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Sample records for surgeon dr william

  1. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  2. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  3. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  4. Early artificial ventilation: the mystery of "Truehead of Galveston"--was he Dr Charles William Trueheart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubuhovich, Ronald V

    2008-12-01

    It seems strange that the medical literature from the United States has only a single original source of reference for a device (from circa 1870) for artificial ventilation in neonatal resuscitation. The invention is attributed to "Dr Truehead of Galveston, Texas". I argue that this mystery arises from two separate misspellings of the inventor's name, and propose that the correct name is Dr Charles William Trueheart (1837-1914), also of Galveston.

  5. Dr. William Thornton's views on sleep, dreams, and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, George

    2009-01-01

    William Thornton, MD, was a polymath who designed the Capitol of the U.S. Capital and the Octagon House, present home of the American Institute of Architecture. He was the founding director of the U.S. Patent Office. His collected papers, which are now preserved at the U.S. Library of Congress, though pruned by the wife who lived almost 40 years after him, are extensive and include comments on science, education, slavery, and politics. His views on sleep and dreaming and his concepts of resuscitation are reviewed as the opinions of an educated man early in the nineteenth century.

  6. Dr William Thornton (1759-1828) a savant of colonial America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberg, Norman G

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Thornton, an Edinburgh-trained physician, practised medicine sporadically in the British West Indies, the location of his birthplace, and in Philadelphia during post-revolutionary Colonial America. He is not well known to medical historians and 21st century physicians and is remembered principally as the amateur architect who designed the Capitol in Washington, DC and the Library Company of Philadelphia.

  7. Dr William Wilson Ingram (1888-1982): doctor-soldier, physician and Antarctic expeditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J H

    2011-09-01

    Dr William Wilson Ingram (1888-1982), a Scottish-born physician, contributed significantly to the health and heritage of Australia, his adopted land. Born on Speyside and educated in Aberdeen, he was a doctor-soldier in two World Wars and decorated with the Military Cross. Ingram was a Foundation Fellow (1938) of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and established one of the first specialist diabetic clinics in Australia, in Sydney in 1928. As an arachnologist, he published clinical descriptions of both surviving and fatal cases of envenomation by the Sydney funnel web spider, Atrax robustus. He founded the Kolling Institute of Medical Research at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney where for two generations he was a leader in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. The international significance of his life's work relates to his service as the medical officer and biologist on the two British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expeditions (BANZARE) of 1929-1931, for which service he was awarded the Polar Medal and subsequent Clasp. Those expeditions secured, for the British Crown, what was to become the Australian Antarctic Territory, ceded to Australia by a British Order in Council of 24 August 1936. Sir Douglas Mawson, polar expeditioner and the leader of BANZARE, described Ingram as 'an ideal medical officer', one who in addition to his clinical skills and judgement, manifested courage and 'physical endurance and a full measure of camaraderie'. Ingram has no published obituary or biography. This précis records some details of his extraordinary life.

  8. The Case of Dr George Gale V. the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario: A Legal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wilton

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available On March 15, 2002, anaesthetist and pain practitioner, Dr George Gale, had his license to practice medicine in Ontario revoked by a decision of the Discipline Committee of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO (1,2. To that point, Dr Gale had practiced medicine as an anaesthetist in Ontario without incident. The CPSO Discipline Committee hearing had taken place over 22 days in 2001 and 2002. The focus of the CPSO prosecution against Dr Gale was his pain practice conducted at a well-known pain clinic in Toronto, Ontario. By an Ontario Divisional Court decision dated October 10, 2003, the CPSO Discipline Committee decision was set aside on appeal (3. Most importantly, the Ontario Divisional Court held that the penalty of revocation levied against Dr Gale was unfair and based on several serious errors made by the Discipline Committee. A closer examination of the decisions of both the Discipline Committee and the Ontario Divisional Court will hopefully illustrate both the medical standards of practice issues for pain practitioners, and some of the perils created by the self governing activities of the CPSO. To put the Gale decision in proper context, it will be necessary for us to briefly examine the function of the CPSO and its Discipline Committee.

  9. The portrait of Dr William Harvey in the Royal Society since 1683.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, Milo

    2006-09-22

    A portrait of William Harvey in the Royal Society since 1683 is a copy by an unknown artist after a portrait, now lost, painted by Sir Peter Lely ca. 1650. Three other unattributed copies besides a copy bought from Lely's studio on his death by the Earl of Bradford have been located. The present labelling of the Royal Society portrait should be corrected.

  10. An Assessment of "What does photon energy tell us about cellphone safety" by Dr. William Bruno

    CERN Document Server

    Leikind, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Bruno asserts the well-known fact that cell phones radiate microwaves in the classical regime. This, he says, means that the photon energy is not relevant to assessing safety. Citing optical tweezers as an example of biologically relevant non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation, Bruno concludes that all other reports of non-thermal effects from microwaves are likely valid. He seeks safety thresholds based upon requiring that cell phone energy density be less than k_BT. This proposal and related ideas produce thresholds many orders of magnitude below present values. While Dr. Bruno is correct that cell phone microwave radiation is generally in the classical regime, he uses peculiar estimates (number of photons per cubic wavelength) that overstate the circumstance by more than 20 factors of ten. He misunderstands the operation of optical tweezers and ignores their significant thermal effects. He credulously accepts poorly supported claims of non-existent non-thermal effects. He mistakenly believes ...

  11. The life and legacy of William Ernest Miles (1869-1947: a tribute to an admirable surgeon William Ernest Miles (1869-1947: tributo a um cirurgião admirável

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Guilherme Campos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article aimed to review some important aspects regarding the work and life of the legendary English surgeon William Ernest Miles. His masterwork began at the beginning of the 20th century, when he devised the first radical procedure that aimed to control rectal cancer, after analyzing the poor outcomes of perineal resections for the disease. The famous 1908 publication, focusing on the technique and early results of abdominoperineal excision influenced numerous surgeons for decades, at a time when most rectal tumors were managed through rectal amputation, regardless of their location. Miles was recognized as a brilliant, fast, and skilled surgeon, and his fame attracted many surgeons to watch him at work in London at that time. He was also recognized as a gentle and kind man who became a trusted leader in coloproctology. In this context, he also made various contributions in the field of anorectal diseases, such as hemorrhoids, anal fistula, anal fissure, and rectal procidentia. Thus, he deserves the honors as the pioneer in the elaboration and refinement of a surgical technique that allowed a significant decrease in tumor recurrence and mortality. Furthermore, the Miles operation shifted the perspectives of rectal cancer, and for that his name will always be regarded as one of the giants in the history of colorectal surgery.O presente artigo teve como objetivo rever alguns dos aspectos importantes referentes ao trabalho e à vida do legendário cirurgião inglês William Ernest Miles. Sua obra-prima teve início no começo do século XX, quando ele concebeu o primeiro procedimento radical para controlar o câncer retal, após analisar os pobres resultados das ressecções perineais para a doença. Sua famosa publicação em 1908, focalizando a técnica e os resultados preliminares da chamada excisão abdômino-perineal do reto, influenciou muitos cirurgiões durante décadas, quando a maioria dos tumores retais era tratada por

  12. Adverse cardiac events in children with Williams syndrome undergoing cardiovascular surgery: An analysis of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Christoph P; Collins, Ronnie Thomas; Jaquiss, Robert D B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L; Pasquali, Sara K; Wallace, Amelia S; Hill, Kevin D

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Williams syndrome (WS) undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Prevalence and risk factors for such events have not been well described. We sought to define frequency and risk of MACE in patients with WS using a multicenter clinical registry. We identified cardiac operations performed in patients with WS using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2000-2012). Operations were divided into 4 groups: isolated supravalvular aortic stenosis, complex left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), isolated right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), and combined LVOT/RVOT procedures. The proportion of patients with MACE (in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest, or postoperative mechanical circulatory support) was described and the association with preoperative factors was examined. Of 447 index operations (87 centers), median (interquartile range) age and weight at surgery were 2.4 years (0.6-7.4 years) and 10.6 kg (6.5-21.5 kg), respectively. Mortality occurred in 20 patients (5%). MACE occurred in 41 patients (9%), most commonly after combined LVOT/RVOT (18 out of 87; 21%) and complex LVOT (12 out of 131; 9%) procedures, but not after isolated RVOT procedures. Odds of MACE decreased with age (odds ratio [OR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98-0.99), weight (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.93-0.99), but increased in the presence of any preoperative risk factor (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.06-4.00), and in procedures involving coronary artery repair (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 2.05-14.06). In this multicenter analysis, MACE occurred in 9% of patients with WS undergoing cardiac surgery. Demographic and operative characteristics were associated with risk. Further study is needed to elucidate mechanisms of MACE in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Physicians and surgeons during the inquisition in new Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The origins of New Spain Inquisition whose jurisdiction extended also to Philippine Islands, are related herein. Physicians and surgeons who worked as Inquisition officers are discussed, from the first Dr. Juan de la Fuente who was appointed on May 9, 1572, to Dr. Pedro del Castillo, appointed on September 24, 1644. Likewise, physicians and surgeons judged by the Holy Office are mentioned. During the XVI century, those judged were few and insignificant personages, the first was the Irish Protestant William Corniels a barber surgeon, who arrived with the John Hawkins' pirate fleet in 1568 and settled in Guatemala. Some physicians and surgeons were judged as "Judaizers" during the first half of the XVII century. Many physicians and surgeons were prosecuted in Mexico, as well as in the Philippine Islands, in the second half of the XVIII century because they were Freemasons or supporters of French Revolution ideology. Among those was the unfortunate Dr. Enrique Esteban Morel, who introduced into Mexico the method of antivariolar inoculation at the time of the great epidemic out-break of 1779. It should be a gesture of justice to build a memorial in the ancient Inquisition Palace to honor this Public Health's worthy physician.

  14. William Stewart Halsted: letters to a young female admirer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, J L; Gordon, T A; Kehoe, M W; McCall, N

    2001-11-01

    To present the first new information in the past 25 years concerning the life of Dr. William Stewart Halsted. This paper reports on recently discovered personal correspondence of Dr. Halsted, beginning at age 66, to a young lady, Elizabeth Blanchard Randall, 40 years his junior. Dr. William Stewart Halsted is generally considered the most important and influential surgeon that this country has produced. During his Hopkins days in Baltimore (1886-1922) he was rather reclusive, and little is known of his personal life. He was married but had no children. Several biographies written by Halsted's contemporaries constitute the bulk of what is known about Halsted's personal life. All extant letters from Dr. Halsted to Miss Randall were reviewed. Archival materials were consulted to understand the context for this friendship. The correspondence between Halsted and Randall took place during a 3-year period, although their acquaintance was probably long-standing. The letters reveal Dr. Halsted and Miss Randall's great and warm affection for each other, despite their 40-year age difference. The letters have a playful nature absent in Halsted's other correspondence. This relationship has not been previously noted. Late in Halsted's life, he developed a warm and affectionate relationship with a young lady 40 years his junior, as revealed in Halsted's correspondence. Halsted's warm, personal, and playful letters are in stark contrast to his biographers' portrayals of him as a more serious and reclusive person.

  15. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. Parents may not have any family history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the ...

  16. St John's Hospital (Morton House), Launceston, Australia: A history of the hospital and Dr William Russ Pugh's first operations under ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, R P; Paull, J D

    2017-03-01

    On 7 June 1847, William Russ Pugh, MD, performed two operations at the St John's Hospital and Self-Supporting Dispensary, Launceston, Tasmania, while his patients were rendered insensible by the inhalation of sulphuric ether. These operations are the earliest documented surgical operations under ether in Australia. St John's Hospital officially opened on 1 September 1845. The hospital may have closed in late 1853 because of financial difficulties. The two-storey Georgian-style building which served as the hospital was completed c1831-1832. It has served as a residence, school, boarding school, hospital, medical consulting rooms and commercial offices. The building is now known as Morton House. We could not identify the date when the name Morton House was adopted, or explain the origin of the name. The earliest identified use of this name is in May 1873 in a newspaper advertisement for boarders. No person with the surname Morton is known to have been associated with the building as an owner or as a tenant. The name Morton House may honour William T.G. Morton, MD, the Boston dentist who performed the first public demonstration of surgical etherisation on 16 October 1846.

  17. Night Vision Manual for the Flight Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Chuck Antonio, Dr Carita DeVilbiss , and Capt George Fiedler from Armstrong Laboratory at Williams AFB, AZ; Major John Kotulak, Dr Bill McLean, and Dr...Cdr Mike Middleman and LCdr Dave Still from the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory at Pensacola, FL; Col Robert Green, Col Dick Dennis, Col

  18. William P. van Wagenen and the first corpus callosotomies for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Marlon S; Linskey, Mark E; Binder, Devin K

    2008-03-01

    As a trainee of Dr. Harvey Cushing, cofounder and first president of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and founder of a prestigious international academic fellowship, Dr. William P. van Wagenen is an important figure in the history of neurological surgery. Perhaps less well known or appreciated is his seminal role as the first neurosurgeon to attempt, study, and publish results of the corpus callosotomy procedure for patients with epilepsy, and his collaboration with Andrew J. Akelaitis, which led to the description of some features of "split-brain" patients 2 decades before similar work in the 1960s eventually resulted in a Nobel Prize for Roger W. Sperry in 1981. These contributions firmly establish William P. van Wagenen as one of the founding pioneers in the surgical treatment of patients with epilepsy.

  19. Evaluation of Current Consensus Statement Recommendations for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Pooled Analysis of William Beaumont Hospital and American Society of Breast Surgeon MammoSite Registry Trial Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, J. Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beitsch, Peter D. [Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Arthur, Doug [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massey Cancer Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden, New Jersey (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Keisch, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Healthcare Associates, Miami, Florida (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lyden, Maureen [Biostat International, Inc, Tampa, Florida (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@pol.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Statement (CS) recommendations for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) are associated with significantly different outcomes in a pooled analysis from William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) and the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) MammoSite® Registry Trial. Methods and Materials: APBI was used to treat 2127 cases of early-stage breast cancer (WBH, n=678; ASBrS, n=1449). Three forms of APBI were used at WBH (interstitial, n=221; balloon-based, n=255; or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, n=206), whereas all Registry Trial patients received balloon-based brachytherapy. Patients were divided according to the ASTRO CS into suitable (n=661, 36.5%), cautionary (n=850, 46.9%), and unsuitable (n=302, 16.7%) categories. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes were analyzed according to CS group. Results: The median age was 65 years (range, 32-94 years), and the median tumor size was 10.0 mm (range, 0-45 mm). The median follow-up time was 60.6 months. The WBH cohort had more node-positive disease (6.9% vs 2.6%, P<.01) and cautionary patients (49.5% vs 41.8%, P=.06). The 5-year actuarial ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), regional nodal failure (RNF), and distant metastasis (DM) for the whole cohort were 2.8%, 0.6%, 1.6%. The rate of IBTR was not statistically higher between suitable (2.5%), cautionary (3.3%), or unsuitable (4.6%) patients (P=.20). The nonsignificant increase in IBTR for the cautionary and unsuitable categories was due to increased elsewhere failures and new primaries (P=.04), not tumor bed recurrence (P=.93). Conclusions: Excellent outcomes after breast-conserving surgery and APBI were seen in our pooled analysis. The current ASTRO CS guidelines did not adequately differentiate patients at an increased risk of IBTR or tumor bed failure in this large patient cohort.

  20. Reality Therapy: Interviews with Dr. William Glasser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrum, J. Robert

    1989-01-01

    Provides background of Glasser's Reality Therapy (RT) since its inception in l960s. Discusses incorporation of Control Theory Psychology into Reality Therapy, growth of RT during past 16 years, and development of Educator Training Center. Cites l98l establishment of annual conference and Senior Faculty examination (l98l) as evidence of continued…

  1. William Carlos Williams (1883-1963): physician-writer and "godfather of avant garde poetry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R

    1999-05-01

    William Carlos Williams, Pulitzer Prize-winning physician-writer, was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, where he practiced medicine until he was incapacitated by a stroke at age 68. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Williams trained in New York City and Leipzig, Germany, settling in Rutherford in 1909. Doctor Williams revolutionized American poetry by rejecting traditional conventions of rhyme and meter, and he masterfully used "American" English-brusque, colloquial, and incisive-in his poetry. Williams is recognized as one of the most original poets of the 20th century. His medical life sometimes trivialized, Williams was a serious student of medicine and considered himself "in the front lines, in the trenches." He regarded art and medicine as "two parts of a whole," and the intimate doctor-patient interface proved a powerful inspiration for his writing. Dr Williams was a physician of immense integrity and dedication; he regarded allegiance to humanism as important as excellence in medical science. Prolific in various genre, Dr William Carlos Williams attained belated recognition in spite of astonishing productivity and originality. His stature and influence has steadily increased since his death in 1963, and Dr Williams is now considered "the most important literary doctor since Chekhov."

  2. Mentoring surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    From time immemorial mentoring has been the angular stone sustaining the building of medical and surgical education. Good teachers are not necessarily good mentors, and good mentors are not always good teachers. A combination of both is very plausible and should be encouraged. Today, the qualities of a good mentor, in our case the surgeon-mentor, should include respect, time, commitment, trust, determination, encouragement, patience, and opportunity for independence. The mentee would need to respond to similar virtues of trust, encouragement, and respect. The reciprocal consideration of equally divided roles would be clearly desirable. Recognizing the importance of a good mentor and making this role the priority of medical schools would enhance our ability to form better professionals. It would certainly promote professionalism, better patient care, and research.

  3. An Account of ... William Cullen: John Thomson and the Making of a Medical Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleton, David E

    2014-01-01

    John Thomson's An Account of the Life, Lectures and Writings of William Cullen (1832; 1859) remains a primary source for the career of the most influential academic physician in eighteenth-century Scotland and is also a significant work of medical history. But this multi-authored text, begun around 1810 by the academic surgeon, John Thomson, but only completed in 1859 by Dr David Craigie, has its own complex history. This chapter addresses what this history can reveal about the development of medical biography as a literary genre. It argues that the Account is a hybrid work shaped by a complex array of practical, domestic, intellectual, and professional pressures, as Thomson, in seeking to bolster his own career, was caught between the demands of Cullen's children for a traditional "Life" and his own more theoretical and socio-cultural interests.

  4. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    the former President of the International Olympic Committee, he was also an orthopaedic surgeon and a keen sailor, competing at three Olympic Games. In 1972, in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master in Sports Medicine, he was the first who studied a sailors' muscle activity by means......'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only...... in Sports Medicine at the Ghent University. Hiking is a critical bilateral and multi-joint movement during dinghy racing, accounting for >60% of the total upwind leg time. Hiking generates large stresses in the anterior muscles that cross the knee and hip joint. Hiking is considered as a quasi...

  5. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  6. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Lu; WANG; Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors.They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army.However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy?It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can’t possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  7. Williams Syndrome and Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Karen; Wharton, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder with a variety of medical and developmental features, focuses on frequent outward expression of happiness. Analysis of the unique expression of happiness in individuals with Williams syndrome is followed by discussion of this happiness in the context of other dimensions of the syndrome,…

  8. William Carlos Williams, Literacy, and the Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemak, Francis E.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the cultivation of the imagination in schools and colleges is largely ignored because of utilitarian biases in the education system, where achievement is determined by quantitative measures of cognitive skills. Discusses Williams' view that acts of the imagination transform reality and applies view to English education. (JG)

  9. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Pictured with Robert Eisenstein, former assistant director for mathematical and physical sciences (MPS) at the US National Science Foundation (NSF), who is spending a year at CERN as a member of the ATLAS collaboration.

  10. The life and legacy of William T. Bovie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Preston L

    2013-05-01

    This Historian's Address, presented at the North Pacific Surgical Association 2012 meeting, held in Spokane, Washington, on November 9, 2012, briefly reviews the life and surgical contributions of the inventor William T. Bovie and his collaboration with Dr Harvey Cushing, which led to the widespread acceptance of surgical electrocautery for dissection and hemostasis.

  11. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ... Search Member Login Home About Mission Strategic Plan Leadership Bylaws History Past Presidents Past TeLinde Lectures Past Distinguished Surgeon ...

  12. Find a Surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ... skin, muscle, bone and cartilage finely attune the oral and maxillofacial surgeon to the need for harmony between facial appearance and function. As ...

  13. Surgeon compensation and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, K K; Walker, P M

    2000-06-01

    Financial incentives are the only form of compensation that will motivate surgeons at an academic health sciences center to perform the tasks outlined in the hospital's mission statement. A questionnaire divided into 5 sections: demographics, compensation, time allocation, benefits and incentives, and motivational factors. The Department of Surgery, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. All academic surgeons (N=64) practicing at The Toronto Hospital in July 1997. Of the 64 eligible mailed surveys, there were responses for 59. Of these 59 surgeons, 48 (81%) receive compensation through a fee-for-service method. However, only 32 (54%) of the surgeons prefer the fee-for-service method, while 18 (31%) prefer salary and 9 (15%) prefer an alternative system. On average, these academic surgeons spend 44% of their time teaching or performing research, for which they receive 14% of their total income. Of the motivational factors assessed, financial bonuses are a positive motivational factor for all "surgeon tasks." In addition, task-specific motivational factors were established for research, teaching, and operating, including research facilities, mentorship and prestige, and interesting case types, respectively. Surgeons are not appropriately renumerated for time spent on academic activities, and many would prefer an alternative form of compensation to the fee-for-service method. Knowledge that surgeons are receptive to tasks supporting the hospital's mission statement leads us to conclude that appropriate motivation can shape the activity of academic surgeons. Financial rewards ranked the highest as a motivational factor for all surgeon tasks; however, task-specific motivational factors were identified. Overall, multiple factors, specifically targeted to the individual, will serve to motivate. Thus, compensation packages based on individual preferences and personal motivational factors will be the most successful.

  14. William Harvey's epitaph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutton, Vivian

    2003-05-01

    This paper gives the first published English translation of William Harvey's epitaph. The translation is based on a re-examination of the stone itself, and is accompanied by an explanatory commentary.

  15. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led.

  16. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  17. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Scholars in Residence Clinical Trials Methods Course Health Services Research Methods Course Surgeon Specific Registry NSQIP Annual ... Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Gaza Strip Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey ...

  18. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Irving B

    2006-08-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in November 1939. He made many contributions to surgical care, particularly in the field of oncology. He attended to many famous people, including King George V and Sigmund Freud and was greatly honoured in his own milieu. He was named honorary surgeon and Sargent Surgeon to the king. In addition, he was a thoughtful individual who addressed problems in human behaviour, contradicting the stereotype of the contemporary surgeon.

  19. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care for You How to Use Apps and Social Media for Your Practice Why Participation in the STS ... STS_CTsurgery Surgeons Residents & Students Allied ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society ...

  20. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccot, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  1. H1N1 Message from the Acting Surgeon General

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-13

    In this podcast, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Steven Galson discusses what you can do to protect yourself from H1N1 flu.  Created: 5/13/2009 by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/13/2009.

  2. Was the real Sherlock Holmes a pediatric surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the pioneering efforts of Joseph Bell, the model for Sherlock Holmes, in the surgical care of children during the antiseptic era. I reviewed biographies of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; the biography of Joseph Bell; his surgical textbook, Edinburgh Medical Journals; and the history of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children. Dr Bell was a colleague of Joseph Lister and one of the first surgeons to apply antiseptic methods to operations involving children. He was the surgeon appointed to the first surgical ward of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital for Sick Children; in that role, he cared for many children with surgical diseases. Dr Joseph Bell, by his compassion for children and his surgical skill, was indeed a pioneer pediatric surgeon. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Leo Doyle, master surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellar, I

    2000-10-01

    On 3 March 1953 Leo Doyle died at the Mercy Hospital, Melbourne. The day before he died Leo Doyle had been operating at the Mercy Hospital when he took ill. Doyle's final illness was almost certainly the result of the severe aortic stenosis that had been developing over some years. His death at the relatively young age of 61 ended the career of a man described by Sir Gordon Gordon Taylor as the greatest technical surgeon that he had ever seen. In all likelihood Australian surgery will never see the likes of Doyle, a virtuoso surgeon, again. And yet to many of the surgeons who were Doyle's contemporaries and to those who followed him he remained somewhat of an enigma. Perhaps in some way the description of the great French surgeon Baron Dupuytren may also be applicable to Leo Doyle: known to all, loved by many, understood by few. By all accounts Leo Doyle's surgical repertoire knew no bounds. He operated with equal facility on the central nervous system, the head and neck, in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis and he was more than competent in gynaecology, urology and orthopaedics. In the latter part of his career he became, par excellence, a cancer surgeon. He was, arguably, Australia's first surgical oncologist. No procedure was deemed too complicated or demanding. Like some other superb technicians his judgement at times did not match his technical ability. Doyle was one of the first surgeons in Australia to perform hindquarter amputation and he helped to pioneer the operations of total gastrectomy and oesophagogastrectomy. An avid reader of the surgical literature, he possessed an enormous library which was matched by an equally large collection of surgical instruments. Unlike Devine he published relatively little. He was not a good clinical teacher, preferring to teach by example in the operating theatre. Although interested in music and the visual arts, surgery was his life.

  4. Appreciating William Wordsworth's poem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨; 袁鸿燕

    2007-01-01

    Through a brief introduction to the basic principles of Romanticism and in-depth analysis of Wordsworth' s representative work "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" in terms of writing style, the object of this poem, language features as well as the theme behind it, this paper seeks to identify the fundamental characteristics of William Wordsworth's Romantic writing.

  5. William Wilde: Historian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, L

    2016-05-01

    This essay attempts to assess William Wilde as a social historian. It examines some of his contributions to the discipline of history and looks particularly at 'The food of the Irish', which was published in the Dublin University Magazine in February 1854.

  6. William Faulkner, 50 Aniversario

    OpenAIRE

    Biblioteca de Filosofía y Letras

    2012-01-01

    Folleto realizado por la Biblioteca Universitaria de Filosofía y Letras, dentro de su programa de “Otoño de premios”, para la muestra bibliográfica sobre William Faulkner en el 50 aniversario de su muerte.

  7. David Owen WILLIAMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Lidy Williams-Oonk and her children Mark & Marietta, being unable to thank everybody individually, would like to express their sincere thanks to friends and colleagues at CERN and abroad for their great help and support, their messages and flowers, as well as their donations to the Ligue Genevoise contre le Cancer, on the death of their beloved husband and father.

  8. Prince William Grows Up!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正> 1 At Eton, william breezed (轻而易轻地取得)through his A-level(大学预科)year.He shined at sport and he was elected by his schoolmates to "POP",the college’s elite prefect’s(英国公学中的级长,班长)club,made up form the eleven most

  9. Motivado por cirujanos Motivated by Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salazar-Vargas

    2010-12-01

    interrogate and to examine those individuals, and every gesture, every question, every maneuver they did, was jealously kept in our minds. However even at an early stage, we clearly perceived, the differences between medical branches and practitioners, and involuntarily, every one was leaning towards this or that specialty. It was during those years when 7 wonderful persons and excellent surgeons, crossed the path of my life, inspiring me to follow their steps and to embrace a surgical career. Two were classic academicians, Dr. Manuel Aguilar Bonilla and Dr. Andres Vesalio Guzman Calleja, 3 were determined, tireless and highly skilled, Dr. Longino Soto Pacheco, Dr. Claudio Orlich Carranza, y el Dr. Carlos Prada Diaz, and 2 were, although well prepared, unassuming, practical and openly friendly, Dr. Fernando Valverde Soley y el Dr. Randall Ferris Iglesias....

  10. William Halsted, his family and 'queer business methods'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkow, I M

    1996-02-01

    The life and times of William Stewart Halsted have become a blend of fact and sometimes fiction. Lost in this hagiographic haze are certain true aspects of his upbringing, family life, and professional activities. Whether Halsted remains as monumental a figure in the evolution of American surgery as he is presently perceived, remains a master of historical inquiry. For instance, the important consideration of Halsted's independent wealth and its impact on his ability to accept a "full-time" faculty position at The Johns Hopkins Hospital is a question of interest. Newly available information shows that Halsted's father, William Mills Halsted, Jr, was involved in numerous financial irregularities centered around the family's business, Halsted, Haines & Co. Among the father's alleged misconduct was the apparent embezzlement and fraudulent assignment of company funds. Included in these abuses was, at the time of the firm's bankruptcy, the providing of "preference loans" to William Stewart Halsted, which became the basis for the surgeon's later affluence.

  11. Drømmejobbet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Medarbejdere vil i fremtiden også kunne arbejde, mens de sover. Virksomheder tilbyder snart deres ansatte interne kurser i ‘lucid dreaming’. Disse giver mulighed for, at man i sine drømme bliver bevidst om, at man drømmer og således kan manipulere dem. Det skal nu udnyttes. Management...

  12. Dr. Daniel Carter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  13. Dr. Daniel Carter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  14. Sir John Struthers (1823-1899), Professor of Anatomy in the University of Aberdeen (1863-1889), President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (1895-1897).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, M H

    2015-11-01

    Between 1841 and 1845 John Struthers attended both the University of Edinburgh and some of the various Extra-mural Schools of Medicine associated with Surgeons' Hall. While a medical student he became a Member of the Hunterian Medical Society of Edinburgh and later was elected one of their Annual Presidents. He graduated with the MD Edin and obtained both the LRCS Edin and the FRCS Edin diplomas in 1845. Shortly afterwards he was invited to teach Anatomy in Dr Handyside's Extra-mural School in Edinburgh. The College of Surgeons certified him to teach Anatomy in October 1847. He had two brothers, and all three read Medicine in Edinburgh. His younger brother, Alexander, died of cholera in the Crimea in 1855 while his older brother James, who had been a bachelor all his life, practised as a Consultant Physician in Leith Hospital, Edinburgh, until his death.When associated with Dr Handyside's Extra-mural School in Edinburgh, John taught Anatomy there until he was elected to the Chair of Anatomy in Aberdeen in 1863. Much of his time was spent in Aberdeen teaching Anatomy and in upgrading the administrative facilities there. He resigned from this Chair in 1889 and subsequently was elected President of Leith Hospital from 1891 to 1897. This was in succession to his older brother, James, who had died in 1891. Later, he was elected President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh from 1895 to 1897 and acted as its Vice-President from 1897 until his death in 1899. In 1898, Queen Victoria knighted him. His youngest son, John William Struthers, was the only one of his clinically qualified sons to survive him and subsequently was elected President of the Edinburgh College of Surgeons from 1941 to 1943.

  15. [The robotic surgeon training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Alessandro; Rossanese, Marta; Abbinante, Maria; Calandriello, Mattia; Kungulli, Afrovita; Giannarini, Gianluca; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The widespread robotic surgery in the world highlighted the relevance of the training programs for young urologists and residents. In the last years, urologic societies and some independent robotic surgeons strongly worked to standardize some general and specific training modules. Theoretical and practical sections of robotic training programs have been recently specified. The role of simulators, dry and wet laboratories, bedside assistance, and modular (step-by-step) training at console represent the most relevant elements of robotic surgeon training. Ideally, these didactic tools should be available in modern training centers. The development of structured robotic training programs should be considered as one of the priorities that the urologic community must take into account in the near future.

  16. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-07-25

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. [Surgeons in Krakow between WWI and WWII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, A; Dolecki, M

    2001-01-01

    During the war time when Polish borders had not been established yet, apart from having two surgical departments Jagiellonian University, Krakow had surgical departments in the Bonifratow, Izraelicki and Military Hospitals. More surgical departments were opened up in later years in pubic Health System Hospitals, among them were Narutowicz at near Pradnicka street and Sisters of Mercy at Lea street. Other well-known Krakow surgeons operated in smaller, private surgeries, such as: Dom Zdrowia (House of Health) or Zwiazkowy (Union) Clinic. At that time only 30 Surgeons worked in Kraków. They were outstanding specialists with a broad practice. Among them were Maksymilian Rutkowski, Jan Glatzel, Stanislaw Nowicki, Michal Hladij. Gradually, younger surgeons started to join them. they were: Jan Kowalczyk, Jerzy Jasienski, Stanislaw Kania, Wladyslaw Laszczak, Jozef Bugusz, Jozef Gasinski. Many of them who worked in the surgical hospitals in Krakow, left the city after obtaining a professorship (like Kornel Michejda, professor at the University of Wilno) or became heads of wards, like Zygmunt Drobniewicz, Alfons Mackowski and Tadeusz Guschlbauer. All of these surgeons were highly respected by the medical community as well as by the general public in their respective town and surrounding areas. A large income allowed that best of them to fund and supply their own wards. Occasionally, however, among the less successful surgeons, an uncompromising competition for patients developed. These events were disapproved and condemned by the medical establishment. Many surgeons led an active life outside of their profession. A surgeon with an exceptionally colorful personality was Jan Glatzel: witty, highly intelligent, a connoisseur of fine art, book lover with an active social life. Maksymilian Rutkowski was active in charitable organizations, helping to support Bratnia Pomoc Medykow. Michal Hladij, president of KS Cracovia, vice president of Krakowski Klub Automobilowy rendered his

  18. [The first woman surgeons in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; De Jong, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the position of woman surgeons in the Netherlands. In 1913 the first woman, Heleen Robert, was accepted as member of the Dutch Society of Surgery. Three others, Jeanne Knoop, Frieda van Hasselt and Rosalie Wijnberg, followed during the next ten years. The nomination of Rosalie Wijnberg caused a turbulent discussion as she was working as a gynaecologist and not as a surgeon. One can wonder about this argument as other members were gynaecologists too. It seems that the male attitudes towards women were changing as more women entered the male dominated field. Nevertheless, from 1931 on, the year in which the registration of specialists was created, a number of women succeeded in obtaining a registration in surgery. Four of them were interviewed: dr. D.A.E. Norel, A.G. Wiersum-de Kwaadsteniet, J. Leeksma-Lievense and A.A. Fierstra. The general opinion still is that surgery is not a female profession. At the moment there are some twenty women working as general surgeon compared to a seven hundred men.

  19. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Hubert M; Joseph, Aaron K

    2017-06-01

    Ergonomic practice increases the productivity, quality, and longevity of the dermatologic surgeon. When used properly, magnification devices can be ergonomic and beneficial additions to the dermatologic surgeon's practice. Herein, we review the available magnification options for the dermatologic surgeon and evaluate the options based on cost, design, and functional advantages and disadvantages. Magnification for the dermatologic surgeon may be a useful tool for a healthier, more efficient, and higher-quality practice.

  20. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane and His Contributions to Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakey, Richard William F; Mulliken, John B

    2015-07-01

    Surgical subspecialties were just emerging at the turn of the 20th Century, before this time, general surgeons had to adjust their operative skills to address disorders throughout the body. Sir William Arbuthnot Lane was a British surgeon, whose restless mind led him to wander throughout the field of general surgery and beyond. Although controversial, he advanced in the repair of cleft lip and palate, introduced the "no touch" operative technique, internal fixation of fractures, and is credited as the first surgeon to perform open massage of the heart. During The Great War, he established the British Plastic Surgery unit at Sidcup and delegated the care of facial and jaw injuries to young Major Harold Gillies. Lane later founded The New Health Society, an organization that stimulated the natural food movement. Sadly, in his latter years Lane's thinking drifted further away from with the times and his professional credibility waned. Nevertheless, Lane's variegated life is of sufficient interest to deserve reassessment.

  1. The anatomy lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp by Rembrandt : A comparison of the painting with a dissected left forearm of a Dutch male cadaver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, Frank F. A.; van de Graaf, Robert C.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2006-01-01

    Rembrandt's The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp (1632) is considered a masterpiece and is a group portrait of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons in the form of an anatomy lesson. Dr. Nicolaes Tulp, Doctor of Medicine and Praelector Anatomiae to the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons, showed an anatomic

  2. Dr Math at your service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation the author explains how the Dr Math service works; how tutors are recruited to act as Dr Math; and how school pupils can reach Dr Math for help with their mathematics homework....

  3. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the career of Theodor Seuss Geisel and suggests activities to celebrate his birthday. Lists selected children's books by Dr. Seuss, selected Seuss videos, Web sites, biographical resources, and biographical videos. (LRW)

  4. Dr.GEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Campora

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentazione di Dr. Geo, un prodotto software Open Source progettato per lo studio interattivo della geometria euclidea piana e per un primo approccio ai fondamenti della programmazione in linguaggio Scheme.

  5. KODAK Directview DR Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Baum

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available KODAK DIRECTVIEW DR 9500 System. The flexibility of a dual detector system in a unique, sin-gle detector design. The DR 9500 easily moves "around" the patient, making it ideal for all horizontal, upright and angled projections, and added convenience for patients - particularly those with limited mobility. "nKODAK DIRECTVIEW DR 7500 System New-generation system provides the ultimate in digital radiography flexibility. Modular components ena-ble you to easily configure a DR system to fit your space, applications, workflow - and budget."nHighest operator comfort:"n• Auto tracking (tube, table, wall stand, both direc-tions"n• Automatic, perpendicular centring to detectors center for table and wall stand"n• Auto positioning (choice of 16, customer programmable tube-detector positions"n• Manual or full motorised up and down motion and motorised detector tilt capability"n• Overhead tube system optional motorised, standard length rail system (5x3m"n• Floor mounted or with floor rails equipped DR 7500WM wall stand"n• Moveable, motorised table with floating top table"nScaleable: "n• degree of motorisation, degree of automatic func-tions"nKODAK DIRECTVIEW DR 3000 System This powerful multipurpose system is designed to handle a full range of general radiography procedures. With its simple design, space saving footprint, and advanced "ease of use" features, this system can enhance departmental workflow, productivity, and the quality of patient care.

  6. William Gibson's paternity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malewitz, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary culture views DNA through a strange temporal logic: on the one hand, technologies of DNA identification and sequencing testify to fundamental transformations in the way we understand biology, anthropology, law, and medicine—we live in "the DNA age"; and on the other, these technologies have revealed as much about the past as they have about the present or future, gesturing backwards to scenes of conception, crime, and evolutionary branching. The essay shows how this double temporal logic operates within William Gibson's electronic poem Agrippa. It concludes that the poem's stanzas form a metaphorical DNA fingerprint that reveals Gibson's life to be, paradoxically, a novel repetition of his father's and grandfather's lives.

  7. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  8. Random Thoughts on William Shakespeare and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KV Sahasranam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Medicine and literature have always been connected over the ages. William Shakespeare (1564-1616 is no exception. There are plenty of references to medicine and diseases in the works of Shakespeare. The knowledge which Shakespeare has of medical conditions is much more than is expected of a common man. This is attributed to his association with practitioners of his time and reading of contemporary texts in medicine. Also his son in law Dr. John Hall who married Susanna, Shakespeare's eldest daughter would have contributed substantially to the knowledge of medicine in Shakespeare's compositions. Surgery at the Elizabethan times was well known and is reflected to a large extent in his plays.

  9. Goody receives William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, K. N.; Goody, Richard M.

    Richard M. Goody was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on May 27, 1998, in Boston, Massachusetts. The William Bowie Medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.

  10. Entrevista com William Uricchio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uricchio, William

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available William Uricchio é professor e diretor do Programa de Mídias Comparadas do Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT e professor de História das Mídias Comparadas da Universidade de Utrecht. O pesquisador, referência em estudos sobre mídia e cultura, participou como conferencista no XI Seminário Internacional da Comunicação da PUCRS, quando concedeu uma entrevista exclusiva a Sessões do Imaginário. O evento abordava os cem anos de Marshall McLuhan, assim, aproveitamos a ocasião para abordar algumas questões sobre as idéias deste teórico dos meios de comunicação, além de outros temas que são referencia nos estudos do professor Uricchio

  11. Drømmebilleder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Bogen beskriver i en række intense analyser forbindelsen mellem ydre og indre billeder: altså mellem de moderne mediers billedverden og drømmens og erindringens indre billeder. I fokus for undersøgelsen er desuden kønnet, altså hvordan billeder viser, omformer eller skjuler kønnet, 'det andet', s...

  12. Drømmebilleder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Bogen beskriver i en række intense analyser forbindelsen mellem ydre og indre billeder: altså mellem de moderne mediers billedverden og drømmens og erindringens indre billeder. I fokus for undersøgelsen er desuden kønnet, altså hvordan billeder viser, omformer eller skjuler kønnet, 'det andet', s...

  13. Modeling a scientific career: an essential component of the mentorship process. An interview with John A. Williams, Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., USA by Martín E. Fernández-Zapico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John A

    2010-01-01

    In the current interview article, Dr. John A. Williams shares his experiences, and provides career advice to junior investigators. Dr. Williams is one of the world's leading physiologists working on signal transduction mechanisms in pancreatic acinar cells. He is worldwide recognized for his contribution to many areas of pancreatology, especially the understanding of GI hormone regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. and IAP.

  14. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  15. The Status of William Carlos Williams in American Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atashi Laleh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available William Carlos Williams was an American poet who renounced poetic diction in favor of the unpoetic, establishing himself in American Modernism as a powerful voice distinct from such canonical contemporaries as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. His attitude towards literary production was different from many of his contemporaries in that he believed ‘the idea is in the thing’ and therefore the presence of objects rather than abstractions is strongly felt in his poems. A critical survey of Williams’ poems indicates that the poet/physician observes, describes and levels criticism at his society where modernism has transformed the American identity in significant ways. In this article, American icons and popular culture are retraced in the poetry of William Carlos Williams in an effort to explain the seeming opacity of his poems.

  16. William and Charles Mayo: their influence on American medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Prado, Roberto; Rubí, Marisol Godínez

    2007-01-01

    In a little-known Midwest town named Rochester, Minnesota, a talented physician grew in fame and respect: Dr. William Worrall Mayo, who was influential in the evolution of medicine. He was a steadfast learner and raised two sons, William and Charles, to follow in his footsteps and further medical knowledge. They were leaders in surgery and in the creation of advanced and sophisticated medical facilities. Their talents, the issues surrounding medical practice, and unexpected opportunity all came into play for the Mayos. Two hospitals, St. Mary's Hospital and later the Methodist Hospital, witnessed and influenced the advancement of medicine through the Mayo Clinic heritage and dynasty in Minnesota and the rest of the world. In this article, we focus on the role of the Mayo brothers and their influence over the increasing acceptance of hospital care in America and abroad.

  17. Emily Dickinson's ophthalmic consultation with Henry Willard Williams, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Donald L

    2012-12-01

    Emily Dickinson is one of America's premier poets of the 19th century. Henry Willard Williams, MD, was one of the very first physicians to limit his practice to ophthalmology and was the established leader in his field in Boston, Massachusetts. They met during the time of the Civil War, when Emily consulted him about her ophthalmic disorder. No records of the diagnosis survive. Photophobia, aching eyes, and a restriction in her ability to work up close were her main symptoms. Iritis, exotropia, or psychiatric problems are the most frequent diagnoses offered to explain her difficulties. Rather than attempt a definitive conclusion, this article will offer an additional possibility that Dr Williams likely considered (ie, hysterical hyperaesthesia of the retina). This was a common diagnosis at that time, although it has currently faded from use.

  18. [William Harvey revisited ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hubert

    2015-07-01

    William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood is often described as a product of the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century. Modern research has, however, shown thatHarvey followed the Aristotelian research tradition and thus tried to reveal the purpose of the organs through examination of various animals. His publication of 1628 has to be read as an argument of natural philosophy, or, more precisely, as a series of linked observations, experiments and philosophical reasonings from which the existence of circulation has to be deduced as a logical consequence. Harvey did not consider experiments as superior to philosophical reasoning nor intended he to create a new system of medicine. He believed in the vitality of the heart and the blood and rejected Francis Bacon's empirism and the mechanistic rationalism of Descartes. Harvey's contribution and originality lied less in his single observations and experiments but in the manner how he linked them with critical reasoning and how he accepted, presented and defended the ensuing radical findings.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2006 Jan 31. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Eckert MA, Galaburda AM, Mills DL, Bellugi U, Korenberg JR, Reiss AL. The neurobiology of Williams syndrome: cascading influences of visual system ...

  20. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863–1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of “the Chief.” Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, “You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good.” Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  1. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  2. What Is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Heart Surgeon? Page Content Article Body If your ... require heart surgery. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Heart Surgeons Have? Pediatric heart surgeons are medical ...

  3. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dr. julio iribarne

    OpenAIRE

    Revista de la, Facultad de Medicina

    2011-01-01

    El Dr. lribarne fue profesor titular de Ginecología, dos veces Decano de la Facultad de Ciencias Médicas de Buenos Aires, uno de los profesores más ilustres, llamado el Decano de las reformas universitarias, escritor y sociólogo profundo conocidoy respetado en todos los centros científicos de Europa y del Nuevo Continente, director de la "Revista Médica Latino Americana". Lamentamos el fallecimiento de este colega que no solamente era una gloria del cuerpo médico argentino, sino de la América...

  5. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  6. André Latarjet (1877-1947). Anatomist and surgeon specialized in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reverón, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    André Latarjet (1877-1947), physician and surgeon, outstanding professor of anatomy, made important contributions to the study of human anatomy. He was the disciple and successor of Dr. Leo Testut and continued the diffusion of his work. He was a member of the French Academy of Medicine and President of the International Federation of Sports Medicine.

  7. The surgeon and the child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    For many reasons pediatric surgeons have been asked to do all general and thoracic procedures in children. The profession has responded by training more, but the core of special cases requiring pediatric surgical expertise has not changed, and there is concern that the many surgeons now in training will not each do enough cases to attain and maintain operative expertise. This presentation examines the psychological, educational, and surgical literature on the development of expertise, especially operative expertise. From this I conclude that individual surgeon volume when gained in deliberate practice with a coach and with effort is essential, and that several technologies hold promise for allowing deliberate practice in simulation environments. I propose that in order to avoid a decline in pediatric surgical operative expertise we must reorganize pediatric surgical training and practice to align with Optimal Resources for Children's Surgery and the evolution of training in general surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgeons' perceptions on industry relations: A survey of 822 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Maria S; Yang, Jie; Wang, Lily; Yin, Donglei; Talamini, Mark; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-07-01

    The relationships between industry and medical professionals are controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgeons' current opinions regarding the industry-surgery partnership, in addition to self-reported industry ties. After institutional review board approval, a survey was sent via RedCap to 3,782 surgeons across the United States. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the responses. The response rate was 23%. From the 822 responders, 226 (27%) reported at least one current relationship with industry, while 297 (36.1%) had at least one such relationship within the past 3 years. There was no difference between general surgery versus other surgical specialties (P = .5). Among the general surgery subspecialties, respondents in minimally invasive surgery/foregut had greater ties to industry compared to other subspecialties (P = .001). In addition, midcareer surgeons, male sex, and being on a reviewer/editorial board were associated with having industry ties (P industry are important for innovation. Our study showed that relationships between surgeons and industry are common, because more than a quarter of our responders reported at least one current relationship. Industry relations are perceived as necessary for operative innovation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The surgeons civil responsibility insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, D

    2004-10-01

    After a short research in the field national insurances, the author analyses the professional physician insurance policy; the ambiguity and difficulty of contracts concerning the professional health activity of surgeon, whether as state employee or as independent professional are pointed put. With the introduction of the ministerial decree dated January 29,1992, the new labour agreement, the privacy law, the evolution of ''informed consent'', the esthetic injury concept, the safety regulations law and the administrative liability, surgeons must pay attention to draw up an insurance policy suitable to their profession.

  10. The demographic work of Sir William Wilde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, P

    2016-05-01

    This paper argues that Sir William Wilde was indeed a pioneering demographer. It also describes the unveiling of the plaque commemorating Sir William Wilde at his home, 1, Merrion Square, Dublin on the 28 October 1971.

  11. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  12. William Harvey, an Aristotelian anatomist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey has long been celebrated as the founding father of physiology for refuting Galen and demonstrating that blood circulates round the body. Yet after his training at Padua, he became a committed Aristotelian: although strongly influencing the new observational sciences of the seventeenth century, Harvey himself looked back towards the classical past.

  13. Spotlight on William D. Revelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Reports on an interview with William D. Revelli on the occasion of his inclusion in the Music Educators Hall of Fame. Reviews the history of music education and discusses future issues and trends in the field. Argues for more cooperation among public school music education programs, community music efforts, and college-level music education. (CFR)

  14. 76 FR 22363 - Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain Restoration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... Forest Service Kaibab National Forest, Williams Ranger District; Arizona; Bill Williams Mountain... forested conditions on and surrounding Bill Williams Mountain by reducing hazardous fuels and moving... approximately 4 miles south-southwest of the city of Williams, Arizona. The Proposed Action includes...

  15. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire.

  16. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  17. DATA SONIFICATION, FROM PHYSICS TO HEALTH - Interview to Domenico Vicinanza and Genevieve Williams, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge.

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, recorded during the 2016 ICTR-PHE conference organized by CERN in Geneva at the International Conference Centre (CICG) in February, Dr. Domenico Vicinanza and Genevieve Williams describe the use of music and sound as tools for scientific investigation, with specific reference to biomedical sciences and show sonifications in action in a practical demonstration carried pout on physicist musician Chiara Mariotti.

  18. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I

    2011-07-01

    The use of smartphones and their associated applications (apps) provides new opportunities for physicians, and specifically orthopaedic surgeons, to integrate technology into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was twofold: to review all apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgeons and to survey orthopaedic residents and surgeons in the United States to characterize the need for novel apps. The five most popular smartphone app stores were searched for orthopaedic-related apps: Blackberry, iPhone, Android, Palm, and Windows. An Internet survey was sent to ACGME-accredited orthopaedic surgery departments to assess the level of smartphone use, app use, and desire for orthopaedic-related apps. The database search revealed that iPhone and Android platforms had apps specifically created for orthopaedic surgery with a total of 61 and 13 apps, respectively. Among the apps reviewed, only one had greater than 100 reviews (mean, 27), and the majority of apps had very few reviews, including AAOS Now and AO Surgery Reference, apps published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and AO Foundation, respectively. The national survey revealed that 84% of respondents (n = 476) have a smartphone, the majority (55%) have an iPhone, and that 53% of people with smartphones already use apps in clinical practice. Ninety-six percent of respondents who use apps reported they would like more orthopaedic apps and would pay an average of nearly $30 for useful apps. The four most requested categories of apps were textbook/reference, techniques/guides, OITE/board review, and billing/coding. The use of smartphones and apps is prevalent among orthopaedic care providers in academic centers. However, few highly ranked apps specifically related to orthopaedic surgery are available, and the types of apps available do not appear to be the categories most desired by residents and surgeons.

  19. Genes and schizophrenia: from a Festschrift Seminar honoring William T. Carpenter Jr, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Anil K

    2014-03-01

    Recent data have begun to elucidate the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, as well as provide new insights into the relationships of specific genetic factors across diagnostic boundaries, with specific symptom domains, and in the prediction of antipsychotic treatment response. Not surprisingly, work conducted at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center (MPRC), led by Dr William Carpenter, has helped to guide the thinking behind much of this work, as well as contributed valuable data toward these efforts. In this article, I will briefly summarize some of the major findings emerging from these lines of research and highlight the role of the Dr Carpenter and his colleagues at the MPRC in this area.

  20. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  1. From Mxit to Dr Math

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Laurie Butgereit, a researcher at the CSIR Meraka Institute, started to use Mxit as a communication channel to tutor her son in mathematics. Her son and a number of his friends logged in, and Dr Math was born. At the inception of Dr Math...

  2. The birth of Kaiser William II (1859-1941) and his birth injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, M G

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the events leading up to the birth of Kaiser William II in 1859. There is a full description of the clinical aspects of his breech delivery that resulted in an Erb-Duchenne palsy. The later physical and psychological effects of his paralysed left arm are discussed fully, as are the comments about Dr Eduard Arnold Martin (1799-1875), the obstetrician who delivered him.

  3. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  4. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  5. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  6. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460...

  7. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180. From l to r: Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  8. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180 with Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  9. How Dr. Pierce Promoted Himself

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This article is about Dr. Raymond V Pierce who owned St. Vincent Island before it became a refuge. The doctor painted advertisements for his famous “Woman’s Tonic”...

  10. Dr. Millie Cleveland: chiropractic achiever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, J

    1998-06-01

    Dr. Mildred Genoa Allison-Cleveland, affectionately known as "Dr. Millie," was an important part of life at Cleveland Chiropractic College for over thirty years, serving first as a clerical assistant, then instructor, administrative assistant, and trusted right hand of her husband, Dr. Carl Cleveland, Jr. Yet Mildred Cleveland, like many other women who have helped the profession grow and survive over the years, has never been the subject of an article in print. In this paper, the author will strive to outline Dr. Mildred Cleveland's accomplishments, as well as to give the reader as clear a picture as possible of the woman who was the wife of one chiropractic pioneer and mother of another.

  11. William E. Adams: Thomas Mann and The Magic Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, A P

    1998-01-01

    The lobectomy for carcinoma of the lung performed by William E. Adams in 1946 on Thomas Mann, author of the tuberculosis saga The Magic Mountain, deserves to be added to Harold Ellis's series of "historically famous operations." This lobectomy, by which the surgeon cured his far more famous patient, was only one episode in his 40 eventful years as Chicago's leading pioneer in early thoracic surgery. The historic case is well documented by preoperative, operative, and pathology reports obtained through the courtesy of still-living witnesses and associates, friends of the author. Thomas Mann died 9 years later of an aortoiliac rupture at the University Hospital in Zurich. At autopsy no local recurrence or distal metastasis was found.

  12. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection.

  13. William Wordsworth and The Daffodils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅琴

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth is best known for his poem, The Daffodils. This paper traces the origin of daffodils in Greek my-thology, the four important facts in Wordsworth’s life and the poetic theories implied in his poem The Daffodils. The most im-portant part shall be the appreciation and analysis of the poem. During this course, readers may find it difficult to understand Wordsworth’s poetic theories of Romanticism. However this is made easier by asking and answering questions and by comparing Chinese and English Romantic poems.

  14. Feminist Motifs in William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhen

    2015-01-01

    As we all know, William Faulkner shows really concern for the Southern people, especially the Southern women who suffer the most. In Faulkner’s works women characters play an important role, which is confirmed. After the theories of feminist literary come to understand Faulkner criticism, critics to Faulkner’s novels drafting an encouraging response detect the author himself either as a pro-feminist or a misogynist. On analyzing the woman characters through Addie and Lena Grove—the wom⁃en images in As I Lay Dying and Light in August, we found out that Faulkner is neither simple a pro-feminist nor a misogynist in the patriarchal society.

  15. Sir William Osler's speech at Troy: a Trojan horse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Troy, New York, is a city of 55,000 people in upstate New York located along the Hudson River. A city of surprisingly rich cultural heritage, it was the home of New York state's first hospital outside New York City. The 50th anniversary celebration of Troy's hospital brought William Osler to the city as the keynote speaker. This speech, delivered on November 28, 1900, is one of Sir William's less well known addresses. Osler began his comments with Sir Thomas More's Utopia and talked at length about the hospital, its obligations, the influences it has upon the community, and the role of physicians and surgeons. He broached one of his old saws, the salary of attending physicians and their needed role in hospital management. His words were published in the diamond jubilee's records, but the hospital did not outlive its prominent guest professor, and it closed its doors in 1914. Just like the great historical city of Troy, New York's own Troy was on the brink of decline, and its hospital would be the first fatality. Therefore, it is almost prescient that the words of Osler, taken into historical context juxtaposed against the socioeconomic forces at work, are akin to the Greek's offering of a wooden edifice to end the Trojan War.

  16. Dr Luigi Orlando, Dr Sergio Ceccuzzi, Dr. Armando Sbrana, Europa Metalli, Italy, Dr Albert Scherger, Member of KM Europa Metal AG, Osnabr ck, Germany, Prof. Filippo Menzinger, Scientific Attaché, Permanent Mission of Italy in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr Lyn Evans and Dr Luigi Orlando Photo 04: L. to r.: Dr Lyn Evans, Dr Luigi Orlando, Prof. Luciano Maiani and Prof. Filippo Menzinger Photo 06: L. to r.: Prof. Philippo Menzinger, Dr Armando Sbrana, Prof. Luciano Maiani, Dr Albert Scherger, Dr Lyn Evans, Dr Luigi Orlando, Dr Sergio Ceccuzzi, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, SM18

  17. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  18. Chinese medicine and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Biji, Sreedhar; Yeung, Chung-Kwong

    2011-07-01

    The surgeon aims at a direct, complete removal of the pathology. In spite of the modern advancements of imaging facilities and precision instrumentations, unsatisfactory results and recurrences are not uncommon. This paper provides a general review of the four specific areas in surgery that would benefit from Chinese medicine. Extensive searches were made on four surgical areas based on available English language journals, viz. low-back pain, chronic ulcers, renal calculus, and enuresis in children, in the past 10 years. The quoted communications are mainly related to clinical evidences, while a smaller number of crucial laboratory reports are also included. Low-back pain, a most frequent orthopaedic problem, would benefit from acupuncture treatment. Chronic leg ulcers could achieve better results of healing using herbal supplements. Problems of renal stones, besides the conventional methods of removal, could be further supplemented with herbal drinks that aim at prevention of recurrences. Enuresis in children, an untreatable common condition, may respond well to acupuncture. Surgeons should keep an open mind. In case of difficulties, they could seriously consider options of traditional treatment.

  19. Stretching Exercises: Range of Motion and Emotion in Four Poems by William Carlos Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Discusses four poems by William Carlos Williams used to teach creative writing to college students. Uses "Portrait of a Woman in Red" and "The Last Words of My English Grandmother" because they contain speakers who are clearly not the poet, which gives undergraduate students opportunities to discuss details Williams uses to…

  20. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  1. Doktor Kimyager Mehmed Ziya Ülken - Sir William Ramsay'ın Türk öğrencisi

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Mehmed Ziya Ülken: the Turkish student of Sir William Ramsay Feza Günergun Born in Istanbul, Mehmed Ziya (1870-1951) graduated from the Imperial Medical School in in 1893. When the Ottoman government decided to send four graduates to Paris, Berlin, London and Vienna to study chemistry, Mehmed Ziya was the one who went to London. He enrolled in the University College London where he became a student of Sir William Ramsay. He graduated in 1898. Back to Istanbul, he started to work as a chem...

  2. Diabetic retinopathy (DR: everybody's business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is on the increase worldwide, due mainly to the rise in the number of people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common because:* People are living longer, and diabetes is more prevalent in older people.* As people increasingly migrate to urban areas, exercise less, eat more, and eat less healthy food, more people are becoming obese – a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, including cataract, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR. DR usually develops between ten and twenty years after the onset of diabetes, and develops faster when diabetes is undiagnosed and untreated.People with DR whose sight is at risk can be treated, most commonly with laser, to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sadly, there is no treatment that can restore vision that has already been lost.

  3. William Wilde: his contribution to otology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M

    2016-05-01

    Sir William Wilde pioneered the epidemiology of deafness. He set otology on a firm scientific basis by applying the principles established by Robert Graves and William Stokes of the Dublin School of Medicine of correlating clinical observation with post-mortem findings and utilising this information as a framework for therapeutic intervention.

  4. William Russell on Schools in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Nikolay; Sabic-El-Rayess, Amra

    2013-01-01

    William Russell became one of the most influential educators in the field of international and comparative education in the first half of the 20th century. In 1914, William Russell obtained his PhD from Teachers College and, within few years, became a prominent figure internationally. He traveled through Europe and taught in Japan and Siberia, as…

  5. A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Trujillo, Cleber A; Freitas, Beatriz C; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Herai, Roberto H; Yu, Diana X; Brown, Timothy T; Marchetto, Maria C; Bardy, Cedric; McHenry, Lauren; Stefanacci, Lisa; Järvinen, Anna; Searcy, Yvonne M; DeWitt, Michelle; Wong, Wenny; Lai, Philip; Ard, M Colin; Hanson, Kari L; Romero, Sarah; Jacobs, Bob; Dale, Anders M; Dai, Li; Korenberg, Julie R; Gage, Fred H; Bellugi, Ursula; Halgren, Eric; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-08-18

    Williams syndrome is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an uncommon hypersociability and a mosaic of retained and compromised linguistic and cognitive abilities. Nearly all clinically diagnosed individuals with Williams syndrome lack precisely the same set of genes, with breakpoints in chromosome band 7q11.23 (refs 1-5). The contribution of specific genes to the neuroanatomical and functional alterations, leading to behavioural pathologies in humans, remains largely unexplored. Here we investigate neural progenitor cells and cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome and typically developing induced pluripotent stem cells. Neural progenitor cells in Williams syndrome have an increased doubling time and apoptosis compared with typically developing neural progenitor cells. Using an individual with atypical Williams syndrome, we narrowed this cellular phenotype to a single gene candidate, frizzled 9 (FZD9). At the neuronal stage, layer V/VI cortical neurons derived from Williams syndrome were characterized by longer total dendrites, increased numbers of spines and synapses, aberrant calcium oscillation and altered network connectivity. Morphometric alterations observed in neurons from Williams syndrome were validated after Golgi staining of post-mortem layer V/VI cortical neurons. This model of human induced pluripotent stem cells fills the current knowledge gap in the cellular biology of Williams syndrome and could lead to further insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the disorder and the human social brain.

  6. Robotics and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Attila; Langenburg, Scott; Klein, Michael D

    2003-06-01

    Surgical robots are enabling devices for minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgery (MIS). They use a computer to enhance a surgeon's skills as hand movements are transmitted to robotic arms. The computer filters tremor, which becomes important at high magnifications of 10 to 15 times available in MIS. It also provides motion scaling so that large hand movements are converted to very small movements of the robotic arm. The robotic arms also have wrists that make suturing and knot tying far more accurate and efficient. Surgical robots are currently used clinically for procedures such as MIS Nissen fundoplication, cholecystectomy, and splenectomy. Laboratory experience indicates that they may provide advantages for newborn procedures such as portoenterostomy for biliary atresia and repair of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. They have a potential for making possible MIS procedures, which can only be done open now, and for introducing entirely new procedures as well as for the performance of procedures by operators distant from the patient.

  7. The advent of the restorative plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Matthew J; Pribaz, Julian J; Talbot, Simon G; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery is presently typified by the existence of discrete clinical identities, namely that of the cosmetic plastic surgeon and the reconstructive plastic surgeon. The emergence of vascularized composite allotransplantation has been accompanied by the development of a third distinct clinical identity, that of the restorative plastic surgeon. The authors describe the core competencies that characterize this new identity, and discuss the implications of the advent of this new professional paradigm.

  8. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee 2017 Tripartite Meeting Search form Search Login Join Now Find a Surgeon ASCRS Patients Members Physicians Latest ...

  9. Navigating the Strait of Magellan: mapping a new paradigm for neurosurgical residency training. Presidential address to the Society of Neurological Surgeons, May 7, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, A John

    2008-10-01

    At the conclusion of his year as 81st president of the Society of Neurological Surgeons, the author delivered the following address at the 2007 annual meeting of the Society of Neurological Surgeons in San Francisco. In his address, Dr. Popp used the voyage of Ferdinand Magellan to illustrate the present climate affecting residency training and why the current training paradigm must be examined and, where necessary, changed. Based on this call to action the leaders of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, The American Board of Neurological Surgeons, The Congress of Neurological Surgeons, The Council of State Neurosurgical Societies, The Residency Review Committee for Neurosurgery, The Society of Neurological Surgeons, and the Washington Committee for Neurosurgery agreed to hold an unprecedented Education Summit meeting to investigate a comprehensive approach to evaluating and changing the current neurosurgical residency training model.

  10. Profile Interview: Dr Desiree Witte

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Albert Schweitzer, with stories about his hospital in. Lambarene, now ... active cases of vaccine-preventable diseases in children living ... aid program between the Dutch and Malawi Governments. I ... the delivery protected from the inquisitive eyes from people ... (LSHTM) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

  11. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  12. In Memoriam Dr. M. Jacobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Marius Jacobs, a senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, died suddenly on 28 April 1983, following a heart attack some days earlier. He was only 53 years old and his death came as a great shock, not only to his colleagues at our institute. Jacobs was a many-sided man with interests in many fi

  13. In Memoriam Dr. M. Jacobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Marius Jacobs, a senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, died suddenly on 28 April 1983, following a heart attack some days earlier. He was only 53 years old and his death came as a great shock, not only to his colleagues at our institute. Jacobs was a many-sided man with interests in many fi

  14. Dr. Hermann otto Sleumer retired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1971-01-01

    On March 1st, 1971, Dr. Hermann Otto Sleumer, senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, retired on reaching the age of 65 years. I have expressly omitted to say ‘from active service’, because his work has gone on uninterruptedly and he even had objections against spending one afternoon, on Febr. 26

  15. [Dr. Torafumi Okuyama, naval medical officer and the author of the dictionaries of medical terms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukase, Y

    1996-03-01

    Dr. Genryo Torafumi Okuyama, the second son of Dr. Genchu Okuyama of the Kaminoyama clan, was born on Dec. 4th, 1847. His elder brother Dr. Toraakira Okuyama was promoted to Dai Ikan (Senior Captain), the highest rank of medical officer in the Japanese Navy, and rendered distinguished services in the establishment of the naval medical systematization in the early Meiji era. Dr. Trafumi Okuyama, who was appointed as medical officer of the Yokohama army Hospital and transferred to Daibyoin in Edo, was engaged in medical treatment of injured soldiers during the Boshin-war in 1868. He went to Kagoshima with William Willis and as one of the founders of the Kagoshima Medical school, gave students education there. He resigned his naval position in 1874, when he was Dai Gun I (Senior Leutenant) and died at the age of 41 in April 16th 1887. Dr. Torafumi Okuyama compiled A medical vocabulary in English and Japanese ("Igo Ruizyu") and Deutsch-Japanisches Hand-Wörterbuch für Medizin ("Dokuwa Igaku Ziten) and published "Koen Hikki", the translation of the lectures by Dr. Edwin Wheeler.

  16. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald J; Russell, Thomas; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence of burnout among American surgeons and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with surgeon burnout. : Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization that leads to decreased effectiveness at work. A limited amount of information exists about the relationship between specific demographic and practice characteristics with burnout among American surgeons. Members of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life (QOL). Burnout and QOL were measured using validated instruments. Of the approximately 24,922 surgeons sampled, 7905 (32%) returned surveys. Responders had been in practice 18 years, worked 60 hours per week, and were on call 2 nights/wk (median values). Overall, 40% of responding surgeons were burned out, 30% screened positive for symptoms of depression, and 28% had a mental QOL score >1/2 standard deviation below the population norm. Factors independently associated with burnout included younger age, having children, area of specialization, number of nights on call per week, hours worked per week, and having compensation determined entirely based on billing. Only 36% of surgeons felt their work schedule left enough time for personal/family life and only 51% would recommend their children pursue a career as a physician/surgeon. Burnout is common among American surgeons and is the single greatest predictor of surgeons' satisfaction with career and specialty choice. Additional research is needed to identify individual, organizational, and societal interventions that preserve and promote the mental health of American surgeons.

  17. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  18. Analysis of Ambuscade of William Faulkner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冠华; 胡树红

    2012-01-01

      Being an outstanding writer in the history of American literature, William Faulkner had many works in his life, many of them are known by Chinese readers. But Ambuscade, as one of them, was analyzed fewer. This short story is different from other works of William Faulkner .In this essay, writer analyzes William Faulkner’s Ambuscade from four aspects:characters, dialogue style, writing skills and the theme expression so that readers can have a whole new perspective to enjoy Faulkner’s work.

  19. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century.

  20. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    that the risk was equal to traditional laparoscopy (3%). The fraction of surgeons willing to learn SILS and NOTES was 44.6% and 32.7%, respectively. The desire to learn was higher among less experienced and surgically active surgeons. Of the responders, 68.8% considered SILS and 43.2% considered NOTES would...

  1. William Pepper Jr, MD (1843-1898): portrait of a nineteenth-century medical educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Re, Vincent; Bellini, Lisa M

    2006-08-01

    Dr William Pepper Jr was a prominent Philadelphia physician whose contributions to medicine in the late 19th century are not widely known. As a young physician he rose in stature rapidly due to his abilities as a diagnostician, teacher, writer and researcher. His primary interest, however, was to improve the education of physicians. He orchestrated the creation of America's first university-controlled teaching hospital, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, enabling substantial improvements in clinical training. Pepper later became Provost of the University of Pennsylvania and ambitiously transformed the curriculum of the medical school, providing greater basic science and clinical training. He also worked to establish several institutes and museums in Philadelphia in order to promote academic pursuits, particularly in medicine. William Pepper Jr was one of the 19th century's foremost medical educators and his accomplishments helped reshape the way medicine was taught throughout the United States.

  2. William Edward Gallie (1882-1959): father of the Gallie wiring technique for atlantoaxial arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Shaughnessy, John; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2017-05-26

    William Edward Gallie (1882-1959) was a Canadian general surgeon with special expertise in orthopedic surgery. His experience with surgical management of cervical spine subluxation led him to invent a method of cervical wiring of the atlas to the axis. His method of C1-2 wiring has since been modified, but it still remains one of the three most commonly taught wiring techniques in neurosurgical training programs. Gallie is also hailed for instituting the first surgical training program in Canada, a curriculum his pupils memorialized as the "Gallie course" in surgery. In this historical vignette, the authors describe Gallie's life and depict his contributions to surgery.

  3. Sproglige drømmerier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farø, Ken Joensen

    2015-01-01

    blev tidligere brugt i Danmarks Radio som pausesignal, afspillet på en spilledåse. Ak ja, det var dengang. Gå ind på nettet og lyt til den, hvis du ikke kender melodien. Det er national kulturarv. Mange bevingede ord indeholder en form af ”drøm(me)”, fx Martin Luther Kings ”I have a Dream”. Eller...

  4. William Harvey, Aristotle and astrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    In this paper I argue that William Harvey believed in a form of astrology. It has long been known that Harvey employed a macrocosm-microcosm analogy and used alchemical terminology in describing how the two types of blood change into one another. This paper then seeks to examine a further aspect of Harvey in relation to the magical tradition. There is an important corollary to this line of thought, however. This is that while Harvey does have a belief in astrology, it is strongly related to Aristotle's views in this area and is quite restricted and attenuated relative to some contemporary beliefs in astrology. This suggests a more general thesis. While Harvey was amenable to ideas which we associate with the natural magic tradition, those ideas had a very broad range of formulation and there was a limit to how far he would accept them. This limit was largely determined by Harvey's adherence to Aristotle's natural philosophy and his Christian beliefs. I argue that this is also the case in relation to Harvey's use of the macrocosm-microcosm analogy and of alchemical terminology, and, as far as we can rely on the evidence, this informs his attitudes towards witches as well. Understanding Harvey's influences and motives here is important in placing him properly in the context of early seventeenth-century thought.

  5. William Friedman, Geneticist Turned Cryptographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Irwin L

    2017-05-01

    William Friedman (1891-1969), trained as a plant geneticist at Cornell University, was employed at Riverbank Laboratories by the eccentric millionaire George Fabyan to work on wheat breeding. Friedman, however, soon became intrigued by and started working on a pet project of Fabyan's involving the conjecture that Francis Bacon, a polymath known for the study of ciphers, was the real author of Shakespeare's plays. Thus, beginning in ∼1916, Friedman turned his attention to the so called "Baconian cipher," and developed decryption techniques that bore similarity to approaches for solving problems in population genetics. His most significant, indeed pathbreaking, work used ideas from genetics and statistics, focusing on analysis of the frequencies of letters in language use. Although he had transitioned from being a geneticist to a cryptographer, his earlier work had resonance in his later pursuits. He soon began working directly for the United States government and produced solutions used to solve complex military ciphers, in particular to break the Japanese Purple code during World War II. Another important legacy of his work was the establishment of the Signal Intelligence Service and eventually the National Security Agency. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. William Band at Yenching University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  7. David Owen Williams (1944 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Many people, not only at CERN but also throughout the world, were saddened to learn that their friend and colleague David Williams had passed away in the early hours of Tuesday 24 October. His death came after a year of fighting cancer with all of his usual determination and optimism. Even days before the end he was still welcoming to visitors, and was alert and interested in all their news. Born in 1944, David came to CERN from the University of Cambridge in 1966, with a degree in Physics and Computer Science. Joining what at the time was called the Documents and Data (DD) Division, in the earlier part his career he worked first on software for analysis of bubble chamber photographs, subsequently leading the group that supported experiments with 'hybrids' of bubble chambers and electronic detectors and then the group supporting online computing in experiments. He thus witnessed all of the enormous changes that took place in particle physics as the era of bubble chambers came to an end and the availability ...

  8. AMS DAYs 2015 - Interview William H. Gerstenmaier

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    William H. Gerstenmaier, associate administrator for the Human Exploration and Operations Directorate at NASA, tells about the science aat the International Space Station and the tasks to be performed to make sure the AMS detector, installed on the main

  9. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  10. Sir William Wilde: an enlightened editor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, M

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines Sir William Wilde's peculiar genius as editor, his contribution to the Irish Journal of Medical Science in ensuring its endurance and making it a treasure-house of the history of medicine in Ireland.

  11. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  12. Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove: A Guide to Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carringer, Robert

    1974-01-01

    Article provided an analysis of the films of Stanley Kubrick, credits for the film, Dr. Strangelove, a sequence outline of Dr. Strangelove and study questions relating to the film. It further made suggestions for additional reading. (RK)

  13. Obituary: Dr Dianne Johnson (1947-2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    It is with great sadness that I report the passing of Dr Dianne Johnson in May 2012. Dr Johnson was a pivotal and important figure in the field of Australian cultural astronomy and in the campaign for Aboriginal rights.

  14. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  15. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  16. White Dwarfs in SDSS DR9 and DR10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile Fusillo, Nicola Pietro; Gänsicke, Boris; Koester, Detlev

    2015-06-01

    Currently the largest catalogue of spectroscopically identified WDs is based on the 7th Data Release (DR) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and contains over 20000 WDs (Kleinman et al. 2013). However, only a fraction of all WDs in the photometric footprint of SDSS have been spectroscopically followed up. Using DR7 spectroscopy as a training sample, we developed a method to select high confidence photometric WD candidates. The novelty of our selection is that it allows us to assign to any object with multi-colour and proper motion data a well-defined "probability of being a white dwarf" (or a contaminant). Exploiting this selection method we compiled a catalogue (Gentile Fusillo et al. in prep) which currently covers the entire photometric footprint of SDSS, 14555sq deg, with a limiting magnitude of g ≤ 19. The catalogue contains over 20000 high-confidence WDs and WD candidates 11500 of which have not yet been followed up with Sloan spectroscopy. Even though, so far, our catalogue relies only SDSS we plan to extend the sky coverage as additional deep multi-colour large area surveys become available. DR10 includes over 1.4 million spectra taken with the new BOSS spectrograph, which improves over the original SDSS spectograph in both resolution and wavelength coverage, but has so far not been systematically mined for WD science. As part of this project, we also inspected over 8000 BOSS spectra of bright (g ≤ 19) colour selected sources and classified 1765 new WDs. We used this independent, spectroscopically confirmed sample to further validate our selection method. Finally we discuss possible application of our catalogue , focusing on the selection and follow up of 9 new DZs which show strong pollution from elements other than Ca and IR excess emission emission consistent with the presence of debris discs.

  17. Dr Jan Theodoor Henrard (with portrait)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, W.A.

    1946-01-01

    On October 16th 1946 Dr J. Th. Henrard will have reached the pensionable age of sixty five years. In accordance with the legal prescriptions he is due to take leave officially as keeper of the ”Rijksherbarium“. The present director, Prof. Dr H. J. Lam, invited me to write a short biography of Dr

  18. Dr Jan Theodoor Henrard (with portrait)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goddijn, W.A.

    1946-01-01

    On October 16th 1946 Dr J. Th. Henrard will have reached the pensionable age of sixty five years. In accordance with the legal prescriptions he is due to take leave officially as keeper of the ”Rijksherbarium“. The present director, Prof. Dr H. J. Lam, invited me to write a short biography of Dr Hen

  19. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  20. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...

  1. [General surgeons and varicose vein surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cuenca, Germán; Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, Jose Luis

    2009-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a highly prevalent condition, with significant health and economic repercussions. Although important therapeutic developments have been introduced in recent years, the majority are dealt with by general surgeons in national health hospitals. These surgeons do not have the required and continuous training, and continue to perform classic surgery techniques. Also, their presence at scientific, organisational meetings and training is almost nil. We present an update on developments in phlebology, and tapping into the preliminary results of a national survey, we reflect on the current status of phlebology and beyond for those general surgeons who should have a role in this field.

  2. Cognitive heterogeneity in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Melanie A; Coltheart, Max

    2005-01-01

    This study used the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability-Revised to investigate a wide range of cognitive abilities in people with Williams syndrome (WS). It involved a comparatively large sample of 31 people with WS, but took a case-series approach. The study addressed the widespread claims of a characteristic "WS cognitive profile" by looking for heterogeneity rather than homogeneity. People with WS showed a variety of preserved (significantly above mental age [MA]), expected (at MA), and significantly impaired (significantly below MA) levels of functioning. Such results provide clear evidence for heterogeneity in cognitive functions within WS. We found the most homogeneity on a test of phonological processing and a test of phonological short-term memory, with half of the WS sample performing at MA levels on these tests. Interestingly, no WS individual showed a weakness on a test of nonverbal reasoning, and only one WS individual showed a weakness on a test of verbal comprehension. In addition, we found that strengths on analysis-synthesis and verbal analogies occurred only for WS individuals with an MA less than 5.5 years (our sample median MA); people with an MA greater than 5.5 years performed at MA level on these 2 tests. Results also provided preliminary evidence for distinct subgroups of WS people based on their cognitive strengths and weaknesses on a broad range of cognitive functions. On the basis of the findings, caution should be made in declaring a single cognitive profile that is characteristic of all individuals with WS. Just as there is heterogeneity in genetic and physical anomalies within WS, not all WS individuals share the same cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Also, not all WS individuals show the profile of a strength in verbal abilities and a weakness in spatial functions.

  3. Surgeon-patient communication during awake procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire S; Guyton, Kristina; Pariser, Joseph J; Siegler, Mark; Schindler, Nancy; Langerman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Surgeons are increasingly performing procedures on awake patients. Communication during such procedures is complex and underexplored in the literature. Surgeons were recruited from the faculty of 2 hospitals to participate in an interview regarding their approaches to communication during awake procedures. Three researchers used the constant comparative method to transcribe, code, and review interviews until saturation was reached. Twenty-three surgeons described the advantages and disadvantages of awake procedures, their communication with the awake patient, their interactions with staff and with trainees, the environment of awake procedures, and how communication in this context is taught and learned. Surgeons recognized communication during awake procedures as important and reported varied strategies for ensuring patient comfort in this context. However, they also acknowledged challenges with multiparty communication during awake procedures, especially in balancing commitments to teaching with their duty to comfort the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sir Donald Ross, pioneer aortic valve surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, David

    2015-06-01

    Tribute to Sir Donald Ross by David Wheatley, as read by Robert Kleinloog, President, Society of Cardiothoracic Surgeons of South Africa at the Annual Congress of the South African Heart Association 19 October 2014.

  5. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Research Foundation of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) and the Society of American ... W. OIympic Blvd Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 USA webmaster@sages.org Tel: (310) 437- ...

  6. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  7. My Continuing Evolution as a Surgeon-Scientist: A Decade after the Jacobson Promising Investigator Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Edith

    2017-01-01

    THE SECOND JOAN L AND JULIUS H JACOBSON PROMISING INVESTIGATOR AWARDEE, EDITH TZENG MD, FACS: In 2005, the Surgical Research Committee of the American College of Surgeons was tasked with selecting the recipient of a newly established award, "The Joan L and Julius H Jacobson Promising Investigator Award." According to the Jacobsons, the award funded by Dr Jacobson should be given at least once every 2 years to a surgeon investigator at "the tipping point," who can demonstrate that his or her research shows the promise of leading to a significant contribution to the practice of surgery and patient safety. Every year, the Surgical Research Committee receives many excellent nominations and has the difficult task of selecting one awardee. The first awardee was Michael Longaker MD, FACS, who 10 years later reflected on the award and the impact it had on his career.(1) This year, Edith Tzeng, MD, FACS, the second Jacobson awardee, reflects on her 10-year journey after receiving the award. Dr Tzeng is now a national and international figure in the field of vascular surgery and has studied the effect of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on intimal hyperplasia. Kamal MF Itani, MD, FACS and Leigh Neumayer, MD, FACS, on behalf of the Surgical Research Committee of the American College of Surgeons.

  8. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of patient factors, surgeons, and surgeon teams in immediate implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfrerer, Lisa; Mattos, David; Mastroianni, Melissa; Weng, Qing Y; Ricci, Joseph A; Heath, Martha P; Lin, Alex; Specht, Michelle C; Haynes, Alex B; Austen, William G; Liao, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Outcome studies of immediate implant-based breast reconstruction have focused largely on patient factors, whereas the relative impact of the surgeon as a contributing variable is not known. As the procedure requires collaboration of both a surgical oncologist and a plastic surgeon, the effect of the surgeon team interaction can have a significant impact on outcome. This study examines outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction and the association with patient characteristics, surgeon, and surgeon team familiarity. A retrospective review of 3142 consecutive implant-based breast reconstruction mastectomy procedures at one institution was performed. Infection and skin necrosis rates were measured. Predictors of outcomes were identified by unadjusted logistic regression followed by multivariate logistic regression. Surgeon teams were grouped according to number of cases performed together. Patient characteristics remain the most important predictors for outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, with odds ratios above those of surgeon variables. The authors observed significant differences in the rate of skin necrosis between surgical oncologists with an approximately two-fold difference between surgeons with the highest and lowest rates. Surgeon teams that worked together on fewer than 150 procedures had higher rates of infection. Patient characteristics are the most important predictors for surgical outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction, but surgeons and surgeon teams are also important variables. High-volume surgeon teams achieve lower rates of infection. This study highlights the need to examine modifiable risk factors associated with optimum implant-based breast reconstruction outcomes, which include patient and provider characteristics and the surgical team treating the patient. Risk, III.

  10. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  11. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  12. Social Cognition in Williams Syndrome: Face Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Heiz, Julie; Sokolov, Alexander N; Barisnikov, Koviljka

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions), the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  13. Social cognition in Williams syndrome: face tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina A Pavlova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many neurological, neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric and psychosomatic disorders are characterized by impairments in visual social cognition, body language reading, and facial assessment of a social counterpart. Yet a wealth of research indicates that individuals with Williams syndrome exhibit remarkable concern for social stimuli and face fascination. Here individuals with Williams syndrome were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images composed of food ingredients and in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style. The primary advantage of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face-specific processing, whereas in face images commonly used for investigating face perception (such as photographs or depictions, the mere occurrence of typical cues already implicates face presence. In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Strikingly, individuals with Williams syndrome exhibited profound deficits in recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which typically developing controls effortlessly recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This suggests atypical face tuning in Williams syndrome. The outcome is discussed in the light of a general pattern of social cognition in Williams syndrome and brain mechanisms underpinning face processing.

  14. Language and communicative development in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Becerra, Angela M

    2007-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, is associated with mild to moderate intellectual disability or learning difficulties. Most individuals with Williams syndrome evidence a cognitive profile including relative strengths in verbal short-term memory and language, and considerable weakness in visuospatial construction. The syndrome has often been argued to provide strong evidence for the independence of language from other aspects of cognition. We provide a brief history of early research on the language abilities of individuals with Williams syndrome and then review contemporary studies of language and cognition in Williams syndrome, beginning with a consideration of performance on standardized assessments. In the remainder of the article, we first consider early language acquisition, with a focus on speech production and perception, vocabulary acquisition, and communicative/pragmatic development and then consider the language abilities of school-age children and adolescents, focusing on semantics, grammar, and pragmatics. We argue that rather than being the paradigm case for the independence of language from cognition, Williams syndrome provides strong evidence of the interdependence of many aspects of language and cognition.

  15. William D. Harper, Jr, MS, DC: anything can cause anything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joseph C

    2008-03-01

    Trained as an engineer and a chiropractor, William D. Harper, Jr. made his career in the healing arts as instructor, writer and president of the Texas Chiropractic College (TCC). A native of Texas who grew up in various locales in the Lone Star State, in Mexico and in the Boston area, he took his bachelor's and master's degree in engineering in 1933 and 1934 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his chiropractic degree at TCC in 1942. Dissatisfied with the "foot-on-the-hose" concept of subluxation syndrome (D.D. Palmer's second theory), Dr. Harper studied and wrote about aberrant neural irritation as an alternative explanation for disease and for the broad clinical value he perceived in the chiropractic art. In this he paralleled much of D.D. Palmer's third theory of chiropractic. His often reprinted textbook, Anything Can Cause Anything, brought together much of what he had lectured and written about in numerous published articles. He was well prepared for the defense of chiropractic that he offered in 1965 in the trial of the England case in federal district court in Louisiana. The case was lost when the court ruled that the legislature rather than the judiciary should decide whether to permit chiropractors to practice, but Harper's performance was considered excellent. He went on to guide the TCC as president from 1965 through 1976, its first 11 years after relocating from San Antonio to Pasadena, Texas. Harper built the school - its faculty, staff and facilities - from very meager beginnings to a small but financially viable institution when he departed. Along the way he found fault with both chiropractic political camps that vied for federal recognition as the accrediting agency for chiropractic colleges in the United States. Dr. Bill Harper was a maverick determined to do things his way, and in many respects he was successful. He left a mark on the profession that merits critical analysis.

  16. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  17. Surgeons and non-surgeons prefer haptic feedback of instrument vibrations during robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Jacqueline K; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2015-10-01

    Clinical robotic surgery systems do not currently provide haptic feedback because surgical instrument interactions are difficult to measure and display. Our laboratory recently developed a technology that allows surgeons to feel and/or hear the high-frequency vibrations of robotic instruments as they interact with patient tissue and other tools. Until now, this type of feedback had not been carefully evaluated by users. We conducted two human-subject studies to discover whether surgeons and non-surgeons value the addition of vibration feedback from surgical instruments during robotic surgery. In the first experiment, 10 surgeons and 10 non-surgeons (n = 20) used an augmented Intuitive da Vinci Standard robot to repeatedly perform up to four dry-lab tasks both with and without haptic and audio feedback. In the second experiment, 68 surgeons and 26 non-surgeons (n = 94) tested the same robot at a surgical conference: each participant spent approximately 5 min performing one or two tasks. Almost all subjects in both experiments (95 and 98 %, respectively) preferred receiving feedback of tool vibrations, and all subjects in the second experiment thought it would be useful for surgeons to have the option of such feedback. About half of the subjects (50, 60 %) preferred haptic and audio feedback together, and almost all the rest (45, 35 %) preferred haptic feedback alone. Subjects stated that the feedback made them more aware of tool contacts and did not interfere with use of the robot. There were no significant differences between the responses of different subject populations for any questions in either experiment. This study illustrates that both surgeons and non-surgeons prefer instrument vibration feedback during robotic surgery. Some participants found audio feedback useful but most preferred haptic feedback overall. This strong preference for tool vibration feedback indicates that this technology provides valuable tactile information to the surgeon.

  18. A Brief Analysis on William Blake's London

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 尚彦飞

    2014-01-01

    William Blake (1757-1827) is a renowned British poet in the 18th century. His lyric poems display the characteristics of romantic spirit, and he is regarded as the forefather of the British Romanticism. His London is a well-known lyric poetry, which is thought to be the best vesicle in the West. This paper will analyse this poem in terms of its form, theme, and im-age and then draw a brief conclusion for the characteristics of William Blake's poem.

  19. PCCF flow analysis -- DR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkin, J.F.

    1961-04-26

    This report contains an analysis of PCCF tube flow and Panellit pressure relations at DR reactor. Supply curves are presented at front header pressures from 480 to 600 psig using cold water and the standard 0.236 inch orifice with taper down stream and the pigtail valve (plug or ball) open. Demand curves are presented for slug column lengths of 200 inches to 400 inches using 1.44 inch O.D. solid poison pieces (either Al or Pb-Cd) and cold water with a rear header pressure of 50 psig. Figure 1 is a graph of Panellit pressure vs. flow with the above supply and demand curves and clearly shows the effect of front header pressure and charge length on flow.

  20. Designing a leadership development program for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Gregory A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Lemak, Christy Harris; Mulholland, Michael W; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous leadership development programs (LDPs) exist in health care, no programs have been specifically designed to meet the needs of surgeons. This study aimed to elicit practicing surgeons' motivations and desired goals for leadership training to design an evidence-based LDP in surgery. At a large academic health center, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 surgical faculty members who voluntarily applied and were selected for participation in a newly created LDP. Transcriptions of the interviews were analyzed using analyst triangulation and thematic coding to extract major themes regarding surgeons' motivations and perceived needs for leadership knowledge and skills. Themes from interview responses were then used to design the program curriculum specifically to meet the leadership needs of surgical faculty. Three major themes emerged regarding surgeons' motivations for seeking leadership training: (1) Recognizing key gaps in their formal preparation for leadership roles; (2) Exhibiting an appetite for personal self-improvement; and (3) Seeking leadership guidance for career advancement. Participants' interviews revealed four specific domains of knowledge and skills that they indicated as desired takeaways from a LDP: (1) leadership and communication; (2) team building; (3) business acumen/finance; and (4) greater understanding of the health care context. Interviews with surgical faculty members identified gaps in prior leadership training and demonstrated concrete motivations and specific goals for participating in a formal leadership program. A LDP that is specifically tailored to address the needs of surgical faculty may benefit surgeons at a personal and institutional level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Dr House, TV, and reality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Montois, Sylvie; Alhéritière, Armelle; De Stefano, Carla; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Adnet, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Medical practice in the media is usually far from reality. Thus, the viewer may be led astray. The world-famous fictional Dr House has to face a difficult diagnosis every week. His practice does not seem to reflect reality. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnosis strategy involved in this television program. An observer has previewed the 2011 season. The episode running time, the patient's age and sex, the list of all investigations and interventions, the final diagnosis, and the patient's outcome were collected. Number and proportion of French viewers for each episode were recorded. We analyzed 18 episodes. The median running time was 42.5 (42.1-43.2) minutes. Main patient characters were 12 men (66%) and 6 women (33%); the average age was 31 (22-38) years. There were 225 investigations or interventions reported, averaging 14 (9-15) per episode, representing one examination every 3.1 (2.9-4.8) minutes. The most frequently prescribed investigations were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 13; 72%), blood sample (11; 61%), and biopsy (10; 56%). The most frequent interventions were surgery, anti-infectious treatments, and steroid treatments (9 each; 50%). Two patients (11%) died. The median number of spectators was 8.4 (8.1-8.7) million, corresponding to 33% (33%-34%) of the French national audience. The population and the examination strategies used by Dr House were unrealistic. Because of this distortion, patients may not understand, nor accept the delay, the investigation choices, the intervention costs, risks, nor failures of a daily medical practice. Physicians should be aware of this "information bias." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tidens Rytmik. Dante Alighieri, William Carlos Williams' Prosodi og Michel Serres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stougaard-Nielsen, Jakob

    2006-01-01

      Artiklen diskuterer William Carlos Williams' poetik og hans lyriske eksperimenter i tilknytning til begreberne 'den variable fod' og 'det triadiske vers'. Den argumenterer for, at Williams' poetik kan opfattes både som et forsøg på at vitalisere et typografisk styret poetisk  sprog og som del a...... et større projekt om at frembringe en poetisk stemme, som korresponderer med modernitetens rytmer og temporalitet. Ezra Pound, George Antheil, Einstein og Michel Serres bliver i denne forbindelse taget med i billedet. ...

  4. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  5. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  6. Homenaje al Dr. Eduardo Vargas Alvarado

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Abarca Barrantes; Leslie Solano Calderón

    2003-01-01

    La Universidad Latina rinde homenaje al Dr. Eduardo Vargas Alvarado, Decano de la Facultad de Medicina de esta Universidad. El Dr. Eduardo VaIgas Alvarado desarrollo la Morgue Judicial, desde su inicio en de enero de 1965, y desde 1975 hasta su jubilación del Poder Judicial en 1992 fue el Jefe del Departamento de Medicina Legal. La Dra. Leslie Solano Calderón es la Jefa actual de dicho Departamento y junto con el Dr. Abarca, fueron discípulos de Don Eduardo. El Dr. Vargas ha escrito varios li...

  7. China's Investment Leade Dr, Alyce Su

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ I. Professional Background Dr. Alyce Su specializes in investment managemeng, managing portfolios consisted of investment opportunities originated from China's growth and internationalization, both'outbound and inbound.

  8. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to reco

  9. Maximizing efficiency on trauma surgeon rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniuk, Aliaksandr; Dickson, Barbara J; Mahoney, Sean; O'Mara, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Rounding by trauma surgeons is a complex multidisciplinary team-based process in the inpatient setting. Implementation of lean methodology aims to increase understanding of the value stream and eliminate nonvalue-added (NVA) components. We hypothesized that analysis of trauma rounds with education and intervention would improve surgeon efficacy. Level 1 trauma center with 4300 admissions per year. Average non-intensive care unit census was 55. Five full-time attending trauma surgeons were evaluated. Value-added (VA) and NVA components of rounding were identified. The components of each patient interaction during daily rounds were documented. Summary data were presented to the surgeons. An action plan of improvement was provided at group and individual interventions. Change plans were presented to the multidisciplinary team. Data were recollected 6 mo after intervention. The percent of interactions with NVA components decreased (16.0% to 10.7%, P = 0.0001). There was no change between the two periods in time of evaluation of individual patients (4.0 and 3.5 min, P = 0.43). Overall time to complete rounds did not change. There was a reduction in the number of interactions containing NVA components (odds ratio = 2.5). The trauma surgeons were able to reduce the NVA components of rounds. We did not see a decrease in rounding time or individual patient time. This implies that surgeons were able to reinvest freed time into patient care, or that the NVA components were somehow not increasing process time. Direct intervention for isolated improvements can be effective in the rounding process, and efforts should be focused upon improving the value of time spent rather than reducing time invested. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The business acumen of Canadian plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, J A; Caputy, G G

    1995-08-01

    We as plastic surgeons are engrossed and consumed by our quest to optimize patient care. In so doing, we are often distracted by that aspect of our practice which has direct bearing on patient care yet for which we are the least prepared--the business aspect. The entire population of Canadian plastic surgeons was surveyed in an effort to establish real and perceived needs of this group with respect to the business management of their practices. The survey elicited demographic information, information on business educational background, interest, and current commitment in acquiring business knowledge, and a final category of questions dealing with how well these surgeons function as business managers. Of the 315 plastic surgeons surveyed, 122 (39 percent) responded, which, in and of itself, indicates an interest in this aspect of their practices. Twelve respondents were excluded from the study for various reasons. Eighty of the 110 remaining respondents (72 percent) used a hospital-integrated facility for both emergency and elective outpatient procedures. Eighty-four of the 110 respondents (76 percent) indicated that 10 percent of their hours per week of inpatient booked operating time was canceled. Ninety-three percent of respondents felt that a business course to familiarize surgeons with common business situations and areas of personal finance would be beneficial. Few were previously educated in business, and similarly, few had great ongoing interest in business, although the majority of respondents used publications specifically dealing with financial matters (provided by the Canadian Medical Association). Twenty-three percent of respondents saw themselves in a growing role as businesspeople; 24 percent felt this dual role was enjoyable, while 29 percent felt this role was forced on them. A total of 21 percent of respondents did not see themselves as businesspeople at all. The six basic functions of a manager (planning, acquiring, organizing, actuating

  11. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  12. Attribution of Negative Intention in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…

  13. William James Sidis, The Broken Twig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montour, Kathleen

    1977-01-01

    By presenting cases of prodigies who entered college as early as William James Bidis but who succeeded, this paper attempts to dissuade the public from its opposition to educational acceleration for precocious children, to which the "Sidis fallacy" has helped give rise. (Author)

  14. Executive Function in Williams and Down Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Daniel P. J.; Brown, Janice H.; Henry, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    Williams (WS) and Down (DS) syndromes are characterised by roughly opposing ability profiles. Relative verbal strengths and visuospatial difficulties have been reported in those with WS, while expressive language difficulties have been observed in individuals with DS. Few investigations into the executive function (EF) skills of these groups have…

  15. Syukuro Manabe Receives 2010 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccoli, Anthony J.; Manabe, Syukuro

    2011-01-01

    Syukuro Manabe was awarded the 2010 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  16. Aki receives 2004 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Aki, Keiiti

    Keiiti Aki was awarded the 2004 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 15 December 2004, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research”

  17. Allegre receives the William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Don L.

    The 1995 William Bowie Medal, given by AGU for outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research, was presented to Claude Allègre at the AGU Spring Meeting Honor Ceremony on May 31 in Baltimore. The award citation is given here.

  18. Solomon Receives 2007 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, Guy; Solomon, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Susan Solomon was awarded the 2007 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 12 December 2007 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.''

  19. The world in eighteen lessons: Christopher Williams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrebi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptual photographer Christopher Williams is a real artist's artist. Ever since he moved to Germany, his measured work, which both reveres and examines the art of photography, has more and more easily found its way into European art institutes, such as this spring at Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens in Deu

  20. Denigrating Carl Rogers: William Coulson's Last Crusade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Howard

    1991-01-01

    Reviews William Coulson's assertions that Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and he initiated the humanistic education field, that Rogers repudiated his philosophy late in life, and that they owe the nation's parents an apology. Argues that these charges are groundless and provides examples and quotations from Rogers' later writings to show how Rogers…

  1. Stranger Danger Awareness in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, D. M.; Kirk, H.; Hanley, M.; Riby, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) is characterised by a distinctive cognitive profile and an intriguing social phenotype. Individuals with the disorder are often highly social engaging with familiar and unfamiliar people and once in an interaction they often show subtle abnormalities of social behaviour. Atypically…

  2. WILLIAM GOLDING'S NOVEL--THE BACKWARD LOOK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PECK, CAROL FAULKNER

    THE "SURPRISE ENDINGS" IN EACH OF WILLIAM GOLDING'S FIRST FOUR NOVELS OCCUR WHEN THE POINT OF VIEW SHIFTS FROM THE LIMITED WORLD OF THE NOVEL TO THE UNLIMITED WORLD OF REALITY. THE BOYS' RESCUE BY THE UNCOMPREHENDING OFFICER IN "LORD OF THE FLIES," REFOCUSES AND REINFORCES ALL THAT PRECEDES IT, AND THE FABLE, SUPERIMPOSED UPON REAL LIFE, BECOMES…

  3. Nature and Nurture: Williams Syndrome across Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer-Comfort, Carol; Doyle, Teresa; Masataka, Nobuo; Korenberg, Julie; Bellugi, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    This study is concerned with ways in which children with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder arising from a hemizygous deletion in chromosome band 7q11.23 including the gene for elastin (ELN) and approximately 20 surrounding genes, are affected by social mores of vastly differing cultures: the United States and Japan. WS…

  4. Who Was the Real William Shakespeare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael Todd

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights a project that encourages students to connect reading and mathematics instruction by using a data analysis approach. Students analyze sonnets from statistical, literary, and historical points of view in an effort to uncover the true identity of William Shakespeare. (Contains 10 figures.)

  5. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly.

  6. 77 FR 76414 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... ID ED-2008-OPE-0009] William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Department of Education... (FFEL) Program; and the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program, including the Public... for Postsecondary Education. Accordingly, 34 CFR part 685 is corrected as follows: PART 685--WILLIAM...

  7. 78 FR 28953 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... May 16, 2013 Part II Department of Education 34 CFR Part 685 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan... Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD13 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Secretary amends the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

  8. Dr Andrea Granelli, Vice President, Telecom Italia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 06: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (second from right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi , F. Gagliardi and G. Cavallari. Photo 15: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (left) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi and G. Cavallari.

  9. Biography of Dr. Simao Nascimento de Sousa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.^red.

    the projects he has handled are the Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (COMAPS) and Integrated Coastal and Marine Area Management Plan for Goa (ICMAM-Goa). Dr. de Sousa was a silent worker of high caliber with exceptional leadership qualities. Dr. A...

  10. Dr Valter Rukavina - amateur painter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavocic, Daina

    2008-01-01

    In this essay Dr Valter Rukavina (Rijeka 1896-1972), excellent specialist in infectious diseases and professor of the Rijeka University School of Medicine, is presented as successful amateur painter. He had been refining his talent through relentless practice since the school days, complementing it with skills and advice from established painters he associated with. He favoured figurative, realistic and somewhat romantic expression for his themes such as coastal landscapes, marinas, Quarnero sceneries, still life in tempera or oil, and drawings in ink or sepia. Despite partial colour blindness, he successfully used colour. He featured in a number of group exhibitions such as that of amateur painters of Rijeka in 1950, of painters physicians of Yugoslavia (Zagreb, 1956), in the Second International Exhibition of Contemporary Art (Florence, 1964), exhibition of the Rijeka branch of the Croatian Association of Visual Artists (Belgrade, 1966), and the 1969 exhibition in Opatija. His native city hosted two one-man exhibitions, the first retrospective in 1971, while he was still alive, and the second posthumous in 2007, with a good selection of his life's work.

  11. How helpful is capsule endoscopy to surgeons?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Ersoy; Bulent Sivri; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a new technology that, for the first time, allows complete, non-invasive endoscopic imaging of the small bowel. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of suspected small bowel diseases has been established. Important applications for surgeons include observations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel neoplasms.

  12. Contemporary social media engagement by breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekatah, Gregory E; Walker, Stephanie G; McDonald, James J; Dixon, J Michael; Brady, Richard R W

    2016-12-01

    There continues to be a steady rise in the use of social media among healthcare professionals. We present an overview of social media use among breast surgeons within the United Kingdom including demographic variations and some of the factors that underpin these trends. The benefits and drawbacks of open social media platforms are also considered.

  13. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs.

  14. Has medical history importance for surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, O W

    1975-03-01

    Surgeons will do well to remember that the two most important contributions to the growth and extension of surgery came from two disciplines, not then regarded as the most innovative. Anesthesia came from dentistry, the work primarily of W.T.G. Morton of Boston; prophylactic surgical antisepsis originated with the obstetrician Semmelweis, who developed a scheme of prophylactic chemical antisepsis that still remains the core of surgical antisepsis. In the mid 1880's, largely as a result of the work of Chamberland and others of the Pasteur school, surgeons in France and Germany substituted thermal for chemical antisepsis, whenever applicable. Whereas Lister's influence was tremendous in fostering acceptance of antisepsis by surgeons, by the end of his professorial career he had begun his capitulation to prophylactic antisepsis, which was complete by 1896 to the very practices that Semmelweis had proved the value of almost five decades previously. These were 19th century innovations. The greatest boon to surgery's advance in this century has been control of cellulitic infections through chemotherapeutic agencies, the sulfonamides and antibiotics. The tremendous upsurge of interest in research at the end of World War II brought surgeons to a fuller realization of the significant part they could play in the advance of their discipline. Intimate alignment of surgeons with physiologists of the circulation begot intracardiac surgery, a significant innovation with consequences of tremendous import for greater medicine's advance. Today, surgeons attacking the problem of tissue transplantation are aligning themselves with biochemists, geneticists, immunologists, experimental pathologists, and pharmacologists in their broad approach to the phenomenon of allograft rejection. The great extension of vascular surgery since World War II has made jewelers of surgeons of small tubular structures. The technical phases of these demanding operative procedures have largely been overcome

  15. Neurosurgeon as innovator: William V. Cone (1897-1959).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preul, M C; Stratford, J; Bertrand, G; Feindel, W

    1993-10-01

    Neurosurgeons are well known for being productive researchers and innovators. Few, however, have possessed the prolific ingenuity of William Cone. In 1934, he and William Penfield were cofounders of the Montreal Neurological Institute where, until 1959, he filled the twin roles of neurosurgeon-in-chief and neuropathologist. Because he did not find writing easy, many of his technical inventions and refinements remained unpublished. His numerous innovations included the extensive use of twist-drill technique for biopsy, drainage for subdural hematoma and cerebral abscess, and ventriculography. In the mid-1940's, he developed power tools driven by nitrogen that led to the modern, universally used air-driven tool systems. He had a special interest in the treatment of spinal dysfunction, for which he invented the Cone-Barton skull-traction tongs along with the Cone spinal operating table. He also devised operative procedures for vertebral fracture-dislocation and craniospinal anomalies. For the maintenance of muscle tone in the paralyzed bladder, he constructed a tidal drainage system. He introduced and popularized ventriculoperitoneal shunting techniques and carried out some of the earliest experimental trails to treat brain infections with sulphonamide and antibiotic drugs. He designed his own set of surgical suction devices, bone rongeurs, and a personal suction "air-conditioning" system for each surgeon. He had a keen early interest in intracranial tumors, and also demonstrated on monkeys how subdural mass lesions caused pupillary dilation and mesial temporal lobe damage due to cerebral compression. His work for the military during World War II on effects of altitude on brain pressure remained classified for many years. The first clipping and excision of an intracranial aneurysm is attributed to Cone. Although Penfield was known as "the Chief," Cone was referred to as "the Boss." His fervent dedication to provide total care to his patients was expressed in round

  16. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  17. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  18. Robert Willis (1799-1878): the works of William Harvey, M. D., London 1847. A bibliographical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    Robert Willis was one of the early historians of medicine in Great Britain. He is recalled as a biographer and editor of the works of William Harvey. His translation of Harvey's 'Exercitatio de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus' of 1628 is appreciated as the standard rendering among all the English versions of this most influential dissertation. Willis' author's copy of 'The Works of William Harvey' with corrections and notes which, however, are not indicative of attempts at a revision of the text is to be found in the Library of the University of Münster at Westphalia in Germany. The book was donated along with 17,000 other books, in the years 1911/12 to the University Library by the German physician Dr Albert Voss who practised in the United States of America.

  19. William Harvey, Peter Lauremberg and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, G

    1992-11-01

    In 1636, the Rostock professor of medicine and the art of poetry, Peter Lauremberg (1585-1639), was one of the earliest to mention circulation which had been discovered by William Harvey and documented in his anatomical manual. In 1628 William Harvey proved the existence of the blood circulation by calculating the "cardiac output in a half an hour (semihora)". The answer to the question why Harvey chose half an hour as the time range can be found in the way of measuring time usual at that period. The sandglasses were turned half-hourly in maritime navigation and the wheel-clocks on shore had only the hour-hand. Improved chronometry was one of the prerequisites for measuring cardiac output. The minute-hand became usual after 1700 and the second-hand later on. Taking into consideration the alterations of cardiac output made the latter one of the most important circulation parameters in diagnostics, prognostication and therapeutics.

  20. Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ranalli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem which generates metaepistemological ramifications for anti-skeptical theories. In particular, we argue that, contra Williams, Rorty’s view that Davidson was offering a theoretical diagnosis of radical skepticism can be consistently maintained with his transcendental approach.

  1. William Wilde and 1 Merrion Square.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntegart, R

    2016-05-01

    William Wilde spent the final third of his life, from 1855 to 1876, in 1 Merrion Square. During the first half of his occupancy of the house his career blossomed to its fullest; the second decade, on the other hand, was marked by scandal, personal tragedy, and an unhappy professional and social decline. This paper considers the background to the development of Merrion Square, the architectural history of 1 Merrion Square from its building in 1762 to the arrival of the Wildes in 1855, the attractions and possibilities which the house offered for William Wilde, the major architectural expansion of the building which he commissioned in 1859, and aspects of his and his family's life in the house.

  2. Homenaje al Dr. Eduardo Vargas Alvarado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Abarca Barrantes

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La Universidad Latina rinde homenaje al Dr. Eduardo Vargas Alvarado, Decano de la Facultad de Medicina de esta Universidad. El Dr. Eduardo VaIgas Alvarado desarrollo la Morgue Judicial, desde su inicio en de enero de 1965, y desde 1975 hasta su jubilación del Poder Judicial en 1992 fue el Jefe del Departamento de Medicina Legal. La Dra. Leslie Solano Calderón es la Jefa actual de dicho Departamento y junto con el Dr. Abarca, fueron discípulos de Don Eduardo. El Dr. Vargas ha escrito varios libros de Medicina Legal, ha recibido múltiples reconocimientos por su labor en la Medicina Legal Latinoamericana y es el Presidente Honorario de la Asociación Costarricense de Medicina Forense. El Departamento de Medicina Legal y la Asociación Costarricense de Medicina Forense se han sumado a este justo y oportuno reconocimiento.The Latina University give honor to Dr. Eduardo Vargas Alvarado, Dean of the Medicine Faculty of this University. Dr. Vargas developed the Judicial Morgue, from its very beginning, January 1, of 1965; and from 1975 until his jubilation from the Judicial Power in 1992 was the Boss of the Legal Medicine Department. Dr. Leslie Solano Calderon, the actual Boss of this Department, and Dr. Abarca were disciples of Mr. Vargas. Dr. Vargas has written many books of Legal Medicine and has received many acknowledgements because of his legal medicine work in Latin America and is the Honorary President of the Costa Rican Forensic Medicine Association. The Legal Medicine Department and the Costa Rican Forensic Medicine Association are added to this just and opportune acknowledge.

  3. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Francesca; Menghini, Deny; Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  4. A Williams' Decomposition for Spatially Dependent Superprocesses

    CERN Document Server

    Delmas, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    We present a genealogy for superprocesses with a non-homogeneous quadratic branching mechanism, relying on a weighted version of the superprocess and a Girsanov theorem. We then decompose this genealogy with respect to the last individual alive (William's decomposition). Letting the extinction time tend to infinity, we get the Q-process by looking at the superprocess from the root, and define another process by looking from the top. Examples including the multitype Feller diff usion and the superdiffusion are provided.

  5. Learning by observation: insights from Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Foti

    Full Text Available Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer's acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for

  6. Sydafrikanske William S. Mazwis Lebenslauf (ca. 1928)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anne Folke

    2008-01-01

    Gennem teoretiske indsigter lånt fra psykologi, pædagogik, filosofi, lingvistik og litteraturvidenskab reflekteres over de metodologiske udfordringer, der kan møde forskeren i analyser af tekster produceret af den 'Anden'. I artiklen fokuseres på den herrnhutiske missionskirke i Sydafrika i begyn...... begyndelsen af det 20. århundrede, og den sorte herrnhuterpræst William S. Mazwis levnedsbeskrivelse analyseres som et eksempel på autoetnografisk selv-subjektivering. Udgivelsesdato: December...

  7. Learning by Observation: Insights from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandolesi, Laura; Federico, Francesca; Vicari, Stefano; Petrosini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Observing another person performing a complex action accelerates the observer’s acquisition of the same action and limits the time-consuming process of learning by trial and error. Observational learning makes an interesting and potentially important topic in the developmental domain, especially when disorders are considered. The implications of studies aimed at clarifying whether and how this form of learning is spared by pathology are manifold. We focused on a specific population with learning and intellectual disabilities, the individuals with Williams syndrome. The performance of twenty-eight individuals with Williams syndrome was compared with that of mental age- and gender-matched thirty-two typically developing children on tasks of learning of a visuo-motor sequence by observation or by trial and error. Regardless of the learning modality, acquiring the correct sequence involved three main phases: a detection phase, in which participants discovered the correct sequence and learned how to perform the task; an exercise phase, in which they reproduced the sequence until performance was error-free; an automatization phase, in which by repeating the error-free sequence they became accurate and speedy. Participants with Williams syndrome beneficiated of observational training (in which they observed an actor detecting the visuo-motor sequence) in the detection phase, while they performed worse than typically developing children in the exercise and automatization phases. Thus, by exploiting competencies learned by observation, individuals with Williams syndrome detected the visuo-motor sequence, putting into action the appropriate procedural strategies. Conversely, their impaired performances in the exercise phases appeared linked to impaired spatial working memory, while their deficits in automatization phases to deficits in processes increasing efficiency and speed of the response. Overall, observational experience was advantageous for acquiring competencies

  8. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  9. Analysis of Coupling between DR and Microstrip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Juan; LIU Guanghu

    2003-01-01

    The coupling between dielectric resonator (DR) and microstrip is theoretically analyzed in this paper. The equivalent circuit and corresponding components' expression are achieved. Also, the formula of the coupling ratio is deduced, which is the critical parameter to calculate the values of components. The analysis of the paper can be used in modeling and strict design in DR applications such as dielectric resonator oscillators(DROs)and DR filters. At the end of the paper, an example of DRO design based on the analysis above is given. The coincidence between modulation and measure shows the significance of the paper.

  10. William Wilde in the West of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, D

    2016-05-01

    It is widely believed that Sir William Wilde's forebears were in Ireland for just two or three generations. This belief stems from a number of short biographies of Wilde which were published during his lifetime. These biographies gave different versions of the origin of the Wilde family and appear to have been generated by the creative imagination of Lady Jane Wilde or, as she was better known by her nom de plume, Speranza. She was equally imaginative in creating narratives about her own family background and in one she claimed descent from the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. So it was not a great challenge for her to invent biographies of her husband which she deemed suitable for a knight living at the prestigious address of 1 Merrion Square, leading many to believe that William and his son Oscar were more English than Irish. It was also important for Speranza to distance Sir William from any connection which the Wilde family might have had with trade. In this paper published and unpublished material are used, together with a careful examination of family deeds in the Registry of Deeds office, to elucidate the real roots of the Wilde family in Dublin and in the West of Ireland.

  11. Obituary - Dr. A. Venkoba Rao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available I have to inform with great regret the sad demise of Dr Venkoba Rao, one of the senior most and highly esteemed psychiatrists this country has produced. His research work in psychiatry and medicine, as well as his work in philosophy and the human predicament, have been noteworthy indeed. He was a researcher and an academician of the highest order.It was always a great pleasure interacting with him. Both juniors and his peers will remember him with great regard and equal fondness. He never made himself difficult to approach, and was open to all positive inputs, from whatever source.He was highly appreciative of the work done by the Mens Sana Research Foundation too. I treasure the encouraging letter he wrote to us sometime back about the Mens Sana Monograph Psychiatry, Science, Religion and Health, of which here is an excerpt:The articles in general are of high standard and are very readable.....Imust tell you that your monograph makes an enjoyable and informative reading and my personal congratulations to you on your achievement.In fact, he was encouraging towards all efforts in the field of mental health.His wide knowledge of philosophy and Indian thought, coupled with active research interest in mainstream psychiatry, made him a unique presence in the field.His absence will be felt for a long long time indeed.But I have lived, and have not lived in vain;My mind may lose its force, my blood its fire,And my frame perish even in conquering pain:But there is that within me which shall tireTorture and Time, and breathe when I expire;Something unearthly, which they deem not of,Like the remembered tone of a mute lyre....Byron ( Childe Harold On behalf of the Mens Sana Editorial Board, our subscribers, readers, as well as the Mensanamonographs group, I offer our deepest condolences to his bereaved family.May his soul rest in peace.

  12. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  13. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2016-07-15

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  14. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... prospectively for 4 days: pre call, on call, post call day 1 (PC1), and post call day 2 (PC2). The urinary metabolite of melatonin and cortisol in saliva were measured to assess the circadian rhythm. Sleep and activity were measured by actigraphy. Subjective measures were assessed by the Karolinska Sleepiness...... Scale and Visual Analog Scale of fatigue, general well-being, and sleep quality. RESULTS: For both metabolite of melatonin and cortisol, a significant difference (P sleep time during the day on call...

  15. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence.

  16. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  17. Paying surgeons less has cost more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph; Derman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 mandated reductions in physician reimbursement. This reduction in payments could be envisioned to limit expenditures on 2 counts: first, individual fees would be lower, producing inherent savings. Furthermore, reducing fees should depress the incentive to work, thereby generating additional savings from reduced output. A rival point of view holds that lower fees might paradoxically lead to greater spending because surgeons compensate for per-case reductions by performing more cases. If this income-targeting hypothesis is correct, lower per-case fees leads to increased volume. Increased work output has particularly sizable economic effects in fields like orthopedic surgery because the total cost of orthopedic interventions is usually many times larger than the physician's fee (largely owing to the cost of implants). As such, increases in work volume more than negate the potential savings from lower surgeon's fees.This phenomenon was studied in the context of total knee arthroplasty. In the decade spanning 1996 to 2005, inflation-adjusted physician reimbursement decreased by approximately 5% per year, leading to a cumulative drop in reimbursement from $2847 to $1685. Nonetheless, because the number of procedures performed increased from 253,841 to 498,169 and because payments to hospitals far exceeded payments to surgeons, total expenditures for total knee arthroplasty increased dramatically: more than $7.1 billion additional was spent on hospital payments. Continuing to pay surgeons less is apt to continue to cost more. Counter to intuition, the best strategy for controlling overall spending might be higher, not lower, surgical fees.

  18. Eulogy John Ludbrook: surgeon, physiologist and biostatistician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Roger G; Johnston, Colin I

    2017-08-12

    On the morning of Friday June 9, Professor John Ludbrook died peacefully in his sleep at the age of 87. John will be deeply missed by his family, friends and colleagues. John Ludbrook had a long and distinguished career as a teacher, educator, surgeon, physiologist and lastly as a statistician. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Plaster of Paris: the orthopaedic surgeon heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Plastering is one of the most ancient of the building handicrafts. Plaster is the common name for calcium sulphate hemi hydrate made by heating the mineral gypsum, the common name for sulphate of lime. In the tenth century the Arabs used liquid plaster in orthopaedic treatment. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, patients with fractures of the lower extremities-and often of the upper extremities as well-were treated in bed with restriction of all activity for many weeks until the fractures united. It was the practice of surgeons to dress wounds and fractures at frequent intervals. The bandages, pads, and splints were removed, the fractures manipulated, and the dressings reapplied. The search for simpler, less cumbersome methods of treatment led to the development of occlusive dressings, stiffened at first with starch and later with plaster of Paris. The ambulatory treatment of fractures was the direct result of these innovations. Two military surgeons, Antonius Mathijsen of the Netherlands, and Nikolai Ivanovitch Pirogov of Russia, were responsible for the introduction of the new plaster bandage technique. At the beginning of the twentieth century the technique was improved by Jean-François Calot, a French surgeon, who invented the hand manufacture of plaster bandage as a roll. During the twentieth century, walking cast and ambulation for fresh fractures were developed with plaster and pin incorporated in plaster; the open fracture care concept was introduced with plaster of Paris by Trueta before the external fixation.

  20. [The educational program for modern military surgeons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Gutcke, A; Klein, B; Rauhut, F; Friemert, B; Kollig, E W; Weller, N; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    Casualties in military conflict produce patterns of injuries that are not seen in routine surgical practice at home. In an era of increasing surgical sub-specialization the deployed surgeon needs to acquire and maintain a wide range of skills from a variety of surgical specialties. Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have become the modus operandi for terrorists and in the current global security situation these tactics can be equally employed against civilian targets. Therefore, knowledge and training in the management of these injuries are relevant to both military and civilian surgeons. To create this kind of military surgeon the so-called "DUO-plus" model for the training of surgical officers (specialization general surgery plus a second specialization either in visceral surgery or orthopedics/trauma surgery) has been developed in the Joint Medical Service of the German Bundeswehr. Other relevant skills, such as emergency neurotraumatology, battlefield surgery with integrated oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery and emergency gynecology, are integrated into this concept and will be taught in courses. Log books will be kept in accordance with the training curricula. On successful completion of the program medical officers will be officially appointed as Medical Officer "Einsatzchirurg" by their commanding officers for a maximum of 5 years and it will be necessary to renew it after this period. These refresher programs will require participation in visiting physicians programs in the complementary surgical disciplines in order to retain the essential specific skills.

  1. [The anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp: The beginning of a medical utopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosler, Roberto; Young, Pablo

    2011-04-01

    The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp was painted by Rembrandt Harmen-szoon van Rijn at the early age of 26 years. In the XVII century these paintings were very popular in the Netherlands, and in this country the cities flourished as cultural centers searching the anatomy knowledge. Nicolaes Tulp was one of the persons in the center of Amsterdam's scene during XVII century. In 1632 Tulp was 39 years old, and he was an anatomist and a surgeon. Rembrandt masterly shows an autopsy performed by Dr. Tulp. This picture is the description of the beginning of a medical intellectual utopia: the absolute visibility of the disease. Unfortunately this utopia is blind to the complete visibility of the psycho-socio-cultural dimensions of the ill.

  2. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  3. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  4. Choosing a Breast Reconstruction Surgeon and Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reconstruction Surgery Questions to Ask Your Surgeon About Breast Reconstruction If you’ve had surgery to treat your ... reconstruction. Finding the right plastic surgeon for your breast reconstruction If you decide to have breast reconstruction, you’ ...

  5. Bram Stoker's brother, the brain surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines the life and work of Sir William Thornley Stoker, 1st Baronet (1845-1912), the eldest brother of Bram Stoker (1847-1912), the author of Dracula (1897). Sir William or "Thornley," as he was commonly known, was one of Ireland's leading physicians. He performed some of the first brain surgeries in Ireland using Sir David Ferrier's maps of the cerebral cortex. From 1879 into the twentieth century, Thornley served as inspector for Ireland under the 1876 Cruelty to Animals Act. In this role, Thornley was responsible for granting licenses to researchers who performed experiments on live animals. Due to his reservations about animal experimentation, Thornley eventually became an advocate for the antivivisection cause, testifying at the second Royal Commission on Vivisection (1906-1912). Thornley also influenced Irish literature, albeit indirectly. Bram Stoker's composition notes for Dracula show that he consulted his older brother about the medical scenes in his novel. Thornley's knowledge of cerebral localization and his animal rights advocacy both surface in Dracula. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of North Americans' opinions regarding surgeons consulting with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Noonan, Vanessa K; Bailey, Christopher S; Dvorak, Marcel F S; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-04-01

    Surgeon-industry conflict of interest (COI) has become a source of considerable interest. Professional medical societies, industry, and policy makers have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The objective of this study was to report on the opinions of individuals representing the general public regarding surgeon-industry consulting relationships. Web-based survey. Survey was administered using a "spine Web site," and opinions are collected on surgeon-industry consulting and regulation. Associations among responses to similar questions were assessed to ensure validity and subgroup analysis performed for respondent age, sex, education, insurance, employment, and patient status. Six hundred ten of 642 surveys had complete data. The sample population comprised more females and was older and more educated than the American population. About 80% of respondents felt it was ethical and either beneficial or of no influence to the quality of health care if surgeons were consultants for surgical device companies. Most felt disclosure of an industry relationship was important and paying surgeons royalties for devices, other than those they directly implant, would not affect quality of care. Respondents support multidisciplinary surgeon-industry COI regulation and trust doctors and their professional societies to head this effort. Despite the known potential negative impact of surgeon-industry COI on patient care, this study revealed that this does not seem to be reflected in the opinion of the general public. The respondents felt that disclosure is deemed one of the most important means of self-regulation and COI management, which is in agreement with current trends of most spine societies and journals that are increasing the stringency of disclosure policies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fu-Chan Wei—Surgeon, Innovator, and Leader of the Legendary Chang Gung Microsurgery Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL Deek, Nidal Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Fu-Chan Wei is a world-renowned plastic and reconstructive surgeon. He is clearly one of the most influential and innovative surgeons in the history of plastic surgery. The Taiwanese legend is the innovator of the osteoseptocutaneous fibula flap, which revolutionized the reconstruction of composite bone and soft tissue defects in the jaw and extremities. He has pioneered several perforator flaps, including the free style variety. He has taken toe-to-hand microsurgical transplantation to a whole new level. He is not only recognized for his surgical skills and clinical innovations, but also for his vision, leadership, and teaching. The establishment and development of the famous Microsurgery Center at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital is unparalleled anywhere. The international fellowship program in microsurgery there remains the envy of all microsurgical trainees. Dr. Wei and his colleagues have trained and influenced more than 1,500 surgeons from all over the world. The aim of this video article is to share what we learned by interviewing Fu-Chan Wei at Chang Gung. The story of Fu Chan Wei, his colleagues, and the development of the Microsurgery Center in Taiwan is worth knowing. PMID:27757352

  8. Dr. Shi Hanzhang's Experience in Treating Andropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Dr. Shi Hanzhang (施汉章) of Dongzhimen Hospital affiliated to Beijing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine is experienced in both teaching and clinical practice, especially in treating andropathy, such as sexual disorder, infertility, and hyperplasia of the prostate. The author has the honour to follow him for study and really learned a lot from him. A brief introduction to Dr. Shi's way of thinking in treatment is as follows.

  9. Implementing Python for DrRacket

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Pedro Palma; Leitão, António Menezes

    2014-01-01

    The Python programming language is becoming increasingly popular in a variety of areas, most notably among novice programmers. On the other hand, Racket and other Scheme dialects are considered excellent vehicles for introducing Computer Science concepts. This paper presents an implementation of Python for Racket and the DrRacket IDE. This allows Python programmers to use Racket libraries and vice versa, as well as using DrRacket's pedagogic features. In particular, it allows architects and d...

  10. Dr. Cheng Yichun's Experience in Treating Hyperthyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Fenglei; Feng Jianhua; Wang Xinzhong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Having been engaged in the TCM clinical practice for more than 40 years, Dr. Cheng Yichun from the Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of TCM has rich experience in treating endocrine metabolic diseases. Authors have had the good fortune to follow Dr. Chen for 10 years. Following is his train of thought in diagnosing and treating hyperthyroidism and his prescriptions most in use for the disease.

  11. Sir William Burnett (1779-1861), professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department and entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Sir William Burnett (1779-1861) had an active career as a Royal Navy surgeon in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, including service at the battles of St Vincent, the Nile and Trafalgar. From 1822 to 1855 he was professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department, when he provided effective leadership in a time of great change. Although his official work earned him the reputation of a "hard-working, unimaginative, somewhat harsh man", his correspondence shows a very humane centre under the official carapace. His official performance and reputation were both eroded towards the end of his career by his determined promotion of zinc chloride, for which he held lucrative patents.

  12. William Fulton Gillespie, 1891-1949: transitional figure in western Canadian academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, R A

    1998-01-01

    The professional life of William Fulton Gillespie, third professor of surgery at the University of Alberta (1939-49) and tenth president of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (1947-49), exemplifies a critical transitional period in Canadian postgraduate surgical training and in western Canadian academic surgery. This article explores the background, the training, the professional career, and the personal character of a surgical scholar and student of the humanities and arts, a man who was thrust into the professorship of surgery in a maturing western Canadian medical school following the financial restraints of the Great Depression and during the challenges faced as a result of the World War II.

  13. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the...

  14. [Portrait of Dr Milenko Petrović (1884-1950)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kljaić, Leposava; Borota, Radoslav

    2008-01-01

    Dr Milenko Petrović was one of the very distinguished physicians in the history of Sombor city, who significantly contributed to the development of health care in Voivodina. His father Dimitrije was a professor in the High Teacher-training School in Sombor, recognized writer and politician of his epoch. He was born in Sombor in 1884, where he was educated and finished grammar school. For medical studies he moved to Budapest as a boarder of the famous Tekelianum, and graduated in 1908. He started specialisation in surgery, but being a great patriot he voluntarily recruited in the Serbian army to fight in Balkan liberation wars against Turkey. For his excellent work as a war surgeon he obtained many recognitions. After completing specialization in surgery in Debrecin, he returned to his native city Sombor, where he intended to practice as a physician, but because af the outbreak of the first world he was mobilized and sent to the front in Galicia. After the war he again returned to Sombor where he was immediatelly nominated for the main county physician and then begins his fruitful many year's work on the establishment and promotion of the health care in Sombor and broader territory. As the main county phsician he initiated the foundation and construction of the hospital in Sombor, because of high mortality rate among children, and spreading of contagious diseases like tuberculosis and trachoma. The construction of the hospital was completed in 1925 and Dr. Petrović was appointed its first director and this duty he performed for many years till the World War 2 in 1941. Under his management the hospital in Sombor became one of the best quality hospitals in the country and gave a big contribution to the promotion of health of the inhabitants of Voivodina. In spite of his extensive duties in the hospital. Dr. Milenko Petrović was very much engaged in social work, as the president of library "Laza Kosti ć". in the Soko association, Fire brigade, Rotary club, and he

  15. Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5 monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Chunxia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10 and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

  16. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  17. William Walker en Centroamérica

    OpenAIRE

    Medaglia Gómez, Marco Aurelio

    2007-01-01

    La campaña Nacional (1856-1857) tuvo su origen en la presencia de los filibusteros en Nicaragua. William Walker fue el mayor representante de la política del “Destino Manifiesto” de los Estados Unidos a mediados del siglo XIX. Esto se manifiesta en sus incursiones en Baja California y Sonora y más tarde en Nicaragua y sus pretensiones sobre Centroamérica. La llamada “falange americana” encarna los intereses de los estados sureños que pretendían mantener su modelo económico basado en la esclav...

  18. Gilbert receives 1999 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turekian, Karl K.; Gilbert, J. Freeman

    J. Freeman Gilbert was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Spring Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on June 2, 1999, in Boston, Massachusetts. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.Freeman Gilbert was a geophysical pioneer, even as a student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he used the Whirlwind computer to apply computational methods to seismic problems. Later at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP),at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he began his professional university career, he wrote a series of papers on the computation of synthetic seismograms in simple media.

  19. #194050 WILLIAMS-BEUREN SYNDROME; WBS [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available social use of language. Many patients sing or play musical instruments with cons...ajority living at home with parents and attending a day center. Lenhoff et al. (1997) described the remarkable music...assorted folktales were often musicians and storytellers. Gosch and Pankau (1994)...s normally in the rostrocaudal direction. Lenhoff et al. (2001) evaluated 5 patients with Williams syndrome for absolute music...al pitch (AP; see 159300), which is the ability to recognize, name, and reproduce the pitch of a music

  20. Walter C. Williams (1919-1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Walter C. Williams was Chief of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's flight research organization on Edwards Air Force Base until his appointment as Associate Director of Project Mercury on September 15, 1959. Walt had started his career with NACA at Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in 1939 as an engineer in the Flight Division. In 1946 he transferred to the Muroc Army Air Field to be in charge of the small group of technicians and engineers who would be doing the flight research on a joint NACA-Army Air Forces program involving the rocket-powered Bell XS-1. See photo DIRECTORS E-49-0170, which addresses the first eight years of Walt's responsibilities with NACA. Williams' achievements as Chief of the NACA/NASA High-Speed Flight Station for the next five years continued to be significant. NACA pilot Joseph A. Walker made the first of 20 NACA research flights in the Douglas X-3 'Flying Stiletto'--on which inertial coupling was first experience--in 1954. The first NACA flight in an Lockheed F-104A aircraft occurred on August 27, 1956. On October 15, 1958, the first of three North American X-15 rocket research aircraft arrived at NASA High Speed Flight Station as preparations moved ahead for the highly successful NASA-Air Force-Navy-North American program that would last 10 years and investigate hypersonic flight. Walt directed a great variety of other flight research programs, including that on the Boeing B-47; investigations using the Century Series fighters, F-100, F-102, F-104, F-105 and F-107; and the ones involving the X-1 #2, which became the X1-E. During Williams' career, he twice received the NASA Distinguished Service Medal and was nominated both to the Meritorious Rank and Distinguished Rank in the Federal Senior Executive Service. In 1963 he was awarded an honorary doctorate of engineering degree by Louisiana State University. He received several awards from the American Institute

  1. George Williams, theoretician and guerilla environmentalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Bobbi S

    2005-03-01

    George Williams is rightly honored for his contributions to basic biological theory. In addition, however, his thought and contribution paved the way for much needed integration of basic evolutionary theory and modern environmental problems. Specifically, his contributions to the levels of selection" debate, and his application of these contributions to the "Gaia" approach to ecological problems, may help us improve our ability to move past untested prescriptions to a thoughtful matching of the characteristics of the problem and solution, and thus improve our effectiveness.

  2. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  3. Enough room for Williams and IMF? / Paul Beckman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Beckman, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Lõppesid Leedu ja USA energeetikakompanii Williams International läbirääkimised Leedu naftakompleksis osaluse omandamise asjus. IMF uurib Leedu majanduslikku arengut, mida tehing Williamsiga komplitseerib

  4. Surgeons' motivation for choice of workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähler, Lena; Kristiansen, Maria; Rudkjøbing, Andreas; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2012-09-01

    To ensure qualified health care professionals at public hospitals in the future, it is important to understand which factors attract health care professionals to certain positions. The aim of this study was to explore motives for choosing employment at either public or private hospitals in a group of Danish surgeons, as well as to examine if organizational characteristics had an effect on motivation. Eight qualitative interviews were conducted with surgeons from both public and private hospitals sampled using the snowball method. The interviews were based on a semi-structured interview guide and analyzed by means of phenomenological theory. Motivational factors such as personal influence on the job, the opportunity to provide the best possible patient care, challenging work tasks colleagues, and ideological reasons were emphasized by the surgeons as important reasons for their choice of employment. Motivational factors appeared to be strongly connected to the structure of the organization; especially the size of the organization was perceived to be essential. It is worth noting that salary, in contrast to the general belief, was considered a secondary benefit rather than a primary motivational factor for employment. The study revealed that motivational factors are multidimensional and rooted in organizational structure; i.e. organizational size rather than whether the organization is public or private is crucial. There is a need for further research on the topic, but it seems clear that future health care planning may benefit from taking into account the implications that large organizational structures have for the staff working within these organizations. not relevant. not relevant.

  5. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  6. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  7. American Orthopaedic Surgeons in World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David P; DeLee, Jesse C

    2017-04-05

    On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany and entered what was then called the Great War. Among the first officers sent to Europe were 21 orthopaedic surgeons in the so-called First Goldthwait Unit. Prior to the war, orthopaedics had been a nonoperative "strap-and-buckle" specialty that dealt primarily with infections, congenital abnormalities, and posttraumatic deformity. The Great War changed all of that forever, creating a new surgical specialty with emphasis on acute treatment, prevention of deformity, restoration of function, and rehabilitation.

  8. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  9. William Butler Yeats’s ‘The Symbolic System’ of William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Antonielli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The theosophical systems formulated by great poets, such as William Blake and William Butler Yeats, represent a personal idiosyncratic actualization of an ancient repertoire of magical symbols and occult visions. This study wants to focus the attention on the philosophical, mythical, and esoteric syncretism that W. B. Yeats drew from William Blake’s symbolical system. A fundamental step of Yeats’s deep investigation into the Blakean ‘vision’ was given by his monumental work, written together with Edwin John Ellis, on Blake’s poetic and pictorial production, completed in 1893 with a three-volume edition entitled The Works of William Blake, Poetic, Symbolic, and Critical. This work, published in London by Bernard Quaritch, deeply influenced Yeats’s symbolical and imaginary system, determining its subsequent development up to its codification in the volume of A Vision. With WWB, Yeats was able to systematize for the first time his own thought, giving unity to his Weltanschauung and his poetry. Following this hypothesis, I concentrated on Yeats’s and Ellis’s numerous analyses dedicated to Blake’s mythological and symbolical corpus and, in particular, I examined the last chapter of the first volume of the Quaritch edition. This chapter, entitled “The Symbolic System”, constitutes an unquestionable link between Yeats the reader and scholar of Blake, and Yeats the poet and follower of Blake.

  10. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  11. Interview with the expert: William E. Collins, Ph.D. Interviewed by Vicki Glaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, William E

    2009-10-01

    William Collins, Ph.D., received his B.S. and M.Sc. degrees in entomology from Michigan State University. He completed his Ph.D. at Rutgers University in two years, just before being inducted into the Army to serve in the Korean War. He was assigned to Fort Detrick at the Biological Warfare Research Laboratories and after three years returned to Rutgers as an extension entomologist. He accepted a position in 1959 with the U.S. Public Health Service, with which he has worked for the last 50 years. In 1963, the Public Health Service laboratory moved to Atlanta and Dr. Collins' group began working with non-human primates following the discovery that monkey malarias were transmissible to humans. Parasites from monkeys or apes isolated in Asia, South America, and Africa were sent to the laboratory in Chamblee, Georgia, where they were adapted and transmitted to laboratory-maintained primates and their life cycles described and characterized. Transmissions to human volunteers were also attempted. In 1973, the laboratory operation was transferred to the CDC, and the emphasis changed from the study of monkey malaria in monkeys to that of human malaria in monkeys. During the last 25 to 30 years, different isolates of human malaria parasites have been adapted to New World monkeys to characterize the isolates for the development and testing of drugs and vaccines. Dr. Collins' task has been to identify and choose the best combination of vector-parasite-host combinations for testing each vaccine candidate. He has co-authored more than 450 manuscripts and has been awarded the U.S. Public Health Service Superior Service Award, The Joseph A. LaPrince Medal for Malariology from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, The Distinguished Service Award of the Department of Health and Human Services, the William Watson Medal of Excellence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Hoogstraal Medal from the American Committee of Medical Entomology.

  12. Opportunities in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Worldwide Surgeons' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael; Newman, Jared M; Khlopas, Anton; Chughtai, Morad; Martinez, Nick; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    This study surveyed a group of US and international orthopaedic surgeons to prioritize areas of improvement in primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Specifically, we assessed surgeon responses regarding the top five areas of TKA needing improvement; which were stratified by: a) US surgeons, b) international surgeons, c) US surgeons' implant-brand-loyalty, and d) surgeons' years of experience and case volume. Four hundred and eighteen surgeons who were board-certified, in practice for at least two years, spent 60% of their time in clinical practice, and performed a minimum of 25 lower extremity joint arthroplasties per year were surveyed. They chose the top five areas (among 17) needing improvement for TKA. Results were stratified by surgeons' location (US and international), implant-brand-loyalty, years of experience, and case volume. Functional outcomes was the top identified area for improvement (US 63% and international 71%), followed by brand loyalty (Company I 68%, other brand 59%, and multi-brand/no loyalty 66%), years of experience (early-career 64%, mid-career 63%, and late-career 75%) and case volume (low-volume 69%, mid-volume 60%, and high-volume 71%). Following this was costs for US surgeons (47%) and implant survivorship for international surgeons (57%). While costs were the next highest area for specific Company-loyal surgeons (57%), implant survivorship was the next highest area for the other two cohorts. Implant survivorship was the second most important area of improvement regardless of years of experience and for low- and mid-volume surgeons. Surgeons identified functional outcomes as the most important area needing improvement. Cost of implants was more important for American as compared to international surgeons.

  13. Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"......Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"...

  14. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  15. Congenital Ulnar Drift in a Surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirae McKee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Windblown hand is a term used in many instances to describe ulnar deviations of the fingers with or without other malformations. In 1994 Wood reviewed all of the descriptions of cases of windblown hand and pointed out how many variants of congenital ulnar drift there are, suggesting that the many variations seen may all belong to a larger type of arthrogryposis. While the most common cause of ulnar deviation of the fingers is rheumatoid arthritis, it can also be caused by other conditions such as windblown hand or Jaccoud’s arthropathy. While most hand surgeons are familiar with presentations of congenital ulnar drift, few of them are knowledgeable about Jaccoud’s arthropathy as this is usually discussed within medical communities such as Rheumatology. We present a case of a surgeon who has had noticeable ulnar deviation of the digits at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint since his early 20s. We propose that the current case is a demonstration of a type of windblown hand that has some hereditary component but is not immediately obvious at birth and presents physically more like Jaccoud’s arthropathy than traditional windblown hand.

  16. Training cardiac surgeons: the Indiana University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W

    2016-12-01

    In this article, I will outline the origin of cardiothoracic surgical (CTS) training at Indiana University (IU) and its evolution to the present. I will describe my educational background, surgical training in this specialty, and my role as an educator of CT surgeons. I will describe our faculty and the structure of the CTS residency. Finally, I will describe a newly adopted smart phone "App" called SIMPL, which allows the resident and faculty to quickly (50% of the most critical aspects of each surgical procedure, the resident's performance during the critical portion of the operation from poor to excellent, and the degree of difficulty of the operation from simple to complex. The attending surgeon and the resident data are then forwarded to the SIMPL database where the SIMPL software aggregates data for each resident and procedure producing a report at the end of the rotation of the resident's performance relative to his peers. This additional evaluation process will better ensure that our CTS residents are "practice ready" when they complete their training.

  17. Denis Browne: maverick or master surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D E

    2000-11-01

    The current generation of surgeons may remember Denis Browne only as an inventor of surgical instruments which few people use, an innovator of procedures condemned as inadequate, and a personality bristling with controversy: a maverick indeed. And yet this assessment belies his influence as the founder of modern paediatric surgery in the development of British surgery. Further, his innovative operations in a range of paediatric lesions were revolutionary in the context of the time. Browne was born in 1892 and educated in Australia, although his whole surgical career was in England. He had a remarkable family background; unique Australian experiences in childhood, when he commenced to display independence and individuality of spirit, through University, where he gained 'Blues' in tennis and shooting, to war, where he served in Gallipoli and France; and to controversies that surrounded him in his battle to establish paediatric surgery as a legitimate surgical discipline. He certainly had a prickly personality and a particular venom reserved for orthopaedic surgeons and anatomists, but his achievements may have been possible only by one possessed of such a strong and towering character.

  18. Perspectives of being spouse, parent, and surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, Yvonne

    2013-10-01

    Achieving a balance between one's career and personal life is a never-ending challenge. As a surgeon, add-on cases and double-booked clinics can lead to long hours at work and make availability for family time unpredictable. It may seem like the threat of interruption because of patient needs always loom. Disruptions to family time extend beyond the long hours spent in surgery and clinics. Inattentiveness at home because of the technology tethers that keep one available for constant questions and patient care issues can also distract from time spent with family. Although the practice of an orthopaedic trauma surgeon can involve unpredictable schedules and patient care issues, there are means of mitigating the chaos that can envelop one's personal life as a result of a chosen career track. Clear priorities and expectations in both personal and professional arenas can improve the work-life balance. Flexible jobs that allow for more time with family do exist. Negotiating for this flexibility and self-assurance in holding fast to personal ideals are important in achieving a successful balance.

  19. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  20. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, M R; Aherne, N J; Coffey, C; Power, C P; Kirwan, W O; Redmond, H P

    2002-11-01

    Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  1. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  2. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr. David Syz (left) with Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes.Photo 02: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book, with Prof. Roger Cashmore.Photo 03: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book.Photo 04: Handshake between Dr. David Syz (left) and Prof. Roger Cashmore.

  3. The leadership principles of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and their relevance to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunicardi, F Charles; Cotton, Ronald T; Cole, George W; Martinez, George

    2007-01-01

    In order to face the challenges in healthcare this century, it is essential that surgeons understand modern leadership principles. One of the greatest leaders in history was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who provides a shining example of level-5 leadership for us to study. The study of leadership principles of great leaders can provide us with practical methods of conflict resolution as well as inspiration to keep us engaged and focused. As leaders of the medical community, we face numerous challenges, including discovering and implementing new treatments for disease, providing care for the indigent, overcoming educational challenges such as incorporating the ACGME Core Competencies into our surgical training and promoting diversity in education. Achieving these goals is often hindered by the environment in which we labor-nearly 50 million are uninsured, the rising cost of medical care is currently at 16% of the GNP, and reimbursement rates are falling-which makes the practice of surgery a significant challenge. Effective leadership will be paramount in achieving these goals. In this editorial, which summarizes a presentation given to the Surgical Section of the annual National Medical Association meeting, five important leadership principles that are important for surgeons have been selected and related to the outstanding leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

  4. A Tribute to Dr. Willy Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Willy Lens, born on December 10th, 1943, passed away on August 29th, 2014. With his passing, the motivation community has lost a seminal member, a mentor, and a friend. Dr. Lens – a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and Founding Fellow of the American Educational Research Association – made fundamental contributions to the study of motivation both through his own work and through his caring and thoughtful mentorship of a large community of scholars. With this tribute, we want to honor Dr. Willy Lens’ significance to psychology and education as well as his positive influence, both personally and professionally, on the lives of dozens of scholars. With his contagious enthusiasm and caring mentorship, Willy was an example for our academic community and with this tribute we express our gratitude for the privilege to have collaborated with him.

  5. Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter D; Chalder, Trudie; Sharpe, Michael; Angus, Brian J; Baber, Hannah L; Bavinton, Jessica; Burgess, Mary; Clark, Lucy V; Cox, Diane L; DeCesare, Julia C; Goldsmith, Kimberley A; Johnson, Anthony L; McCrone, Paul; Murphy, Gabrielle; Murphy, Maurice; O'Dowd, Hazel; Potts, Laura; Walwyn, Rebacca; Wilks, David

    2017-08-01

    This article is written in response to the linked editorial by Dr Geraghty about the adaptive Pacing, graded Activity and Cognitive behaviour therapy; a randomised Evaluation (PACE) trial, which we led, implemented and published. The PACE trial compared four treatments for people diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. All participants in the trial received specialist medical care. The trial found that adding cognitive behaviour therapy or graded exercise therapy to specialist medical care was as safe as, and more effective than, adding adaptive pacing therapy or specialist medical care alone. Dr Geraghty has challenged these findings. In this article, we suggest that Dr Geraghty's views are based on misunderstandings and misrepresentations of the PACE trial; these are corrected.

  6. An interview with Dr Barbara A. Carper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, Dr Barbara A. Carper's foundational work, "Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing," arguably created a paradigm shift in nursing. However, her voice has been absent from the nursing literature in recent years. I was privileged to conduct a personal interview with Dr Carper in 2014. The edited interview includes a synopsis of her background, career trajectory, sources of inspiration, and her perspective on the current state of nursing. She reaffirmed her passion for reflective nursing practice, the importance incorporating the arts and humanities into nursing education, and using an integrated approach with the patterns of knowing in nursing.

  7. Herniation of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2012-12-01

    Herniations of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons are far more common in practice than the paucity of reported cases would indicate. A likely explanation may be the peculiar, nonergonomic positions that plastic surgeons must hold during surgery while wearing a headlight and loupes. From January 2003 to December 2006, at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, 4 plastic surgeons experienced herniations of the cervical disk. Magnetic resonance imaging study indicated there was disk herniation or bulging with spinal cord impingement. Two plastic surgeons received cervical diskectomy, corpectomy with strut reconstruction using titanium cages. These 2 surgeons were symptom-free 2 years after their operations. The other 2 plastic surgeons were under conservative physical therapy with persistent symptoms. The clinical evidence indicated that cervical disk herniation is an occupational hazard in plastic surgeons. To prevent prolonged hyperflexion and twisting of the neck, we proposed wearing a cervical brace during surgery for the plastic surgeons at Tri-Service-General Hospital since January 2008. No more plastic surgeons have experienced herniation of the cervical disk since then. The results indicated that wearing a cervical brace may be an effective measure to protect plastic surgeons from cervical disk disease.

  8. The Dangers of Gathering Data: Surgeon-Specific Outcomes Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Ferraris, Suellen P.; Wehner, Paulette S.; Setser, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of risk adjustment is important in developing surgeon profiles. As surgeon profiles are obtained from observational, nonrandomized data, we hypothesized that selection bias exists in how patients are matched with surgeons and that this bias might influence surgeon profiles. We used the Society of Thoracic Surgeons risk model to calculate observed to expected (O/E) mortality ratios for each of six cardiac surgeons at a single institution. Propensity scores evaluated selection bias that might influence development of risk-adjusted mortality profiles. Six surgeons (four high and two low O/E ratios) performed 2298 coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) operations over 4 years. Multivariate predictors of operative mortality included preoperative shock, advanced age, and renal dysfunction, but not the surgeon performing CABG. When patients were stratified into quartiles based on the propensity score for operative death, 83% of operative deaths (50 of 60) were in the highest risk quartile. There were significant differences in the number of high-risk patients operated upon by each surgeon. One surgeon had significantly more patients in the highest risk quartile and two surgeons had significantly less patients in the highest risk quartile (p < 0.05 by chi-square). Our results show that high-risk patients are preferentially shunted to certain surgeons, and away from others, for unexplained (and unmeasured) reasons. Subtle unmeasured factors undoubtedly influence how cardiac surgery patients are matched with surgeons. Problems may arise when applying national database benchmarks to local situations because of this unmeasured selection bias. PMID:23204823

  9. Mailability v. the Crusader: Williams v. O'Brien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charles E.

    The issues of prior restraint and press censorship are examined in this paper, which focuses on the 1970 Williams v. O'Brien court case. The paper discusses the litigation, in which Robert F. Williams, as an American citizen living in Peking, China, sued the United States Postmaster General over the banning of the May 1967 issue of "The Crusader,"…

  10. "The Country and the City" by Raymond Williams. Essay Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry D.; Howley, Craig B.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews essays by Raymond Williams, which explain how, within the context of a 150-year literary history, rural stereotypes have been constructed and imbedded within a collective consciousness by a form of cultural colonization. Suggests that Williams' insights can help rural education researchers think outside the conventional wisdom that…

  11. 77 FR 72960 - William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 685 RIN 1840-AD05 William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary... of William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) program regulations that establish a new...

  12. 76 FR 2902 - Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing January 10, 2011. Take notice that on January 10, 2011, Barry Lawson Williams submitted for filing, an application for authority to...

  13. Prince William%威廉姆斯王子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The pright future for Britain's Royalty 不列颠皇室的美好未来 Prince William has come of age. After his father, the Prince of Wales, he is next in line to the throne. This is an enormous responsibility for anyone let alone someone in his twenties. As the future King of England, Prince William lives in the public eye.

  14. Discovering Structure in Auditory Input: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Mayada; Cohen, Henri; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2010-01-01

    We examined auditory perception in Williams syndrome by investigating strategies used in organizing sound patterns into coherent units. In Experiment 1, we investigated the streaming of sound sequences into perceptual units, on the basis of pitch cues, in a group of children and adults with Williams syndrome compared to typical controls. We showed…

  15. Pursuing the Panderer: An Analysis of "United States v. Williams"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrain, Patrick N.; Moore, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    In May 2008, the Supreme Court addressed whether the government can regulate the ownership and distribution of virtual child pornography. "U.S. v. Williams" marked the first time the Court directly addressed the concept of pandering virtual child pornography. This article examines the Court's decision in "U.S. v. Williams" and…

  16. 75 FR 62530 - Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Williams, Barry Lawson; Notice of Filing October 4, 2010. Take notice that on September 24, 2010, Barry Lawson Williams submitted for filing, an application for authority...

  17. Dominique-Jean Larrey, chief surgeon of the French Army with Napoleon in Egypt: notes and observations on Larrey's medical memoirs based on the Egyptian campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mary Mendenhall

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Dominique-Jean Larrey wrote memoirs of 12 diseases he encountered while serving as chief surgeon of the French army during Napoleon's Egyptian campaign. He describes symptoms and treatments, evaluates remedies used by the Egyptians, and the effects of the climate. Of interest are his original though misguided explanations of causes of sickness or complications from wounds as well as descriptions of medications--now known to be dangerous--but all balanced by his common sense and efforts to ameliorate suffering.

  18. Should Advertising by Aesthetic Surgeons be Permitted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Neeraj

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetic, aesthetic and cutaneous surgical procedures require qualified specialists trained in the various procedures and competent to handle complications. However, it also requires huge investments in terms of infrastructure, trained staff and equipment. To be viable advertising is essential to any establishment which provides cosmetic and aesthetic procedures. Business men with deep pockets establish beauty chains which also provide these services and advertise heavily to sway public opinion in their favour. However, these saloons and spas lack basic medical facilities in terms of staff or equipment to handle any complication or medical emergency. To have a level playing field ethical advertising should be permitted to qualified aesthetic surgeons as is permitted in the US and UK by their respective organisations. PMID:28529421

  19. Mapping a surgeon's becoming with Deleuze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Fenwick, Tara

    2015-12-01

    The process of 'becoming' shapes professionals' capability, confidence and identity. In contrast to notions of rugged individuals who achieve definitive status as experts, 'becoming' is a continuous emergent condition. It is often a process of struggle, and is always interminably linked to its environs and relationships. 'Becoming' is a way of understanding the tensions of everyday practice and knowledge of professionals. In this paper, we explore the notion of 'becoming' from the perspective of surgeons. We suggest that 'becoming', as theorised by Deleuze, offers a more nuanced understanding than is often represented using conventional vocabularies of competence, error, quality and improvement. We develop this conception by drawing from our Deleuze-inspired study of mapping experience in surgery. We argue for Deleuzian mapping as a method to research health professionals' practice and experience, and suggest the utility of this approach as a pedagogical tool for medical education.

  20. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  1. John Banister: an Elizabethan surgeon in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Amílcar D'Avila de

    2011-03-01

    In Brazil's sixteenth-century history, very few references are made to health professionals. On the expedition of Edward Fenton, dispatched by the English Crown in 1582 to set up a trading post in Asia, was the famous barber-surgeon and physician John Banister. The naval squadron, diverted from its original route to repeat the feats of Sir Francis Drake, stopped over in Africa, crossed the Atlantic and anchored off the Santa Catarina coast in Brazil. In these waters, the expedition degenerated into piracy and returned unsuccessful to Europe. John Banister is considered the person who liberated English anatomy from mediaeval slavery, shedding upon it the light of the Renaissance. It was the first time that anyone of this importance in the area of health had visited these latitudes.

  2. In Memoriam- Prof. Dr. Andries Willem Lategan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Ligthelm

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie Curriculum Vitae sou voorgelees gewees het met die inougurele rede van wyle prof. dr. A. W. Lategan met die aanvaarding van 'n ereprofessoraat aan die P.U. vir C.H.O. op 29 Oktober 1965. Prof. Lategan is op 23 Oktober 1965 oor- lcde. Sy inougurele rede verskyn as ’n bylaag in hierdie uit- gawe.

  3. Dr. Strangelove and Irrational Collective Rationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩蕾

    2012-01-01

      Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 black comedy film with satire of arm races and nuclear scare by the director Stanley Kubrick. In the movie, irrational practice and ideologies manifest them⁃selves as collective rationality and result in the destruction of the earth.

  4. Dr. A.F.M. Reijnders, centenarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bas, C.

    1999-01-01

    A few weeks ago a reprint was distributed of an interesting paper on the formation of spores by metamorphosis of basidia in fruiting bodies of Mycocalia and Scleroderma. That in itself was not so remarkable. But it is really a small miracle that this paper was written by Dr. A.F.M. Reijnders at the

  5. Dr D. F. van Slooten †

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, H.J.

    1953-01-01

    On March 7, 1953 the Rijksherbarium suffered a severe loss by the sudden death of its honorary co-operator Dr. D. F. van Slooten, the wellknown specialist particularly of Dipterocarpaceae. To honour his memory the following lines may serve as an obituary note. Dirk Fok van Slooten was born in Amersf

  6. ["Allergy testing" with "Dr. Voll electroacupuncture"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresser, H

    1993-06-01

    Electroacupuncture according to Dr. Voll (EAV) is one of the numerous unconventional methods propagated for allergy testing in Germany. From an experimental examination for "drug testing" of this method, it can be concluded that EAV is unsuitable for any form of allergy testing.

  7. Dr. Lutz Reichhoff zum 65. Geburtstag

    OpenAIRE

    Böhnert, Wolfgang; Schönbrodt, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Am 26. Oktober 2013 vollendete Dr. rer. nat. sc. Lutz Reichhoff sein 65. Lebensjahr. Alle die ihn näher kennen wissen, dass diese Jahreszahl noch lange nicht seinen Ruhestand einläuten wird. Wir nehmen dennoch gern diesen Tag zum Anlass, seine umfangreichen und vielfältigen Leistungen im beruflichen und ehrenamtlichen Wirken zu würdigen.

  8. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  9. Dr. S. J. van Ooststroom retired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1971-01-01

    In January 1971 Dr. Simon Jan van Ooststroom, senior botanist of the Rijksherbarium, retired on reaching the age of 65, having been on the staff since November 1934. Though this event will to a certain extent change, but not interrupt, his work, it is nevertheless worth commemorating, as he has so

  10. Stop words for “Dr Math”

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available “Dr Math” is a facility where primary and secondary school pupils can use MXit on their cell phones to get help with their mathematics homework. Pupils use an abbreviated “MXit lingo” leaving out most vowels and substituting various numerals...

  11. Confessions of a Dr Math tutor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics look different on a small 3-inch screen of an inexpensive cell phone when compared to a 3-meter whiteboard in a mathematics classroom. Dr Math uses cell phone or mobile data "chat" technologies to assist primary and secondary school...

  12. Dr. Bakhuizen van den Brink retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1976-01-01

    On 11 September 1976 dr. Reinier Cornelis Bakhuizen van den Brink will reach the age of 65 and so he must retire from his position as a senior botanist at the Rijksherbarium. He has worked in our institute since December 1943, after having obtained his doctor’s degree in Utrecht. At the Rijksherbari

  13. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  14. [William Harvey, discoverer of the blood circulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    v Mühlendahl, K E

    2007-06-01

    William Harvey (1578-1657), living at the turn to modern times, scientifically speaking, was an eminent physician and scientist. He developed the concept of the circulation of the blood and his findings have proved to be correct in nearly all details to this day. He published his physiological findings and interpretations in a small, albeit epoch-making, volume: Exercitatio anatomica de motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus, published in Frankfurt in 1628. On the occasion of the 350th anniversary of his death on June 3, 2007, this essay commemorates the work of this important physician, illustrating his brilliant conception of the blood circulation by quoting passages from De motu cordis et sanguinis.

  15. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    William P. Bidelman--Editor of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific from 1956 to 1961--passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day.

  16. [Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, M; Washizuka, T; Ikeguchi, S; Sasayama, S

    1996-08-01

    Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs have Ca-channel blocking actions. Since L-type Ca-channels play key roles in regulating pulse conduction in atrioventricular node as well as in pathologically-depolarized myocardium, Ca-channel blockers known to modulate this type of Ca-channel (ICa,L) are used as antiarrhythmic agents. ICa,L channels have relatively high threshold potential (-40 mV) to activate and long-opening properties, and are enhanced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Among three major ICa,L blockers, dihydropyridines such as nifedipine were found to bind to the channel from extracellular side. In contrast, verapamil and diltiazem interact with the channel from the cytoplasmic side, thereby causing rate-dependent block of ICa,L channels. This sideness of pharmacological action of the Ca-channel blockers determines an important therapeutic modality and their indication for tachyarrhythmias.

  17. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  18. A Mystic in English Literature: William Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fahri DOĞAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have never been satisfied with this ephemeral world. Perhaps, yearning and desire of rejoining −stemming from the descent from the heaven to the earth− are the emotions felt by the members of both celestial and non-celestial religions. Mysticism, having started with the zeal of people who weren‘t satisfied with this ephemeral world towards the eternal world, aimed at the love of God in the religions where there is a belief of single God. In this article, glancing at the life of a Christian mystic William Blake, we will try to shed light into his mystic thoughts. While studying Blake‘s mystic thoughts, there will be common points with Sufism. Nevertheless, analysis of these common points has been assigned to other studies.

  19. William Whiston, suur veeuputus ja kohutav spektaakel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roomet Jakapi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available William Whiston (1667-1752 was an English divine, mathematician and astronomer. His works nicely reveal the close relationship between science and religion in the early modern period. The paper aims to characterize Whiston's way of thinking in the light of his Astronomical Principles of Religion, Natural and Reveal'd (1717. In the 17th and early 18th century cosmologies, the location of Hell in the universe was a major issue. This horrible place of punishment could be located beneath the earth or on the sun. Whiston's view on this issue relies on the juxtaposition of biblical descriptions of Hell and scientific evidence regarding comets. Research for this paper was supported by Estonian Science Foundation grant no. 6099.

  20. Geiss Receives 2005 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, George; Geiss, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Johannes Geiss was awarded the 2005 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research. I am most pleased and honored to present this citation to Johannes Geiss, a truly great space scientist and investigator of the solar system and universe. His pioneering work, spanning over half a century, has paved the way toward understanding the physical world in which we live, its origins, and its destiny. He is a strong and effective advocate of science and ingenious in his ability to influence science policy and foster good science. Space limitations allow me to highlight only a few of Geiss's outstanding scientific accomplishments, service to science and society, and contributions to the conduct of science.

  1. Sir William Ramsay and the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Alwyn G

    2012-01-01

    Sir William Ramsay was one of the world's leading scientists at the end of the 19th century, and in a spectacular period of research between 1894 and 1898, he discovered five new elements. These were the noble gases, helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon; they added a whole new group to the Periodic Table of the elements, and provided the keystone to our understanding of the electronic structure of atoms, and the way those electrons bind the atoms together into molecules. For this work he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904, the first such prize to come to a British subject. He was also a man of great charm, a good linguist, and a composer and performer of music, poetry and song. This review will trace his career, describe his character and give and account of the chemistry which led to the award of the Nobel Prize.

  2. William Osler and Arthur Conan Doyle versus the antivivisectionists: some lessons from history for today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, J D; Rodin, A E

    1984-03-01

    Reaction against vivisection for research reached its height in the last two decades of the 19th century and the first two of the 20th, and a resurgence began in the 1960s. Antivivisectionism was and is related, in part, to emphasis on humanitarian sentiments. Two humanitarian physicians defended vivisection as essential. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle in 1886 justified the killing of rabbits to relieve human suffering from hydrophobia. In 1910, he objected to the antihuman campaign of the antivivisectionists. Dr. William Osler reacted similarly to the threat to vivisection. He gave emphatic evidence to investigative committees in the United States in 1900 and in Britain in 1907. Osler also performed vivisection. His experimentation included studies of pig typhoid and tapeworm cysts in pigs and of the fate of india ink injected into the lungs of kittens. Osler and Conan Doyle were but two of the many prominent physicians who helped stem the tide of antivivisection legislation near the turn of the century. A review of the elements that fostered antivivisectionism in the society of their time is relevant in understanding and reacting to similar sentiments in the present era.

  3. Non-gyroscope DR and adaptive information fusion algorithm used in GPS/DR device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qingli; Xue Yongqi; Shang Yanlei; Shi Pengfei

    2006-01-01

    In view of the problems existing in GPS, a non-gyroscope DR is introduced. The operating principle and the algorithm of the GPS/DR device are also presented. By operating measured data synthetically, linear observation equations are obtained for the information fusion algorithm. This approach avoids model error due to linearizing nonlinear observation equations in the conventional algorithm, so that the stability of information fusion algorithm is improved and computation expenses are reduced. Field running experiments show that satisfactory accuracy can be obtained by the proposed navigation model and algorithm for the non-gyroscope GPS/DR device.

  4. A Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels%Comparative Study of William Golding'S Four Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔晓强

    2008-01-01

    With his keen insight,William Golding becomes very conscious of the human heart and the necessity that we become aware of this darkness we are to save ourselves.All his novels,attempt to deal with the essential human condition.All Golding 's novels, products of his peculiar literary temperament and habit,are reactive experiments.Each of them represents a response to a specific book by an early writer.

  5. [Stefan Boleslaw Szuman (1889-1972), the Torun surgeon, psychologist and educator, the Jagiellonski University professor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łysiak, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Professor Stefan Szuman was an outstanding offspring of dr med Leon Szuman, the Torun surgeon. He was born in Torun on 3.01.1889. Encouraged by his father he successfully graduated from medical school. Father's hopes that his private surgery clinic in Torun could be runned by his son were shattered when Stefan found a pretext for quitting surgery. It turned out that his real passion was psychology and education. Luckily, he survived the two world wars. In years 1948-1949, a 28 year old priest Karol Wojtyla listened to his lectures on characterology. It seems that among others, Stefan Szuman's views on human attitude towards death exerted a noticeable influence on the later Pope John Paul II.

  6. Among Musculoskeletal Surgeons, Job Dissatisfaction Is Associated With Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wulfften Palthe, Olivier D R; Neuhaus, Valentin; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2016-08-01

    Burnout is common in professions such as medicine in which employees have frequent and often stressful interpersonal interactions where empathy and emotional control are important. Burnout can lead to decreased effectiveness at work, negative health outcomes, and less job satisfaction. A relationship between burnout and job satisfaction is established for several types of physicians but is less studied among surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions. We asked: (1) For surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, what risk factors are associated with worse job dissatisfaction? (2) What risk factors are associated with burnout symptoms? Two hundred ten (52% of all active members of the Science of Variation Group [SOVG]) surgeons who treat musculoskeletal conditions (94% orthopaedic surgeons and 6% trauma surgeons; in Europe, general trauma surgeons do most of the fracture surgery) completed the Global Job Satisfaction instrument, Shirom-Malamed Burnout Measure, and provided practice and surgeon characteristics. Most surgeons were male (193 surgeons, 92%) and most were academically employed (186 surgeons, 89%). Factors independently associated with job satisfaction and burnout were identified with multivariable analysis. Greater symptoms of burnout (β, -7.13; standard error [SE], 0.75; 95% CI, -8.60 to -5.66; p < 0.001; adjusted R(2), 0.33) was the only factor independently associated with lower job satisfaction. Having children (β, -0.45; SE, 0.0.21; 95% CI, -0.85 to -0.043; p = 0.030; adjusted R(2), 0.046) was the only factor independently associated with fewer symptoms of burnout. Among an active research group of largely academic surgeons treating musculoskeletal conditions, most are satisfied with their job. Efforts to limit burnout and job satisfaction by optimizing engagement in and deriving meaning from the work are effective in other settings and merit attention among surgeons. Level II, prognostic study.

  7. Surgeon unemployment: would practice sharing be a viable solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeam, Elliot; Feinberg, Stan

    2016-04-01

    Surgeon unemployment has become a crisis within Canadian surgery in recent years. Without dedicated governmental workforce planning, ensuring that new residency graduates can find employment will require new models of employment. Practice sharing, whereby a new graduate and a senior surgeon partner to divide their practices, allows the senior surgeon to wind down and the newer surgeon to ramp up. Importantly, this arrangement builds in formal mentoring, which is so important in the early years of starting a surgical practice. Practice sharing may be a solution for the workforce issues currently afflicting new surgical graduates across Canada.

  8. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  9. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG. Methods: Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology. Results: The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal. Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  10. [Management abilities of the head surgeon: essential for survival!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, J

    2012-04-01

    Due to increased economic challenges in the management of hospitals head surgeons do not only need excellent surgical expertise but also significant management qualities. The personality of head surgeons should include authenticity, sincerity, fairness and the ability to cooperate. Visionary leadership, strategic thinking and strategic management of the personnel are further prerequisites for success. Besides good abilities in communication head surgeons need knowledge of the operating figures for interpretation. To keep up with the own capabilities time and self-management is essential. A survival as head surgeon is likely if these qualities and abilities exist.

  11. Combination of TRAIL with bortezomib shifted apoptotic signaling from DR4 to DR5 death receptor by selective internalization and degradation of DR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim L Bychkov

    Full Text Available TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand mediates apoptosis in cancer cells through death receptors DR4 and DR5 preferring often one receptor over another in the cells expressing both receptors. Receptor selective mutant variants of TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against DR4 and DR5 are highly promising anticancer agents. Here using DR5 specific mutant variant of TRAIL--DR5-B we have demonstrated for the first time that the sensitivity of cancer cells can be shifted from one TRAIL death receptor to another during co-treatment with anticancer drugs. First we have studied the contribution of DR4 and DR5 in HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cells and demonstrated that in HCT116 p53+/+ cells the both death receptors are involved in TRAIL-induced cell death while in HCT116 p53-/- cells prevailed DR4 signaling. The expression of death (DR4 and DR5 as well as decoy (DcR1 and DcR2 receptors was upregulated in the both cell lines either by TRAIL or by bortezomib. However, combined treatment of cells with two drugs induced strong time-dependent and p53-independent internalization and further lysosomal degradation of DR4 receptor. Interestingly DR5-B variant of TRAIL which do not bind with DR4 receptor also induced elimination of DR4 from cell surface in combination with bortezomib indicating the ligand-independent mechanism of the receptor internalization. Eliminatory internalization of DR4 resulted in activation of DR5 receptor thus DR4-dependent HCT116 p53-/- cells became highly sensitive to DR5-B in time-dependent manner. Internalization and degradation of DR4 receptor depended on activation of caspases as well as of lysosomal activity as it was completely inhibited by Z-VAD-FMK, E-64 and Baf-A1. In light of our findings, it is important to explore carefully which of the death receptors is active, when sensitizing drugs are combined with agonistic antibodies to the death receptors or receptor selective variants of TRAIL to enhance

  12. Combination of TRAIL with bortezomib shifted apoptotic signaling from DR4 to DR5 death receptor by selective internalization and degradation of DR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, Maxim L; Gasparian, Marine E; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2014-01-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) mediates apoptosis in cancer cells through death receptors DR4 and DR5 preferring often one receptor over another in the cells expressing both receptors. Receptor selective mutant variants of TRAIL and agonistic antibodies against DR4 and DR5 are highly promising anticancer agents. Here using DR5 specific mutant variant of TRAIL--DR5-B we have demonstrated for the first time that the sensitivity of cancer cells can be shifted from one TRAIL death receptor to another during co-treatment with anticancer drugs. First we have studied the contribution of DR4 and DR5 in HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cells and demonstrated that in HCT116 p53+/+ cells the both death receptors are involved in TRAIL-induced cell death while in HCT116 p53-/- cells prevailed DR4 signaling. The expression of death (DR4 and DR5) as well as decoy (DcR1 and DcR2) receptors was upregulated in the both cell lines either by TRAIL or by bortezomib. However, combined treatment of cells with two drugs induced strong time-dependent and p53-independent internalization and further lysosomal degradation of DR4 receptor. Interestingly DR5-B variant of TRAIL which do not bind with DR4 receptor also induced elimination of DR4 from cell surface in combination with bortezomib indicating the ligand-independent mechanism of the receptor internalization. Eliminatory internalization of DR4 resulted in activation of DR5 receptor thus DR4-dependent HCT116 p53-/- cells became highly sensitive to DR5-B in time-dependent manner. Internalization and degradation of DR4 receptor depended on activation of caspases as well as of lysosomal activity as it was completely inhibited by Z-VAD-FMK, E-64 and Baf-A1. In light of our findings, it is important to explore carefully which of the death receptors is active, when sensitizing drugs are combined with agonistic antibodies to the death receptors or receptor selective variants of TRAIL to enhance cancer treatment

  13. Does Surgeon Sex Matter?: Practice Patterns and Outcomes of Female and Male Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoky, Catherine E; Sellers, Morgan M; Keele, Luke J; Wirtalla, Christopher J; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2017-07-24

    We sought to compare postoperative outcomes of female surgeons (FS) and male surgeons (MS) within general surgery. FS in the workforce are increasing in number. Female physicians provide exceptional care in other specialties. Differences in surgical outcomes of FS and MS have not been examined. We linked the AMA Physician Masterfile to discharge claims from New York, Florida, and Pennsylvania (2012 to 2013) to examine practice patterns and to compare surgical outcomes of FS and MS. We paired FS and MS operating at the same hospital using cardinality matching with refined balance and compared inpatient mortality, any postoperative complication, and prolonged length of stay (pLOS) in FS and MS. Overall practice patterns differed between the 663 FS and 3219 MS. We identified 2462 surgeons (19% FS, 81% MS) at 429 hospitals who met inclusion criteria for outcomes analysis. FS were younger (mean age ± SD FS: 48.5 ± 8.4 years, MS: 54.3 ± 9.4y; P best fit for them regardless of sex.

  14. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  15. The surgeon, the Countess, her husband and his lover: John Hunter (1728-93) and the Countess of Strathmore (1749-1800).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Wendy

    2007-08-01

    John Hunter (1728-93) was one of the most popular and controversial surgeons of the 18th century. He treated the celebrities of his day including William Pitt the younger, Adam Smith and David Hume. Today he is acclaimed for his pioneering approach as the founder of scientific surgery. Yet a hitherto unknown aspect of his work--looking after the illegitimate offspring of one of his patients--has only recently come to light in some letters transcribed in archives at Glamis Castle in Scotland.

  16. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  17. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  18. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-07-16

    Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position "1" and "2". We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position "1" lasted 0.5 hours, and position "2" lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. The analysis was done in three positions: "Operating position 1", "Operating position 2 ', and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this model using CATIA R5v19. The proposed model is based on CATIA software

  19. The Glass Houses of Attending Surgeons: An Assessment of Unprofessional Behavior on Facebook Among Practicing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Sudbeck, Craig; Luers, Thomas; Adamson, Peter; Cook, Gates; Schenarts, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication demonstrated that unprofessional behavior on Facebook is common among surgical residents. In the formulation of standards and curricula to address this issue, it is important that surgical faculty lead by example. Our current study refocuses on the Facebook profiles of faculty surgeons involved in the education of general surgery residents. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) web site was used to identify general surgery residencies located in the Midwest. Departmental web sites were then searched to identify teaching faculty for the general surgery residency. Facebook was then searched to determine which faculty had profiles available for viewing by the general public. Profiles were then placed in 1 of the 3 following categories: professional, potentially unprofessional, or clearly unprofessional. A chi-square test was used to determine significance. In all, 57 residency programs were identified on the ACS web site, 100% of which provided an institutional web site listing the surgical faculty. A total of 758 general surgery faculty were identified (133 women and 625 men), of which 195 (25.7%) had identifiable Facebook accounts. In all, 165 faculty (84.6%) had no unprofessional content, 20 (10.3%) had potentially unprofessional content, and 10 (5.1%) had clearly unprofessional content. Inter-rater reliability was good (88.9% agreement, κ = 0.784). Clearly unprofessional behavior was found only in male surgeons. For male surgeons, clearly unprofessional behavior was more common among those in practice for less than 5 years (p = 0.031). Alcohol and politics were the most commonly found variables in the potentially unprofessional group. Inappropriate language and sexually suggestive material were the most commonly found variables in the clearly unprofessional group. Unprofessional behavior on Facebook is less common among surgical faculty compared with surgical residents. However, the rates remain unacceptably high, especially among men and

  20. William Eggleston摄影展在巴黎举行

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Holly(译)

    2009-01-01

    以巴黎为基地的卡地亚基金会Fondation Cartier最近邀请国际著名摄影师Wiliam Eggleston举办摄影展.首次将William Eggleston一批摄影精品以及多幅抽象画作一并展出,部分作品是首次公开展览。William Eggleston于1939年出生于美国,这次展出的William Eggleston摄影作品大多是以巴黎当年的时尚生活为主题。

  1. Discoverers of the universe William and Caroline Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Hoskin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Discoverers of the Universe tells the gripping story of William Herschel, the brilliant, fiercely ambitious, emotionally complex musician and composer who became court astronomer to Britain's King George III, and of William's sister, Caroline, who assisted him in his observations of the night sky and became an accomplished astronomer in her own right. Together, they transformed our view of the universe from the unchanging, mechanical creation of Newton's clockmaker god to the ever-evolving, incredibly dynamic cosmos that it truly is. William was in his forties when his amateur observations usi

  2. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2006-01-15

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  3. Richard von Volkmann: surgeon and Renaissance man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R; Mubarak, Scott J

    2008-02-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19(th) century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867-1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the "antiseptic technique" to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann's contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children's fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics.

  4. Changing perceptions of beauty: a surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Peter A; Zavod, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is a mystery that has been with us for ages. Scholars and scientists have investigated its roots and effects, and its presence is ubiquitous. Has the construct of beauty changed over time? Is our sense of beauty learned or innate? What IS beauty, and can we quantify it? A substantial amount of work supports a Darwinian theory of selection, which predicts a survival advantage based on physical attractiveness. However, there is evidence that certain perceptions of beauty change with time. Indeed, the recent globalization of modern society has wrought changes in our perceptions of beauty. Are patients electing cosmetic surgery procuring a survival advantage, or are they bypassing genetics and setting a new standard for beauty? As facial plastic surgeons, we must be poised to respond to this metamorphosis and understand its roots. Although there is some equivocation and debate about this elusive subject, it is our duty to stay abreast of the current dynamic to make sound judgments that are in the best interests of our patients.

  5. Occupational Hazards Among Dental Surgeons In Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Nabeel Naeem; Aleem, Sajid Atif

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency of different occupational hazards among dental surgeons in Karachi. Cross-sectional survey. Amulticenter study conducted at Ameen Diabetic and Dental Hospital, Dental OPD, Karachi Medical and Dental College, and Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi, from February to March 2014. Dentists, practicing in different areas of Karachi, were given a self-administered questionnaire. It comprised of a form containing information about the socio-demographic profile of dentists and questionnaires regarding occupational hazards experienced in practice. Atotal of 130 dentists, involved in clinical practice, were randomly selected. There were 45 (35%) males and 85 (65%) females. The average age was 39 ±5.76 years. Out of 130 dentists, 93.8% (122/130) had occupational hazard during practice. Cervical back pain was observed in 81.96% dentists followed by knee / elbow joint pain in 53.27%, eye infection in 44.615%, impaired hearing in 40.98%, psychological stress in 41.80% and material allergy was 12.29%. Various spinal and joint pains, eye infections, impaired hearing, stress and material allergy represented occupational hazard to 93.8% of the surveyed dentists.

  6. William Blake: escritura y lectura iluminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Picón

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerando que la fuerza divina es un poder propiamente humano, que permite trascender desde la mera visualización y percepción sensorial del mundo finito y terrenal hacia el reino eterno y verdadero de la imaginación, el poeta, artista y visionario inglés William Blake (1757-1827 identificó a dios con dicha facultad humana. En su lucha contra la ‘religión de la razón’, bajo cuyo poder el hombre se había limitado a la ‘vacía’ percepción exterior, Blake buscará recobrar la ‘religión de la imaginación’. Desde esta perspectiva, este estudio pretende dilucidar el modo en que la materialidad de lo escrito (Roger Chartier y la utilización de un método de escritura particular por parte del visionario -distinto al que su propio tiempo le ofrecía- afecta el circuito de la comunicación visionaria de comienzo a fin, relacionándose directamente con la finalidad que Blake otorgó a sus poemas proféticos iluminados: despertar en los lectores esa capacidad visionaria y verdadera que ‘reside en el pecho de todos los hombres’.Considering the ‘divine force’ as a human power that allows humans to transcend from the mere sensory visualization and perception of the finite and earthly world to the true and eternal realm of imagination, William Blake, the english poet, artist and visionary (1757-1827 identified god with this human faculty. In his struggle against the ‘religion of reason’, under which humans had been reduced to an ‘empty’ outward perception, Blake wants to recover the ‘religion of imagination’. From this perspective, I expect to elucidate the ways in which the material aspects of writing (Roger Chartier and the visionary use of a specific method of writing -different from the methods available to Blake in his own time- affect the visionary circuit of communication. This complete transformation is directly connected with the purpose of Blake’s illuminated prophetic poems: he intends to awake in his

  7. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  8. This Is Not Dr. Conn's Aldosterone Anymore

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    In 1955, Dr. Jerome Conn described a patient with severe hypertension and hypokalemia and an aldosterone-secreting adenoma. The prevalence of hyperaldosteronism is increased among patients with obesity or resistant hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers reduce the secretion of aldosterone, but with chronic treatment aldosterone concentrations “escape” back to baseline values. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism reduces mortality i...

  9. DR21 Main: A Collapsing Cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Larry

    2008-01-01

    The molecular cloud, DR21 Main, is an example of a large-scale gravitational collapse about an axis near the plane of the sky where the collapse is free of major disturbances due to rotation or other effects. Using flux maps, polarimetric maps, and measurements of the field inclination by comparing the line widths of ion and neutral species, we estimate the temperature, mass, magnetic field, and the turbulent kinetic, mean magnetic, and gravitational potential energies, and present a 3D model...

  10. Diathermy awareness among surgeons-An analysis in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. McQuail

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results show a dearth of awareness among surgeons regarding diathermy. Given our findings, we urge a shift in attitude towards diathermy, with surgeons adopting a more cautious and safe approach to diathermy use. We recommend that formal training be introduced as a hospital based initiative.

  11. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  12. Patients' Opinions about Polish Surgeons and Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakowski, Marek; Hładoń, Aleksandra; Seweryn, Mariusz; Ciosek, Jakub; Świątkiewicz, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    In Polish society Stereotypes about the surgeons are deeply rooted, which could really affect their relationship with the patient and the entire treatment process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of an opinion survey on the image of the surgeon and operative treatment.

  13. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  14. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-02-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  15. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  16. Spine Surgeon Selection Criteria: Factors Influencing Patient Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Mayo, Benjamin C; Louie, Philip K; Singh, Kern

    2016-07-01

    A prospective questionnaire. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors that patients consider when selecting a spine surgeon. The rise in consumer-driven health insurance plans has increased the role of patients in provider selection. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that may influence a patient's criteria for selecting a spine surgeon. Two hundred thirty-one patients who sought treatment by one spine surgeon completed an anonymous questionnaire consisting of 26 questions. Four questions regarded demographic information; 16 questions asked respondents to rate the importance of specific criteria regarding spine surgeon selection (scale 1-10, with 10 being the most important); and six questions were multiple-choice regarding patient preferences toward aspects of their surgeon (age, training background, etc.). Patients rated board certification (9.26 ± 1.67), in-network provider status (8.10 ± 3.04), and friendliness/bedside manner (8.01 ± 2.35) highest among factors considered when selecting a spine surgeon. Most patients (92%) reported that 30 minutes or less should pass between check-in and seeing their surgeon during a clinic appointment. Regarding whether their spine surgeon underwent training as a neurosurgeon versus an orthopedic surgeon, 25% reported no preference, 52% preferred neurosurgical training, and 23% preferred orthopedic training. Our findings suggest that board certification and in-network health insurance plans may be most important in patients' criteria for choosing a spine surgeon. Advertisements were rated least important by patients. Patients expressed varying preferences regarding ideal surgeon age, training background, proximity, medical student/resident involvement, and clinic appointment availability. The surgeon from whom patients sought treatment completed an orthopedic surgery residency; hence, it is notable that 52% of patients preferred a spine surgeon with a neurosurgical background. In the context

  17. DR-Cloud: Multi-Cloud Based Disaster Recovery Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu Gu DongshengWang Ghuanyi Liu

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper presents a practical multi-cloud based disaster recovery service model: DR- Cloud. With DR-Cloud, resources of multiple cloud service providers can be utilized cooperatively by the disaster recovery service provider...

  18. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-08-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  19. [Patient's pain feeling and surgeon's comfort--ECCE versus phacoemulsification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałuzny, Jakub J; Eliks, Iwona; Mierzejewski, Andrzej; Kałuzny, Bartłomiej

    2004-01-01

    To compare patient's pain and surgeon's comfort during ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia and phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. 120 patients scheduled for planned routine cataract extraction were divided in 2 groups: group 1-60 eyes, ECCE under retrobulbar anesthesia and group II-60 eyes, phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Immediately after operation patients were asked, to answer questions about their feeling during surgery. Simultaneously, the surgeon filled up the questionnaire, concerning patients behavior during the entire procedure. Statistically significant higher level of pain was reported in group I (ECCE). The most painful moment of the procedure was retrobulbar injection. During surgery pain feeling in both groups was similar. Both types of anesthesia provided very good level of surgeon's comfort. The longer operation, the higher level of pain and lower surgeon's comfort were reported in both groups. Patients having ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia reported more pain comparing to phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Both anesthesia methods provided high level of surgeon's comfort.

  20. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary.

  1. The portraiture of William Harvey (1578-1657) unveiled by the detective work of Geoffrey Keynes (1887-1983) and Alex Sakula (1917-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D Geraint

    2005-05-01

    In November 1948, Sir Geoffrey Keynes exhibited the only known portrait of William Harvey in mid-life. The recovery of this rare portrait was due to Keynes's detective work at visits to Rolls Park in Essex. Dr Alex Sakula discovered the Betchworth portraits of the Harvey family by accident when he was invited to visit a patient, Major General Goulburn, at Betchworth in Surrey. After much research work Sakula was able to mount an informative exhibition at the Royal College of Physicians. Sakula also reminded us of Eliab Harvey (1758-1830), William's descendant, captain of the Téméraire at the Battle of Trafalgar; the year 2005 marks the bicentenary.

  2. Occupational Stress and Burnout among Surgeons in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajeev; Huggard, Peter; van Toledo, Annik

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the levels of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji. A document set comprising a cover letter; a consent form; a sociodemographic and supplementary information questionnaire; the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI); the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12); the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT); and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaires were provided to surgeons from three public divisional hospitals in Fiji. Thirty-six of 43 (83.7%) invited surgeons participated in the study. According to their MBI scores, surgeons suffered from low (10, 27.8%), moderate (23, 63.9%), and high (3, 8.3%) levels of burnout. Comparatively, 23 (63.9%) demonstrated moderate burnout according to their ProQOL scores. Substantial psychiatric morbidity was observed in 16 (44.0%) surgeons per their GHQ-12 scores. Consumption of alcohol was noted in 29 (80.6%) surgeons, and 12 (33.4%) had AUDIT scores characterizing their alcohol use in excess of low-risk guidelines or as harmful or hazardous drinking. Surgeons of Fijian nationality showed higher MBI emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores compared with surgeons of other nationalities. Surgeons with an awareness of the availability of counseling services at their hospitals showed low AUDIT and ProQOL burnout scores. Smokers, alcohol drinkers, and kava drinkers showed higher AUDIT scores. This study highlights a level of occupational stress and burnout among surgeons in Fiji and a lack of awareness of their mental and physical well-being. The authors recommend that occupational stress and burnout intervention strategies be put in place in hospitals in Fiji.

  3. Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Intihar Klančar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Slovene reactions to William Faulkner's writing: a lot of critical attention was given to the author twice, namely after he won the Nobel Prize for Literature  in 1949 and after his death in 1962. The articles and reviews published  in Slovene magazines  and newspapers focused on themes, characterization, style and structure of his novels. Thus the Slovene reading public got the chance to get to know one of the greatest novelists of 20th century, his troubled, decaying, socially, racially, religiously and historically challenged American South and through it themselves and their attitude toward the world and its problems. Faulkner also had a strong influence on some of the Slovene writers of 1950s and 1960s: they adopted his themes and writing techniques, namely a cyclic structure of the novel and stream-of-consciousness technique,  thus forging the new Slovene modernist fiction that started to emerge from the late 1960s onwards.

  4. Space perception and William James's metaphysical presuppositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Martin J

    2011-05-01

    William James's overtly philosophical work may be more continuous with his psychological work than is sometimes thought. His Essays in Radical Empiricism can be understood as an explicit statement of the absolute presupposition that formed the basis of Jamesian psychology: that direct experience is primary and has to be taken at face value. An examination of James's theory of space perception suggests that, even in his early work, he presupposed the primacy of direct experience, and that later changes in his account of space perception can be understood as making his view more consistent with this presupposition. In his earlier view of space perception, James argued that sensations were directly experienced as spatial, though he accepted that spatial relations between sensations may be constructed by higher order thought. In his later view, however, James argued that spatial relations were just as directly experienced as sensations. The work of T. H. Green may have prompted James to recognize the full consequence of his ideas and to realize that taking experience at face value required that spatial relations be thought of as intrinsic to experience rather than the result of intellectual construction.

  5. Memory abilities in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, S; Brizzolara, D; Carlesimo, G A; Pezzini, G; Volterra, V

    1996-09-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic condition characterised by intellectual disability, typical facial dysmorphology and several medical anomalies. A specific neuropsychological profile with a dissociation between language (relatively preserved) and visuo-spatial abilities (more seriously impaired) has been hypothesised in these children. Memory abilities of these patients have not been adequately investigated, although they may substantially contribute to better understanding their neuropsychological profile. The present study aimed at investigating verbal and spatial memory in patients with WS (N = 16). Their performance was compared with that of normally developing children on tasks of verbal and spatial span and immediate and delayed recall of verbal and visuo-perceptual materials. Memory abilities of WS children appear to be characterised by defective visuo-spatial memory, both in the short-term and long-term domain, and a dissociation between normal short- but deficient long-term verbal learning. Results are interpreted by supporting the thesis that intellectual disability reflects the defective functioning of a complex system in which some cognitive competencies may be disrupted more than others (Detterman, 1987; Vicari, Albertini and Caltagirone, 1992).

  6. Neural Correlates of Amusia in Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam D. Lense

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is defined by marked deficits in pitch perception and production. Though historically examined only in otherwise typically developing (TD populations, amusia has recently been documented in Williams syndrome (WS, a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder with a unique auditory phenotype including auditory sensitivities and increased emotional responsiveness to music but variable musical skill. The current study used structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging to examine neural correlates of amusia in 17 individuals with WS (4 of whom met criteria for amusia. Consistent with findings from TD amusics, amusia in WS was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The relationship between amusia and FA in the inferior component of the SLF was particularly robust, withstanding corrections for cognitive functioning, auditory sensitivities, or musical training. Though the number of individuals with amusia in the study is small, results add to evidence for the role of fronto-temporal disconnectivity in congenital amusia and suggest that novel populations with developmental differences can provide a window into understanding gene-brain-behavior relationships that underlie musical behaviors.

  7. Affective prosody in children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setter, Jane; Stojanovik, Vesna; Van Ewijk, Lizet; Moreland, Matthew

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate expressive affect in children with Williams syndrome (WS) in comparison to typically developing children in an experimental task and in spontaneous speech. Fourteen children with WS, 14 typically developing children matched to the WS group for receptive language (LA) and 15 typically developing children matched to the WS groups for chronological age (CA) were recruited. Affect was investigated using an experimental Output Affect task from the Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems-Child version (PEPS-C) battery, and by measuring pitch range and vowel durations from a spontaneous speech task. The children were also rated for level of emotional involvement by phonetically naïve listeners. The WS group performed similarly to the LA and CA groups on the Output Affect task. With regard to vowel durations, the WS group was no different from the LA group; however both the WS and the LA groups were found to use significantly longer vowels than the CA group. The WS group differed significantly from both control groups on their range of pitch range and was perceived as being significantly more emotionally involved than the two control groups.

  8. Introducing william stern (1871-1938).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiell, James T

    2012-11-01

    This article discusses the events and considerations, both 'distal' and 'proximal,' behind the production of the author's recent book, William Stern (1871-1938): A Brief Introduction to His Life and Works (Pabst Science Publishers, Germany, March, 2010). The 'distal' roots of the work lie in the advice given to the author by German and other European colleagues in the mid-1980s that examining Stern's writing in some detail would likely prove fruitful. The more proximal roots lie in a series of public lectures that the author prepared and delivered in the capacity of Ernst Cassirer Guest Professor in the Institute for Philosophy at the University of Hamburg in 2004. It is explained that the primary intent of the book is to provide readers with a preliminary sense of the breadth of Stern's contributions to psychology, and to suggest that his works might well deserve closer attention in the 21st century than they ever gained during the 20th. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. William Pendry Bidelman (1918-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Howard E.

    2017-01-01

    William P. Bidelman—Editor of these Publications from 1956 to 1961—passed away on 2011 May 3, at the age of 92. He was one of the last of the masters of visual stellar spectral classification and the identification of peculiar stars. I review his contributions to these subjects, including the discoveries of barium stars, hydrogen-deficient stars, high-galactic-latitude supergiants, stars with anomalous carbon content, and exotic chemical abundances in peculiar A and B stars. Bidelman was legendary for his encyclopedic knowledge of the stellar literature. He had a profound and inspirational influence on many colleagues and students. Some of the bizarre stellar phenomena he discovered remain unexplained to the present day. Material for this article was contributed by several family members, colleagues, and former students, including: Billie Bidelman Little, Joseph Little, James Caplinger, D. Jack MacConnell, Wayne Osborn, George W. Preston, Nancy G. Roman, and Nolan Walborn. Any opinions stated are those of the author.

  10. Was Sir William Crookes epistemically virtuous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ian James

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to use Sir William Crookes' researches into psychical phenomena as a sustained case study of the role of epistemic virtues within scientific enquiry. Despite growing interest in virtues in science, there are few integrated historical and philosophical studies, and even fewer studies focussing on controversial or 'fringe' sciences where, one might suppose, certain epistemic virtues (like open-mindedness and tolerance) may be subjected to sterner tests. Using the virtue of epistemic courage as my focus, it emerges that Crookes' psychical researches were indeed epistemically courageous, but that this judgment must be grounded in sensitivity to the motivational complexity and context-sensitivity of the exercise of epistemic virtues. The paper then considers Crookes' remarks on the relationship between epistemic virtuousness and the intellectual integrity and public duties of scientists, thereby placing epistemic virtues in the context of wider debates about the authority of science in late modern societies. I conclude that Crookes' researches into psychical phenomena offer instructive lessons for historians of science and virtue epistemologists concerning the complexity and contextuality of epistemic virtues, and the profitable forms that future studies of virtues in science could take. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sir William Mitchell (1925-2002)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Sir William (Bill) Mitchell, former President of the CERN Council, died on 30th October 2002 at the age of 77. Mitchell was professor of Physics at Oxford University from 1978 to 1989, having previously been Professor of Physics, Dean of Science and Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Reading University. From 1985 to 1990 he was Chairman of the UK's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC), which at the time was the funding agency for the UK's participation in the CERN programme. As Chairman, Mitchell was one of the UK representatives on the CERN Council, and in 1991 he was elected President, a position he held for three years. This was a difficult period for CERN. Financial problems were being faced in many member states, notably in Germany as a result of unification. This led to calls for reductions in the CERN budget and, more significantly, to requests for delays in consderation of future programmes. On the other hand for the future of CERN and the progress of elementary particle physics, it was necessary...

  12. The epileptology of William Aldren Turner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, M J

    2006-01-01

    William Aldren Turner (1864-1945), in his day Physician to the National Hospital, Queen Square, and to King's College Hospital, London, was one of the major figures in the world of epileptology in the period between Hughlings Jackson in the latter part of the 19th century and the advent of electroencephalography in the 1930s. Although he also made contributions to knowledge in other areas of neurology, and with Grainger Stewart wrote a competent textbook on that subject, Turner's main professional interest throughout his career seems to have been epilepsy. On the basis of a series of earlier, rather heavily statistical, personal publications dealing with various aspects of the disorder, he authored what became a well-accepted monograph entitled Epilepsy - a study of the idiopathic disorder, which appeared in 1907, and he also gave the 1910 Morison lectures in Edinburgh on the topic. His writings on epilepsy over a period of three decades consolidated knowledge rather than led to significant advances, but helped maintain interest in the disorder during a rather long fallow phase in the development of the understanding of its nature.

  13. William D. Stevenson: Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhida, Karim; Mendez, Ivar

    2007-12-01

    The origins of neurosurgical services in Atlantic Canada are tied to the individual efforts of William D. Stevenson. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, Stevenson completed his senior matriculation in Dunnville, Ontario, before studying medicine at the University of Toronto. He completed the Gallie surgical course in Toronto and then spent 1 year training with Edward Archibald at McGill University. After working for 2 years with the Canadian Mobile Neurosurgical Unit in Europe during the Second World War, Stevenson undertook formal neurosurgical training with Kenneth G. McKenzie, Canada's first neurosurgeon. Stevenson was thereafter recruited to Halifax to start the neurosurgical service at the Victoria General Hospital in January 1948, and he remained head of the division for the next 26 years. His pioneering work laid the foundations for the establishment of a major academic neurosurgical service at Dalhousie University and was crucial for the establishment of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada. After his retirement, Stevenson moved back to Ontario and began his second career, transferring his passion for neurosurgery to oil painting. His legacy to neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada will be remembered in perpetuity with the annual Neurosurgery Resident Research Award at Dalhousie University, established and named in his honour. This paper focuses on Stevenson's life and work in neurosurgery as Atlantic Canada's first neurosurgeon.

  14. Salmon stream reconnaissance Prince William Sound and Afognak Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In April of 1963, salmon stream improvement projects in Prince William Sound were visited. Objectives of the trip, from a fisheries standpoint, were as follows: (1)...

  15. William L Finley - Slender False-brome Eradication

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — William L. Finley NWR contains some of the largest and best examples of remaining Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and prairie habitats remaining in the...

  16. Coastal Ocean Processes Symposium: A Tribute to William D. Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts distributed at the Coastal Ocean Processes Symposium: A Tribute to William D . Grant at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution from September 27-September 30, 1998.

  17. The Trail Inventory of William L. Finley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  18. Anny Cazenave Receives 2012 William Bowie Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    Anny Cazenave was awarded the 2012 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for "outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research."

  19. Gerald J. Wasserburg Awarded 2008 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.; Wasserburg, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Gerald J. Wasserburg was awarded the 2008 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held 17 December 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for ``outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.''

  20. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  1. Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marine bird populations in Prince William Sound, Alaska, were censused in the winter and summer of 1972 and 1973 to assess the potential impact of oil transport...

  2. 34 CFR 685.100 - The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. 685...) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Purpose and Scope § 685.100 The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program. (a) Under the William D....

  3. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  4. Dr. Yu Wang, Director, Natural Science Division, National Science Council, Taiwan

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Photo 01: L. to r.: Dr. Philippe Bloch, CERN CMS ECAL Deputy Project Manager, Dr. Yu Wang, Dr. Etiennette Auffray, CERN, responsible of the CERN ECAL Regional Centre. Photo 02: L. to r.: Dr. Yu Wang, Dr. Philippe Bloch, Dr. Apollo GO, National Central University, Taiwan, Dr. Etiennette Auffray.

  5. Quality of life of indian pediatric surgeons: Results of a survey (of indian association of pediatric surgeons members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zameer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common belief that pediatric surgeons are unsatisfied. It also acts as a point of reference and encouragement to newer aspirants in pediatric surgery.

  6. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  7. Surgeon-related factors and outcome in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, G A; Soskolne, C L; Yakimets, W W; Newman, S C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether surgical subspecialty training in colorectal surgery or frequency of rectal cancer resection by the surgeon are independent prognostic factors for local recurrence (LR) and survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Variation in patient outcome in rectal cancer has been shown among centers and among individual surgeons. However, the prognostic importance of surgeon-related factors is largely unknown. METHODS: All patients undergoing potentially curative low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection for primary adenocarcinoma of the rectum between 1983 and 1990 at the five Edmonton general hospitals were reviewed in a historic-prospective study design. Preoperative, intraoperative, pathologic, adjuvant therapy, and outcome variables were obtained. Outcomes of interest included LR and disease-specific survival (DSS). To determine survival rates and to control both confounding and interaction, multivariate analysis was performed using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: The study included 683 patients involving 52 surgeons, with > 5-year follow-up obtained on 663 (97%) patients. There were five colorectal-trained surgeons who performed 109 (16%) of the operations. Independent of surgeon training, 323 operations (47%) were done by surgeons performing < 21 rectal cancer resections over the study period. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of LR was increased in patients of both noncolorectal trained surgeons (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.5, p = 0.001) and those of surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.8, p < 0.001). Stage (p < 0.001), use of adjuvant therapy (p = 0.002), rectal perforation or tumor spill (p < 0.001), and vascular/neural invasion (p = 0.002) also were significant prognostic factors for LR. Similarly, decreased disease-specific survival was found to be independently associated with noncolorectal-trained surgeons (HR = 1.5, p = 0.03) and surgeons performing < 21 resections (HR = 1.4, p = 0.005). Stage (p < 0

  8. 77 FR 72413 - William Blair & Company, L.L.C. and William Blair Funds.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... or feasible. 5. The A Share Fund has filed a Certificate of Formation, to be effective as of December... Series will have its own portfolio manager or portfolio management team at William Blair who will...

  9. Ethical challenges in surgery as narrated by practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and female surgeons were found. They reasoned in both action and relational ethical perspectives. Surgeons focused on their relationships with patients and colleagues and their moral self in descriptions of the ethical challenges in their work. Dialogue and personal involvement were important in their relationships with patients. The surgeons emphasized the importance of open dialogue, professional recognition, and an inclusive and accepting environment between colleagues. Conclusion The surgeons are personally challenged by the existential realities of human life in their relationships with patients. They realized that ethical challenges are an inherent part of performing surgery and of life itself, and say that they have to learn to "live with" these challenges in a way that is confirmed both socially and by their inner moral self. This means accepting their personal and professional limitations, being uncertain, being fallible, and being humble. Living with the ethical challenges of surgery seems to contribute to the surgeons' confidence and vulnerability in their professional identity.

  10. Surgical complications and their implications for surgeons' well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A; Faiz, O; Bicknell, C; Vincent, C

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare professionals can be seriously affected when they are involved in major clinical incidents. The impact of such incidents on staff is of particular relevance to surgery, as the operating room is one of the highest-risk areas for serious complications. This qualitative study aimed to assess the personal and professional impact of surgical complications on surgeons. This single time point study involved semistructured, individual interviews with general and vascular surgeons, consultants and senior registrars from two National Health Service organizations in London, UK. Twenty-seven surgeons participated. Many were seriously affected by major surgical complications. Surgeons' practice was also often affected, not always in the best interest of their patients. The surgeons' reactions depended on the preventability of the complications, their personality and experience, patient outcomes and patients' reactions, as well as colleagues' reactions and the culture of the institution. Discussing complications, deconstructing the incidents and rationalizing were the most commonly quoted coping mechanisms. Institutional support was generally described as inadequate, and the participants often reported the existence of strong institutional blame cultures. Suggestions for supporting surgeons in managing the personal impact of complications included better mentoring, teamwork approaches, blame-free opportunities for the discussion of complications, and structures aimed at the human aspects of complications. Those involved in the management of surgical services need to consider how to improve support for surgeons in the aftermath of major surgical incidents. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Uncertainty in Meaning and Possibility of Multi-interpretation--Read-ing Poems Written by William Carlos Williams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金娟

    2013-01-01

    William Carlos Williams is noted for the simplicity of his verse form and clear interpretation of its meaning. In this pa-per, the writer tends to unfold that the seemingly simplicity of Williams’poems reveals his deep concern about the modern life. He draws our attention to the particular scene or thing which itself abounds in different meanings. Thus it enables his poems open to different interpretations.

  12. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland, toured the assembly hall of the ATLAS experiment on a recent visit to CERN.Photos 01, 02: Dr. Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment (second from left), explains to Dr. David Syz (fourth from left) and accompanying visitors the process of integration of a 26-metre-long coil of the barrel toroid magnet system into its coil casing.Photo 03: Dr. Peter Jenni (extreme right) with Dr. David Syz (front row, fourth from right) behind a stack of 26-metre-long 'racetrack' coils awaiting integration into their coil casings.

  13. William Byrd: Political and Recusant Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Foshay Bacon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amidst the pendulum of political and religious upheaval that pervaded England throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth century, William Byrd stands as one of the best loved and lauded composers. Byrd succeeded in the secular and sacred realms, contributing great works to the Anglican Church, popularizing the English madrigal and producing prolific amounts of sacred music. However, in a time where one’s religious beliefs were often linked with political loyalty, Byrd defied his monarch’s established and enforced Protestant religion, composing politically charged music for recusant use in clandestine Catholic Church services. His themes were aligned with the Jesuit mission and his texts were often drawn from the lips of martyred Catholics at the gallows; their last words forever immortalized by Byrd for the furthering of the Jesuit cause and the Counter-Reformation. The examination of sources by prominent Byrd scholars, an analyses of Byrd’s ‘political’ compositions and a study of the social and historical background are used to place Byrd within the appropriate context, prove his recusant and political leanings, and analyze his precarious relationship with the English monarch, Elizabeth I. It is shown that Byrd could not have proceeded with his recusant practices, personally or musically, had it not been for his status as a composer, as well as Byrd’s shrewdness in procuring diplomatic relationships with high persons at court and with Queen Elizabeth I through the Chapel Royal. Finally, Byrd’s success at writing for the Anglican Church service and popular secular music showcased his ability to take a moderate stance in situations that benefitted his status with the crown

  14. William James, Gustav Fechner, and Early Psychophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L. Hawkins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his radically empiricist ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  15. William james, gustav fechner, and early psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephanie L

    2011-01-01

    American psychologist and philosopher William James devoted the entirety of his career to exploring the nature of volition, as expressed by such phenomena as will, attention, and belief. As part of that endeavor, James's unorthodox scientific pursuits, from his experiments with nitrous oxide and hallucinogenic drugs to his investigation of spiritualist mediums, represent his attempt to address the "hard problems" of consciousness for which his training in brain physiology and experimental psychology could not entirely account. As a student, James's reading in chemistry and physics had sparked his interest in the concepts of energy and force, terms that he later deployed in his writing about consciousness and in his arguments against philosophical monism and scientific materialism, as he developed his "radically empiricist" ideas privileging discontinuity and plurality. Despite James's long campaign against scientific materialism, he was, however, convinced of the existence of a naturalistic explanation for the more "wayward and fitful" aspects of mind, including transcendent experiences associated with hysteria, genius, and religious ecstasy. In this paper, I examine aspects of James's thought that are still important for contemporary debates in psychology and neuroscience: his "transmission theory" of consciousness, his ideas on the "knowing of things together," and, finally, the related concept of "the compounding of consciousness," which postulates the theoretical possibility for individual entities within a conscious system of thought to "know" the thoughts of others within the system. Taken together, these ideas suggest that James, in spite of, or perhaps because of, his forays into metaphysics, was working toward a naturalistic understanding of consciousness, what I will term a "distributive model," based on his understanding of consciousness as an "awareness" that interacts dynamically within, and in relation to, its environment.

  16. Obituary: William A. Rense (1914-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Glen

    2009-12-01

    On March 28, 2008, the space research community lost another of its pioneers. William A. Rense, professor emeritus of physics at the University of Colorado in Boulder, who died in Estes Park, Colorado, following complications from cancer. He was 94. Bill, as he was widely known, was born in 1914 in Massillon, Ohio, the son of German immigrants. His was a large family - five brothers and one sister. His father, Joseph Rense, worked for the city of Cleveland while his mother, Rosalia (Luther) Rense was a housewife. As a child, Bill developed a love of astronomy which led him to earn a bachelor's degree in physics and astronomy from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by master's and PhD degrees in physics at Ohio State University. He held teaching positions at Rutgers, University of Miami (Florida), Texas A & M, and Louisiana State University before taking his final appointment at CU in 1949. While teaching at LSU, he met and in 1942 married Wanda (Childs) Rense. In addition to teaching physics at CU, Bill did research in CU's Upper Air Laboratory. His early work there included studies of polarized light and its implications for the analysis of zodiacal light. He and his co-workers also began developing instrumentation to be flown above the Earth's atmosphere in sounding rockets. In 1952 he obtained the first photographic spectrogram of the solar Lyman-alpha line of hydrogen (121.6nm). This work was followed in 1956 by the first full disk spectroheliogram in Lyman-alpha. These results could not have been possible without the use of pointing control systems for sounding rockets. These "sun trackers" kept the payloads pointed at the sun long enough for the measurements to be made, and CU was a pioneer in their development. The expanding research venue led the Upper Air Laboratory to be renamed the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), and Bill Rense was its first director. He continued his research into the properties of the solar

  17. Prof. DR. F. C. Eloff - An appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G de Graaff

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available I have been requested to write an appreciation of the man to whom these proceedings of a symposium on the Kalahari Ecosystem are dedicated @ Prof. Dr. F. C. Eloff, or Fritz as he is popularly referred to. I undertook the task with some trepidation and the only claim to the honour to write this article may be the fact that I have known Professor Eloff since 1949 when I was a green-shanked first year veterinary student at the University of Pretoria where he lectured in zoology to the new students.

  18. An Interview with Dr.Joseph Hung

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包天仁

    2007-01-01

    @@ Prof.Bao Tianren(Bao):Dr.Hung,thank you for joining us in the 2nd National English as a Foreign Language Teaching Conference for Primary and Secondary Teachers of English in Guangzhou.We organize this conference every year and the theme of this year is Approaches on Raising China's English Language Teaching and Learning Efficiency.The current ELT situation for primary and secondary students in China is rather ineffective.Students learn English for 3 years or more in primary schools,but when they upgrade in junior schools,most of them will have to study English from the very beginning again.

  19. 'The anatomy lesson of Dr. Frederik Ruysch' of 1683, a milestone in knowledge about obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijpma, Frank F A; Radziun, Anna; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-09-01

    'The anatomy lesson of Dr. Frederik Ruysch' (1683) belongs to the famous collection of group portraits of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons. In this painting, Ruysch is portrayed with a dissected corpse of a newborn, which was still attached to its placenta. Several guild officials as well as his son, who is holding a skeleton of an infant, are surrounding him. Dissection of a child instead of an executed criminal was very uncommon at that time. We therefore investigated the medical background of the painting, with the question why Ruysch was depicted with these obstetrical subjects. To this end, the contents of Ruysch's original works and his over 300-year-old anatomical specimens in the Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera) in St. Petersburg were studied and described in the context of the painting. Major contributions to anatomical knowledge and to human development should be attributed to Ruysch, and these provided the essentials of the composition depicted in this painting.

  20. International Internship Report for Asher Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Asher

    2015-01-01

    For the 2015 NASA I (sup 2) Internship Program, I was selected to work in Dr. John Hogan's laboratory on a Human Nutrient Production in Space (Bio-Nutrients) Project involving Research & Development in advanced microbial strategies for the production of nutrients within crewed spacecraft and habitats. Long-term space missions encounter the hurdle of substantial degradation of certain nutrients in food and supplements with time, potentially resulting in nutrient deficiency and serious health problems. The goal of the Bio-Nutrients Project is to enable rapid, safe, and reliable in situ production of needed nutrients using minimal mass, power, and volume. A platform technology is being developed to employ hydratable single-use packets that contain an edible growth medium and a food microbe engineered to produce target human nutrients. In particular, we examined the production of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin in a spore-forming strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Carotenoids are important antioxidants required for ocular health, a problematic area for some astronauts on long-duration ISS missions...To meet the first-year milestones for the Bio-Nutrients project, my specific task was to design and run preliminary tests on a disposable bioreactor for in situ production of human nutrients in space.

  1. The effects of surgeons and anesthesiologists on operating room efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nessa Timoney

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In some procedures types a significant part of the variability in operative time is due to the interaction between the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Reviewing operative records should allow identification of efficient/inefficient combinations.

  2. Concussion in Sports: What Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Need to Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick J; Refakis, Christian; Storey, Eileen; Warner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A concussion is a relatively common sports-related injury that affects athletes of all ages. Although orthopaedic surgeons are not expected to replace sports medicine physicians and neurologists with regard to the management of concussions, orthopaedic surgeons, particularly those who are fellowship-trained in sports medicine, must have a current knowledge base of what a concussion is, how a concussion is diagnosed, and how a concussion should be managed. Orthopaedic surgeons should understand the pathophysiology, assessment, and management of concussion so that they have a basic comprehension of this injury, which is at the forefront of the academic literature and North American media. This understanding will prepare orthopaedic surgeons to work in concert with and assist sports medicine physicians, athletic trainers, and physical therapists in providing comprehensive care for athletes with a concussion.

  3. Perspectives of South African general surgeons regarding their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-03

    Aug 3, 2014 ... the data had been presented reflecting different institutions (without necessarily ... is no formal training in clinical governance to equip graduating surgeons for a ... shifting healthcare landscape, in SA and globally. Martin D ...

  4. A Methodological Critique of the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Pronovost, Peter J; Shahian, David M; Safran, Dana Gelb; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Elliott, Marc N; Damberg, Cheryl L; Dimick, Justin B; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2016-05-09

    On July 14, 2015, ProPublica published its Surgeon Scorecard, which displays "Adjusted Complication Rates" for individual, named surgeons for eight surgical procedures performed in hospitals. Public reports of provider performance have the potential to improve the quality of health care that patients receive. A valid performance report can drive quality improvement and usefully inform patients' choices of providers. However, performance reports with poor validity and reliability are potentially damaging to all involved. This article critiques the methods underlying the Scorecard and identifies opportunities for improvement. Until these opportunities are addressed, the authors advise users of the Scorecard-most notably, patients who might be choosing their surgeons-not to consider the Scorecard a valid or reliable predictor of the health outcomes any individual surgeon is likely to provide. The authors hope that this methodological critique will contribute to the development of more-valid and more-reliable performance reports in the future.

  5. Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Valencia, Victoria; Moriates, Christopher; Boscardin, Christy K; Catschegn, Sereina; Rajkomar, Alvin; Bozic, Kevin J; Soo Hoo, Kent; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pitts, Lawrence; Lawton, Michael T; Dudley, R Adams; Gonzales, Ralph

    2017-03-01

    Despite the significant contribution of surgical spending to health care costs, most surgeons are unaware of their operating room costs. To examine the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room. The OR Surgical Cost Reduction (OR SCORE) project was a single-health system, multihospital, multidepartmental prospective controlled study in an urban academic setting. Intervention participants were attending surgeons in orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and neurological surgery (n = 63). Control participants were attending surgeons in cardiothoracic surgery, general surgery, vascular surgery, pediatric surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, ophthalmology, and urology (n = 186). From January 1 to December 31, 2015, each surgeon in the intervention group received standardized monthly scorecards showing the median surgical supply direct cost for each procedure type performed in the prior month compared with the surgeon's baseline (July 1, 2012, to November 30, 2014) and compared with all surgeons at the institution performing the same procedure at baseline. All surgical departments were eligible for a financial incentive if they met a 5% cost reduction goal. The primary outcome was each group's median surgical supply cost per case. Secondary outcome measures included total departmental surgical supply costs, case mix index-adjusted median surgical supply costs, patient outcomes (30-day readmission, 30-day mortality, and discharge status), and surgeon responses to a postintervention study-specific health care value survey. The median surgical supply direct costs per case decreased 6.54% in the intervention group, from $1398 (interquartile range [IQR], $316-$5181) (10 637 cases) in 2014 to $1307 (IQR, $319-$5037) (11 820 cases) in 2015. In contrast, the median surgical supply direct cost increased 7.42% in the control group, from $712 (IQR, $202-$1602) (16 441 cases

  6. [Andreas Vesalius, distinguished surgeon of the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1996-01-01

    The author gives here some considerations about A. Vesalius through his life and his works as a surgeon. He was the father of the anatomical revolution against Galen but was also an eminent clinician and surgeon. He was immediately able to adapt his surgical practice whenever the promising methodology was identified (see Consilia). The author concludes with a critical analysis of the Chirurgia magna in septem libros digesta attributed to A. Vesalius.

  7. Surgeons' Perspectives on Premium Implants in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasterlain, Amy S; Bello, Ricardo J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Long, William J

    2017-06-29

    Declining total joint arthroplasty reimbursement and rising implant prices have led many hospitals to restrict access to newer, more expensive total joint arthroplasty implants. The authors sought to understand arthroplasty surgeons' perspectives on implants regarding innovation, product launch, costs, and cost-containment strategies including surgeon gain-sharing and patient cost-sharing. Members of the International Congress for Joint Reconstruction were surveyed regarding attitudes about implant technology and costs. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. A total of 126 surgeons responded from all 5 regions of the United States. Although 76.9% believed new products advance technology in orthopedics, most (66.7%) supported informing patients that new implants lack long-term clinical data and restricting new implants to a small number of investigators prior to widespread market launch. The survey revealed that 66.7% would forgo gain-sharing incentives in exchange for more freedom to choose implants. Further, 76.9% believed that patients should be allowed to pay incremental costs for "premium" implants. Surgeons who believed that premium products advance orthopedic technology were more willing to forgo gain-sharing (P=.040). Surgeons with higher surgical volume (P=.007), those who believed implant companies should be allowed to charge more for new technology (Pinnovation advances the field but support discussing the "unproven" nature of new implants with patients. Many surgeons support alternative payment models permitting surgeons and patients to retain implant selection autonomy. Most respondents prioritized patient beneficence and surgeon autonomy above personal financial gain. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  9. How do Orthopedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Vranceanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment.   Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350 completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral.

  10. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  11. A New Culture of Transparency: Industry Payments to Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ahmed, Rizwan; Bae, Sunjae; Hicks, Caitlin W; El Dafrawy, Mostafa; Osgood, Greg M; Segev, Dorry L

    2016-11-01

    Under the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, "payments or transfers of value" by biomedical companies to physicians must be disclosed through the Open Payments Program. Designed to provide transparency of financial transactions between medication and device manufacturers and health care providers, the Open Payments Program shows financial relationships between industry and health care providers. Awareness of this program is crucial because its interpretation or misinterpretation by patients, physicians, and the general public can affect patient care, clinical practice, and research. This study evaluated nonresearch payments by industry to orthopedic surgeons. A retrospective cross-sectional review of the first wave of Physician Payments Sunshine Act data (August through December 2013) was performed to characterize industry payments to orthopedic surgeons by subspecialty, amount, type, origin, and geographic distribution. During this 5-month period, orthopedic surgeons (n=14,828) received $107,666,826, which included 3% of those listed in the Open Payments Program and 23% of the total amount paid. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payment, 45% received less than $100 and 1% received $100,000 or more. Median payment (interquartile range) was $119 ($34-$636), and mean payment was $7261±95,887. The largest payment to an individual orthopedic surgeon was $7,849,711. The 2 largest payment categories were royalty or license fees (68%) and consulting fees (13%). During the study period, orthopedic surgeons had substantial financial ties to industry. Of orthopedic surgeons who received payments, the largest proportion (45%) received less than $100 and only 1% received large payments (≥$100,000). The Open Payments Program offers insight into industry payments to orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1058-e1062.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Surgeon commitment to trauma care decreases missed injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ko; Lin, Chia-Ju; Chan, Hon-Man; Lee, Wei-Che; Chen, Chao-Wen; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Cheng, Yuan-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries sustain an important issue concerning patient safety and quality of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of surgeon commitment to trauma care on missed injuries. We hypothesised that surgeons committed to the trauma service has less missed injuries than surgeons not committed to the trauma service would have. By retrospective analysis of 976 adult patients admitted to the trauma intensive care unit (ICU) at an urban, university-based trauma centre. Missed injuries were compared between two groups; in group 1 the patients were evaluated and treated by the surgeons who were committed to the trauma service and in group 2 the patients were evaluated and treated by surgeons practicing mainly in other specialties. Patients had significantly lower rates of missed major or life-threatening injuries when treated by group 1 surgeons. Logistic regression model revealed significant factors associated with missed major or life-threatening injuries including ISS and groups in which patients were treated by different group surgeons. Physicians will perform better when they are trained and interested in a specific area than those not trained, or even not having any particular interest in that specific area. Surgeons committed to the trauma service had less missed injuries in severely injured patients, and it is vital to improve patient safety and quality of care for trauma patients. Staff training and education for assessing severely injured patients and creating an open culture with detection and reduction of the potential for error are important and effective strategies in decreasing missed injuries and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal geomapping of pediatric surgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Charles L

    2008-03-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of manpower needs in pediatric surgery. The number of training programs has multiplied dramatically over the past decade. The distribution of surgeons is more significant than the absolute change in numbers--are major metropolitan areas seeing a more dramatic increase than less populated areas? To evaluate the geographic and demographic changes associated with this increase, we used choropleth and geomapping techniques to evaluate the change in number and distribution of American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) members (and by proxy, pediatric surgeons) in the United States over the past decade. Data regarding membership were obtained from APSA. In 1996, management companies changed, and accurate data for initial year of membership were only available after 1996. Online sources (www.services.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/home and www.mapresso.com) were used for data analysis. There was a 175% increase in the number of APSA members over the past decade. The geographic distribution parallels the state population to some extent but is uneven. The number of APSA members by state over time is displayed in color density maps. Predictions of prior manpower studies were generally accurate. The number of pediatric surgeons in the United States has rapidly increased in the past decade, with no sign of diminution in this trend. Increases in the number of surgeons correlates with state population, indicating a tendency for surgeons to reside in more densely populated areas, as expected. Areas with a disproportionately high or low number of surgeons can be identified via choropleth mapping.

  14. An online review of plastic surgeons in southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Priya; Kobayashi, Emily; Gupta, Subhas

    2015-05-01

    It has become commonplace for patients to access online reviews of physicians when making choices about health care, just as any consumer would in today's computer-dependent world. Previous studies have shown that online reviews of physicians are generally positive. However, 1 negative review has the potential to adversely affect business and reputations. To characterize the online presence of plastic surgeons in Southern California as portrayed by physician rating websites (PRWs). An extensive online database of board-certified plastic surgeons was used to generate a list of surgeons within a 50-mile radius of Pomona, CA. Ratings from the PRWs HealthGrades.com, Vitals.com, and UCompareHealthcare.com were cataloged by number of reviews and ratings. Two hundred sixty-three surgeons were evaluated with the most-represented cities being Beverly Hills (N=47), Los Angeles (N=31), and Newport Beach (N=27). Ninety-seven percent of the surgeons were rated on at least 1 of the 3 PRWs chosen. In general, surgeons were rated highly, with a mean rating of 85%, SD, 14% (Pconscious of their online reputations. Overall, the ratings were high, regardless of the number of reviews.

  15. A model of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2014-09-01

    Surgeons are the physicians with the highest rates of documented disruptive behavior. We hypothesized that a unified conceptual model of disruptive surgeon behavior could be developed based on specific individual and system factors in the perioperative environment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 operating room staff of diverse occupations at a single institution. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Participants described episodes of disruptive surgeon behavior, personality traits of perpetrators, environmental conditions of power, and situations when disruptive behavior was demonstrated. Verbal hostility and throwing or hitting objects were the most commonly described disruptive behaviors. Participants indicated that surgical training attracts and creates individuals with particular personality traits, including a sense of shame. Interviewees stated this behavior is tolerated because surgeons have unchecked power, have strong money-making capabilities for the institution, and tend to direct disruptive behavior toward the least powerful employees. The most frequent situational stressors were when something went wrong during an operation and working with unfamiliar team members. Each factor group (ie, situational stressors, cultural conditions, and personality factors) was viewed as being necessary, but none of them alone were sufficient to catalyze disruptive behavior events. Disruptive physician behavior has strong implications for the work environment and patient safety. This model can be used by hospitals to better conceptualize conditions that facilitate disruptive surgeon behavior and to establish programs to mitigate conduct that threatens patient safety and employee satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A national study of burnout among American transplant surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertges Yost, W; Eshelman, A; Raoufi, M; Abouljoud, M S

    2005-03-01

    This study examines burnout in a national sample of transplant surgeons. Data analyses were conducted on a sample of 209 actively practicing transplant surgeons. Measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory, a demographic survey, and the Surgeon Coping Inventory. Burnout was reflected in 38% of surgeons scoring high on the Emotional Exhaustion dimension, whereas 27% showed high levels of Depersonalization, and 16% had low levels of Personal Accomplishment. Several significant predictors of emotional exhaustion were identified and included questioning one's career choice, giving up activities, and perceiving oneself as having limited control over the delivery of medical services (R2= 0.43). Those who perceived themselves as having a higher ability to control delivery of medical services and who felt more appreciated by patients had lower levels of depersonalization and were less likely to question their career choice (R2= 0.16). Surgeons with high personal accomplishment experienced greater professional growth opportunities, perceived their institution as supportive, felt more appreciated by patients, and were less likely to question their career (R2= 0.24). The prioritization of goals to reflect both professional and personal values accounted for a significant amount of the variance in predicting both emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment in separate regression equations. Recommendations to decrease burnout would include greater institutional support, increased opportunities for professional growth, and greater surgeon control over important services to facilitate efficient work. Coping strategies to moderate stress and burnout are also beneficial and should include prioritizing goals to reflect both professional and personal values.

  17. Depth Perception of Surgeons in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Rositsa; Boulanger, Pierre; Zheng, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) poses visual challenges to the surgeons. In MIS, binocular disparity is not freely available for surgeons, who are required to mentally rebuild the 3-dimensional (3D) patient anatomy from a limited number of monoscopic visual cues. The insufficient depth cues from the MIS environment could cause surgeons to misjudge spatial depth, which could lead to performance errors thus jeopardizing patient safety. In this article, we will first discuss the natural human depth perception by exploring the main depth cues available for surgeons in open procedures. Subsequently, we will reveal what depth cues are lost in MIS and how surgeons compensate for the incomplete depth presentation. Next, we will further expand our knowledge by exploring some of the available solutions for improving depth presentation to surgeons. Here we will review the innovative approaches (multiple 2D camera assembly, shadow introduction) and devices (3D monitors, head-mounted devices, and auto-stereoscopic monitors) for 3D image presentation from the past few years.

  18. A change in opinion on surgeon's performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytham, Gary; Kessaris, Nicos

    2011-04-01

    Individual performance indicators for cardiac surgeons in the UK were published in 2004. A comprehensive update published in 2009 reported statistically significant decreases in mortality rates suggesting that the publication of this data may have contributed to this improvement in outcomes. In view of this, the authors present an assessment of the attitudes of cardiac surgeons to individual performance tables, having performed this by sending questionnaires exploring the surgeon's views on performance tables to UK cardiac surgeons in 2005 and 2009. The responses demonstrated that whilst the majority of cardiac surgeons (68.8%) were initially opposed to performance tables, the number welcoming their introduction increased significantly (22.9-48.5%) over the four-year period. The attitude of the consultants towards the possible effect of this data on the management of high-risk patients also changed, with fewer consultants believing they would (P=0.0001) or may (P=0.023) avoid these patients. The observed change in attitude of cardiac surgeons may be due to acclimatization to an established system of audit, improved mortality rates, a desire for more transparency following the Bristol Enquiry, or improved risk stratification. These findings may be of benefit to those tasked with initiating these indicators elsewhere.

  19. High occupational stress and low career satisfaction of Korean surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hee; Boo, Yoon Jung; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Hyung Joon; Jung, Cheol Woong; Kim, Chong Suk

    2015-02-01

    Surgery is a demanding and stressful field in Korea. Occupational stress can adversely affect the quality of care, decrease job satisfaction, and potentially increase medical errors. The aim of this study was to investigate the occupational stress and career satisfaction of Korean surgeons. We have conducted an electronic survey of 621 Korean surgeons for the occupational stress. Sixty-five questions were used to assess practical and personal characteristics and occupational stress using the Korean occupational stress scale (KOSS). The mean KOSS score was 49.31, which was higher than the average of Korean occupational stress (45.86) or that of other specialized professions (46.03). Young age, female gender, long working hours, and frequent night duties were significantly related to the higher KOSS score. Having spouse, having hobby and regular exercise decreased the KOSS score. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that long working hours and regular exercise were the independent factors associated with the KOSS score. Less than 50% of surgeons answered that they would become a surgeon again. Most surgeons (82.5%) did not want to recommend their child follow their career. Korean Surgeons have high occupational stress and low level of career satisfaction.

  20. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  1. Williams Syndrome and 15q Duplication: Coincidence versus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Agarwal, Swashti; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a multisystem disorder caused by contiguous gene deletion in 7q11.23, commonly associated with distinctive facial features, supravalvular aortic stenosis, short stature, idiopathic hypercalcemia, developmental delay, joint laxity, and a friendly personality. The clinical features of 15q11q13 duplication syndrome include autism, mental retardation, ataxia, seizures, developmental delay, and behavioral problems. We report a rare case of a girl with genetically confirmed Williams syndrome and coexisting 15q duplication syndrome. The patient underwent treatment for central precocious puberty and later presented with primary amenorrhea. The karyotype revealed 47,XX,+mar. FISH analysis for the marker chromosome showed partial trisomy/tetrasomy for proximal chromosome 15q (15p13q13). FISH using an ELN-specific probe demonstrated a deletion in the Williams syndrome critical region in 7q11.23. To our knowledge, a coexistence of Williams syndrome and 15q duplication syndrome has not been reported in the literature. Our patient had early pubertal development, which has been described in some patients with Williams syndrome. However, years later after discontinuing gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue treatment, she developed primary amenorrhea.

  2. Biogen's portfolio and research efforts in multiple sclerosis: an interview with Dr Ralph Kern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Ralph Kern speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor: Dr Ralph Kern is Senior Vice President and Head of Worldwide Medical at Biogen in Cambridge, MA, USA. In this role, he oversees Biogen's global therapeutic, regional and country medical teams, global medical operations, as well as medical research and scientific communications functions. Prior to joining Biogen, he was head of the Neuroscience Medical Unit at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and held various medical and commercial leadership roles at Genzyme Corporation. Prior to joining industry, he was a consultant neurologist at Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario and was head of the neurology postgraduate academic program at the University of Toronto. Ralph completed neurology postgraduate training at McGill University and completed a masters of health administration from the Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto. He is a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

  3. Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message Unity and diversity – the Williams subjects’ message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Dechert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation. Williams subjects, due to a genetically based neuro-developmental disorder from birth, besides various medical problems, demonstrate a dissociation between cognitive and special linguistic processing, and a dissociation within language modules, language domains, and language mini-domains with reference to different languages. This ichotomous profile results from a deletion on one hromosome. What other genes on the same chromosome, not yet identified, or other genes on other chromosomes of the human genome, may be responsible for the same or similar or any other cognitive deficits and/or interactions of cognitive and linguistic deficits, and as such may reveal the specific processes located within specific modules, domains, and/or mini-domains across different languages and cultures, we do not know. What we need, however, is a unified consilient approach engaging the sciences and the humanities to integrate knowledge from various sources of investigation.

  4. Obituary: William K. Rose (1935-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-12-01

    Stellar astrophysicist William Kenneth Rose died near his home in Potomac, Maryland, on September 30, 2010, after an extended illness. Rose was the son of pharmacist Kenneth William Rose and Shirley Near Rose and was born in Ossining, New York, on August 10, 1935. He received an AB from Columbia College in 1957 and a PhD in physics from Columbia University in 1963, with a thesis on "measurements of linear polarization in discrete radio sources using a 9.4 cm maser," under the direction of Charles H. Townes. Rose played a major role in designing and constructing the maser and used it at a radio telescope at Maryland Point that belonged to the Naval Research Lab. He observed Jupiter and Saturn and a number of extra-solar-system sources, and also diffuse centimeter emission (see appendix). The thesis was not published in an archival journal, but can be found under Library of Congress code QB 475.R67. While in graduate School, Bill married Sheila Tuchman, whose primary scientific interests were biological. None of their three children chose to be scientists, but two are CPAs. Bill moved successfully through the academic hurdles) from a research position at Princeton (1963-67), where a collaboration with Nick Woolf and Martin Schwarzchild on the infrared spectra of giant stars became one of his most-cited papers, to assistant and associate professorships at MIT (1967-71), and then associate and full professorships at the University of Maryland (1971 to retirement in 2005). His most innovative work was probably that on nova explosions arising from degenerate ignition of hydrogen accreted on white dwarfs in close binary systems, published in 1968. The same idea occurred to others at about the same time, and Bill did not, perhaps, get quite his fair share of the credit. I first met Sheila and Bill in summer 1969 at the Stony Brook summer school on stellar evolution (not published until 1972). He lectured on the nature of nova explosions and on nuclear burning in thin

  5. Quality of Life of Indian Pediatric Surgeons: Results of a Survey (of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons Members)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameer, M. M.; Rao, Sanjay; Vinay, C.; D’Cruz, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Much is debated on the quality of life of pediatric surgeons practicing in India, all based on anecdotal and personal experiences. There is no systematic study on this. This study addresses this and attempts to glean a clearer picture of the life as a pediatric surgeon in India. Methodology: This questionnaire-based study was administered via an online survey to all Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons members. The responses were anonymous and investigators blinded. Data were collated and analyzed using STAT11.1. Results: A total of 173 pediatric surgeons responded. Eighty-six percent were men. About 73.7% of the surgeons were between 31 and 50 years of age. Almost 63.4% practiced in urban areas, whereas 36% in other smaller towns. About 0.6% reported that their practice was rural. Almost 26.4% were in private/solo practices, whereas 53.4% were in institution-based practice. Almost 80% felt that they were adequately trained while starting their practice. About 78% are professionally satisfied with their work. Only 44.5% of surgeons felt that they were compensated adequately financially. Reading was the favorite pass time. Almost 40% of the surgeons felt that they were either overweight or obese. About 41% of the surgeons exercise more than 3 times a week. Only 11.4% smoke, whereas 36% drink. Fifty-three percent of surgeons felt that their personal savings were adequate. Seventy-six percent use Facebook. Sixty-eight percent were satisfied with their quality of life. Age was significantly associated with professional satisfaction, financial satisfaction, and quality of life and all improve as one's age progresses. None were affected with one's gender, type of practice, and the place of practice. Age, weight, exercise, and one's savings significantly affected ones quality of life. Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common

  6. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  7. Plastic Surgeons Urge Giving Up E-Cigs Before Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HealthDay News) -- Plastic surgery patients should avoid smoking e-cigarettes for at least four weeks before their procedures, ... reasonable to advise plastic surgery candidates to cease e-cigarette use," said Dr. Peter Taub,, of Mount Sinai ...

  8. WE-G-213-00: History Symposium: Radiological Physics Pioneers: Roentgen and the AAPM Award Eponyms - William Coolidge, Edith Quimby, and Marvin Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    was hired by Giacchino Failla as a radiation physicist at Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. Failla had studied with Madame Curie and obtained his doctoral degree in her laboratory. After many groundbreaking medical physics studies from 1919 until 1942, they both moved to Columbia University. Dr. Quimby developed a widely employed dosimetry system for single plane implants with radium and radon seeds, and a dosimetry methodology for internal radionuclides. She was author of more than 75 scientific publications, and of significant textbooks including the first comprehensive physics textbook for radiologists “Physical Foundations of Radiology”, which was co-authored with Otto Glasser, Lauriston Taylor and James Weatherwax in the first edition, with Russell Morgan added for the second edition and Paul Goodwin for the fourth edition. With Sergei Feitelberg, M.D. she published two editions of “Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine and Biology: Basic Physics and Instrumentation”. Quimby became a renowned examiner for the American Board of Radiology when the third ABR examination, given in 1936, added physics. She served as President of the American Radium Society, received the RSNA Gold Medal, and also numerous prestigious awards given to women in science. Edith Quimby was a Charter Member of AAPM. The AAPM Lifetime Achievement Award was renamed the Edith H. Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award in her honor in 2011. Marvin Martin Dixon Williams (1902–1981) Marvin Williams was born in Walla Walla, WA in 1902, and attended the same college as Edith Quimby, graduating from Whitman College in 1926. He was greatly influenced to go into medical physics by her accomplishments. During his early career, Williams worked with James Weatherwax in Philadelphia while he was working toward an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1931 Williams was awarded a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Minnesota, with the work actually performed at the Mayo Clinic

  9. WE-G-213-02: The AAPM Award Eponyms: William D. Coolidge, Edith H. Quimby, and Marvin M.D. Williams - Who Were They and What Did They Do?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberg, L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    was hired by Giacchino Failla as a radiation physicist at Memorial Hospital for Cancer in New York City. Failla had studied with Madame Curie and obtained his doctoral degree in her laboratory. After many groundbreaking medical physics studies from 1919 until 1942, they both moved to Columbia University. Dr. Quimby developed a widely employed dosimetry system for single plane implants with radium and radon seeds, and a dosimetry methodology for internal radionuclides. She was author of more than 75 scientific publications, and of significant textbooks including the first comprehensive physics textbook for radiologists “Physical Foundations of Radiology”, which was co-authored with Otto Glasser, Lauriston Taylor and James Weatherwax in the first edition, with Russell Morgan added for the second edition and Paul Goodwin for the fourth edition. With Sergei Feitelberg, M.D. she published two editions of “Radioactive Isotopes in Medicine and Biology: Basic Physics and Instrumentation”. Quimby became a renowned examiner for the American Board of Radiology when the third ABR examination, given in 1936, added physics. She served as President of the American Radium Society, received the RSNA Gold Medal, and also numerous prestigious awards given to women in science. Edith Quimby was a Charter Member of AAPM. The AAPM Lifetime Achievement Award was renamed the Edith H. Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award in her honor in 2011. Marvin Martin Dixon Williams (1902–1981) Marvin Williams was born in Walla Walla, WA in 1902, and attended the same college as Edith Quimby, graduating from Whitman College in 1926. He was greatly influenced to go into medical physics by her accomplishments. During his early career, Williams worked with James Weatherwax in Philadelphia while he was working toward an M.S. from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1931 Williams was awarded a Ph.D. in Biophysics from the University of Minnesota, with the work actually performed at the Mayo Clinic

  10. Are shoulder surgeons any good at diagnosing rotator cuff tears using ultrasound?: A comparative analysis of surgeon vs radiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyam Muthu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasound has gained increasing popularity as an aid in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology. With the advent of portable machines, ultrasound has become accessible to clinicians. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing rotator cuff tears by a shoulder surgeon and comparing their ability to that of a musculoskeletal radiologist. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff pathology underwent preoperative ultrasonography (US. All patients were of similar demographics and pathology. The surgeon used a Sonosite Micromax portable ultrasound machine with a 10-MHz high frequency linear array transducer and the radiologist used a 9-12 MHz linear array probe on a Siemens Antares machine. Arthroscopic diagnosis was the reference standard to which ultrasound findings were compared. Results: The sensitivity in detecting full thickness tears was similar for both the surgeon (92% and the radiologist (94%. The radiologist had 100% sensitivity in diagnosing partial thickness tears, compared to 85.7% for the surgeon. The specificity for the surgeon was 94% and 85% for the radiologist. Discussion: Our study shows that the surgeons are capable of diagnosing rotator cuff tears with the use of high-resolution portable ultrasound in the outpatient setting. Conclusion: Office ultrasound, by a trained clinician, is a powerful diagnostic tool in diagnosing rotator cuff tears and can be used effectively in running one-stop shoulder clinics.

  11. Decommissioning of DR 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strufe, N.

    2009-02-15

    This report describes the work of dismantling and demolishing reactor DR 2, the waste volumes generated, the health physical conditions and the clearance procedures used for removed elements and waste. Since the ultimate goal for the decommissioning project was not clearance of the building, but downgrading the radiological classification of the building with a view to converting it to further nuclear use, this report documents how the lower classification was achieved and the known occurrence of remaining activity. The report emphasises some of the deliberations made and describes the lessons learned through this decommissioning project. The report also intends to contribute towards the technical basis and experience basis for further decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Denmark. (au)

  12. Generic Data Pipelining Using ORAC-DR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alasdair; Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Currie, Malcolm J.; Bly, Martin J.

    A generic data reduction pipeline is, perhaps, the holy grail for data reduction software. We present work which sets us firmly on the path towards this goal. ORAC-DR is an online data reduction pipeline written by the Joint Astronomy Center (JAC) and the UK Astronomy Technology Center (ATC) and distributed as part of the Starlink Software collection (SSC). It is intended to run with a minimum of observer interaction, and is able to handle data from many different instruments, including SCUBA, CGS4, UFTI, IRCAM and Michelle, with support for IRIS2 and UIST under development. Recent work by Starlink in collaboration with the JAC has resulted in an increase in the pipeline's flexibility, opening up the possibility that it could be used for truly generic data reduction for data from any imaging, and eventually spectroscopic, detector.

  13. VIP Visit Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite President Republic of Lithuania. Wednesday 20 January 2016. General introduction to CERN’s activities by CERN Director-General F. Gianotti. CERN Director-General introduces CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson K. Borras and CMS Lithuanians A. Rinkevicius with V. Rapsevicius. Met by J. Shiers, IT Department Data Preservation Project Leader, and walk to 1st floor Data Centre Visit Point. CERN Data Centre Visit Point, 1st floor, building 513. View the robotic arms of the CERN IT data centre automated libraries (J. Shiers) CERN Computer Centre, building 513, level -1. Physics hands-on and virtual visit with a High School class in Lithuania (S. Schmeling) CERN S’cool Lab, building 143. Meeting with the Lithuanian community at CERN. Signature of the Guest Book with CERN Director-General witnessed by the Lithuanian community at CERN. Family photograph with the Lithuanian community at CERN.

  14. Dr Harold Frederick Shipman: an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, John

    2010-07-01

    Dr. Shipman was the worst known serial killer in British history, at least in terms of numbers of victims, and possibly the worst in world history, if politicians are excluded. He killed at least 215 patients and may have begun his murderous career at the age of 25, within a year of finishing his medical training. His case has had a profound impact on the practice of medicine in the United Kingdom. Was he a special case? What were the origins of this behaviour? Could the behaviour have been prevented? It is necessary to learn what we can from a few personal facts and largely circumstantial evidence. He withheld himself from any useful clinical investigation or treatment once he had been taken into custody. Could he have been treated at any stage?

  15. Dr. Solco Tromp and the Tromp Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. Scott; Rietveld, Wop J.

    2017-09-01

    The Tromp Award is the highest honor awarded by the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB). The award acknowledges outstanding research in biometeorology by a scientist under the age of 35 and was established in conjunction with the Tromp Foundation and the ISB. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the ISB, this article will provide a brief summary of the life of Dr. Solco Tromp and of the six awardees of the Tromp Award since the inaugural issuance of the award in 1999. The Tromp Award was established in part to recognize and support the efforts of young biometeorological professionals. As the brief summary of the awardees and a few of their selected subsequent publications have shown, the ISB and the Tromp Award has proven effective at identifying and supporting promising young scientists.

  16. DR-model-based estimation algorithm for NCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Si-niu; CHEN Zong-ji; WEI Chen

    2006-01-01

    A novel estimation scheme based on dead reckoning (DR) model for networked control system (NCS)is proposed in this paper.Both the detailed DR estimation algorithm and the stability analysis of the system are given.By using DR estimation of the state,the effect of communication delays is overcome.This makes a controller designed without considering delays still applicable in NCS Moreover,the scheme can effectively solve the problem of data packet loss or timeout.

  17. Musculoskeletal disorders among robotic surgeons: A questionnaire analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Robotic surgical systems offer better workplace in order to relieve surgeons from prolonged physical efforts and improve their surgical outcomes. However, robotic surgery could produce musculoskeletal disorders due to the prolonged sitting position of the operator, the fixed position of the console viewer and the movements of the limbs. Until today, no one study has been reported concerning the association between robotics and musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this work was verify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Italian robotic surgeons. Material and methods: Between July 2011 and April 2012 a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was delivered to thirty-nine Italian robotic centres. Twentytwo surgeons (56% returned the questionnaires but only seventeen questionnaires (43.5% were evaluable. Results: Seven surgeons (41.2% reported musculoskeletal disorders, by since their first use of the robot which significantly persisted during the daily surgical activity (P < 0.001. Regarding the body parts affected, musculoskeletal disorders were mainly reported in the cervical spine (29.4% and in the upper limbs (23.5%. Six surgeons (35.3% defined the robotic console as less comfortable or neither comfortable/uncomfortable with a negative influence on their surgical procedures. Conclusions: In spite of some important limitations, our data showed musculoskeletal disorders due to posture discomfort with negative impact on daily surgical activity among robotic surgeons. These aspects could be due to the lack of ergonomic seat and to the fixed position of the console viewer which could have produced an inadequate spinal posture. The evaluation of these postural factors, in particular the development of an integrated and more ergonomic chair, could further improve the comfort feeling of the surgeon at the console and probably his surgical outcomes.

  18. Obituary: William L. Kraushaar, 1920-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Professor William L. Kraushaar, a former MIT physics professor and a pioneer in the field of high-energy astronomy, died 21 March 2008 of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 87. Kraushaar received his bachelor's degree from Lafayette College in 1942. During World War II he worked at the National Bureau of Standards on projects that included development of the proximity fuse for artillery shells. After the war he earned his doctorate at Cornell University. In 1949 Kraushaar was appointed research associate at MIT, where he made the first measurements of the mean life of the pi meson at the MIT electron synchrotron. Over the next fifteen years he rose through the faculty ranks, becoming a full professor before leaving MIT for the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1965. In 1957 Kraushaar began a decade-long effort to map the sky in the "light" of cosmic gamma rays. Their detection promised to open new ways to investigate high-energy processes in the universe. Initial balloon-borne experiments failed due to background gamma rays generated in the residual atmosphere above the highest attainable altitudes. In 1958, Kraushaar seized a new opportunity for experiments above the atmosphere. Working with Professor George Clark, he directed the development in the MIT Laboratory for Nuclear Science of a gamma-ray detector for a satellite experiment that was launched in April 1961 as Explorer 11. It registered 31 events with the electronic signatures of cosmic gamma rays with energies greater than 50 MeV. Kraushaar then initiated a second and more refined experiment to be carried on OSO 3. In this project Kraushaar and Clark were joined by Gordon Garmire, a former student of Kraushaar. The OSO 3 experiment, launched in March of 1967, registered 621 cosmic gamma-ray events. It yielded the first all-sky map of high-energy cosmic gamma rays showing a concentration of gamma rays from directions in the Milky Way where gamma-ray producing interactions of charged cosmic

  19. Postcardiotomy mechanical circulatory support in two infants with williams' syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A; Chatzis, Andrew C; Kanakis, Meletios A; Azariadis, Prodromos A; Mitropoulos, Fotios A

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has made their use more efficient and less traumatic. We describe our experience of using the Levitronix CentriMag pump in two patients with Williams' syndrome who underwent surgical correction of supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  20. William Barlow and the Determination of Atomic Arrangement in Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskopf, Seymour H

    2015-04-01

    William Barlow (1845-1934) was an important if unconventional scientist, known for having developed the 'closest-packing' atomic models of crystal structure. He resumed an early nineteenth-century tradition of utilizing crystallographical and chemical data to determine atomic arrangements in crystals. This essay recounts Barlow's career and scientific activity in three parts: (a) His place in the tradition of determining atomic arrangement in context of this earlier tradition and of contemporaneous developments of crystallography and chemistry, (b) his unconventional career, and (c) the 'success' of his program to determine atomic arrangements in crystals and its influence on the work of William Lawrence Bragg.

  1. The oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrange A.R.

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound Alaska, on March 24, 1989, treatment centres for sea otters were set up at Valdez, Seward and Homer. Otter survival rates were lower at Valdez than at Seward, probably because the animals collected were closer to the spill in time and space, and oil toxicity was at a maximum. Otters collected in Prince William Sound were predominantly female and pregnant or lactating. Weathered oil persists in otter habitats throughout the spill zone - long term studies are underway to assess the effects of this.

  2. Relational ethics in the novels of Charles Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Kemp, H

    1987-06-01

    In the novels of Charles Williams, characters are faced with the mundane but profound choice between "charity and selfishness," the City and Infamy. Williams' "way of exchange" and "doctrine of substitution" have direct parallels in contextual family therapy. In Descent Into Hell, he explores the long-term effects of legacy and the balancing of the relational ledger through the process of "substituted" love. In All Hallows' Eve, the focus is on forgiveness and the opportunity to correct relational mistakes while one is in a purgatorial state. Both novels include parallel processes of relational stagnation/disjunction and rejunction, illustrating the fact that our simple, everyday choices have ultimate significance.

  3. William Pulteney Alison, the Scottish philosophy, and the making of a political medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Christopher

    2006-04-01

    This article considers the public health and social-reform agitations of Dr. William Pulteney Alison (1790-1858), professor of medicine at Edinburgh University and leader of the Scottish medical profession, in the context of Scottish moral philosophy. Throughout his career, Alison reflected on what has come to be recognized as a central problem of social medicine: where did its domain end? At what point did the medical mission of identifying and eliminating factors that harm health pass into a non-medical domain-the provinces of political economy, individual liberty, participatory politics, or acceptance of nature's dictates? On these issues Alison was an expansionist, relentlessly pushing back the borders of medicine. Drawing on Alison's writings on such disparate topics as the philosophy of mind, the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and modes of agrarian organization, the article argues that the trajectory of much of Alison's work was to discover the structural implications of a comprehensive biological reading of human capacity and behavior. It is therefore appropriate to see him as a promulgator of a "political medicine," which he presented as a critical alternative to the classical political economy of the Scottish Malthusians. The article concludes by suggesting that Alison's work (and influence) have been under-recognized and remain pertinent to modern social epidemiology, public health, and medicine more broadly.

  4. Projections of Demand for Cardiovascular Surgery and Supply of Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Jeung; Park, Nam Hee; Lee, Kun Sei; Chee, Hyun Keun; Sim, Sung Bo; Kim, Myo Jeong; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myunghwa; Park, Choon Seon

    2016-12-01

    While demand for cardiovascular surgery is expected to increase gradually along with the rapid increase in cardiovascular diseases with respect to the aging population, the supply of thoracic and cardiovascular surgeons has been continuously decreasing over the past 10 years. Consequently, this study aims to achieve guidance in establishing health care policy by analyzing the supply and demand for cardiovascular surgeries in the medical service area of Korea. After investigating the actual number of cardiovascular surgeries performed using the National Health Insurance claim data of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, as well as drawing from national statistics concerning the elderly population aged 65 and over, this study estimated the number of future cardiovascular surgeries by using a cell-based model. To be able to analyze the supply and demand of surgeons, the recent status of new surgeons specializing in thoracic and cardiovascular surgeries and the ratio of their subspecialties in cardiovascular surgeries were investigated. Then, while taking three different scenarios into account, the number of cardiovascular surgeons expected be working in 5-year periods was projected. The number of cardiovascular surgeries, which was recorded at 10,581 cases in 2014, is predicted to increase consistently to reach a demand of 15,501 cases in 2040-an increase of 46.5%. There was a total of 245 cardiovascular surgeons at work in 2014. Looking at 5 year spans in the future, the number of surgeons expected to be supplied in 2040 is 184, to retire is 249, and expected to be working is 309-an increase of -24.9%, 1.6%, and 26.1%, respectively compared to those in 2014. This forecasts a demand-supply imbalance in every scenario. Cardiovascular surgeons are the most central resource in the medical service of highly specialized cardiovascular surgeries, and fostering the surgeons requires much time, effort, and resources; therefore, by analyzing the various factors

  5. Burnout syndrome in oral and maxillofacial surgeons: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, G G; Carneiro, S C; Vasconcelos, B C; Nascimento, M M; Leal, J L F

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome among Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons and its relationship with socio-demographic, clinical, and habit variables. The sample of this study comprised 116 surgeons. The syndrome was quantified using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (General Survey), which defines burnout as the triad of high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. The criteria of Grunfeld et al. were used to evaluate the presence of the syndrome (17.2%). No significant differences between the surgeons diagnosed with and without the syndrome were observed according to age (P=0.804), sex (P=0.197), marital status (P=0.238), number of children (P=0.336), years of professional experience (P=0.102), patients attended per day (P=0.735), hours worked per week (P=0.350), use of alcohol (P=0.148), sports practice (P=0.243), hobbies (P=0.161), or vacation period per year (P=0.215). Significant differences occurred in the variables sex in the emotional exhaustion subscale (P=0.002) and use or not of alcohol in the personal accomplishment subscale (P=0.035). Burnout syndrome among Brazilian surgeons is average, showing a low personal accomplishment. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of disruptive surgeon behavior in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons are the physician group most commonly identified as "disruptive physicians." The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual model of the results of disruptive surgeon behavior and to identify the coping strategies used by perioperative staff. Perspectives of 19 individuals of diverse occupations in the perioperative setting were drawn together using a grounded theory methodology. Effects of disruptive behavior described by participants included shift in attention from the patient to the surgeon, increased mistakes during procedures, deterrence from careers in surgery, and diminished respect for surgeons. Individual coping strategies employed in the face of intimidation include talking to colleagues, externalizing the behavior, avoidance of perpetrators, and warning others. Using grounded theory analysis, we were able to elucidate the impact of disruptive surgeon behavior in the perioperative environment. This conceptual model may be used to understand and counter the negative effects of manipulation and intimidation of hospital staff and trainees and to build on current programmatic strengths to improve surgical environments and training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Treating Wisely: The Surgeon's Role in Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Ira L; Fabrizio, Anne; Cosgrove, Sara E; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2016-10-04

    Antibiotic resistance continues to receive national attention as a leading public health threat. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to curb the rise of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Whereas many antibiotics are prescribed appropriately to treat infections, there continue to be a large number of inappropriately prescribed antibiotics. Although much of the national attention with regards to stewardship has focused on primary care providers, there is a significant opportunity for surgeons to embrace this national imperative and improve our practices. Local quality improvement efforts suggest that antibiotic misuse for surgical disease is common. Opportunities exist as part of day-to-day surgical care as well as through surgeons' interactions with nonsurgeon colleagues and policy experts. This article discusses the scope of the antibiotic misuse in surgery for surgical patients, and provides immediate practice improvements and also advocacy efforts surgeons can take to address the threat. We believe that surgical antibiotic prescribing patterns frequently do not adhere to evidence-based practices; surgeons are in a position to mitigate their ill effects; and antibiotic stewardship should be a part of every surgeons' practice.

  8. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons. In this ......BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons......, and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  9. Oncofertility Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Canadian Breast Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Ellen; Yee, Samantha; Kennedy, Erin; Glass, Karen; Foong, Shu; Seminsky, Maureen; Quan, May Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines recommend that oncologists discuss treatment-related fertility issues with young cancer patients as early as possible after diagnosis and, if appropriate, expedite referral for fertility preservation (FP). This study sought to determine the attitudes and practices of Canadian breast surgeons regarding fertility issues, as well as barriers to and facilitators of fertility discussion and referrals. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 28 site lead surgeons (SLSs) at 28 (97 %) of 29 centers (25 % cancer centers, 64 % teaching hospitals) across Canada participating in RUBY, a pan-Canadian research program for young women with breast cancer. In addition, 56 (65 %) of 86 of their surgical colleagues (non-site lead surgeons [NSLSs]) completed an online survey of their oncofertility knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Of the 28 SLSs (43 % male, 36 % in practice knowledge, 25 % discussed fertility only if mentioned by the patient, 21 % believed fertility discussion and referral were the mandate of the medical oncologist, and 45 % did not know of an FP center in their area. More than 80 % of the NSLSs (54 % male, 30 % in practice knowledge was low among the SLSs, especially the NSLSs, and barriers to referral were identified. An oncofertility knowledge translation intervention specifically for breast surgeons is being developed to increase surgeon knowledge and awareness of oncofertility issues and referral.

  10. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS...

  11. 78 FR 71022 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Christopher Williams: The...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Christopher Williams: The Production..., 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Christopher Williams:...

  12. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  13. Simulation-based education and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsness, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    Education in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for a surgeon to perform at an expert level in the operating room, and beyond, must address all potential cognitive and technical performance gaps, professionalism and personal behaviors, and effective team communication. Educational strategies should also seek to replicate the stressors and distractions that might occur during a high-risk operation or critical care event. Finally, education cannot remain fixed in an apprenticeship model of "See one, do one, teach one," whereby patients are exposed to the risk of harm inherent to any learning curve. The majority of these educational goals can be achieved with the addition of simulation-based education (SBE) as a valuable adjunct to traditional training methods. This article will review relevant principles of SBE, explore currently available simulation-based educational tools for pediatric surgeons, and finally make projections for the future of SBE and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

  14. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  16. Wilde's worlds: Sir William Wilde in Victorian Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachie, J

    2016-05-01

    Other contributors to this collection have evoked the disparate worlds inhabited by Sir William Wilde. To provide an overall assessment of his career. Looking at the historical conditions that made possible such a career spanning such disparate worlds. Deploying methodologies developed by historians of medicine and sociologists of science, the article brings together Wilde the nineteenth century clinician and Dublin man of science, the Wilde of the Census and of the west of Ireland, William Wilde Victorian medical man and Wilde the Irish medical man-the historian of Irish medical traditions and the biographer of Irish medical men, and William Wilde as an Irish Victorian. A variety of close British Isles parallels can be drawn between Wilde and his cohort in the medical elite of Dublin and their clinical peers in Edinburgh and London both in terms of clinical practice and self-presentation and in terms of the social and political challenges facing their respective ancient regime hegemonies in an age of democratic radicalisation. The shared ideological interests of Wilde and his cohort, however, were also challenged by the socio-political particularities and complexities of Ireland during the first half of the nineteenth century culminating in the catastrophe of the Great Famine. William Wilde saw the practice of scientific medicine as offering a means of deliverance from historical catastrophe for Irish society and invoked a specifically Irish scientific and medical tradition going back to the engagement with the condition of Ireland by enlightened medical men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

  17. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  18. Strategies and Biases in Location Memory in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Emily K.

    2008-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) demonstrate impaired visuo-spatial abilities in comparison to their level of verbal ability. In particular, visuo-spatial construction is an area of relative weakness. It has been hypothesised that poor or atypical location coding abilities contribute strongly to the impaired abilities observed on…

  19. Visually Guided Step Descent in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; Braddick, Oliver; Atkinson, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impairments in visuospatial tasks and in manual visuomotor control, consistent with parietal and cerebellar abnormalities. Here we examined whether individuals with WS also have difficulties in visually controlling whole-body movements. We investigated visual control of stepping down at a change of…

  20. Nature, the Source of William Wordsworth’s Inspiration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    和光辉

    2014-01-01

    William Wordsworth has been considered a great Romantic poet in English literature. His thoughts and poems have been researched by literary critics from different aspects. This paper argues that nature is the source of his inspiration by analyzing the background of the poet’s life and his famous poems.

  1. Atypical Sleep Architecture and Altered EEG Spectra in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombos, F.; Bodizs, R.; Kovacs, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterised by physical abnormalities and a distinctive cognitive profile with intellectual disabilities (IDs) and learning difficulties. Methods: In our study, nine adolescents and young adults with WS and 9 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) participants…

  2. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  3. Object Recognition in Williams Syndrome: Uneven Ventral Stream Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hearn, Kirsten; Roth, Jennifer K.; Courtney, Susan M.; Luna, Beatriz; Street, Whitney; Terwillinger, Robert; Landau, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder associated with severe visuospatial deficits, relatively strong language skills, heightened social interest, and increased attention to faces. On the basis of the visuospatial deficits, this disorder has been characterized primarily as a deficit of the dorsal stream, the occipitoparietal brain regions…

  4. Comprehension of Sarcasm, Metaphor and Simile in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although people with Williams syndrome (WS) are often characterized as friendly and sociable with relatively good general language abilities, there is emerging evidence of pragmatic difficulties and trouble comprehending aspects of non-literal language. Aims: The main aim was to investigate the comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor and…

  5. Musicality Correlates with Sociability and Emotionality in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Rowena; Lai, Philip; Levitin, Daniel J.; Bellugi, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic developmental disorder characterized by peaks and valleys of cognitive abilities. One peak that has been understudied is the affinity that many individuals with WS have with music. It remains unknown whether their high levels of musical interest, skill, and expressivity are related to their sociable…

  6. William Butler Yeats, George Antheil, Ezra Pound Friends and Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Saddlemyer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available William Butler Yeats was throughout his life determined to relate his words to music, and involved many writers and musicians in his search for the key. While in Rapallo staying near Ezra Pound, he met the young composer George Antheil, who became one of his converts. Others followed, with Yeats continuing to expound and clarify his ambition.

  7. Repayment Book. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is intended to help individuals who received William D. Ford Federal Direct Loans as students manage the repayment process. Following an introduction, explanations are offered for how the principal balance of the loan is determined and how interest rates are applied. The following sections explain the four different repayment plans,…

  8. A salute to William D. Novelli and AARP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    William D. Novelli is the CEO of AARP, the membership organization which represents more than 40 million people over the age of 50. He has made AARP not only the largest, but the most respected association in Washington, D.C. He is known nationwide for his advocacy as well as his philanthropy.

  9. Dziewoński Receives 2002 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam Dziewoński was awarded the William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 8 December 2002, in San Francisco, California. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and unselfish cooperation in research.

  10. Rodríguez-Iturbe Receives 2009 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Peter S.; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Ignacio Rodríguez-Iturbe was awarded the 2009 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 16 December 2009 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  11. Louis J. Lanzerotti receives 2011 William Bowie Medal: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Kennel, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Louis J. Lanzerotti was awarded the 2011 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  12. Bowie Medal Citation: Wunsch Receives 2006 William Bowie Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Wunsch, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Carl Wunsch was awarded the 2006 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 13 December 2006, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal recognizes outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.

  13. Louis J. Lanzerotti receives 2011 William Bowie Medal: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Louis J. Lanzerotti was awarded the 2011 William Bowie Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding contributions to fundamental geophysics and for unselfish cooperation in research.”

  14. Memory Abilities in Williams Syndrome: Dissociation or Developmental Delay Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Sousa, Nuno; Fernandez, Montse; Henriques, Margarida; Goncalves, Oscar F.

    2008-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder often described as being characterized by a dissociative cognitive architecture, in which profound impairments of visuo-spatial cognition contrast with relative preservation of linguistic, face recognition and auditory short-memory abilities. This asymmetric and dissociative cognition…

  15. William Stern: An Historical Model of a Generalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean; Wesley, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Describes William Stern's professional accomplishments, including pioneering work in educational counseling and contributions to general systems such as Gestalt psychology. Argues that Stern's example supports conclusion that no one scientific method provides single best approach to all questions of psychology, and that interaction between…

  16. I Know! It's Backwards Day! Gender Roles and William's Doll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Kleut, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a case study of an exploration of gender roles in a second-grade classroom. The author discusses some of the discursive identities in which she and her students are positioned, and then uses the picture book William's Doll to introduce a discussion of discursive gender identities with her students. She then asks students to…

  17. Social Criticism in The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓芸

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly focuses on social criticism in William Blake's poems,both entitled"The Chimnet SWeeper"by analy-zing social background at that time and different Views in these two poems.It also tries to embody a fuller effect in thesc two separate poems.

  18. Characterisation of Sleep Problems in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Hill, Catherine M.; Ashworth, Anna; Holley, Simone; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Sleep is critical to optimal daytime functioning, learning and general health. In children with established developmental disorders sleep difficulties may compound existing learning difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and syndrome specificity of sleep problems in Williams syndrome (WS), a…

  19. William Faulkner: No Friend of Brown v. Board of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsgrove, Carol

    2001-01-01

    In the years following the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate America's public schools, William Faulkner, Norman Mailer, Hannah Arendt, Robert Penn Warren, and, to a lesser extent, C. Vann Woodward, provided intellectual sustenance to southern efforts to resist racial integration. Focuses on Faulkner's political…

  20. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  1. William Stern: An Historical Model of a Generalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Dean; Wesley, Frank

    1988-01-01

    Describes William Stern's professional accomplishments, including pioneering work in educational counseling and contributions to general systems such as Gestalt psychology. Argues that Stern's example supports conclusion that no one scientific method provides single best approach to all questions of psychology, and that interaction between…

  2. The Darwinian Center to the Vision of William James.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredo, Eric

    The essence of William James's vision can sometimes be hard to discover due to emotional volatility and exploratory impulsiveness. On the other hand, beneath James's apparent inconsistency was a constancy of purpose that can be easily underestimated. This paper argues that the center of James's vision lay in an interpretation of Darwinism. By…

  3. Benjamin Franklin, William Hewson and the Craven Street bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hillson

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Renovation of the house in London where Benjamin Franklin lived has led to the discovery of the remains of a late eighteenth-century anatomy school. Investigations by bioarchaeologists from the Institute are revealing William Hewson's remarkable contribution to the development of anatomical science.

  4. Discourse Analysis of Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliveettil, George Mathew; Gadallah, Mahmoud Sobhi Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    "The Glass Menagerie" is one of the Tennessee Williams' most famous plays which won the New York Drama Critics' Circle award. It elevated him to be one of the greatest playwrights of his generation. As a playwright, he is skilful to make the readers conscious of the unconscious habits and attitudes in everyday life. In "The Glass…

  5. William Faulkner's Symbolism in A Rose For Emily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏英姿

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses William Faulkner's writing style in his short story A Rose for Emily,especially his use of sym-bolism helps readers to stimulate the imagination.Through the analysis of his use ofsymbolism,this article wants to deepen our undemanding of the characters in this story.

  6. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese people, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85.I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  7. Personal Space Regulation in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Emma; Flynn, Emma; Riby, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Personal space refers to a protective barrier that we strive to maintain around our body. We examined personal space regulation in young people with Williams syndrome (WS) and their typically developing, chronological age-matched peers using a parent report questionnaire and a stop-distance paradigm. Individuals with WS were reported by their…

  8. Comprehension of Metaphor and Metonymy in Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Van Herwegen, Jo; Thomas, Michael; Fishman, Roza; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    Background: Figurative language, such as metaphor and metonymy, is very common in daily language use. Its underlying cognitive processes are sometimes viewed as lying at the interface of language and thought. Williams syndrome, which is a rare genetic developmental disorder, provides an opportunity to study this interface because individuals with…

  9. Williams Syndrome: Daily Challenges and Positive Impact on the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scallan, Susan; Senior, Joyce; Reilly, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the distinctive physical, cognitive, personality and behavioural characteristics associated with Williams syndrome, few studies to date have examined parental experiences of raising a child with this genetic syndrome. Methods: This explorative pilot study employed predominantly qualitative methodologies via face-to-face…

  10. In Profound Memory of American Friend WILLIAM H. HINTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenZhichang

    2004-01-01

    William H. Hinton, an old friend of the Chinese peopie, died of illness in Boston, the United States on May 15, 2004 at the age of 85. I was filled with deep sorrow for losing a good friend of the Chinese people.

  11. A Stylistic Appreciation of William Wordsworth's The Solitary Reaper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡园媛

    2009-01-01

    This paper, based on the literary stylistic approach, is about the analysis of William Wordsworth's lyrics The Solitary Reaper. The features in its metrics, lexis and imagery explicitly reveal the poet's love for human, passion for nature and principle of simplicity.

  12. Language and Literacy Development of Children with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…

  13. William Shakespeare’s“Hamlet”and Oedipus Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迪丽努尔

    2014-01-01

    “Hamlet”is one of the great dramas of William Shakespeare. This paper by describing the relationship between Hamlet and his mother, the Ghost and his uncle, tries to approve that Oedipus complex is the main reason of Hamlet’s kil ing his uncle.

  14. The Poetics of "Pattern Recognition": William Gibson's Shifting Technological Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Alex

    2007-01-01

    William Gibson's 1984 cyberpunk novel "Neuromancer" continues to be a touchstone in cultural representations of the impact of new information and communication technologies on the self. As critics have noted, the posthumanist, capital-driven, urban landscape of "Neuromancer" resembles a Foucaultian vision of a panoptically engineered social space…

  15. Orientation Perception in Williams Syndrome: Discrimination and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Melanie; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Williams Syndrome (WS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, which stems from a genetic deletion on chromosome 7 and causes a profound weakness in visuospatial cognition. Our current study explores how orientation perception may contribute to the visuospatial deficits in WS. In Experiment 1, we found that WS individuals and normal 3-4 year olds…

  16. The Dog's Children: Anishinaabe Texts Told by Angeline Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Leonard, Ed.; Nichols, John D., Ed.

    In 1941, Angeline Williams, an Anishinaabe elder taught the Ojibwa (Chippewa) language to a class at the Linguistic Institute at the University of North Carolina. Ojibwa is an American Indian language which was spoken as a chain of dialects in numerous communities from Quebec across the Great Lakes and into the plains of Saskatchewan. This text…

  17. The Interplay between Anxiety and Social Functioning in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Hanley, Mary; Kirk, Hannah; Clark, Fiona; Little, Katie; Fleck, Ruth; Janes, Emily; Kelso, Linzi; O'Kane, Fionnuala; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Allday, Marianne Hvistendahl; Hocking, Darren; Cornish, Kim; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2014-01-01

    The developmental disorder Williams syndrome (WS) has been associated with an atypical social profile of hyper-sociability and heightened social sensitivity across the developmental spectrum. In addition, previous research suggests that both children and adults with WS have a predisposition towards anxiety. The current research aimed to explore…

  18. Great Alaska Earthquake, Prince William Sound, March 28, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Prince William Sound magnitude 8.4 earthquake at 03:36 UT on March 28, 1964, was one of the largest shocks ever recorded on the North American Continent. The...

  19. Experiences of Bullying for Individuals with Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H.; Lough, Emma; Griffin, Megan M.; Lane, Laurel A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals with intellectual disability experience high rates of bullying, but it is not known how people with specific syndromes, such as Williams syndrome (WS), experience and respond to bullying. Given their behavioral profile, including hypersociability and heightened anxiety, and their risk for experiencing other forms of…

  20. Joseph Mallord William Turner: Burning of the Houses of Parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solender, Katherine; Buchanan, Penelope D.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a lesson plan that introduces students in grades seven-nine to artistic depiction of a specific time and place. Explores Joseph Mallord William Turner's "Burning of the Houses of Parliament" as both visual record and emotional interpretation. Lists instructional strategies for description, analysis, interpretation, and judgment. Suggests…