-sectional qualitative-quantitative study. This research conducted in 3 phases-phases I: (use of library studies and databases to collect data), phase II: localization of detected factors in first phase by using the Delphi technique and phase III: prioritizing the affecting factors on performance of doctors by using qualitative interviews. Results: 12 articles were analyzed from 300 abstracts during the evaluation process. The output of assessment identified 23 factors was sent to surgeons and their assistants for obtaining their opinions. Quantitative analysis of the findings showed that “work qualification” (86.1%) and “managers and supervisors style” (50%) have respectively the most and the least impact on the performance of doctors. Finally 18 effective factors were identified and prioritized in the performance of general surgeons. Conclusion: The results showed that motivation and performance is not a single operating parameter and it depends on several factors according to cultural background. Therefore it is necessary to design, implementation and monitoring based on key determinants of effective interventions due to cultural background. PMID:27157161

  17. The Surgeon General's Report and special-needs patients: a framework for action for children and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavkin, H C

    2001-01-01

    The Surgeon General's Report, Oral Health in America, is the first comprehensive assessment of oral, dental, and craniofacial health in the history of our nation. The intent of this first-ever Report is to alert Americans to the full meaning of oral health and its importance to general health and well-being across the lifespan. Moreover, the Report has been released at a time in human history of enormous changes as well as opportunities. The convergence of public health policies, "quality of life" expectations, global informatics, a new century of biotechnology, the completion of the Human Genome Project, changes in the management of health care, and the acknowledgment of enormous health disparities herald a call to action. These profound dynamics particularly affect children and their caregivers and the multitude of social, economic, and health issues associated with special patients and developmental disabilities. This paper will highlight the issues, provide recommendations, and suggest a call to action.

  18. Reliable assessment of general surgeons' non-technical skills based on video-recordings of patient simulated scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Dieckmann, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training.......Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training....

  19. Appearance of urology at the beginining of xxth century -from the general surgeon up to the highly trained specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Ivan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolvement of urology as a separate scientific discipline depends on several factors. Endoscopic diagnostics, radiological diagnostics, and operative techniques in general surgery, had provided an ability to perform more complex and longer operations. Urology had evolved from the great schools of surgery in Germany and France, and their the most important surgeons, who were intersted in urological surgery. The first endoscope was introduced in 1806, and received today’s form in 1879. Application of "X" rays in medicine started in 1895, and it was later applied as a cystography, retrograde pyelography as well as intravenous urography. The most important thing for the operative technique evolution were application of anhestesia, asepsis and new hemostatic devices. During the one century long development, urology had passed the way from completely unknown field, up to the discipline with the best diagnostic preciseness.

  20. Dealing with sickness certification – a survey of problems and strategies among general practitioners and orthopaedic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Gunnar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to get sickness benefit a sick-listed person need a medical certificate issued by a physician; in Sweden after one week of self-certification. Physicians experience sick-listing tasks as problematic and conflicts may arise when patients regard themselves unable to work due to complaints that are hard to objectively verify for the physician. Most GPs and orthopaedic surgeons (OS deal regularly with sick-listing issues in their daily practice. The aim of this study was to explore perceived problems and coping strategies related to tasks of sickness certification among general practitioners (GP and orthopaedic surgeons (OS. Methods A cross-sectional study about sickness certification in two Swedish counties, with 673 participating GPs and 149 OSs, who answered a comprehensive questionnaire. Frequencies together with crude and adjusted (gender and working years Odds ratios were calculated. Results A majority of the GPs and OSs experienced problems in sickness certification every week. To assess the patient's work ability, to handle situations when they and the patient had different opinions about the need for sickness absence, and to issue prolongation certificates when the previous was issued by another physician were reported as problematic by a majority in both groups. Both GPs and OSs prolonged sickness certifications due to waiting times in health care or at Social Insurance Office (SIO. To handle experienced problems they used different strategies; OSs issued sickness certificates without personal appointment more often than the GPs, who on the other hand reported having contact with SIO more often than the OSs. A higher rate of GPs experienced support from management and had a common strategy for handling sickness certification at the clinic than the OSs. Conclusion Most GPs and OSs handled sickness certification weekly and reported a variety of problems in relation to this task, generally GPs to a higher extent

  1. Implementation of an electronic surgical referral service. Collaboration, consensus and cost of the surgeongeneral practitioner Delphi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augestad KM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Knut Magne Augestad,1–3 Arthur Revhaug,1,3 Roar Johnsen,4 Stein-Olav Skrøvseth,2 Rolv-Ole Lindsetmo1,3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, 2Department of Integrated Care and Telemedicine, University Hospital North Norway, Tromsø, Norway; 3Department of Colorectal Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 4Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background: Poor coordination between levels of care plays a central role in determining the quality and cost of health care. To improve patient coordination, systematic structures, guidelines, and processes for creating, transferring, and recognizing information are needed to facilitate referral routines. Methods: Prospective observational survey of implementation of electronic medical record (EMR-supported guidelines for surgical treatment. Results: One university clinic, two local hospitals, 31 municipalities, and three EMR vendors participated in the implementation project. Surgical referral guidelines were developed using the Delphi method; 22 surgeons and seven general practitioners (GPs needed 109 hours to reach consensus. Based on consensus guidelines, an electronic referral service supported by a clinical decision support system, fully integrated into the GPs' EMR, was developed. Fifty-five information technology personnel and 563 hours were needed (total cost 67,000 £ to implement a guideline supported system in the EMR for 139 GPs. Economical analyses from a hospital and societal perspective, showed that 504 (range 401–670 and 37 (range 29–49 referred patients, respectively, were needed to provide a cost-effective service. Conclusion: A considerable amount of resources were needed to reach consensus on the surgical referral guidelines. A structured approach by the Delphi method and close collaboration between IT personnel, surgeons and primary care physicians were needed to

  2. European Association of Endoscopic Surgeons (EAES) consensus statement on the use of robotics in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szold, Amir; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Broeders, Ivo; Dankelman, Jenny; Forgione, Antonello; Langø, Thomas; Melzer, Andreas; Mintz, Yoav; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Rhodes, Michael; Satava, Richard; Tang, Chung-Ngai; Vilallonga, Ramon

    2015-02-01

    Following an extensive literature search and a consensus conference with subject matter experts the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. Robotic surgery is still at its infancy, and there is a great potential in sophisticated electromechanical systems to perform complex surgical tasks when these systems evolve. 2. To date, in the vast majority of clinical settings, there is little or no advantage in using robotic systems in general surgery in terms of clinical outcome. Dedicated parameters should be addressed, and high quality research should focus on quality of care instead of routine parameters, where a clear advantage is not to be expected. 3. Preliminary data demonstrates that robotic system have a clinical benefit in performing complex procedures in confined spaces, especially in those that are located in unfavorable anatomical locations. 4. There is a severe lack of high quality data on robotic surgery, and there is a great need for rigorously controlled, unbiased clinical trials. These trials should be urged to address the cost-effectiveness issues as well. 5. Specific areas of research should include complex hepatobiliary surgery, surgery for gastric and esophageal cancer, revisional surgery in bariatric and upper GI surgery, surgery for large adrenal masses, and rectal surgery. All these fields show some potential for a true benefit of using current robotic systems. 6. Robotic surgery requires a specific set of skills, and needs to be trained using a dedicated, structured training program that addresses the specific knowledge, safety issues and skills essential to perform this type of surgery safely and with good outcomes. It is the responsibility of the corresponding professional organizations, not the industry, to define the training and credentialing of robotic basic skills and specific procedures. 7. Due to the special economic environment in which robotic surgery is currently employed special care should be taken in the decision making process when

  3. A General Introduction of the Earthquake Early Warning System Technology Developed in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008, a dramatic progress on earthquake early warning (EEW) has been made by Institute of Care-life (ICL) in China. The research on EEW by ICL covers choosing appropriate sensors, methods of installing the sensors, data automatic process methods of the seismic waves for EEW, methods of applying of EEW warnings for public, schools and life-line projects. ICL innovatively applies distributed computing and cloud computing technology. So far, ICL has deployed over 5500 EEW sensors in China, which is 5 times the number of EEW sensors in Japan, covering more than 2.1 million square kilometers. Since June, 2011, over 5000 earthquakes, with 28 of them are destructive quakes, have triggered the EEWS with no false alert. The root mean square (RMS) error of the magnitude for the 28 destructive quakes is 0.32. In addition, innovative work is done to suppress false alarm and miss alarm, which pushes forward the application of EEW in China. The technology is also being applied in Nepal now.

  4. The doctor and the market: about the influence of market reforms on the professional medical ethics of surgeons and general practitioners in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarswaard, J.; Hilhorst, M.; Trappenburg, M.

    2011-01-01

    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2-3 years aft

  5. Meteorological Integration for the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System: General Guidance for BWIC Cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, William J.; Wang, Weiguo; Rutz, Frederick C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Xie, YuLong; Seiple, Timothy E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2007-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for developing systems to detect the release of aerosolized bioagents in urban environments. The system that accomplishes this, known as BioWatch, is a robust first-generation monitoring system. In conjunction with the BioWatch detection network, DHS has also developed a software tool for cities to use to assist in their response when a bioagent is detected. This tool, the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization (BWIC) System, will eventually be deployed to all BioWatch cities to aid in the interpretation of the public health significance of indicators from the BioWatch networks. BWIC consists of a set of integrated modules, including meteorological models, that estimate the effect of a biological agent on a city’s population once it has been detected. For the meteorological models in BWIC to successfully calculate the distribution of biological material, they must have as input accurate meteorological data, and wind fields in particular. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for cities to use in identifying sources of good-quality local meteorological data that BWIC needs to function properly. This process of finding sources of local meteorological data, evaluating the data quality and gaps in coverage, and getting the data into BWIC, referred to as meteorological integration, is described. The good news for many cities is that meteorological measurement networks are becoming increasingly common. Most of these networks allow their data to be distributed in real time via the internet. Thus, cities will often only need to evaluate the quality of available measurements and perhaps add a modest number of stations where coverage is poor.

  6. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Irving B

    2006-08-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in November 1939. He made many contributions to surgical care, particularly in the field of oncology. He attended to many famous people, including King George V and Sigmund Freud and was greatly honoured in his own milieu. He was named honorary surgeon and Sargent Surgeon to the king. In addition, he was a thoughtful individual who addressed problems in human behaviour, contradicting the stereotype of the contemporary surgeon.

  7. [What Must the (Abdominal) Surgeon Know about Experimental Medicine (?) - Translational Research in General (Abdominal) Surgery(Viszeral-)Chirurg & experimentelle Medizin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, T; Kuester, D; Meyer, F

    2015-08-01

    Experimental medicine has evolved tremendously in the last few years. In particular, the introduction of novel techniques, in-vitro models, knock-out/transgenic animals and high-through put analytical methodologies have resulted in a deeper understanding of cellular pathophysiology and diseases. The daily clinical management has benefited by the introduction of biomarkers and targeted therapies. This development has been accompanied by increasing specialisation across all fields of research and medicine. Therefore, clinical-translational research requires a team of competent partners nowadays. The visceral surgeon can contribute significantly to these projects. The present review highlights several aspects of translational research and put chances and potential pitfalls into perspective in context with the work of the visceral surgeon.

  8. Comparison of Pediatric and General Orthopedic Surgeons' Approaches in Management of Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Flexible Flatfoot: the Road to Clinical Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarbashi, Ramin Haj; Bonaki, Hirbod Nasiri; Zadegan, Shayan Abdollah; Baghdadi, Taghi; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Shirazi, Mehdi Ramezan

    2017-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and flatfoot are common pediatric orthopedic disorders, being referred to and managed by both general and pediatric orthopedic surgeons, through various modalities. Our study aimed to evaluate their consensus and perspective disagreements in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of the mentioned deformities. Forty participants in two groups of general orthopedic surgeons (GOS) (n=20) and pediatric orthopedic surgeons (POS) (n=20), were asked to answer an 8-item questionnaire on DDH and flexible flatfoot. The questions were provided with two- or multiple choices and a single choice was accepted for each one. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests was performed to compare the responses. For a neonate with limited hip abduction, hip ultrasonography was the agreed-upon approach in both groups (100% POS vs 71% GOS), and for its interpretation 79% of POS relied on their own whereas 73% of GOS relied on radiologist's report (P=0.002). In failure of a 3-week application of the Pavlik harness, ending it and closed reduction (57% POS vs. 41% GOS) followed by surgery quality assessment with CT scan (64% POS vs. 47% GOS) and without the necessity for avascular necrosis evaluation (79% POS vs. 73% GOS) were the choice measures. In case of closed reduction failure, open reduction via medial approach was the favorite next step in both groups (62% POS and 80% GOS). For the patient with flexible flat foot, reassurance was the choice plan of 79% of pediatric orthopedists. Our findings demonstrated significant disagreements among the orthopedic surgeons. This proposes insufficiency of high-level evidence.

  9. Mentoring surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    From time immemorial mentoring has been the angular stone sustaining the building of medical and surgical education. Good teachers are not necessarily good mentors, and good mentors are not always good teachers. A combination of both is very plausible and should be encouraged. Today, the qualities of a good mentor, in our case the surgeon-mentor, should include respect, time, commitment, trust, determination, encouragement, patience, and opportunity for independence. The mentee would need to respond to similar virtues of trust, encouragement, and respect. The reciprocal consideration of equally divided roles would be clearly desirable. Recognizing the importance of a good mentor and making this role the priority of medical schools would enhance our ability to form better professionals. It would certainly promote professionalism, better patient care, and research.

  10. Adherence of Surgeons to Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Guidelines in a Tertiary General Hospital in a Rapidly Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel-Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the standard practice of care of surgeons regarding surgical antibiotic prophylaxis, to identify gaps, and to set recommendations. Methods. A retrospective analysis of data obtained from different surgical units in a single center in Qatar over a 3-month period in 2012. A total of 101 patients who underwent surgery and followed regimes for surgical prophylaxis as per hospital guidelines were included in the study. Results. The overall use of antibiotic was 89%, whereas the current practice did not match the recommended hospital protocols in 53.5% of cases. Prolonged antibiotics use (59.3% was the commonest reason for nonadherence followed by the use of an alternative antibiotic to that recommended in the protocol (31.5% and no prophylaxis was used in 9.2% of cases. The rate of compliance was significantly higher among clean surgery than clean contaminated group (P=0.03. Forty-four percent of clean and 65% of clean-contaminated procedures showed noncompliance with the recommended surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis hospital guidelines. Conclusion. Lack of adherence to hospital protocols is not uncommon. This finding remains a challenge to encourage clinicians to follow hospital guidelines appropriately and to consistently apply the surgical antibiotic prophylaxis. The role of clinical pharmacist may facilitate this process across all surgical disciplines.

  11. Teaching Generalized Reading of Product Warning Labels to Young Adults with Autism Using the Constant Time Delay Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogoe, Maud S.; Banda, Devender R.; Lock, Robin H.; Feinstein, Rita

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the constant timed delay procedure for teaching two young adults with autism to read, define, and state the contextual meaning of keywords on product warning labels of common household products. Training sessions were conducted in the dyad format using flash cards. Results indicated that both participants…

  12. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Anne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. METHODS: Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+) in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate). Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. RESULTS: Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia), hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%). Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache), with slurred speech (54%) as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland). CONCLUSION: Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  13. Stroke awareness in the general population: knowledge of stroke risk factors and warning signs in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Emer

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. Methods Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+ in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate. Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. Results Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%. Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache, with slurred speech (54% as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland. Conclusion Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  14. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460...

  15. 76 FR 24901 - Request for Input To Inform a Possible Surgeon General Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth AGENCY: National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes...: The National Institute on Drug Abuse, a Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health, is... General response to the public health problem of prescription drug abuse among youth....

  16. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of General Surgeons Regarding Pediatric Inguinal Hernia at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Sindh

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpa Goswami; Samreen Memon; Nand Lal Kella

    2014-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a most common surgical condition worldwide during infancy. In spite of significant improvements in pediatric surgery it still carries mortality and morbidity due to delay between diagnosis and surgical intervention. A delay in the treatment of inguinal hernia may lead to incarceration and strangulation. In developing countries like us the risk of incarceration and complications is much higher due to delay in seeking treatment due to lack of awareness among parents, general ...

  17. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of General Surgeons Regarding Pediatric Inguinal Hernia at Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro Sindh

    OpenAIRE

    Pushpa Goswami; Samreen Memon; Nand Lal Kella

    2014-01-01

    Inguinal hernia is a most common surgical condition worldwide during infancy. In spite of significant improvements in pediatric surgery it still carries mortality and morbidity due to delay between diagnosis and surgical intervention. A delay in the treatment of inguinal hernia may lead to incarceration and strangulation. In developing countries like us the risk of incarceration and complications is much higher due to delay in seeking treatment due to lack of awareness among parents, general ...

  18. [The robotic surgeon training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Alessandro; Rossanese, Marta; Abbinante, Maria; Calandriello, Mattia; Kungulli, Afrovita; Giannarini, Gianluca; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The widespread robotic surgery in the world highlighted the relevance of the training programs for young urologists and residents. In the last years, urologic societies and some independent robotic surgeons strongly worked to standardize some general and specific training modules. Theoretical and practical sections of robotic training programs have been recently specified. The role of simulators, dry and wet laboratories, bedside assistance, and modular (step-by-step) training at console represent the most relevant elements of robotic surgeon training. Ideally, these didactic tools should be available in modern training centers. The development of structured robotic training programs should be considered as one of the priorities that the urologic community must take into account in the near future.

  19. Preliminary validation of a consumer-oriented colorectal cancer risk assessment tool compatible with the US Surgeon General's My Family Health Portrait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feero, W Gregory; Facio, Flavia M; Glogowski, Emily A; Hampel, Heather L; Stopfer, Jill E; Eidem, Haley; Pizzino, Amy M; Barton, David K; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the analytic validity of a software tool designed to provide individuals with risk assessments for colorectal cancer based on personal health and family history information. The software is compatible with the US Surgeon General's My Family Health Portrait (MFHP). An algorithm for risk assessment was created using accepted colorectal risk assessment guidelines and programmed into a software tool (MFHP). Risk assessments derived from 150 pedigrees using the MFHP tool were compared with "gold standard" risk assessments developed by three expert cancer genetic counselors. Genetic counselor risk assessments showed substantial, but not perfect, agreement. MFHP risk assessments for colorectal cancer yielded a sensitivity for colorectal cancer risk of 81% (95% confidence interval: 54-96%) and specificity of 90% (95% confidence interval: 83-94%), as compared with genetic counselor pedigree review. The positive predictive value for risk for MFHP was 48% (95% confidence interval: 29-68%), whereas the negative predictive value was 98% (95% confidence interval: 93-99%). Agreement between MFHP and genetic counselor pedigree review was moderate (κ = 0.54). The analytic validity of the MFHP colorectal cancer risk assessment software is similar to those of other types of screening tools used in primary care. Future investigations should explore the clinical validity and utility of the software in diverse population groups.Genet Med 17 9, 753-756.

  20. The surgeon and the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    For many reasons pediatric surgeons have been asked to do all general and thoracic procedures in children. The profession has responded by training more, but the core of special cases requiring pediatric surgical expertise has not changed, and there is concern that the many surgeons now in training will not each do enough cases to attain and maintain operative expertise. This presentation examines the psychological, educational, and surgical literature on the development of expertise, especially operative expertise. From this I conclude that individual surgeon volume when gained in deliberate practice with a coach and with effort is essential, and that several technologies hold promise for allowing deliberate practice in simulation environments. I propose that in order to avoid a decline in pediatric surgical operative expertise we must reorganize pediatric surgical training and practice to align with Optimal Resources for Children's Surgery and the evolution of training in general surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgeon length of service and risk-adjusted outcomes: linked observational analysis of the UK National Adult Cardiac Surgery Audit Registry and General Medical Council Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Graeme L; Grant, Stuart W; Freemantle, Nick; Cunningham, David; Munsch, Christopher M; Livesey, Steven A; Roxburgh, James; Buchan, Iain; Bridgewater, Ben

    2014-09-01

    To explore the relationship between in-hospital mortality following adult cardiac surgery and the time since primary clinical qualification for the responsible consultant cardiac surgeon (a proxy for experience). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected national registry data over a 10-year period using mixed-effects multiple logistic regression modelling. Surgeon experience was defined as the time between the date of surgery and award of primary clinical qualification. UK National Health Service hospitals performing cardiac surgery between January 2003 and December 2012. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafts and/or valve surgery under the care of a consultant cardiac surgeon. All-cause in-hospital mortality. A total of 292,973 operations performed by 273 consultant surgeons (with lengths of service from 11.2 to 42.0 years) were included. Crude mortality increased approximately linearly until 33 years service, before decreasing. After adjusting for case-mix and year of surgery, there remained a statistically significant (p=0.002) association between length of service and in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 1.013; 95% CI 1.005-1.021 for each year of 'experience'). Consultant cardiac surgeons take on increasingly complex surgery as they gain experience. With this progression, the incidence of adverse outcomes is expected to increase, as is demonstrated in this study. After adjusting for case-mix using the EuroSCORE, we observed an increased risk of mortality in patients operated on by longer serving surgeons. This finding may reflect under-adjustment for risk, unmeasured confounding or a real association. Further research into outcomes over the time course of surgeon's careers is required. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  2. An examination of the advances in science and technology of prevention of tooth decay in young children since the Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Zero, Domenick T; Tanzer, Jason M

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses a number of areas related to how effectively science and technology have met Healthy People 2010 goals for tooth decay prevention. In every area mentioned, it appears that science and technology are falling short of these goals. Earlier assessments identified water fluoridation as one of the greatest public health accomplishments of the last century. Yet, failure to complete needed clinical and translational research has shortchanged the caries prevention agenda at a critical juncture. Science has firmly established the transmissible nature of tooth decay. However, there is evidence that tooth decay in young children is increasing, although progress has been made in other age groups. Studies of risk assessment have not been translated into improved practice. Antiseptics, chlorhexidine varnish, and polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine (PVI-I) may have value, but definitive trials are needed. Fluorides remain the most effective agents, but are not widely disseminated to the most needy. Fluoride varnish provides a relatively effective topical preventive for very young children, yet definitive trials have not been conducted. Silver diamine fluoride also has potential but requires study in the United States. Data support effectiveness and safety of xylitol, but adoption is not widespread. Dental sealants remain a mainstay of public policy, yet after decades of research, widespread use has not occurred. We conclude that research has established the public health burden of tooth decay, but insufficient research addresses the problems identified in the report Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Transfer of technology from studies to implementation is needed to prevent tooth decay among children. This should involve translational research and implementation of scientific and technological advances into practice.

  3. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  5. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Lu; WANG; Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors.They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army.However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy?It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can’t possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  6. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ... Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ...

  7. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ...

  8. Surgeon compensation and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, K K; Walker, P M

    2000-06-01

    Financial incentives are the only form of compensation that will motivate surgeons at an academic health sciences center to perform the tasks outlined in the hospital's mission statement. A questionnaire divided into 5 sections: demographics, compensation, time allocation, benefits and incentives, and motivational factors. The Department of Surgery, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. All academic surgeons (N=64) practicing at The Toronto Hospital in July 1997. Of the 64 eligible mailed surveys, there were responses for 59. Of these 59 surgeons, 48 (81%) receive compensation through a fee-for-service method. However, only 32 (54%) of the surgeons prefer the fee-for-service method, while 18 (31%) prefer salary and 9 (15%) prefer an alternative system. On average, these academic surgeons spend 44% of their time teaching or performing research, for which they receive 14% of their total income. Of the motivational factors assessed, financial bonuses are a positive motivational factor for all "surgeon tasks." In addition, task-specific motivational factors were established for research, teaching, and operating, including research facilities, mentorship and prestige, and interesting case types, respectively. Surgeons are not appropriately renumerated for time spent on academic activities, and many would prefer an alternative form of compensation to the fee-for-service method. Knowledge that surgeons are receptive to tasks supporting the hospital's mission statement leads us to conclude that appropriate motivation can shape the activity of academic surgeons. Financial rewards ranked the highest as a motivational factor for all surgeon tasks; however, task-specific motivational factors were identified. Overall, multiple factors, specifically targeted to the individual, will serve to motivate. Thus, compensation packages based on individual preferences and personal motivational factors will be the most successful.

  9. The general practitioner and the surgeon: stereotypes and medical specialties O clínico e o cirurgião: esteriótipos e especialidades médicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Lacerda Bellodi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate and characterize the professional stereotypes associated with general medicine and surgery among Brazilian medical residents. METHODS: A randomized sample of residents of the General Medicine and Surgery Residence Programs were interviewed and their perceptions and views of general and surgical doctors were compared. RESULTS: The general practitioner was characterized by the residents in general to be principally a sensitive and concerned doctor with a close relationship with the patient; (45%; calm, tranquil, and balanced (27%; with intellectual skills (25%; meticulous and attentive to details (23%; slow to resolve problems and make decisions (22%; and working more with probabilities and hypotheses (20%. The surgeon was considered to be practical and objective (40%; quickly resolving problems (35%; technical with manual skills (23%; omnipotent, arrogant, and domineering (23%; anxious, stressed, nervous, and temperamental (23%; and more decided, secure, and courageous (20%. Only the residents of general medicine attributed the surgeon with less knowledge of medicine and only the surgeons attributed gender characteristics to their own specialty. CONCLUSION: There was considerable similarity in the description of a typical general practitioner and surgeon among the residents in general, regardless of the specialty they had chosen. It was interesting to observe that these stereotypes persist despite the transformations in the history of medicine, i.e. the first physicians (especially regarding the valorization of knowledge and the first surgeons, so-called "barber surgeons" in Brazil (associated with less knowledge and the performance of high-risk procedures.OBJETIVOS: Investigar e caracterizar entre residentes brasileiros os estereótipos profissionais associados ao médico clínico e ao cirurgião. METODOLOGIA: uma amostra randomizada de residentes dos programas de Clínica Médica e Cirurgia foi entrevistada e suas

  10. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the...

  11. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  12. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Scholars in Residence Clinical Trials Methods Course Health Services Research Methods Course Surgeon Specific Registry NSQIP Annual ... Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Gaza Strip Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey ...

  13. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care for You How to Use Apps and Social Media for Your Practice Why Participation in the STS ... STS_CTsurgery Surgeons Residents & Students Allied ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society ...

  14. A human-machine system with warning function and general failed system repair time distribution%具有预警功能和可修复储备部件的人-机系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩筱爽; 方明

    2014-01-01

    在具有可修复储备部件的人机系统基础上,增加一个预警状态,使其变为预警系统,利用线性算子半群理论证明了系统非负时间依赖解的存在唯一性、渐进稳定性和指数稳定性,最后通过数值计算得出在一定条件下预警系统与非预警系统的稳态可用度的相对误差趋近于0.%Based on a model representing human-machine system with general failed system repair time distri-bution,we added a warning state and make it into a system with warning function.We proved non-negative time-dependent existence and uniqueness,asymptotic stability and exponential stability of system solution by the linear operator semi-group theory.At last,by using numerical calculation,we concluded that,under cer-tain condition,the steady-state availability’s relative error of warning system and non-warning system is tend to be zero.

  15. Warning systems and public warning response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1993-09-01

    This background paper reviews current knowledge on warning systems and human response to warnings. It expands on an earlier paper prepared for a workshop on the Second Assessment on Natural Hazards, held in Estes Park, Colorado in July 1992. Although it has a North American perspective, many of the lessons learned are universally applicable. The paper addresses warning systems in terms of dissemination and does not cover physical science issues associated with prediction and forecast. Finally, it covers hazards with relatively short lead times -- 48 hours or less. It does not address topics such as long-term forecasts of earthquakes or volcanic eruptions or early famine warning systems.

  16. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  17. Wind gust warning verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Operational meteorological centres around the world increasingly include warnings as one of their regular forecast products. Warnings are issued to warn the public about extreme weather situations that might occur leading to damages and losses. In forecasting these extreme events, meteorological centres help their potential users in preventing the damage or losses they might suffer. However, verifying these warnings requires specific methods. This is due not only to the fact that they happen rarely, but also because a new temporal dimension is added when defining a warning, namely the time window of the forecasted event. This paper analyses the issues that might appear when dealing with warning verification. It also proposes some new verification approaches that can be applied to wind warnings. These new techniques are later applied to a real life example, the verification of wind gust warnings at the German Meteorological Centre ("Deutscher Wetterdienst"). Finally, the results obtained from the latter are discussed.

  18. Warning Signs of Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to talk to kids about bullying. Respond to Bullying Learn how to respond to bullying . From stopping ... Text Size: A A A Warning Signs for Bullying There are many warning signs that may indicate ...

  19. Leo Doyle, master surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellar, I

    2000-10-01

    On 3 March 1953 Leo Doyle died at the Mercy Hospital, Melbourne. The day before he died Leo Doyle had been operating at the Mercy Hospital when he took ill. Doyle's final illness was almost certainly the result of the severe aortic stenosis that had been developing over some years. His death at the relatively young age of 61 ended the career of a man described by Sir Gordon Gordon Taylor as the greatest technical surgeon that he had ever seen. In all likelihood Australian surgery will never see the likes of Doyle, a virtuoso surgeon, again. And yet to many of the surgeons who were Doyle's contemporaries and to those who followed him he remained somewhat of an enigma. Perhaps in some way the description of the great French surgeon Baron Dupuytren may also be applicable to Leo Doyle: known to all, loved by many, understood by few. By all accounts Leo Doyle's surgical repertoire knew no bounds. He operated with equal facility on the central nervous system, the head and neck, in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis and he was more than competent in gynaecology, urology and orthopaedics. In the latter part of his career he became, par excellence, a cancer surgeon. He was, arguably, Australia's first surgical oncologist. No procedure was deemed too complicated or demanding. Like some other superb technicians his judgement at times did not match his technical ability. Doyle was one of the first surgeons in Australia to perform hindquarter amputation and he helped to pioneer the operations of total gastrectomy and oesophagogastrectomy. An avid reader of the surgical literature, he possessed an enormous library which was matched by an equally large collection of surgical instruments. Unlike Devine he published relatively little. He was not a good clinical teacher, preferring to teach by example in the operating theatre. Although interested in music and the visual arts, surgery was his life.

  20. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  1. Interpretations of cigarette advertisement warning labels by Philadelphia Puerto Ricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Nancy; Gilpin, Dawn R; Lenos, Melissa; Hobbs, Renee

    2011-09-01

    This study examined Philadelphia Puerto Ricans' interpretations of the Surgeon General's warnings that appear on cigarette packaging and in advertisements. In-home family focus groups in which participants were asked to comment on magazine cigarette advertisements showed a great variety of interpretations of the legally mandated warning labels. These findings (a) corroborate and add to research in public health and communications regarding the possibility of wide variations in message interpretations and (b) support the call for public health messages to be carefully tested for effectiveness among different social groups. The article's focus on Puerto Ricans addresses the problem of misleading conclusions that can arise from aggregating all Latino subpopulations into one group. The use of a naturalistic setting to examine interpretations of messages about smoking departs from the experimental methods typically used for such research and provides new evidence that even a seemingly straightforward message can be interpreted in multiple ways. Understanding and addressing differences in message interpretation can guide public health campaigns aimed at reducing health disparities. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  2. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  4. Herniation of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2012-12-01

    Herniations of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons are far more common in practice than the paucity of reported cases would indicate. A likely explanation may be the peculiar, nonergonomic positions that plastic surgeons must hold during surgery while wearing a headlight and loupes. From January 2003 to December 2006, at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, 4 plastic surgeons experienced herniations of the cervical disk. Magnetic resonance imaging study indicated there was disk herniation or bulging with spinal cord impingement. Two plastic surgeons received cervical diskectomy, corpectomy with strut reconstruction using titanium cages. These 2 surgeons were symptom-free 2 years after their operations. The other 2 plastic surgeons were under conservative physical therapy with persistent symptoms. The clinical evidence indicated that cervical disk herniation is an occupational hazard in plastic surgeons. To prevent prolonged hyperflexion and twisting of the neck, we proposed wearing a cervical brace during surgery for the plastic surgeons at Tri-Service-General Hospital since January 2008. No more plastic surgeons have experienced herniation of the cervical disk since then. The results indicated that wearing a cervical brace may be an effective measure to protect plastic surgeons from cervical disk disease.

  5. Chinese medicine and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Biji, Sreedhar; Yeung, Chung-Kwong

    2011-07-01

    The surgeon aims at a direct, complete removal of the pathology. In spite of the modern advancements of imaging facilities and precision instrumentations, unsatisfactory results and recurrences are not uncommon. This paper provides a general review of the four specific areas in surgery that would benefit from Chinese medicine. Extensive searches were made on four surgical areas based on available English language journals, viz. low-back pain, chronic ulcers, renal calculus, and enuresis in children, in the past 10 years. The quoted communications are mainly related to clinical evidences, while a smaller number of crucial laboratory reports are also included. Low-back pain, a most frequent orthopaedic problem, would benefit from acupuncture treatment. Chronic leg ulcers could achieve better results of healing using herbal supplements. Problems of renal stones, besides the conventional methods of removal, could be further supplemented with herbal drinks that aim at prevention of recurrences. Enuresis in children, an untreatable common condition, may respond well to acupuncture. Surgeons should keep an open mind. In case of difficulties, they could seriously consider options of traditional treatment.

  6. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  7. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  8. Effects of disruptive surgeon behavior in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons are the physician group most commonly identified as "disruptive physicians." The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual model of the results of disruptive surgeon behavior and to identify the coping strategies used by perioperative staff. Perspectives of 19 individuals of diverse occupations in the perioperative setting were drawn together using a grounded theory methodology. Effects of disruptive behavior described by participants included shift in attention from the patient to the surgeon, increased mistakes during procedures, deterrence from careers in surgery, and diminished respect for surgeons. Individual coping strategies employed in the face of intimidation include talking to colleagues, externalizing the behavior, avoidance of perpetrators, and warning others. Using grounded theory analysis, we were able to elucidate the impact of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment. This conceptual model may be used to understand and counter the negative effects of manipulation and intimidation of hospital staff and trainees and to build on current programmatic strengths to improve surgical environments and training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p < 0.001; adjusted R(2), 0.33) was the only factor independently associated with lower job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  11. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of North Americans' opinions regarding surgeons consulting with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Noonan, Vanessa K; Bailey, Christopher S; Dvorak, Marcel F S; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-04-01

    Surgeon-industry conflict of interest (COI) has become a source of considerable interest. Professional medical societies, industry, and policy makers have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The objective of this study was to report on the opinions of individuals representing the general public regarding surgeon-industry consulting relationships. Web-based survey. Survey was administered using a "spine Web site," and opinions are collected on surgeon-industry consulting and regulation. Associations among responses to similar questions were assessed to ensure validity and subgroup analysis performed for respondent age, sex, education, insurance, employment, and patient status. Six hundred ten of 642 surveys had complete data. The sample population comprised more females and was older and more educated than the American population. About 80% of respondents felt it was ethical and either beneficial or of no influence to the quality of health care if surgeons were consultants for surgical device companies. Most felt disclosure of an industry relationship was important and paying surgeons royalties for devices, other than those they directly implant, would not affect quality of care. Respondents support multidisciplinary surgeon-industry COI regulation and trust doctors and their professional societies to head this effort. Despite the known potential negative impact of surgeon-industry COI on patient care, this study revealed that this does not seem to be reflected in the opinion of the general public. The respondents felt that disclosure is deemed one of the most important means of self-regulation and COI management, which is in agreement with current trends of most spine societies and journals that are increasing the stringency of disclosure policies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  13. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  14. Effect of surgeon experience on femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Bono, James V; Froimson, Mark; Jones, Morgan; Bershadsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty should not vary from surgeon to surgeon for patients with the same bone size. This study explored if systematic variations in femoral component size selection exist. Thirteen surgeons' choices of femoral component size (Duracon, n = 1388; Triathlon, n = 740) were analyzed using a generalized linear model with femoral component size as the dependent variable and surgeon identification, years in practice, and adult reconstruction fellowship training as the independent variables. The model adjusted for differences in bone size. It was found that more experienced surgeons implant larger femoral components. New instruments and training protocols may be necessary to adjust for surgeon experience.

  15. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  16. 21 CFR 330.2 - Pregnancy-nursing warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pregnancy-nursing warning. 330.2 Section 330.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... AND NOT MISBRANDED General Provisions § 330.2 Pregnancy-nursing warning. A pregnancy-nursing...

  17. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  18. [Surgeons in Krakow between WWI and WWII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, A; Dolecki, M

    2001-01-01

    During the war time when Polish borders had not been established yet, apart from having two surgical departments Jagiellonian University, Krakow had surgical departments in the Bonifratow, Izraelicki and Military Hospitals. More surgical departments were opened up in later years in pubic Health System Hospitals, among them were Narutowicz at near Pradnicka street and Sisters of Mercy at Lea street. Other well-known Krakow surgeons operated in smaller, private surgeries, such as: Dom Zdrowia (House of Health) or Zwiazkowy (Union) Clinic. At that time only 30 Surgeons worked in Kraków. They were outstanding specialists with a broad practice. Among them were Maksymilian Rutkowski, Jan Glatzel, Stanislaw Nowicki, Michal Hladij. Gradually, younger surgeons started to join them. they were: Jan Kowalczyk, Jerzy Jasienski, Stanislaw Kania, Wladyslaw Laszczak, Jozef Bugusz, Jozef Gasinski. Many of them who worked in the surgical hospitals in Krakow, left the city after obtaining a professorship (like Kornel Michejda, professor at the University of Wilno) or became heads of wards, like Zygmunt Drobniewicz, Alfons Mackowski and Tadeusz Guschlbauer. All of these surgeons were highly respected by the medical community as well as by the general public in their respective town and surrounding areas. A large income allowed that best of them to fund and supply their own wards. Occasionally, however, among the less successful surgeons, an uncompromising competition for patients developed. These events were disapproved and condemned by the medical establishment. Many surgeons led an active life outside of their profession. A surgeon with an exceptionally colorful personality was Jan Glatzel: witty, highly intelligent, a connoisseur of fine art, book lover with an active social life. Maksymilian Rutkowski was active in charitable organizations, helping to support Bratnia Pomoc Medykow. Michal Hladij, president of KS Cracovia, vice president of Krakowski Klub Automobilowy rendered his

  19. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  20. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  1. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The first woman surgeons in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; De Jong, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the position of woman surgeons in the Netherlands. In 1913 the first woman, Heleen Robert, was accepted as member of the Dutch Society of Surgery. Three others, Jeanne Knoop, Frieda van Hasselt and Rosalie Wijnberg, followed during the next ten years. The nomination of Rosalie Wijnberg caused a turbulent discussion as she was working as a gynaecologist and not as a surgeon. One can wonder about this argument as other members were gynaecologists too. It seems that the male attitudes towards women were changing as more women entered the male dominated field. Nevertheless, from 1931 on, the year in which the registration of specialists was created, a number of women succeeded in obtaining a registration in surgery. Four of them were interviewed: dr. D.A.E. Norel, A.G. Wiersum-de Kwaadsteniet, J. Leeksma-Lievense and A.A. Fierstra. The general opinion still is that surgery is not a female profession. At the moment there are some twenty women working as general surgeon compared to a seven hundred men.

  3. Surgical complications and their implications for surgeons' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A; Faiz, O; Bicknell, C; Vincent, C

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare professionals can be seriously affected when they are involved in major clinical incidents. The impact of such incidents on staff is of particular relevance to surgery, as the operating room is one of the highest-risk areas for serious complications. This qualitative study aimed to assess the personal and professional impact of surgical complications on surgeons. This single time point study involved semistructured, individual interviews with general and vascular surgeons, consultants and senior registrars from two National Health Service organizations in London, UK. Twenty-seven surgeons participated. Many were seriously affected by major surgical complications. Surgeons' practice was also often affected, not always in the best interest of their patients. The surgeons' reactions depended on the preventability of the complications, their personality and experience, patient outcomes and patients' reactions, as well as colleagues' reactions and the culture of the institution. Discussing complications, deconstructing the incidents and rationalizing were the most commonly quoted coping mechanisms. Institutional support was generally described as inadequate, and the participants often reported the existence of strong institutional blame cultures. Suggestions for supporting surgeons in managing the personal impact of complications included better mentoring, teamwork approaches, blame-free opportunities for the discussion of complications, and structures aimed at the human aspects of complications. Those involved in the management of surgical services need to consider how to improve support for surgeons in the aftermath of major surgical incidents. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...... Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P sleep time during the day on call...

  5. Occupational Stress and Burnout among Surgeons in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajeev; Huggard, Peter; van Toledo, Annik

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the levels of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji. A document set comprising a cover letter; a consent form; a sociodemographic and supplementary information questionnaire; the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI); the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12); the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT); and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaires were provided to surgeons from three public divisional hospitals in Fiji. Thirty-six of 43 (83.7%) invited surgeons participated in the study. According to their MBI scores, surgeons suffered from low (10, 27.8%), moderate (23, 63.9%), and high (3, 8.3%) levels of burnout. Comparatively, 23 (63.9%) demonstrated moderate burnout according to their ProQOL scores. Substantial psychiatric morbidity was observed in 16 (44.0%) surgeons per their GHQ-12 scores. Consumption of alcohol was noted in 29 (80.6%) surgeons, and 12 (33.4%) had AUDIT scores characterizing their alcohol use in excess of low-risk guidelines or as harmful or hazardous drinking. Surgeons of Fijian nationality showed higher MBI emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores compared with surgeons of other nationalities. Surgeons with an awareness of the availability of counseling services at their hospitals showed low AUDIT and ProQOL burnout scores. Smokers, alcohol drinkers, and kava drinkers showed higher AUDIT scores. This study highlights a level of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji and a lack of awareness of their mental and physical well-being. The authors recommend that occupational stress and burnout intervention strategies be put in place in hospitals in Fiji.

  6. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  7. Annan warns of 'content divide' between rich and poor

    CERN Multimedia

    Dickson, D

    2003-01-01

    "The Secretary-General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan, warned today (10 December) that a "content divide" is threatening to deprive developing countries of the full benefits offered by information and communications technologies (ICTs)" (1 page)

  8. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  9. Surgeon-related factors and outcome in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, G A; Soskolne, C L; Yakimets, W W; Newman, S C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether surgical subspecialty training in colorectal surgery or frequency of rectal cancer resection by the surgeon are independent prognostic factors for local recurrence (LR) and survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Variation in patient outcome in rectal cancer has been shown among centers and among individual surgeons. However, the prognostic importance of surgeon-related factors is largely unknown. METHODS: All patients undergoing potentially curative low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum between 1983 and 1990 at the five Edmonton general hospitals were reviewed in a historic-prospective study design. Preoperative, intraoperative, pathologic, adjuvant therapy, and outcome variables were obtained. Outcomes of interest included LR and disease-specific survival (DSS). To determine survival rates and to control both confounding and interaction, multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: The study included 683 patients involving 52 surgeons, with > 5-year follow-up obtained on 663 (97%) patients. There were five colorectal-trained surgeons who performed 109 (16%) of the operations. Independent of surgeon training, 323 operations (47%) were done by surgeons performing < 21 rectal cancer resections over the study period. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LR was increased in patients of both noncolorectal trained surgeons (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.5, p = 0.001) and those of surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.8, p < 0.001). Stage (p < 0.001), use of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.002), rectal perforation or tumor spill (p < 0.001), and vascular/neural invasion (p = 0.002) also were significant prognostic factors for LR. Similarly, decreased disease-specific survival was found to be independently associated with noncolorectal-trained surgeons (HR = 1.5, p = 0.03) and surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.4, p = 0.005). Stage (p < 0

  10. [The surgeons civil responsibility insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, D

    2004-10-01

    After a short research in the field national insurances, the author analyses the professional physician insurance policy; the ambiguity and difficulty of contracts concerning the professional health activity of surgeon, whether as state employee or as independent professional are pointed put. With the introduction of the ministerial decree dated January 29,1992, the new labour agreement, the privacy law, the evolution of ''informed consent'', the esthetic injury concept, the safety regulations law and the administrative liability, surgeons must pay attention to draw up an insurance policy suitable to their profession.

  11. 我国普通外科医师培养模式及教学面临的问题及对策%Problems and strategies faced by training model and education of general surgeon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨镇

    2015-01-01

    At present, chinese general surgery should improve residency and subspecialty residencies training utilized global standards which is consisted of 3 overlapping phases.Fundamentals of surgery curriculum and surgical skills curriculum are an effective way to enhance the students' basic surgical skills and would obtain the global standards for postgraduate medical education. Working-hour restrictions and a heightened awareness of patient safety has changed resident education and training. Specialization and the current practices of general surgeons are a important problem. Postgraduate medical students program should be combined with resident training.Interprofessional education and service learning is a model for the future of health professions education. Simulation-based surgical education and simulator center has completely revolutionized the training process, especially in the laparoscopic and robotic surgery curriculum for resident training. Virtual realicy is the application of the computer aid technique in recent years, which shows its dominant position in medical education. E-learning will play an important role in the near future.%当前,我国普通外科要以国际标准完善住院医师和专科培训,涵盖医学教育连续统一体的3个阶段。外科基础课程和外科技能课程能有效地提升学生的基本手术技术和能达到全球医学教育最基本要求。医师工作时间的限制和病人安全意识的加强改变了住院医师教育和培训的模式。普通外科医师的专业化与当前的临床实践是重要问题。研究生的教育应与专科医师培训相结合。跨专业教育和学习服务是对未来医疗卫生教育的一种模式。基于虚拟技术的外科培训和模拟中心完全改变了教育的程序,特别是住院医师培训的腹腔镜和机器人外科课程。虚拟现实技术是近年出现的计算机辅助应用技术,在医学教育领域展显优势。电子学习系统将发挥重要作用。

  12. Development of tsunami early warning systems and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wächter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fostered by and embedded in the general development of information and communications technology (ICT, the evolution of tsunami warning systems (TWS shows a significant development from seismic-centred to multi-sensor system architectures using additional sensors (e.g. tide gauges and buoys for the detection of tsunami waves in the ocean.

    Currently, the beginning implementation of regional tsunami warning infrastructures indicates a new phase in the development of TWS. A new generation of TWS should not only be able to realise multi-sensor monitoring for tsunami detection. Moreover, these systems have to be capable to form a collaborative communication infrastructure of distributed tsunami warning systems in order to implement regional, ocean-wide monitoring and warning strategies.

    In the context of the development of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS and in the EU-funded FP6 project Distant Early Warning System (DEWS, a service platform for both sensor integration and warning dissemination has been newly developed and demonstrated. In particular, standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC and the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS have been successfully incorporated.

    In the FP7 project Collaborative, Complex and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises (TRIDEC, new developments in ICT (e.g. complex event processing (CEP and event-driven architecture (EDA are used to extend the existing platform to realise a component-based technology framework for building distributed tsunami warning systems.

  13. An online review of plastic surgeons in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Priya; Kobayashi, Emily; Gupta, Subhas

    2015-05-01

    It has become commonplace for patients to access online reviews of physicians when making choices about health care, just as any consumer would in today's computer-dependent world. Previous studies have shown that online reviews of physicians are generally positive. However, 1 negative review has the potential to adversely affect business and reputations. To characterize the online presence of plastic surgeons in Southern California as portrayed by physician rating websites (PRWs). An extensive online database of board-certified plastic surgeons was used to generate a list of surgeons within a 50-mile radius of Pomona, CA. Ratings from the PRWs HealthGrades.com, Vitals.com, and UCompareHealthcare.com were cataloged by number of reviews and ratings. Two hundred sixty-three surgeons were evaluated with the most-represented cities being Beverly Hills (N=47), Los Angeles (N=31), and Newport Beach (N=27). Ninety-seven percent of the surgeons were rated on at least 1 of the 3 PRWs chosen. In general, surgeons were rated highly, with a mean rating of 85%, SD, 14% (Pconscious of their online reputations. Overall, the ratings were high, regardless of the number of reviews.

  14. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  15. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  16. The Glass Houses of Attending Surgeons: An Assessment of Unprofessional Behavior on Facebook Among Practicing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Sudbeck, Craig; Luers, Thomas; Adamson, Peter; Cook, Gates; Schenarts, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication demonstrated that unprofessional behavior on Facebook is common among surgical residents. In the formulation of standards and curricula to address this issue, it is important that surgical faculty lead by example. Our current study refocuses on the Facebook profiles of faculty surgeons involved in the education of general surgery residents. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) web site was used to identify general surgery residencies located in the Midwest. Departmental web sites were then searched to identify teaching faculty for the general surgery residency. Facebook was then searched to determine which faculty had profiles available for viewing by the general public. Profiles were then placed in 1 of the 3 following categories: professional, potentially unprofessional, or clearly unprofessional. A chi-square test was used to determine significance. In all, 57 residency programs were identified on the ACS web site, 100% of which provided an institutional web site listing the surgical faculty. A total of 758 general surgery faculty were identified (133 women and 625 men), of which 195 (25.7%) had identifiable Facebook accounts. In all, 165 faculty (84.6%) had no unprofessional content, 20 (10.3%) had potentially unprofessional content, and 10 (5.1%) had clearly unprofessional content. Inter-rater reliability was good (88.9% agreement, κ = 0.784). Clearly unprofessional behavior was found only in male surgeons. For male surgeons, clearly unprofessional behavior was more common among those in practice for less than 5 years (p = 0.031). Alcohol and politics were the most commonly found variables in the potentially unprofessional group. Inappropriate language and sexually suggestive material were the most commonly found variables in the clearly unprofessional group. Unprofessional behavior on Facebook is less common among surgical faculty compared with surgical residents. However, the rates remain unacceptably high, especially among men and

  17. 49 CFR 234.259 - Warning time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning time. 234.259 Section 234.259..., Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.259 Warning time. Each crossing warning system shall be tested for the prescribed warning time at least once every 12 months and when the warning system...

  18. Temporal geomapping of pediatric surgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Charles L

    2008-03-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of manpower needs in pediatric surgery. The number of training programs has multiplied dramatically over the past decade. The distribution of surgeons is more significant than the absolute change in numbers--are major metropolitan areas seeing a more dramatic increase than less populated areas? To evaluate the geographic and demographic changes associated with this increase, we used choropleth and geomapping techniques to evaluate the change in number and distribution of American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) members (and by proxy, pediatric surgeons) in the United States over the past decade. Data regarding membership were obtained from APSA. In 1996, management companies changed, and accurate data for initial year of membership were only available after 1996. Online sources (www.services.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/home and www.mapresso.com) were used for data analysis. There was a 175% increase in the number of APSA members over the past decade. The geographic distribution parallels the state population to some extent but is uneven. The number of APSA members by state over time is displayed in color density maps. Predictions of prior manpower studies were generally accurate. The number of pediatric surgeons in the United States has rapidly increased in the past decade, with no sign of diminution in this trend. Increases in the number of surgeons correlates with state population, indicating a tendency for surgeons to reside in more densely populated areas, as expected. Areas with a disproportionately high or low number of surgeons can be identified via choropleth mapping.

  19. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  1. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  2. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  3. Surgeons' motivation for choice of workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Lena; Kristiansen, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2012-09-01

    To ensure qualified health care professionals at public hospitals in the future, it is important to understand which factors attract health care professionals to certain positions. The aim of this study was to explore motives for choosing employment at either public or private hospitals in a group of Danish surgeons, as well as to examine if organizational characteristics had an effect on motivation. Eight qualitative interviews were conducted with surgeons from both public and private hospitals sampled using the snowball method. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by means of phenomenological theory. Motivational factors such as personal influence on the job, the opportunity to provide the best possible patient care, challenging work tasks colleagues, and ideological reasons were emphasized by the surgeons as important reasons for their choice of employment. Motivational factors appeared to be strongly connected to the structure of the organization; especially the size of the organization was perceived to be essential. It is worth noting that salary, in contrast to the general belief, was considered a secondary benefit rather than a primary motivational factor for employment. The study revealed that motivational factors are multidimensional and rooted in organizational structure; i.e. organizational size rather than whether the organization is public or private is crucial. There is a need for further research on the topic, but it seems clear that future health care planning may benefit from taking into account the implications that large organizational structures have for the staff working within these organizations. not relevant. not relevant.

  4. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  5. Does Surgeon Sex Matter?: Practice Patterns and Outcomes of Female and Male Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoky, Catherine E; Sellers, Morgan M; Keele, Luke J; Wirtalla, Christopher J; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2017-07-24

    We sought to compare postoperative outcomes of female surgeons (FS) and male surgeons (MS) within general surgery. FS in the workforce are increasing in number. Female physicians provide exceptional care in other specialties. Differences in surgical outcomes of FS and MS have not been examined. We linked the AMA Physician Masterfile to discharge claims from New York, Florida, and Pennsylvania (2012 to 2013) to examine practice patterns and to compare surgical outcomes of FS and MS. We paired FS and MS operating at the same hospital using cardinality matching with refined balance and compared inpatient mortality, any postoperative complication, and prolonged length of stay (pLOS) in FS and MS. Overall practice patterns differed between the 663 FS and 3219 MS. We identified 2462 surgeons (19% FS, 81% MS) at 429 hospitals who met inclusion criteria for outcomes analysis. FS were younger (mean age ± SD FS: 48.5 ± 8.4 years, MS: 54.3 ± 9.4y; P best fit for them regardless of sex.

  6. Managing Risks? Early Warning Systems for Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitati, A. M.; Zommers, Z. A.; Habilov, M.

    2014-12-01

    Early warning systems are a tool with which to minimize risks posed by climate related hazards. Although great strides have been made in developing early warning systems most deal with one hazard, only provide short-term warnings and do not reach the most vulnerable. This presentation will review research results of the United Nations Environment Programme's CLIM-WARN project. The project seeks to identify how governments can better communicate risks by designing multi-hazard early warning systems that deliver actionable warnings across timescales. Household surveys and focus group discussions were conducted in 36 communities in Kenya, Ghana and Burkina Faso in order to identify relevant climate related hazards, current response strategies and early warning needs. Preliminary results show significant variability in both risks and needs within and between countries. For instance, floods are more frequent in rural western parts of Kenya. Droughts are frequent in the north while populations in urban areas face a range of hazards - floods, droughts, disease outbreaks - that sometimes occur simultaneously. The majority of the rural population, especially women, the disabled and the elderly, do not have access to modern media such as radio, television, or internet. While 55% of rural populace never watches television, 64% of urban respondents watch television on a daily basis. Communities have different concepts of how to design warning systems. It will be a challenge for national governments to create systems that accommodate such diversity yet provide standard quality of service to all. There is a need for flexible and forward-looking early warning systems that deliver broader information about risks. Information disseminated through the system could not only include details of hazards, but also long-term adaptation options, general education, and health information, thus increasingly both capabilities and response options.

  7. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, M R; Aherne, N J; Coffey, C; Power, C P; Kirwan, W O; Redmond, H P

    2002-11-01

    Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  8. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  9. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection.

  10. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis.

  11. Lack of pregnancy warnings on over-the-counter dermatologic products containing potentially harmful hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio, L L; Cies, J J

    2017-07-01

    To determine the presence of pregnancy warnings on over-the-counter (OTC) dermatologic products with hydroquinone, a potentially harmful ingredient. Data were obtained from the Food and Drug Administration National Drug Code Directory and Label Repository to identify OTC dermatologic products containing hydroquinone. Products were stratified based on pregnancy or general warning presence (WP) or absence (WA). Product characteristics were compared between groups: hydroquinone concentration, presence of external packaging, indication and warning statements. Of the 112 products studied, 21 had a pregnancy warning and 3 included a general warning against use: WP (n=24) and WA (n=88) group. External packaging was more prevalent in the WP group compared to WA (62.5% vs 29.5%, P=0.004). Majority of OTC dermatologic products containing hydroquinone did not have a pregnancy warning. This highlights the need for improved labeling and informs providers caring for pregnant women of OTC labeling limitations.

  12. Burnout syndrome in oral and maxillofacial surgeons: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, G G; Carneiro, S C; Vasconcelos, B C; Nascimento, M M; Leal, J L F

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome among Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons and its relationship with socio-demographic, clinical, and habit variables. The sample of this study comprised 116 surgeons. The syndrome was quantified using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (General Survey), which defines burnout as the triad of high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. The criteria of Grunfeld et al. were used to evaluate the presence of the syndrome (17.2%). No significant differences between the surgeons diagnosed with and without the syndrome were observed according to age (P=0.804), sex (P=0.197), marital status (P=0.238), number of children (P=0.336), years of professional experience (P=0.102), patients attended per day (P=0.735), hours worked per week (P=0.350), use of alcohol (P=0.148), sports practice (P=0.243), hobbies (P=0.161), or vacation period per year (P=0.215). Significant differences occurred in the variables sex in the emotional exhaustion subscale (P=0.002) and use or not of alcohol in the personal accomplishment subscale (P=0.035). Burnout syndrome among Brazilian surgeons is average, showing a low personal accomplishment. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flash floods: forecasting and warning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sene, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    ... and levees.The volume discusses the increasing use of meteorological observation and forecasting techniques to extend the lead time available for warning, combined with hydrological models for the river response...

  14. Flash floods: forecasting and warning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sene, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    .... Floods of this type are often characterised by fast flowing deep water and a high debris content which - combined with the short lead time available for warnings - add to the risk to people and property...

  15. Assessment and remedial clinical education of surgeons in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosman, Bard C; Alverson, Aaron D; Boal, Peter A; Owens, Erik L; Norcross, William A

    2011-12-01

    Assessment and remedial clinical education of practicing surgeons is feasible and possibly beneficial. Retrospective series. Urban academic medical center. Licensed surgeons. Structured assessment and remedial clinical education based on resident-education models. Assessment and clinical education results. Forty-seven general, general/vascular, and colorectal surgeons were assessed by the University of California, San Diego, Physician Assessment and Clinical Education program in 2000 to 2010. Forty-six (98%) were male (mean [SD] age, 54 [11] years; range, 34-80 years). Thirty-three (70%) came from state medical board actions: 25 from California's disciplinary division, 2 from California's licensing division, 3 from other state boards, and 3 self-referred during other state board actions. Fourteen (30%) came from health care organizations: 8 from California hospitals, 3 from hospitals in other states, 2 self-referred during hospital proceedings, and 1 self-referred during a medical group investigation. Twenty-three (49%) underwent a 2-day assessment only, including a 1-hour mock oral board examination: 8 "passed" with no recommendations; 6, with minor recommendations; 6 had major recommendations; and 3 "failed." Twenty-four surgeons (51%) also completed 26 five-day clinical education programs, with 20 "passes," 1 minor recommendation, 3 major recommendations, and 2 "fails." A program of assessment and remedial clinical education of surgeons designed to meet the needs of one medical board is being used by nongovernmental organizations as well, and it seems to meet the needs of some individual surgeons. This type of program may play a role in the profession's self-regulation.

  16. Society of U.S. Air Force Surgeons’ 2010 State of the Flight Surgeon Survey: The Medical Treatment Facility Commander’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    filling an active billet as a flight surgeon may be very short (i.e., immediate), as in the case of a general medical officer ( GMO ), or very long...Inexperience (9/19) • The two assigned flight surgeons are general medical officers ( GMOs ). It is difficult to complete the necessary training at a...other two are newly assigned GMOs , who are motivated but are still in the learning phase. I have no doubt they will eventually grow into outstanding

  17. 21 CFR 878.4480 - Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4480 Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. Absorbable powder...

  18. Impact of Surgeon Experience During Carotid Endarterectomy Operation and Effects on Perioperative Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Yüksel

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: We evaluated the effect of surgeon experience on complication and mortality rates of carotid endarterectomy operation. Methods: Fifty-nine consecutive patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy between January 2013 and February 2016 were divided into two groups. Patients who had been operated by surgeons performing carotid endarterectomy for more than 10 years were allocated to group 1 (experienced surgeons; n=34. Group 2 (younger surgeons; n=25 consisted of patients operated by surgeons independently performing carotid endarterectomy for less than 2 years. Both groups were compared in respect of operative results and postoperative complications. Results: No intergroup difference was found for laterality of the lesion or concomitant coronary artery disease. In group 1, signs of local nerve damage (n=2; 5.9% were detected, whereas in group 2 no evidence of local nerve damage was observed. Surgeons in group 1 used local and general anesthesia in 3 (8.8% and 31 (91.2% patients, respectively, while surgeons in group 2 preferred to use local and general anesthesia in 1 (4% and 24 (96% patients, respectively. Postoperative stroke was observed in group 1 (n=2; 5.9% and group 2 (n=2; 5.8%. Conclusion: Younger surgeons perform carotid endarterectomy with similar techniques and have similar results compared to experienced surgeons. Younger surgeons rarely prefer using shunt during carotid endarterectomy. The experience and the skills gained by these surgeons during their training, under the supervision of experienced surgeons, will enable them to perform successful carotid endarterectomy operations independently after completion of their training period.

  19. Robotics and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Attila; Langenburg, Scott; Klein, Michael D

    2003-06-01

    Surgical robots are enabling devices for minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgery (MIS). They use a computer to enhance a surgeon's skills as hand movements are transmitted to robotic arms. The computer filters tremor, which becomes important at high magnifications of 10 to 15 times available in MIS. It also provides motion scaling so that large hand movements are converted to very small movements of the robotic arm. The robotic arms also have wrists that make suturing and knot tying far more accurate and efficient. Surgical robots are currently used clinically for procedures such as MIS Nissen fundoplication, cholecystectomy, and splenectomy. Laboratory experience indicates that they may provide advantages for newborn procedures such as portoenterostomy for biliary atresia and repair of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. They have a potential for making possible MIS procedures, which can only be done open now, and for introducing entirely new procedures as well as for the performance of procedures by operators distant from the patient.

  20. Preoperative Breast MRI: Surgeons' Patient Selection Patterns and Potential Bias in Outcomes Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyon; Tanaka, Elaine; Eby, Peter R; Zhou, Shouhao; Wei, Wei; Eppelheimer, Christine; Loving, Vilert A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which patient- and tumor-related and clinical variables influence dedicated breast surgeons' and general surgeons' referrals for preoperative breast MRI for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Surgeons who perform breast surgery responded to a survey from June 16, 2014, through August 11, 2014. Participants self-identified as breast or general surgeons and provided professional practice details. They used Likert scores (range, 1-7 with increasing likelihood to order MRI) to weigh numerous patient- and tumor-related and clinical variables. Mean likelihood scores were calculated and compared using a linear mixed model. A p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Two hundred eighty-nine surveys from 154 (53%) breast surgeons and 135 (47%) general surgeons showed an overall likelihood to refer for patients with a BRCA mutation (mean Likert score, 6.17), familial (mean Likert score, 5.33) or personal (mean Likert score, 5.10) breast cancer history, extremely dense breasts (mean Likert score, 5.30), age younger than 40 years (mean Likert score, 5.24), axillary nodal involvement (mean Likert score, 6.22), tumor that is mammographically occult (mean Likert score, 5.62) or fixed to the pectoralis (mean Likert score, 5.49), tumor that is a candidate for neoadjuvant treatment (mean Likert score, 5.38), multifocal or multicentric disease (mean Likert score, 5.22), invasive lobular carcinoma (mean Likert score, 5.20), T3 (mean Likert score, 4.48) or T2 (mean Likert score, 4.41) tumor, triple-negative breast cancer (mean Likert score, 4.66), a patient who is a candidate for mastectomy requesting breast conservation therapy (mean Likert score, 5.27), and radiologists' recommendations (mean Likert score, 5.19). Across all patient ages, breast surgeons referred more often than did general surgeons (mean Likert score, 4.32 vs 3.92; p = 0.03), especially for patients with BRCA mutation (mean Likert score, 6.39 vs 5.93; p

  1. The advent of the restorative plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Matthew J; Pribaz, Julian J; Talbot, Simon G; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery is presently typified by the existence of discrete clinical identities, namely that of the cosmetic plastic surgeon and the reconstructive plastic surgeon. The emergence of vascularized composite allotransplantation has been accompanied by the development of a third distinct clinical identity, that of the restorative plastic surgeon. The authors describe the core competencies that characterize this new identity, and discuss the implications of the advent of this new professional paradigm.

  2. Design and evaluation of multimedia security warnings for the interaction between humans and industrial robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruth, Jana; Kraetzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana

    2011-01-01

    In this document a multi-media security warning design approach for automated production scenarios with industrial robots is introduced. This first approach is based on and adapts design principles of common security programs and a German VDI standard for safety warnings design. We focus on direct human-to-robot interaction scenarios, e.g. the online-programming of industrial robots, because of their potential indirect safety impacts, which could be caused by malicious codes infection of a robots control computer. We designed ten different multi-media security warnings, composed of visual and acoustical information. Visual information of warnings is transported via a traffic light metaphor (symbolizing three different threat levels), different warn icons (symbolizing properties of malicious codes) and instructions icons to programmers or operators and additional textual information. With an acknowledgment button in the middle of the warning, the programmer's confirmation of the reception of the warning is verified. Additionally, three different acoustical signals also indicate the threat level of the warning. Furthermore, an evaluation is presented, which uses concepts known from usability testing (method of loud thinking, questionnaire, time measurement). The aim is to evaluate general design criteria of our developed security warnings and tendency of user perception for further advancement of our warnings design.

  3. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee 2017 Tripartite Meeting Search form Search Login Join Now Find a Surgeon ASCRS Patients Members Physicians Latest ...

  4. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald J; Russell, Thomas; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence of burnout among American surgeons and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with surgeon burnout. : Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization that leads to decreased effectiveness at work. A limited amount of information exists about the relationship between specific demographic and practice characteristics with burnout among American surgeons. Members of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life (QOL). Burnout and QOL were measured using validated instruments. Of the approximately 24,922 surgeons sampled, 7905 (32%) returned surveys. Responders had been in practice 18 years, worked 60 hours per week, and were on call 2 nights/wk (median values). Overall, 40% of responding surgeons were burned out, 30% screened positive for symptoms of depression, and 28% had a mental QOL score >1/2 standard deviation below the population norm. Factors independently associated with burnout included younger age, having children, area of specialization, number of nights on call per week, hours worked per week, and having compensation determined entirely based on billing. Only 36% of surgeons felt their work schedule left enough time for personal/family life and only 51% would recommend their children pursue a career as a physician/surgeon. Burnout is common among American surgeons and is the single greatest predictor of surgeons' satisfaction with career and specialty choice. Additional research is needed to identify individual, organizational, and societal interventions that preserve and promote the mental health of American surgeons.

  5. EVALUATING EFFECTIVENESS OF MOBILE BROWSER SECURITY WARNINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Shah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work precisely evaluates whether browser security warnings are as ineffective as proposed by popular sentiments and past writings. This research used different kinds of Android mobile browsers as well as desktop browsers to evaluate security warnings. Security experts and developers should give emphasis on making a user aware of security warnings and should not neglect aim of communicating this to users. Security experts and system architects should emphasis the goal of communicating security information to end users. In most of the browsers, security warnings are not emphasized, and browsers simply do not show warnings, or there are a number of ways to hide those warnings of malicious sites. This work precisely finds that how inconsistent browsers really are in prompting security warnings. In particular, majority of the modern mobile web browsers are vulnerable to these security threats. We find inconsistency in SSL warnings among web browsers. Based on this work, we make recommendations for warning designers and researchers.

  6. New Zealand plastic surgeons' life-time contribution to peer-reviewed literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Tess; Adams, Brandon

    2017-05-12

    The New Zealand Medical Association commits the New Zealand doctor to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication. To assess this commitment, one measure, contribution to the peer-reviewed literature, was examined for one group of New Zealand doctors: plastic surgeons. Plastic surgeons with a current practising certificate were identified on the New Zealand medical register (April 2016). Scopus database was searched for publications by each. Sixty-five surgeons authored 541 unique items in 134 journals, generating 8,047 citations. Between medical graduation and specialty qualification, a mean 1.8 items were published per practitioner (range 0-11). Twenty-three practitioners (35.4%) did not publish during this time. Between specialty qualification and the end of 2015, mean number of items published per surgeon was 7.3 (range 0-97). Thirteen (20.0%) surgeons had not published since specialist qualification. The general trend was for surgeons to become less productive with increasing time in practice. Mean surgeon h-index was 4.4 (range 0-26). Four surgeons (6.2%) had not published at any time. As a group, but with exceptions and less so in later practice, New Zealand plastic surgeons would seem to demonstrate commitment to evidence-based medicine, scholarship, teaching, collaboration and communication expected of a New Zealand doctor, as evidenced by peer-review publication.

  7. A leadership development program for surgeons: First-year participant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradarelli, Jason C; Jaffe, Gregory A; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-08-01

    In a dynamic health care system, strong leadership has never been more important for surgeons. Little is known about how to design and conduct effectively a leadership program specifically for surgeons. We sought to evaluate critically a Leadership Development Program for practicing surgeons by exploring how the program's strengths and weaknesses affected the surgeons' development as physician-leaders. At a large academic institution, we conducted semistructured interviews with 21 surgical faculty members who applied voluntarily, were selected, and completed a newly created Leadership Development Program in December 2012. Interview transcripts underwent qualitative descriptive analysis with thematic coding based on grounded theory. Themes were extracted regarding surgeons' evaluations of the program on their development as physician-leaders. After completing the program, surgeons reported personal improvements in the following 4 areas: self-empowerment to lead, self-awareness, team-building skills, and knowledge in business and leadership. Surgeons felt "more confident about stepping up as a leader" and more aware of "how others view me and my interactions." They described a stronger grasp on "giving feedback" as well as a better understanding of "business/organizational issues." Overall, surgeon-participants reported positive impacts of the program on their day-to-day work activities and general career perspective as well as on their long-term career development plans. Surgeons also recommended areas where the program could potentially be improved. These interviews detailed self-reported improvements in leadership knowledge and capabilities for practicing surgeons who completed a Leadership Development Program. A curriculum designed specifically for surgeons may enable future programs to equip surgeons better for important leadership roles in a complex health care environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 37 CFR 201.24 - Warning of copyright for software lending by nonprofit libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... software lending by nonprofit libraries. 201.24 Section 201.24 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.24 Warning of copyright for software lending by nonprofit libraries. (a) Definition. A Warning of Copyright for...

  9. 37 CFR 201.14 - Warnings of copyright for use by certain libraries and archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by certain libraries and archives. 201.14 Section 201.14 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.14 Warnings of copyright for use by certain libraries and archives. (a) Definitions. (1) A Display Warning...

  10. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  11. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  12. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century.

  13. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    that the risk was equal to traditional laparoscopy (3%). The fraction of surgeons willing to learn SILS and NOTES was 44.6% and 32.7%, respectively. The desire to learn was higher among less experienced and surgically active surgeons. Of the responders, 68.8% considered SILS and 43.2% considered NOTES would...

  14. Macro finance early warning system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihuan ZHENG; Xun ZHANG; Wei SHANG; Shanying XU

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a financial early warning informa-tion system is developed based on the multi-dimensional cli-mate approach that is featured with a multi-dimensional in-dex construction and the relevant multi-dimensional analy-sis. Requirement analysis and design issues of building an information system supporting this multi-dimensional cli-mate approach are discussed in detail. And a case using this system to study the macro financial issues is presented to illustrate how the proposed multi-dimensional approach works in the information system we design. This research is an interdisciplinary work of economic theories, macro finan-cial empirical studies, and software engineering. With ad-vanced macro financial early warning theories implemented in a web application, the Macro Financial Early Warning System (FEWS) developed in this research has been proved to be effective in a trial running in the Forecasting research institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Cation Exchange Resins and colonic perforation. What surgeons need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rita Rodríguez-Luna

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Despite the low incidence of colonic complication and lethal colonic necrosis associated with the CER clinical use, the general surgeon needs a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients treated with CER and abdominal pain.

  16. Surgeon and nonsurgeon personalities at different career points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdeck, Joseph M; Osayi, Sylvester N; Peterson, Laura A; Yu, Lianbo; Ellison, Edwin Christopher; Muscarella, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated correlations between personality traits and job performance and satisfaction. Evidence suggests that personality differences exist between surgeons and nonsurgeons, some of which may develop during medical training. Understanding these personality differences may help optimize job performance and satisfaction among surgical trainees and be used to identify individuals at risk of burnout. This study aims to identify personality traits of surgeons and nonsurgeons at different career points. We used The Big Five Inventory, a 44-item measure of the five factor model. Personality data and demographics were collected from responses to an electronic survey sent to all faculty and house staff in the Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Family Medicine at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Data were analyzed to identify differences in personality traits between surgical and nonsurgical specialties according to level of training and to compare surgeons to the general population. One hundred ninety-two house staff and faculty in surgery and medicine completed the survey. Surgeons scored significantly higher on conscientiousness and extraversion but lower on agreeableness compared to nonsurgeons (all P personality differences between surgical and nonsurgical specialties. The use of personality testing may be a useful adjunct in the residency selection process for applicants deciding between surgical and nonsurgical specialties. It may also facilitate early intervention for individuals at high risk for burnout and job dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  18. 21 CFR 201.63 - Pregnancy/breast-feeding warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pregnancy/breast-feeding warning. 201.63 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.63 Pregnancy/breast... during pregnancy or while nursing has been established for a particular drug product in a new...

  19. Is More Better? — Night Vision Enhancement System’s Pedestrian Warning Modes and Older Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Timothy; He, Yefei; Roe, Cheryl; Schnell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Pedestrian fatalities as a result of vehicle collisions are much more likely to happen at night than during day time. Poor visibility due to darkness is believed to be one of the causes for the higher vehicle collision rate at night. Existing studies have shown that night vision enhancement systems (NVES) may improve recognition distance, but may increase drivers’ workload. The use of automatic warnings (AW) may help minimize workload, improve performance, and increase safety. In this study, we used a driving simulator to examine performance differences of a NVES with six different configurations of warning cues, including: visual, auditory, tactile, auditory and visual, tactile and visual, and no warning. Older drivers between the ages of 65 and 74 participated in the study. An analysis based on the distance to pedestrian threat at the onset of braking response revealed that tactile and auditory warnings performed the best, while visual warnings performed the worst. When tactile or auditory warnings were presented in combination with visual warning, their effectiveness decreased. This result demonstrated that, contrary to general sense regarding warning systems, multi-modal warnings involving visual cues degraded the effectiveness of NVES for older drivers. PMID:21050616

  20. Human factors research problems in electronic voice warning system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The speech messages issued by voice warning systems must be carefully designed in accordance with general principles of human decision making processes, human speech comprehension, and the conditions in which the warnings can occur. The operator's effectiveness must not be degraded by messages that are either inappropriate or difficult to comprehend. Important experimental variables include message content, linguistic redundancy, signal/noise ratio, interference with concurrent tasks, and listener expectations generated by the pragmatic or real world context in which the messages are presented.

  1. Sugary Drink Warnings Hit Home with Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160860.html Sugary Drink Warnings Hit Home With Teens Fewer choose sweetened ... Health warning labels can steer teens away from sugary drinks, a new study suggests. "The average teen in ...

  2. Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) Storm Wallets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) is responsible for typhoon forecasts and warnings for the Western Pacific and Indian Ocean basins. After each storm, the JTWC...

  3. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  4. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  5. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...

  6. 30 CFR 56.14208 - Warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 56.14208 Section 56.14208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices...

  7. 30 CFR 57.14208 - Warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 57.14208 Section 57.14208... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14208 Warning devices. (a) Visible warning devices shall be used when parked mobile equipment creates a hazard to persons in other mobile...

  8. 30 CFR 57.14214 - Train warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible above the surrounding noise level shall be sounded— (a) Immediately prior to moving trains; (b) When... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Train warnings. 57.14214 Section...

  9. 30 CFR 56.14214 - Train warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14214 Train warnings. A warning that is audible above the surrounding noise level shall be sounded— (a) Immediately prior to moving trains; (b) When trains... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Train warnings. 56.14214 Section...

  10. Richard von Volkmann: surgeon and Renaissance man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R; Mubarak, Scott J

    2008-02-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19(th) century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867-1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the "antiseptic technique" to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann's contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children's fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics.

  11. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  12. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-07-16

    Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position "1" and "2". We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position "1" lasted 0.5 hours, and position "2" lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. The analysis was done in three positions: "Operating position 1", "Operating position 2 ', and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this model using CATIA R5v19. The proposed model is based on CATIA software

  13. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sir Donald Ross, pioneer aortic valve surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, David

    2015-06-01

    Tribute to Sir Donald Ross by David Wheatley, as read by Robert Kleinloog, President, Society of Cardiothoracic Surgeons of South Africa at the Annual Congress of the South African Heart Association 19 October 2014.

  15. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Research Foundation of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) and the Society of American ... W. OIympic Blvd Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 USA webmaster@sages.org Tel: (310) 437- ...

  16. Should the surgeon or the general practitioner (GP follow up patients after surgery for colon cancer? A randomized controlled trial protocol focusing on quality of life, cost-effectiveness and serious clinical events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringberg Unni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All patients who undergo surgery for colon cancer are followed up according to the guidelines of the Norwegian Gastrointestinal Cancer Group (NGICG. These guidelines state that the aims of follow-up after surgery are to perform quality assessment, provide support and improve survival. In Norway, most of these patients are followed up in a hospital setting. We describe a multi-centre randomized controlled trial to test whether these patients can be followed up by their general practitioner (GP without altering quality of life, cost effectiveness and/or the incidence of serious clinical events. Methods and Design Patients undergoing surgery for colon cancer with histological grade Dukes's Stage A, B or C and below 75 years of age are eligible for inclusion. They will be randomized after surgery to follow-up at the surgical outpatient clinic (control group or follow-up by the district GP (intervention group. Both study arms comply with the national NGICG guidelines. The primary endpoints will be quality of life (QoL (measured by the EORTC QLQ C-30 and the EQ-5D instruments, serious clinical events (SCEs, and costs. The follow-up period will be two years after surgery, and quality of life will be measured every three months. SCEs and costs will be estimated prospectively. The sample size was 170 patients. Discussion There is an ongoing debate on the best method of follow-up for patients with CRC. Due to a wide range of follow-up programmes and paucity of randomized trials, it is impossible to draw conclusions about the best combination and frequency of clinic (or family practice visits, blood tests, endoscopic procedures and radiological examinations that maximize the clinical outcome, quality of life and costs. Most studies on follow-up of CRC patients have been performed in a hospital outpatient setting. We hypothesize that postoperative follow-up of colon cancer patients (according to national guidelines by GPs will not have

  17. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  18. Assessment of patient factors, surgeons, and surgeon teams in immediate implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Mattos, David; Mastroianni, Melissa; Weng, Qing Y; Ricci, Joseph A; Heath, Martha P; Lin, Alex; Specht, Michelle C; Haynes, Alex B; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Outcome studies of immediate implant-based breast reconstruction have focused largely on patient factors, whereas the relative impact of the surgeon as a contributing variable is not known. As the procedure requires collaboration of both a surgical oncologist and a plastic surgeon, the effect of the surgeon team interaction can have a significant impact on outcome. This study examines outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction and the association with patient characteristics, surgeon, and surgeon team familiarity. A retrospective review of 3142 consecutive implant-based breast reconstruction mastectomy procedures at one institution was performed. Infection and skin necrosis rates were measured. Predictors of outcomes were identified by unadjusted logistic regression followed by multivariate logistic regression. Surgeon teams were grouped according to number of cases performed together. Patient characteristics remain the most important predictors for outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, with odds ratios above those of surgeon variables. The authors observed significant differences in the rate of skin necrosis between surgical oncologists with an approximately two-fold difference between surgeons with the highest and lowest rates. Surgeon teams that worked together on fewer than 150 procedures had higher rates of infection. Patient characteristics are the most important predictors for surgical outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, but surgeons and surgeon teams are also important variables. High-volume surgeon teams achieve lower rates of infection. This study highlights the need to examine modifiable risk factors associated with optimum implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes, which include patient and provider characteristics and the surgical team treating the patient. Risk, III.

  19. Common contractual concerns for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Eugene W

    2008-02-01

    Whether new to private practice or a seasoned practitioner, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) needs to understand how to handle complicated and often stressful negotiations of contracts for which he or she usually is untrained. This article is designed to give a general understanding of certain common contractual language. It is not comprehensive in scope, but it attempts to cover contracts that are most often seen by an OMS in practice. It is a general discussion of common legal concepts that could face an OMS, but it is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice.

  20. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient’s needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry. How to cite this article Wali A, Siddiqui TM, Khan R, Batool K. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):372-378. PMID:28127171

  1. Storm Warnings on Lake Balaton,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-06

    magnitude of this effect. Consequently, the employees of the Storm Warning Service decided in the course of the summer 1962, to set up a cup -type... anemometer on a passenger ship regularly passing between Si6fok and Balatonfired, and to take wind measurements along this route across the Lake in a...along this route. During the measurements, the reading of the anemometer was taken at intervals and noted together with the time of reading. Since the

  2. Current Practice Patterns Regarding the Conduct of Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy amongst Surgeons - A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Henry, LB Helou, NP Solomon, A Chang, SK Libutti, A Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heterogeneity of surgical care exists among surgeons regarding the conduct of thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.Aim: To identify the current patterns of technical conduct of operation amongst surgeons performing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.Methods: A survey was designed and beta-tested on five surgical oncologists for face validity and usability. The final version of this survey was constructed and disseminated using the professional version of the internet-based survey mechanism Survey Monkey and consisted of two eligibility questions and 22 questions regarding thyroidectomy/parathyroidectomy treatment patterns. The survey was disseminated electronically to American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES and American College of Surgeons (ACS members. Survey results were collected, tabulated and analyzed. Responses among groups were compared using two sample T- tests. Significant responses were subsequently analyzed in generalized linear models to ascertain if significance remained with control of covariates.Results: Of 420 initial web survey visits, 236 (56.2% surveys were completed. The majority of respondents reported being 'fellowship trained', experienced and 'high-volume' surgeons. The most common fellowship trainings were endocrine (46%, oncology (22%, head & neck (13%, or combinations of the three fellowships (14%. Most surgeons reported that they dissect the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN without using neuromonitoring. Nearly a third of respondents reported routinely using the Harmonic scalpel during the conduct of the operations. Significant differences emerged regarding operative technique according to residency training type, fellowship training, surgeon volume, and practice setting, but only those associated with residency training type and annual surgeon surgical volume remained significant within generalized linear models.Conclusion: Most surgeons who responded to this survey do not routinely

  3. Surgeons and non-surgeons prefer haptic feedback of instrument vibrations during robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Jacqueline K; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2015-10-01

    Clinical robotic surgery systems do not currently provide haptic feedback because surgical instrument interactions are difficult to measure and display. Our laboratory recently developed a technology that allows surgeons to feel and/or hear the high-frequency vibrations of robotic instruments as they interact with patient tissue and other tools. Until now, this type of feedback had not been carefully evaluated by users. We conducted two human-subject studies to discover whether surgeons and non-surgeons value the addition of vibration feedback from surgical instruments during robotic surgery. In the first experiment, 10 surgeons and 10 non-surgeons (n = 20) used an augmented Intuitive da Vinci Standard robot to repeatedly perform up to four dry-lab tasks both with and without haptic and audio feedback. In the second experiment, 68 surgeons and 26 non-surgeons (n = 94) tested the same robot at a surgical conference: each participant spent approximately 5 min performing one or two tasks. Almost all subjects in both experiments (95 and 98 %, respectively) preferred receiving feedback of tool vibrations, and all subjects in the second experiment thought it would be useful for surgeons to have the option of such feedback. About half of the subjects (50, 60 %) preferred haptic and audio feedback together, and almost all the rest (45, 35 %) preferred haptic feedback alone. Subjects stated that the feedback made them more aware of tool contacts and did not interfere with use of the robot. There were no significant differences between the responses of different subject populations for any questions in either experiment. This study illustrates that both surgeons and non-surgeons prefer instrument vibration feedback during robotic surgery. Some participants found audio feedback useful but most preferred haptic feedback overall. This strong preference for tool vibration feedback indicates that this technology provides valuable tactile information to the surgeon.

  4. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  5. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tanning is not a safe way to get vitamin D. The best way to protect your skin from UV rays is by using effective sun ... skin. Although it is important to get enough vitamin D, the safest way is through what you eat. Tanning ... IN What can policymakers do? • ...

  8. Smoking and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    This book is divided into three sections. In the first section the health consequences of smoking are delineated. Part two contains discussions of the behavioral and biological aspects of smoking. The final section is devoted to educational opportunities for preventing addiction to tobacco. (JD)

  9. ["Stress" ulcer--a problem of the general surgeon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelisen, D; Zigić, B; Rac, S

    1982-01-01

    Contemporary way of living accompanied by everday frustrations, a frequent use of medicaments, an easy application of corticosteroids, complexity of an opeation, so as an increased incidence of polytraumas --those are the factors responsible for an increasing rate of stress ulcus. The rate of 54 verified stress ulcus in the period from 1969-1979 in Regional Medical Centre of Banja Luka, at Surgical Department, are very often indicative of this disease. Thirty eight operatively treated patients are indicative of severity of this disease. The authors are reporting their experiences in resolving this disease by method of vagotomy with partial gastrectomy in comparison to simple sutures of acutely developed ulcus in addition to PS vagotomy. Perforation, which has, usually, been bigger than the chronic ulcus, we had in 31 cases. If the reports of the world authors are reliable, perforation occurs in 5% of cases only, therefore it is clear how many such conditions has remained undetected or treated under various other "working" diagnoses: (DIC, consumer coagulopathy, fibrinolysis, etc.". The stress ulcus is the disease which is a danger to any patient at Surgical Department.

  10. Shouldice Herniorrhaphy Technique: Surgeons Need to Remember It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dervişoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hernia surgery is the second most common surgical intervention performed by general surgeons following emergent surgeries. Shouldice herniorraphy is a classical surgery which is in the high tension repair group. This technique should be known by every surgeon. Also being an alternative method, it can be a necessity in cases in which tension free methods can not be performed. In the present study we investigated the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the Shouldice herniorraphy and Lichtenstein technique with the review of the technical literature. Material and Method: We compared 75 patients who were diagnosed with inguinal hernia and treated with Lichtenstein herniorraphy with 33 patients who were treated with Shouldice herniorraphy in Samsun Bafra Public Hospital between April 2007 and May 2008. Age, sex, hernia type, anesthesia method, mean hospitalisation length, early and late post operative complications were recorded. Result: Early post operative complications were urinary retention, wound infection and hematoma. The patients under spinal anesthesia with urinary retention were treated with urinary catheterization. Superficial wound infection was treated with drainage and antibiotic threapy. Among late postoperative complications; we observed paresthesia in the thigh in one patient in the Shouldice group and relapse hernia in one patient in the Lichtenstein group. Discussion: We suggest that this surgical technique which should be known by every surgeon should be taught to new surgery attenders as an alternative technique. This technique can be an alternative method and also may be the first choice in patients in whom tension free methods can not be applicated.

  11. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to reco

  12. Maximizing efficiency on trauma surgeon rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniuk, Aliaksandr; Dickson, Barbara J; Mahoney, Sean; O'Mara, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Rounding by trauma surgeons is a complex multidisciplinary team-based process in the inpatient setting. Implementation of lean methodology aims to increase understanding of the value stream and eliminate nonvalue-added (NVA) components. We hypothesized that analysis of trauma rounds with education and intervention would improve surgeon efficacy. Level 1 trauma center with 4300 admissions per year. Average non-intensive care unit census was 55. Five full-time attending trauma surgeons were evaluated. Value-added (VA) and NVA components of rounding were identified. The components of each patient interaction during daily rounds were documented. Summary data were presented to the surgeons. An action plan of improvement was provided at group and individual interventions. Change plans were presented to the multidisciplinary team. Data were recollected 6 mo after intervention. The percent of interactions with NVA components decreased (16.0% to 10.7%, P = 0.0001). There was no change between the two periods in time of evaluation of individual patients (4.0 and 3.5 min, P = 0.43). Overall time to complete rounds did not change. There was a reduction in the number of interactions containing NVA components (odds ratio = 2.5). The trauma surgeons were able to reduce the NVA components of rounds. We did not see a decrease in rounding time or individual patient time. This implies that surgeons were able to reinvest freed time into patient care, or that the NVA components were somehow not increasing process time. Direct intervention for isolated improvements can be effective in the rounding process, and efforts should be focused upon improving the value of time spent rather than reducing time invested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The business acumen of Canadian plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, J A; Caputy, G G

    1995-08-01

    We as plastic surgeons are engrossed and consumed by our quest to optimize patient care. In so doing, we are often distracted by that aspect of our practice which has direct bearing on patient care yet for which we are the least prepared--the business aspect. The entire population of Canadian plastic surgeons was surveyed in an effort to establish real and perceived needs of this group with respect to the business management of their practices. The survey elicited demographic information, information on business educational background, interest, and current commitment in acquiring business knowledge, and a final category of questions dealing with how well these surgeons function as business managers. Of the 315 plastic surgeons surveyed, 122 (39 percent) responded, which, in and of itself, indicates an interest in this aspect of their practices. Twelve respondents were excluded from the study for various reasons. Eighty of the 110 remaining respondents (72 percent) used a hospital-integrated facility for both emergency and elective outpatient procedures. Eighty-four of the 110 respondents (76 percent) indicated that 10 percent of their hours per week of inpatient booked operating time was canceled. Ninety-three percent of respondents felt that a business course to familiarize surgeons with common business situations and areas of personal finance would be beneficial. Few were previously educated in business, and similarly, few had great ongoing interest in business, although the majority of respondents used publications specifically dealing with financial matters (provided by the Canadian Medical Association). Twenty-three percent of respondents saw themselves in a growing role as businesspeople; 24 percent felt this dual role was enjoyable, while 29 percent felt this role was forced on them. A total of 21 percent of respondents did not see themselves as businesspeople at all. The six basic functions of a manager (planning, acquiring, organizing, actuating

  14. Electronic gaming machine warning messages: information versus self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Sally; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Regulators have extensively used warning signs in many health domains to enhance knowledge and shift attitudes and behaviors to reduce associated harm. The effectiveness of these signs is influenced by their physical attributes and content. Gambling warning signs traditionally focus on the following: informing individuals of the potentially risky outcomes of gambling and the odds of winning, encouraging gambling within affordable limits, and advertising counseling services. The limited evidence suggests that warning signs for gambling attract attention and improve knowledge but are generally ineffective in modifying players' thoughts and behaviors. Therefore, the authors aimed to determine the optimal content of messages that would enhance responsible gambling practices. The authors conclude that, in contrast with signs displaying probabilities or informing players of the risks associated with gambling, signs designed to encourage players to reflect on, appraise, evaluate, and self-regulate their actions have greater theoretical and empirical support. The authors comment that warning signs should promote the application of self-appraisal and self-regulation skills rather than the simple provision of information on odds and probabilities to maximize their effectiveness as a public health tool.

  15. 33 CFR 127.113 - Warning signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas § 127.113 Warning signs. (a) The marine transfer...

  16. 33 CFR 127.207 - Warning alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Equipment § 127.207 Warning alarms. (a) The...

  17. Communicating risk information and warnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileti, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Major advances have occurred over the last 20 years about how to effectively communicate risk information and warnings to the public. These lessons have been hard won. Knowledge has mounted on the finding from social scientific studies of risk communication failures, successes and those which fell somewhere in between. Moreover, the last 2 decades have borne witness to the brith, cultivation, and blossoming of information sharing between those physical scientists who discover new information about risk and those communcation scientists who trace its diffusion and then measure pbulic reaction. 

  18. Social media and your practice: navigating the surgeon-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; De Martino, Ivan; Fehring, Keith A; Sculco, Peter K

    2016-12-01

    Utilization of social media both in the private and professional arenas has grown rapidly in the last decade. The rise of social media use within health care can be viewed as the Internet-based corollary of the patient-centered care movement, in which patient perspectives and values are central to the delivery of quality care. For orthopedic surgeons and their practices, general-purpose online social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, are convenient platforms for marketing, providing patient education and generating referrals. Virtual health communities are used less frequently by orthopedic surgeons but provide forums for patient engagement and active surgeon-to-patient communication via blogs and ask-the-doctor platforms. This commentary reviews the current state of social media use in orthopedic practice, with particular emphasis on managing the extension of the surgeon-patient relationship online, including the unique practice risks social media poses, such as privacy concerns, potential liability, and time consumption.

  19. Designing Wearable Personal Assistants for Surgeons: An Egocentric Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The design of general-purpose wearable computers demands particular care for how human perception, cognition, and action work and work together. The authors propose a human body-and-mind centric (egocentric as opposed to device-centric) design framework and present initial findings from deploying...... it in the design of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons. The result is a Google Glass-based prototype system aimed at facilitating touchless interaction with x-ray images, browsing of electronic patient records (EPR) when on the move, and synchronized ad hoc remote collaboration...

  20. How helpful is capsule endoscopy to surgeons?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Ersoy; Bulent Sivri; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a new technology that, for the first time, allows complete, non-invasive endoscopic imaging of the small bowel. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of suspected small bowel diseases has been established. Important applications for surgeons include observations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel neoplasms.

  1. Contemporary social media engagement by breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekatah, Gregory E; Walker, Stephanie G; McDonald, James J; Dixon, J Michael; Brady, Richard R W

    2016-12-01

    There continues to be a steady rise in the use of social media among healthcare professionals. We present an overview of social media use among breast surgeons within the United Kingdom including demographic variations and some of the factors that underpin these trends. The benefits and drawbacks of open social media platforms are also considered.

  2. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs.

  3. Has medical history importance for surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, O W

    1975-03-01

    Surgeons will do well to remember that the two most important contributions to the growth and extension of surgery came from two disciplines, not then regarded as the most innovative. Anesthesia came from dentistry, the work primarily of W.T.G. Morton of Boston; prophylactic surgical antisepsis originated with the obstetrician Semmelweis, who developed a scheme of prophylactic chemical antisepsis that still remains the core of surgical antisepsis. In the mid 1880's, largely as a result of the work of Chamberland and others of the Pasteur school, surgeons in France and Germany substituted thermal for chemical antisepsis, whenever applicable. Whereas Lister's influence was tremendous in fostering acceptance of antisepsis by surgeons, by the end of his professorial career he had begun his capitulation to prophylactic antisepsis, which was complete by 1896 to the very practices that Semmelweis had proved the value of almost five decades previously. These were 19th century innovations. The greatest boon to surgery's advance in this century has been control of cellulitic infections through chemotherapeutic agencies, the sulfonamides and antibiotics. The tremendous upsurge of interest in research at the end of World War II brought surgeons to a fuller realization of the significant part they could play in the advance of their discipline. Intimate alignment of surgeons with physiologists of the circulation begot intracardiac surgery, a significant innovation with consequences of tremendous import for greater medicine's advance. Today, surgeons attacking the problem of tissue transplantation are aligning themselves with biochemists, geneticists, immunologists, experimental pathologists, and pharmacologists in their broad approach to the phenomenon of allograft rejection. The great extension of vascular surgery since World War II has made jewelers of surgeons of small tubular structures. The technical phases of these demanding operative procedures have largely been overcome

  4. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Asfandyar; Ali, Sajid; Ejaz, Sadaf; Farooqi, Marium; Ahmed, Syed Salman; Jawaid, Imran

    2012-11-06

    The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6%) was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9%) was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7%) were ready to disclose their error to the patient. The most

  5. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Asfandyar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6% was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9% was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7% were ready

  6. Comparison of pediatric surgical outcomes by the surgeon's degree of specialization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Daniel; Papandria, Dominic; Yang, Jessica; Zhang, Yiyi; Ortega, Gezzer; Colombani, Paul M; Chang, David C; Abdullah, Fizan

    2013-08-01

    Improved surgical outcomes in children have been associated with pediatric surgical specialization, previously defined by surgeon operative volume or fellowship training. The present study evaluates pediatric surgical outcomes through classifying surgeons by degrees of pediatric versus adult operative experience. A cross-sectional study was performed using nationally representative hospital discharge data from 1998 to 2007. Patients under 18 years of age undergoing inpatient operations in neurosurgery, otolaryngology, cardiothoracic, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and urology were included. An index was created, calculating the proportion of children treated by each surgeon. In-hospital mortality and length of stay were compared by index quartiles. Multivariate analysis was adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. A total of 119,164 patients were operated on by 13,141 surgeons. Within cardiothoracic surgery, there were 1.78 (p=0.02) and 2.61 (ppediatric specialization respectively with the highest quartile. For general surgery, a 2.15 (p=0.04) increase in odds for mortality was found when comparing surgeons between the lowest and the highest quartiles. Comparing the least to the most specialized surgeons, length of stay increased 1.14 days (p=0.02) for cardiothoracic surgery, 0.58 days (p=0.04) for neurosurgery, 0.23 days (p=0.02) for otolaryngology, and decreased by 1.06 days (psurgery. The present study demonstrates that surgeons caring preferentially for children-as a proportion of their overall practice-generally have improved mortality outcomes in general and cardiothoracic surgery. These data suggest a benefit associated with increased referral of children to pediatric practitioners, but further study is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. HIV/AIDS: occupational risk, attitude and behaviour of surgeons in southeast Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, S N; Waboso, P; Ozumba, B C

    2005-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the level of occupational risk, attitude and behaviour of surgeons towards HIV-infected patients. A questionnaire survey of 264 randomly selected surgeons in training or in practice in five different health institutions in southeast Nigeria within a five-month period was carried out. A 94% response rate was obtained with completed questionnaires from 264 surgeons. The respondents included obstetricians and gynaecologists (n = 78), general surgeons (n = 121), orthopaedic surgeons (n = 40), dental surgeons (n = 10), ophthalmologists (n = 6), urologists (n = 5), and ear, nose and throat surgeons (n = 4). Of them, 31% (n = 82) were qualified surgeons in practice, while the remaining 69% (n = 182) were resident surgeons in training. In the past five years, 40.2% (n = 106) and 26% (n = 70) of the respondents reported needle-stick injuries and blood splash, respectively, during surgery. The majority of the victims were resident surgeons, obstetricians and gynaecologists, and orthopaedic surgeons. Level of clinical experience and high patient blood loss are likely to contribute to this observation. In all, 89% (n = 236) were engaged in the risky practice of operating on patients with open wounds in their hand and the wounds were contaminated with blood in 5% of cases. During surgical procedures, all (100%) respondents wore protective apron, 65.2% (n = 172) wore double gloves and 30.3% (n = 80) used protective goggles. The use of double gloves and protective eye wear increased remarkably over the past decade, probably because the fear of occupational transmission of HIV was substantial. In total, 83% (n = 220) of the respondents had some reservations about treating patients infected with HIV, while 13.3% (n = 35) viewed them with fear. The remaining 3.4% (n = 9) had a more positive attitude towards HIV-infected patients. Further, 92% advocated preoperative screening, with special precaution during surgery, if the results are positive. In

  8. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  9. 30 CFR 75.208 - Warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Warning devices. 75.208 Section 75.208 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.208 Warning devices. Except during...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1830 - Warning sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (2) Facing outboard towards the water so that the sign may be seen from the water. (b) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, each warning sign must have the following words: (1) Warning. (2) Dangerous Cargo. (3) No Visitors. (4) No Smoking. (5) No Open Lights. (c) Each letter in the words on...

  11. An Infrastructure for a Traffic Warning System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2005-01-01

    The LIWAS Trafc Warning System aims at providingearly warning to vehicles about road conditions, such aswhether the road is slippery. The LIWAS system is currentlybeing developed and consists of two main parts:sensors for determining the state of the road and a communicationinfrastructure support...

  12. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  13. An Infrastructure for a Traffic Warning System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønsted, Jeppe; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2005-01-01

    The LIWAS Trafc Warning System aims at providingearly warning to vehicles about road conditions, such aswhether the road is slippery. The LIWAS system is currentlybeing developed and consists of two main parts:sensors for determining the state of the road and a communicationinfrastructure support...

  14. Crisis management and warning procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie November

    2009-03-01

    territoriale du risque s’avère nécessaire.Based on two flood events that recently affected new housing areas in very different political, organisational and hydrological contexts, this article examines the practices of actors involved in emergency and crisis situations in Switzerland. In both cases, the actors are identified – through their role and their position in the various procedures related to crisis management – and an inventory is made of the documents used. The study examines how the flood events were managed, identifies the organisational changes that followed the crises, and determines how the risk was conceived and to what extent it was formalised by the different actors both before and after the floods. Finally new forecasting and warning procedures that were set up following the events are described. The study shows that floods have a decisive impact on the production of knowledge, but that this phenomenon varies according to the actors. Events such as floods also sometimes reveal the existence of "latent" knowledge, or knowledge that is available but has not yet been integrated into institutional procedures. In terms of both forecasting and crisis management, these events also provide the opportunity to test information channels and to identify and correct any problems relating to organisation, cooperation or the reliability of means of communication. Among other things, the risks and crises related to flooding modify the dynamics and policies of the local area as a result of readjustments in the networks of actors. The introduction of emergency and crisis management measures appears more effective, however, than the reorganisation of planning and development procedures, a process which generally takes a lot longer. Nevertheless, since the recollection of events tends to fade with time, it is important that risks find a more concrete form of spatial expression on the landscape.

  15. [Extra-oral signs to look for in patients exhibiting oral warning signs of genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Lusson, Charlène; Hyon, Isabelle; Dajean-Trutaud, Sylvie; Le Caignec, Cédric; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed at defining guidelines for dental surgeons to manage patients with warning signs of rare genetic diseases. Anomalies of tooth development may occur as an isolated condition or in association with other symptoms in syndromes. In many cases, dental anomalies may be the first manifestations of a genetic disease. The dentist can contribute to the diagnosis, and hence to an early treatment of this syndrome. When one or more dental anomalies are found, practitioners should refer patients to a genetic clinic or a specialized reference center to diagnose genetic diseases. Therefore, we provide, for the first time, a table of extra-oral signs that dental surgeons can look for in patients exhibiting heritable dental developmental anomalies. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Career and lifestyle satisfaction among surgeons: what really matters? The National Lifestyles in Surgery Today Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppmann, Kathrin M; Palis, Bryan E; Goodnight, James E; Ho, Hung S; Troppmann, Christoph

    2009-08-01

    Optimizing recruitment of the next surgical generation is paramount. Unfortunately, many nonsurgeons perceive surgeons' lifestyle as undesirable. It is unknown, however, whether the surgeons-important opinion makers about their profession-are indeed dissatisfied. We analyzed responses to a survey mailed to all surgeons who were certified by the American Board of Surgery in 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004. We performed multivariate analyses to study career dissatisfaction and inability to achieve work-life balance, while adjusting for practice characteristics, demographics, and satisfaction with reimbursement. A total of 895 (25.5%) surgeons responded: mean age was 46 years; 80% were men; 88% were married; 86% had children; 45% were general surgeons; 72% were in urban practice; and 83% were in nonuniversity practice. Surgeons worked 64 hours per week; ideally, they would prefer to work 50 hours per week (median). Fifteen percent were dissatisfied with their careers. On multivariate analysis, significant (p career to their own children. On multivariate analysis, significant risk factors were nonuniversity practice (OR 2.5) and dissatisfaction with reimbursement (OR 3.4). In all, 33.5% did not achieve work-life balance. On multivariate analysis, dissatisfaction with reimbursement (OR 3.0) was a significant risk factor. Respondents' lives could be improved by "limiting emergency call" (77%), "diminishing litigation" (92%), and "improving reimbursement" (94%). Most surgeons are satisfied with their careers. Areas in need of improvement, particularly for nonuniversity surgeons, include reimbursement, work hours, and litigation. Strong local and national advocacy may not only improve career satisfaction, but could also render the profession more attractive for those contemplating a surgical career.

  17. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  18. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2016-07-15

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  19. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence.

  20. Paying surgeons less has cost more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph; Derman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 mandated reductions in physician reimbursement. This reduction in payments could be envisioned to limit expenditures on 2 counts: first, individual fees would be lower, producing inherent savings. Furthermore, reducing fees should depress the incentive to work, thereby generating additional savings from reduced output. A rival point of view holds that lower fees might paradoxically lead to greater spending because surgeons compensate for per-case reductions by performing more cases. If this income-targeting hypothesis is correct, lower per-case fees leads to increased volume. Increased work output has particularly sizable economic effects in fields like orthopedic surgery because the total cost of orthopedic interventions is usually many times larger than the physician's fee (largely owing to the cost of implants). As such, increases in work volume more than negate the potential savings from lower surgeon's fees.This phenomenon was studied in the context of total knee arthroplasty. In the decade spanning 1996 to 2005, inflation-adjusted physician reimbursement decreased by approximately 5% per year, leading to a cumulative drop in reimbursement from $2847 to $1685. Nonetheless, because the number of procedures performed increased from 253,841 to 498,169 and because payments to hospitals far exceeded payments to surgeons, total expenditures for total knee arthroplasty increased dramatically: more than $7.1 billion additional was spent on hospital payments. Continuing to pay surgeons less is apt to continue to cost more. Counter to intuition, the best strategy for controlling overall spending might be higher, not lower, surgical fees.

  1. Eulogy John Ludbrook: surgeon, physiologist and biostatistician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Roger G; Johnston, Colin I

    2017-08-12

    On the morning of Friday June 9, Professor John Ludbrook died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 87. John will be deeply missed by his family, friends and colleagues. John Ludbrook had a long and distinguished career as a teacher, educator, surgeon, physiologist and lastly as a statistician. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation.

  3. Choosing a Breast Reconstruction Surgeon and Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reconstruction Surgery Questions to Ask Your Surgeon About Breast Reconstruction If you’ve had surgery to treat your ... reconstruction. Finding the right plastic surgeon for your breast reconstruction If you decide to have breast reconstruction, you’ ...

  4. Emergency neurosurgery in Darwin: still the generalist surgeons' responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Tara; Treacy, Peter John; Mathieson, Matthew; Sandilands, Jessica; Weidlich, Stephanie; Read, David

    2015-09-01

    Royal Darwin Hospital (RDH) is the only major hospital for the 'Top End' of Northern Territory and Western Australia. As retrieval distances exceed 2600 km, resident generalist surgeons undertake all emergency neurosurgery. Retrospective clinical study from RDH records and review of prospectively collected datasets from RDH Intensive Care Unit and National Critical Care Trauma Response Centre for all emergency neurosurgery patients between 2008 and 2013. Data were obtained from 161 patients with 167 admissions (73% male, 39% indigenous) who underwent 195 procedures (33 per year), including burr hole, craniotomy, cerebral and posterior fossa craniectomy, elevation fracture and ventricular drain. Trauma accounted for 68%, with alcohol as a known factor in 57%. Subdural haematoma (SDH) accounted for 53%. Severity of head injury at presentation correlated with outcome (R(2) = 0.12, P 24 h (P = 0.023) and specific diagnoses of acute SDH (P = 0.006), acute-on-chronic SDH (P = 0.053) and infection (P = 0.052). Indigenous patients were younger (40 versus 55 years, P < 0.001) and more likely to have alcohol as a factor in trauma cases (71% versus 49%, P = 0.027). Time from injury to hospital was high for accidents at a remote location (12.9 versus 1.3 h, P < 0.001); however, Glasgow Outcome Scales (P = 0.13) were no different to accident at metropolitan Darwin. General surgeons at RDH perform a wide range of emergency neurosurgical procedures primarily for trauma. Factors contributing to poor outcomes included remote location of trauma and delay in reaching the hospital. Outcomes at 3 months appear acceptable. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Vehicle Dynamics Approach to Driver Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef A. Ghoneim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a concept for enhanced active safety by introducing a driver warning system based on vehicle dynamics that predicts a potential loss of control condition prior to stability control activation. This real-time warning algorithm builds on available technologies such as the Electronic Stability Control (ESC. The driver warning system computes several indices based on yaw rate, side-slip velocity, and vehicle understeer using ESC sensor suite. An arbitrator block arbitrates between the different indices and determines the status index of the driving vehicle. The status index is compared to predetermined stability levels which correspond to high and low stability levels. If the index exceeds the high stability level, a warning signal (haptic, acoustic, or visual is issued to alert the driver of a potential loss of control and ESC activation. This alert will remain in effect until the index is less than the low stability level at which time the warning signal will be terminated. A vehicle speed advisory algorithm is integrated with the warning algorithm to provide a desired vehicle speed of a vehicle traveling on a curve. Simulation results and vehicle tests were conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the warning algorithm.

  6. Seismic Activity: Public Alert and Warning: Legal Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocchetti, D.

    2007-12-01

    As science and technology evolve in ways that increase our ability to inform the public of potentially destructive seismic activity, there are significant legal issues for consideration. Even though countries and even states within the United States have differing legal tenets that could either change or at least re-shape the outcome of specific legal questions that this session will be pondering, there are fundamental legal principals that will permeate. It is often said that the law lags behind society and in particular its technological developments. No doubt in the area of warning the public of impending destructive forces of nature or society, the law will need to do some catching up. The law is probably adequately developed for at least some preliminary discussion of the key issues. No matter the legal scheme, if there is a failure or perceived failure in the system to warn people of a pending emergencies, albeit an earthquake, tsunami, or other predictable event, those who are harmed or believe they are harmed will seek relief under the law. Every day there are situations wherein the failure to warn or to adequately warn is key, such as with faulty or defective consumer products, escaped prisoners, and police high-speed vehicle chases. With alert and warning systems for disaster, however, we have a unique set of facts. Generally, the systems and their failures occur during emergencies or at least during situations under apparently exigent circumstances when the disaster's predictability is widely recognized as less than 100 percent. The law, in particular United States tort law, has been particularly lenient when people and organizations are operating during compressed timeframes and their actions are generally considered necessary to address circumstances relative to public safety. The legal system has been forgiving when the actor that failed or appeared to fail was government. The courts have liberally applied the principal of sovereign immunity to

  7. Inversion of tsunami waveforms and tsunami warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chao

    Ever since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the technique of inversion of tsunami data and the importance of tsunami warning have drawn the attention of many researchers. However, since tsunamis are rare and extreme events, developed inverse techniques lack validation, and open questions rise when they are applied to a real event. In this study, several of those open questions are investigated, i.e., the wave dispersion, bathymetry grid size and subfault division. First, tsunami records from three large tsunami events -- 2010 Maule, 2011 Tohoku and 2012 Haida Gwaii -- are analyzed to extract the main characteristics of the leading tsunami waves. Using the tool of wavelet transforming, the instant wave period can be obtained and thus the dispersive parameter mu2 can be calculated. mu2 is found to be smaller than 0.02 for all records, indicating that the wave dispersion is minor for the propagation of tsunami leading waves. Second, inversions of tsunami data are carried out for three tsunami events -- 2011 Tohoku, 2012 Haida Gwaii and 2014 Iquique. By varying the subfault size and the bathymetry grid size in the inversions, general rules are established for choosing those two parameters. It is found that the choice of bathymetry grid size depends on various parameters, such as the subfault size and the depth of subfaults. The global bathymetry data GEBCO with spatial resolution of 30 arcsec is generally good if the subfault size is larger than 40 km x 40 km; otherwise, bathymetry data with finer resolution is desirable. Detailed instructions of choosing the bathymetry size can be found in Chapter 2. By contrast, the choice of subfault size has much more freedom; our study shows that the subfault size can be very large without significant influence on the predicted tsunami waves. For earthquakes with magnitude of 8.0 ˜ 9.0, the subfault size can be 60 km ˜ 100 km. In our study, the maximum subfault size results in 9 ˜ 16 subfault patches on the ruptured fault surface

  8. Evaluation of Pre-marketing Factors to Predict Post-marketing Boxed Warnings and Safety Withdrawals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Andreas; Miller, Kathleen L; Lanthier, Michael; Dal Pan, Gerald; Nardinelli, Clark

    2017-06-01

    -marketing boxed warning. Although drugs approved with a boxed warning or priority review are more likely to experience serious post-marketing safety events, other information provided during the FDA drug review that is easy to quantify is generally not associated with post-marketing safety events. It appears that these post-marketing events are not discernible during a pre-marketing review and therefore might not be avoidable using current review data.

  9. Can a Plastic Surgeon be a Department Chairman?….Really?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, M W

    2016-04-01

    There is significant responsibility in being a Department of Surgery Chairman within a medical school. The Chairman is appointed by the Dean of Medicine to lead surgery in a path that serves the mission of the school. The Department of Surgery Chairman is charged with facilitating the academic, operational, and programmatic surgical initiatives of the School of Medicine. Traditionally the Chairman of Surgery has been a general surgeon but now our educational and clinical experiences have changed making traditional leadership less intuitive. Plastic surgeons appointed as current Chairman of the Department of Surgery are rare in the United States. Whereas, general surgeons may have less interaction with other surgical sub-specialties today, Plastic surgeons have more interaction crossing all disciplines of surgery. Innovation and creativity that defines our discipline, seems to fit well with Department leadership where strategic planning, vision and curriculum development, and the pursuit of academic and clinical quality remain core essentials to plastic surgery. This article is an editorial of my philosophy as a plastic surgeon leading a Department of Surgery.

  10. "Einsatzchirurgie"--experiences of German military surgeons in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Hauer, Thorsten; Huschitt, Niels; Palm, Hans-Georg

    2011-04-01

    the training of military surgeons (specialisation general surgery plus a second sub-specialisation either in visceral surgery or orthopaedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery, and emergency gynaecology are also integrated into this concept and will be addressed in special courses. On successful completion of this training programme, military surgeons will be officially appointed as "Einsatzchirurg" for a duration of 5 years. After this time, it will be obligatory to renew this "combat ready" status. The buildings and materials in German military medical treatment facilities provide for excellent working conditions. The training programme for military surgeons in its end-2010 version has been designed specifically with data about injury pattern and non-battle diseases as well as the political situation and professional requirements in the civilian sphere in mind.

  11. Mentoring during residency education: a unique challenge for the surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2006-08-01

    A mentor serves as role model, counselor, and advocate for an understudy or protégé. The art and science of mentoring have been investigated most thoroughly in the educational literature, yet there are unique situational and individual considerations in the surgical arena that may warrant special consideration. The general attributes of successful mentors are not foreign to academic surgeons but may require deliberate cultivation to optimize mentorship in the context of academic medicine. Moreover, the stages of productive mentoring may be counter to the learned adaptive behaviors and instinctive personality traits of some accomplished surgeon educators. Indeed, examples of failed mentorship are common in our medical centers and, specifically, in surgical training programs. The behavioral adaptation that supports surgical decision-making under conditions of incomplete data and unusual stress often devalues succession planning and derivation of satisfaction from the success of other members of the team. Accordingly, fostering effective mentoring relationships in academic surgery will require a concerted effort to develop appropriate behaviors conducive to the mentoring process. The personal and professional growth of our students as well as the succession planning for our specialty are dependent upon the successful creation of an environment conducive to mentoring in academic orthopaedics.

  12. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863–1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of “the Chief.” Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, “You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good.” Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  13. The development of reactions of the public to warning and emergency situations in France, Greece, and the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegman, O.; Boer, H.; Gutteling, J.M.; Komilis, E.; Cadet, B. (Department of Psychology, University of Twente, (Netherlands))

    1992-02-01

    This article describes the different reactions to emergency warning messages among residents living within a 3-km radius of a hazardous chemical complex and by people living at least 10 km from an industrial site in France, Greece, and the Netherlands. Belief in warning, primary and secondary appraisal, emotional response, and adherence to normal routine were assessed by conducting face-to-face interviews in which a four-phase scenario simulating a credible industrial accident was presented. The results showed that respondents who did not reside in the neighborhood of the hazardous site were, in general, more inclined to trust the warning messages than respondents who resided in the neighborhood were. With the exception of primary appraisal, the warning phases evoked very distinct reactions in the respondents from all three countries with regard to warning belief, secondary appraisal, emotional response, and adherence to normal routine.

  14. What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What Are the Warning Signs of Stroke? Brain tissue affected by blockage Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in ... over 55 years old have more chance of stroke, and the risk gets greater as you get ...

  15. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  16. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  17. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  18. National Weather Service County Warning Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains polygons corresponding to the County Warning Areas (CWAs) of each Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in the National Weather Service (NWS).

  19. FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA Warns About Stem Cell Claims Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... blood-forming system. back to top Regulation of Stem Cells FDA regulates stem cells in the U.S. to ...

  20. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  1. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  2. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  3. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  4. Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is a nationally representative public health surveillance system that has monitored drug related emergency department (ED)...

  5. 21 CFR 290.6 - Spanish-language version of required warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spanish-language version of required warning. 290... (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CONTROLLED DRUGS General Provisions § 290.6 Spanish-language version of required... of this drug to any person other than the patient for whom it was prescribed.” The Spanish version...

  6. Development of Flood Warning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy J. Labo,

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-based early warning systems (CBEWS is a “people-centered” system and empowers individuals and communities threatened by hazards to act on sufficient time and in an appropriate manner to reduce the possibility of personal injury, loss of life, damage to property, environment and loss of livelihood. These things lead to the development of the device necessary for the protection of the community against flood hazards as it allows people to get prepared with sufficient time. An alarm system was developed to monitor the water level on Salog River that overflows during heavy rains. The water level sensors were submerged in a canal of water to test the functionality of the device before its installation. Computer programs were created to enhance the monitoring of water level: the River Monitor Software and the Water Level Monitor. The LED arrays emit light according to water level; green for low, orange for medium, and red for high. A siren also alarms with different intervals (30 seconds for low, 15 seconds for medium, and a continuous alarm for high. Automatic emergency lighting was integrated in the design and lights up during power outages powered by rechargeable sealed battery that charges when ac power is supplied to the device. Levels were established based on available data; low water level means awareness; medium water level means preparedness and high water level means immediate response is necessary.

  7. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  8. Thoracic surgery in the real world: does surgical specialty affect outcomes in patients having general thoracic operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P; Davenport, Daniel L; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Most general thoracic operations in the United States are performed by general surgeons. Results obtained by those identified as general surgeons are often compared with those identified as thoracic surgeons. We interrogated the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database over a 5-year period to compare outcomes in patients who underwent similar operations by surgeons identified as either thoracic surgeons or general surgeons. We employed propensity-score matching to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of surgeon identity on postoperative outcomes. During the study period, thoracic surgeons performed 3,263 major pulmonary or esophageal operations, and general surgeons performed 15,057 similar operations. Compared with patients operated on by general surgeons, patients operated on by thoracic surgeons had significant excess multivariate comorbidities, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concurrent pneumonia, congestive heart failure, previous cardiac surgery, dialysis-dependent renal failure, disseminated cancer, prior sepsis, and previous operation within 30 days. Likewise, patients in highest risk categories had operations performed by thoracic surgeons more commonly than by general surgeons. Unadjusted comparisons for mortality and serious morbidity showed significantly worse mortality and pulmonary complications in patients operated on by thoracic surgeons. However, with propensity matching according to surgeon type, thoracic surgeons had significantly fewer serious adverse outcomes compared with general surgeons, and this decreased morbidity occurred in a higher risk cohort. Our results show that patients operated on by thoracic surgeons have higher acuity compared with patients operated on by general surgeons. When patients are matched for comorbidities and serious preoperative risk factors, thoracic surgeons have improved outcomes, especially with regard to

  9. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  10. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  11. The SuperNova Early Warning System

    OpenAIRE

    Scholberg, K.

    2008-01-01

    A core collapse in the Milky Way will produce an enormous burst of neutrinos in detectors world-wide. Such a burst has the potential to provide an early warning of a supernova's appearance. I will describe the nature of the signal, the sensitivity of current detectors, and SNEWS, the SuperNova Early Warning System, a network designed to alert astronomers as soon as possible after the detected neutrino signal.

  12. Internet sex and dating sites need warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    For this issue's Commentary column, Peter L. Tenore, MD, discusses risk for infection with HIV or acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases associated with the use of the Internet to find sexual partners and presents results of an informal survey to determine whether Internet sites used to find sexual partners provide warnings about sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. He also calls for the operators of such sites to add warnings to their sites.

  13. The United States Army Battalion Surgeon: Frontline Requirement or Relic of a Bygone Era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    Care with Physicians .................................. 47  Benefits of Specialty Care at Battalion Level...Battalion Aid Station BN Battalion BS Battalion Surgeon CBMM Core Battalion Medical Mission DOW Died of Wounds FSO Full Spectrum Operations GMO ...General Medical Officers or GMOs . Young, motivated, and greedy for knowledge, GMOs propelled the field of military medicine forward during

  14. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  15. Distribution of new graphic warning labels: Are tobacco companies following regulations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoek Janet

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To test the hypothesis that tobacco companies would not follow a regulation that required seven new graphic health warnings (GHWs to be evenly distributed on cigarette packs and that they would distribute fewer packs featuring warnings regarded by smokers as being more disturbing. Methods Cross-sectional survey of purchased packs (n = 168 and street-collected discarded packs (convenience sample of New Zealand cities and towns, n = 1208 packs with statistical analysis of seven types of new GHWs. A priori warning impact was judged using three criteria, which were tested against data from depth interviews with retailers. Results The GHWs on the purchased packs and street-collected packs both showed a distribution pattern that was generally consistent with the hypothesis ie, there were disproportionately more packs featuring images judged as "least disturbing" and disproportionately fewer of those with warnings judged "more disturbing". The overall patterns were statistically significant, suggesting an unequal frequency of the different warnings for both purchased (p Conclusion These results suggest that tobacco companies are not following the regulations, which requires even distribution of the seven different GHWs on cigarette packs; further monitoring is required to estimate the extent of this non-compliance. As an immediate measure, governments should strictly enforce all regulations applying to health warnings, particularly given that these are an effective tobacco control intervention that cost tax payers nothing.

  16. Impact of objectively assessing surgeons' teaching on effective perioperative instructional behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryl I; Gupta, Rama N; Larson, Joseph R; Abubars, Omar I; Kwiecien, Andrew J; Lake, Alexander D; Hozain, Ahmed E; Tanious, Adam; O'Brien, Trevor; Basson, Marc D

    2013-10-01

    Advancing surgical technology and decreasing resident learning hours have limited exposure to perioperative training, necessitating more effective and efficient perioperative teaching by faculty surgeons. Participation in collaborative efforts and process improvement can change behaviors and enhance teaching. To promote deliberate teaching of residents, change resident perception of their teachers, and produce sustainable improvements by objectively measuring surgeons' perioperative teaching performance. This 3-phase observational study of surgeons' perioperative teaching behaviors included university-based surgeons, general surgery residents, and preclinical student observers and involved elective cases at a 600+ bed tertiary hospital. Initially, we measured teaching behaviors by surgeons unaware of study objectives, provided aggregate and confidential individual feedback, and developed standardized preoperative briefings and postoperative debriefings. Phase 2 applied a deliberate teaching model and reinforced behaviors with continuous process improvement efforts (Plan, Do, Check, Act) and repeat observations. Phase 3 used resident prompts to enhance teaching behaviors and demonstrate sustainability. Resident surveys conducted 3 times assessed perceptions of deliberate guidance by faculty when compared with national benchmarks. Introduction of deliberate faculty preprocedural focusing and postprocedural reinforcement to facilitate resident learning. More frequent and complete perioperative teaching by faculty and the perception of enhanced teaching by residents. Faculty more commonly and more completely performed the 10-step preoperative briefings and postoperative debriefings (P teaching styles significantly improved and residents' survey-reported assessments of faculty teaching improved over national data for describing procedural steps (P = .02) and requests for resident self-evaluation (P = .006). Objective recording of teaching behavior frequency

  17. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jessica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Janz, Nancy K. [Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sabel, Michael S. [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Katz, Steven J. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational

  18. Warning navigation system using real-time safe region monitoring for otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byunghyun; Oka, Masamichi; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Ouchida, Riichi; Hong, Jaesung; Hashizume, Makoto

    2013-05-01

    We developed a surgical navigation system that warns the surgeon with auditory and visual feedback to protect the facial nerve with real-time monitoring of the safe region during drilling. Warning navigation modules were developed and integrated into a free open source software platform. To obtain high registration accuracy, we used a high-precision laser-sintered template of the patient's bone surface to register the computed tomography (CT) images. We calculated the closest distance between the drill tip and the surface of the facial nerve during drilling. When the drill tip entered the safe regions, the navigation system provided an auditory and visual signal which differed in each safe region. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system, we performed phantom experiments for maintaining a given safe margin from the facial nerve when drilling bone models, with and without the navigation system. The error of the safe margin was measured on postoperative CT images. In real surgery, we evaluated the feasibility of the system in comparison with conventional facial nerve monitoring. The navigation accuracy was submillimeter for the target registration error. In the phantom study, the task with navigation ([Formula: see text] mm) was more successful with smaller error, than the task without navigation ([Formula: see text] mm, [Formula: see text]). The clinical feasibility of the system was confirmed in three real surgeries. This system could assist surgeons in preserving the facial nerve and potentially contribute to enhanced patient safety in the surgery.

  19. Development of a charting method to monitor the individual performance of surgeons at the beginning of their career.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Duclos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Efforts to provide a valid picture of surgeons' individual performance evolution should frame their outcomes in relation to what is expected depending on their experience. We derived the learning curve of young thyroidectomy surgeons as a baseline to enable the accurate assessment of their individual outcomes and avoid erroneous conclusions that may derive from more traditional approaches. METHODS: Operative time and postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy of 2006 patients who underwent a thyroidectomy performed by 19 young surgeons in five academic hospitals were monitored from April 2008 to December 2009. The database was randomly divided into training and testing datasets. The training data served to determine the expected performance curve of surgeons during their career and factors influencing outcome variation using generalized estimating equations (GEEs. To simulate prospective monitoring of individual surgeon outcomes, the testing data were plotted on funnel plots and cumulative sum charts (CUSUM. Performance charting methods were utilized to present outcomes adjusted both for patient case-mix and surgeon experience. RESULTS: Generation of performance curves demonstrated a gradual reduction in operative time from 139 (95% CI, 137 to 141 to 75 (71 to 80 minutes, and from 15.7% (15.1% to 16.3% to 3.3% (3.0% to 3.6% regarding the nerve palsy rate. Charts interpretation revealed that a very young surgeon had better outcomes than expected, whereas a more experienced surgeon appeared to be a poor performer given the number of years that he had already spent in practice. CONCLUSIONS: Not considering the initial learning curve of surgeons exposes them to biased measurement and to misinterpretation in assessing their individual performance for thyroidectomy. The performance chart represents a valuable tool to monitor the outcome of surgeons with the expectation to provide safe and efficient care to patients.

  20. Opportunities in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worldwide Surgeons' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael; Newman, Jared M; Khlopas, Anton; Chughtai, Morad; Martinez, Nick; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    This study surveyed a group of US and international orthopaedic surgeons to prioritize areas of improvement in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Specifically, we assessed surgeon responses regarding the top five areas of TKA needing improvement; which were stratified by: a) US surgeons, b) international surgeons, c) US surgeons' implant-brand-loyalty, and d) surgeons' years of experience and case volume. Four hundred and eighteen surgeons who were board-certified, in practice for at least two years, spent 60% of their time in clinical practice, and performed a minimum of 25 lower extremity joint arthroplasties per year were surveyed. They chose the top five areas (among 17) needing improvement for TKA. Results were stratified by surgeons' location (US and international), implant-brand-loyalty, years of experience, and case volume. Functional outcomes was the top identified area for improvement (US 63% and international 71%), followed by brand loyalty (Company I 68%, other brand 59%, and multi-brand/no loyalty 66%), years of experience (early-career 64%, mid-career 63%, and late-career 75%) and case volume (low-volume 69%, mid-volume 60%, and high-volume 71%). Following this was costs for US surgeons (47%) and implant survivorship for international surgeons (57%). While costs were the next highest area for specific Company-loyal surgeons (57%), implant survivorship was the next highest area for the other two cohorts. Implant survivorship was the second most important area of improvement regardless of years of experience and for low- and mid-volume surgeons. Surgeons identified functional outcomes as the most important area needing improvement. Cost of implants was more important for American as compared to international surgeons.

  1. Early Warning Signals - conceptual limitations and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathiany, Sebastian; Claussen, Martin; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Due to potentially large positive feedbacks in the climate system, the existence of tipping points is under debate. At these points, small changes in forcing can lead to abrupt climate change due to the destabilising feedbacks. In order to predict such abrupt changes or to distinguish changes in stability from random state transitions, it has been proposed to exploit statistical precursors of instabilities, also called early warning signals (EWS). However, we argue that the limitations of the underlying concept generally do not allow conclusions on the mechanism of abrupt changes without substantial physical knowledge - the burden of proof lies with the applier of EWS. We demonstrate these limitations with examples from vegetation dynamics and sea ice cover change in models of very different complexity. Apart from the practical problem of short and non-stationary time-series, statistical properties such as variance and autocorrelation usually change for reasons unrelated to the system's stability. In particular, it has to be known, how the natural variability (noise) in a system is caused and how it propagates through the system. A further fundamental limitation is imposed by the large number of spatial degrees of freedom. The benefit of EWS has only been shown in idealised systems of predefined spatial extent. In a more general context like a complex climate system model, the critical subsystem that exhibits a loss in stability (hotspot) and the critical mode of the transition may be unknown. An abrupt change can therefore come as a surprise. However, we suggest that EWS can be applied as a diagnostic tool to find the hotspot of a sudden transition and to distinguish this hotspot from regions experiencing an induced tipping. For this purpose we present a scheme which identifies a hotspot as a certain combination of grid cells which maximise an EWS. The method can provide information on the causality of sudden transitions and may help to improve the knowledge on

  2. Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirae McKee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud’s arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud’s arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud’s arthropathy than traditional windblown hand.

  3. Training cardiac surgeons: the Indiana University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W

    2016-12-01

    In this article, I will outline the origin of cardiothoracic surgical (CTS) training at Indiana University (IU) and its evolution to the present. I will describe my educational background, surgical training in this specialty, and my role as an educator of CT surgeons. I will describe our faculty and the structure of the CTS residency. Finally, I will describe a newly adopted smart phone "App" called SIMPL, which allows the resident and faculty to quickly (50% of the most critical aspects of each surgical procedure, the resident's performance during the critical portion of the operation from poor to excellent, and the degree of difficulty of the operation from simple to complex. The attending surgeon and the resident data are then forwarded to the SIMPL database where the SIMPL software aggregates data for each resident and procedure producing a report at the end of the rotation of the resident's performance relative to his peers. This additional evaluation process will better ensure that our CTS residents are "practice ready" when they complete their training.

  4. Denis Browne: maverick or master surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D E

    2000-11-01

    The current generation of surgeons may remember Denis Browne only as an inventor of surgical instruments which few people use, an innovator of procedures condemned as inadequate, and a personality bristling with controversy: a maverick indeed. And yet this assessment belies his influence as the founder of modern paediatric surgery in the development of British surgery. Further, his innovative operations in a range of paediatric lesions were revolutionary in the context of the time. Browne was born in 1892 and educated in Australia, although his whole surgical career was in England. He had a remarkable family background; unique Australian experiences in childhood, when he commenced to display independence and individuality of spirit, through University, where he gained 'Blues' in tennis and shooting, to war, where he served in Gallipoli and France; and to controversies that surrounded him in his battle to establish paediatric surgery as a legitimate surgical discipline. He certainly had a prickly personality and a particular venom reserved for orthopaedic surgeons and anatomists, but his achievements may have been possible only by one possessed of such a strong and towering character.

  5. Perspectives of being spouse, parent, and surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Achieving a balance between one's career and personal life is a never-ending challenge. As a surgeon, add-on cases and double-booked clinics can lead to long hours at work and make availability for family time unpredictable. It may seem like the threat of interruption because of patient needs always loom. Disruptions to family time extend beyond the long hours spent in surgery and clinics. Inattentiveness at home because of the technology tethers that keep one available for constant questions and patient care issues can also distract from time spent with family. Although the practice of an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can involve unpredictable schedules and patient care issues, there are means of mitigating the chaos that can envelop one's personal life as a result of a chosen career track. Clear priorities and expectations in both personal and professional arenas can improve the work-life balance. Flexible jobs that allow for more time with family do exist. Negotiating for this flexibility and self-assurance in holding fast to personal ideals are important in achieving a successful balance.

  6. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  7. Ratings checklist for warnings: a prototype tool to aid experts in the adequacy evaluation of proposed or existing warnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenorovitz, David R; Leonard, S David; Karnes, Edward W

    2012-01-01

    In the field of forensic human factors, experts are often called upon to assess and evaluate the adequacy of new or existing products' warnings or warnings systems. The usual goal of this evaluation is to arrive at a simple binary decision regarding the warning in question (i.e., does it "pass/fail", or is it "adequate/inadequate"). However, such a warning assessment process may in fact be quite complex and multidimensional in its execution. The existing warnings research literature has identified a fairly large number of warnings features or factors likely to have an impact on a given warning's effectiveness or adequacy. The tool addressed in this article is intended for use by a warnings expert (as opposed to one less knowledgeable and informed about complex warnings issues), and can serve as a reminder checklist to help ensure that the expert has taken into consideration the most relevant features or factors during such a warnings adequacy assessment.

  8. Geoethical considerations in early warning of flooding and landslides: Case study from Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoli, Graziella; Kleivane Krøgli, Ingeborg; Dahl, Mads Peter; Colleuille, Hervé; Nykjær Boje, Søren; Sund, Monica

    2015-04-01

    The Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVE) runs the national early warning systems (EWS) for flooding and shallow landslides in Norway. The two EWSs have been operational since the late 1980s and 2013 respectively, and are based on weather forecasts, various hydro-meteorological prognosis and expert evaluation. Daily warning levels and related information to the public is prepared and presented through custom build internet platforms. In natural hazards sciences, the risk of a specific threat is defined as the product of hazard and consequence. In this context an EWS is intended to work as a mitigation measure in lowering the consequence and thus the risk of the threat. One of several factors determining the quality of such an EWS, is how warnings are communicated to the public. In contrary to what is common practice in some other countries, experts working with EWS in Norway cannot be held personally responsible for consequences of warnings being issued or not. However, the communication of warnings for flooding and landslides at NVE still implies many considerations of geoethical kind. Which are the consequences today for the forecasters when erroneous warning messages are sent because based on a poorly documented analysis? What is for example the most responsible way to describe uncertainties in warnings issued? What is the optimal compromise between avoiding false alarms and not sending out a specific warning? Is it responsible to rely on a "gut feeling"? Some authorities complain in receiving warning messages too often. Is it responsible to begin notifying these, only in cases of "high hazard level" and no longer in cases of "moderate hazard level"? Is it acceptable to issue general warnings for large geographical areas without being able to pinpoint the treat on local scale? What responsibility lies within the EWS in recommending evacuation or other practical measures to local authorities? By presenting how early warnings of flooding and

  9. IG Statement: Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on OIG report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statement of Inspector General Arthur A. Elkins, Jr., on the Office of Inspector General (OIG) report Early Warning Report: Main EPA Headquarters Warehouse in Landover, Maryland, Requires Immediate EPA Attention.

  10. Instructors' Use of Trigger Warnings and Behavior Warnings in Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Guy A.; Wells, Anna Mae; Dawson, Kaylee J.

    2016-01-01

    College students have been increasingly demanding warnings and accommodations in relation to course topics they believe will elicit strong, negative emotions. These "trigger warnings" are highly relevant to Abnormal Psychology because of the sensitive topics covered in the course (e.g., suicide, trauma, sex). A survey of Abnormal…

  11. The Dangers of Gathering Data: Surgeon-Specific Outcomes Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Wehner, Paulette S.; Setser, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of risk adjustment is important in developing surgeon profiles. As surgeon profiles are obtained from observational, nonrandomized data, we hypothesized that selection bias exists in how patients are matched with surgeons and that this bias might influence surgeon profiles. We used the Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk model to calculate observed to expected (O/E) mortality ratios for each of six cardiac surgeons at a single institution. Propensity scores evaluated selection bias that might influence development of risk-adjusted mortality profiles. Six surgeons (four high and two low O/E ratios) performed 2298 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operations over 4 years. Multivariate predictors of operative mortality included preoperative shock, advanced age, and renal dysfunction, but not the surgeon performing CABG. When patients were stratified into quartiles based on the propensity score for operative death, 83% of operative deaths (50 of 60) were in the highest risk quartile. There were significant differences in the number of high-risk patients operated upon by each surgeon. One surgeon had significantly more patients in the highest risk quartile and two surgeons had significantly less patients in the highest risk quartile (p < 0.05 by chi-square). Our results show that high-risk patients are preferentially shunted to certain surgeons, and away from others, for unexplained (and unmeasured) reasons. Subtle unmeasured factors undoubtedly influence how cardiac surgery patients are matched with surgeons. Problems may arise when applying national database benchmarks to local situations because of this unmeasured selection bias. PMID:23204823

  12. Environment Agency England flood warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Chris; Walters, Mark; Haynes, Elizabeth; Dobson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Context In England around 5 million homes are at risk of flooding. We invest significantly in flood prevention and management schemes but we can never prevent all flooding. Early alerting systems are fundamental to helping us reduce the impacts of flooding. The Environment Agency has had the responsibility for flood warning since 1996. In 2006 we invested in a new dissemination system that would send direct messages to pre-identified recipients via a range of channels. Since then we have continuously improved the system and service we offer. In 2010 we introduced an 'opt-out' service where we pre-registered landline numbers in flood risk areas, significantly increasing the customer base. The service has performed exceptionally well under intense flood conditions. Over a period of 3 days in December 2013, when England was experiencing an east coast storm surge, the system sent nearly 350,000 telephone messages, 85,000 emails and 70,000 text messages, with a peak call rate of around 37,000 per hour and 100% availability. The Floodline Warnings Direct (FWD) System FWD provides warnings in advance of flooding so that people at risk and responders can take action to minimise the impact of the flood. Warnings are sent via telephone, fax, text message, pager or e-mail to over 1.1 million properties located within flood risk areas in England. Triggers for issuing alerts and warnings include attained and forecast river levels and rainfall in some rapidly responding locations. There are three levels of warning: Flood Alert, Flood Warning and Severe Flood Warning, and a stand down message. The warnings can be updated to include relevant information to help inform those at risk. Working with our current provider Fujitsu, the system is under a programme of continuous improvement including expanding the 'opt-out' service to mobile phone numbers registered to at risk addresses, allowing mobile registration to the system for people 'on the move' and providing access to

  13. Tsunami early warning and decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Steinmetz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An innovative newly developed modular and standards based Decision Support System (DSS is presented which forms part of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS. The GITEWS project stems from the effort to implement an effective and efficient Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System for the coast of Indonesia facing the Sunda Arc along the islands of Sumatra, Java and Bali. The geological setting along an active continental margin which is very close to densely populated areas is a particularly difficult one to cope with, because potential tsunamis' travel times are thus inherently short. National policies require an initial warning to be issued within the first five minutes after an earthquake has occurred. There is an urgent requirement for an end-to-end solution where the decision support takes the entire warning chain into account. The system of choice is based on pre-computed scenario simulations and rule-based decision support which is delivered to the decision maker through a sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI using information fusion and fast information aggregation to create situational awareness in the shortest time possible. The system also contains risk and vulnerability information which was designed with the far end of the warning chain in mind – it enables the decision maker to base his acceptance (or refusal of the supported decision also on regionally differentiated risk and vulnerability information (see Strunz et al., 2010. While the system strives to provide a warning as quickly as possible, it is not in its proper responsibility to send and disseminate the warning to the recipients. The DSS only broadcasts its messages to a dissemination system (and possibly any other dissemination system which is operated under the responsibility of BMKG – the meteorological, climatological and geophysical service of Indonesia – which also hosts the tsunami early warning center. The system is to be seen

  14. Should Advertising by Aesthetic Surgeons be Permitted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations. PMID:28529421

  15. Mapping a surgeon's becoming with Deleuze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Fenwick, Tara

    2015-12-01

    The process of 'becoming' shapes professionals' capability, confidence and identity. In contrast to notions of rugged individuals who achieve definitive status as experts, 'becoming' is a continuous emergent condition. It is often a process of struggle, and is always interminably linked to its environs and relationships. 'Becoming' is a way of understanding the tensions of everyday practice and knowledge of professionals. In this paper, we explore the notion of 'becoming' from the perspective of surgeons. We suggest that 'becoming', as theorised by Deleuze, offers a more nuanced understanding than is often represented using conventional vocabularies of competence, error, quality and improvement. We develop this conception by drawing from our Deleuze-inspired study of mapping experience in surgery. We argue for Deleuzian mapping as a method to research health professionals' practice and experience, and suggest the utility of this approach as a pedagogical tool for medical education.

  16. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  17. John Banister: an Elizabethan surgeon in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Amílcar D'Avila de

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil's sixteenth-century history, very few references are made to health professionals. On the expedition of Edward Fenton, dispatched by the English Crown in 1582 to set up a trading post in Asia, was the famous barber-surgeon and physician John Banister. The naval squadron, diverted from its original route to repeat the feats of Sir Francis Drake, stopped over in Africa, crossed the Atlantic and anchored off the Santa Catarina coast in Brazil. In these waters, the expedition degenerated into piracy and returned unsuccessful to Europe. John Banister is considered the person who liberated English anatomy from mediaeval slavery, shedding upon it the light of the Renaissance. It was the first time that anyone of this importance in the area of health had visited these latitudes.

  18. Evaluation of Flood Forecast and Warning in Elbe river basin - Impact of Forecaster's Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhelka, Jan; Vlasak, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    model operation, experience and forecasting strategy differs between responsible forecasting offices. Warning is based on model outputs interpretation by hydrologists-forecaster. Warning hit rate reached 0.60 for threshold set to lowest flood stage of which 0.11 was underestimation of flood degree (miss 0.22, false alarm 0.28). Critical success index of model forecast was 0.34, while the same criteria for warning reached 0.55. We assume that the increase accounts not only to change of scale from single forecasting point to region for warning, but partly also to forecaster's added value. There is no official warning strategy preferred in the Czech Republic (f.e. tolerance towards higher false alarm rate). Therefore forecaster decision and personal strategy is of great importance. Results show quite successful warning for 1st flood level exceedance, over-warning for 2nd flood level, but under-warning for 3rd (highest) flood level. That suggests general forecaster's preference of medium level warning (2nd flood level is legally determined to be the start of the flood and flood protection activities). In conclusion human forecaster's experience and analysis skill increases flood warning performance notably. However society preference should be specifically addressed in the warning strategy definition to support forecaster's decision making.

  19. Surgeon unemployment: would practice sharing be a viable solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeam, Elliot; Feinberg, Stan

    2016-04-01

    Surgeon unemployment has become a crisis within Canadian surgery in recent years. Without dedicated governmental workforce planning, ensuring that new residency graduates can find employment will require new models of employment. Practice sharing, whereby a new graduate and a senior surgeon partner to divide their practices, allows the senior surgeon to wind down and the newer surgeon to ramp up. Importantly, this arrangement builds in formal mentoring, which is so important in the early years of starting a surgical practice. Practice sharing may be a solution for the workforce issues currently afflicting new surgical graduates across Canada.

  20. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  1. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG. Methods: Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology. Results: The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal. Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  2. [Management abilities of the head surgeon: essential for survival!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, J

    2012-04-01

    Due to increased economic challenges in the management of hospitals head surgeons do not only need excellent surgical expertise but also significant management qualities. The personality of head surgeons should include authenticity, sincerity, fairness and the ability to cooperate. Visionary leadership, strategic thinking and strategic management of the personnel are further prerequisites for success. Besides good abilities in communication head surgeons need knowledge of the operating figures for interpretation. To keep up with the own capabilities time and self-management is essential. A survival as head surgeon is likely if these qualities and abilities exist.

  3. A survey of early warning technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, G.D.; Arlowe, H.D.; Williams, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents a survey of technologies useful in providing early warning in physical security systems. Early warning is important in virtually all types of security systems whether they are used for temporary (tactical, portable, or semi-permanent) applications, border warning, fixed-site detection, or standoff surveillance detection. With the exception of the standoff surveillance detection systems, all systems discussed in this paper usually involve a moving target. The fact that a person(s) to be detected in a standoff surveillance scenario is not moving presents challenging problems and requires different applications of technology. The technologies commonly used to detect moving targets and some suggestions for detection of stationary targets are addressed in this paper.

  4. Automatic earthquake confirmation for early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyuk, H. S.; Colombelli, S.; Zollo, A.; Allen, R. M.; Erdik, M. O.

    2015-07-01

    Earthquake early warning studies are shifting real-time seismology in earthquake science. They provide methods to rapidly assess earthquakes to predict damaging ground shaking. Preventing false alarms from these systems is key. Here we developed a simple, robust algorithm, Authorizing GRound shaking for Earthquake Early warning Systems (AGREEs), to reduce falsely issued alarms. This is a network threshold-based algorithm, which differs from existing approaches based on apparent velocity of P and S waves. AGREEs is designed to function as an external module to support existing earthquake early warning systems (EEWSs) and filters out the false events, by evaluating actual shaking near the epicenter. Our retrospective analyses of the 2009 L'Aquila and 2012 Emilia earthquakes show that AGREEs could help an EEWS by confirming the epicentral intensity. Furthermore, AGREEs is able to effectively identify three false events due to a storm, a teleseismic earthquake, and broken sensors in Irpinia Seismic Network, Italy.

  5. Natural risk warning: comparison of two methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cavallo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Italian network of "Centri Funzionali" is now reaching operational status both in hydro-meteorological risk forecasting and support to the decision making of administrations that issue natural risk warning. Each centre operates for its district of influence. In order to have a nationwide common standard the National Civil Protection Department proposed a quantitative warning methodology based on the definition of rainfall thresholds correlated to historical damages. In the first phase the thresholds have been defined using two studies that cover all Italy: the VAPI (statistics of extreme rainfall and discharges, see reference and the AVI (database of historical flood and landslide events and reported damages, see reference. This work presents one year back analysis that compares the new methodology and the one that has been usied since 2000 by the Liguria Region Meteorological Centre with regard to flood warning, pinpointing the performance differences in terms of false and missed alerts.

  6. Interactive early warning technique based on SVDD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    After reviewing current researches on early warning,it is found that"bad" data of some systems is not easy to obtain,which makes methods proposed by these researches unsuitable for monitored systems.An interactive early warning technique based on SVDD(support vector data description)is proposed to adopt"good" data as samples to overcome the difficulty in obtaining the"bad"data.The process consists of two parts:(1)A hypersphere is fitted on"good"data using SVDD.If the data object are outside the hypersphere,it would be taken as"suspicious";(2)A group of experts would decide whether the suspicious data is"bad"or"good",early warning messages would be issued according to the decisions.And the detailed process of implementation is proposed.At last,an experiment based on data of a macroeconomic system is conducted to verify the proposed technique.

  7. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families Become an APA Member Learn More Explore APA Psychiatrists Residents & Medical Students Patients & Families About APA ... Psychiatric News Message from President APA Blogs Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical Students International ...

  8. Distributed GIS for automated natural hazard zonation mapping Internet-SMS warning towards sustainable society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanjan Bhattacharya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, open systems are needed for real time analysis and warnings on geo-hazards and over time can be achieved using Open Source Geographical Information System (GIS-based platform such as GeoNode which is being contributed to by developers around the world. To develop on an open source platform is a very vital component for better disaster information management as far as spatial data infrastructures are concerned and this would be extremely vital when huge databases are to be created and consulted regularly for city planning at different scales, particularly satellite images and maps of locations. There is a big need for spatially referenced data creation, analysis, and management. Some of the salient points that this research would be able to definitely contribute with GeoNode, being an open source platform, are facilitating the creation, sharing, and collaborative use of geospatial data. The objective is development of an automated natural hazard zonation system with Internet-short message service (SMS warning utilizing geomatics for sustainable societies. A concept of developing an internet-resident geospatial geohazard warning system has been put forward in this research, which can communicate alerts via SMS. There has been a need to develop an automated integrated system to categorize hazard and issue warning that reaches users directly. At present, no web-enabled warning system exists which can disseminate warning after hazard evaluation at one go and in real time. The objective of this research work has been to formalize a notion of an integrated, independent, generalized, and automated geo-hazard warning system making use of geo-spatial data under popular usage platform. In this paper, a model of an automated geo-spatial hazard warning system has been elaborated. The functionality is to be modular in architecture having GIS-graphical user interface (GUI, input, understanding, rainfall prediction, expert, output, and warning modules. A

  9. A Framework for Monitoring and Maintenance of a Tsunami Early Warning System using ITIL®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Stephan; Günther, Michael; Henneberger, Ralph; Strollo, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    of the three may lead to event detection, which is filtered, categorized and prioritized. As soon as an event is detected, a corrective maintenance process is triggered, which is modeled as a circular process. The developed procedure is being tested on the full process chain for the seismic component. Afterwards, the model will be applied to the full INATEWS system. Although we present a tailor-made approach for INATEWS, the general schema of our approach can be useful for large and complex warning systems with a multitude of sensors and sensor systems that are widely geographically distributed. It may help to keep each component at a functional level, so that the final product, the dissemination of a warning message, is not going to be endangered, due to malfunction of a sub-component.

  10. A new French flash flood warning service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Saint-Aubin Céline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The French State services in charge of flood forecasting supervise about 22,000 km among the 120,000 km of the French rivers within a warning procedure called Vigilance Crues (http://www.vigicrues.gouv.fr. Some recent dramatic flood events on small watershed not covered by Vigilance Crues highlight the need for a new warning procedure to anticipate violent flash floods that regularly affect rapid river-basins. Thus the concept emerged of an automatic warning service specifically dedicated to local crisis managers. This service will be less elaborated than Vigilance Crues, probably with false alarms and missed events sometimes, but it will deliver a first information. The generation of the warning is based on a simple rainfall-runoff hydrological model developed by Irstea on all French rivers, fed with radar-gauge rainfall grids provided by Meteo-France. Every fifteen minutes, the hydrological model estimates the discharges on the rivers eligible to the service and determine if certain thresholds corresponding to a high or very high flood are likely to be exceeded. The last step of the real-time system is to determine which municipalities are concerned with flood risk and send them an automatic warning by voice call, optionally by sms or email. A specific web interface is available for users to monitor the evolution of the flood risk on maps that are updated every 15 minutes. This new flash flood warning service will be operational early 2017 as a free service for about 8,000 French municipalities.

  11. Recasting the warning-response problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C.O.; Otto, F.; Brante, J.;

    2010-01-01

    , accepted, prioritized and responded to by policy-makers. This has led to a simplistic understanding of how communicative, cognitive and political processes involving a range of actors can influence both the perception as well as the response to warnings. The paper also criticizes that many normative...... judgments about the desirability of preventive action are suffering from hindsight bias and insufficient attention to balancing problems related to risk substitution, opportunity costs and moral hazard. In response to these deficits, the paper puts forward a modified model of warning as a persuasive process...

  12. Choosing surgery as a specialty: opinions of medical students about surgery and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Ferraina, Pedro; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B; Poveda Camargo, Ricardo L

    2014-11-01

    Since the number of applicants to residencies in general surgery in Argentina seems to be decreasing, we designed this work with the objective of studying the factors considered undesirable by students when choosing surgery as a specialty. Between March and April 2012, one-hundred students were surveyed with a structured questionnaire with true/false binary answers in an observational case-control design. The survey contained 26 statements that made reference to characteristics of surgery as a specialty, or about the personality and lifestyle of surgeons, as they could be perceived by students. As a control group the same survey was applied to 20 surgeons who were in contact with the students and that could represent a role model for them during their rotation in surgery. Comparison between students and surgeons showed no difference in most answers, except in «surgery has poor reimbursement» (OR: 8,9; P=.0001), «there is not enough job demand» (OR: 8,1; P=.015), «surgery restrains intellectual development» (OR: 17,5; P=.014), «surgeons have too many non-scheduled activities» (OR: 9,36; P=.024), «they have a limited patient-physician relationship» (OR: 3,61; P=.009), «they have little time for family» (OR: 4,27; P=.036) and «they are exposed to infectious diseases» (OR: 5,90; P=.007). Women would be as interested as men in working as surgeons; a remarkable fact when considering that the surgical specialties have been predominantly filled by men. The fact that surgeons mostly coincide with the views of students means that role models should be reviewed to promote vocations. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. GNSS Tsunami Warning System Augmentation for the Indo-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The years since the devastating Banda Aceh Earthquake of December, 2004 have repeatedly inflicted the terrible loss of life and economic disruption from large earthquakes and resulting tsunamis upon Indo-Pacific coastal populations. The hardest hit populations are those closest to the earthquake source, a scenario for which most Indo-Pacific nations lack an adequate early warning system. Following the Banda Aceh Earthquake, GNSS based techniques were developed to provide accurate, timely, estimates of ground displacements, the modeling and monitoring of tsunami propagation. Major investments are also being made to deploy and upgrade existing GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Beidou, Galileo, GZSS, and IRNSS) by the end of this decade. There have also been significant investments in multi-GNSS ground networks and analysis centers that often provide measurements in real time. These multi-national investments now present the possibility for significant improvements to the Indo-Pacific region's tsunami warning. The development of GNSS based tsunami warning integrated with existing seismic based tsunami warning systems will provide a robust, accurate, timely, and cost effective network to provide effective warning for the Indo-Pacific coastal communities. The UN General Assembly has called for the sharing of geodetic data for the mitigation of natural hazards while the IUGG and IGS recommend the implementation of a GNSS based augmentation to the Tsunami Early Warning System. The same GNSS ground networks and constellations that support the Tsunami Early Warning network also provide Positioning, Navigation, and Timing and other benefits to these communities thereby insuring a sustainable and reliable capability.

  14. The SAFER-Project and Seismic Early Warning in Europe (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschau, J.; Gasparini, P.

    2009-12-01

    SAFER (Seismic EArly Warning For EuRope) is the first large scale scientific project in Europe on earthquake early warning. It is funded by the European Commission in the context of Framework Program 6 under the theme Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystems. Its general objective is to develop knowledge and tools for increasing the capability of effective earthquake early warning in Europe and to implement and test these tools in selected European cities. The SAFER project was carried out between 2006 and 2009 by a consortium formed by 20 institutes from 11 European and Mediterranean countries (Germany, Italy, Greece, Romania, Switzerland, Norway, France, the Netherlands, Iceland, Turkey and Egypt) and one each from Japan, Taiwan and USA. Five major earthquake prone cities were chosen as test areas: Athens, Bucharest, Cairo, Istanbul and Naples. The combined population of these cities is about 40 million inhabitants and all have experienced severe earthquakes in recent years. SAFER is strongly multi-disciplinary, calling upon expertise in seismology, structural and geotechnical engineering, informatics and statistics. Some of the specific problems addressed are related to - the rapid determination of earthquake size, complex earthquake features, and damage potential; - the implementation of a fully probabilistic framework for applications of earthquake early warning based on cost-benefit analysis; - the development of a new generation of early warning systems being decentralised and people-centred, and - the implementation of the real-time “shake map”-technology in large European cities. The presentation will review the major scientific findings, comment on the improvements of the earthquake early warning capabilities achieved by SAFER in the five test cities, and present some ideas for the future development of earthquake early warning in Europe.

  15. UncertiantyQuantificationinTsunamiEarlyWarningCalculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunziato, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the Tsunami calculations is the estimation of the impact of waves caused by large seismic events on the coasts and the determination of potential inundation areas. In the case of Early Warning Systems, i.e. systems that should allow to anticipate the possible effects and give the possibility to react consequently (i.e. issue evacuation of areas at risk), this must be done in very short time (minutes) to be effective. In reality, the above estimation includes several uncertainty factors which make the prediction extremely difficult. The quality of the very first estimations of the seismic parameters is not very precise: the uncertainty in the determination of the seismic components (location, magnitude and depth) decreases with time because as time passes it is possible to use more and more seismic signals and the event characterization becomes more precise. On the other hand other parameters that are necessary to establish for the performance of a calculation (i.e. fault mechanism) are difficult to estimate accurately also after hours (and in some cases remain unknown) and therefore this uncertainty remains in the estimated impact evaluations; when a quick tsunami calculation is necessary (early warning systems) the possibility to include any possible future variation of the conditions to establish the "worst case scenario" is particularly important. The consequence is that the number of uncertain parameters is so large that it is not easy to assess the relative importance of each of them and their effect on the predicted results. In general the complexity of system computer codes is generated by the multitude of different models which are assembled into a single program to give the global response for a particular phenomenon. Each of these model has associated a determined uncertainty coming from the application of that model to single cases and/or separated effect test cases. The difficulty in the prediction of a Tsunami calculation response is

  16. Streamlining Tsunami Messages (e.g., Warnings) of the US National Tsunami Warning Center, Palmer, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, C. E.; Sorensen, J. H.; Vogt Sorensen, B.; Whitmore, P.; Johnston, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Spurred in part by world-wide interest in improving warning messaging for and response to tsunamis in the wake of several catastrophic tsunamis since 2004 and growing interest at the US National Weather Service (NWS) to integrate social science into their Tsunami Program, the NWS Tsunami Warning Centers in Alaska and Hawaii have made great progress toward enhancing tsunami messages. These include numerous products, among them being Tsunami Warnings, Tsunami Advisories and Tsunami Watches. Beginning in 2010 we have worked with US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Warning Coordination and Mitigation and Education Subcommittee members; Tsunami Program administrators; and NWS Weather Forecast Officers to conduct a series of focus group meetings with stakeholders in coastal areas of Alaska, American Samoa, California, Hawaii, North Carolina, Oregon, US Virgin Islands and Washington to understand end-user perceptions of existing messages and their existing needs in message products. We also reviewed research literature on behavioral response to warnings to develop a Tsunami Warning Message Metric that could be used to guide revisions to tsunami warning messages of both warning centers. The message metric is divided into categories of Message Content, Style, Order, Formatting, and Receiver Characteristics. A sample message is evaluated by cross-referencing the message with the operational definitions of metric factors. Findings are then used to guide revisions of the message until the characteristics of each factor are met, whether the message is a full length or short message. Incrementally, this work contributed to revisions in the format, content and style of message products issued by the National Tsunami Warning Center (NTWC). Since that time, interest in short warning messages has continued to increase and in May 2016 the NTWC began efforts to revise message products to take advantage of recent NWS policy changes allowing use of mixed-case text

  17. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  18. A profile of female academic surgeons: training, credentials, and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Han, E; Pettitt, B J; Styblo, T M; Rozycki, G S

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the profile (credentials, training, and type of practice) of female academic general surgeons and factors that influenced their career choice. A survey was sent to female academic surgeons identified through general surgery residency programs and American medical schools. The women had to be Board eligible/certified by the American Board of Surgery or equivalent Board and have an academic appointment in a Department of Surgery. Data were analyzed using the SPSS program. Two hundred seventy women (age range, 32-70 years) completed the survey (98.9% response rate). Fellowships were completed by 82.3 per cent (223/270), most commonly in surgical critical care. There were 134 (50.2%, 134/367) who had two or more Board certificates, most frequently (46%, 61/134) in surgical critical care. Full-time academic appointments were held by 86.7 per cent of women, most as assistant professors, clinical track; only 12.4 per cent were tenured professors. The majority of women described their practice as "general surgery" or "general surgery with emphasis on breast." The most frequent administrative title was "Director." Only three women stated that they were "chair" of the department. The top reason for choosing surgery was "gut feeling," whereas "intellectual challenge" was the reason they pursued academic surgery. When asked "Would you do it again?", 77 per cent responded in the affirmative. We conclude that female academic surgeons are well trained, with slightly more than half having two or more Board certificates; that most female academic surgeons are clinically active assistant or associate professors whose practice is "general surgery," often with an emphasis on breast disease; that true leadership positions remain elusive for women in academic general surgery; and that 77 per cent would choose the same career again.

  19. Indicators of financial crises do work! : an early-warning system for six Asian countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lestano, [No Value; Jacobs, Jan; Kuper, Gerard H.

    2003-01-01

    Indicators of financial crisis generally do not have a good track record. This paper presents an early warning system for six countries in Asia, in which indicators do work.We distinguish three types of financial crises, currency crises, banking crises and debt crises, and extract four groups of ind

  20. 49 CFR 393.51 - Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges... and vacuum gauges. (a) General Rule. Every bus, truck and truck tractor, except as provided in.... (d) Vacuum brakes. A commercial motor vehicle (regardless of the date it was manufactured) having...

  1. The attitude and perceptions of work-life balance: a comparison among women surgeons in Japan, USA, and Hong Kong China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kazumi; Kwong, Ava; Yorozuya, Kyoko; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Numann, Patricia J; Sanfey, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore how women surgeons manage their work-life balance in three environmental and cultural settings. Members of the Japan Association of Women Surgeons (JAWS), the United States of America (US) based Association of Women Surgeons (AWS), and the Women's Chapter of the College of Surgeons of Hong Kong (WCHK) were surveyed. Among 822 women surgeons contacted, 252 responded (response rate 31.8 %; 55.5 % JAWS, 28.2 % AWS, and 25.3 % WCHK). Japanese women surgeons think that work is the number one priority, whereas US and Hong Kong China (HK) respondents think the number one priority is home life. Work satisfaction level was generally high among women surgeons in all countries; however, 19 % of US surgeons are somewhat dissatisfied with their work and 76.1 % think that men are treated more favorably than women at work. Whereas 51.6 % of Japanese women surgeons think that men are treated more favorably than women at home, at the same time they placed more importance on the role of women in the family. More than half of Japanese women surgeons are "uncertain" about their career path in the future, whereas 55.2/87.1 % of US/HK respondents are optimistic. All surgeons recommended expanding support for child rearing or nursing care during work hours, promoting a flexible work schedule and changing some of the older conventional ideas about gender role. It is essential to address women surgeons' concerns to enable them to have a clearer vision and a challenging career, and to be more certain about their personal and professional goals.

  2. Regional variability in use of a novel assessment of thoracolumbar spine fractures: United States versus international surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrop James S

    2007-09-01

    -US surgeons. Intra-rater reliability for management was substantial in both US and non-US surgeons. The TLISS incorporates generally accepted features of spinal injury assessment into a simple patient evaluation tool. The management recommendation of the treatment algorithm component of the TLISS shows good inter-rater and substantial intra-rater reliability in both non-US and US based spine surgeons. The TLISS may improve communication between health providers and may contribute to more efficient management of thoracolumbar injuries.

  3. Addressing the Safety of Transportation Cyber-Physical Systems: Development and Validation of a Verbal Warning Utility Scale for Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important application of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS, advances in intelligent transportation systems (ITS improve driving safety by informing drivers of hazards with warnings in advance. The evaluation of the warning effectiveness is an important issue in facilitating communication of ITS. The goal of the present study was to develop a scale to evaluate the warning utility, namely, the effectiveness of a warning in preventing accidents in general. A driving simulator study was conducted to validate the Verbal Warning Utility Scale (VWUS in a simulated driving environment. The reliability analysis indicated a good split-half reliability for the VWUS with a Spearman-Brown Coefficient of 0.873. The predictive validity of VWUS in measuring the effectiveness of the verbal warnings was verified by the significant prediction of safety benefits indicated by variables, including reduced kinetic energy and collision rate. Compared to conducting experimental studies, this scale provides a simpler way to evaluate overall utility of verbal warnings in communicating associated hazards in intelligent transportation systems. This scale can be further applied to improve the design of warnings of ITS in order to improve transportation safety. The applications of the scale in nonverbal warning situations and limitations of the current scale are also discussed.

  4. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  5. Feasibility study of earthquake early warning (EEW) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Weston A.; Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Bodin, Paul

    2016-09-30

    The effects of earthquake shaking on the population and infrastructure across the State of Hawaii could be catastrophic, and the high seismic hazard in the region emphasizes the likelihood of such an event. Earthquake early warning (EEW) has the potential to give several seconds of warning before strong shaking starts, and thus reduce loss of life and damage to property. The two approaches to EEW are (1) a network approach (such as ShakeAlert or ElarmS) where the regional seismic network is used to detect the earthquake and distribute the alarm and (2) a local approach where a critical facility has a single seismometer (or small array) and a warning system on the premises.The network approach, also referred to here as ShakeAlert or ElarmS, uses the closest stations within a regional seismic network to detect and characterize an earthquake. Most parameters used for a network approach require observations on multiple stations (typically 3 or 4), which slows down the alarm time slightly, but the alarms are generally more reliable than with single-station EEW approaches. The network approach also benefits from having stations closer to the source of any potentially damaging earthquake, so that alarms can be sent ahead to anyone who subscribes to receive the notification. Thus, a fully implemented ShakeAlert system can provide seconds of warning for both critical facilities and general populations ahead of damaging earthquake shaking.The cost to implement and maintain a fully operational ShakeAlert system is high compared to a local approach or single-station solution, but the benefits of a ShakeAlert system would be felt statewide—the warning times for strong shaking are potentially longer for most sources at most locations.The local approach, referred to herein as “single station,” uses measurements from a single seismometer to assess whether strong earthquake shaking can be expected. Because of the reliance on a single station, false alarms are more common than

  6. How Can We Improve Education of Breast Surgeons Across Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Club) research fellowship; SSO/ ESSO fellowshipthrough its partnership with ESSO, SSO provides a grant to attend the SSO Annual Symposium; Reciprocal International Exchange Programmes with Japan, Latin America and North America (2). ESSO courses and masterclasses: expanded portfolio of courses, in- and outside Europe, basic and advanced, international faculty, multidisciplinary approach, learning methods: hands-on with human cadavers, workshops in small groups, live and case demonstrations, interactive sessions, 3D videos (for instance in 2017 ESSO course on ultrasound of breast in Barcelona, advanced course on oncoplastic surgery in Barcelona, advanced course on breast cancer surgery in Naples) (2). Trials: Interantional Nipple- Sparing Mastectomy Registry (INSPIRE), EURECCA (European Cancer Audit) project. The aim of INSPIRE is to provide pooled evidence derived from a prospective collaborative high-quality registry between international centers, oncological safety, patient- reported outcome measures, launched in March, 2016, European Breast Cancer Conference EBCC 10, Amsterdam (2). European Board of Surgery Qualification in Breast Surgery (EBSQ in BS): phase 1-eligibility assessment (CV, logbook, references); phase 2- test; phase 3- oral examination with 2 clinical cases and 1 critical review of academic paper. The applicant must hold a current license to practice as a surgeon (general or plastic or gynaecologist), demonstrate work for one year in a breast surgery unit with at least 150 new primary breast cancer cases per year, attended at least one national/ international training course in breast surgery and has attended at least one well recognized international congress. The applicant should present a signed log book for breast surgery with application; published either one paper or book chapter on breast disease Conclusions 1. The need for certified breast units: Standardised techniques by specialist breast surgeons across Europe should be the aim. 2. No man

  7. Changing perceptions of beauty: a surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Peter A; Zavod, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is a mystery that has been with us for ages. Scholars and scientists have investigated its roots and effects, and its presence is ubiquitous. Has the construct of beauty changed over time? Is our sense of beauty learned or innate? What IS beauty, and can we quantify it? A substantial amount of work supports a Darwinian theory of selection, which predicts a survival advantage based on physical attractiveness. However, there is evidence that certain perceptions of beauty change with time. Indeed, the recent globalization of modern society has wrought changes in our perceptions of beauty. Are patients electing cosmetic surgery procuring a survival advantage, or are they bypassing genetics and setting a new standard for beauty? As facial plastic surgeons, we must be poised to respond to this metamorphosis and understand its roots. Although there is some equivocation and debate about this elusive subject, it is our duty to stay abreast of the current dynamic to make sound judgments that are in the best interests of our patients.

  8. Occupational Hazards Among Dental Surgeons In Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nabeel Naeem; Aleem, Sajid Atif

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency of different occupational hazards among dental surgeons in Karachi. Cross-sectional survey. Amulticenter study conducted at Ameen Diabetic and Dental Hospital, Dental OPD, Karachi Medical and Dental College, and Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi, from February to March 2014. Dentists, practicing in different areas of Karachi, were given a self-administered questionnaire. It comprised of a form containing information about the socio-demographic profile of dentists and questionnaires regarding occupational hazards experienced in practice. Atotal of 130 dentists, involved in clinical practice, were randomly selected. There were 45 (35%) males and 85 (65%) females. The average age was 39 ±5.76 years. Out of 130 dentists, 93.8% (122/130) had occupational hazard during practice. Cervical back pain was observed in 81.96% dentists followed by knee / elbow joint pain in 53.27%, eye infection in 44.615%, impaired hearing in 40.98%, psychological stress in 41.80% and material allergy was 12.29%. Various spinal and joint pains, eye infections, impaired hearing, stress and material allergy represented occupational hazard to 93.8% of the surveyed dentists.

  9. Performance analysis of landslide early warning systems at regional scale: the EDuMaP method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciullo, Luca; Calvello, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Landslide early warning systems (LEWSs) reduce landslide risk by disseminating timely and meaningful warnings when the level of risk is judged intolerably high. Two categories of LEWSs, can be defined on the basis of their scale of analysis: "local" systems and "regional" systems. LEWSs at regional scale (ReLEWSs) are used to assess the probability of occurrence of landslides over appropriately-defined homogeneous warning zones of relevant extension, typically through the prediction and monitoring of meteorological variables, in order to give generalized warnings to the public. Despite many studies on ReLEWSs, no standard requirements exist for assessing their performance. Empirical evaluations are often carried out by simply analysing the time frames during which significant high-consequence landslides occurred in the test area. Alternatively, the performance evaluation is based on 2x2 contingency tables computed for the joint frequency distribution of landslides and alerts, both considered as dichotomous variables. In all these cases, model performance is assessed neglecting some important aspects which are peculiar to ReLEWSs, among which: the possible occurrence of multiple landslides in the warning zone; the duration of the warnings in relation to the time of occurrence of the landslides; the level of the warning issued in relation to the landslide spatial density in the warning zone; the relative importance system managers attribute to different types of errors. An original approach, called EDuMaP method, is proposed to assess the performance of landslide early warning models operating at regional scale. The method is composed by three main phases: Events analysis, Duration Matrix, Performance analysis. The events analysis phase focuses on the definition of landslide (LEs) and warning events (WEs), which are derived from available landslides and warnings databases according to their spatial and temporal characteristics by means of ten input parameters. The

  10. Diathermy awareness among surgeons-An analysis in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. McQuail

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results show a dearth of awareness among surgeons regarding diathermy. Given our findings, we urge a shift in attitude towards diathermy, with surgeons adopting a more cautious and safe approach to diathermy use. We recommend that formal training be introduced as a hospital based initiative.

  11. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  12. Patients' Opinions about Polish Surgeons and Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakowski, Marek; Hładoń, Aleksandra; Seweryn, Mariusz; Ciosek, Jakub; Świątkiewicz, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    In Polish society Stereotypes about the surgeons are deeply rooted, which could really affect their relationship with the patient and the entire treatment process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of an opinion survey on the image of the surgeon and operative treatment.

  13. Health warnings on tobacco packaging in Italy: do they describe all possible smoking-related conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Colamesta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This report aims to evaluate the adherence between the health warnings on tobacco products in Italy and the smoking-related conditions known in the scientific literature. The Legislative Decree 2003 and 2012 established the general and the additional warnings on tobacco packaging. Regarding the smoking-related conditions, the health damages presented in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC report are reported. Also a narrative review was performed. Respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, adverse reproductive outcomes and childhood neurobehavioral disorders are well reported in the textual health warning. Also there is at least one message indicating that the exposure of secondhand smoke is harmful. Conversely, several smoking-related cancers and other adverse health effects (diabetes, hip fractures, low bone density in postmenopausal women, rheumatoid arthritis, mental decline, acne and allergy, etc are not considered. The health warnings represent an important mean for communicating that may change smokers’ attitudes and behaviours, therefore, it’s important to implement them, also considering the introduction of graphical warnings, to maintain their effectiveness over time.

  14. Short and Sweet: The Persuasive Effects of Message Framing and Temporal Context in Antismoking Warning Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollen, Saar; Engelen, Susanne; Kessels, Loes T E; van den Putte, Bas

    2017-01-01

    Current warning labels on cigarette packages are generally focused on long-term losses that can be incurred if one continues smoking. This study compares the effects of these labels against warning labels that stress short-term losses of smoking as well as labels that stress short- and long-term benefits that can be obtained when one quits smoking. A 2 (message frame: gain vs. loss) × 2 (temporal context: short vs. long term) between-subjects experiment was conducted among 132 smokers, with attitude toward quitting smoking and intention to quit smoking, as well as information-seeking behavior and message recall, as the dependent variables. Findings were in line with theory regarding message framing and temporal discounting, showing enhanced effects of gain over loss frames and short-term over long-term consequences on warning labels for attitudes and intentions. In addition, an interaction between message frame and temporal context was found. Especially, gain-framed messages showed stronger effects on intentions to quit smoking than loss-framed messages when warning labels concerned short-term outcomes. Findings suggest that current warning labels, with an emphasis on long-term negative health outcomes, should be reconsidered.

  15. Flood early warning system: sensors and internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pengel, B.E.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Melnikova, N.B.; Shirshov, G.S.; Koelewijn, A.R.; Pyayt, A.L.; Mokhov, I.I.; Chavoshian, A.; Takeuchi, K.

    2013-01-01

    The UrbanFlood early warning system (EWS) is designed to monitor data from very large sensornetworks in flood defences such as embankments, dikes, levees, and dams. The EWS, based on the internet, uses real-time sensor information and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to immediately calculate the probabi

  16. Forecasting, Warning and Responding to Transnational Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    areas to conceptualise and empirically study the interlinked problems of forecasting, warning and mobilising preventive action. Contributors comment on key problems such as uncertainty, silo-mentality, spotting weak-signals, cultures of blame, conflicts of interest and divergent risk perceptions...

  17. Researchers warn of neglect to basic science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Russia is losing its standing as a scientific powerhouse and its science is in a state of decline, according to a new report by the information-services provider Thomson Reuters. Entitled "The New Geography of Science: Research and Collaboration in Russia", the report warns that the country's research base "has a problem, and it shows little sign of a solution".

  18. ʿHello! I'm behind you’: Warnings at trouble moments in forklift driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard; Wagner, Johannes

    We are interested generally in the verbalized and embodied character of ’warnings’ at moments of potential ‘trouble’ in a flow of movement for collaborative work. Our participants are forklift truck drivers, whose primary occupation it is to handle and take objects from one place to another. Our...... physical setting is a site for training and certification, simulating a warehouse scene. Drivers range in experience from beginner to relatively experienced but needing formal qualification. Our data are approx. 85 hours of recordings, and feature multiple camera views (truck mounted, floor, bird’s eye......). The paper focusses on warnings expressed to other drivers in situations when potential collisions between trucks might occur as they move around the shared shelf/floorspace. Through warnings, drivers identify, orient and respond to such moments. Put simply, a driver warns by announcing his/her presence...

  19. The Effect of Sonic Booms on Earthquake Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurman, Gilead; Haering, Edward A, Jr.; Price, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Several aerospace companies are designing quiet supersonic business jets for service over the United States. These aircraft have the potential to increase the occurrence of mild sonic booms across the country. This leads to interest among earthquake warning (EQW) developers and the general seismological community in characterizing the effect of sonic booms on seismic sensors in the field, their potential impact on EQW systems, and means of discriminating their signatures from those of earthquakes. The SonicBREWS project (Sonic Boom Resistant Earthquake Warning Systems) is a collaborative effort between Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. (SWS) and NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. This project aims to evaluate the effects of sonic booms on EQW sensors. The study consists of exposing high-sample-rate (1000 sps) triaxial accelerometers to sonic booms with overpressures ranging from 10 to 600 Pa in the free field and the built environment. The accelerometers record the coupling of the sonic boom to the ground and surrounding structures, while microphones record the acoustic wave above ground near the sensor. Sonic booms are broadband signals with more high-frequency content than earthquakes. Even a 1000 sps accelerometer will produce a significantly aliased record. Thus the observed peak ground velocity is strongly dependent on the sampling rate, and increases as the sampling rate is reduced. At 1000 sps we observe ground velocities that exceed those of P-waves from ML 3 earthquakes at local distances, suggesting that sonic booms are not negligible for EQW applications. We present the results of several experiments conducted under SonicBREWS showing the effects of typical-case low amplitude sonic booms and worst-case high amplitude booms. We show the effects of various sensor placements and sensor array geometries. Finally, we suggest possible avenues for discriminating sonic booms from earthquakes for the purposes of EQW.

  20. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    A prospective questionnaire. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that patients consider when selecting a spine surgeon. The rise in consumer-driven health insurance plans has increased the role of patients in provider selection. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that may influence a patient's criteria for selecting a spine surgeon. Two hundred thirty-one patients who sought treatment by one spine surgeon completed an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions. Four questions regarded demographic information; 16 questions asked respondents to rate the importance of specific criteria regarding spine surgeon selection (scale 1-10, with 10 being the most important); and six questions were multiple-choice regarding patient preferences toward aspects of their surgeon (age, training background, etc.). Patients rated board certification (9.26 ± 1.67), in-network provider status (8.10 ± 3.04), and friendliness/bedside manner (8.01 ± 2.35) highest among factors considered when selecting a spine surgeon. Most patients (92%) reported that 30 minutes or less should pass between check-in and seeing their surgeon during a clinic appointment. Regarding whether their spine surgeon underwent training as a neurosurgeon versus an orthopedic surgeon, 25% reported no preference, 52% preferred neurosurgical training, and 23% preferred orthopedic training. Our findings suggest that board certification and in-network health insurance plans may be most important in patients' criteria for choosing a spine surgeon. Advertisements were rated least important by patients. Patients expressed varying preferences regarding ideal surgeon age, training background, proximity, medical student/resident involvement, and clinic appointment availability. The surgeon from whom patients sought treatment completed an orthopedic surgery residency; hence, it is notable that 52% of patients preferred a spine surgeon with a neurosurgical background. In the context

  1. Tsunami Warning Services for the Caribbean Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, P. M.; Ferris, J. C.; Weinstein, S. A.

    2007-05-01

    Tsunami warning and watch services are currently provided to the Caribbean region through a collaborative effort between the two NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs): the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) in Ewa Beach, Hawaii, and the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska. The WCATWC, in coordination with the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), provides fast-response warning services to the U.S. territories of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (PR/VI). The PTWC provides regional watch services to other countries throughout and surrounding the Caribbean Sea as part of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Caribbean Sea and Adjacent Regions. This collaboration is analogous to the TWC's responsibilities in the Pacific basin: the WCATWC provides fast-response warning services for the U.S. west coast states, Alaska, and British Columbia in Canada, while the PTWC provides regional services for countries throughout and surrounding the Pacific Ocean (as well as a fast-response service for the U.S. State of Hawaii). Caribbean seismic data are transmitted to the TWCs through several means. The PRSN directly exports data to the WCATWC, providing the Center sufficient seismic data for the PR/VI region. Additionally, the PRSN provides the TWCs with data gathered from other Caribbean nations. Using modern communication capabilities, the seismic data can be processed at the TWCs at the same time it is processed locally. Another source of high- quality seismic data is the new USGS nine-station array that circles the region. The Global Seismic Network maintains several stations in Caribbean, Central American, and South American nations which are available in real-time to the TWCs. Unfortunately, sea level data coverage is sporadic in the region. The PR/VI has a relatively dense array of coastal tide gages, but coastal tide gage coverage is very sparse for the rest of the Caribbean basin. Three deep-ocean pressure

  2. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-08-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  3. [Patient's pain feeling and surgeon's comfort--ECCE versus phacoemulsification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałuzny, Jakub J; Eliks, Iwona; Mierzejewski, Andrzej; Kałuzny, Bartłomiej

    2004-01-01

    To compare patient's pain and surgeon's comfort during ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia and phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. 120 patients scheduled for planned routine cataract extraction were divided in 2 groups: group 1-60 eyes, ECCE under retrobulbar anesthesia and group II-60 eyes, phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Immediately after operation patients were asked, to answer questions about their feeling during surgery. Simultaneously, the surgeon filled up the questionnaire, concerning patients behavior during the entire procedure. Statistically significant higher level of pain was reported in group I (ECCE). The most painful moment of the procedure was retrobulbar injection. During surgery pain feeling in both groups was similar. Both types of anesthesia provided very good level of surgeon's comfort. The longer operation, the higher level of pain and lower surgeon's comfort were reported in both groups. Patients having ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia reported more pain comparing to phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Both anesthesia methods provided high level of surgeon's comfort.

  4. Electrical Distribution System (EDS) and Caution and Warning System (CWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclung, T.

    1975-01-01

    An astronaut caution and warning system is described which monitors various life support system parameters and detects out-of-range parameter conditions. The warning system generates a warning tone and displays the malfunction condition to the astronaut along with the proper corrective procedures required.

  5. Combat surgeons before, during, and after war: the legacy of Loyal Davis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jeremy W; Teff, Richard J

    2010-05-01

    By 1942, Loyal Davis had firmly established himself as a preeminent civilian neurosurgeon. With military operations rapidly escalating, he was recruited to serve in the European Theater of Operations as a consultant to the Surgeon General. Davis brought tremendous experience, insight, and leadership to this position; however, he found the military system in which he was suddenly immersed inefficient and impassive. His requests for even basic equipment became mired in endless bureaucracy even as his communiqués to the Chief Surgeon in the European Theater and to the Surgeon General's staff in Washington seemed to fall short of their intended recipients. Then, when he attempted to vent his frustrations to his academic colleagues, he was nearly court-martialed. Notwithstanding, Davis became the first to formally recognize high-altitude frostbite and also developed protective headgear for airmen, and later in his service, he joined a contingent of senior medical leaders who visited the Soviet Union to study their system of combat casualty care. Subsequent to his service on active duty, Davis returned to his academic practice at Northwestern where he used his position as editor of Surgery, Gynecology, and Obstetrics to advocate for change within the military medical corps. Others like Davis have contributed greatly to the advancement of combat casualty care both during active service and long after their time in uniform. This paper examines the lessons from Davis's experiences as a military neurosurgeon and his continued advocacy for change in the medical corps along with additional recent examples of change effected by former military surgeons. For those currently serving, these lessons illustrate the value of contributing wherever a need is recognized, and for those who have served in the past, they demonstrate the importance of having a continued voice with junior combat surgeons and the military leadership.

  6. Patient and surgeon factors are associated with the use of laparoscopy in appendicitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCartan, D P

    2012-02-01

    Aim The use of a minimally invasive approach to treat appendicitis has yet to be universally accepted. The objective of this study was to examine recent trends in Ireland in the surgical management of acute appendicitis. Method Data were obtained from the Irish Hospital In-Patient Enquiry system for patients discharged with a diagnosis of appendicitis between 1999 and 2007. An anonymous postal survey was sent to all general surgeons of consultant and registrar level in Ireland to assess current attitudes to the use of laparoscopic appendectomy. Results The use of laparoscopic appendectomy increased throughout the study and was the most common approach for appendectomy in 2007. Multivariate analysis revealed age under 50 years (OR = 1.51), female sex (OR = 2.84) and residence in high-density population areas (OR = 4.15) as predictive factors for undergoing laparoscopic appendectomy in the most recent year of the study. While 97% of surgeons reported current use of laparoscopy in patients with acute right iliac fossa pain, in most cases it was selective. Surgeons in university teaching hospitals (42 of 77; 55%) were more likely to report using laparoscopic appendectomy for all cases of appendicitis than those in regional (six of 23; 26%) or general (13 of 53; 25%) hospitals (P = 0.048). Conclusion This study has demonstrated a significant increase in laparoscopic appendectomy, yet a variety of patient and surgeon factors contribute to the choice of procedure. Differences in the perception of benefit of the laparoscopic approach amongst surgeons appears to be an important factor in determining the operative approach for appendectomy.

  7. Reduction Mammoplasty: A Comparison Between Operations Performed by Plastic Surgery and General Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kordahi, Anthony M.; Hoppe, Ian C.; Lee, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reduction mammoplasty is an often-performed procedure by plastic surgeons and increasingly by general surgeons. The question has been posed in both general surgical literature and plastic surgical literature as to whether this procedure should remain the domain of surgical specialists. Some general surgeons are trained in breast reductions, whereas all plastic surgeons receive training in this procedure. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Project provides a unique opportuni...

  8. Warning Triggers in Environmental Hazards: Who Should Be Warned to Do What and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Thomas J; Dennison, Philip E; Li, Dapeng; Drews, Frank A; Siebeneck, Laura K; Lindell, Michael K

    2016-07-13

    Determining the most effective public warnings to issue during a hazardous environmental event is a complex problem. Three primary questions need to be answered: Who should take protective action? What is the best action? and When should this action be initiated? Warning triggers provide a proactive means for emergency managers to simultaneously answer these questions by recommending that a target group take a specified protective action if a preset environmental trigger condition occurs (e.g., warn a community to evacuate if a wildfire crosses a proximal ridgeline). Triggers are used to warn the public across a wide variety of environmental hazards, and an improved understanding of their nature and role promises to: (1) advance protective action theory by unifying the natural, built, and social themes in hazards research into one framework, (2) reveal important information about emergency managers' risk perception, situational awareness, and threat assessment regarding threat behavior and public response, and (3) advance spatiotemporal models for representing the geography and timing of disaster warning and response (i.e., a coupled natural-built-social system). We provide an overview and research agenda designed to advance our understanding and modeling of warning triggers.

  9. Quality of life of indian pediatric surgeons: Results of a survey (of indian association of pediatric surgeons members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zameer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common belief that pediatric surgeons are unsatisfied. It also acts as a point of reference and encouragement to newer aspirants in pediatric surgery.

  10. Early Warning System for reducing disaster risk: the technological platform DEWETRA for the Republic of Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabo, Marco; Molini, Luca; Kostic, Bojan; Campanella, Paolo; Stevanovic, Slavimir

    2015-04-01

    Disaster risk reduction has long been recognized for its role in mitigating the negative environmental, social and economic impacts of natural hazards. Flood Early Warning System is a disaster risk reduction measure based on the capacities of institutions to observe and predict extreme hydro-meteorological events and to disseminate timely and meaningful warning information; it is furthermore based on the capacities of individuals, communities and organizations to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the possibility of harm or loss. An operational definition of an Early Warning System has been suggested by ISDR - UN Office for DRR [15 January 2009]: "EWS is the set of capacities needed to generate and disseminate timely and meaningful warning information to enable individuals, communities and organizations threatened by a hazard to prepare and to act appropriately and in sufficient time to reduce the possibility of harm or loss.". ISDR continues by commenting that a people-centered early warning system necessarily comprises four key elements: 1-knowledge of the risks; 2-monitoring, analysis and forecasting of the hazards; 3-communication or dissemination of alerts and warnings; and 4- local capabilities to respond to the warnings received." The technological platform DEWETRA supports the strengthening of the first three key elements of EWS suggested by ISDR definition, hence to improve the capacities to build real-time risk scenarios and to inform and warn the population in advance The technological platform DEWETRA has been implemented for the Republic of Serbia. DEWETRA is a real time-integrate system that supports decision makers for risk forecasting and monitoring and for distributing warnings to end-user and to the general public. The system is based on the rapid availability of different data that helps to establish up-to-date and reliable risk scenarios. The integration of all relevant data for risk management significantly

  11. Flexible Early Warning Systems with Workflows and Decision Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, F.; Chaves, F.; Zeiner, H.

    2012-04-01

    An essential part of early warning systems and systems for crisis management are decision support systems that facilitate communication and collaboration. Often official policies specify how different organizations collaborate and what information is communicated to whom. For early warning systems it is crucial that information is exchanged dynamically in a timely manner and all participants get exactly the information they need to fulfil their role in the crisis management process. Information technology obviously lends itself to automate parts of the process. We have experienced however that in current operational systems the information logistics processes are hard-coded, even though they are subject to change. In addition, systems are tailored to the policies and requirements of a certain organization and changes can require major software refactoring. We seek to develop a system that can be deployed and adapted to multiple organizations with different dynamic runtime policies. A major requirement for such a system is that changes can be applied locally without affecting larger parts of the system. In addition to the flexibility regarding changes in policies and processes, the system needs to be able to evolve; when new information sources become available, it should be possible to integrate and use these in the decision process. In general, this kind of flexibility comes with a significant increase in complexity. This implies that only IT professionals can maintain a system that can be reconfigured and adapted; end-users are unable to utilise the provided flexibility. In the business world similar problems arise and previous work suggested using business process management systems (BPMS) or workflow management systems (WfMS) to guide and automate early warning processes or crisis management plans. However, the usability and flexibility of current WfMS are limited, because current notations and user interfaces are still not suitable for end-users, and workflows

  12. Predictions of flood warning threshold exceedance computed with logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, Tommaso; Marsigli, Chiara; Stefania Tesini, Maria

    2017-04-01

    A method based on logistic regression is proposed for the prediction of river level threshold exceedance at different lead times (from +6h up to +42h). The aim of the study is to provide a valuable tool for the issue of warnings by the authority responsible of public safety in case of flood. The role of different precipitation periods as predictors for the exceedance of a fixed river level has been investigated, in order to derive significant information for flood forecasting. Based on catchment-averaged values, a separation of "antecedent" and "peak-triggering" rainfall amounts as independent variables is attempted. In particular, the following flood-related precipitation periods have been considered: (i) the period from 1 to n days before the forecast issue time, which may be relevant for the soil saturation ("state of the catchment"), (ii) the last 24 hours, which may be relevant for the current water level in the river ("state of the river"), and (iii) the period from 0 to x hours in advance with respect to the forecast issue time, when the flood-triggering precipitation generally occurs ("state of the atmosphere"). Several combinations and values of these predictors have been tested to optimise the method implementation. In particular, the period for the precursor antecedent precipitation ranges between 5 and 45 days; the current "state of the river" can be represented by the last 24-h precipitation or, as alternative, by the current river level. The flood-triggering precipitation has been cumulated over the next 18-42 hours, or the previous 6-12h, according to the forecast lead time. The proposed approach requires a specific implementation of logistic regression for each river section and warning threshold. The method performance has been evaluated over several catchments in the Emilia-Romagna Region, northern Italy, which dimensions range from 100 to 1000 km2. A statistical analysis in terms of false alarms, misses and related scores was carried out by using

  13. Non-smoking male adolescents' reactions to cigarette warnings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K Pepper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA is working to introduce new graphic warning labels for cigarette packages, the first change in cigarette warnings in more than 25 years. We sought to examine whether warnings discouraged participants from wanting to smoke and altered perceived likelihood of harms among adolescent males and whether these warning effects varied by age. METHODS: A national sample of 386 non-smoking American males ages 11-17 participated in an online experiment during fall 2010. We randomly assigned participants to view warnings using a 2 × 2 between-subjects design. The warnings described a harm of smoking (addiction or lung cancer using text only or text plus an image used on European cigarette package warnings. Analyses tested whether age moderated the warnings' impact on risk perceptions and smoking motivations. RESULTS: The warnings discouraged most adolescents from wanting to smoke, but lung cancer warnings discouraged them more than addiction warnings did (60% vs. 34% were "very much" discouraged, p<.001. Including an image had no effect on discouragement. The warnings affected several beliefs about the harms from smoking, and age moderated these effects. Adolescents said addiction was easier to imagine and more likely to happen to them than lung cancer. They also believed that their true likelihood of experiencing any harm was lower than what an expert would say. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that warnings focusing on lung cancer, rather than addiction, are more likely to discourage wanting to smoke among adolescent males and enhance their ability to imagine the harmful consequences of smoking. Including images on warnings had little effect on non-smoking male adolescents' discouragement or beliefs, though additional research on the effects of pictorial warnings for this at-risk population is needed as the FDA moves forward with developing new graphic labels.

  14. LIVE DEMONSTRATION OF DISTANT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitzsch, M.; Lendholt, M.; Wächter, J.

    2009-12-01

    The DEWS (Distant Early Warning System) [1] project, funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union, has the objective to create a new generation of interoperable early warning systems based on an open sensor platform. This platform integrates OGC [2] SWE [3] compliant sensor systems for the rapid detection of earthquakes, for the monitoring of sea level, ocean floor events, and ground displacements. Based on the upstream information flow DEWS focuses on the improvement of downstream capacities of warning centres especially by improving information logistics for effective and targeted warning message aggregation for a multilingual environment. Multiple telecommunication channels will be used for the dissemination of warning messages. Wherever possible, existing standards have been integrated. The Command and Control User Interface (CCUI), a rich client application based on Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform) [4] and the open source GIS uDig [5], integrates various OGC services. Using WMS (Web Map Service) [6] and WFS (Web Feature Service) [7] spatial data are utilized to depict the situation picture and to integrate a simulation system via WPS (Web Processing Service) [8] to identify affected areas. Warning messages are compiled and transmitted in the OASIS [9] CAP (Common Alerting Protocol) [10] standard together with addressing information defined via EDXL-DE (Emergency Data Exchange Language - Distribution Element) [11]. Internal interfaces are realized with SOAP [12] web services. Based on results of GITEWS [13] - in particular the GITEWS Tsunami Service Bus [14] - the DEWS approach provides an implementation for tsunami early warning systems. The introductory part of the demonstration briefly explains the DEWS project, the CCUI in conjunction with operators’ workflow, the system architecture, details of information logistics and the virtual scenario of live demonstration. The live demonstration exhibits the CCUI on screen and the service

  15. Early warning of changing drinking water quality by trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomperi, Jani; Juuso, Esko; Leiviskä, Kauko

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring and control of water treatment plants play an essential role in ensuring high quality drinking water and avoiding health-related problems or economic losses. The most common quality variables, which can be used also for assessing the efficiency of the water treatment process, are turbidity and residual levels of coagulation and disinfection chemicals. In the present study, the trend indices are developed from scaled measurements to detect warning signs of changes in the quality variables of drinking water and some operating condition variables that strongly affect water quality. The scaling is based on monotonically increasing nonlinear functions, which are generated with generalized norms and moments. Triangular episodes are classified with the trend index and its derivative. Deviation indices are used to assess the severity of situations. The study shows the potential of the described trend analysis as a predictive monitoring tool, as it provides an advantage over the traditional manual inspection of variables by detecting changes in water quality and giving early warnings.

  16. Ethical challenges in surgery as narrated by practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and female surgeons were found. They reasoned in both action and relational ethical perspectives. Surgeons focused on their relationships with patients and colleagues and their moral self in descriptions of the ethical challenges in their work. Dialogue and personal involvement were important in their relationships with patients. The surgeons emphasized the importance of open dialogue, professional recognition, and an inclusive and accepting environment between colleagues. Conclusion The surgeons are personally challenged by the existential realities of human life in their relationships with patients. They realized that ethical challenges are an inherent part of performing surgery and of life itself, and say that they have to learn to "live with" these challenges in a way that is confirmed both socially and by their inner moral self. This means accepting their personal and professional limitations, being uncertain, being fallible, and being humble. Living with the ethical challenges of surgery seems to contribute to the surgeons' confidence and vulnerability in their professional identity.

  17. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  18. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  19. Orthopedic surgeons' attitudes to osteoporosis investigation and management after minimal trauma fracture (MTF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Wurf, Jane; McGirr, Joe; Seal, Alexa; Harding, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    A study of orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis found they believe follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important; responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management lies with primary health care and current communication systems are poor. The investigation and treatment of osteoporosis after minimal trauma fracture (MTF) is regarded as sub-optimal. There is strong evidence of the benefit of identifying and treating osteoporosis after MTF, and there has been discussion of the possible role that orthopedic surgeons might play in the management of osteoporosis after MTF. The study surveyed orthopedic surgeons in rural and regional Southeast Australia to determine their attitudes to investigation and management of osteoporosis, the role health professionals should play, and the communication and co-ordination of follow-up care. A survey was developed and piloted prior to being posted to 69 orthopedic surgeons asking for their opinions about the general management of osteoporosis, and the roles and responsibilities of health professionals in dealing with osteoporosis following an MTF. Responses were received from 42 participants (60.8%) with the majority of respondents agreeing that it is important to treat osteoporosis following MTF. Less than 15% of respondents felt that it was their responsibility to initiate discussion or treatment or investigation after MTF. No respondent felt that the coordination of osteoporosis care was good and 45% stated it was poor. Communication after discharge is mostly left to the hospital (30%), while 20% stated they did not follow up at all. This study shows that many rural orthopedic surgeons believe that follow-up in regard to osteoporosis after MTF is important, that responsibility for follow-up diagnosis and management of osteoporosis lies with primary health care and the current communication systems are poor.

  20. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  1. Skeletal metastases - the role of the orthopaedic and spinal surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastley, Nicholas; Newey, Martyn; Ashford, Robert U

    2012-09-01

    Developments in oncological and medical therapies mean that life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD) is often measured in years. Complications of MBD may dramatically and irreversibly affect patient quality of life, making the careful assessment and appropriate management of these patients essential. The roles of orthopaedic and spinal surgeons in MBD generally fall into one of four categories: diagnostic, the prophylactic fixation of metastatic deposits at risk of impending fracture (preventative surgery), the stabilisation or reconstruction of bones affected by pathological fractures (reactive surgery), or the decompression and stabilisation of the vertebral column, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Several key principals should be adhered to whenever operating on skeletal metastases. Discussions should be held early with an appropriate multi-disciplinary team prior to intervention. Detailed pre-assessment is essential to gauge a patient's suitability for surgery - recovery from elective surgery must be shorter than the anticipated survival. Staging and biopsies provide prognostic information. Primary bone tumours must be ruled out in the case of a solitary bone lesion to avoid inappropriate intervention. Prophylactic surgical fixation of a lesion prior to a pathological fracture reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay. Regardless of a lesion or pathological fracture's location, all regions of the affected bone must be addressed, to reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Surgical implants should allow full weight bearing or return to function immediately. Post-operative radiotherapy should be utilised in all cases to minimise disease progression. Spinal surgery should be considered for those with spinal pain due to potentially reversible spinal instability or neurological compromise. The opinion of a spinal surgeon should be sought early, as delays in referral directly correlate to worse functional recovery following intervention

  2. Physically based landslide warning at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, Ekrem; Mergili, Martin; Glade, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Albeit advancements in the past within the field of geotechnical engineering have led to an increasing in situ damage control in many parts of the world, heavy rainstorms still cause severe damage by triggering landslides. Landslides are usually restricted to the local scale when taking into consideration single events, however, they often tend to occur spatially abundant which makes them a regional phenomenon. This makes the necessity of regional-scale early warning systems (EWS) indispensable. When dealing with landslide EWS, it is impossible to cover all potential early warning situations. Although the calculation of rainfall thresholds is the most common approach for assessing regional landslide early warning, they only represent a simplification of the physical processes involved. In most cases, indeed, there is more than just this one causative factor involved. Here, we present an early prototype for a regional, physically based landslide EWS driven by real-time spatio-temporal rainfall data. Instead of assuming uniform rainfall over a certain area, an automated geostatistical approach is suggested which allows approximating real-time spatially distributed, hourly rainfall predictions based on gauged rainfall data available on the internet. The methodology presented in this study is especially suitable for the implementation in warning systems that contain predefined thresholds and for landslides related to a progressive increase of soil saturation and/or a rising groundwater table. The transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based slope stability (TRIGRS) model is used in a modified way to compute transient pore-pressure changes and associated changes in the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. The geotechnical properties involved are probabilistically integrated within certain predefined ranges to account for the inherent spatial uncertainties. The result is an automatically generated probability of failure raster map that is updated hourly based

  3. Experimental evaluation of fog warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ali S

    2007-11-01

    Highway safety is a major concern to the public and to transportation professionals, so the number of crashes caused by poor visibility due to fog form an alarming statistic. Drivers respond to poor visibility conditions in different ways: some slow down; others do not. Many drivers simply follow the taillights of the vehicle ahead. Accordingly, hazardous conditions are created in which speeds are both too high for the prevailing conditions and highly variable. Findings are presented from a study of traffic crashes due to fog in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. The primary objective was to assess the effectiveness of fog detection and warning system on driver behavior regarding speed and headway. This warning system includes visibility sensors that automatically activate a variable message sign that posts an advisory speed when hazardous conditions due to fog occur. The system was installed on a 2 km section of a two-lane, rural highway. A data set of 36,013 observations from both experimental and control sections at two study sites was collected and analyzed. The data included vehicle speed, volume, and classification; time headway, time of day, and visibility distance. Although the warning system was ineffective in reducing speed variability, mean speed throughout the experimental sections was reduced by about 6.5 kph. This reduction indicates that the warning system appeared to have a positive effect on driver behavior in fog even though the observed mean speeds were still higher than the posted advisory speed. From relationships found in the literature between mean driving speed and number of crashes, a speed reduction of only 5 kph would yield a 15% decrease in the number of crashes.

  4. Flood early warning system: sensors and internet

    OpenAIRE

    Pengel, B.E.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Melnikova, N.B.; Shirshov, G.S.; Koelewijn, A.R.; Pyayt, A.L.; Mokhov, I.I.; Chavoshian, A.; Takeuchi,K.

    2013-01-01

    The UrbanFlood early warning system (EWS) is designed to monitor data from very large sensornetworks in flood defences such as embankments, dikes, levees, and dams. The EWS, based on the internet, uses real-time sensor information and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to immediately calculate the probability of dike failure, the ensuing scenarios of dike breaching, predicted flood spreading and escape routes for people from the affected areas. Results are presented on interactive decision support ...

  5. Crowd-Sourced Global Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minson, S. E.; Brooks, B. A.; Glennie, C. L.; Murray, J. R.; Langbein, J. O.; Owen, S. E.; Iannucci, B. A.; Hauser, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Although earthquake early warning (EEW) has shown great promise for reducing loss of life and property, it has only been implemented in a few regions due, in part, to the prohibitive cost of building the required dense seismic and geodetic networks. However, many cars and consumer smartphones, tablets, laptops, and similar devices contain low-cost versions of the same sensors used for earthquake monitoring. If a workable EEW system could be implemented based on either crowd-sourced observations from consumer devices or very inexpensive networks of instruments built from consumer-quality sensors, EEW coverage could potentially be expanded worldwide. Controlled tests of several accelerometers and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers typically found in consumer devices show that, while they are significantly noisier than scientific-grade instruments, they are still accurate enough to capture displacements from moderate and large magnitude earthquakes. The accuracy of these sensors varies greatly depending on the type of data collected. Raw coarse acquisition (C/A) code GPS data are relatively noisy. These observations have a surface displacement detection threshold approaching ~1 m and would thus only be useful in large Mw 8+ earthquakes. However, incorporating either satellite-based differential corrections or using a Kalman filter to combine the raw GNSS data with low-cost acceleration data (such as from a smartphone) decreases the noise dramatically. These approaches allow detection thresholds as low as 5 cm, potentially enabling accurate warnings for earthquakes as small as Mw 6.5. Simulated performance tests show that, with data contributed from only a very small fraction of the population, a crowd-sourced EEW system would be capable of warning San Francisco and San Jose of a Mw 7 rupture on California's Hayward fault and could have accurately issued both earthquake and tsunami warnings for the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku-oki, Japan earthquake.

  6. A comparison of different informative vibrotactile forward collision warnings: does the warning need to be linked to the collision event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rob; Ho, Cristy; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent research demonstrates that auditory and vibrotactile forward collision warnings presenting a motion signal (e.g., looming or apparent motion across the body surface) can facilitate speeded braking reaction times (BRTs). The purpose of the present study was to expand on this work by directly comparing warning signals in which the motion conveyed was constant across all collision events with signals in which the speed of motion was dependent on the closing velocity (CV). Two experiments were conducted using a simulated car-following task and BRTs were measured. In Experiment 1, increasing intensity (looming) vibrotactile signals were presented from a single tactor attached to the driver's waist. When the increase in intensity was CV-linked, BRTs were significantly faster as compared to a no-warning condition, however, they were not significantly different from constant intensity and CV-independent looming warnings. In Experiment 2, a vertical array of three tactors was used to create motion either towards (upwards) or away (downwards) from the driver's head. When the warning signal presented upwards motion that was CV-linked, BRTs were significantly faster than all other warning types. Downwards warnings led to a significantly higher number of brake activations in false alarm situations as compared to upwards moving warnings. The effectiveness of dynamic tactile collision warnings would therefore appear to depend on both the link between the warning and collision event and on the directionality of the warning signal.

  7. A comparison of different informative vibrotactile forward collision warnings: does the warning need to be linked to the collision event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Gray

    Full Text Available Recent research demonstrates that auditory and vibrotactile forward collision warnings presenting a motion signal (e.g., looming or apparent motion across the body surface can facilitate speeded braking reaction times (BRTs. The purpose of the present study was to expand on this work by directly comparing warning signals in which the motion conveyed was constant across all collision events with signals in which the speed of motion was dependent on the closing velocity (CV. Two experiments were conducted using a simulated car-following task and BRTs were measured. In Experiment 1, increasing intensity (looming vibrotactile signals were presented from a single tactor attached to the driver's waist. When the increase in intensity was CV-linked, BRTs were significantly faster as compared to a no-warning condition, however, they were not significantly different from constant intensity and CV-independent looming warnings. In Experiment 2, a vertical array of three tactors was used to create motion either towards (upwards or away (downwards from the driver's head. When the warning signal presented upwards motion that was CV-linked, BRTs were significantly faster than all other warning types. Downwards warnings led to a significantly higher number of brake activations in false alarm situations as compared to upwards moving warnings. The effectiveness of dynamic tactile collision warnings would therefore appear to depend on both the link between the warning and collision event and on the directionality of the warning signal.

  8. The effects of surgeons and anesthesiologists on operating room efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nessa Timoney

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In some procedures types a significant part of the variability in operative time is due to the interaction between the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Reviewing operative records should allow identification of efficient/inefficient combinations.

  9. Concussion in Sports: What Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Refakis, Christian; Storey, Eileen; Warner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A concussion is a relatively common sports-related injury that affects athletes of all ages. Although orthopaedic surgeons are not expected to replace sports medicine physicians and neurologists with regard to the management of concussions, orthopaedic surgeons, particularly those who are fellowship-trained in sports medicine, must have a current knowledge base of what a concussion is, how a concussion is diagnosed, and how a concussion should be managed. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of concussion so that they have a basic comprehension of this injury, which is at the forefront of the academic literature and North American media. This understanding will prepare orthopaedic surgeons to work in concert with and assist sports medicine physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists in providing comprehensive care for athletes with a concussion.

  10. A Methodological Critique of the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Pronovost, Peter J; Shahian, David M; Safran, Dana Gelb; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Elliott, Marc N; Damberg, Cheryl L; Dimick, Justin B; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2016-05-09

    On July 14, 2015, ProPublica published its Surgeon Scorecard, which displays "Adjusted Complication Rates" for individual, named surgeons for eight surgical procedures performed in hospitals. Public reports of provider performance have the potential to improve the quality of health care that patients receive. A valid performance report can drive quality improvement and usefully inform patients' choices of providers. However, performance reports with poor validity and reliability are potentially damaging to all involved. This article critiques the methods underlying the Scorecard and identifies opportunities for improvement. Until these opportunities are addressed, the authors advise users of the Scorecard-most notably, patients who might be choosing their surgeons-not to consider the Scorecard a valid or reliable predictor of the health outcomes any individual surgeon is likely to provide. The authors hope that this methodological critique will contribute to the development of more-valid and more-reliable performance reports in the future.

  11. Feasibility study of earthquake early warning (EEW) in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Weston A.; Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Bodin, Paul

    2016-09-30

    The effects of earthquake shaking on the population and infrastructure across the State of Hawaii could be catastrophic, and the high seismic hazard in the region emphasizes the likelihood of such an event. Earthquake early warning (EEW) has the potential to give several seconds of warning before strong shaking starts, and thus reduce loss of life and damage to property. The two approaches to EEW are (1) a network approach (such as ShakeAlert or ElarmS) where the regional seismic network is used to detect the earthquake and distribute the alarm and (2) a local approach where a critical facility has a single seismometer (or small array) and a warning system on the premises.The network approach, also referred to here as ShakeAlert or ElarmS, uses the closest stations within a regional seismic network to detect and characterize an earthquake. Most parameters used for a network approach require observations on multiple stations (typically 3 or 4), which slows down the alarm time slightly, but the alarms are generally more reliable than with single-station EEW approaches. The network approach also benefits from having stations closer to the source of any potentially damaging earthquake, so that alarms can be sent ahead to anyone who subscribes to receive the notification. Thus, a fully implemented ShakeAlert system can provide seconds of warning for both critical facilities and general populations ahead of damaging earthquake shaking.The cost to implement and maintain a fully operational ShakeAlert system is high compared to a local approach or single-station solution, but the benefits of a ShakeAlert system would be felt statewide—the warning times for strong shaking are potentially longer for most sources at most locations.The local approach, referred to herein as “single station,” uses measurements from a single seismometer to assess whether strong earthquake shaking can be expected. Because of the reliance on a single station, false alarms are more common than

  12. Influence of Health Warnings on Beliefs about the Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking, in the Context of an Experimental Study in Four Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Reid

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette package health warnings can be an important and low-cost means of communicating the health risks of smoking. We examined whether viewing health warnings in an experimental study influenced beliefs about the health effects of smoking, by conducting surveys with ~500 adult male smokers and ~500 male and female youth (age 16–18 in Beijing, China (n = 1070, Mumbai area, India (n = 1012, Dhaka, Bangladesh (n = 1018, and Republic of Korea (n = 1362. Each respondent was randomly assigned to view and rate pictorial health warnings for 2 of 15 different health effects, after which they reported beliefs about whether smoking caused 12 health effects. Respondents who viewed relevant health warnings (vs. other warnings were significantly more likely to believe that smoking caused that particular health effect, for several health effects in each sample. Approximately three-quarters of respondents in China (Beijing, Bangladesh (Dhaka, and Korea (which had general, text-only warnings thought that cigarette packages should display more health information, compared to approximately half of respondents in the Mumbai area, India (which had detailed pictorial warnings. Pictorial health warnings that convey the risk of specific health effects from smoking can increase beliefs and knowledge about the health consequences of smoking, particularly for health effects that are lesser-known.

  13. [Andreas Vesalius, distinguished surgeon of the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1996-01-01

    The author gives here some considerations about A. Vesalius through his life and his works as a surgeon. He was the father of the anatomical revolution against Galen but was also an eminent clinician and surgeon. He was immediately able to adapt his surgical practice whenever the promising methodology was identified (see Consilia). The author concludes with a critical analysis of the Chirurgia magna in septem libros digesta attributed to A. Vesalius.

  14. Surgeons' Perspectives on Premium Implants in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterlain, Amy S; Bello, Ricardo J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Long, William J

    2017-06-29

    Declining total joint arthroplasty reimbursement and rising implant prices have led many hospitals to restrict access to newer, more expensive total joint arthroplasty implants. The authors sought to understand arthroplasty surgeons' perspectives on implants regarding innovation, product launch, costs, and cost-containment strategies including surgeon gain-sharing and patient cost-sharing. Members of the International Congress for Joint Reconstruction were surveyed regarding attitudes about implant technology and costs. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. A total of 126 surgeons responded from all 5 regions of the United States. Although 76.9% believed new products advance technology in orthopedics, most (66.7%) supported informing patients that new implants lack long-term clinical data and restricting new implants to a small number of investigators prior to widespread market launch. The survey revealed that 66.7% would forgo gain-sharing incentives in exchange for more freedom to choose implants. Further, 76.9% believed that patients should be allowed to pay incremental costs for "premium" implants. Surgeons who believed that premium products advance orthopedic technology were more willing to forgo gain-sharing (P=.040). Surgeons with higher surgical volume (P=.007), those who believed implant companies should be allowed to charge more for new technology (Pinnovation advances the field but support discussing the "unproven" nature of new implants with patients. Many surgeons support alternative payment models permitting surgeons and patients to retain implant selection autonomy. Most respondents prioritized patient beneficence and surgeon autonomy above personal financial gain. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  16. How do Orthopedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Vranceanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment.   Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350 completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral.

  17. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  18. Surgeon commitment to trauma care decreases missed injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Chia-Ju; Chan, Hon-Man; Lee, Wei-Che; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Cheng, Yuan-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries sustain an important issue concerning patient safety and quality of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of surgeon commitment to trauma care on missed injuries. We hypothesised that surgeons committed to the trauma service has less missed injuries than surgeons not committed to the trauma service would have. By retrospective analysis of 976 adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at an urban, university-based trauma centre. Missed injuries were compared between two groups; in group 1 the patients were evaluated and treated by the surgeons who were committed to the trauma service and in group 2 the patients were evaluated and treated by surgeons practicing mainly in other specialties. Patients had significantly lower rates of missed major or life-threatening injuries when treated by group 1 surgeons. Logistic regression model revealed significant factors associated with missed major or life-threatening injuries including ISS and groups in which patients were treated by different group surgeons. Physicians will perform better when they are trained and interested in a specific area than those not trained, or even not having any particular interest in that specific area. Surgeons committed to the trauma service had less missed injuries in severely injured patients, and it is vital to improve patient safety and quality of care for trauma patients. Staff training and education for assessing severely injured patients and creating an open culture with detection and reduction of the potential for error are important and effective strategies in decreasing missed injuries and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Motivado por cirujanos Motivated by Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salazar-Vargas

    2010-12-01

    interrogate and to examine those individuals, and every gesture, every question, every maneuver they did, was jealously kept in our minds. However even at an early stage, we clearly perceived, the differences between medical branches and practitioners, and involuntarily, every one was leaning towards this or that specialty. It was during those years when 7 wonderful persons and excellent surgeons, crossed the path of my life, inspiring me to follow their steps and to embrace a surgical career. Two were classic academicians, Dr. Manuel Aguilar Bonilla and Dr. Andres Vesalio Guzman Calleja, 3 were determined, tireless and highly skilled, Dr. Longino Soto Pacheco, Dr. Claudio Orlich Carranza, y el Dr. Carlos Prada Diaz, and 2 were, although well prepared, unassuming, practical and openly friendly, Dr. Fernando Valverde Soley y el Dr. Randall Ferris Iglesias....

  20. A model of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2014-09-01

    Surgeons are the physicians with the highest rates of documented disruptive behavior. We hypothesized that a unified conceptual model of disruptive surgeon behavior could be developed based on specific individual and system factors in the perioperative environment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 operating room staff of diverse occupations at a single institution. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Participants described episodes of disruptive surgeon behavior, personality traits of perpetrators, environmental conditions of power, and situations when disruptive behavior was demonstrated. Verbal hostility and throwing or hitting objects were the most commonly described disruptive behaviors. Participants indicated that surgical training attracts and creates individuals with particular personality traits, including a sense of shame. Interviewees stated this behavior is tolerated because surgeons have unchecked power, have strong money-making capabilities for the institution, and tend to direct disruptive behavior toward the least powerful employees. The most frequent situational stressors were when something went wrong during an operation and working with unfamiliar team members. Each factor group (ie, situational stressors, cultural conditions, and personality factors) was viewed as being necessary, but none of them alone were sufficient to catalyze disruptive behavior events. Disruptive physician behavior has strong implications for the work environment and patient safety. This model can be used by hospitals to better conceptualize conditions that facilitate disruptive surgeon behavior and to establish programs to mitigate conduct that threatens patient safety and employee satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A national study of burnout among American transplant surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertges Yost, W; Eshelman, A; Raoufi, M; Abouljoud, M S

    2005-03-01

    This study examines burnout in a national sample of transplant surgeons. Data analyses were conducted on a sample of 209 actively practicing transplant surgeons. Measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory, a demographic survey, and the Surgeon Coping Inventory. Burnout was reflected in 38% of surgeons scoring high on the Emotional Exhaustion dimension, whereas 27% showed high levels of Depersonalization, and 16% had low levels of Personal Accomplishment. Several significant predictors of emotional exhaustion were identified and included questioning one's career choice, giving up activities, and perceiving oneself as having limited control over the delivery of medical services (R2= 0.43). Those who perceived themselves as having a higher ability to control delivery of medical services and who felt more appreciated by patients had lower levels of depersonalization and were less likely to question their career choice (R2= 0.16). Surgeons with high personal accomplishment experienced greater professional growth opportunities, perceived their institution as supportive, felt more appreciated by patients, and were less likely to question their career (R2= 0.24). The prioritization of goals to reflect both professional and personal values accounted for a significant amount of the variance in predicting both emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment in separate regression equations. Recommendations to decrease burnout would include greater institutional support, increased opportunities for professional growth, and greater surgeon control over important services to facilitate efficient work. Coping strategies to moderate stress and burnout are also beneficial and should include prioritizing goals to reflect both professional and personal values.

  2. Depth Perception of Surgeons in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Rositsa; Boulanger, Pierre; Zheng, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) poses visual challenges to the surgeons. In MIS, binocular disparity is not freely available for surgeons, who are required to mentally rebuild the 3-dimensional (3D) patient anatomy from a limited number of monoscopic visual cues. The insufficient depth cues from the MIS environment could cause surgeons to misjudge spatial depth, which could lead to performance errors thus jeopardizing patient safety. In this article, we will first discuss the natural human depth perception by exploring the main depth cues available for surgeons in open procedures. Subsequently, we will reveal what depth cues are lost in MIS and how surgeons compensate for the incomplete depth presentation. Next, we will further expand our knowledge by exploring some of the available solutions for improving depth presentation to surgeons. Here we will review the innovative approaches (multiple 2D camera assembly, shadow introduction) and devices (3D monitors, head-mounted devices, and auto-stereoscopic monitors) for 3D image presentation from the past few years.

  3. A change in opinion on surgeon's performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytham, Gary; Kessaris, Nicos

    2011-04-01

    Individual performance indicators for cardiac surgeons in the UK were published in 2004. A comprehensive update published in 2009 reported statistically significant decreases in mortality rates suggesting that the publication of this data may have contributed to this improvement in outcomes. In view of this, the authors present an assessment of the attitudes of cardiac surgeons to individual performance tables, having performed this by sending questionnaires exploring the surgeon's views on performance tables to UK cardiac surgeons in 2005 and 2009. The responses demonstrated that whilst the majority of cardiac surgeons (68.8%) were initially opposed to performance tables, the number welcoming their introduction increased significantly (22.9-48.5%) over the four-year period. The attitude of the consultants towards the possible effect of this data on the management of high-risk patients also changed, with fewer consultants believing they would (P=0.0001) or may (P=0.023) avoid these patients. The observed change in attitude of cardiac surgeons may be due to acclimatization to an established system of audit, improved mortality rates, a desire for more transparency following the Bristol Enquiry, or improved risk stratification. These findings may be of benefit to those tasked with initiating these indicators elsewhere.

  4. High occupational stress and low career satisfaction of Korean surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hee; Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Hyung Joon; Jung, Cheol Woong; Kim, Chong Suk

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is a demanding and stressful field in Korea. Occupational stress can adversely affect the quality of care, decrease job satisfaction, and potentially increase medical errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the occupational stress and career satisfaction of Korean surgeons. We have conducted an electronic survey of 621 Korean surgeons for the occupational stress. Sixty-five questions were used to assess practical and personal characteristics and occupational stress using the Korean occupational stress scale (KOSS). The mean KOSS score was 49.31, which was higher than the average of Korean occupational stress (45.86) or that of other specialized professions (46.03). Young age, female gender, long working hours, and frequent night duties were significantly related to the higher KOSS score. Having spouse, having hobby and regular exercise decreased the KOSS score. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that long working hours and regular exercise were the independent factors associated with the KOSS score. Less than 50% of surgeons answered that they would become a surgeon again. Most surgeons (82.5%) did not want to recommend their child follow their career. Korean Surgeons have high occupational stress and low level of career satisfaction.

  5. Space systems for disaster warning, response, and recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This SpringerBrief provides a general overview of the role of satellite applications for disaster mitigation, warning, planning, recovery and response. It covers both the overall role and perspective of the emergency management community as well as the various space applications that support their work. Key insights are provided as to how satellite telecommunications, remote sensing, navigation systems, GIS, and the emerging domain of social media are utilized in the context of emergency management needs and requirements. These systems are now critical in addressing major man-made and natural disasters. International policy and treaties are covered along with various case studies from around the world. These case studies indicate vital lessons that have been learned about how to use space systems more effectively in addressing the so-called “Disaster Cycle.” This book is appropriate for practicing emergency managers, Emergency Management (EM) courses, as well as for those involved in various space applica...

  6. Overview of Existing Landslide Early-Warning Systems in Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, C.; Bazin, S.; Blikra, L. H.; Derron, M.-H.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    The project SafeLand is intended to develop generic risk management tools and strategies for landslides. Indeed, the intention of the screening study is to provide guidelines that will help and facilitate the establishment of new early warning systems (EWS) and to increase the quality of existing systems (Bazin et al., 2012). Consequently, one of the first steps is to merge actual knowledge and expert judgments. Thus, as part of this study, we gathered experiences from organizations in charge of landslide EWSs and risk management in order to compile information about the state of the art technologies and existing strategies. To ensure those objectives, a questionnaire was produced by UNIL, ICG and ÅTB. Divided in 5 parts, the questionnaires collected information about: 1. General information on the unit in charge of the EWS; 2. Knowledge about the monitored landslide; 3. Pre-investigations used to design the EWS; 4. Monitoring parameters, thresholds and sensors evaluation; 5. Warnings, communications and decision making process. Finally, sent in June 2011 to about hundred organizations in charge of one or several EWS, 14 institutions from 8 countries sent the questionnaires back during the summer and autumn 2011, speaking about 23 landslides. The compilation and analysis of the most interesting answers are the scope of this poster. First, there are no common requirements to design and operate EWSs. From the surveyed countries, only Norway and Slovakia have produced codes or recommendations for this purpose. Secondly, more than 81% of the EWSs are based on displacement monitoring, certainly because it is the direct evidence of deformations. Then the weather conditions are monitored for more than half of the cases. It is also an essential parameter since rainfalls are a destabilizing factor for more than 80% of the studied landslides. Then, advantages and limitations of existing EWSs are clearly defined. Indeed, an EWS should be (1) robust, (2) simple, (3) redundant

  7. Implicit motivational impact of pictorial health warning on cigarette packs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Volchan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The use of pictorial warning labels on cigarette packages is one of the provisions included in the first ever global health treaty by the World Health Organization against the tobacco epidemic. There is substantial evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of graphic health warning labels on intention to quit, thoughts about health risks and engaging in cessation behaviors. However, studies that address the implicit emotional drives evoked by such warnings are still underexplored. Here, we provide experimental data for the use of pictorial health warnings as a reliable strategy for tobacco control. METHODS: Experiment 1 pre-tested nineteen prototypes of pictorial warnings to screen for their emotional impact. Participants (n = 338 were young adults balanced in gender, smoking status and education. Experiment 2 (n = 63 tested pictorial warnings (ten that were stamped on packs. We employed an innovative set-up to investigate the impact of the warnings on the ordinary attitude of packs' manipulation, and quantified judgments of warnings' emotional strength and efficacy against smoking. FINDINGS: Experiment 1 revealed that women judged the warning prototypes as more aversive than men, and smokers judged them more aversive than non-smokers. Participants with lower education judged the prototypes more aversive than participants with higher education. Experiment 2 showed that stamped warnings antagonized the appeal of the brands by imposing a cost to manipulate the cigarette packs, especially for smokers. Additionally, participants' judgments revealed that the more aversive a warning, the more it is perceived as effective against smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Health warning labels are one of the key components of the integrated approach to control the global tobacco epidemic. The evidence presented in this study adds to the understanding of how implicit responses to pictorial warnings may contribute to behavioral change.

  8. Isn't it time to start speaking about "European surgeons"?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzareschi Daniel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency surgery has become a neglected specialization in Europe and in many other parts of the world. In certain medical fields, emergency surgery isn't even considered an autonomous specialization. However every emergency surgeon must have a good formation in General Surgery but exist huge disparities between different European surgical formative systems. Methods An analysis of the main problems of the European surgical formative system was conducted. Results This discrepancy between formative systems is absolutely unacceptable and presents a notable hazard for the European Union, considering that surgical certifications are reciprocally recognized between programs within all European Union states. Conclusion Considering the increasing possibilities to move inside the European Union, is necessary to improve the European surgical formative system to warrant an uniform formation for all surgeons.

  9. The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveslage, Ingmar; Fischer, Joachim; Kühnlenz, Frank; Lichtblau, Björn; Milkereit, Claus; Picozzi, Matteo

    2010-05-01

    The Self-Organising Seismic Early Warning Information Network (SOSEWIN) represents a new approach for Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS), consisting in taking advantage of novel wireless communications technologies without the need of a planned, centralised infrastructure. It also sets out to overcome problems of insufficient node density, which typically affects present existing early warning systems, by having the SOSEWIN seismological sensing units being comprised of low-cost components (generally bought "off-the-shelf"), with each unit initially costing 100's of Euros, in contrast to 1,000's to 10,000's for standard seismological stations. The reduced sensitivity of the new sensing units arising from the use of lower-cost components will be compensated by the network's density, which in the future is expected to number 100's to 1000's over areas served currently by the order of 10's of standard stations. The robustness, independence of infrastructure, spontaneous extensibility due to a self-healing/self-organizing character in the case of removing/failing or adding sensors makes SOSEWIN potentially useful for various use cases, e.g. monitoring of building structures (as we could proof during the L'Aquila earthquake) or technical systems and most recently for seismic microzonation. Nevertheless the main purpose SOSEWIN was initially invented for is the earthquake early warning and rapid response, for which reason the ground motion is continuously monitored by conventional accelerometers (3-component) and processed within a station. Based on this, the network itself decides whether an event is detected cooperatively in a two-level hierarchical alarming protocol. Experiences and experiment results with the SOSEWIN-prototype installation in the Ataköy district of Istanbul (Turkey) are presented. The limited size of this installation with currently 20 nodes allows not answering certain questions regarding the useful or possible size of a SOSEWIN installation

  10. Tsunami Warning Center in Turkey : Status Update 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral Ozel, N.; Necmioglu, O.; Yalciner, A. C.; Kalafat, D.; Yilmazer, M.; Comoglu, M.; Sanli, U.; Gurbuz, C.; Erdik, M.

    2012-04-01

    This is an update to EGU2011-3094 informing on the progress of the establishment of a National Tsunami Warning Center in Turkey (NTWC-TR) under the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission - Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (IOC-ICG/NEAMTWS) initiative. NTWC-TR is integrated into the 24/7 operational National Earthquake Monitoring Center (NEMC) of KOERI comprising 129 BB and 61 strong motion sensors. Based on an agreement with the Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (DEMP), data from 10 BB stations located in the Aegean and Mediterranean Coast is now transmitted in real time to KOERI. Real-time data transmission from 6 primary and 10 auxiliary stations from the International Monitoring System will be in place in the very near future based on an agreement concluded with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) in 2011. In an agreement with a major Turkish GSM company, KOERI is enlarging its strong-motion network to promote real-time seismology and to extend Earthquake Early Warning system countrywide. 25 accelerometers (included in the number given above) have been purchased and installed at Base Transceiver Station Sites in coastal regions within the scope of this initiative. Data from 3 tide gauge stations operated by General Command of Mapping (GCM) is being transmitted to KOERI via satellite connection and the aim is to integrate all tide-gauge stations operated by GCM into NTWC-TR. A collaborative agreement has been signed with the European Commission - Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) and MOD1 Tsunami Scenario Database and TAT (Tsunami Analysis Tool) are received by KOERI and user training was provided. The database and the tool are linked to SeisComp3 and currently operational. In addition KOERI is continuing the work towards providing contributions to JRC in order to develop an improved database

  11. Quality of Life of Indian Pediatric Surgeons: Results of a Survey (of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons Members)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameer, M. M.; Rao, Sanjay; Vinay, C.; D’Cruz, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Much is debated on the quality of life of pediatric surgeons practicing in India, all based on anecdotal and personal experiences. There is no systematic study on this. This study addresses this and attempts to glean a clearer picture of the life as a pediatric surgeon in India. Methodology: This questionnaire-based study was administered via an online survey to all Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons members. The responses were anonymous and investigators blinded. Data were collated and analyzed using STAT11.1. Results: A total of 173 pediatric surgeons responded. Eighty-six percent were men. About 73.7% of the surgeons were between 31 and 50 years of age. Almost 63.4% practiced in urban areas, whereas 36% in other smaller towns. About 0.6% reported that their practice was rural. Almost 26.4% were in private/solo practices, whereas 53.4% were in institution-based practice. Almost 80% felt that they were adequately trained while starting their practice. About 78% are professionally satisfied with their work. Only 44.5% of surgeons felt that they were compensated adequately financially. Reading was the favorite pass time. Almost 40% of the surgeons felt that they were either overweight or obese. About 41% of the surgeons exercise more than 3 times a week. Only 11.4% smoke, whereas 36% drink. Fifty-three percent of surgeons felt that their personal savings were adequate. Seventy-six percent use Facebook. Sixty-eight percent were satisfied with their quality of life. Age was significantly associated with professional satisfaction, financial satisfaction, and quality of life and all improve as one's age progresses. None were affected with one's gender, type of practice, and the place of practice. Age, weight, exercise, and one's savings significantly affected ones quality of life. Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common

  12. Heparin and Lovenox: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, LisaMarie Di; Ferneini, Elie M

    2016-11-01

    For the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, many patients will be on heparin products during surgery. So far, there is no standardized approach to treating anticoagulated patients during oral and maxillofacial surgical procedures. When a patient is on heparin therapy, heparin may be stopped 4 to 6 hours before surgery and resumed once hemostasis is achieved, usually within 24 hours. If low-molecular-weight heparin is administered, the treatment is generally stopped at least 12 hours before surgery and then resumed in a similar fashion. Local measures are generally enough to provide adequate hemostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Are shoulder surgeons any good at diagnosing rotator cuff tears using ultrasound?: A comparative analysis of surgeon vs radiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyam Muthu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasound has gained increasing popularity as an aid in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology. With the advent of portable machines, ultrasound has become accessible to clinicians. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing rotator cuff tears by a shoulder surgeon and comparing their ability to that of a musculoskeletal radiologist. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff pathology underwent preoperative ultrasonography (US. All patients were of similar demographics and pathology. The surgeon used a Sonosite Micromax portable ultrasound machine with a 10-MHz high frequency linear array transducer and the radiologist used a 9-12 MHz linear array probe on a Siemens Antares machine. Arthroscopic diagnosis was the reference standard to which ultrasound findings were compared. Results: The sensitivity in detecting full thickness tears was similar for both the surgeon (92% and the radiologist (94%. The radiologist had 100% sensitivity in diagnosing partial thickness tears, compared to 85.7% for the surgeon. The specificity for the surgeon was 94% and 85% for the radiologist. Discussion: Our study shows that the surgeons are capable of diagnosing rotator cuff tears with the use of high-resolution portable ultrasound in the outpatient setting. Conclusion: Office ultrasound, by a trained clinician, is a powerful diagnostic tool in diagnosing rotator cuff tears and can be used effectively in running one-stop shoulder clinics.

  14. Early Warning System: a juridical notion to be built

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, A.

    2007-12-01

    Early warning systems (EWS) are becoming effective tools for real time mitigation of the harmful effects arising from widely different hazards, which range from famine to financial crisis, malicious attacks, industrial accidents, natural catastrophes, etc. Early warning of natural catastrophic events allows to implement both alert systems and real time prevention actions for the safety of people and goods exposed to the risk However the effective implementation of early warning methods is hindered by the lack of a specific juridical frame. Under a juridical point of view, in fact, EWS and in general all the activities of prevention need a careful regulation, mainly with regards to responsibility and possible compensation for damage caused by the implemented actions. A preventive alarm, in fact, has an active influence on infrastructures in control of public services which in turn will suffer suspensions or interruptions because of the early warning actions. From here it is necessary to possess accurate normative references related to the typology of structures or infrastructures upon which the activity of readiness acts; the progressive order of suspension of public services; the duration of these suspensions; the corporate bodies or administrations that are competent to assume such decisions; the actors responsible for the consequences of false alarm, missed or delayed alarms; the mechanisms of compensation for damage; the insurance systems; etc In the European Union EWS are often quoted as preventive methods of mitigation of the risk. Nevertheless, a juridical notion of EWS of general use is not available. In fact, EW is a concept that finds application in many different circles, each of which require specific adaptations, and may concern subjects for which the European Union doesn't have exclusive competence as may be the responsibility of the member states to assign the necessary regulations. In so far as the juridical arrangement of the EWS, this must be

  15. Application of Machine Vision to Vehicle Automatic Collision Warning Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiang-feng; GAO Feng; XU Guo-yan; YAO Sheng-zhuo

    2008-01-01

    Using the new technologies such as information technology, communication technology and electronic control technology, vehicle collision warning system(CWS) can acquire road condition, adjacent vehicle march condition as well as its dynamics performance continuously, then it can forecast the oncoming potential collision and give a warning. Based on the analysis of driver's driving behavior, algorithm's warning norms are determined. Based on warning norms adopting machine vision method, the cooperation collision warning algorithm(CWA) model with multi-input and multi-output is established which is used in supporting vehicle CWS. The CWA is tested using the actual data and the result shows that this algorithm can identify and carry out warning for vehicle collision efficiently, which has important meaning for improving the vehicle travel safety.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders among robotic surgeons: A questionnaire analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Robotic surgical systems offer better workplace in order to relieve surgeons from prolonged physical efforts and improve their surgical outcomes. However, robotic surgery could produce musculoskeletal disorders due to the prolonged sitting position of the operator, the fixed position of the console viewer and the movements of the limbs. Until today, no one study has been reported concerning the association between robotics and musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this work was verify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Italian robotic surgeons. Material and methods: Between July 2011 and April 2012 a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was delivered to thirty-nine Italian robotic centres. Twentytwo surgeons (56% returned the questionnaires but only seventeen questionnaires (43.5% were evaluable. Results: Seven surgeons (41.2% reported musculoskeletal disorders, by since their first use of the robot which significantly persisted during the daily surgical activity (P < 0.001. Regarding the body parts affected, musculoskeletal disorders were mainly reported in the cervical spine (29.4% and in the upper limbs (23.5%. Six surgeons (35.3% defined the robotic console as less comfortable or neither comfortable/uncomfortable with a negative influence on their surgical procedures. Conclusions: In spite of some important limitations, our data showed musculoskeletal disorders due to posture discomfort with negative impact on daily surgical activity among robotic surgeons. These aspects could be due to the lack of ergonomic seat and to the fixed position of the console viewer which could have produced an inadequate spinal posture. The evaluation of these postural factors, in particular the development of an integrated and more ergonomic chair, could further improve the comfort feeling of the surgeon at the console and probably his surgical outcomes.

  17. The Innovation Research of Financial Early-Warning Index Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The period economic fluctuation is vital for an enterprise to exist and further develop,it directly affect the enterprise financial health.So,it is significant to build up financial early-warning index and measure the warning condition that the enterprise faces and take the effective measures to eliminate. We criticize Altman's Z calculating model and build up some new indexes for enterprise financial early-warning condition measuring and making sound decision.

  18. Real-time earthquake warning for astronomical observatories

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael; Barrientos, Sergio; Claver, Chuck; Harms, Jan; Smith, Christopher; Warner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Early earthquake warning is a rapidly developing capability that has significant ramifications for many fields, including astronomical observatories. In this work, we describe the susceptibility of astronomical facilities to seismic events, including large telescopes as well as second-generation ground-based gravitational-wave interferometers. We describe the potential warning times for observatories from current seismic networks and propose locations for future seismometers to maximize warning times.

  19. Implicit Motivational Impact of Pictorial Health Warning on Cigarette Packs

    OpenAIRE

    Eliane Volchan; Isabel A David; Gisella Tavares; Nascimento, Billy M.; Oliveira, Jose M.; Sonia Gleiser; Andre Szklo; Cristina Perez; Tania Cavalcante; Mirtes G. Pereira; Leticia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The use of pictorial warning labels on cigarette packages is one of the provisions included in the first ever global health treaty by the World Health Organization against the tobacco epidemic. There is substantial evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of graphic health warning labels on intention to quit, thoughts about health risks and engaging in cessation behaviors. However, studies that address the implicit emotional drives evoked by such warnings are still underexplored. H...

  20. Nutritional information and health warnings on wine labels: Exploring consumer interest and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, A; Pomarici, E; Vecchio, R; Mariani, A

    2016-11-01

    This paper aims to contribute to the current debate on the inclusion of nutritional information and health warnings on wine labels, exploring consumers' interest and preferences. The results of a survey conducted on a sample of Italian wine consumers (N = 300) show the strong interest of respondents in the inclusion of such information on the label. Conjoint analysis reveals that consumers assign greater utility to health warnings, followed by nutritional information. Cluster analysis shows the existence of three different consumer segments. The first cluster, which included mainly female consumers (over 55) and those with high wine involvement, revealed greater awareness of the links between wine and health and better knowledge of wine nutritional properties, preferring a more detailed nutritional label, such as a panel with GDA%. By contrast, the other two clusters, consisting of individuals who generally find it more difficult to understand nutritional labels, preferred the less detailed label of a glass showing calories. The second and largest cluster comprising mainly younger men (under 44), showed the highest interest in health warnings while the third cluster - with a relatively low level of education - preferred the specification of the number of glasses not to exceed. Our results support the idea that the policy maker should consider introducing a mandatory nutritional label in the easier-to-implement and not-too-costly form of a glass with calories, rotating health warnings and the maximum number of glasses not to exceed.

  1. An Envelope Based Feedback Control System for Earthquake Early Warning: Reality Check Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, T. H.; Karakus, G.; Beck, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquake early warning systems are, in general, designed to be open loop control systems in such a way that the output, i.e., the warning messages, only depend on the input, i.e., recorded ground motions, up to the moment when the message is issued in real-time. We propose an algorithm, which is called Reality Check Algorithm (RCA), which would assess the accuracy of issued warning messages, and then feed the outcome of the assessment back into the system. Then, the system would modify its messages if necessary. That is, we are proposing to convert earthquake early warning systems into feedback control systems by integrating them with RCA. RCA works by continuously monitoring and comparing the observed ground motions' envelopes to the predicted envelopes of Virtual Seismologist (Cua 2005). Accuracy of magnitude and location (both spatial and temporal) estimations of the system are assessed separately by probabilistic classification models, which are trained by a Sparse Bayesian Learning technique called Automatic Relevance Determination prior.

  2. Initial application of the maximum likelihood earthquake location method to early warning system in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, D. H.; Seong, Y. J.; Park, J. H.; Lim, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    From the early of this year, the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) began to operate the first stage of an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) and provide early warning information to the general public. The earthquake early warning system (EEWS) in the KMA is based on the Earthquake Alarm Systems version 2 (ElarmS-2), developed at the University of California Berkeley. This method estimates the earthquake location using a simple grid search algorithm that finds the location with the minimum variance of the origin time on successively finer grids. A robust maximum likelihood earthquake location (MAXEL) method for early warning, based on the equal differential times of P arrivals, was recently developed. The MAXEL has been demonstrated to be successful in determining the event location, even when an outlier is included in the small number of P arrivals. This presentation details the application of the MAXEL to the EEWS of the KMA, its performance evaluation over seismic networks in South Korea with synthetic data, and comparison of statistics of earthquake locations based on the ElarmS-2 and the MAXEL.

  3. The Danish Fracture Database can monitor quality of fracture-related surgery, surgeons' experience level and extent of supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Jon; Gromov, Kirill; Brix, Michael

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The importance of supervision and of surgeons' level of experience in relation to patient outcome have been demonstrated in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the surgeons' experience level and the extent of supervision for: 1) fracture......-related surgery in general; 2) the three most frequent primary operations and reoperations; and 3) primary operations during and outside regular working hours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 9,767 surgical procedures were identified from the Danish Fracture Database (DFDB). Procedures were grouped based...... on the surgeons' level of experience, extent of supervision, type (primary, planned secondary or reoperation), classification (AO Müller), and whether they were performed during or outside regular hours. RESULTS: Interns and junior residents combined performed 46% of all procedures. A total of 90% of surgeries...

  4. The Danish Fracture Database can monitor quality of fracture-related surgery, surgeons' experience level and extent of supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. J.; Gromov, K.; Brix, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The importance of supervision and of surgeons' level of experience in relation to patient outcome have been demonstrated in both hip fracture and arthroplasty surgery. The aim of this study was to describe the surgeons' experience level and the extent of supervision for: 1) fracture......-related surgery in general; 2) the three most frequent primary operations and reoperations; and 3) primary operations during and outside regular working hours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 9,767 surgical procedures were identified from the Danish Fracture Database (DFDB). Procedures were grouped based...... on the surgeons' level of experience, extent of supervision, type (primary, planned secondary or reoperation), classification (AO Muller), and whether they were performed during or outside regular hours. RESULTS: Interns and junior residents combined performed 46% of all procedures. A total of 90% of surgeries...

  5. Up Close and Personal: A Statewide Collaborative's Effort to Get Individual Surgeon Quality Improvement Data to the Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cecil, William; Cofer, Joseph B; Clarke, P Chris; Guillamondegui, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    Ranking of surgeons and hospitals focuses on procedure volume and hospitality. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program provides vetted outcomes of surgical quality and therefore can direct improvement. Our statewide collaborative's analysis creates personalized surgeon data to drive quality improvement. Statewide National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data generated specific measures from 103,656 general/vascular cases and identified individual surgeon's outcome of occurrences and length of procedure. We assumed a normal distribution and called the top 2.5 per cent as exemplars and the bottom 2.5 per cent as outliers. For length of operation, a standard duration was calculated, and identified outliers as longer than the 95th percentile of the upper confidence interval/procedure. Since 2009, sharing best practice reduced statewide mortality rate by 31.5 per cent and postoperative morbidity by 33.3 per cent. For length of surgery, long outliers have more complications (urinary tract infection, organ space/surgical site infection, sepsis, septic shock, prolonged intubation, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, deep incisional infection, and wound disruption). No significant trends in surgeon performance were seen over 24 months. A statewide collaborative has resulted in substantial risk-adjusted reductions in surgical morbidity and mortality. These results of the individual surgeon demonstrate best practices are shared, a proven tool for improvement in our collaborative.

  6. Landslide risk mitigation by means of early warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Michele

    2017-04-01

    Among the many options available to mitigate landslide risk, early warning systems may be used where, in specific circumstances, the risk to life increases above tolerable levels. A coherent framework to classify and analyse landslide early warning systems (LEWS) is herein presented. Once the objectives of an early warning strategy are defined depending on the scale of analysis and the type of landslides to address, the process of designing and managing a LEWS should synergically employ technical and social skills. A classification scheme for the main components of LEWSs is proposed for weather-induced landslides. The scheme is based on a clear distinction among: i) the landslide model, i.e. a functional relationship between weather characteristics and landslide events considering the geotechnical, geomorphological and hydro-geological characterization of the area as well as an adequate monitoring strategy; ii) the warning model, i.e. the landslide model plus procedures to define the warning events and to issue the warnings; iii) the warning system, i.e. the warning model plus warning dissemination procedures, communication and education tools, strategies for community involvement and emergency plans. Each component of a LEWS is related to a number of actors involved with their deployment, operational activities and management. For instance, communication and education, community involvement and emergency plans are all significantly influenced by people's risk perception and by operational aspects system managers need to address in cooperation with scientists.

  7. A Quantitative Analysis of Variability Warnings in Linux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo, Jean; Flesborg, Elvis; Brabrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In order to get insight into challenges with quality in highly-configurable software, we analyze one of the largest open source projects, the Linux kernel, and quantify basic properties of configuration-related warnings. We automatically analyze more than 20 thousand valid and distinct random...... configurations, in a computation that lasted more than a month. We count and classify a total of 400,000 warnings to get an insight in the distribution of warning types, and the location of the warnings. We run both on a stable and unstable version of the Linux kernel. The results show that Linux contains...

  8. A Plant Damage State Early Warning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Chih Yao; Chou, Hwai Pwu [National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China)

    2014-08-15

    In case of a severe accident, operators need to follow the emergency operating procedures (EOPS) to limit the damage. In order to assist operators to face a lot of Plant Damage States (PDS) suddenly, we try to predict and identify the Plant Damage State (PDS) for early warning and decision making. In this study, Containment Event Tree (CET) is used in this event-oriented approach to help severe accident management. The Taipower Lungmen nuclear power station (LNPS), an advanced boiling water reactor, is chosen for case study. The LNPS full scope engineering simulator is used to generate the testing data for method development.

  9. Device for Monitoring - Warning Frequency Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Nhu Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Power quality was assessed by two parameters voltage and frequency, the voltage changes are of a local property, and change the frequency – systematic. Frequency deviation in the grid due to an imbalance in power between the generator and the load will affect the economic and technical indicators of power stations, as well as consumers. To ensure the stability and reliability of the electric system and generator protection to prevent damage during the operation, it is necessary and indispensable device monitoring – warning frequency generator in power stations.

  10. Aircraft Low Altitude Wind Shear Detection and Warning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter C.; Kuhn, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to substantiate the causal relationship between low altitude wind shear (LAWS) and the recent increase in low-altitude aircraft accidents. The National Research Council has found that for the period 1964 to 1982, LAWS was involved in nearly all the weather-related air carrier fatalities. However, at present, there is no acceptable method, technique, or hardware system that provides the necessary safety margins, for spatial and timely detection of LAWS from an aircraft during the critical phases of landing and takeoff. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has addressed this matter and supports the development of an airborne system for detecting hazardous LAWS with at least a one minute warning of the potential hazard to the pilot. One of the purposes of this paper is to show from some of our preliminary flight measurement research that a forward looking infrared radiometer (FLIR) system can be used to successfully detect the cool downdraft of downbursts [microbursts/macrobursts (MB)] and thunderstorm gust front outflows that are responsible for most of the LAWS events. The FLIR system provides a much greater safety margin for the pilot than that provided by reactive designs such as inertial-air speed systems that require the actual penetration of the MB before a pilot warning can be initiated. Our preliminary results indicate that an advanced airborne FLIR system could provide the pilot with remote indication of MB threat, location, movement, and predicted MB hazards along the flight path ahead of the aircraft.In a proof-of-concept experiment, we have flight tested a prototype FLIR system (nonscanning, fixed range) near and within Colorado MBs with excellent detectability. The results show that a minimum warning time of one-four minutes (5×10 km), depending on aircraft speed, is available to the pilot prior to a MB encounter. Analysis of the flight data with respect to a modified `hazard index' indicates the severe hazard

  11. Does the surgeon still have a role to play in the diagnosis and management of lymphomas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Anju

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the course of the past 40 years, there have been a significant number of changes in the way in which lymphomatous disease is diagnosed and managed. With the advent of computed tomography, there is little role for staging laparotomy and the surgeon's role may now more diagnostic than therapeutic. Aims To review all cases of lymphoma diagnosed at a single institution in order determine the current role of the surgeon in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma. Patients and methods Computerized pathology records were reviewed for a five-year period 1996 to 2000 to determine all cases of lymph node biopsy (incisional or excisional in which tissue was obtained as part of a planned procedure. Cases of incidental lymphadenopathy were thus excluded. Results A total of 297 biopsies were performed of which 62 (21% yielded lymphomas. There were 22 females and 40 males with a median age of 58 years (range: 19–84 years. The lymphomas were classified as 80% non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 18% Hodgkin's lymphoma and 2% post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Diagnosis was established by general surgeons (n = 48, ENT surgeons (n = 9, radiologists (n = 4 and ophthalmic surgeons (n = 1. The distribution of excised lymph nodes was: cervical (n = 23, inguinal (n = 15, axillary (n = 11, intra-abdominal (n = 6, submandibular (n = 2, supraclavicular (n = 2, periorbital (n = 1, parotid (n = 1 and mediastinal (n = 1. Fine needle aspiration cytology had been performed prior to biopsy in only 32 (52% cases and had suggested: lymphoma (n = 10, reactive changes (n = 13, normal (n = 5, inadequate (n = 4. The majority (78% of cervical lymph nodes were subjected to FNAC prior to biopsy whilst this was performed in only 36% of non-cervical lymphadenopathy. Conclusion The study has shown that lymphoma is a relatively common cause of surgical lymphadenopathy. Given the limitations of FNAC, all suspicious lymph nodes should be biopsied following FNAC even

  12. Pectus excavatum repair from a plastic surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabegger, Anton H

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) or similar procedures for pectus excavatum (PE) repair, nowadays no longer performed by one single speciality, may not always achieve sufficient aesthetic results, particularly in the infrapectoral or infraxiphoidal region. Reasons for this include the diaphragm inhibiting correct positioning of the bars, as well as asymmetric deformities which may still be present after remodelling attempts. Furthermore, some cases develop a mild recurrence or partial concavity once the correction bar is removed. However, any secondary re-do MIRPE procedure remains risky because of adhesions between the pleura, lung, pericardium, thoracic wall as residuals from the primary intervention. Treatment options as secondary correction for these deformities may include open access surgery, resection or reshaping of deformed costal cartilage. Moreover, augmentation of a residual concave area can be achieved by autologous transplantation of resected over-abundant cartilage, as well as by liposhifting or implantation of customized alloplastics. A physician dealing with PE corrections should be familiar with various shaping and complementary reconstructive techniques in order to provide the best options for a variety of expressions of anterior wall deformities. Among treating surgeons, there is an awareness that no single method can be applied for every kind of funnel chest deformity. An appropriate technique, either as a single approach for the ordinary deformities or in conjunction with ancillary procedures for the intricate cases, should be selected carefully based on the heterogeneity of symptoms, severity, expectations and surgical skill in addition to the available equipment. Out of a variety of such ancillary procedures available and based on experience within general plastic reconstructive surgery, some techniques for PE repair are explained and illustrated here with their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittner AC

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Pittner,1 Brian R Sullivan2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, 2Edward Hines Jr VA Hospital, Ophthalmology Section, Hines, IL, USA Purpose: Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS versus conventional phacoemulsification.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation.Results: Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each P<0.05. Mean duration for manual completion of anterior capsulotomy was shorter in the laser group (P<0.001. There were no statistically significant differences in the individual steps of nucleus removal, cortical removal, or intraocular lens placement. Surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the groups.Conclusion: In early cases, resident completion of femtosecond cataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the

  14. Projections of Demand for Cardiovascular Surgery and Supply of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jeung; Park, Nam Hee; Lee, Kun Sei; Chee, Hyun Keun; Sim, Sung Bo; Kim, Myo Jeong; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myunghwa; Park, Choon Seon

    2016-12-01

    While demand for cardiovascular surgery is expected to increase gradually along with the rapid increase in cardiovascular diseases with respect to the aging population, the supply of thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons has been continuously decreasing over the past 10 years. Consequently, this study aims to achieve guidance in establishing health care policy by analyzing the supply and demand for cardiovascular surgeries in the medical service area of Korea. After investigating the actual number of cardiovascular surgeries performed using the National Health Insurance claim data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, as well as drawing from national statistics concerning the elderly population aged 65 and over, this study estimated the number of future cardiovascular surgeries by using a cell-based model. To be able to analyze the supply and demand of surgeons, the recent status of new surgeons specializing in thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and the ratio of their subspecialties in cardiovascular surgeries were investigated. Then, while taking three different scenarios into account, the number of cardiovascular surgeons expected be working in 5-year periods was projected. The number of cardiovascular surgeries, which was recorded at 10,581 cases in 2014, is predicted to increase consistently to reach a demand of 15,501 cases in 2040-an increase of 46.5%. There was a total of 245 cardiovascular surgeons at work in 2014. Looking at 5 year spans in the future, the number of surgeons expected to be supplied in 2040 is 184, to retire is 249, and expected to be working is 309-an increase of -24.9%, 1.6%, and 26.1%, respectively compared to those in 2014. This forecasts a demand-supply imbalance in every scenario. Cardiovascular surgeons are the most central resource in the medical service of highly specialized cardiovascular surgeries, and fostering the surgeons requires much time, effort, and resources; therefore, by analyzing the various factors

  15. General characteristics of causes of urban flood damage and flood forecasting/warning system in Seoul, Korea Young-Il Moon1, 2, Jong-Suk Kim1, 2 1 Department of Civil Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743, South Korea 2 Urban Flood Research Inst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Il; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2015-04-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and climate change, the frequency of concentrated heavy rainfall has increased, causing urban floods that result in casualties and property damage. As a consequence of natural disasters that occur annually, the cost of damage in Korea is estimated to be over two billion US dollars per year. As interest in natural disasters increase, demands for a safe national territory and efficient emergency plans are on the rise. In addition to this, as a part of the measures to cope with the increase of inland flood damage, it is necessary to build a systematic city flood prevention system that uses technology to quantify flood risk as well as flood forecast based on both rivers and inland water bodies. Despite the investment and efforts to prevent landside flood damage, research and studies of landside-river combined hydro-system is at its initial stage in Korea. Therefore, the purpose of this research introduces the causes of flood damage in Seoul and shows a flood forecasting and warning system in urban streams of Seoul. This urban flood forecasting and warning system conducts prediction on flash rain or short-term rainfall by using radar and satellite information and performs prompt and accurate prediction on the inland flooded area and also supports synthetic decision-making for prevention through real-time monitoring. Although we cannot prevent damage from typhoons or localized heavy rain, we can minimize that damage with accurate and timely forecast and a prevention system. To this end, we developed a flood forecasting and warning system, so in case of an emergency there is enough time for evacuation and disaster control. Keywords: urban flooding, flood risk, inland-river system, Korea Acknowledgments This research was supported by a grant (13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program (AWMP) funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.

  16. [Physicians and surgeons during the inquisition in new Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The origins of New Spain Inquisition whose jurisdiction extended also to Philippine Islands, are related herein. Physicians and surgeons who worked as Inquisition officers are discussed, from the first Dr. Juan de la Fuente who was appointed on May 9, 1572, to Dr. Pedro del Castillo, appointed on September 24, 1644. Likewise, physicians and surgeons judged by the Holy Office are mentioned. During the XVI century, those judged were few and insignificant personages, the first was the Irish Protestant William Corniels a barber surgeon, who arrived with the John Hawkins' pirate fleet in 1568 and settled in Guatemala. Some physicians and surgeons were judged as "Judaizers" during the first half of the XVII century. Many physicians and surgeons were prosecuted in Mexico, as well as in the Philippine Islands, in the second half of the XVIII century because they were Freemasons or supporters of French Revolution ideology. Among those was the unfortunate Dr. Enrique Esteban Morel, who introduced into Mexico the method of antivariolar inoculation at the time of the great epidemic out-break of 1779. It should be a gesture of justice to build a memorial in the ancient Inquisition Palace to honor this Public Health's worthy physician.

  17. Treating Wisely: The Surgeon's Role in Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Ira L; Fabrizio, Anne; Cosgrove, Sara E; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2016-10-04

    Antibiotic resistance continues to receive national attention as a leading public health threat. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to curb the rise of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Whereas many antibiotics are prescribed appropriately to treat infections, there continue to be a large number of inappropriately prescribed antibiotics. Although much of the national attention with regards to stewardship has focused on primary care providers, there is a significant opportunity for surgeons to embrace this national imperative and improve our practices. Local quality improvement efforts suggest that antibiotic misuse for surgical disease is common. Opportunities exist as part of day-to-day surgical care as well as through surgeons' interactions with nonsurgeon colleagues and policy experts. This article discusses the scope of the antibiotic misuse in surgery for surgical patients, and provides immediate practice improvements and also advocacy efforts surgeons can take to address the threat. We believe that surgical antibiotic prescribing patterns frequently do not adhere to evidence-based practices; surgeons are in a position to mitigate their ill effects; and antibiotic stewardship should be a part of every surgeons' practice.

  18. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons. In this ......BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons......, and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  19. Oncofertility Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Canadian Breast Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Ellen; Yee, Samantha; Kennedy, Erin; Glass, Karen; Foong, Shu; Seminsky, Maureen; Quan, May Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines recommend that oncologists discuss treatment-related fertility issues with young cancer patients as early as possible after diagnosis and, if appropriate, expedite referral for fertility preservation (FP). This study sought to determine the attitudes and practices of Canadian breast surgeons regarding fertility issues, as well as barriers to and facilitators of fertility discussion and referrals. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 28 site lead surgeons (SLSs) at 28 (97 %) of 29 centers (25 % cancer centers, 64 % teaching hospitals) across Canada participating in RUBY, a pan-Canadian research program for young women with breast cancer. In addition, 56 (65 %) of 86 of their surgical colleagues (non-site lead surgeons [NSLSs]) completed an online survey of their oncofertility knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Of the 28 SLSs (43 % male, 36 % in practice knowledge, 25 % discussed fertility only if mentioned by the patient, 21 % believed fertility discussion and referral were the mandate of the medical oncologist, and 45 % did not know of an FP center in their area. More than 80 % of the NSLSs (54 % male, 30 % in practice knowledge was low among the SLSs, especially the NSLSs, and barriers to referral were identified. An oncofertility knowledge translation intervention specifically for breast surgeons is being developed to increase surgeon knowledge and awareness of oncofertility issues and referral.

  20. Exploring Surgeons' Perceptions of the Role of Simulation in Surgical Education: A Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Clark

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The last two decades have seen the adoption of simulation-based surgical education in various disciplines. The current study’s goal was to perform a needs assessment using the results to inform future curricular planning and needs of surgeons and learners. Methods: A survey was distributed to 26 surgeon educators and interviews were conducted with 8 of these surgeons.  Analysis of survey results included reliability and descriptive statistics. Interviews were analyzed for thematic content with a constant comparison technique, developing coding and categorization of themes. Results: The survey response rate was 81%. The inter-item reliability, according to Cronbach’s alpha was 0.81 with strongest agreement for statements related to learning new skills, training new residents and the positive impact on patient safety and learning.   There was less strong agreement for maintenance of skills, improving team functioning and reducing teaching in the operating room. Interview results confirmed those themes from the survey and highlighted inconsistencies for identified perceived barriers and a focus on acquisition of skills only.  Interview responses specified concerns with integrating simulation into existing curricula and the need for more evaluation as a robust educational strategy. Conclusion: The findings were summarized in four themes: 1 use of simulation, 2 integration into curriculum, 3 leadership, and 4 understanding gaps in simulation use. This study exemplifies a mixed-methods approach to planning a surgical simulation program through a general needs assessment.

  1. Early Warning System Ghana: how to successfully implement a disaster early warning system in a data scarce region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Job; Jungermann, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Ghana is a country frequently struck by natural disasters like floods and droughts. Timely warning or detection of such disasters will mitigate the negative impact on lives and property. However, local data and monitoring systems necessary to provide such a warning are hardly available. The availability and improvement of internet, mobile phones and satellites has provided new possibilities for disaster warning systems in data scarce regions such as Ghana. Our presentation describes the development of an early warning system (EWS) in Ghana completely based on satellite based open data. The EWS provides a flood or drought hazard warning on sub-catchment level and links the warning to a more detailed flood or drought risk map, to enable the disaster coordinator to send warnings or relieve more efficiently to areas that have the highest risk. This is especially relevant because some areas for which the system is implemented are very remote. The system is developed and tested to be robust and operational especially in remote areas. This means that the necessary information is also available under limited internet conditions and not dependent on local computer facilities. In many rural areas in Ghana communities rely on indigenous knowledge when it comes to flood or drought disaster forecasting. The EWS has a feature that allows indigenous knowledge indicators to be taken into account in the warning and makes easy comparison possible with the satellite based warnings.

  2. Discussion on Earthquake Forecasting and Early Warning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaodong; Jiang Haikun; Li Mingxiao

    2008-01-01

    Through analysis of natural and social attributes of earthquake forecasting,the relationship between the natural and social attributes of earthquake forecasting (early warning) has been discussed.Regarding the natural attributes of earthquake forecasting,it only attempts to forecast the magnitude,location and occurrence time of future earthquake based on the aualysis of observational data and relevant theories and taking into consideration the present understanding of seismogeny and earthquake generation.It need not consider the consequences an earthquake forecast involves,and its purpose is to check out the level of scientific understanding of earthquakes.In respect of the social aspect of earthquake forecasting,people also focus on the consequence that the forecasting involves,in addition to its natural aspect,such as the uncertainty of earthquake prediction itself,the impact of earthquake prediction,and the earthquake resistant capability of structures (buildings),lifeline works,etc.In a word,it highlights the risk of earthquake forecasting and tries to mitigate the earthquake hazard as much as possible.In this paper,the authors also discuss the scientific and social challenges faced in earthquake prediction and analyze preliminarily the meanings and content of earthquake early warning.

  3. Students' Perceptions of Trigger Warnings in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Elizabeth A; Díaz, Sebastián; Kerr, Anna M; Balbo, Jane T; Prokopakis, Kayla E; Fredricks, Todd R

    2017-07-28

    Phenomenon: Trigger warnings are verbal statements or written warnings that alert students in advance to potentially distressing material. Medical education includes numerous subjects frequently identified as triggers, such as abuse, rape, self-injurious behaviors, eating disorders, drug and alcohol addiction, and suicide. Thus, exploring medical students' perceptions of trigger warnings may provide a valuable perspective on the use of these warnings in higher education. As part of a larger descriptive, cross-sectional survey study on medical education, we assessed 1st- and 2nd-year medical students' perceptions of trigger warnings in the preclinical curriculum. Five questions specific to trigger warnings explored students' knowledge, prior experience, and perceptions of trigger warnings in medical education. Frequencies of individual question responses were calculated, and qualitative data were analyzed via content and thematic analyses. Of the 424 medical students invited to participate, 259 completed the survey (M = 24.8 years, SD + 3.4, 51.4% female, 76.1% White, 53.7% 1st-year students). Few students (11.2%) were aware of the term trigger warning and its definition. However, after being presented with a formal definition on the online survey, 38.6% reported having had a professor use one. When asked whether they supported the use of trigger warnings in medical education, respondents were distributed fairly equally by response (yes = 31.0%, maybe = 39.2%, no = 29.7%). Qualitative analysis revealed three themes: (a) Trigger Warnings Allow Students to Know What is Coming and Prepare Themselves: Respondents believed that trigger warnings would benefit students with a history of trauma by providing them additional time to prepare for the material and, if appropriate, seek professional help; (b) Students Need to Learn How to Handle Distressing Information: Respondents agreed that they needed to learn and cope with highly sensitive material because they would be

  4. Simulation-based education and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsness, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    Education in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for a surgeon to perform at an expert level in the operating room, and beyond, must address all potential cognitive and technical performance gaps, professionalism and personal behaviors, and effective team communication. Educational strategies should also seek to replicate the stressors and distractions that might occur during a high-risk operation or critical care event. Finally, education cannot remain fixed in an apprenticeship model of "See one, do one, teach one," whereby patients are exposed to the risk of harm inherent to any learning curve. The majority of these educational goals can be achieved with the addition of simulation-based education (SBE) as a valuable adjunct to traditional training methods. This article will review relevant principles of SBE, explore currently available simulation-based educational tools for pediatric surgeons, and finally make projections for the future of SBE and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

  5. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Was the real Sherlock Holmes a pediatric surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the pioneering efforts of Joseph Bell, the model for Sherlock Holmes, in the surgical care of children during the antiseptic era. I reviewed biographies of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; the biography of Joseph Bell; his surgical textbook, Edinburgh Medical Journals; and the history of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children. Dr Bell was a colleague of Joseph Lister and one of the first surgeons to apply antiseptic methods to operations involving children. He was the surgeon appointed to the first surgical ward of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children; in that role, he cared for many children with surgical diseases. Dr Joseph Bell, by his compassion for children and his surgical skill, was indeed a pioneer pediatric surgeon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  8. Sponsoring surgeons; an investigation on the influence of the da Vinci robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Cory N; Gadepalli, Samir K

    2017-08-26

    The integrity of the medical literature about robotic surgery remains unclear despite wide-spread adoption. We sought to determine if payment from Intuitive Surgical Incorporated (ISI) affected quality of the research produced by surgeons. Publicly available financial data from the CMS website regarding the top-20 earners from ISI for 2015 was gathered. Studies conducted by these surgeons were identified using PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of publications about the da Vinci(®) robot on patient outcomes. The primary outcome of our study was if the study conclusion was positive/equivocal/negative towards the robot. Secondary outcomes included authorship, sponsorship, study controls, and disclosure. The top earners received $3,296,844 in 2015, with a median of $141,959. Sub-specialties included general surgery (55%), colorectal (20%), thoracic (15%), and obstetrics/gynecology (10%). Of the 37 studies, there was 1 RCT, with observational studies comprising the rest. The majority of the studies (n = 16, 43%) had no control population, with 11 (30%) comparing to same institution/surgeon, Though ISI sponsored only 6 (16%) studies, all with positive conclusions, 27 (73%) studies had positive conclusions for robot use, 9 (24%) equivocal, and only 1 (3%) negative. Overall, 13 earners had lead authorship and 11 senior. This initial pilot study highlights a potential bias as current literature published by benefactors demonstrates low quality and highly positive conclusions towards approval of the robot. This substantiates the need for a large, systematic review of the potential influence of sponsoring surgeons on medical literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  10. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  11. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Reporting sharp injuries among Surgeons in Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamed Mortada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and rationale of the study: Although Sharps injuries are a preventable hazard faced by medical personnel in the operating room yet it continues to be one of the hidden problems among HCP. The potential consequence of such injuries includes transmission of blood-borne pathogens with detrimental effects. Despite the advances in technology and increased awareness of medical staff, annually around 600 thousand to one million workers are affected thus considered as one of the most serious threats facing health care workers specially surgeon.Methodology: a cross sectional study of Zagazig University Hospitals surgical departments. Using a sample composed of 287 surgeons randomly chosen from different surgical departments. A questionnaire assessed in addition to personal and professional characteristics, the history of sharp injuries, types of instrument causing the injury, their post exposure prophylaxis including reporting. The results: There were total 287 surgeons participated in this study. (47% of the respondent surgeons had been exposed to at least one episode of sharp injury in the preceding 3 months and most of the exposures (68% occurred in the operation room. The injury was mainly caused during suturing (83%. The commonest devices, accused in most of the injuries were suturing needle and scalpel (74 and 59%. The majority of the surgeons (62% didn’t report the SI and it was largely explained by the majority of the sampled respondents (89% were not aware of the reporting system existing in their hospital.Conclusions: The most common reason of underreporting  in our study was the lack of awareness that all injuries must be reported.Recommendations: The observed high level of under reporting reflects the need for education on prevention. Our results can guide in planning an education program for the surgeons to increase awareness about dangers of sharp injuries and help improve the reporting strategy  and other potential

  13. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  14. Patient-specific hip prostheses designed by surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coigny Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient-specific bone and joint replacement implants lead to better functional and aesthetic results than conventional methods [1], [2], [3]. But extracting 3D shape information from CT Data and designing individual implants is demanding and requires multiple surgeon-to-engineer interactions. For manufacturing purposes, Additive Manufacturing offers various advantages, especially for low volume manufacturing parts, such as patient specific implants. To ease these new approaches and to avoid surgeon-to-engineer interactions a new design software approach is needed which offers highly automated and user friendly planning steps.

  15. Update in achalasia: what the surgeon needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Peter W; Holloway, Richard H; Crosthwaite, Gary; Devitt, Peter G; Thompson, Sarah K

    2016-07-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder encountered by surgeons during the investigation and treatment of dysphagia. Recent advances in manometry technology, a widely accepted new classification system and a new treatment rapidly gaining international acceptance, have changed the working knowledge required to successfully manage patients with achalasia. We review the Chicago classification subtypes of achalasia with type II achalasia being a predictor of success and type III achalasia a predictor of treatment failure. We review per-oral endoscopic myotomy as an emerging treatment option and its potential for improving the treatment of type III achalasia. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. The Role of the Orthopaedic Surgeon in Workers' Compensation Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Kuris, Eren O; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Workers' compensation is an employer-funded insurance program that provides financial and medical benefits for employees injured at work. Because many occupational injuries are musculoskeletal in nature, the orthopaedic surgeon plays an important role in the workers' compensation system. Along with establishing the correct diagnosis and implementing an appropriate treatment plan, the clinician must understand the fundamental components of the workers' compensation system to manage an injured employee. Ultimately, effective claim management requires collaboration among the employer, the employee, the legal representatives, the insurance company, and the orthopaedic surgeon.

  17. Surgeon-Directed Cost Variation in Isolated Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, E Bailey; Cannamela, Peter C; Johnson, Jared S; Saad, Charles D; Barnes, John; Silbernagel, Janette; Faciszewski, Thomas; Shea, Kevin G

    2016-12-01

    As value becomes a larger component of heath care decision making, cost data can be evaluated for regional and physician variation. Value is determined by outcome divided by cost, and reducing cost increases value for patients. "Third-party spend" items are individual selections by surgeons used to perform procedures. Cost data for third-party spend items provide surgeons and hospitals with important information regarding care value, potential cost-saving opportunities, and the total cost of ownership of specific clinical decisions. To perform a cost review of isolated rotator cuff repair within a regional 7-hospital system and to document procedure cost variation among operating surgeons. Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes were used to retrospectively identify subjects who received an isolated rotator cuff repair within a 7-hospital system. Cost data were collected for clinically sensitive third-party spend items and divided into 4 cost groups: (1) suture anchors, (2) suture-passing devices and needles, (3) sutures used for cuff repair, and (4) disposable tools or instruments. A total of 62 isolated rotator cuff repairs were performed by 17 surgeons over a 13-month period. The total cost per case for clinically sensitive third-party spend items (in 2015 US dollars) ranged from $293 to $3752 (mean, $1826). Four surgeons had a mean procedure cost that was higher than the data set mean procedure cost. The cost of an individual suture anchor ranged from $75 to $1775 (mean, $403). One disposable suture passer was used, which cost $140. The cost of passing needles ranged from $140 to $995 (mean, $468). The cost per repair suture (used to repair cuff tears) varied from $18 to $298 (mean, $61). The mean suture (used to close wounds) cost per case was $81 (range, $0-$454). A total of 316 tools or disposable instruments were used, costing $1 to $1573 per case (mean, $624). This study demonstrates significant cost

  18. Warning labels formulated as questions positively influence smoking-related risk perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glock, S.; Müller, B.C.N.; Ritter, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Research on warning labels printed on cigarette packages has shown that fear inducing health warnings might provoke defensive responses. This study investigated whether reformulating statements into questions could avoid defensive reactions. Smokers were presented with either warning labels formulat

  19. 33 CFR 143.15 - Lights and warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights and warning devices. 143... devices. (a) OCS facilities must meet the lights and warning devices requirements under part 67 of this... devices requirements under the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 or...

  20. Multimodal warnings to enhance risk communication and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, E.C.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal warnings incorporate audio and/or skin-based (tactile) cues to supplement or replace visual cues in environments where the user’s visual perception is busy, impaired, or nonexistent. This paper describes characteristics of audio, tactile, and multimodal warning displays and their role in

  1. 30 CFR 77.410 - Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.410 Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices. (a) Mobile equipment such as front-end loaders, forklifts, tractors, graders, and trucks,...

  2. 75 FR 69523 - Required Warnings for Cigarette Packages and Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... descriptive printed matter a brief statement of, among other things, the relevant warnings. Moreover, a.... Specifically, the new required warnings are designed to clearly and effectively convey the negative health... at p. 89; see also Ref. 19 at p. 158). Research has shown that some adolescents report symptoms of...

  3. 49 CFR 218.73 - Warning signal display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... signal display. (a) Warning signals, i.e., a white disk with the words “Occupied Camp Car” in black.... Once the signals have been displayed— (1) The camp cars may not be moved for coupling to other rolling...) Warning signals indicating the presence of occupied camp cars, displayed in accordance with §§ 218.75 and...

  4. The investigation of early warning signs of aggression in forensic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof Berno van Meijel; Mirjan van Leeuwen; Mieke Grypdonck; Frans Fluttert; Bjørkly Stal

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. The Forensic Early Warning Signs of Aggression Inventory (FESAI) was developed to assist nurses and patients in identifying early warning signs and constructing individual early detection plans (EDP) for the prevention of aggressive incidents. The aims of this research were as f

  5. Tactical Checkpoint: Hail/Warn Suppress/Stop (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    distractor , optical suppression , human behavior, checkpoint, ambient light, driver suppression , human experimentation, light, paintball, obscuration...HAIL/WARN AND - SUPPRESS /STOP Poster Presented at the 2010 Directed Energies Professional Society Meeting, 15-19 November 2010. 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...warning to a driver that is approaching a checkpoint. The laser, MCNC light, and the windshield obscuration were evaluated for their suppression

  6. 46 CFR 98.30-33 - Warning signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Warning signals. 98.30-33 Section 98.30-33 Shipping... Warning signals. (a) If the vessel is moored, no person may transfer to or from a portable tank a product... a red flag. (c) The signal required in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section must be visible on all...

  7. 49 CFR 393.19 - Hazard warning signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazard warning signals. 393.19 Section 393.19... signals. The hazard warning signal operating unit on each commercial motor vehicle shall operate independently of the ignition or equivalent switch, and when activated, cause all turn signals required by § 393...

  8. Warning signs prior to aggressive behavior in child psychiatric units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faay, M.D.M.; Valenkamp, M.W.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims at detecting and categorizing early warning signs of aggressive behavior in child psychiatric units. We analyzed 575 violent incident report forms and developed a coding scheme consisting of 16 warning signs. From the 575 incident report forms, a total of 1087 signs were coded. Most

  9. The Effect of Cancer Warning Statements on Alcohol Consumption Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Jongenelis, Michelle I.; Glance, David; Chikritzhs, Tanya; Pratt, Iain S.; Slevin, Terry; Liang, Wenbin; Wakefield, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In response to increasing calls to introduce warning labels on alcoholic beverages, this study investigated the potential effectiveness of alcohol warning statements designed to increase awareness of the alcohol-cancer link. A national online survey was administered to a diverse sample of Australian adult drinkers (n = 1,680). Along with…

  10. Perceptions and Expected Immediate Reactions to Tornado Warning Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, M. K.; Huang, S. K.; Wei, H. L.; Samuelson, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    To provide people with more specific information about tornado threats, the National Weather Service has replaced its county-wide warnings with smaller warning polygons that more specifically indicate the risk area. However, tornado warning polygons do not have a standardized definition regarding tornado strike probabilities (ps) so it is unclear how warning recipients interpret them. To better understand this issue, 155 participants responded to 15 hypothetical warning polygons. After viewing each polygon, they rated the likelihood of a tornado striking their location and the likelihood that they would take nine different response actions ranging from continuing normal activities to getting in a car and driving somewhere safer. The results showed participants inferred that the ps was highest at the polygon's centroid, lower just inside the edges of the polygon, still lower (but not zero) just outside the edges of the polygon, and lowest in locations beyond that. Moreover, higher ps values were associated with lower expectations of continuing normal activities and higher expectations of seeking information from social sources (but not environmental cues) and higher expectations of seeking shelter (but not evacuating in their cars). These results indicate that most people make some errors in their ps judgments but are likely to respond appropriately to the ps they infer from the warning polygons. Overall, the findings from this study and other research can help meteorologists to better understand how people interpret the uncertainty associated with warning polygons and, thus, improve tornado warning systems.

  11. Silent Warning: Understanding the National Terrorism Advisory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    examination of a terrorism warning system must qualitatively accommodate the complex warning community, determine the level of decision advantage it...costs incurred by state and local governments—and the potential economic losses from reductions in consumer confidence, travel, and tourism —only makes

  12. Surgeon`s adherence to guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Shing Ng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSurgical site infections are the most common nosocomial infection among surgical patients. Patients who experience surgical site infections are associated with prolonged hospital stay, rehospitalisation, increased morbidity and mortality, and costs. Consequently, surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (SAP, which is a very brief course of antibiotic given just before the surgery, has been introduced to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. The efficacy of SAP depends on several factors, including selection of appropriate antibiotic, timing of administration, dosage, duration of prophylaxis and route of administration. In many institutions around the globe, evidence-based guidelines have been developed to advance the proper use of SAP. This paper aims to review the studies on surgeons’ adherence to SAP guidelines and factors influencing their adherence. A wide variation of overall compliance towards SAP guidelines was noted, ranging from 0% to 71.9%. The misuses of prophylactic antibiotics are commonly seen, particularly inappropriate choice and prolonged duration of administration. Lack of awareness of the available SAP guidelines, influence of initial training, personal preference and influence from colleagues were among the factors which hindered the surgeons’ adherence to SAP guidelines. Immediate actions are needed to improve the adherence rate as inappropriate use of SAP can lead to the emergence of a strain of resistant bacteria resulting in a number of costs to the healthcare system. Corrective measures to improve SAP adherence include development of guidelines, education and effective dissemination of guidelines to targeted surgeons and routine audit of antibiotic utilisation by a dedicated infection control team.

  13. [Chronic surplus of Japanese cardiac surgeon--ideal nurse practitioner for cardiac surgery, cardiac surgeon's attitude toward the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Hirohisa

    2014-03-01

    It is chronically surplus of doctors in the world of cardiac surgery. There are too many cardiac surgeons because cardiac surgery requires a large amount of manpower resources to provide adequate medical services. Many Japanese cardiac surgeons do not have enough opportunity to perform cardiac surgery operations, and many Japanese cardiac surgery residents do not have enough opportunity to learn cardiac surgery operations. There are physician assistants and nurse practitioners in the US. Because they provide a part of medical care to cardiac surgery patients, American cardiac surgeons can focus more energy on operative procedures. Introduction of cardiac surgery specialized nurse practitioner is essential to deliver a high quality medical service as well as to solve chronic problems that Japanese cardiac surgery has had for a long time.

  14. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arattano, Massimo; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2008-04-04

    Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows), their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and nonstructural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall) and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche pendulums, photocells

  15. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Marchi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows, their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and nonstructural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche

  16. Speak Simply When Warning About After Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, A. J.; Hardebeck, J.; Page, M. T.; van der Elst, N.; Wein, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    When a fault in the ground slips, the ground moves fast and can shake hard. After a big ground shake, there are more shakes. We call them after shocks and these can happen over a long time, for many years. An after shock can shake the ground more than it shook the first time. These shocks can shake and break places where people live and work, make rocks fall down and the ground go soft and wet, and hurt or kill people. After shocks also make people worry. If people are scared, then they may leave the area and not come back. To help people be safe and feel calm we want to tell them what may happen. We often use big words and lots of numbers to give the chances for the number of shakes over days, weeks, and years. That helps some people fix things and do their jobs such as those who work on roads, power, water, phones, hospitals, schools or in the money business. But big words and too many numbers can confuse a lot of people and make them worry more. Studies of talking about the ground shake problem show that it is best to speak simply to people. What if we only use the ten hundred most often used words to talk about these ground shakes. Would that work? Here is a possible warning: Last week's huge ground shake will probably make more ground shakes. This week expect to feel three to ten ground shakes and maybe one big ground shake that could break things. That big ground shake has a chance of 1 in 10. This is normal. Be safe. Stay out of broken houses, shops, and work places. When you feel the ground shake: drop, cover, and hold on. People may feel afraid or be hurt, so check on friends and family. Get some more food and water. Over time there will be fewer ground shakes, but always be ready for them. That warning gives a lot of key ideas: what may happen, whether houses could get broken, that what is happening is normal, and what people may feel and should do. These are the key parts of a good warning. Maybe we should use the most often used words all the time.

  17. An Early Warning System for Asteroid Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonry, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Earth is bombarded by meteors, occasionally by one large enough to cause a significant explosion and possible loss of life. It is not possible to detect all hazardous asteroids, and the efforts to detect them years before they strike are only advancing slowly. Similarly, ideas for mitigation of the danger from an impact by moving the asteroid are in their infancy. Although the odds of a deadly asteroid strike in the next century are low, the most likely impact is by a relatively small asteroid, and we suggest that the best mitigation strategy in the near term is simply to move people out of the way. With enough warning, a small asteroid impact should not cause loss of life, and even portable property might be preserved. We describe an early warning system that could provide a week’s notice of most sizeable asteroids or comets on track to hit the Earth. This may be all the mitigation needed or desired for small asteroids, and it can be implemented immediately for relatively low cost. This system, dubbed Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System (ATLAS), comprises two observatories separated by about 100 km that simultaneously scan the visible sky twice a night. Software automatically registers a comparison with the unchanging sky and identifies everything that has moved or changed. Communications between the observatories lock down the orbits of anything approaching the Earth, within one night if its arrival is less than a week. The sensitivity of the system permits detection of 140 m asteroids (100 Mton impact energy) three weeks before impact and 50 m asteroids a week before arrival. An ATLAS alarm, augmented by other observations, should result in a determination of impact location and time that is accurate to a few kilometers and a few seconds. In addition to detecting and warning of approaching asteroids, ATLAS will continuously monitor the changing universe around us: most of the variable stars in our Galaxy, many microlensing events from stellar

  18. Isolated specialist or system integrated physician – different views on sickness certification among orthopaedic surgeons: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swartling Malin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sickness certification is a frequent and sometimes problematic task for orthopaedic surgeons. Our aim was to explore how orthopaedic surgeons view their sick-listing commission and sick-listing practice. Methods Semi-structured interviews with seventeen orthopaedic surgeons from five orthopaedic clinics in four Swedish counties. The focus was on the experiences of these physicians in relation to handling of sickness certification. Phenomenographic analysis was performed to reveal differences in existing views. Results The orthopaedic surgeons' views on sick-listing seemed mainly to be a consequence of how they perceived their role in the healthcare system. Three categories were found: The "isolated specialists", whose work and responsibilities were confined to the orthopaedic clinic, and did not really include sickness certification; the "orthopaedic advisers", who saw themselves mainly as advice-givers in the general health care system and perceived sickness certification as part of their job; the "system-integrated physicians", who perceived the orthopaedic clinic as one part of the healthcare system and whose ultimate goal was to get the patient well functioning in her life again with regained work ability, seeing sick-listing as one of the instruments to achieve this. Some informants described difficulties in handling conflicting opinions with patients in relation to the need for sick-leave. Conclusion Orthopaedic surgeons certify a large proportion of total sickness benefits. Some orthopaedic surgeons may certify sickness benefits sub-optimally for patients and society due to a narrow view of their role in the health care system or due to poor skills in handling discordant opinions with the patient. This problem can be addressed at the level of the individual physician and at the system level.

  19. Surgeon's view of the skull base from the lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, R A

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents the surgical anatomy of the skull base and infratemporal fossa. The information has been derived from the author's own experience in surgical and cadaver dissection, standard anatomical references, and selected experience of other skull base surgeons. Because the lateral approach has become the utilitarian method of exposure, the intricate detailed anatomy is demonstrated from this view at five levels of dissection, so the surgeon may gain a practical understanding of the surgical relationship of critical structures. Consistent anatomical landmarks can be used by the surgeon in the location of these critical structures. The styloid process, sphenoidal spine, and middle meningeal artery identify the internal carotid artery as it enters the carotid canal. The bony or fibrous septum that divides the jugular foramen into neural and vascular compartments may be used to better identify nerves IX, X, and XI. The zygomatic root is useful for location of the middle fossa dura. The lateral pterygoid plate leads directly to the foramen ovale. The increased precision of dissection permitted by use of the microscope requires an increased level of knowledge of anatomical structures in this area. It is hoped that the information presented in this paper will assist surgeons in the meticulous and thorough removal of skull base tumors and in the preservation of neural and vascular structures that are presently being sacrificed.

  20. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...

  1. [Collaboration between geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons on elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Else Marie; Borris, Lars; Duus, Benn; van der Mark, Susanne

    2013-10-07

    Close collaboration between geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons on elderly patients with hip fractures reduces mortality, the number of complications, and the length of hospital stay and increases the functional abilities of the patients. In some Danish hospitals the two groups of doctors work closely together, in others there are few or no geriatricians.

  2. Clubfoot: An Orthopaedic Surgeon Describes Clubfoot and Current Treatment Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael

    2007-01-01

    As an orthopaedic surgeon who has treated numerous cases of clubfoot in his career, the author knows that it takes exceptional parents to deal with the challenges of having a child born with a clubfoot. However, it should be noted that a clubfoot diagnosis does not mean a life of pain, deformity, and disability for a child. Today's treatment…

  3. Optimal Brain Surgeon on Artificial Neural Networks in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Job, Jonas Hultmann; Klyver, Katrine;

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how the procedure know as optimal brain surgeon can be used to trim and optimize artificial neural networks in nonlinear structural dynamics. Beside optimizing the neural network, and thereby minimizing computational cost in simulation, the surgery procedure can also serve as a quick...

  4. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Ultrasound has a well-established role in the diagnostic assessment of acute abdominal pain where some ultrasonically easily-accessible organs account for several diagnostic possibilities. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether surgeons without ultrasound experience could...

  5. HIV-positive status among surgeons - an ethical dilemma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-11

    Aug 11, 2006 ... HIV I AIDS is a manageable disease with a reasonable expectation that affected ... the potential risk of an HIV-positive surgeon transmitting .... much-publicised Florida (USA) dentist transmitting HIV to a patient,? There has ...

  6. Designing Wearable Personal Assistants for Surgeons: An Egocentric Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    it in the design of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons. The result is a Google Glass-based prototype system aimed at facilitating touchless interaction with x-ray images, browsing of electronic patient records (EPR) when on the move, and synchronized ad hoc remote collaboration...

  7. Cutting around corners: Endo-Periscope increases surgeon's scope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kasteren, J.

    2001-01-01

    Many surgeons find it difficult to perform laparoscopies, operations performed inside the abdominal cavity without opening the abdominal wall. These keyhole operations are particularly taxing due to a lack of depth perception and impaired hand-eye coordination. Consequently, the method has been used

  8. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS MARKERS IN SURGEONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Subjects: One hundred and sixty seven surgeons(study group)and l93 ... Nigeria. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence ... MATERIALS AND METHODS ..... C.J. Immune status in preschool children born after mass hepatitis B.

  9. Body Dysmorphia, the Plastic Surgeon, and the Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Domeena C.

    2003-01-01

    Misperceived ugliness is called body dysmorphia or dysmorphophobia, often only diagnosed after several discontented return visits to a plastic surgeon who refers the patient for counseling--rarely welcome referrals by the patient when they are convinced the problem is physical and not psychological. Careful listening and patient acceptance are…

  10. Research and implement of remote vehicle monitoring and early-warning system based on GPS/GPRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiwu; Tian, Jingjing; Yang, Zhifa; Qiao, Feiyan

    2013-03-01

    Concerning the problem of road traffic safety, remote monitoring and early-warning of vehicle states was the key to prevent road traffic accidents and improve the transportation effectiveness. Through the embedded development technology, a remote vehicle monitoring and early-warning system was developed based on UNO2170 industrial computer of Advantech with WinCE operating system using Embedded Visual C++ (EVC), which combined with multisensor data acquisition technology, global positioning system (GPS) and general packet radio service (GPRS). It achieved the remote monitoring and early-warning of commercial vehicle. This system was installed in a CA1046L2 light truck. Through many road tests, test results showed that the system reacted rapidly for abnormal vehicle states and had stable performance.

  11. Operators in Yemen draw warning from Saudis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-04

    This paper reports that foreign oil companies with concessions in northern Yemen have been drawn into a border dispute between Yemen and Saudi Arabia. At least six companies received letters from the Saudi government warning them that steps, as yet undefined, will be taken if exploration extends into disputed areas. A second territorial dispute also appears to be brewing in the region. Iran has ejected United Arab Emirates nationals from the island of Abu Musa in the Persian Gulf, which is jointly administered by Iran and Sharjah, one of the emirates. The U.A.E. government has reported the situation to the Gulf Cooperation Council, triggering a denial from Iran that anyone has been deported from the island.

  12. Tsunami Modeling, Forecast and Warning (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, K.

    2010-12-01

    Tsunami is an infrequent natural hazard; however, once it happens, the effects are devastating and can be on global scale, as demonstrated by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Deterministic modeling of tsunami generation, propagation and coastal behavior has become popular, at least for earthquake tsunamis. Once the earthquake parameters are specified, tsunami arrival times, heights and current velocity at specific coastal points, and inland inundation area can be estimated. Such modeling has been used to make hazard maps usually by assuming largest possible earthquakes. However, smaller tsunamis than such a worst-case scenario occur more frequently. If the hazard maps are used incorrectly, it may lose reliability of coastal residents. Probabilistic tsunami hazard assessments, similar to Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis, have been made for some coasts. The output is tsunami hazard curves, i.e. annual probability (or return period) for specified coastal tsunami heights. A hazard curve is obtained by integration over the aleatory uncertainties, and a large number of hazard curves are made for each branch of logic tress representing epistemic uncertainty. Probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis is used for design of critical facilities but not popularly used for disaster mitigation. Tsunami warning systems, which have been significantly developed since 2004, rely on seismic and sea-level monitoring and pre-made numerical simulation. Real-time data assimilation of offshore sea level measurements can be used to update the warning levels. Tsunami from the February 2010 Chilean earthquake was recorded on many tide gauges and ocean bottom pressure gauges in the Pacific, before it arrived on the Japanese coast about 22 hours after the earthquake. The tsunami height was up to 2 m on the Japanese coast, causing fishery damage amounting 60 million US dollars, but did not cause any human damage.

  13. Dual antiplatelet therapy use by Canadian cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Bobby; Ruel, Marc; Bonneau, Christopher; Lee, Myunghyun M; Chung, Jennifer; Al Shouli, Sadek; Fagan, Andrew; Al Khalifa, Abdulwahab; White, Christopher W; Yamashita, Michael H; Currie, Maria E; Teoh, Hwee; Mewhort, Holly E M; Verma, Subodh

    2015-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone treatment for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Recent Canadian Guidelines recommend the use of dual antiplatelet therapy for 1 year after coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but considerable variability remains. We performed a survey of 75 Canadian cardiac surgeons to assess the use of dual antiplatelet therapy. Whereas 58.6% of respondents indicated that the benefits of dual antiplatelet therapy were seen irrespective of how patients were managed after acute coronary syndrome, 36.2% believed that the benefits of dual antiplatelet therapy were limited to those treated medically or percutaneously. In regard to the timing of dual antiplatelet therapy administration, 57% of respondents indicated that dual antiplatelet therapy should be given upstream in the emergency department, whereas 36.2% responded that dual antiplatelet therapy should be given only once the coronary anatomy has been defined. The majority surveyed (81%) weighed bleeding risk as being more important than ischemic risk reduction. In stable patients after acute coronary syndrome, the majority of surgeons would wait approximately 4 days after the last dose of P2Y12 antagonist before coronary artery bypass grafting. Only 44.6% indicated that they routinely use dual antiplatelet therapy postrevascularization in the setting of acute coronary syndrome. Rather, most surgeons use dual antiplatelet therapy for select patients, such as those with a stented vessel without a bypass graft, endarterectomy, or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Cardiac surgeons exhibit variation in their attitudes and practice patterns toward dual antiplatelet therapy after coronary artery bypass grafting, and in approximately half of cases, their practice does not adhere to current guideline recommendations. New trials focusing on coronary artery bypass grafting cases in their primary analysis and educational initiatives for surgeons

  14. Improving surgeon utilization in an orthopedic department using simulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simwita YW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusta W Simwita, Berit I Helgheim Department of Logistics, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Purpose: Worldwide more than two billion people lack appropriate access to surgical services due to mismatch between existing human resource and patient demands. Improving utilization of existing workforce capacity can reduce the existing gap between surgical demand and available workforce capacity. In this paper, the authors use discrete event simulation to explore the care process at an orthopedic department. Our main focus is improving utilization of surgeons while minimizing patient wait time.Methods: The authors collaborated with orthopedic department personnel to map the current operations of orthopedic care process in order to identify factors that influence poor surgeons utilization and high patient waiting time. The authors used an observational approach to collect data. The developed model was validated by comparing the simulation output with the actual patient data that were collected from the studied orthopedic care process. The authors developed a proposal scenario to show how to improve surgeon utilization.Results: The simulation results showed that if ancillary services could be performed before the start of clinic examination services, the orthopedic care process could be highly improved. That is, improved surgeon utilization and reduced patient waiting time. Simulation results demonstrate that with improved surgeon utilizations, up to 55% increase of future demand can be accommodated without patients reaching current waiting time at this clinic, thus, improving patient access to health care services.Conclusion: This study shows how simulation modeling can be used to improve health care processes. This study was limited to a single care process; however the findings can be applied to improve other orthopedic care process with similar operational characteristics. Keywords: waiting time, patient, health care process

  15. Orthopaedics and the Physician Payments Sunshine Act: An Examination of Payments to U.S. Orthopaedic Surgeons in the Open Payments Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Sravisht; Derman, Peter; Sandhu, Harvinder S

    2016-03-02

    The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently released the Open Payments database (OPD) detailing payments from industry to physicians and teaching hospitals. We seek here to provide an overview of the data with a focus on the orthopaedic community. We analyzed payments in the OPD from August 1 to December 31, 2013. The OPD consists of three individual databases: General Payments, Research Payments, and Ownership. Physician identification number, physician specialty, payment type, and payment value were collected. Physicians assigned to multiple specialties were excluded. Comparisons were made between orthopaedic surgeons and the remainder of the top fifteen specialties by payment value. In all, 2,697,015 payments with physicians were recorded; 491,223 of these payments (18.2%) were made to physicians with multiple listed specialties and were excluded. Excluding these potentially misattributed payments did not have a significant impact on the trends identified, and $394.5 million in payments remained. Orthopaedic surgeons represented 3.4% of payments but 25.6% of value, and 13,347 orthopaedic surgeons (68.9% of all active orthopaedic surgeons) were listed in the OPD. Payments over $10,000 represented only 1.6% of payments to orthopaedic surgeons but 75.5% of value. The majority of these payments (56.1%) were royalties. The median payment value for orthopaedic surgeons listed in the OPD was $38.11, with two payments per surgeon; the median aggregated value was $132.56 per surgeon. Orthopaedic surgeons listed in the OPD were more likely to receive payments for travel compared with all other specialties (p orthopaedic surgeons and industry are highly prevalent. A small subset of orthopaedic surgeons received large royalties, which accounted for a majority of the transactional value provided by industry. Orthopaedic surgeons were the recipients of more payments for travel and for royalties than all other specialties except neurological surgery

  16. Decisions of psychiatric nurses about duty to warn, compulsory hospitalization, and competence of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehiralti, Mine; Er, Rahime A

    2013-02-01

    Nurses who attend patients with psychiatric disorders often encounter ethical dilemmas and experience difficulties in making the right decision. The present study aimed to evaluate the decisions of psychiatric nurses regarding their duty to warn third parties about the dangerousness of the patient, the need for compulsory hospitalization, and the competence of patients. In total, 111 nurses working in the field of psychiatry in Turkey completed a questionnaire form consisting of 33 questions. The nurses generally assessed the decision-making competency of the patient correctly. However, their decisions regarding whether the patient should be compulsorily hospitalized and their understanding of their duty to warn/protect were less consistent. A significant relationship was found between the decisions of the psychiatric nurses and their work experience, them having children, and them having postgraduate education in psychiatric nursing. The nurses stated their desire to be part of the team that decided on ethical problems in psychiatry.

  17. How did the surgeons treat neonates with imperforate anus in the eighteenth century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesildag, Ebru; Muñiz, Rubén Martínez; Buyukunal, S N Cenk

    2010-12-01

    Anorectal malformations (ARMS) are one of those challenging topics of pediatric surgery. The developments in assessing and approaching patients with these anomalies have been made in the last decades and the methods described in older textbooks functioned as a guide in planning these attempts (Kiely and Peña in Pediatric surgery, Mosby, Missouri, pp 1425-1449, 1998; Grosfeld in Anorectal malformations in children, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp 3-15, 2006). The aim of this study is to present the attitude of a surgeon of eighteenth century to the treatment of anorectal malformations, and the evolution in the history of the anomaly. The part about imperforate anus in a textbook of surgery, found in a second-hand bookstore, was translated. The description and the classification of the anomaly, the methods of approaching these cases together with some case reports were presented and compared with today's practice. The historical background of the anomaly was evaluated not only with regard to the book of Heister specifically but also to the other data obtained in the literature. The anomaly was reported to be "not rarely" observed. The obstetricians were warned to examine a newborn baby completely for early diagnosis. The classification of the anomaly was made according to the properties of the membrane covering the anus but prompt treatment, initiating with its simple excision, was suggested in all types. Better results in cases whose anus was covered with a thin, delicate membrane were reported. The results show that routine neonatal examination for all babies was recommended in this Textbook of Surgery which had been published 260 years ago. The physical deterioration due to delay was well described. A broad classification of imperforate anus was made and successful outcome in low-type anomalies of today was reported with some case samples. It is clear that all the efforts starting from Soranus until today improved the understanding of the anomaly. Combining previous

  18. [Surgeons-anesthetists relations: From an individual responsibility of the surgeon to a shared responsibility with the anesthetist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip; Slim, Karem; Soulier, Laure; Theissen, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Throughout the perioperative period, anesthetists and surgeons jointly provide care for patients. The advances in medicine and surgery, the practice of perioperative quality medicine and the recent application of enhanced recovery program after surgery have necessitated strengthening the place of each in its area of expertise while developing the spirit team and communication. Thus, alongside the surgeon who was once considered the head of the surgical team, the anesthetist's role has been to consolidate for the management of the surgical patient and had his spot empower themselves in the eye of the patient with the birth an own contract with the patient (due in particular to the obligation to preanesthetic consultation by the decree of December 5, 1994). This has led to a new division of responsibility between these actors: jurisprudence has abandoned the exclusive responsibility of the surgeon, devoted own responsibility of the anesthetist with a division (if any) of responsibility between the anesthetist and the surgeon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Early warning, warning or alarm systems for natural hazards? A generic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sättele, Martina; Bründl, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Early warning, warning and alarm systems have gained popularity in recent years as cost-efficient measures for dangerous natural hazard processes such as floods, storms, rock and snow avalanches, debris flows, rock and ice falls, landslides, flash floods, glacier lake outburst floods, forest fires and even earthquakes. These systems can generate information before an event causes loss of property and life. In this way, they mainly mitigate the overall risk by reducing the presence probability of endangered objects. These systems are typically prototypes tailored to specific project needs. Despite their importance there is no recognised system classification. This contribution classifies warning and alarm systems into three classes: i) threshold systems, ii) expert systems and iii) model-based expert systems. The result is a generic classification, which takes the characteristics of the natural hazard process itself and the related monitoring possibilities into account. The choice of the monitoring parameters directly determines the system's lead time. The classification of 52 active systems moreover revealed typical system characteristics for each system class. i) Threshold systems monitor dynamic process parameters of ongoing events (e.g. water level of a debris flow) and incorporate minor lead times. They have a local geographical coverage and a predefined threshold determines if an alarm is automatically activated to warn endangered objects, authorities and system operators. ii) Expert systems monitor direct changes in the variable disposition (e.g crack opening before a rock avalanche) or trigger events (e.g. heavy rain) at a local scale before the main event starts and thus offer extended lead times. The final alarm decision incorporates human, model and organisational related factors. iii) Model-based expert systems monitor indirect changes in the variable disposition (e.g. snow temperature, height or solar radiation that influence the occurrence probability

  20. [Study on early-warning of Chinese materia medica price base on ARMA model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng; Mao, Yang-Dui

    2014-05-01

    This study sets up an early-warning system framework of Chinese materia medica price, using price index as early warning indicator to establish black early-warning model, with indicator of price index volatility and limit line of "price principal". The research divides warning degree into 5 parts named negative heavy warning, negative light warning, no warning, positive light warning and positive heavy warning, with 5 corresponding lights to describe the change level of the medicine price. Then make an early-warning empirical research based on Chengdu Chinese materia medica price index from December in 2010 to October in 2013. ARMA model is applied to forecast index and the result of early-warning is analyzed, and finally farmer households, companies, customers and the government are recommended respectively.

  1. Predictors for the Number of Warning Information Sources During Tornadoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Zhen; Luo, Jianjun; Liang, Daan; Nejat, Ali

    2017-04-01

    People may receive tornado warnings from multiple information sources, but little is known about factors that affect the number of warning information sources (WISs). This study examined predictors for the number of WISs with a telephone survey on randomly sampled residents in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and Joplin, Missouri, approximately 1 year after both cities were struck by violent tornadoes (EF4 and EF5) in 2011. The survey included 1006 finished interviews and the working sample included 903 respondents. Poisson regression and Zero-Inflated Poisson regression showed that older age and having an emergency plan predicted more WISs in both cities. Education, marital status, and gender affected the possibilities of receiving warnings and the number of WISs either in Joplin or in Tuscaloosa. The findings suggest that social disparity affects the access to warnings not only with respect to the likelihood of receiving any warnings but also with respect to the number of WISs. In addition, historical and social contexts are important for examining predictors for the number of WISs. We recommend that the number of WISs should be regarded as an important measure to evaluate access to warnings in addition to the likelihood of receiving warnings. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:168-172).

  2. Comparing Alcohol Marketing and Alcohol Warning Message Policies Across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettlaufer, Ashley; Cukier, Samantha N; Giesbrecht, Norman

    2017-08-24

    In order to reduce harms from alcohol, evidence-based policies are to be introduced and sustained. To facilitate the dissemination of policies that reduce alcohol-related harms by documenting, comparing, and sharing information on effective alcohol polices related to restrictions on alcohol marketing and alcohol warning messaging in 10 Canadian provinces. Team members developed measurable indicators to assess policies on (a) restrictions on alcohol marketing, and (b) alcohol warning messaging. Indicators were peer-reviewed by three alcohol policy experts, refined, and data were collected, submitted for validation by provincial experts, and scored independently by two team members. The national average score was 52% for restrictions on marketing policies and 18% for alcohol warning message policies. Most provinces had marketing regulations that went beyond the federal guidelines with penalties for violating marketing regulations. The provincial liquor boards' web pages focused on product promotion, and there were few restrictions on sponsorship activities. No province has implemented alcohol warning labels, and Ontario was the sole province to have legislated warning signs at all points-of-sale. Most provinces provided a variety of warning signs to be displayed voluntarily at points-of-sale; however, the quality of messages varied. Conclusions/Importance: There is extensive alcohol marketing with comparatively few messages focused on the potential harms associated with alcohol. It is recommended that governments collaborate with multiple stakeholders to maximize the preventive impact of restrictions on alcohol marketing and advertising, and a broader implementation of alcohol warning messages.

  3. Anatomy of Historical Tsunamis: Lessons Learned for Tsunami Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Y.; Kong, L.; Yamamoto, M.; McCreery, C. S.

    2011-11-01

    Tsunamis are high-impact disasters that can cause death and destruction locally within a few minutes of their occurrence and across oceans hours, even up to a day, afterward. Efforts to establish tsunami warning systems to protect life and property began in the Pacific after the 1946 Aleutian Islands tsunami caused casualties in Hawaii. Seismic and sea level data were used by a central control center to evaluate tsunamigenic potential and then issue alerts and warnings. The ensuing events of 1952, 1957, and 1960 tested the new system, which continued to expand and evolve from a United States system to an international system in 1965. The Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific (ITSU) steadily improved through the decades as more stations became available in real and near-real time through better communications technology and greater bandwidth. New analysis techniques, coupled with more data of higher quality, resulted in better detection, greater solution accuracy, and more reliable warnings, but limitations still exist in constraining the source and in accurately predicting propagation of the wave from source to shore. Tsunami event data collected over the last two decades through international tsunami science surveys have led to more realistic models for source generation and inundation, and within the warning centers, real-time tsunami wave forecasting will become a reality in the near future. The tsunami warning system is an international cooperative effort amongst countries supported by global and national monitoring networks and dedicated tsunami warning centers; the research community has contributed to the system by advancing and improving its analysis tools. Lessons learned from the earliest tsunamis provided the backbone for the present system, but despite 45 years of experience, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami reminded us that tsunamis strike and kill everywhere, not just in the Pacific. Today, a global intergovernmental tsunami warning system is coordinated

  4. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of a rockfall warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Michael; Sättele, Martina; Krautblatter, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Rockslides and rockfalls can pose high risk to human settlements and traffic infrastructure. In addition to structural mitigation measures like rockfall nets, warning systems are increasingly installed to reduce rockfall risks. Whereas for structural mitigation measures with reducing effects on the spatial extent a structured evaluation method is existing, no or only few approaches to assess the effectiveness for warning systems are known. Especially for higher magnitude rockfalls structural mitigation measures are not effective, and reliable early warning systems will be essential in future. In response to that, we developed a classification and a framework to assess the reliability and effectiveness of early warning systems (Sättele et al, 2015a; 2016). Here, we demonstrate an application for the rockfall warning system installed in Preonzo prior to a major rockfall in May 2012 (Sättele et al., 2015b). We show that it is necessary to design such a warning system as fail-safe construction, which has to incorporate components with low failure probabilities, high redundancy, low warning thresholds, and additional control systems. With a hypothetical probabilistic analysis, we investigate the effect of the risk attitude of decision makers and of the number of sensors on the probability of detecting an event and on initiating a timely evacuation, as well as on related intervention cost. We conclude that it is possible to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of warning systems, which helps to optimize mitigation strategies against rockfall events. References Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Reliability and effectiveness of warning systems for natural hazards: concept and application to debris flow warning, Rel. Eng. Syst. Safety, 142, 192-202, 2015a. Sättele, M., Krautblatter, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Forecasting rock slope failure: How reliable and effective are warning systems?, Landslides, 605, 1-14, 2015b. Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and

  5. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pcareer, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  6. A Near Real-time Early Warning System on Erosion Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal H. Ali

    2006-01-01

    Navigation Systems, would be beneficial to the local authorities, highway operators and the public in general in providing an early warning especially during periods of heavy rainfall, which could possibly trigger serious soil erosion occurrences that may induce landslides.

  7. Presurgical hand antisepsis: concepts and current habits of veterinary surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Grulke, Sigrid; Kampf, Günter

    2011-07-01

    To assess current habits for surgical hand preparation among veterinary surgical specialists and to compare data with current guidelines for hand asepsis techniques. Survey of veterinary surgical specialists. Diplomates of the American (ACVS) and European Colleges of Veterinary Surgeons (ECVS). An internet-based survey of hand preparation methods before surgical procedures was conducted of 1300 listed ACVS and ECVS Diplomates. A 42.6% response rate was obtained. Approximately, 80% of respondents use disinfecting soaps as a primary method for hand antisepsis. Of those, 81% use chlorhexidine-based scrubs and 7% use a neutral soap followed by a hydroalcoholic solution. Contrary to current recommendations of the World Health Organization and scientific evidence supporting use of hydro-alcoholic rubs for presurgical hand preparation, veterinary surgical specialists still use surgical scrub solutions containing disinfecting soaps. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  8. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database 2016 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cameron D; Paone, Gaetano; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Brothers, Leo; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Habib, Robert H; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The art and science of outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety continue to evolve, and cardiothoracic surgery leads many of these advances. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is one of the principal reasons for this leadership role, as it provides a platform for the generation of knowledge in all of these domains. Understanding these topics is a professional responsibility of all cardiothoracic surgeons. Therefore, beginning in January 2016, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery began publishing a monthly series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. This article provides a summary of the status of the STS National Database as of October 2016 and summarizes the articles about the STS National Database that appeared in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 2016 series, "Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety."

  9. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tania K; Greer, Joseph D; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient.

  10. The orthopaedic surgeon and manufacturing industry relationship. Ethical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, E V; Aquino, N J

    1999-11-01

    Orthopaedic surgery has progressed over the years because of innovative work of pioneering orthopaedic surgeons; new developments in internal fixation techniques and implants codeveloped with the orthopaedic manufacturing industry have improved treatment greatly. This article analyzes and reviews the relationship of orthopaedic surgeons to the orthopaedic implant industry, analyzing three broad categories of the relationship: (1) physicians receiving gifts from industry; (2) the orthopaedic industry's financial support of educational and research endeavors of academic trauma and other centers; and (3) the relationship of the industry with innovators in the field of orthopaedic surgery by retainer fees, royalties, and stock options from industry. The ethical relationship requires: (1) putting the patient's concerns first above vested interests; (2) an awareness of a potential for abuse; and (3) a level of awareness of the relationship and the ability to explain and inculcate this relationship in the teaching program of young residents to maintain the high standards that have been set.

  11. [Gastrointestinal surgeons should master the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin; Chen, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is one of the main diseases of gastrointestinal surgeons. It is very important to master the adjuvant chemotherapy of colorectal cancer for gastrointestinal surgeons. In recent years, with the development of a number of clinical trials and the appearance of new drugs, fluorouracil combined with oxaliplatin had been established as the standard regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. In the current guidelines, stage III( colon cancer is the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy, while stage II( colon cancer should receive adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain. Unlike colon cancer, adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer is not evidence-based. Especially, the indication and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy remain controversial. Adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer still needs further investigation.

  12. pSNOWPACK: a forecasting tool for avalanche warning services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bellaire

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Avalanche danger is often estimated based on snow cover stratigraphy and snow stability data. In Canada, single forecasting regions are very large (>50 000 km2 and snow cover data are often not available. To provide additional information on the snow cover and its seasonal evolution the Swiss snow cover model SNOWPACK was therefore coupled with a regional weather forecasting model GEM15. We assess the capability of this model chain (pSNOWPACK to forecast three key factors of snow cover instability at a single point: new snow amounts, surface hoar formation and crust formation. The output of GEM15 was compared to meteorological data from Mt. Fidelity, British Columbia, Canada, for five winters between 2005 and 2010. Forecasted precipitation amounts were generally over-estimated. The forecasted data were therefore filtered and used as input for the snow cover model. Comparison between the model output and manual observations showed that after pre-processing the input data the snow depth, new snow events and amounts were well modelled. Relevant critical layers, i.e. melt-freeze crusts and surface hoar layers were reproduced. Overall, the model chain pSNOWPACK shows promising potential as a forecasting tool for avalanche warning services in Canadian data sparse areas and could thus well be applied to similarly large regions elsewhere.

  13. A Bayesian decision approach to rainfall thresholds based flood warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. V. Martina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Operational real time flood forecasting systems generally require a hydrological model to run in real time as well as a series of hydro-informatics tools to transform the flood forecast into relatively simple and clear messages to the decision makers involved in flood defense. The scope of this paper is to set forth the possibility of providing flood warnings at given river sections based on the direct comparison of the quantitative precipitation forecast with critical rainfall threshold values, without the need of an on-line real time forecasting system. This approach leads to an extremely simplified alert system to be used by non technical stakeholders and could also be used to supplement the traditional flood forecasting systems in case of system failures. The critical rainfall threshold values, incorporating the soil moisture initial conditions, result from statistical analyses using long hydrological time series combined with a Bayesian utility function minimization. In the paper, results of an application of the proposed methodology to the Sieve river, a tributary of the Arno river in Italy, are given to exemplify its practical applicability.

  14. Online reviews of orthopedic surgeons: an emerging trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-04-01

    Various websites are dedicated to rating physicians. The goals of this study were to: (1) evaluate the prevalence of orthopedic surgeon ratings on physician rating websites in the United States and (2) evaluate factors that may affect ratings, such as sex, practice sector (academic or private), years of practice, and geographic location. A total of 557 orthopedic surgeons selected from the 30 most populated US cities were enrolled. The study period was June 1 to July 31, 2013. Practice type (academic vs private), sex, geographic location, and years since completion of training were evaluated. For each orthopedic surgeon, numeric ratings from 7 physician rating websites were collected. The ratings were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100. Written reviews were also collected and categorized as positive or negative. Of the 557 orthopedic surgeons, 525 (94.3%) were rated at least once on 1 of the physician rating websites. The average rating was 71.4. The study included 39 female physicians (7.4%) and 486 male physicians (92.6%). There were 204 (38.9%) physicians in academic practice and 321 (61.1%) in private practice. The greatest number of physicians, 281 (50.4%), practiced in the South and Southeast, whereas 276 (49.6%) practiced in the West, Midwest, and Northeast. Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (74.4 vs 71.1; P<.007). No significant difference based on sex (72.5 male physicians vs 70.2 female physicians; P=.17) or geographic location (P=.11) were noted. Most comments (64.6%) were positive or extremely positive. Physicians who were in practice for 6 to 10 years had significantly higher ratings (76.9, P<.01) than those in practice for 0 to 5 years (70.5) or for 21 or more years (70.7).

  15. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    -Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...... qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected...

  16. Credentialing and privileging for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Steven R

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the credentialing and privileging process is important for all practitioners. Whether applying to a medical staff for the first time, participating in the reappointment process, applying for new privileges, or challenging a clinical privilege denial, the practitioner needs to understand the process and know his or her rights. This article should assist the oral and maxillofacial surgeon and the organizations providing credentials and privileges to make the process less difficult and more efficient.

  17. Left-handed surgical instruments - a guide for cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Clare; Theakston, Maureen; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Kendall, Simon William Henry

    2016-08-19

    For ease of use and to aid precision, left-handed instruments are invaluable to the left-handed surgeon. Although they exist, they are not available in many surgical centres. As a result, most operating theatre staff (including many left-handers) have little knowledge of their value or even application. With specific reference to cardiac surgery, this article addresses the ways in which they differ, why they are needed and what is required - with tips on use.

  18. Surgeon-Based 3D Printing for Microvascular Bone Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-07-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printing has developed as a revolutionary technology with the capacity to design accurate physical models in preoperative planning. We present our experience in surgeon-based design of 3D models, using home 3D software and printing technology for use as an adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Methods Home 3D printing techniques were used in the design and execution of vascularized bone flap transfers to the upper extremity. Open source imaging software was used to convert preoperative computed tomography scans and create 3D models. These were printed in the surgeon's office as 3D models for the planned reconstruction. Vascularized bone flaps were designed intraoperatively based on the 3D printed models. Results Three-dimensional models were created for intraoperative use in vascularized bone flaps, including (1) medial femoral trochlea (MFT) flap for scaphoid avascular necrosis and nonunion, (2) MFT flap for lunate avascular necrosis and nonunion, (3) medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap for wrist arthrodesis, and (4) free fibula osteocutaneous flap for distal radius septic nonunion. Templates based on the 3D models allowed for the precise and rapid contouring of well-vascularized bone flaps in situ, prior to ligating the donor pedicle. Conclusions Surgeon-based 3D printing is a feasible, innovative technology that allows for the precise and rapid contouring of models that can be created in various configurations for pre- and intraoperative planning. The technology is easy to use, convenient, and highly economical as compared with traditional send-out manufacturing. Surgeon-based 3D printing is a useful adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Level of Evidence Level IV. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Communication of emergency public warnings: A social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileti, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Sorensen, J.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    More than 200 studies of warning systems and warning response were reviewed for this social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment of communication of emergency public warnings. The major findings are as follows. First, variations in the nature and content of warnings have a large impact on whether or not the public heeds the warning. Relevant factors include the warning source; warning channel; the consistency, credibility, accuracy, and understandability of the message; and the warning frequency. Second, characteristics of the population receiving the warning affect warning response. These include social characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age, social setting characteristics such as stage of life or family context, psychological characteristics such as fatalism or risk perception, and knowledge characteristics such as experience or training. Third, many current myths about public response to emergency warning are at odds with knowledge derived from field investigations. Some of these myths include the keep it simple'' notion, the cry wolf'' syndrome, public panic and hysteria, and those concerning public willingness to respond to warnings. Finally, different methods of warning the public are not equally effective at providing an alert and notification in different physical and social settings. Most systems can provide a warning given three or more hours of available warning time. Special systems such as tone-alert radios are needed to provide rapid warning. 235 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Paradoxical Effects of Warning in the Production of Children's False Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Francesco; Mirandola, Chiara; Konishi, Mahiko; Cornoldi, Cesare; Ghetti, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The effects of warning on false recognition and associated subjective experience of false recollection and familiarity were investigated in 7-to 13-year-old children and young adults (N = 259) using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Two warning conditions (warning with an example of a critical lure and warning without an example of a…