WorldWideScience

Sample records for surficial sediment samples

  1. Seafloor Surficial Sediments (Deck 41)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) "Deck41" database contains surficial sediment descriptions for over 36,000 seafloor samples worldwide. The file was begun...

  2. Deck41 Surficial Seafloor Sediment Description Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deck41 is a digital summary of surficial sediment composition for 36,401 seafloor samples worldwide. Data include collecting source, ship, cruise, sample id,...

  3. Offshore Surficial Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This data layer (PAC_EXT.txt and PAC_PRS.txt) represents two of five point coverages of known sediment samples, inspections, and probes from the usSEABED data...

  4. Effect of Interaction of Non-residual Fractions on Adsorption of Atrazine onto Surficial Sediments and Natural Surface Coating Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; LI Shan-shan; GAO Qian; WANG Ao

    2011-01-01

    To quantify the effect of the interaction of non-residual fractions[Fe oxides(Fe), Mn oxide(Mn), organic materials(OMs)] in the surficial sediments and the natural surface coating samples on the adsorption of atrazine(AT),an AT multiple regression adsorption modeI(AT-MRAM) was developed. The AT-MRAM improves upon the previous AT additional adsorption modeI(AT-AAM) with superior goodness-of-fit test(adjusted R2=ca.l.000), F-test and t-test(P<0.01), and reveals the effect of the interaction among the components in the surficial sediments(SSs) and natural surface coatings samples(NSCSs) on the adsorption of AT, which was neglected by the AT-AAM. Meanwhile, the AT-MRAM was also verified through adsorption experiments of AT and the relative deviation between predicted maximum adsorption of AT and the experimental one is less than 15%. The resulted information shows that Mn is prone to interact with other non-residual components, the total maximum adsorption of AT is inversly proportional to the level of Mn, and Fe and OMs facilitate the adsorption of AT. The results also indicate that the adsorption of AT is not only dominated by Fe, OMs, Fe/OMs, but also restrained by Fe/Mn, Fe/Mn/OMs, with lesser roles attributed to Mn, and the estimated AT distributions among the components do not agree with that previously predicted by the AT-AAM, especially with the relative contribution of Mn to the adsorption of AT, revealing significant contribution of the interactions among non-residual components in controlling the behavior of AT in aquatic environments.

  5. Surficial sediment distribution and the associated net sediment transport pattern in the Pearl River Estuary, South China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Zheng, J.H.; Ji, X.M.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; van der Vegt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variations in grain-size parameters contain information on sediment transport patterns. Therefore, in this study, 106 surficial sediment samples taken from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), South China, were analyzed, to better understand the net sediment transport pattern in this region. The P

  6. Investigation on Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd fractions in the natural surface coating samples and surficial sediments in the Songhua River, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Shu-hai; WANG Xiao-li; LI YU; CHEN Jie-jiang; YANG Jun-cheng

    2006-01-01

    Natural surface coating samples (NSCSs) from the surface of shingles and surficial sediments (SSs) in the Songhua River,China were employed to investigate the relationship between NSCSs and SSs in fractions of heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd) using the modified sequential extraction procedure (MSEP). The results show that the differences between NSCSs and SSs in Fe fractions were insignificant and Fe was dominantly present as residual phase (76.22% for NSCSs and 80.88% for SSs) and Fe-oxides phase (20.33% for NSCSs and 16.15% for SSs). Significant variation of Mn distribution patterns between NSCSs and SSs was observed with Mn in NSCSs mainly present in Mn-oxides phase (48.27%) and that in SSs present as residual phase (45.44%). Zn, Cu,Pb and Cd were found dominantly in residual fractions (>48%), and next in solid oxides/hydroxides for Zn, Pb and Cd and in easily oxidizable solids/compounds form for Cu, respectively. The heavy metal distribution patterns implied that Fe/Mn oxides both in NSCSs and SSs were more important sinks for binding and adsorption of Zn, Pb and Cd than organic matter (OM), and inversely,higher affinity of Cu to OM than Fe/Mn oxides in NSCSs and SSs was obtained. Meanwhile, it was found that the distributions of heavy metals in NSCSs and SSs were similar to each other and the pseudo-total concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd in NSCSs were greater than those in SSs, highlighting the more importance for NSCSs than SSs in controlling behaviours of heavy metals in aquatic environments.

  7. Long Island Sound Surficial Sediment Data (LISSEDDATA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Many scientific questions and policy issues related to sediments in Long Island Sound require data of historical, regional and interdisciplinary scope. Existent data...

  8. Surficial Sediment Facies features near Shorty's Island on the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The surficial bed-sediment facies, herein after referred to as the sediment facies, quantitatively describes the dominant sediment substrate on the surface of the...

  9. Distribution of surficial sediments in the Southern Evoikos and Petalioi Gulfs, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. KARAGEORGIS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of 123 surficial sediment samples from the Southern Evoikos and Petalioi Gulfs was studied for grain-size properties, carbonate content and mineralogical composition. Distribution of the sediments revealed two sedimentary provinces. The first concerns the Southern Evoikos Gulf, characterised by silty sediments with relatively low carbonate content. Quartz, feldspars, micas, clay and carbonate minerals are the major mineralogical components of the sediments. These sediments are the result of the Asopos River supply during Holocene and they contribute to the formation of smooth bottom morphology. The second province concerns the Petalioi Gulf (Northern and Southern, where the surficial sediments are mainly sandy and characterised by very high carbonate content. Their mineralogical composition reflects the lithology of the drainage basin. Since the modern terrigenous solid supply is limited, these sediments are not considered as products of recent sedimentation, but older deposits (relict sands. Their presence at such depths is justified by sea-level fluctuations and their preservation is due to the low sedimentation rate in the Petalioi Gulf, in combination with the strong hydrodynamic status of the area.

  10. Composition And Characteristic Of The Surficial Sediments In The Southern Corniche Of Jeddah, Red Sea Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talha A Al-Dubai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work discusses the composition and characteristic of the surficial sediments in the southern corniche of Jeddah, Saudi Red Sea coast, in an attempt to infer the surficial distribution pattern of minerals and provenance of sediments. Twenty-six superficial sediments samples were collected from backreef and forereef areas and were analyzed for grain size, CaCO3 content, and mineralogy. The textural of grain size range from gravel to mud fraction. The mud-dominated substrates (<63 µm occur generally in the back-reef area near the shoreline (sheltered area and in the lagoon. Gravel rich-sediments are mostly found in forereef regions. The highest content of aragonite and Mg-calcite occur in the forereef area, probably because to suitability the forereef region for chemical and biochemical precipitation of these minerals. High Mg-calcite and Dolomite are low in both the regions. The pyrite occurs in lagoon; this indicates the reductive conditions in this part. However, on the contrary the percentage of carbonate minerals were low in the backreef-flat area, which could be attributed to the supply of non-carbonate terrigenous materials. The terrigenous material contains quartz, k-feldspar, plagioclase and amphibole minerals and are dominant in backreef-flat area with averages of 12.7%, 7.13%, 2.93% and 0.65%, respectively. Their abundance could be attributed to the supply of terrigenous materials by Aeolian deposits and intermittent Wadis.

  11. Surficial Sediment Distributions off Eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts (CC_SEDDIST.SHP, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set shows the distribution of surficial sediments offshore of northern and eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This interpretation is based on data collected...

  12. Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet Christopher Martens Dept. of Marine Sciences CB...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...was noted that there was substantially higher organic material in the shallow troughs of the sand ripples than on the crests. Most of this appears

  13. Surficial Sediment Facies features near the Myrtle Bend Confluence with the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The surficial bed-sediment facies, herein after referred to as the sediment facies, quantitatively describes the dominant sediment substrate on the surface of the...

  14. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Comparison of Pb and Cd adsorption to the surface coatings and surficial sediments collected in Xianghai Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; WANG Xiao-li; WANG Yue; DONG De-ming; ZHANG Hua-peng; LI Qing-shan; LI Xing-chun

    2005-01-01

    Surface coatings and surficial sediments ware obtained in four natural waters in Xianghai Wetland in China to study the role of surface coatings and surficial sediments in controlling the transporting and cycling of heavy metals in aquatic environments. Pb and Cd adsorption to the surface coatings and surficial sediments were measured under controlled laboratory conditions(mineral salts solution with defined speciation, ionic strength 0.05 mol/L, 25℃ and pH 6.0 for surface coatings; and 0.005 mol/L CaCl2 solution, 25℃ and pH 6.0 for surficial sediments). The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was applied to estimate equilibrium coefficients of Pb and Cd adsorption to the surface coatings and surficial sediments, and the component analyses of surface coatings and surficial sediments were also carried out.Correlation analyses between the maximum adsorption of Pb and Cd ( Гmax ) and the components in the surface coatings and surficial sediments suggested that there was a statistically significant trend for Pb and Cd adsorption(Гmax ) to the surface coatings to increase with increasing in contents of Fe and Mn oxides in the surface coatings and surficial sediments. And the metal adsorption abilities of surface coatings were much stronger than those of surficial sediments, highlighting that in the same water, i.e. at the same pH and initial metal concentrations, the metals (such as lead and cadmium) in supernatant were feasible to be adsorbed by surface coatings than surficial sediments. The more importance of surface coatings than surficial sediments for adsorbing and cycling of heavy metals in aquatic environments was evidenced.

  16. Surficial sediments of the continental shelf off Karnataka

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    on the inner shelf. X-ray mineralogy of the silt fraction of the sediments shows the presence of quartz, calcite, aragonite and orthoclase as major minerals. Some of the sedimentary processes effecting the distribution of these sediments are discussed...

  17. Distinct bacterial communities in surficial seafloor sediments following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of the petroleum hydrocarbons discharged during the 2010 Macondo oil spill became associated with and sank to the seafloor as marine snow flocs. This sedimentation pulse induced the development of distinct bacterial communities. Between May 2010 and July 2011, full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries demonstrated bacterial community succession in oil-polluted sediment samples near the wellhead area. Libraries from early May 2010, before the sedimentation event, served as the baseline control. Freshly deposited oil-derived marine snow was collected on the surface of sediment cores in September 2010, and was characterized by abundantly detected members of the marine Roseobacter cluster within the Alphaproteobacteria. Samples collected in mid-October 2010 closest to the wellhead contained members of the sulfate-reducing, anaerobic bacterial families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria, suggesting that the oil-derived sedimentation pulse triggered bacterial oxygen consumption and created patchy anaerobic microniches that favored sulfate-reducing bacteria. Phylotypes of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading genus Cycloclasticus, previously found both in surface oil slicks and the deep hydrocarbon plume, were also found in oil-derived marine snow flocs sedimenting on the seafloor in September 2010, and in surficial sediments collected in October and November 2010, but not in any of the control samples. Due to the relative recalcitrance and stability of polycyclic aromatic compounds, Cycloclasticus represents the most persistent microbial marker of seafloor hydrocarbon deposition that we could identify in this dataset. The bacterial imprint of the DWH oil spill had diminished in late November 2010, when the bacterial communities in oil-impacted sediment samples collected near the Macondo wellhead began to resemble their pre-spill counterparts and spatial controls. Samples collected in summer

  18. Long Island Sound Surficial Sediment Data (LISSEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Many scientific questions and policy issues related to sediments in Long Island Sound require data of historical, regional and interdisciplinary scope. Existent data...

  19. Long Island Sound Surficial Sediment Data (LISSEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Many scientific questions and policy issues related to sediments in Long Island Sound require data of historical, regional and interdisciplinary scope. Existent data...

  20. Assessment of heavy metal pollution in surficial sediments from a tropical river-estuary-shelf system: A case study of Kelantan River, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ai-Jun; Bong, Chui Wei; Xu, Yong-Hang; Hassan, Meor Hakif Amir; Ye, Xiang; Bakar, Ahmad Farid Abu; Li, Yun-Hai; Lai, Zhi-Kun; Xu, Jiang; Loh, Kar Hoe

    2017-08-11

    To understand the source-to-sink of pollutants in the Kelantan River estuary and the adjacent shelf area in Malaysia, a total of 42 surface sediment samples were collected in the Kelantan River-estuary-shelf system to analyze for grain size, total organic carbon (TOC) content, Al and heavy metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb). The surficial sediments were mainly composed of clayey silt and the TOC content in sediments decreased from the river to the shelf. The surficial sediments experienced Pb pollution; Cr only showed a certain level of pollution in the coastal area of the estuary but not in other areas, and Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cd showed no pollution. The heavy metals mainly originated from natural weathering and erosion of rocks and soils in the catchment and enriched near the river mouth. Total organic carbon can promote the enrichment of heavy metals in sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sediment pollution and dynamic in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (southern Italy): insights from bottom sediment traps and surficial sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Cassin, Daniele; Giuliani, Silvia; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Major and trace element, PAH, and PCB concentrations were measured in surface sediments and particles from sediment traps collected in the First and Second Basin of the Mar Piccolo (Gulf of Taranto) in two periods (June-July and August-September, 2013). The aim of the study was to evaluate pollution degree, sediment transport and particle redistribution dynamic within the area. Results confirm the higher contamination of sediments from the First Basin observed by previous researches, particularly for Cu, Hg, Pb, total PAHs, and total PCBs. Advective transport from the First to the Second Basin appears to be the leading transfer mechanism of particles and adsorbed contaminants, as evidenced by measured fluxes and statistical analyses of contaminant concentrations in surficial sediments and particles from sediment traps. Long-range selective transports of PAHs and microbial anaerobic degradation processes for PCBs have been also observed. These results are limited to a restricted time window but are consistent with the presence of transport fluxes at the bottom of the water column. This mechanism deserves further investigation and monitoring activities, potentially being the main responsible of pollutant delivering to the less contaminated sectors of the Mar Piccolo.

  2. Heavy mineral distribution in the surficial sediments from the eastern continental margin of India and their implications on palaeoenvironment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mislankar, P.G.; Gujar, A.R.

    Heavy mineral distribution from the surficial sediments of the Eastern Continental Margin of India, between Machilipatnam and Gopalpur shows that their concentration ranges from 0.4 to 13.9%. Heavy minerals such as opaques, (ilmenite, magnetite...

  3. Surficial sediment data from Boston Harbor collected during USGS Field Activity 04019 (SEDGRABS, UTM 19, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes the locations, identifiers, grain-size data and(or) textural descriptions of surficial sediments collected at stations based on topographic...

  4. Modeling the source contribution of heavy metals in surficial sediment and analysis of their historical changes in the vertical sediments of a drinking water reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqiang; A, Yinglan; Jiang, Hong; Fu, Qing; Zheng, Binghui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing water pollution in developing countries poses a significant threat to environmental health and human welfare. Understanding the spatial distribution and apportioning the sources of pollution are important for the efficient management of water resources. In this study, ten types of heavy metals were detected during 2010-2013 for all ambient samples and point sources samples. A pollution assessment based on the surficial sediment dataset by Enrichment Factor (EF) showed the surficial sediment was moderately contaminated. A comparison of the multivariate approach (principle components analysis/absolute principle component score, PCA/APCS) and the chemical mass balance model (CMB) shows that the identification of sources and calculation of source contribution based on the CMB were more objective and acceptable when source profiles were known and source composition was complex. The results of source apportionment for surficial heavy metals, both from PCA/APCS and CMB model, showed that the natural background (30%) was the most dominant contributor to the surficial heavy metals, followed by mining activities (29%). The contribution percentage of the natural background was negatively related to the degree of contamination. The peak concentrations of many heavy metals (Cu, Ba, Fe, As and Hg) were found in the middle layer of sediment, which is most likely due to the result of development of industry beginning in the 1970s. However, the highest concentration of Pb appeared in the surficial sediment layer, which was most likely due to the sharp increase in the traffic volume. The historical analysis of the sources based on the CMB showed that mining and the chemical industry are stable sources for all of the sections. The comparing of change rates of source contribution versus years indicated that the composition of the materials in estuary site (HF1) is sensitive to the input from the land, whereas center site (HF4) has a buffering effect on the materials from

  5. Hydrophobic organic contaminants in surficial sediments of Baltimore Harbor: Inventories and sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Baker, J.E. [Univ. System of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.

    1999-05-01

    The heavily urbanized and industrialized Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco River/Back River system is one of the most highly contaminated regions of the Chesapeake Bay. In June 1996, surficial sediments were collected at 80 sites throughout the subestuarine system, including historically undersampled creek sand embayments. The samples were analyzed for a suite of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) consisting of 32 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 113 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. Total PAH and total PCB concentrations ranged from 90 to 46,200 and 8 to 2,150 ng/g dry weight, respectively. There was enormous spatial variability in the concentrations of HOCs, which was not well correlated to grain size or organic carbon content, suggesting nonequilibrium partitioning and/or proximity to sources as important factors explaining the observed spatial variability. High concentrations of both classes of HOCs were localized around major urban stormwater runoff discharges. Elevated PAH concentrations were also centered around the Sparrow`s Point Industrial Complex, most likely a result of the pyrolysis of coal during the production of steel. All but 1 of the 80 sites exceeded the effects range-low (ERL) for total PCBs and, of those sites, 40% exceeded the effects range-medium (ERM), suggesting toxicity to marine benthic organisms would frequently occur. Using principal component analysis, differences in PAH signatures were discerned. Higher molecular weight PAHs were enriched in signatures from sediments close to suspected sources (i.e., urban stormwater runoff and steel production complexes) compared to those patterns observed at sites further from outfalls or runoff. Due to varying solubilities and affinities for organic matter of the individual PAHs, partitioning of the heavier weight PAHs may enrich settling particles with high molecular weight PAHs. Lower molecular weight PAHs, having lower affinity for particles, may travel from the source to a

  6. Water- and air-quality and surficial bed-sediment monitoring of the Sweetwater Reservoir watershed, San Diego County, California, 2003-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to assess the overall health of the Sweetwater watershed in San Diego County, California. This study was designed to provide a data set that could be used to evaluate potential effects from the construction and operation of State Route 125 within the broader context of the water quality and air quality in the watershed. The study included regular sampling of water, air, and surficial bed sediment at Sweetwater Reservoir (SWR) for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), base-neutral and acid- extractable organic compounds (BNAs) that include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides, and metals. Additionally, water samples were collected for anthropogenic organic indicator compounds in and around SWR. Background water samples were collected at Loveland Reservoir for VOCs, BNAs, pesticides, and metals. Surficial bed-sediment samples were collected for PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and metals at Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs.

  7. Trace element distributions in surficial sediments of the northern Tyrrhenian Sea: Contribution to heavy-metal pollution assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Leonardo; Sartori, Franco; Damiani, Vincenzo; Ferretti, Ornella; Viel, Monique

    1991-03-01

    The trace element distributions in surficial sediment of Tyrrhenian Sea have been investigated as a part of a series of studies on the environmental quality of the area off the Tuscany coast (west-central Italy). This research has focused on the presence of possible contaminated zones; it also provides data for the identification and future monitoring and control of pollution sources. The study of numerous surface sediments and core samples has made it possible to distinguish between heavy-metal enrichments related to natural sources and other anomalies caused by anthropogenic contamination. Over much of the basin, the surface Pb, Cu, Zn, and As contents appear considerably enriched relative to those below 15 cm; among these metals, Pb shows the highest and most widespread enrichment. Only in the case of some coarse-grained sediments close to the mouth of Cecina River it is possible to relate anomalously high Zn contents to natural sources. In all other sampling stations, the enrichments of Pb, Cu, Zn, and As are ascribed to man's influence. The sediment distributions of Co, Cr, and Ni do not seem to be related to anthropogenic activities; rather they mirror influx of materials derived from sources of ophiolitic rock. The distribution of barium shows only two significant positive anomalies, and both are related to natural causes. Concentrations of vanadium are high in a zone close to an important smelting plant; these are thought to be of anthropogenic origin.

  8. Trace element distributions in surficial sediments of the northern Tyrrhenian Sea: Contribution to heavy-metal pollution assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leoni, L.; Sartori, F. (Univ. of Pisa, (Italy)); Damiani, V.; Ferretti, O.; Viel, M. (ENEA, La Spezia (Italy))

    The trace element distributions in surficial sediments of Tyrrhenian Sea have been investigated as a part of a series of studies on the environmental quality of the area off the Tuscany coast (west-central Italy). This research has focused on the presence of possible contaminated zones; it also provides data for the identification and future monitoring and control of pollution sources. The study of numerous surface sediments and core samples has made it possible to distinguish between heavy-metal enrichments related to natural sources and other anomalies caused by anthropogenic contamination. Over much of the basin, the surface Pb, Cu, Zn, and As contents appear considerably enriched relative to the those below 15 cm; among these metals. Pb shows the highest and most widespread enrichment. Only in the case of some coarse-grained sediments close to the mouth of Cecina River it is possible to relate anomalously high Zn contents to natural sources. In all other sampling stations, the enrichments of Pb, Cu, Zn, and As are ascribed to man's influence. The sediment distributions of Co, Cr, and Ni do not seem to be related to anthropogenic activities; rather they mirror influx of materials derived from sources of ophiolitic rock. The distribution of barium shows only two significant positive anomalies, and both are related to natural causes. Concentrations of vanadium are high in a zone close to an important smelting plant; these are thought to be of anthropogenic origin.

  9. Depth shapes α- and β-diversities of microbial eukaryotes in surficial sediments of coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Shi, Fei; Ma, Bin; Dong, Jun; Pachiadaki, Maria; Zhang, Xiaoli; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the relative influence of historic processes and environmental gradients on shaping the diversity of single-celled eukaryotes in marine benthos. By combining pyrosequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes with data on multiple environmental factors, we investigated the diversity of microeukaryotes in surficial sediments of three basins of the Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem. A considerable proportion (about 20%) of reads was affiliated with known parasitoid protists. Dinophyta and Ciliophora appeared dominant in terms of relative proportion of reads and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness. Overall, OTU richness of benthic microeukaryotes decreased with increasing water depth and decreasing pH. While community composition was significantly different among basins, partial Mantel tests indicated a depth-decay pattern of community similarity, whereby water depth, rather than geographic distance or environment, shaped β-diversity of benthic microeukaryotes (including both the abundant and the rare biosphere) on a regional scale. Similar hydrographic and mineralogical factors contributed to the biogeography of both the abundant and the rare OTUs. The trace metal vanadium had a significant effect on the biogeography of the rare biosphere. Our study sheds new light on the composition, diversity patterns and underlying mechanisms of single-celled eukaryote distribution in surficial sediments of coastal oceans.

  10. Nature, Source and Composition of Volcanic Ash in Surficial Sediments Around the Zhongsha Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; WANG Xinyu

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic detrital sediments are a unique indicator for reconstructing the petrogenetie evolution of submarine volcanic terrains. Volcanic ash in surficial sediments around the Zhongsha Islands includes three kinds of volcanogenic detritus, i.e., brown volcanic glass, colorless volcanic glass and volcanic scoria. The major element characteristics show that bimodal volcanic activity may have taken place in the northern margin of the South China Sea, with brown volcanic glass and colorless volcanic glass repre-senting the maric end-member and felsie end-member, respectively. Fractional crystallization is the main process for magma evolu-tion. The nature of the volcanic activity implies that the origin of volcanic activity was related to extensional tectonic settings, which is corresponding to an extensional geodynamie setting in the Xisha Trench, and supports the notion, which is based on geophysical data and petrology, that there may exist a mantle plume around the Hainan Island.

  11. Processing RoxAnn sonar data to improve its categorization of lake bed surficial sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholwek, Gary; Bonde, John; Li, Xing; Richards, Carl; Yin, Karen

    2000-01-01

    To categorize spawning and nursery habitat for lake trout in Minnesota's near shore waters of Lake Superior, data was collected with a single beam echo sounder coupled with a RoxAnn bottom classification sensor. Test areas representative of different bottom surficial substrates were sampled. The collected data consisted of acoustic signals which showed both depth and substrate type. The location of the signals was tagged in real-time with a DGPS. All data was imported into a GIS database. To better interpret the output signal from the RoxAnn, several pattern classifiers were developed by multivariate statistical method. From the data a detailed and accurate map of lake bed bathymetry and surficial substrate types was produced. This map will be of great value to fishery and other natural resource managers.

  12. Use of Multi-Media Sampling as Integrated Approach to Surficial Geochemical Sampling for Gold in Regional Reconnaissance Surveys in Parts of the Ashanti Belt, Southwest Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosper M. Nude

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the conventional method used in surficial geochemical sampling to multimedia sampling method during reconnaissance surveys in gold exploration. The use of the conventional method in regional reconnaissance exploration surveys whereby surficial geochemical sampling is done step-wise, first by sampling stream sediments followed by rock chips then soils and other regolith materials in the search and defining of prospective targets of gold mineralization appears inefficient in geological environments characterized by complex regolith and landform modifications. However, multi-media geochemical sampling which involves the simultaneous sampling of different geochemical samples appears a better alternative and eliminates false and erratic anomalies often associated with the sampling of a single medium. Multi-media samples comprising rock chips, scree, termite mounds and lateritic lags, were collected simultaneously to support stream sediments in parts of the Ashanti belt in the Birimian of southwest Ghana, which is characterized by complex regolith and landform modifications. The most prospective targets among the three anomalous zones defined by the stream survey were better pronounced with the support of the other media, based on the consistency in significant gold contents in those samples. Gold assay values from the multi-media samples ranked the Manso East target as the most prospective and the Manso Northwest target being least prospective due to the inconsistent gold assay values in the different media. Thus the integration of the gold assay values from the various media defined real and prospective geochemical gold targets better than in the conventional method in which sampling of different media was done in stages. Unlike the conventional method, the multi-media survey provided gold results that showed regional, proximal and in-situ anomalies simultaneously. Multi-media geochemical survey therefore, appears to be a

  13. Chromium Distribution and Spatial Variations in the Finer Sediment Grain Size Fraction and Unfractioned Surficial Sediments on Nyanza Gulf, of Lake Victoria (East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job Mwamburi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surficial sediments collected from the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria (East Africa were used to determine spatial concentrations of Cr and determine differences in contents of the unfractioned (whole sediment and the finer grain size sediments, establishing any changes in Cr enrichment and potential ecological risks using sediment quality guidelines. A single pollution index was also used to evaluate level of Cr contamination. The spatial mean Cr contents in the <63 µm (silt-clay fraction were found to be significantly lower than those in the unfractioned sediments, but with a strong linear positive correlation. The study results show decreasing spatial amounts of Cr in surficial sediments of the Nyanza Gulf, when compared to a study done 20 years earlier. However, the 95% confidence limits of the overall mean Cr in unfractioned sediments exceed the threshold effect concentration (TEC, indicating the potential for Cr remobilization from sediments. In general the sediment enrichment is evidence of possible dominance of lithogenous sources of Cr in the surface lake sediments, with potential anthropogenic sources from the drainage system and nearshore urban areas. The sediments are unpolluted with respect to geoaccumulation index, and sediment enrichment factors suggest a minor to moderate enrichment of Cr in surficial sediments of three sites around the Nyanza Gulf zones and around the river mouth in the main lake.

  14. Verdine and glaucony facies from surficial sediments of the eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Thamban, M.; Lamboy, M.

    The present paper reports the first mineralogical description of green grains (verdine and glaucony) from sediments of the eastern continental margin of India. Only 24 of the 82 sediment samples studied, at depths between 18 and 247 m, contain green...

  15. Heavy metal concentrations in the soft tissues of swan mussel (Anodonta cygnea) and surficial sediments from Anzali wetland, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourang, N; Richardson, C A; Mortazavi, M S

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of cadmium, copper, and lead were determined in surficial sediments and the soft tissues (foot and gills) of swan mussel Anodonta cygnea from two sampling sites in Anzali wetland, which is an internationally important wetland registered in the Ramsar Convention. The metal contents in the mussel species from the studied region were comparable to other world areas. In most cases, the levels of the metals either fell within the range for other areas or were lower. There were significant differences between the tissues for the accumulation of Cd and Pb. Only in the case of Pb accumulation in gills significant differences between the specimens from the selected sampling sites could be observed. Age-related correlations were found in the case of Cu accumulation in foot and Cd levels in gills. No weight-dependent trend could be observed for the accumulation of the three elements. There was significant negative width-dependent relationship in the case of Cu. A significant negative correlation was also found between the maximum shell height and Cu accumulation in the gills. The only association among the elements in the selected soft tissues was found between Cd and Pb. Highly significant differences could be found between the sampling sites from the concentration of the elements in sediments point of view. The pattern of metal occurrence in the selected tissues and sediments exhibited the following descending order: Pb, Cu>Cd for gills, Cu>Pb, Cd for foot, and Cu>Pb>Cd for sediments. The mean concentrations of Cd and Pb in the sediments from the study area were higher than the global baseline values and world average shale. In the case of Cu, our results were somewhat higher than the baseline values but well below the world average shale.

  16. Distribution and composition characteristics of heavy minerals in surficial sediment of Minjiang Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Maoquan; XU Wenbin; SUN Meiqin

    2005-01-01

    Heavy minerals with a size range of 0.125~0.250 mm in the surficial sediment of Minjiang Estuary are studied. Thirty-four heavy minerals have been identified, with an average content of 1.92%. Major minerals include magnetite, epidote, hematite, hornblende, ilmenite, and zircon mica. These types are the same as those in the 0.063~0.125 mm range; however, the average content is lower, which reveals that the heavy minerals in Minjiang Estuary are mainly enriched in the very-fine sand fraction. According to the content and distribution characteristics of the major heavy minerals, Minjiang Estuary can be divided into 4 mineral assemblage zones. In each zone the assemblage of heavy minerals is greatly affected by the hydrodynamic condition and the sedimentary environment. Heavy mineral types also show that detrital matters in Minjiang Estuary are originated from the weathering and erosion of the bedrock in the Minjiang River drainage area.

  17. Seasonal mercury transformation and surficial sediment detoxification by bacteria of Marano and Grado lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Franco; Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide; Fani, Renato; Maida, Isabel; Horvat, Milena; Fajon, Vesna; Zizek, Suzana; Hines, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Marano and Grado lagoons are polluted by mercury from the Isonzo River and a chlor-alkali plant, yet despite this contamination, clam cultivation is one of the main activities in the region. Four stations (MA, MB, MC and GD) were chosen for clam seeding and surficial sediments were monitored in autumn, winter and summer to determine the Hg detoxifying role of bacteria. Biotransformation of Hg species in surficial sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons was investigated while taking into consideration the speciation of organic matter in the biochemical classes of PRT (proteins), CHO (carbohydrates) and LIP (lipids), water-washed cations and anions, bacterial biomass, Hg-resistant bacteria, some specific microbial activities such as sulfate reduction rates, Hg methylation rates, Hg-demethylation rates, and enzymatic ionic Hg reduction. MeHg in sediments was well correlated with PRT content, whereas total Hg in sediments correlated with numbers of Hg-resistant bacteria. Correlations of the latter with Hg-demethylation rates in autumn and winter suggested a direct role Hg-resistant bacteria in Hg detoxification by producing elemental Hg (Hg0) from ionic Hg and probably also from MeHg. MeHg-demethylation rates were ˜10 times higher than Hg methylation rates, were highest in summer and correlated with high sulfate reduction rates indicating that MeHg was probably degraded in summer by sulfate-reducing bacteria via an oxidative pathway. During the summer period, aerobic heterotrophic Hg-resistant bacteria decreased to Staphylococcus and Bacillus) and two Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas). Two were able to produce Hg0, but just one contained a merA gene; while other two strains did not produce Hg0 even though they were able to grow at 5 μg ml of HgCl2. Lagoon sediments support a strong sulfur cycle in summer that controls Hg methylation and demethylation. However, during winter, Hg-resistant bacteria that are capable of degrading MeHg via the mer

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls and pesticides in surficial coastal sediments of the Ligurian Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolotto, R.M.; Cuneo, C.; Albanese, S. [ARPAL, Direzione Scientifica, Genova (Italy); Magherini, A. [ARPAL, Dipartimento di Genova, Genova (Italy); Frignani, M.; Bellucci, L.G.; Alvarado-Aguilar, D. [ISMAR, Sezione di Geologia Marina, Bologna (Italy)

    2004-09-15

    , sources and potential toxicological significance of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in surficial sediments of the marine coastal area of the Ligurian Sea.

  19. Stability studies of surficial sediments in the Wilmington-Lindenkohl Canyons area, eastern U.S. margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagor, G.; Bennett, R.H.; Mc Gregor, B.A.; Shephard, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Stability analysis, based on infinite slope analysis and geotechnical data from a suite of 34 cores collected from the continental slope between Wilmington and Lindenkohl Canyons, indicates that the Quaternary surficial silty clay sediments on gentle slopes are stable; that sediment stability on steeper slopes (14??-19??) is marginal; and that on precipitous slopes (>50??) only a thin veneer of unconsolidated sediments can exist. Small earthquake-induced accelerations or the effects of internal waves can result in slope sediment instabilities. ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  20. Archive of sediment physical properties and grain-size data for sediment samples collected offshore of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release serves as an archive of sediment physical properties and grain-size data for surficial samples collected offshore of Assateague Island, Maryland...

  1. Selective extraction and separation of Fe, Mn oxides and organic materials in river surficial sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng-mei; WANG Xiao-li; LI Yu; GUO Shu-hai; ZHONG Ai-ping

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the adsorption mechanism of trace metals to surficial sediments (SSs), a selective extraction procedure was improved in the present work. The selective extraction procedure has been proved to selectively remove and separate Fe, Mn oxides and organic materials (OMs) in the non-residual fraction from the SSs collected in Songhua River, China. After screening different kinds of conventional extractants of Fe and Mn oxides and OMs used for separation of heavy metals in the soils respectively applied to selectively extract Mn oxides, Fe/Mn oxides and OMs. After the extraction treatments, the target components were removed with extraction efficiencies between 86.09%-93.36% for the hydroxylamine hydrochloride treatment, 80.63%-101.09% for the oxalate solution extraction, and 94.76%-102.83% for the hydrogen peroxide digestion, respectively. The results indicate that this selective extraction technology was effective for the extraction and separation of Fe, Mn oxides and OMs in the SSs,and important for further mechanism study of trace metal adsorption onto SSs.

  2. Elemental distributions in surficial sediments and potential offshore mineral resources from the western continental margin of India. Part 2. Potential offshore mineral resources

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Mascarenhas, A.; Rao, Ch.M.; PrakashBabu, C.; Murty, P.S.N.

    patterns of ten selected elements is surficial sediments. Part 2 projects the potential offshore mineral resources. Target areas for future exploration and indicated and exploration strategies are recommended. Appendix 1 is a compilation of the bibliography...

  3. Heavy metals in surficial sediments of the central Bohai Sea:their distribution, speciation and sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; FAN Dejiang; LIAO Yongjie; CHEN Bin; YANG Zuosheng

    2016-01-01

    The semi-enclosed Bohai Sea has received large amount of pollutants from surrounding rivers and sewage channels along the densely populated and industrializing Bohai coasts, as well as the offshore oil exploration in the sea. The concentrations of heavy metals copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, lead, chromium and cadmium in 25 surface sediment samples from the central Bohai Sea are obtained by ICP-MS analysis. The speciation of these heavy metals is extracted and their distribution, fractionation, pollution status and sources are presented. High concentrations of copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc and chromium are found in the sediments off the coastal area of the Bohai Bay and the central Bohai Sea mud, while high concentrations of cadmium and lead are found in the sediments in the whole study area. The residual fraction is the dominant form of copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc and chromium in the surface sediments, while cadmium and lead have large proportions in the nonresidual fractions. The ecological risk assessment shows that the sediments in the study area are unpolluted with respect to the heavy metals of cobalt, nickel and chromium and unpolluted to moderately polluted with respect to copper, zinc, cadmium and lead. Cobalt, nickel and chromium mainly have natural origin and their concentrations significantly vary with the composition of the sediments. The contents of copper, zinc, lead and especially cadmium in sediments are suggested to be influenced by pollutants of human activities. The heavy metals in the surface sediments at most sampling stations are mainly come from the Huanghe River; the heavy metals in the sediments in the northernmost part of the study area are significantly affected by the sediment from the Luanhe River; while in the Bohai Bay and the central region they were affected by the sediment from the Haihe River and aerosol deposition.

  4. Environmental Controls on Nitrogen and Sulfur Cycles in Surficial Aquatic Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhui eGu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen (N and sulfur (S have disturbed their biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The N and S cycles interact with one another through competition for labile forms of organic carbon between nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Furthermore, the N and S cycles could interact through nitrate (NO3- reduction coupled to S oxidation, consuming NO3- and producing sulfate (SO42-. The research questions of this study were: (1 what are the environmental factors explaining variability in N and S biogeochemical reaction rates in a wide range of surficial aquatic sediments, and (2 which biogeochemical processes are involved when NO3- and/or SO42- are present. The N and S biogeochemical reaction rates were measured on intact surface sediment slices using flow-through reactors. The two terminal electron acceptors (TEA NO3- and SO42- were added either separately or simultaneously and NO3- and SO42- reduction rates as well as NO3- reduction linked to S oxidation were determined. We used redundancy analysis, to assess how environmental variables are related to these rates. Our analysis showed that overlying water pH and salinity were two dominant environmental factors that explain 58% of the variance in the N and S biogeochemical reaction rates when NO3- and SO42- were both present. When NO3- and SO42- were added separately, however, sediment N content in addition to pH and salinity accounted for 62% of total variance of the biogeochemical reaction rates. The SO42- addition had little effect on NO3- reduction; neither did the NO3- addition inhibit SO42- reduction. The presence of NO3- led to SO42- production most likely due to the oxidation of sulfur. Our observations suggest that metal-bound S, instead of free sulfide produced by SO42- reduction, was responsible the S oxidation. The subsequent release of toxic metals from this coupling might have adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Heavy-metal enrichment in surficial sediments in the Oder River discharge area: source or sink for heavy metals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimmield, G. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Edinburgh, West Mains Rd., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Leipe, T.; Neumann, T. [Institut fuer Ostseeforschung Warnemuende, Seestr. 15, 18119 Rostock (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    The Oder river drains a highly polluted industrial area and enters the Baltic Sea through a system of shallow lagoons. Surficial sediments in the discharge area of the Oder are highly enriched in heavy metals compared to their preindustrial background levels. Pore-water studies in short sediment cores reveal anoxic environments over the entire sediment column, except for a suboxic layer in the uppermost 5 to 20 mm of the sediment where Mn- and Fe-oxyhydroxides are reduced by organic matter. Heavy metals (such as Cu, Zn and Pb) are mobilized within the suboxic zones in the inner lagoon (represented by the Oder Lagoon) and in the open Baltic (represented by the Arkona Basin). The Achterwasser, located between the Oder Lagoon and the Arkona Basin, is directly affected by sea-level fluctuations in the Baltic. Pore-water studies indicate that, in contrast to the situation in the Oder Lagoon and Arkona Basin, surficial sediments of the Achterwasser represent a sink for heavy metals. This is associated with the high rate of Fe-sulphide formation occurring there, at least seasonally during salt-water inflow.(Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Geochemistry of surficial sediments along the central southwest coast of India - Seasonal changes in regional distribution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.; Das, V.K.; Sheeba, P.

    carbon of the composite samples using wet digestion (chromic acid) followed by back titration with ferrous ammonium sulphate (EL WAKEEL and RILEY, 1957, precision::':: 0.25%). Finely powdered and dried (at 105 0 ::':: 5°C) sediments were digested in a...-earth element;; in the fluvial fraction « 4 IJ-m) that also date back to one~ct of sampling during 1981. Inadequacies in all the above stud ies have been their proper addressing of the influence 'If Seasonal Analysis of Sediment Geochemistry 665 Legend: PALL...

  7. Application of ecological risk indicators for the assessment of Greek surficial sediments contaminated by toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John Ν; Vasilaki, Georgia; Smaragdaki, Eleftheria; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-05-01

    Τhe present research investigates the partitioning of six selected toxic metals (Ni, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, and As) in eight sediment samples; half of them were collected from Elefsis Gulf, and the other half were taken from Koumoundourou Lake, Athens, Greece. Each one of them was treated by applying Tessier's five-step sequential extraction procedure. Regarding gulf sediments, the results indicated that Cu exhibits a strong affinity to the organic matter with percentages ranging from 65 to 78 %. Considerable amount of Zn (32-40 %) is bound to the Fe-Mn fraction and the non-residual fraction, while Cr and Ni are bound to the organic fraction, an observation that suits all toxic metals examined. Regarding lake sediments, Pb is the predominant metal bound to Fe-Mn (48-51 %). It is also noteworthy that the percentage of Zn bound to carbonated fraction (5-15 %), indicating biological availability. In conclusion, the application of several ecological risk indicators demonstrated that Elefsis Gulf sediments correspond to a moderate pollution level, with Pb and Ni being less bioavailable than in the lake's samples, in contrast to Zn which is more bioavailable. Finally, Koumoundourou Lakes' basin is characterized of "low risk."

  8. [Distribution Characteristics, Sources and Pollution Assessment of Trace Elements in Surficial Sediments of the Coastal Wetlands, Northeastern Hainan Island].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-kun; Gan, Hua-yang; Bi, Xiang-yang; Wang, Jia-sheng

    2016-04-15

    Totally 128 surficial sediments samples were collected from the coastal wetlands, northeastern Hainan Island and analyzed for their concentrations of 14 elements including Al2O3, Fe2O3, MnO, Cu, Ni, Sr, Zn, V, Pb, Cr, Zr, As, Cd and Hg, TOC and grain sizes. The mean concentrations of trace metals V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Cd and Hg were (40.13 +/- 32.65), (35.92 +/- 26.90), (13.03 +/- 11.46), (11.56 +/- 10.27)-, (48.75 +/- 27.00), (5.48 +/- 1.60), ( 18.70 +/- 8.66), (0.054 +/- 0.045 ), (0.050 +/- 0.050) microg x g(-1), respectively, which were much lower than those in Pearl River Estuary, Yangzi River Estuary, Bohai Bay, upper crust and average shale. The average concentrations of Sr and Zr were much higher, reaching up to (1253.60 +/- 1649.58) microg x g(-1) and (372.40 +/- 516.49) microg x g(-1), respectively. The spatial distribution patterns of Al2O3, Fe2O3, MnO, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, Pb, Cr, Cd and Hg concentrations were the same as each other except for those of As, Sr and Zr. Generally, relatively high concentrations of these elements only appeared in the Haikou Bay, Nandu estuary, Dongzhai Harbor, Qinglan Harbor and Xiaohai in study area. The factor analysis revealed that the trace elements Al2O3 Fe2O3, MnO, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, Pb, Cr and part of Hg were mainly originated from the rock material by natural weathering processes, while the Cd and a part of Hg were from the biological source controlled by TOC. As and part of MnO were influenced by anthropogenic source, especially by aquacultures. Zr and some MnO were derived from heavy minerals dominated by the coarse grain of sediments. In contrast to the ERL, ERM and the results of enrichment factors (EF) , the environment of study area was good in general and the degree of contamination by trace elements was low on the whole. However, there are still some places where anthropogenic input have caused serious enrichments of trace elements and the occasional adverse effect on benthic organism induced by Ni could probably

  9. The use of vintage surficial sediment data and sedimentary cores to determine past and future trends in estuarine metal contamination (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, G F; Chang, C-H; Lee, J-H; Churchill, L J

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of the present investigation were to determine past trends in sediment contamination and possibly predict future trends. Multiple vintages of surficial sediment metal data, from a quasi-decadal 'Status and Trends' programme, were used to provide large-scale spatial information on current status and temporal change. This information was augmented by sediment cores, specifically located to verify surface sediment data and to determine trends at major points of stormwater discharge. The data obtained indicate that surficial sediment metal concentrations have declined, since about the early 1990s, in extensive parts of the upper and central estuaries and have increased slightly in the lower estuary, due mainly to a down-estuary shift in industry and urbanisation. Declining surficial sediment metal concentrations is due to a movement of industry out of the catchment, especially from foreshore areas and the introduction of regulation, which prevent pollutants being discharged directly to the estuary. The major present-day source of metals is stormwater, with minor inputs from the main estuary channel into embayments and runoff from previously contaminated mainland sites. Modelled relaxation rates are optimistic as high metal concentrations in stormwater will slow predicted rates. Stormwater remediation should be the main managerial focus for this estuary. Multiple vintages of surficial sediment metal data covering the past 30 years, supplemented by sedimentary core data, have allowed past and future contamination trends to be determined. This type of science-based information provides an important tool for strategic management of this iconic waterway.

  10. C:N:P Molar Ratios, Sources and 14C Dating of Surficial Sediments from the NW Slope of Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe de la Lanza Espino

    Full Text Available The surficial sediments recovered from 12 sites located near the channel axis of the Florida Straits and the lower slope off NW Cuba were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC, nitrogen (TN, phosphorus (TP, elemental C:N:P ratios, C and N isotopic values, and 14C dating. The depth profiles of TOC, TN, and TP (0-18 cm displayed a downcore trend and a significant variation. The TOC values were low (0.15 to 0.62%; 66 to 516 µmol g(-1. Sites near the island's lower slope had lower TOC average concentrations (158-333 µmol g(-1 than those closer to the channel axis (averaging 341-516 µmol g(-1; p <0.05. The TN concentrations near the lower slope attained 0.11% (80 µmol g(-1, whereas, towards the channel axis, they decreased to 0.07% (55 µmol g(-1; p<0.05. The C:N ratios ranged from 1.9 to 10.2. The mean molar C:N ratio (5.4 indicated a marine hemipelagic deposition. The TP was lower at sites near the lower slope (38.4 to 50.0 µmol gv; 0.12% to 0.16% than those near the channel axis (50.0 to 66 µmol g(-1; 0.15 to 0.21%. C:P fluctuated from 7.7 to 14.1 in the surficial sediment layer. The bulk organic δ13Corg and δ15N values confirmed pelagic organic sources, and the 14C dating revealed that the sediments were deposited during the Holocene (1000-5000 yr BP. We suggest that the hydrodynamic conditions in the Straits influence vertical and advective fluxes of particulate organic material trapped in the mixed-layer, which reduces the particulate matter flux to the seabed.

  11. C:N:P Molar Ratios, Sources and 14C Dating of Surficial Sediments from the NW Slope of Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Lanza Espino, Guadalupe; Soto, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The surficial sediments recovered from 12 sites located near the channel axis of the Florida Straits and the lower slope off NW Cuba were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC), nitrogen (TN), phosphorus (TP), elemental C:N:P ratios, C and N isotopic values, and 14C dating. The depth profiles of TOC, TN, and TP (0-18 cm) displayed a downcore trend and a significant variation. The TOC values were low (0.15 to 0.62%; 66 to 516 µmol g(-1)). Sites near the island's lower slope had lower TOC average concentrations (158-333 µmol g(-1)) than those closer to the channel axis (averaging 341-516 µmol g(-1); p <0.05). The TN concentrations near the lower slope attained 0.11% (80 µmol g(-1)), whereas, towards the channel axis, they decreased to 0.07% (55 µmol g(-1); p<0.05). The C:N ratios ranged from 1.9 to 10.2. The mean molar C:N ratio (5.4) indicated a marine hemipelagic deposition. The TP was lower at sites near the lower slope (38.4 to 50.0 µmol gv; 0.12% to 0.16%) than those near the channel axis (50.0 to 66 µmol g(-1); 0.15 to 0.21%). C:P fluctuated from 7.7 to 14.1 in the surficial sediment layer. The bulk organic δ13Corg and δ15N values confirmed pelagic organic sources, and the 14C dating revealed that the sediments were deposited during the Holocene (1000-5000 yr BP). We suggest that the hydrodynamic conditions in the Straits influence vertical and advective fluxes of particulate organic material trapped in the mixed-layer, which reduces the particulate matter flux to the seabed.

  12. Magnetic properties of surficial sediments in Lake Ogawara on the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan: spatial variability and correlation with brackish water stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Akira; Nakano, Ryoma; Nagashima, Aya; Seto, Koji; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Yonenobu, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    To examine limnological conditions in Lake Ogawara on the Pacific coast of northwestern Japan, we investigated the magnetic properties of dredged bottom sediment originally collected from the lake in the summer of 2011. We used non-destructive methods to measure the low-field magnetic susceptibility shortly after sampling, and anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) was assessed in 2012 and 2015. The ARM acquisition and demagnetization curves from littoral sites showed several patterns that reflect the provenance of the sediments. At water depths below 10 m, the magnetic susceptibility and ARM of greenish black mud with high organic content decreased considerably with the increase in water depth, but ARM increased slightly at water depths greater than 16 m. We also found that the magnetic concentrations of mud samples were reduced markedly during a period of storage for about 3 years. We attributed these reductions to diagenetic loss of magnetic minerals, which had been enhanced at deeper sites. It is possible that the ARM carriers in deeper areas were derived from authigenic formation of iron sulfide or from deposition of suspended matter in the hypolimnion water. We propose that the magnetic properties of surficial sediments are controlled by limnological stratification of the brackish lake water, thus possibly providing an analog for down-core variations of magnetic parameters associated with the modification of magnetic minerals during reductive diagenesis.

  13. Shear-wave velocity of surficial geologic sediments in Northern California: Statistical distributions and depth dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, T.L.; Bennett, M.J.; Noce, T.E.; Tinsley, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    Shear-wave velocities of shallow surficial geologic units were measured at 210 sites in a 140-km2 area in the greater Oakland, California, area near the margin of San Francisco Bay. Differences between average values of shear-wave velocity for each geologic unit computed by alternative approaches were in general smaller than the observed variability. Averages estimated by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and slowness differed by 1 to 8%, while coefficients of variation ranged from 14 to 25%. With the exception of the younger Bay mud that underlies San Francisco Bay, velocities of the geologic units are approximately constant with depth. This suggests that shear-wave velocities measured at different depths in these surficial geologic units do not need to be normalized to account for overburden stress in order to compute average values. The depth dependence of the velocity of the younger Bay mud most likely is caused by consolidation. Velocities of each geologic unit are consistent with a normal statistical distribution. Average values increase with geologic age, as has been previously reported. Velocities below the water table are about 7% less than those above it. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  14. Comparing surficial sediments maps interpreted by experts with dual-frequency acoustic backscatter on the Scotian Shelf, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Andrew; Anderson, John T.; Devillers, Rodolphe

    2015-11-01

    Understanding seabed properties is increasingly important to support policy in the marine environment. Such knowledge can be gained from diverse methods, ranging from more traditional expert-interpretations of acoustic and ground-truth data, to maps resulting from fully quantitative analyses of acoustic data. This study directly compares surficial geology maps created through expert-interpretations to near-nadir acoustic backscatter data from two frequencies (38 kHz and 120 kHz) collected using single beam echosounders (SBES) for two 5×1 km study areas on the Scotian Shelf, Canada. Statistical methods were used to analyze and classify both single and dual-frequency acoustic backscatter for comparisons. In particular, spatial scaling of acoustic backscatter responses and acoustic classes created using acoustic seabed classification (ASC) is compared between frequencies and to interpreted sediment units (ISUs) which make up surficial geology maps produced by experts. Seabed morphology layers were included in an ASC approach to reflect the morphological components included in the interpreted geological maps. Results confirmed that higher frequencies and coarser grain sizes generally produced higher backscatter, while more heterogeneous and rougher seabeds produced variable backscatter. Differing acoustic responses within similar substrate units suggest fundamental seabed variations not reflected in the geological interpretations. Spatial scaling of sand and gravel substrates from 38 kHz frequency were closer than the 120 kHz frequency to the spatial scaling of the interpreted geological map. Variable grain size in the sediment volume and surface morphology are both presented as possible reasons for frequency differences. While both frequencies had similar general responses, differences in frequency responses of backscatter occurred at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. Results presented here emphasize the importance of multi-scale seabed mapping and additional

  15. Underwater Sediment Sampling Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Statement Diluted bitumen, Dilbit, diluents, total petroleum hydrocarbon, TPH, Texas Raw Crude, Turner Designs Cyclops-7, pore water, Dexsil PetroFlag...concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). While this study focuses on Dilbit and a Texas crude, a sampling process that could also be applied to...measurement system SubChem SubChem Sensor Systems, Inc. TPH Total petroleum hydrocarbons TR Texas Raw Crude U.S. United States USB Universal serial bus

  16. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment in Las Vegas Bay, Lake Mead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.; Rendigs, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and seismic-reflection profiles were collected in the northwestern part of Las Vegas Bay to map the distribution and volume of sediment that has accumulated in this part of Lake Mead since impoundment. The mapping suggests that three ephemeral streams are the primary source of this sediment, and of these, Las Vegas Wash is the largest. Two deltas off the mouth of Las Vegas Wash formed at different lake elevations and account for 41% of the total volume of post-impoundment sediment within the study area. Deltas off the other two washes (Gypsum and Government) account for only 6% of the total volume. The sediment beyond the front of the deltas is primarily mud, and it only occurs in valley floors, where it forms a flat-lying blanket that is mostly less than 1.5 m thick. Although a thin layer, the fine-grained sediment accounts for approximately 53% of the total post-impoundment sediment volume of 5.7 x 106 m3 that has accumulated in the study area. This sediment appears to have been transported several kilometers from the river sources by density flows.

  17. Toxic Metals Enrichment in the Surficial Sediments of a Eutrophic Tropical Estuary (Cochin Backwaters, Southwest Coast of India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G. D.; George, Rejomon; Shaiju, P.; Muraleedharan, K. R.; Nair, S. M.; Chandramohanakumar, N.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations and distributions of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in surficial sediments of the Cochin backwaters were studied during both monsoon and pre-monsoon periods. Spatial variations were in accordance with textural charaterstics and organic matter content. A principal component analysis distinguished three zones with different metal accumulation capacity: (i) highest levels in north estuary, (ii) moderate levels in central zone, and (iii) lowest levels in southern part. Trace metal enrichments are mainly due to anthropogenic contribution of industrial, domestic, and agricultural effluents, whose effect is enhanced by settling of metals due to organic flocculation and inorganic precipitation associated with salinity changes. Enrichments factors using Fe as a normalizer showed that metal contamination was the product of anthropogenic activities. An assessment of degree of pollution-categorized sediments as moderately polluted with Cu and Pb, moderately-to-heavily polluted with Zn, and heavily-to-extremely polluted with Cd. Concentrations at many sites largely exceed NOAA ERL (e.g., Cu, Cr, and Pb) or ERM (e.g., Cd, Ni, and Zn). This means that adverse effects for benthic organisms are possible or even highly probable. PMID:22645488

  18. Total and methyl mercury, moisture, and porosity in Lake Michigan surficial sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Total and methyl mercury, moisture content (%), and porosity were measured in Lake Michigan sediment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Office of Research...

  19. USGS Map service: usSEABED - US Coastal Offshore Surficial-Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The usSEABED database contains a compilation of published and previously unpublished sediment texture and other geologic data about the sea floor from diverse...

  20. Planktonic organic matter in surficial sediments of the Banda Sea (Indonesia) : a palynological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waveren, I.M.

    1993-01-01

    The acid resistant microscopic organic matter preserved in marine sediments (palynofacies) represents a small fraction of marine and terrestrial biomass that escaped rapid degradation and recycling to the atmospheric and hydrospheric carbon reservoirs. Palynofacies consists of (1) organic

  1. USGS Map service: usSEABED - US Coastal Offshore Surficial-Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The usSEABED database contains a compilation of published and previously unpublished sediment texture and other geologic data about the sea floor from diverse...

  2. Biogeochemistry of the surficial sediments of the western and eastern continental shelves of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jacob, J.; Chandramohanakumar, N.; Jayaraj, K.A.; Raveendran, T.V.; Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Nair, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, K.K.C.; George, R.; Ravi, Z.P.

    compared to the east coast, but the percentages of labile constituents of total organic matter in the sediments were found to be higher in the east coast by a factor of three as compared to the west coast. The differences in the productivity patterns...

  3. Rare earth element studies of surficial sediments from the southwestern Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N; Higgs, N

    into these sediments is suggested from the weak positive Eu/Eu anomaly. Shale-normalized (NASC) pattern along with La sub((n)/Yb sub((n) ratio suggest enrichment of heavy REE (HREE) relative to the light REE (LREE) with a negative Ce/Ce anomaly implying retention of a...

  4. Distinct Bacterial Communities in Surficial Seafloor Sediments Following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Blowout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Tingting; Speare, Kelly; McKay, Luke

    2016-01-01

    A major fraction of the petroleum hydrocarbons discharged during the 2010 Macondo oil spill became associated with and sank to the seafloor as marine snow flocs. This sedimentation pulse induced the development of distinct bacterial communities. Between May 2010 and July 2011, full-length 16S rRN...

  5. Adsorption of multi-heavy metals Zn and Cu onto surficial sediments: modeling and adsorption capacity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Meng; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Improved multiple regression adsorption models (IMRAMs) was developed to estimate the adsorption capacity of the components [Fe oxides (Fe), Mn oxides (Mn), organic materials (OMs), residuals] in surficial sediments for multi-heavy metal Zn and Cu. IMRAM is an improved version over MRAM, which introduces a computer program in the model developing process. As MRAM, Zn(Cu) IMRAM, and Cu(Zn) IMRAM again confirmed that there is significant interaction effects that control the adsorption of compounded Zn and Cu, which was neglected by additional adsorption model. The verification experiment shows that the relative deviation of the IMRAMs is less than 13%. It is revealed by the IMRAMs that Mn, which has the greatest adsorption capability for compounded Zn and Cu (54.889 and 161.180 mg/l, respectively), follows by interference adsorption capacity of Fe/Mn (-1.072 and -24.591 mg/l respectively). Zn and Cu influence each other through different mechanisms. When Zn is the adsorbate, compounded Cu mainly affects the adsorption capacities of Fe/Mn and Fe/Mn/OMs; while when Cu is the adsorbate, compounded Zn mainly exerts its effect on Mn, Fe/Mn, and Mn/OMs. It also shows that the compounded Zn or Cu weakened the interference adsorption of Fe/Mn, and meanwhile, strengthened the interference adsorption of Mn/OMs.

  6. Distribution of mercury in surficial sediments from Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Galindo, E A; Casas-Beltrán, D A; Muñoz-Barbosa, A; Daesslé, L W; Segovia-Zavala, J A; Macías-Zamora, J V; Orozco-Borbón, M V

    2008-02-01

    During 2004 the spatial distribution of total Hg in sediments from Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México was studied to evaluate the degree of environmental impact in this bay. The results showed low concentrations and no Hg enrichment at any site. These findings suggest natural levels of Hg in the water of Todos Santos Bay. The regional distribution of Hg/Fe shows lower values in the East and higher in the West of the bay. No significant correlations (p<0.05) were found between Hg and organic matter or particle size, suggesting that the distribution of Hg is not controlled by these variables.

  7. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyu, V. R.; Harji, R. R.; Bhosle, N. B.; Sawant, S. S.; Venkat, K.

    2013-04-01

    Surface sediments collected from 19 stations along Visakhapatnam harbour were analysed for organic carbon (OC), δ 13Coc, total lipids (TL), total hydrocarbon (THC), n-alkane concentration and composition. OC, δ 13Coc, TL and THC ranged from 0.6% to 7.6%, -29.3 to -23.8‰, 300 to 14,948 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, and 0.2 to 2,277 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, respectively. Predominance of even carbon numbers n-alkanes C12-C21 with carbon preference index (CPI) of <1 suggests major microbial influence. Fair abundance of odd carbon number n-alkanes in the range of C15-C22 and C23-C33 indicates some input from phytoplankton and terrestrial sources, respectively. Petrogenic input was evident from the presence of hopanes and steranes. The data suggest that organic matter (OM) sources varied spatially and were mostly derived from mixed source.

  8. -Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V R Punyu; R R Harji; N B Bhosle; S S Sawant; K Venkat

    2013-04-01

    Surface sediments collected from 19 stations along Visakhapatnam harbour were analysed for organic carbon (OC), 13CoC, total lipids (TL), total hydrocarbon (THC), -alkane concentration and composition. OC, 13CoC, TL and THC ranged from 0.6% to 7.6%, -29.3 to -23.8‰, 300 to 14,948 g g−1 dw, and 0.2 to 2,277 g g−1 dw, respectively. Predominance of even carbon numbers -alkanes C12–C21 with carbon preference index (CPI) of < 1 suggests major microbial influence. Fair abundance of odd carbon number -alkanes in the range of C15–C22 and C23–C33 indicates some input from phytoplankton and terrestrial sources, respectively. Petrogenic input was evident from the presence of hopanes and steranes. The data suggest that organic matter (OM) sources varied spatially and were mostly derived from mixed source.

  9. Measurement of Atrazine Adsorption onto Surficial Sediments (Natural Surface Coatings)——New Evidence for the Importance of Fe Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; WANG Ao; GAO Qian; WANG Xiao-li

    2009-01-01

    To reveal the relative contribution of the components, Fe, Mn oxides or organic materials(OMs) in the surficial sediments(SSs), and the natural surface coating samples(NSCSs) to adsorbing atrazine(AT), a selective chemical extraction technique was employed, to remove the different components, and the adsorption characteristics of AT on the SSs and the NSCSs were investigated. The observed adsorptions of AT on the original and extracted SSs and NSCSs were analyzed by nonlinear least squares fitting(NLSF) to estimate the relative contribution of the com-ponents. The results showed that the maximum adsorption of AT on the NSCSs was greater than that in the SSs, be-fore and after extraction treatments, implying that the NSCSs were more dominant than the SSs for organic pollutant adsorption. It was also found that the Fe oxides, OMs, and residues in SSs(NSCSs) facilitated the adsorption of AT, but Mn oxides directly or indirectly restrained the interaction of AT with SSs(NSCSs) particles. The contribution of the Fe oxides to AT adsorption was more than that of OMs; the greatest contribution to AT adsorption on a molar ba-sis was from the Fe oxides in the nonresidual fractions, indicating that the Fe oxides played an important role in con-trolling the environmental behavior of AT in an aquatic environment.

  10. Surficial sediment character of the New York-New Jersey offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Poppe, Lawrence J.; Reid, Jane A.; Reid, Jamey M.; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    Broad continental shelf regions such as the New York Bight are the product of a complex geologic history and dynamic oceanographic processes, dominated by the Holocene marine transgression (>100 m sea-level rise) following the end of the last Pleistocene ice advance ~ 20,000 years ago. The area of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (U.S. EEZ) territory, extending 200 nautical miles seaward from the coast, is larger than the continental U.S. and contains submerged landforms that provide a variety of natural functions and societal benefits, such as: critical habitats for fisheries, ship navigation and homeland security, and engineering activities (i.e. oil and gas platforms, pipeline and cable routes, potential wind-energy-generation sites). Some parts of the continental margins, particularly inner-continental shelf regions, also contain unconsolidated hard-mineral deposits such as sand and gravel that are regarded as potential aggregate resources to meet or augment needs not met by onshore deposits (Williams, 1992). The present distribution of surficial sediment off the northeastern United States is shaped from the deposits left by the last glaciation and reflects the cumulative effects of sediment erosion, transport, sorting, and deposition by storm and tidal processes during the Holocene rise in sea level. As a result, the sediments on the sea floor represent both an historical record of former conditions and a guide to possible future sedimentary environments. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the Coastal and Marine Geology Program, in cooperation with the University of Colorado and other partners, has compiled extant sediment character and textural data as well as other geologic information on the sea floor from all regions around the U.S. into the usSEABED data system (Reid and others, 2005; Buczkowski and others, 2006; Reid and others, 2006). The usSEABED system, which contains information on sediment grain size and lithology for more than 340

  11. Distribution of Surficial Sediments of NOAA H11310 Sidescan Sonar Mosaic in Central Narragansett Bay (H11310SEDS.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology...

  12. Surficial sediment character of the Louisiana offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Reid, Jane A.; Flocks, James; Kulp, Mark A.; Penland, Shea; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    The Louisiana coastal zone, comprising the Mississippi River delta plain stretching nearly 400 km from Sabine Pass at the Texas border east to the Chandeleur Islands at the Mississippi border, represents one of North America’s most important coastal ecosystems in terms of natural resources, human infrastructure, and cultural heritage. At the same time, this region has the highest rates of coastal erosion and wetland loss in the Nation due to a complex combination of natural processes and anthropogenic actions over the past century. Comparison of historical maps dating back to 1855 and recent aerial photography show the Louisiana coast undergoing net erosion at highly variable rates. Rates have increased significantly during the past several decades. Earlier published statewide average shoreline erosion rates were >6 m/yr; rates have increased recently to >10 m/yr. The increase is attributable to collective action of storms, rapid subsidence, and pervasive man-made alterations of the rivers and the coast. In response to the dramatic landloss, regional-scale restoration plans are being developed by a partnership of federal and state agencies for the delta plain that have the objectives of maintaining the barrier islands, reducing wetland loss, and enhancing the natural sediment delivery processes. There is growing awareness that the sustainability of coastal Louisiana's natural resources and human infrastructure depends on the successful restoration of natural geologic processes. Critical to the long term success of restoration is scientific understanding of the geologic history and processes of the coastal zone region, including interactions between the rivers, wetlands, coast, and inner shelf. A variety of geophysical studies and mapping of Late Quaternary sedimentary framework and coastal processes by U.S. Geological Survey and other scientists during the past 50 years document that the Louisiana delta plain is the product of a complex history of cyclic delta

  13. Seasonal variation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in surficial sediment, trapped settling material, and suspended particulate material in Lake Michigan, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sander D; Landrum, Peter F; Van Hoof, Patricia L; Eadie, Brian J

    2008-02-01

    A unique time series of surface sediment, trapped settling material, and suspended particulate material polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) samples were collected at a 45-m deep site off Grand Haven (MI, USA) over a 14-month period. Both concentrations and congener distributions remained constant for the sediments, although there were seasonal and interannual variability in the other matrices. Trapped settling material and suspended particulate material PCB concentrations were substantially lower (~50%) in 1997 than in the samples from December 1997 through July 1998. The cause could not be determined from the data collected, but there were some very large storms during the winter-spring period of 1998, resulting in major sediment resuspension throughout the southern basin. Observed seasonal variation in PCB concentration and congener distribution on particles likely was due to the changes in particle composition. These include particle size and the source of particles (such as the amount of resuspended sediment in trapped settling material), and the role of diagenesis of the organic matter on particles.

  14. Concentration and chiral signature of chlordane in soils and sediments of the Central Tibetan Plateau, China: Transformation in the surficial process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guo-Li; Wu, Ming-Zhe; Sun, Yong; Li, Jun; Han, Peng; Wang, Gen-Hou

    2015-11-01

    The fraction of trans-chlordane (TC) in chlordane was used to indicate racemic degradation while the enantiomer fractions (EFs) indicated enantioselective depletion. In 44 soils of the Central Tibetan Plateau, the fractions of TC ranged from 0.368 to 0.411. The EFs ranged from 0.174 to 0.696 for TC and from 0.483 to 0.672 for cis-chlordane (CC). (-) enantiomer excess (ee) was found to be 80.0% in the soils for TC and (+) ee was 86.5% for CC. The fraction of TC changed with the clay content while the EFs changed with the soil organic carbon. Meanwhile, the fractions of TC and the EFs were determined for the surficial sediments in Yamzhog Yumco Lake, which were compared with those in the soils at its catchment area. The composition and chiral signature of chlordane did not vary between soils and sediments. Our results will help to elucidate the transformation of chlordane in soils and in surficial transport.

  15. Mineral provinces and material provenance of the surficial sediments near the Zhongsha Islands in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; WANG Kunshan

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics and distribution patterns of clastic minerals (0.063~0.125 mm) in bottom sediments represent a significant indicator for the identification of the origin of sediment. One hundred and fourteen surface sediment samples, which were collected from the area near the Zhongsha Islands in the South China Sea, were analysed to identify the mineral suites and their distributions in the study area. The area can be divided into three mineral provinces: (Ⅰ) a province of biogenic minerals, which mainly originate from the Zhongsha Atoll; (Ⅱ) a province of volcanogenic minerals, which are mainly derived from local basaltic seamounts and small-scale volcanoes that are probably erupting, with some influences from the island-arc volcanic region around the South China Sea; and (Ⅲ) a mixed mineral province whose material source includes biogenic minerals, volcanogenic minerals and terrigenous minerals; the last province can be subdivided into a mixed mineral sub-province of the northeastern part of the study area, in which terrigenous minerals are mainly derived from China's Mainland and do not exceed 17°N, and a mixed mineral sub-province of the southeastern part of the study area, in which terrigenous minerals are derived from Kalimantan and Indochina Peninsula and might be further transported into the deep sea basin through submarine canyons.

  16. Geochemical interactions between process-affected water from oil sands tailings ponds and North Alberta surficial sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, A A; Donahue, R B; Ulrich, A C

    2011-01-25

    In Northern Alberta, the placement of out-of-pit oil sands tailings ponds atop natural buried sand channels is becoming increasingly common. Preliminary modeling of such a site suggests that process-affected (PA) pond water will infiltrate through the underlying clay till aquitard, reaching the sand channel. However, the impact of seepage upon native sediments and groundwater resources is not known. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of adsorption and ion exchange reactions in the clay till and their effect on the attenuation or release of inorganic species. This was evaluated using batch sorption experiments (traditional and a recent modification using less disturbed sediment samples) and geochemical modeling with PHREEQC. The results show that clay till sediments have the capacity to mitigate the high concentrations of ingressing sodium (600 mg L(-1)), with linear sorption partitioning coefficients (K(d)) of 0.45 L kg(-1). Ion exchange theory was required to account for all other cation behaviour, precluding the calculation of such coefficients for other species. Qualitative evidence suggests that chloride will behave conservatively, with high concentrations remaining in solution (375 mg L(-1)). As a whole, system behaviour was found to be controlled by a combination of competitive ion exchange, dissolution and precipitation reactions. Observations, supported by PHREEQC simulations, suggest that the influx of PA water will induce the dissolution of pre-existing sulphate salts. Sodium present in the process-affected water will exchange with sediment-bound calcium and magnesium, increasing the divalent ions' pore fluid concentrations, and leading to the precipitation of a calcium-magnesium carbonate mineral phase. Thus, in similar tailings pond settings, particularly if the glacial till coverage is thin or altogether absent, it is reasonable to expect that high concentrations of sodium and chloride will remain in solution, while sulphate

  17. Use of Sediment Quality Guidelines and pollution indicators for the assessment of heavy metal and PAH contamination in Greek surficial sea and lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahladakis, John; Smaragdaki, Eleftheria; Vasilaki, Georgia; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2013-03-01

    Eight different surface sediment samples (K1-K8) were collected from two separate areas of Lake Koumoundourou and two samples (E1 and E2) from one area of Elefsis Bay, Athens, Greece. The level of pollution attributed to heavy metals was evaluated using several pollution indicators. Degree of Contamination, Modified Contamination Degree and Geoaccumulation Indexes were applied in order to determine and assess the anthropogenic contribution of the selected six elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As and Pb). Moreover, the adverse effects of the sediments to aquatic organisms, from both heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were determined by using Sediment Quality Guidelines. The results indicated that Lake Koumoundourou is contaminated with heavy metals in a moderate degree and almost 50 % of the sediments are associated with frequent observation of adverse effects, when it comes to Ni and occasional observation of adverse effects, when it comes to Cu, Zn and Pb. As far as PAHs are concerned, around 60 % of the samples can be occasionally associated to toxic biological effects according to the effect-range classification for phenanthrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and pyrene. Finally, samples taken from the north side of the lake are more contaminated with PAHs than the ones taken from the east side probably due to the existence of the water barrier which acts as a reservoir of PAHs.

  18. Morphology of submarine canyon system and geotechnical properties of surficial sediments across the Peru-Chile forearc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergersen, D.D.; Coulbourn, W.T.; Moberly, R.

    1989-03-01

    During August 1987, a SeaMARC II side-scan and sampling survey was conducted across the Peru-Chile forearc from 17/degrees/30'S to 19/degrees/30'S. Side-scan images reveal a complex submarine canyon system. Incised canyons meander across the Arequipa basin; their sinuosity results from erosion and cutbank slumping of the basin sediments. Lenticular packets of strata visible in reprocessed digital single-channel seismic profiles are interpreted to be buried channels. Tributary canyons coalesce into a single canyon at the structural high that deviates from its north-south course to a northeast-southwest course as a result of stream piracy. A dendritic drainage basin forming on the midslope may be the rejuvenation of an abandoned channel. Sediment properties were measured on 42 free-fall cores and 7 piston cores recovered both in and around the submarine canyon. Olive-gray (5Y 3/2) hemipelagic mud is the predominant sediment across the forearc. Most cores exhibit a small degree of bioturbation and thin laminae of sand; the number of sand laminae increases as the distance away from the canyon decreases. Shear strengths, averaged over a 1-m core length, decrease slightly with water depth. Carbonate content in all samples from this area is negligible with the exception of one piston core recovered from the upper reaches of the canyon, the bottom of which is composed of gravel- and sand-size shell fragments. Bulk mineralogy, determined from semiquantitative analysis of x-ray diffraction patterns, shows a decrease in relative feldspar percent and an increase in total clay content with increasing water depth. Preliminary analysis of core tops shows a mean grain size in the medium to very fine silt class, with increasing grain size toward the canyon. Smear slide counts generally show a surprisingly low abundance of volcanic glass and biogenic material, particularly diatoms.

  19. Mineral provinces and matter provenance of the surficial sediments in the western Philippine Sea: implication for modern sedimentation in West Pacific marginal basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiangwen; YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; WANG Kunshan; JIANG Xiaoli

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution patterns of detrital minerals (0.063~0.125 mm) in marine sediments provide a significant indicator for the identification of the origin of sediment.The detrital mineral composition of 219 surface sediment samples was analysed to identify the distribution of sediments within the western Philippine Sea. The area can be divided into three mineral provinces: (Ⅰ) province east of the Philippine Trench, the detrital minerals in this province are mainly composed of calcareous or siliceous organisms, with the addition of volcanogenic minerals from an adjacent island arc; (Ⅱ) middle mineral province, clastic minerals including feldspar, quartz and colorless volcanic glass, sourced from seamounts with intermediate-acid volcanic rock, or erupting intermediate-acid volcano; (Ⅲ) province west of the Palau-Kyūshū Ridge, the matter provenance within this province is complex; the small quantity of feldspar and quartz may be sourced from seamounts or erupting volcano with intermediate-acid composition, with a component of volcanic scoria sourced from a volcano erupting on the Palau-Kyūshū Ridge. it is suggested that, (1) Biogenic debris of the study area is closely related to water depth, with the amount of biogenic debris controlled by carbonate lysocline. (2) Volcaniclastic matter derived from the adjacent island arc can be entrained by oceanic currents and transported towards the abyssal basin over a short distance. The weathering products of volcanic rocks of the submarine plateau (e.g.,Benham Plateau) and adjacent ridges provide an important source of detrital sedimentation, and the influence scope of them is constrained by the intensity of submarine weathering. (3) Terrigenous sediments from the continent of Asia and the adjacent Philippine island arc have little influence on the sedimentation of this study area, and the felsic mineral component is probably sourced from volcanic seamounts of intermediate-acid composition.

  20. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q; Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Clark, D.R. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  1. Snake and Columbia Rivers Sediment Sampling Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinza, M. R.; Word, J. Q.; Barrows, E. S.; Mayhew, H. L.; Clark, D. R. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The disposal of dredged material in water is defined as a discharge under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and must be evaluated in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulation 40 CFR 230. Because contaminant loads in the dredged sediment or resuspended sediment may affect water quality or contaminant loading, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Walla Walla District, has requested Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to collect and chemically analyze sediment samples from areas that may be dredged near the Port Authority piers on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Sediment samples were also collected at River Mile (RM) stations along the Snake River that may undergo resuspension of sediment as a result of the drawdown. Chemical analysis included grain size, total organic carbon, total volatile solids, ammonia, phosphorus, sulfides, oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and 21 congeners of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

  2. Origin and distribution of hydrocarbons and organic matter in the surficial sediments of the Sfax-Kerkennah channel (Tunisia, Southern Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghden, Hatem; Tedetti, Marc; Sayadi, Sami; Serbaji, Mohamed Moncef; Elleuch, Boubaker; Saliot, Alain

    2017-04-15

    We investigated the origin and distribution of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs and PAHs) and organic matter (OM) in surficial sediments of the Sfax-Kerkennah channel in the Gulf of Gabès (Tunisia, Southern Mediterranean Sea). TOC, AH and PAH concentrations ranged 2.3-11.7%, 8-174μgg(-1)sed.dw and 175-10,769ngg(-1)sed.dw, respectively. The lowest concentrations were recorded in the channel (medium sand sediment) and the highest ones in the Sfax harbor (very fine sand sediment). AHs, PAHs and TOC were not correlated for most of the stations. TOC/N and δ(13)C values revealed a mixed origin of OM with both marine and terrestrial sources. Hydrocarbon molecular composition highlighted the dominance of petrogenic AHs and the presence of both petrogenic and pyrogenic PAHs, associated with petroleum products and combustion processes. This work underscores the complex distribution patterns and the multiple sources of OM and hydrocarbons in this highly anthropogenized coastal environment.

  3. Processes controlling forms of phosphorus in surficial sediments from the eastern Arabian Sea impinged by varying bottom water oxygenation conditions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrakashBabu, C.; Nath, B.N.

    in OMZ sediments from the NE Arabian Sea may indicate a higher degree of regeneration and diagenetic transformation of labile forms of P to other phases. Authigenic phosphorus (P sub(aut)) fraction varies by a factor of 2-8 in sediments from the OMZ when...

  4. Chincoteague Bay surface sediment physical parameters data from the spring and fall sampling trips of 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  5. Chincoteague Bay surface sediment physical parameters data from the spring and fall sampling trips of 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  6. Verdine and other associated authigenic (glaucony, phosphate) facies from the surficial sediments of the southwestern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Lamboy, M.; Dupeuble, P.A.

    Green grains, pale green-brown infillings of foraminifer tests and brown friable aggregates occur in the coarse fraction of the surface sediments from the southwestern continental margin of India, between the Periyar River in the north and Quilon...

  7. 100 Area Columbia River sediment sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-08

    Forty-four sediment samples were collected from 28 locations in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to assess the presence of metals and man-made radionuclides in the near shore and shoreline settings of the Hanford Site. Three locations were sampled upriver of the Hanford Site plutonium production reactors. Twenty-two locations were sampled near the reactors. Three locations were sampled downstream of the reactors near the Hanford Townsite. Sediment was collected from depths of 0 to 6 in. and between 12 to 24 in. below the surface. Samples containing concentrations of metals exceeding the 95 % upper threshold limit values (DOE-RL 1993b) are considered contaminated. Contamination by arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc was found. Man-made radionuclides occur in all samples except four collected opposite the Hanford Townsite. Man-made radionuclide concentrations were generally less than 1 pCi/g.

  8. Mercury and methylmercury contamination in surficial sediments and clams of a coastal lagoon (Pialassa Baiona, Ravenna, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombini, Claudio; Fabbri, Daniele; Lombardo, Marco; Vassura, Ivano; Zavoli, Elisabetta; Horvat, Milena

    2003-11-01

    The Ramsar site Pialassa Baiona is an intertidal brackish lagoon lying 5 km north of the city of Ravenna and covering a surface area of about 1100 ha. From 1958 to 1976 Pialassa Baiona was heavily impacted by industrial pollution; mercury, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polymers were among the most important pollutants which nowadays contaminate the sedimentary compartment. Following earlier investigations on total mercury (THg) distribution and bioavailability, this study is focused on mercury speciation in sediments and clams. Methylmercury ( MMHg) concentrations were determined in surface sediments (0-5 cm) in different seasons, and compared to THg. Selected sediments were subjected to a sequential extraction procedure to study solid state THg distribution. Operationally, three fractions of inorganic mercury were defined: mobile mercury ( Hgm), humic acid complexed mercury ( Hgha), and sulphide-bound mercury ( Hgs). THg and MMHg concentrations in sediments ranged in the 0.2-250 μg g -1 and 0.13-45 ng g -1 d.w. intervals, respectively. MMHg/THg ratios were higher in summer as well as in sites where the THg burden was lower; the highest MMHg/THg values were observed in Chiaro del Pontazzo, an area subjected to a drastic reduction of salinity. THg and MMHg concentrations were also determined in tissues of clams ( Tapes philippinarum) collected in the lagoon. MMHg in clams felt in the 180-470 ng g -1 interval and accounts for 72-95% of tissue THg.

  9. Archive of sediment physical properties and grain-size data for sediment samples collected offshore of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha; Wheaton, Cathryn J.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    This data release serves as an archive of sediment physical properties and grain-size data for surficial samples collected offshore of Assateague Island, Maryland and Virginia, for comparison with surficial estuarine and subaerial sedimentological samples collected and assessed following Hurricane Sandy (Ellis and others, 2015; Smith and others, 2015; Bernier and others, 2016). The sediment samples were collected by scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) office in Woods Hole, Massachusetts while aboard the motor vessel (M/V) Scarlett Isabella as part of a larger effort to map the inner continental shelf (Pendleton and others, 2016). Following field work, the sediment samples were shipped to the USGS Coastal and Marine Science Center in St. Petersburg, Florida, where they were renamed for consistency with a previously existing naming scheme and processed for bulk density, loss on ignition (LOI), and grain-size. The grain-size subsamples were processed on a Coulter LS200 particle-size analyzer for consistency regarding methods and output statistics with related data sets from Chincoteague Bay and Assateague Island. For more information regarding sample collection and site information or the related data sets, refer to USGS data release Pendleton and others, 2016; for more information regarding processing methods refer to USGS Open-File Report 2015–1219.

  10. Distribution and diversity of diatom assemblages in surficial sediments of shallow lakes in Wapusk National Park (Manitoba, Canada) region of the Hudson Bay Lowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Olivier; Bouchard, Frédéric; MacDonald, Lauren A; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    The hydrology of shallow lakes (and ponds) located in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is sensitive to climate warming and associated permafrost thaw. However, their biological characteristics are poorly known, which hampers effective aquatic ecosystem monitoring. Located in northern Manitoba along the southwestern coast of Hudson Bay, Wapusk National Park (WNP) encompasses numerous shallow lakes representative of the subarctic zone. We analyzed the distribution and diversity of diatom (microscopic algae; class Bacillariophyceae) assemblages in surficial sediments of 33 lakes located in three different ecozones spanning a vegetation gradient, from NE to SW: the Coastal Fen (CF), the Interior Peat Plateau (IPP), and the Boreal Spruce Forest (BSF). We found significant differences (P lakes, and CF and BSF lakes, but not between IPP and BSF lakes. These results are consistent with water chemistry measurements, which indicated distinct limnological conditions for CF lakes. Diatom communities in CF lakes were generally dominated by alkaliphilous taxa typical of waters with medium to high conductivity, such as Nitzschia denticula. In contrast, several IPP and BSF lakes were dominated by acidophilous and circumneutral diatom taxa with preference for low conductivity (e.g., Tabellaria flocculosa, Eunotia mucophila, E. necompacta var. vixcompacta). This exploratory survey provides a first detailed inventory of the diatom assemblages in the WNP region needed for monitoring programs to detect changes in shallow lake ecosystems and ecozonal shifts in response to climate variations.

  11. A Direct-Push Sample-Freezing Drive Shoe for Collecting Sediment Cores with Intact Pore Fluid, Microbial, and Sediment Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B. A.; Trost, J.; Christy, T. M.; Mason, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic and biological reactions in shallow groundwater and bottom sediments are central to understanding groundwater contaminant attenuation and biogeochemical cycles. The laminar flow regime in unconsolidated surficial aquifers creates narrow reaction zones. Studying these reaction zones requires fine-scale sampling of water together with adjacent sediment in a manner that preserves in situ redox conditions. Collecting representative samples of these narrow zones with traditional subsurface sampling equipment is challenging. For example, use of a basket type core catcher for saturated, non-cohesive sediments results in loss of fluid and sediments during retrieval. A sample-freezing drive shoe designed for a wire line piston core sampler allowed collection of cores with intact sediment, microbial, and pore fluid distributions and has been the basis for studies documenting centimeter-scale variations in aquifer microbial populations (Murphy and Herkelrath, 1996). However, this freezing drive shoe design is not compatible with modern-day direct push sampling rigs. A re-designed sample-freezing drive shoe compatible with a direct-push dual-tube coring system was developed and field-tested. The freezing drive shoe retained sediment and fluid distributions in saturated sediment core samples by freezing a 10 centimeter plug below the core sample with liquid CO­2. Core samples collected across the smear zone at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, were successfully extracted without loss of fluid or sediment. Multiple core sections from different depths in the aquifer were retrieved from a single hole. This new design makes a highly effective sampling technology available on modern-day direct push sampling equipment to inform myriad questions about subsurface biogeochemistry processes. The re-design of the freezing drive shoe was supported by the USGS Innovation Center for Earth Sciences. References: Murphy, Fred, and W. N. Herkelrath. "A sample

  12. Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2006-10-12

    This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to

  13. Environmental controls on the distribution of organic matter in recent sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.; Rao, Ch.M.; Murty, P.S.N.

    A large number of surficial sediment samples from the western continental shelf and slope regions were analysed for the organic carbon and total nitrogen content. The organic carbon and nitrogen contents of these sediments exhibit marked regional...

  14. SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLING METHODS | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response's (OSWER) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) needs innovative methods and techniques to solve new and difficult sampling and analytical problems found at the numerous Superfund sites throughout the United States. Inadequate site characterization and a lack of knowledge of surface and subsurface contaminant distributions hinders EPA's ability to make the best decisions on remediation options and to conduct the most effective cleanup efforts. To assist OSWER, NERL conducts research to improve their capability to more accurately, precisely, and efficiently characterize Superfund, RCRA, LUST, oil spills, and brownfield sites and to improve their risk-based decision making capabilities, research is being conducted on improving soil and sediment sampling techniques and improving the sampling and handling of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soils, among the many research programs and tasks being performed at ESD-LV.Under this task, improved sampling approaches and devices will be developed for characterizing the concentration of VOCs in soils. Current approaches and devices used today can lose up to 99% of the VOCs present in the sample due inherent weaknesses in the device and improper/inadequate collection techniques. This error generally causes decision makers to markedly underestimate the soil VOC concentrations and, therefore, to greatly underestimate the ecological

  15. Flow Through a Laboratory Sediment Sample by Computer Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-07

    Flow through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling R.B. Pandeya’b*, Allen H. Reeda, Edward Braithwaitea, Ray Seyfarth0, J.F...through a laboratory sediment sample by computer simulation modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  16. Standard operating procedures for collection of soil and sediment samples for the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shawn C.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Jones, Daniel K.; Benzel, William M.; Griffin, Dale W.; Loftin, Keith A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cohl, Jonathan A.

    2015-12-17

    An understanding of the effects on human and ecological health brought by major coastal storms or flooding events is typically limited because of a lack of regionally consistent baseline and trends data in locations proximal to potential contaminant sources and mitigation activities, sensitive ecosystems, and recreational facilities where exposures are probable. In an attempt to close this gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has implemented the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) strategy pilot study to collect regional sediment-quality data prior to and in response to future coastal storms. The standard operating procedure (SOP) detailed in this document serves as the sample-collection protocol for the SCoRR strategy by providing step-by-step instructions for site preparation, sample collection and processing, and shipping of soil and surficial sediment (for example, bed sediment, marsh sediment, or beach material). The objectives of the SCoRR strategy pilot study are (1) to create a baseline of soil-, sand-, marsh sediment-, and bed-sediment-quality data from sites located in the coastal counties from Maine to Virginia based on their potential risk of being contaminated in the event of a major coastal storm or flooding (defined as Resiliency mode); and (2) respond to major coastal storms and flooding by reoccupying select baseline sites and sampling within days of the event (defined as Response mode). For both modes, samples are collected in a consistent manner to minimize bias and maximize quality control by ensuring that all sampling personnel across the region collect, document, and process soil and sediment samples following the procedures outlined in this SOP. Samples are analyzed using four USGS-developed screening methods—inorganic geochemistry, organic geochemistry, pathogens, and biological assays—which are also outlined in this SOP. Because the SCoRR strategy employs a multi-metric approach for sample analyses, this

  17. Surficial geology and distribution of post-impoundment sediment of the western part of Lake Mead based on a sidescan sonar and high-resolution seismic-reflection survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David C.; Cross, VeeAnn A.; Rudin, Mark J.; Parolski, Kenneth F.

    1999-01-01

    Sidescan sonar imagery and high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles were collected in Las Vegas Bay and Boulder Basin of Lake Mead to determine the surficial geology as well as the distribution and thickness of sediment that has accumulated in these areas of the lake since the completion of Hoover Dam in 1935 (Gould, 1951). Results indicate that the accumulation of post-impoundment sediment is restricted to the original Colorado River bed which runs down the axis of Boulder Basin from Boulder Canyon to Hoover Dam, and the old Las Vegas Creek bed that bisects Las Vegas Bay. The sediment cover along the original Colorado River bed is continuous and is typically greater than 10-m thick throughout much of its length with the thickness in some areas exceeding 35 meters. The flat-lying nature of the deposits suggests that they are the result of turbidity currents that flow the length of the lake. The sediment cover in Las Vegas Bay is much thinner (rarely exceeding 2 m in thickness) and more discontinuous. The source for these sediments presumably is Las Vegas Wash and a series of other ephemeral washes that empty into this part of the lake. The presence of sediments along the entire length of the Las Vegas Creek bed suggests that turbidity currents probably are active here as well, and that sediment has been transported from these streams at least 10 km down the axis of this valley to where it enters Boulder Basin. Alluvial deposits and rock outcrops are still exposed on large parts of the lake floor.

  18. Distribution of some biochemical compounds in the sediments of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Dhople, V.M.

    Surficial sediment samples collected from the continental shelf and slope of the Bay of Bengal were studied for the distribution of organic carbon and its constituent fractions such as carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids and lipids. Organic carbon...

  19. Sediments of Block Island Sound acquired in 1966 (SAVARD66 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A total of 84 surficial sediments samples were collected aboard two cruises from Block Island Sound as part of a Master's Thesis completed at the University of...

  20. Sediments of Block Island Sound acquired in 1966 (SAVARD66 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A total of 84 surficial sediments samples were collected aboard two cruises from Block Island Sound as part of a Master's Thesis completed at the University of Rhode...

  1. Sediments of Block Island Sound acquired in 1966 (SAVARD66 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A total of 84 surficial sediments samples were collected aboard two cruises from Block Island Sound as part of a Master's Thesis completed at the University of Rhode...

  2. Sediment sampling and processing methods in Hungary, and possible improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Eniko Anna; Koch, Daniel; Varga, Gyorgy

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the monitoring of sediment processes is unquestionable: sediment balance of regulated rivers suffered substantial alterations in the past century, affecting navigation, energy production, fish habitats and floodplain ecosystems alike; infiltration times to our drinking water wells have shortened, exposing them to an eventual pollution event and making them vulnerable; and sediment-attached contaminants accumulate in floodplains and reservoirs, threatening our healthy environment. The changes in flood characteristics and rating curves of our rivers are regularly being researched and described, involving state-of-the-art measurement methods, modeling tools and traditional statistics. Sediment processes however, are much less known. Unlike the investigation of flow processes, sediment-related research is scarce, which is partly due to the outdated methodology and poor database background in the specific field. Sediment-related data, information and analyses form an important and integral part of Civil engineering in relation to rivers all over the world. In relation to the second largest river of Europe, the Danube, it is widely known in expert community and for long discussed at different expert forums that the sediment balance of the river Danube has changed drastically over the past century. Sediment monitoring on the river Danube started as early as the end of the 19th century, with scattered measurements carried out. Regular sediment sampling was developed in the first half of the 20th century all along the river, with different station density and monitoring frequencies in different countries. After the first few decades of regular sampling, the concept of (mainly industrial) development changed along the river and data needs changed as well, furthermore the complicated and inexact methods of sampling bed load on the alluvial reach of the river were not developed further. Frequency of suspended sediment sampling is very low along the river

  3. In situ sampling of interstitial water from lake sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Albertus G.; van Raaphorst, Wim; Lijklema, Lambertus

    1982-01-01

    A sampler with a relatively high resolution has been developed, which allows interstitial water to be obtained from lake sediments at well defined depths, without serious disturbance of sediment structure. Oxidation effects are excluded. Sampling time is in the order of a day. Installation requires

  4. The mismatch of bioaccumulated trace metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) in field and transplanted oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) to ambient surficial sediments and suspended particulate matter in a highly urbanised estuary (Sydney estuary, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Birch, Gavin F

    2016-04-01

    A significant correlation between sedimentary metals, particularly the 'bio-available' fraction, and bioaccumulated metal concentrations in the native Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) tissues has been successfully demonstrated previously for Cu and Zn in a number of estuaries in New South Wales, Australia. However, this relationship has been difficult to establish in a highly modified estuary (Sydney estuary, Australia) where metal contamination is of greatest concern and where a significant relationship would be most useful for environmental monitoring. The use of the Sydney rock oyster as a biomonitoring tool for metal contamination was assessed in the present study by investigating relationships between metals attached to sediments and suspended particulate matter (SPM) to bioaccumulated concentrations in oyster tissues. Surficial sediments (both total and fine-fraction), SPM and wild oysters were collected over 3 years from three embayments (Chowder Bay, Mosman Bay and Iron Cove) with each embayment representing a different physiographic region of Sydney estuary. In addition, a transplant experiment of farmed oysters was conducted in the same embayments for 3 months. No relationship was observed between sediments or SPM metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) to tissue of wild oysters; however, significant relationship was observed against transplanted oysters. The mismatch between wild and farmed, transplanted oysters is perplexing and indicates that wild oysters are unsuitable to be used as a biomonitoring tool due to the involvement of unknown complex factors while transplanted oysters hold strong potential.

  5. Design of a gravity corer for near shore sediment sampling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Sonawane, A; Nayak, B

    For the purpose of geotechnical investigation a gravity corer has been designed and fabricated to obtain undisturbed sediment core samples from near shore waters. The corer was successfully operated at 75 stations up to water depth 30 m. Simplicity...

  6. Concentrations of DDTs and dieldrin in Long Island Sound sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijia; Li, Xiqing; Zhang, Pengfei; Melcer, Michael E; Wu, Youxian; Jans, Urs

    2012-03-01

    The concentrations of three frequently detected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and one degradation product, p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD, dieldrin, and p,p'-DDE were determined in recently collected (2005-2006) and archived (1986-1989) surficial sediments and sediment cores from Long Island Sound (LIS). The concentration of dieldrin ranged from 0.05 to 5.27 ng g(-1) dry weight in the surficial sediments, and from 0.05 to 11.7 ng g(-1) dry weight in the sediment cores. Total DDXs (the sum of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT) concentrations ranged from 1.31 to 33.2 ng g(-1) in surficial sediments and 1.11 to 66.4 ng g(-1) in sediment cores. The results indicate that the three OCPs and DDE were still widely present in LIS surficial sediments two decades after the use of these pesticides in the United States was banned. In addition, the surficial concentrations did not decrease significantly when compared to the concentrations in archived samples collected two decades ago. Sediments in the western part of LIS were more contaminated (with concentrations in some western sites being still above probable effect levels) than those in the eastern part, probably as a result of the net westward sediment transport in LIS. The three OCPs and DDE were detected at all depths (down to ~50 cm) in the sediment cores, and concentration profiles indicated a depositional sedimentary environment with significant sediment mixing. Such mixing may redistribute OCPs deposited earlier (deeper in sediment bed) to the sediment surface and lead to enhanced persistence of OCP concentrations in surficial sediments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program: Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity of South Carolina and Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries - Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons...

  8. Distribution of some biochemical compounds in sediments of the shelf and slope regions of the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Dhargalkar, V.K.; Braganca, A.

    Surficial sediment samples collected from the continental shelf and slope of the Bay of Bengal were studied for the distribution of organic carbon and its constituent fractions such as carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids and lipids. Organic carbon...

  9. Thickness of the surficial aquifer, Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, Judith; Nardi, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    A digital map of the thickness of the surficial unconfined aquifer, including from the land surface and unsaturated zone to the bottom of sediments of geologic units identified as part of the surficial aquifer, was produced to improve understanding of the hydrologic system in the Maryland and Delaware portions of the Delmarva Peninsula. The map is intended to be used in conjunction with other environmental coverages (such land use, wetlands, and soil characteristics) to provide a subsurface hydrogeologic component to studies of nitrate transport that have historically relied on maps of surficial features. It could also be used to study the transport of other water soluble chemicals. The map was made using the best currently available data, which was of varying scales. It was created by overlaying a high resolution land surface and bathymetry digital elevation model (DEM) on a digital representation of the base of the surficial aquifer, part of hydrogeologic framework, as defined by Andreasen and others (2013). Thickness was calculated as the difference between the top of land surface and the bottom of the surficial aquifer sediments, which include sediments from geologic formations of late-Miocene through Quaternary age. Geologic formations with predominantly sandy surficial sediments that comprise the surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula include the Parsonsburg Sand, Sinepuxent Formation (Fm.), and parts of the Omar Fm. north of Indian River Bay in Delaware, the Columbia Fm., Beaverdam Fm., and Pennsauken Fm. (Ator and others 2005; Owens and Denney, 1986; Mixon, 1985; Bachman and Wilson, 1984). Formations with mixed texture and sandy stratigraphy including the Scotts Corner Fm. and Lynch Heights Fm. in Delaware are also considered part of the surficial aquifer (Ramsey, 1997). Subcropping aquifers and confining beds underlie the surficial aquifer throughout the Peninsula and may increase or limit its thickness, respectively (Andreasen and others, 2013

  10. Geochemical and isotopic signatures of surficial sediments from the western continental shelf of India: Inferring provenance, weathering, and the nature of organic matter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurian, S.; Nath, B.N.; Kumar, N.C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    matter. Major elements such as Si, Ti, Mg, and discrimination plots involving alkalies and silica have shown a distinct north-south provinciality, with the source signatures pointing at Deccan basalt for sediments in the north (from Dwaraka to Goa...

  11. Geochemical analysis of soils and sediments, Coeur d'Alene drainage basin, Idaho: sampling, analytical methods, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Stephen E.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Ikramuddin, Mohammed; Lindsay, James

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the locations, descriptions, analytical procedures used, and an inter-lab comparison of over 1100 geochemical analyses of samples of soil and sediment in and downstream of a major lead-zinc-silver mining district in the Coeur d'Alene (CdA) drainage basin of northern Idaho. The samples fall in 3 broad categories: (1) samples from vertical profiles of floodplain soils in the valley of the main stem of the CdA River (767 samples) and of the South Fork of the CdA River (38 samples), (2) size fractionated surficial samples of sediment bedload within the channel of the South Fork of the CdA River (68 samples), and (3) samples from vertical profiles of sediment bedload within the channel of the main stem of the CdA River (260 samples). Five different laboratories contributed geochemical data for this report. Four of the five laboratories employed analytical methods that require sample dissolution prior to analysis; one laboratory (US Geological Survey) used analytical instrumentation (energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence [EDXRF]) that is applied to pulverized samples. Some dissolution procedures use four acids (hydrochloric, nitric, perchloric, and hydrofluoric; Eastern Washington University [EWU] Geochemical Laboratory and XRAL Laboratories, Inc.), others use two acids (nitric acid and aqua regia; CHEMEX Labs, Inc.), and some use only concentrated nitric acid (ACZ Laboratories, Inc.). Most analyses of dissolved samples were done by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or by ICP - MS (Mass Spectroscopy). Some analyses for Ag and K were done by Flame Atomic Absorption (FAA). Inter-laboratory comparisons are made for 6 elements: lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), iron

  12. Geochemical investigation of Sasa tailings dam material and its influence on the Lake Kalimanci surficial sediments (Republic of Macedonia – preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Vrhovnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at investigating the mineralogical characteristics of the tailings material and heavy metal contents of the tailings material deposited close to the Sasa Pb-Zn Mine in the Osogovo Mountains (eastern Macedonia and on its possible impact on Lake Kalimanci. The mineral composition of Sasa Mine tailings materialis dominated by quartz, pyrite, galena, sphalerite, magnetite and others. Geochemical analysis was performed in a certified commercial laboratory for the following elements: Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, As, Cd, Sb, Bi, Ag, Al, Fe, Mn, S.Analysis revealed very high concentrations of toxic metals in the tailing material – with average values [ mg kg-1]:Mo 2.9, Cu 279, Pb 3975, Zn 5320, Ni 30, As 69, Cd 84, Sb 4.2, Bi 9.4 and Ag 4.1. The multi-element contamination of Sasa Mine tailings material was assigned a pollution index greater of 15, indicating that the tailings material from Sasa Mine contains very high amounts of toxic metals and represents a high environmental risk for surrounding ecosystems. For this reason the influence of discharged tailings dam material into Lake Kalimanci which liesapproximately 12 km lower than Sasa Mine, was also established. Calculated pollution index values for Lake Kalimancisediments vary from 21 to 65 and for Sasa mine surficial tailings dam material from 15 to 60.

  13. Sedimentology, geochemistry, pollution status and ecological risk assessment of some heavy metals in surficial sediments of an Egyptian lagoon connecting to the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Ghada F; Draz, Suzanne E O; El-Sadaawy, Manal M; Moneer, Abeer A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial distribution of heavy metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cr, Mn, Zn and Fe) was studied on Lake Edku's surface sediments in relation to sedimentology and geochemistry characteristics and their contamination status on the ecological system. Lake Edku's sediments were dominated by sandy silt and silty sand textures and were enriched with carbonate content (9.83-58.46%). Iron and manganese were the most abundant heavy metals with ranges of 1.69 to 8.06 mg g(-1) and 0.88 to 3.27 mg g(-1), respectively. Cobalt and nickel showed a harmonic distribution along the studied sediments. The results were interpreted by the statistical means. The heavy metal pollution status and their ecological risk in Lake Edku was evaluated using the sediment quality guidelines and the contamination assessment methods (geoaccumulation, pollution load and potential ecological risk indices, enrichment factor, contamination degree as well as effect range median (ERM) and probable effect level (PEL) quotients). Amongst the determined heavy metals, zinc had the most ecological risk. Overall, the heavy metals in surface sediments showed ecological effect range from moderate to considerable risk, specially, in the stations in front of the seawater and in drain sources that had the highest toxic priority.

  14. Analysis of elements in lake sediment samples by PIXE spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelarescu, E. D.; Radulescu, C.; Stihi, C.; Bretcan, P.; Tanislav, D.; Dulama, I. D.; Stirbescu, R. M.; Teodorescu, S.; Bucurica, I. A.; Andrei, R.; Morarescu, C.

    2017-09-01

    This work aims to determine the concentrations of several elements (e.g. Pb, Ni, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe) from lake sediments, in order to characterize their origin and evolution. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique using the 3 MV Tandetron™ particle accelerator from National Institute for R&D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering ;Horia Hulubei; (IFIN-HH), Magurele-Bucharest, Romania, was applied. Sediment cores from different salt lakes from Romania (i.e. Amara Lake, Caineni Lake, and Movila Miresii Lake) were collected, in August 2015. The content of Pb, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni from sediment samples show similarities with other data presented in literature and international regulation. The Zn was the only element with a higher content in all samples (e.g. maximum 401.7-517.3 mg/kg d.w.).

  15. Equilibrium sampling for a thermodynamic assessment of contaminated sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Mäenpää, Kimmo

    valid equilibrium sampling (method incorporated QA/QC). The measured equilibrium concentrations in silicone (Csil) can then be divided by silicone/water partition ratios to yield Cfree. CSil can also be compared to CSil from silicone equilibrated with biota in order to determine the equilibrium status...... will focus at the latest developments in equilibrium sampling concepts and methods. Further, we will explain how these approaches can provide a new basis for a thermodynamic assessment of polluted sediments.......Hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) reaching the aquatic environment are largely stored in sediments. The risk of contaminated sediments is challenging to assess since traditional exhaustive extraction methods yield total HOC concentrations, whereas freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree...

  16. Arthrobacter enclensis sp. nov., isolated from sediment sample

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dastager, S.G.; Qin, L.; Tang, S.K.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Lee, J.C.; Li, W.J.

    A novel bacterial strain designated as NIO-1008(T) was isolated from marine sediments sample in Chorao Island India. Cells of the strains were gram positive and non-motile, displayed a rod-coccus life cycle and formed cream to light grey colonies...

  17. Geologic-SURFICIAL62K-poly

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The GeologicSurficial_SURFICIAL data consists of surficial geologic features as digitized from the 1:62,500 15 minute series USGS quadrangle map sheets, compiled by...

  18. Occurrence and sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in surficial sediments of Lakes Superior and Huron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Li; Gewurtz, Sarah B. [Department of Chemistry, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1 (Canada); Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 125 Resources Road, Toronto, Ontario, M9P 3V6 (Canada); Reiner, Eric J.; MacPherson, Karen A.; Kolic, Terry M.; Khurana, Vin; Helm, Paul A.; Howell, E. Todd [Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 125 Resources Road, Toronto, Ontario, M9P 3V6 (Canada); Burniston, Debbie A. [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, Ontario, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Brindle, Ian D. [Department of Chemistry, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1 (Canada); Marvin, Chris H. [Department of Chemistry, Brock University, 500 Glenridge Avenue, St. Catharines, Ontario, L2S 3A1 (Canada); Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 125 Resources Road, Toronto, Ontario, M9P 3V6 (Canada)], E-mail: chris.marvin@ec.gc.ca

    2009-04-15

    Concentrations and congener profile patterns of 2378-substituted PCDD/Fs and DLPCBs in offshore, nearshore and tributary sediments of Lakes Superior and Huron are reported, and spatial trends and source contributions assessed. PCDD/F concentrations ranged from 5 to 18 000 pg/g dw (Lake Superior) and 3 to 6100 pg/g dw (Lake Huron); DLPCBs ranged from 9 to 11 000 pg/g dw (Lake Superior) and 9 to 27 000 pg/g dw (Lake Huron). Our analysis indicated atmospheric deposition is a primary source to depositional areas of both lakes; however, greater PCDD/F and DLPCB concentrations were observed at several nearshore and tributary sites, and were attributed to corresponding land use in the watershed. Statistical analysis and pattern comparison suggested that industrial inputs mainly associated with wood treatment plants, pulp and paper mills, mining operations, and chlorine-based chemical manufacturing also contributed to contamination by PCDD/Fs and DLPCBs in certain nearshore and offshore areas of Lakes Superior and Huron. - Lake-wide 2378-PCDD/F and DLPCB concentrations, spatial trends, and congener patterns are first reported in Lakes Superior and Huron sediments.

  19. Development of an Integrated Suspended Sediment Sampling System - Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerantzaki, Sofia; Moirogiorgou, Konstantia; Efstathiou, Dionissis; Giannakis, George; Voutsadaki, Stella; Zervakis, Michalis; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Zacharias, Ierotheos; Karatzas, George P.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by a unique micro-climate and a complex geologic and geomorphologic environment caused by its position in the Alpine orogenesis belt. Unique features of the region are the temporary rivers that are dry streams or streams with very low flow for most of the time over decadal time scales. One of their key characteristics is that they present flashy hydrographs with response times ranging from minutes to hours. It is crucial to monitor flash-flood events and observe their behavior since they can cause environmental degradation of the river's wider location area. The majority of sediment load is transferred during these flash events. Quantification of these fluxes through the development of new measuring devices is of outmost importance as it is the first step for a comprehensive understanding of the water quality, the soil erosion and erosion sources, and the sediment and nutrient transport routes. This work proposes an integrated suspended sediment sampling system which is implemented in a complex semi-arid Mediterranean watershed (i.e. the Koiliaris River Basin of Crete) with temporary flow tributaries and karstic springs. The system consists of sensors monitoring water stage and turbidity, an automated suspended sediment sampler, and an online camera recording video sequence of the river flow. Water stage and turbidity are continuously monitored and stage is converted to flow with the use of a rating curve; when either of these variables exceeds certain thresholds, the pump of the sediment sampler initiates sampling with a rotation proportional to the stage (flow weighted sampling). The water passes through a filter that captures the sediment, the solids are weighted after each storm and the data are converted to a total sediment flux. At the same time, the online camera derives optical measurements for the determination of the two-dimensional river flow velocity and the spatial sediment distribution by analyzing the Hue

  20. Surficial geology of the Cornell Dam 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Nebraska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following is a surficial geology map of the Cornell Dam on the Niobrara River and surrounding area, near Valentine, Nebraska. This map shows the sediments and...

  1. The effects of sample scheduling and sample numbers on estimates of the annual fluxes of suspended sediment in fluvial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Clarke, Robin T.; Merten, Gustavo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1970s, there has been both continuing and growing interest in developing accurate estimates of the annual fluvial transport (fluxes and loads) of suspended sediment and sediment-associated chemical constituents. This study provides an evaluation of the effects of manual sample numbers (from 4 to 12 year−1) and sample scheduling (random-based, calendar-based and hydrology-based) on the precision, bias and accuracy of annual suspended sediment flux estimates. The evaluation is based on data from selected US Geological Survey daily suspended sediment stations in the USA and covers basins ranging in area from just over 900 km2 to nearly 2 million km2 and annual suspended sediment fluxes ranging from about 4 Kt year−1 to about 200 Mt year−1. The results appear to indicate that there is a scale effect for random-based and calendar-based sampling schemes, with larger sample numbers required as basin size decreases. All the sampling schemes evaluated display some level of positive (overestimates) or negative (underestimates) bias. The study further indicates that hydrology-based sampling schemes are likely to generate the most accurate annual suspended sediment flux estimates with the fewest number of samples, regardless of basin size. This type of scheme seems most appropriate when the determination of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment-associated chemical concentrations, annual suspended sediment and annual suspended sediment-associated chemical fluxes only represent a few of the parameters of interest in multidisciplinary, multiparameter monitoring programmes. The results are just as applicable to the calibration of autosamplers/suspended sediment surrogates currently used to measure/estimate suspended sediment concentrations and ultimately, annual suspended sediment fluxes, because manual samples are required to adjust the sample data/measurements generated by these techniques so that they provide depth-integrated and cross

  2. Textural description of surface sediment samples collected in March/April 2014 and October 2014 from Chincoteague Bay, Virginia and Maryland (U.S. Geological Survey Field Activity Numbers 14CTB01, and 14CTB22).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  3. Sediment Sample Locations Collected in March/April 2014 and October 2014 from Chincoteague Bay, Virginia and Maryland (U.S. Geological Survey Field Activity Numbers 14CTB01, and 14CTB22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  4. Textural description of surface sediment samples collected in March/April 2014 and October 2014 from Chincoteague Bay, Virginia and Maryland (U.S. Geological Survey Field Activity Numbers 14CTB01, and 14CTB22).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  5. Sediment Sample Locations Collected in March/April 2014 and October 2014 from Chincoteague Bay, Virginia and Maryland (U.S. Geological Survey Field Activity Numbers 14CTB01, and 14CTB22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from...

  6. Equilibrium sampling for a thermodynamic assessment of contaminated sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the biota relative to the sediment. Furthermore, concentrations in lipid at thermodynamic equilibrium with sediment (Clip?Sed) can be calculated via lipid/silicone partition ratios CSil × KLip:Sil, which has been done in studies with limnic, river and marine sediments. The data can then be compared to lipid...

  7. Use of spatially distributed time-integrated sediment sampling networks and distributed fine sediment modelling to inform catchment management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, M T; Warburton, J; Bracken, L J; Reaney, S M; Emery, S B; Hirst, S

    2017-11-01

    Under the EU Water Framework Directive, suspended sediment is omitted from environmental quality standards and compliance targets. This omission is partly explained by difficulties in assessing the complex dose-response of ecological communities. But equally, it is hindered by a lack of spatially distributed estimates of suspended sediment variability across catchments. In this paper, we demonstrate the inability of traditional, discrete sampling campaigns for assessing exposure to fine sediment. Sampling frequencies based on Environmental Quality Standard protocols, whilst reflecting typical manual sampling constraints, are unable to determine the magnitude of sediment exposure with an acceptable level of precision. Deviations from actual concentrations range between -35 and +20% based on the interquartile range of simulations. As an alternative, we assess the value of low-cost, suspended sediment sampling networks for quantifying suspended sediment transfer (SST). In this study of the 362 km(2) upland Esk catchment we observe that spatial patterns of sediment flux are consistent over the two year monitoring period across a network of 17 monitoring sites. This enables the key contributing sub-catchments of Butter Beck (SST: 1141 t km(2) yr(-1)) and Glaisdale Beck (SST: 841 t km(2) yr(-1)) to be identified. The time-integrated samplers offer a feasible alternative to traditional infrequent and discrete sampling approaches for assessing spatio-temporal changes in contamination. In conjunction with a spatially distributed diffuse pollution model (SCIMAP), time-integrated sediment sampling is an effective means of identifying critical sediment source areas in the catchment, which can better inform sediment management strategies for pollution prevention and control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An instrument system for monitoring and sampling suspended sediment in the benthic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, R.W.; Johnson, R.V.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument system has been constructed that can monitor and sample suspended sediment distributions in the benthic boundary layer. It consists of miniature nephelometers and suspended sediment samplers placed within one meter of the seabed. The system is capable of continuously monitoring suspended sediment profiles at eight levels between 14 and 100 cm above the seabed and collecting suspended sediment samples at four levels (20, 50, 70 and 100 cm) at three times during a deployment period. The suspended sediment system is designed to fit onto the instrumented tripod GEOPROBE which contains four electromagnetic current meters, pressure sensor, bottom stereo camera, two temperature sensors, transmissometer, and a Savonius rotor current meter. Sensor operation, data recording, and sediment sampling events are synchronized. Thus detailed measurements of the near-bottom flow conditions are made concurrently with suspended sediment measurements. The combined system has been used in sediment transporting environments within San Francisco Bay, California, and Puget Sound, Washington. ?? 1986.

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls in suspended-sediment samples from outfalls to Meandering Road Creek at Air Force Plant 4, Fort Worth, Texas, 2003-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2010-01-01

    Meandering Road Creek is an intermittent stream and tributary to Lake Worth, a reservoir on the West Fork Trinity River on the western edge of Fort Worth, Texas. U.S. Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) is on the eastern shore of Woods Inlet, an arm of Lake Worth. Meandering Road Creek gains inflow from several stormwater outfalls as it flows across AFP4. Several studies have characterized polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water and sediments of Lake Worth and Meandering Road Creek; sources of PCBs are believed to originate primarily from AFP4. Two previous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports documented elevated PCB concentrations in surficial sediment samples from Woods Inlet relative to concentrations in surficial sediment samples from other parts of Lake Worth. The second of these two previous reports also identified some of the sources of PCBs to Lake Worth. These reports were followed by a third USGS report that documented the extent of PCB contamination in Meandering Road Creek and Woods Inlet and identified runoff from outfalls 4 and 5 at AFP4 as prominent sources of these PCBs. This report describes the results of a fourth study by the USGS, in cooperation with the Lockheed Martin Corporation, to investigate PCBs in suspended-sediment samples in storm runoff from outfalls 4 and 5 at AFP4 following the implementation of engineering controls designed to potentially alleviate PCB contamination in the drainage areas of these outfalls. Suspended-sediment samples collected from outfalls 4 and 5 during storms on March 2 and November 10, 2008, were analyzed for selected PCBs. Sums of concentrations of 18 reported PCB congeners (Sigma PCBc) in suspended-sediment samples collected before and after implementation of engineering controls are compared. At both outfalls, the Sigma PCBc before engineering controls was higher than the Sigma PCBc after engineering controls. The Sigma PCBc in suspended-sediment samples collected at AFP4 before and after implementation of

  10. Equilibrium sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls in River Elbe sediments – Linking bioaccumulation in fish to sediment contamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Sabine; Antoni, Catherine; Möhlenkamp, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling can be applied to measure freely dissolved concentrations (cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) that are considered effective concentrations for diffusive uptake and partitioning. It can also yield concentrations in lipids at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sedim...... to apply equilibrium sampling for determining bioavailability and bioaccumulation potential of HOCs, since this technique can provide a thermodynamic basis for the risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments.......Equilibrium sampling can be applied to measure freely dissolved concentrations (cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) that are considered effective concentrations for diffusive uptake and partitioning. It can also yield concentrations in lipids at thermodynamic equilibrium...... with the sediment (Clip⇔sed) by multiplying concentrations in the equilibrium sampling polymer with lipid to polymer partition coefficients. We have applied silicone coated glass jars for equilibrium sampling of seven ‘indicator’ polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediment samples from ten locations along...

  11. Finding even more anthropogenic indicators in mildly prepared sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Renée; Odgaard, Bent Vad

    2016-01-01

    derived from sediment, pollen and macrofossil analyses. The sediment from the forest hollow encompasses environmental information from the last 6000 years, including a period of locally intense pastoral and/or agricultural activity during the Iron Age. Keywords: NPP diversity, forest hollow, anthropogenic...

  12. Sediment Sampling and Analysis for Stream Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    designs. Bed Level Changes To identify aggradation and degradation trends within the system. Nearly always used as a means of assessing channel...changes. Sometimes used. Warranted when long-term aggradation or degradation are expected and data are available. Scour Analyses To estimate the...the division on the basis of geomorphic significance. Sediment Size Investigating sedimentation problems such as scour, aggradation and

  13. Bacillus filamentosus sp. nov., isolated from sediment sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonalkar, Vidya V; Mawlankar, Rahul; Venkata Ramana, V; Joseph, Neetha; Shouche, Yogesh S; Dastager, Syed G

    2015-02-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming bacterium, designated SGD-14(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample in Goa Province, India. Cells of the isolate were found to be strictly aerobic. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SGD-14(T) showed a similarity of 99.5 % with Bacillus endophyticus and similarities to other Bacillus type strains were below 96 %. The whole-cell sugar pattern was found to consist of ribose, xylose and glucose. The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7 and the major fatty acids as anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0, anteiso-C17:0, C16:0 and iso-C14:0. The strain was found to grow optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. DNA G + C content was determined to be 39.6 mol%. The phospholipid pattern was found to consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. DNA-DNA hybridization studies between strain SGD-14(T) and B. endophyticus CIP106778(T) showed that strain SGD-14(T) exhibited Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus filamentosus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Bacillus filamentosus is SGD-14(T) = (=NCIM 5491(T) = DSM 27955(T)).

  14. Monte Carlo path sampling approach to modeling aeolian sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, E. J.; Mitasova, H.; Mitas, L.

    2011-12-01

    but evolve the system according to rules that are abstractions of the governing physics. This work presents the Green function solution to the continuity equations that govern sediment transport. The Green function solution is implemented using a path sampling approach whereby sand mass is represented as an ensemble of particles that evolve stochastically according to the Green function. In this approach, particle density is a particle representation that is equivalent to the field representation of elevation. Because aeolian transport is nonlinear, particles must be propagated according to their updated field representation with each iteration. This is achieved using a particle-in-cell technique. The path sampling approach offers a number of advantages. The integral form of the Green function solution makes it robust to discontinuities in complex terrains. Furthermore, this approach is spatially distributed, which can help elucidate the role of complex landscapes in aeolian transport. Finally, path sampling is highly parallelizable, making it ideal for execution on modern clusters and graphics processing units.

  15. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  16. Enzyme leaching of surficial geochemical samples for detecting hydromorphic trace-element anomalies associated with precious-metal mineralized bedrock buried beneath glacial overburden in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert J.; Meier, A.L.; Riddle, G.; ,

    1990-01-01

    One objective of the International Falls and Roseau, Minnesota, CUSMAP projects was to develop a means of conducting regional-scale geochemical surveys in areas where bedrock is buried beneath complex glacially derived overburden. Partial analysis of B-horizon soils offered hope for detecting subtle hydromorphic trace-element dispersion patterns. An enzyme-based partial leach selectively removes metals from oxide coatings on the surfaces of soil materials without attacking their matrix. Most trace-element concentrations in the resulting solutions are in the part-per-trillion to low part-per-billion range, necessitating determinations by inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry. The resulting data show greater contrasts for many trace elements than with other techniques tested. Spatially, many trace metal anomalies are locally discontinuous, but anomalous trends within larger areas are apparent. In many instances, the source for an anomaly seems to be either basal till or bedrock. Ground water flow is probably the most important mechanism for transporting metals toward the surface, although ionic diffusion, electrochemical gradients, and capillary action may play a role in anomaly dispersal. Sample sites near the Rainy Lake-Seine River fault zone, a regional shear zone, often have anomalous concentrations of a variety of metals, commonly including Zn and/or one or more metals which substitute for Zn in sphalerite (Cd, Ge, Ga, and Sn). Shifts in background concentrations of Bi, Sb, and As show a trend across the area indicating a possible regional zoning of lode-Au mineralization. Soil anomalies of Ag, Co, and Tl parallel basement structures, suggesting areas that may have potential for Cobalt/Thunder Baytype silver viens. An area around Baudette, Minnesota, which is underlain by quartz-chlorite-carbonate-altered shear zones, is anomalous in Ag, As, Bi, Co, Mo, Te, Tl, and W. Anomalies of Ag, As, Bi, Te, and W tend to follow the fault zones, suggesting potential

  17. A method for disaggregating clay concretions and eliminating formalin smell in the processing of sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1989-01-01

    A complete handling procedure for processing sediment samples is described. It includes some improvements of conventional methods. The fixed sediment sample is mixed with a solution of the alkaline detergent AJAX® (Colgate-Palmolive). It is kept at 80-900 C for 20-40 min. This treatment facilitates...

  18. Equilibrium sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls in River Elbe sediments--Linking bioaccumulation in fish to sediment contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sabine; Antoni, Catherine; Möhlenkamp, Christel; Claus, Evelyn; Reifferscheid, Georg; Heininger, Peter; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    Equilibrium sampling can be applied to measure freely dissolved concentrations (cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) that are considered effective concentrations for diffusive uptake and partitioning. It can also yield concentrations in lipids at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sediment (clip⇌sed) by multiplying concentrations in the equilibrium sampling polymer with lipid to polymer partition coefficients. We have applied silicone coated glass jars for equilibrium sampling of seven 'indicator' polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediment samples from ten locations along the River Elbe to measure cfree of PCBs and their clip⇌sed. For three sites, we then related clip⇌sed to lipid-normalized PCB concentrations (cbio,lip) that were determined independently by the German Environmental Specimen Bank in common bream, a fish species living in close contact with the sediment: (1) In all cases, cbio,lip were below clip⇌sed, (2) there was proportionality between the two parameters with high R(2) values (0.92-1.00) and (3) the slopes of the linear regressions were very similar between the three stations (0.297; 0.327; 0.390). These results confirm the close link between PCB bioaccumulation and the thermodynamic potential of sediment-associated HOCs for partitioning into lipids. This novel approach gives clearer and more consistent results compared to conventional approaches that are based on total concentrations in sediment and biota-sediment accumulation factors. We propose to apply equilibrium sampling for determining bioavailability and bioaccumulation potential of HOCs, since this technique can provide a thermodynamic basis for the risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments.

  19. Determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment samples from Bombay harbour, Dharamtar creek and Amba river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, S.A.; Dhaktode, S.S.; Kadam, A.N.

    The surface sediment samples were collected by van Veen grab sampler during premonsoon, monsoon and postmonsoon seasons from Bombay harbour, Dharamtar creek and Amba river estuary Moisture content of the samples ranges from 36 to 67.5...

  20. Evaluation of sediment sampling devices and methods used in the NKS/EKO-1 project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilus, E. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Finland)

    1996-10-01

    The radioactive fallout caused by nuclear weapons tests in the 1960s and the accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986 has created useful markers in the sediments of many Nordic waters. These have been successfully used not only in radioecological studies but also in limnological and marine research dealing with sedimentation processes and rates. To be able to study sedimentation and processes in sediments, it is essential to obtain reliable samples from sediments. False conclusions are an obvious risk if the studies are based on biased field samples. More strictly,, it is unreasonable to perform exacting and expensive analyses if the samples themselves are unreliable or of poor quality. The instruments best suited for quantitative sampling of soft-bottom sediments appear to be those based on the coring principle. Box corers can be reliably used for bulk sampling of coherent sediments and some silty and sandy sediments. Many factors speak in favour of large diameters/areas of the corer orifices. It is not possible, however, to increase the tube diameter without negative impact to the corer`s handiness and increasing difficulty in handling and slicing of the cores. Despite the large variety of sampling instruments and many sources of error involved in the use of different instruments, it is most important to know and account for the disadvantages and to work as carefully as possible towards minimizing errors and obtaining undisturbed, reliable samples. (EG).

  1. Water column and bed-sediment core samples collected from Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosness, Ryan L.; Naymik, Jesse; Hopkins, Candice B.; DeWild, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Idaho Power Company, collected water-column and bed-sediment core samples from eight sites in Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, during May 5–7, 2012. Water-column and bed-sediment core samples were collected at each of the eight sites and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury. Additional bed-sediment core samples, collected from three of the eight sites, were analyzed for pesticides and other organic compounds, trace metals, and physical characteristics, such as particle size. Total mercury and methylmercury were detected in each of the water column and bed-sediment core samples. Only 17 of the 417 unique pesticide and organic compounds were detected in bed-sediment core samples. Concentrations of most organic wastewater compounds detected in bed sediment were less than the reporting level. Trace metals detected were greater than the reporting level in all the bed-sediment core samples submitted for analysis. The particle size distribution of bed-sediment core samples was predominantly clay mixed with silt.

  2. DEVELOPING AN EXCELLENT SEDIMENT RATING CURVE FROM ONE HYDROLOGICAL YEAR SAMPLING PROGRAMME DATA: APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preksedis M. Ndomba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents preliminary findings on the adequacy of one hydrological year sampling programme data in developing an excellent sediment rating curve. The study case is a 1DD1 subcatchment in the upstream of Pangani River Basin (PRB, located in the North Eastern part of Tanzania. 1DD1 is the major runoff-sediment contributing tributary to the downstream hydropower reservoir, the Nyumba Ya Mungu (NYM. In literature sediment rating curve method is known to underestimate the actual sediment load. In the case of developing countries long-term sediment sampling monitoring or conservation campaigns have been reported as unworkable options. Besides, to the best knowledge of the authors, to date there is no consensus on how to develop an excellent rating curve. Daily-midway and intermittent-cross section sediment samples from Depth Integrating sampler (D-74 were used to calibrate the subdaily automatic sediment pumping sampler (ISCO 6712 near bank point samples for developing the rating curve. Sediment load correction factors were derived from both statistical bias estimators and actual sediment load approaches. It should be noted that the ongoing study is guided by findings of other studies in the same catchment. For instance, long term sediment yield rate estimated based on reservoir survey validated the performance of the developed rating curve. The result suggests that excellent rating curve could be developed from one hydrological year sediment sampling programme data. This study has also found that uncorrected rating curve underestimates sediment load. The degreeof underestimation depends on the type of rating curve developed and data used.

  3. Water and stream-sediment sampling techniques for use in uranium exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich-Verbeek, Karen J.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of sampling water and stream sediments for uranium were established in this study. Water samples should be taken using a US DH-48 water sampler across the stream channel and should be filtered and acidified in situ. Stream sediments should be taken as a composite sample up and across the axis of the channel. Only sediment fractions less than 90 ?m (170 mesh) should be analyzed for uranium. The elements As, Ca, Al, B, Mg, K, and Na exhibit a positive correlation with uranium in surface waters, while a much larger suite of elements exhibit a positive correlation with uranium in stream sediments: K, Mn, Mg, Ti, Ca, Al, Fe, Pb, Cr, Y, Zr, Li, Zn, Th, and As. Analyses have revealed that anomalies detected in either the dissolved or suspended fractions of water, or the stream sediments, are frequently not reflected in the other two; hence, all three should be sampled and analyzed.

  4. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, ART'S MANUFACTURING, SPLIT CORE SAMPLER FOR SUBMERGED SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Split Core Sampler for Submerged Sediments (Split Core Sampler) designed and fabricated by Arts Manufacturing & Supply, Inc., was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at ...

  5. Geologic-SURFICIAL62K-Sand and gravel pits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The GeologicSurficial_SURFICIAL data consists of surficial geologic features as digitized from the 1:62,500 15 minute series USGS quadrangle map sheets, compiled by...

  6. Geologic-SURFICIAL62K-Rocklines-Striations-Till-Fabric

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The GeologicSurficial_SURFICIAL data consists of surficial geologic features as digitized from the 1:62,500 15 minute series USGS quadrangle map sheets, compiled by...

  7. Equilibrium sampling of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments: challenges and new approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaefer, S.; Mayer, Philipp; Becker, B.

    2015-01-01

    . The coated glass jars were very convenient for routine monitoring campaigns since (1) equilibration times are minimized by the very thin coatings, (2) the equilibration is done in the laboratory and (3) equilibrium sampling is confirmed by equal analyte concentrations in various silicone coating thicknesses......) are considered to be the effective concentrations for diffusive uptake and partitioning, and they can be measured by equilibrium sampling. We have thus applied glass jars with multiple coating thicknesses for equilibrium sampling of HOCs in sediment samples from various sites in different German rivers...... without tedious time-serious measurements. However, for some sediment samples analyte concentrations decreased towards thicker silicone coating possibly caused by depletion of the sediment or equilibrium partitioning not being attained. In this study, we investigated the application of sediment depletion...

  8. Surficial geology interpretive map from the inner continental shelf off the northern Oregon and southern Washington coast based on sidescan-sonar imagery and sediment samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Two 21-day field operations were conducted in 1997 and 1998 in the estuaries and on the inner continental shelf off the northern Oregon and southern Washington...

  9. Grab Sample Locations & Surficial Sediment Texture collected by the U.S. Geological Survey 1999-2003 offshore of the Grand Strand, South Carolina region (GRABS, Point shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline...

  10. Grab Sample Locations & Surficial Sediment Texture collected by the U.S. Geological Survey 1999-2003 offshore of the Grand Strand, South Carolina region (GRABS, Point shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline...

  11. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F.; Adams, Rachel G.

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake...

  12. Environmental contaminants in water, sediment and biological samples from Playa Lakes in southeastern New Mexico - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water, bird tissue, and invertebrates were collected from 10 playa lakes in Southeastern New Mexico in 1991 and 1992. These samples were analyzed for a...

  13. Modern sedimentation patterns in Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia, derived from surface sediment and inlet streams samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wennrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake El'gygytgyn/NE Russia holds a continuous 3.58 Ma sediment record, which is regarded as the most long-lasting climate archive of the terrestrial Arctic. Based on multi-proxy geochemical, mineralogical, and granulometric analyses of surface sediment, inlet stream and bedrock samples, supplemented by statistical methods, major processes influencing the modern sedimentation in the lake were investigated. Grain-size parameters and chemical elements linked to the input of feldspars from acidic bedrock indicate a wind-induced two-cell current system as major driver of sediment transport and accumulation processes in Lake El'gygytgyn. The distribution of mafic rock related elements in the sediment on the lake floor can be traced back to the input of weathering products of basaltic rocks in the catchment. Obvious similarities in the spatial variability of manganese and heavy metals indicate sorption or co-precipitation of these elements with Fe and Mn hydroxides and oxides. But the similar distribution of organic matter and clay contents might also point to a fixation to organic components and clay minerals. An enrichment of mercury in the inlet streams might be indicative of neotectonic activity around the lake. The results of this study add to the fundamental knowledge of the modern lake processes of Lake El'gygytgyn and its lake-catchment interactions, and thus, yield crucial insights for the interpretation of paleo-data from this unique archive.

  14. Modern sedimentation patterns in Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia, derived from surface sediment and inlet streams samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wennrich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High Arctic Lake El'gygytgyn/NE Russia holds a continuous 3.58 Ma sediment record, which is regarded as the most long-lasting climate archive of the terrestrial Arctic. Based on multi-proxy geochemical, mineralogical and granulometric analyses of surface sediment, inlet stream and bedrock samples, supplemented by statistical methods, major processes influencing the modern sedimentation in the lake were investigated. Grain-size parameters and chemical elements linked to the input of feldspars from acidic bedrock indicate a wind-induced two-cell current system as major driver of sediment transport and accumulation processes in Lake El'gygytgyn. The distribution of mafic-rock related elements in the sediment on the lake floor can be traced back to the input of weathering products of basaltic rocks in the catchment. Obvious similarities in the spatial variability of manganese and heavy metals indicate sorption or co-precipitaion of these elements with Fe and Mn hydroxides and oxides. But the akin distribution of organic matter content might also point to a fixation to organic components. An enrichment of mercury in the inlet streams might be indicative of neotectonic activity around the lake. The results of this study add to the fundamental knowledge of the in-lake processes of Lake El'gygytgyn and its lake-catchment interactions, and thus, yield crucial insights for the interpretation of paleo-data from this unique archive.

  15. Development and testing of a sampling device for the analyses of suspended sediment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schletterer, Martin; Reindl, Robert; Unterlercher, Franz; Hauer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Suspended sediment concentrations are not equal in time as well as within a cross section. For calibration, sampling is needed within a cross profile (using e.g. sampler US P-61-A1) or nearby of a SSC sensor. However, due to insufficient hydraulic efficiency, uncontrolled handling under water as well as lack in accuracy in starting and closing the suspended sediment sampling, the well-established extracting of water samples by hand (dip or grab sample) lacks reproducibility. Due to these shortcomings a novel measuring device has been developed for suspended sediment sampling in rivers. For the design of the presented sampler the experiences of previous technical concepts of direct suspended sediment sampling in rivers have been considered. The sampling device consists of 2 tubes: a filling pipe (8x1 mm = 6 mm inner diameter) and an exhaust pipe (6x1 mm = 4 mm inner diameter). The filling pipe is equipped thread (M8x1 mm) to attach the "measuring nozzle" made of brass. We compared three different nozzles (D4, D5, D6) in order to investigate possible effects of different filling times. Both tubes are connected (TIG -Tungsten Inert-Gaswelding) by a flat steel. All parts (despite the nozzles) are made from stainless steel. On the tubes a plastic screw cap is mounted which allows to attach (and quickly change) standard sampling bottles. A mount enables that the device can be attached to a commercially available "GARDENA aluminium handle", thus using this rod samples can be taken at certain localities. The measurement device has been designed to improve the accuracy of suspended sediment sampling in rivers. The target was to achieve an optimum in hydraulic efficiency without disturbing the natural transport dynamics. Thus, the water sample gained from this sampling device supports the calibration and validation of indirect suspended sediment sampling devices (e.g. SSC sensor). We present the design of the sampler as well as field data in comparison with conventional dip

  16. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  17. Using public participation to sample trace metals in lake surface sediments: the OPAL Metals Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S D; Rose, N L; Goldsmith, B; Bearcock, J M; Scheib, C; Yang, H

    2017-05-01

    Members of the public in England were invited in 2010 to take part in a national metals survey, by collecting samples of littoral sediment from a standing water body for geochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first national sediment metals survey using public participation and reveals a snapshot of the extent of metals contamination in ponds and lakes across England. Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb concentrations exceeding sediment quality guidelines for the health of aquatic biota are ubiquitous in ponds and lakes, not just in areas with a legacy of industrial activity. To validate the public sampling approach, a calibration exercise was conducted at ten water bodies selected to represent a range of lakes found across England. Sediment concentrations of Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were measured in samples of soil, stream and littoral and deep water sediment to assess inputs. Significant differences between littoral sediment metal concentrations occur due to local variability, but also organic content, especially in upland, peat soil catchments. Variability of metal concentrations between littoral samples is shown to be low in small (metal contamination in standing waters. However, the heterogeneity of geology, soils and history/extent of metal contamination in the English landscape, combined with the random nature of sample collection, shows that systematic sampling for evaluating the full extent of metal contamination in lakes is still required.

  18. Effects of sample mass and macrofossil type on radiocarbon dating of arctic and boreal lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, W W; Anderson, P M; Brown, T A; Brubaker, L B; Hu, F S; Lozhkin, A V; Tinner, W; Kaltenrieder, P

    2006-05-29

    Dating lake sediments by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) {sup 14}C analysis of plant macrofossils overcomes one of the main problems associated with dating bulk sediment samples, the presence of old organic matter. Even so, many AMS dates from arctic and boreal sites appear to misrepresent the age of the sediment. To understand the nature of these apparent dating anomalies better, we conducted a series of {sup 14}C dating experiments using samples from Alaskan and Siberian lake-sediment cores. First, to test whether our analytical procedures introduced a sample-mass bias, we obtained {sup 14}C dates for different-sized pieces of single woody macrofossils. In these sample-mass experiments, sized statistically equivalent ages were found for samples as small as 0.05 mg C. Second, to assess whether macrofossil type influenced dating results, we conducted sample-type experiments in which {sup 14}C dates were obtained for different macrofossil types sieved from the same depth in the sediment. We dated materials from multiple levels in sediment cores from Upper Capsule Lake (North Slope, northern Alaska) and Grizzly Lake (Copper River Basin, southern Alaska), and from single depths in other records from northern Alaska. In several of the experiments there were significant discrepancies between dates for different plant tissues, and in most cases wood and charcoal were older than other macrofossil types, usually by several hundred years. This pattern suggests that {sup 14}C dates for woody macrofossils may misrepresent the age of the sediment by centuries, perhaps due to their longer terrestrial residence time and the potential in-built age of long-lived plants. This study identifies why some {sup 14}C dates appear to be inconsistent with the overall age-depth trend of a lake-sediment record, and it may guide the selection of {sup 14}C samples in future studies.

  19. Quantifying recent erosion and sediment delivery using probability sampling: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Lewis

    2002-01-01

    Abstract - Estimates of erosion and sediment delivery have often relied on measurements from locations that were selected to be representative of particular terrain types. Such judgement samples are likely to overestimate or underestimate the mean of the quantity of interest. Probability sampling can eliminate the bias due to sample selection, and it permits the...

  20. {sup 10}Be measurements at MALT using reduced-size samples of bulk sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho, E-mail: kh@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Oniyanagi, Itsumi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, 3, Bunkyo-chou, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Wasada, Hiroshi [Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Graduate school of Science, Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [MALT, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In order to establish {sup 10}Be measurements on reduced-size (1-10 mg) samples of bulk sediments, we investigated four different pretreatment designs using lacustrine and marginal-sea sediments and the AMS system of the Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator (MALT) at University of Tokyo. The {sup 10}Be concentrations obtained from the samples of 1-10 mg agreed within a precision of 3-5% with the values previously determined using corresponding ordinary-size ({approx}200 mg) samples and the same AMS system. This fact demonstrates reliable determinations of {sup 10}Be with milligram levels of recent bulk sediments at MALT. On the other hand, a clear decline of the BeO{sup -} beam with tens of micrograms of {sup 9}Be carrier suggests that the combination of ten milligrams of sediments and a few hundred micrograms of the {sup 9}Be carrier is more convenient at this stage.

  1. Surficial Geology of the Mosier Creek Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A surficial and structural geologic map (SIR-2012-5002, fig. 2) was compiled to aid in the building of the three-dimensional geologic model. The map covers 327...

  2. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F; Adams, Rachel G; Cargill, John G; Gan, Jay; Gouin, Todd; Gschwend, Philip M; Hawthorne, Steven B; Helm, Paul; Witt, Gesine; You, Jing; Escher, Beate I

    2014-04-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake into benthic organisms and exchange with the overlying water column. Consequently, Cfree provides a more relevant dose metric than total sediment concentration. Recent developments in PSMs have significantly improved our ability to reliably measure even very low levels of Cfree . Application of PSMs in sediments is preferably conducted in the equilibrium regime, where freely dissolved concentrations in the sediment are well-linked to the measured concentration in the sampler via analyte-specific partition ratios. The equilibrium condition can then be assured by measuring a time series or a single time point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree allows a direct assessment of 1) contaminant exchange and equilibrium status between sediment and overlying water, 2) benthic bioaccumulation, and 3) potential toxicity to benthic organisms. Thus, the use of PSMs to measure Cfree provides an improved basis for the mechanistic understanding of fate and transport processes in sediments and has the potential to significantly improve risk assessment and management of contaminated sediments.

  3. Surficial deposits on salt diapirs (Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform, Iran): Characterization, evolution, erosion and the influence on landscape morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Asadi, Naser; Zare, Mohammad; Šlechta, Stanislav; Churáčková, Zdenka

    2009-06-01

    The surfaces of salt diapirs in the Zagros Mountains are mostly covered by surficial deposits, which significantly affect erosion rates, salt karst evolution, land use and the density of the vegetation cover. Eleven salt diapirs were selected for the study of surficial deposits in order to cover variability in the geology, morphology and climate in a majority of the diapirs in the Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of 80 selected samples were studied mainly by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. Changes in salinity along selected vertical profiles were studied together with the halite and gypsum distribution. The subaerial residuum formed from minerals and rock detritus released from the dissolved rock salt is by far the most abundant material on the diapirs. Fluvial sediments derived from this type of residuum are the second most common deposits found, while submarine residuum and marine sediments have only local importance. The mineralogical/chemical composition of surficial deposits varies amongst the three end members: evaporite minerals (gypsum/anhydrite and minor halite), carbonates (dolomite and calcite) and silicates-oxides (mainly quartz, phyllosilicates, and hematite). Based on infiltration tests on different types of surficial deposits, most of the rainwater will infiltrate, while overland flow predominates on rock salt exposures. Recharge concentration and thick accumulations of fine sediment support relatively rich vegetation cover in some places and even enable local agricultural activity. The source material, diapir relief, climatic conditions and vegetation cover were found to be the main factors affecting the development and erosion of surficial deposits. A difference was found in residuum type and landscape morphology between the relatively humid NW part of the studied area and the arid Persian Gulf coast: In the NW, the medium and thick residuum seems to be stable under current

  4. Technical note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxhammer, Tim; Bach, Lennart T.; Czerny, Jan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial and temporal decoupling between particle formation in the surface ocean and particle collection in sediment traps at depth often handicaps reconciliation of production and sedimentation even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms are restricted to the surface ocean, but have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to studying how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples for biogeochemical analysis. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently separated from bulk seawater by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride, and we discuss the advantages and efficiencies of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranged from fine to coarse silt (2-63 µm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements, and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight into various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate the processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  5. A special core liner for sub-sampling of aqueous sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    tubes or syringes, (b) cutting windows in the side of the core liner with a vibrating saw blade and inserting small coring tubes or syringes, or (c) splitting 1 m sections of the core open for core description and sub-sampling from the exposed half... sediments. Although hand-operated push core sub- sampling method is popular, it has limitations and cannot be used for sub-sampling the sediments from gravity or piston core. Further, the gravity and piston core samplers do have problems with them 3 . A...

  6. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Shirkhanloo Hamid; Mousavi Zavvar Hassan; Rouhollahi Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM) column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample ...

  7. Major and trace elements assessment in sediment samples from Rio Grande Reservoir, by neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Robson L.; Ferreira, Francisco J., E-mail: robsonf@cetesbnet.sp.gov.b [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo(CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Quimica Inorganica e Radioatividade; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica; Bevilacqua, Jose Eduardo [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo(CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Qualidade das Aguas

    2009-07-01

    The Rio Grande Reservoir, Southeast of the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) supplies water for four counties (Sao Bernardo do Campo, Sao Caetano do Sul, Santo Andre and Diadema). It has been seriously affected by urban expansion, due to chaotic urban occupation and improper use of the surrounding areas. In this study bottom sediment samples were collected, by using a Van Veen sampler, during the dry and rainy seasons. Four sampling points were defined by using GPS and are located at the mouth of the Rio Grande and Ribeirao Pires Rivers, in the middle of the reservoir and near the catchment point of the water supply. The sediment samples were submitted to instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and the following elements were determined: As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U e Zn and the rare earth elements Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb, Yb. Short irradiation was also performed for total Hg determination by NAA using {sup 197}Hg radioisotope. This was possible due to the high Hg concentration levels in these sediments. The methodology validation was carried out by certified reference material analyses. The results obtained for multielemental concentrations in the sediment samples were compared to NASC (North American Shale Composite) values. The concentration values obtained for As and metals Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to the Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values) and adopted by CETESB. (author)

  8. Uranium and plutonium containing particles in a sea sediment sample from Thule, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, M.; Ikäheimonen, T.K.; Pöllänen, R.

    2001-01-01

    in the environment. The presence of particulate radioactive materials in the sediment samples was revealed by combining gamma-spectrometry and autoradiography. Isolation and separation of a radioactive particle from a bulk sample were performed using autoradiography, phosphor plate imaging and scanning electron...

  9. 1984 Nearshore Surveys and Sediment Sampling, Assateague Island, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    PEBBL I’-. GRNL IVCA~ CORS I MEIU I FINE I . IN ICORS SAMPLE I.. SAM A1-N0I477.74 I- 8 LOCATION1" ELEV./OEPTH I SA DFN89. - - - - - - w COMMENT...0 3 ia -- -’ - - CL 2 I GRNL VCAStCAS EJ FN .FN OREIMDU PEBEIRNLI.ORECOARSE IMD:U FINE I V IE COARSEI MEDIUM SILT:."-," 32ASE FINEC^SE 1SAND

  10. Mineralogical, optical, geochemical, and particle size properties of four sediment samples for optical physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, K.; Clement, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and spectroscopy were used to investigate the mineralogical and chemical properties of the Calvert, Ball Old Mine, Ball Martin, and Jordan Sediments. The particle size distribution and index of refraction of each sample were determined. The samples are composed primarily of quartz, kaolinite, and illite. The clay minerals are most abundant in the finer particle size fractions. The chemical properties of the four samples are similar. The Calvert sample is most notably different in that it contains a relatively high amount of iron. The dominant particle size fraction in each sample is silt, with lesser amounts of clay and sand. The indices of refraction of the sediments are the same with the exception of the Calvert sample which has a slightly higher value.

  11. Validation of an analytical methodology for the quantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Yordad Companioni Damas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a validation of an analytical procedure for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine sediment samples. The proposed protocol is able to measure n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in samples at concentrations as low as 30 ng/g, with a precision better than 15% for most of analytes. The extraction efficiency of fortified sediments varied from 65.1 to 105.6% and 59.7 to 97.8%, for n-alkanes and PAH in the ranges: C16 - C32 and fluoranthene - benzo(apyrene, respectively. The analytical protocol was applied to determine petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments collected from a marine coastal zone.

  12. 多种环境因子交互作用对沉积物吸附阿特拉津的影响%Characteristics of Atrazine Adsorption onto Surficial Sediments Influenced by Interaction of Various Environmental Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鱼; 王志增; 王檬; 王倩

    2013-01-01

    采用自行研制的模拟自然水环境吸附解吸系统实验装置,运用24完全析因实验设计,研究4种环境因子(pH、离子强度、曝气强度和温度)共同作用对沉积物吸附阿特拉津的影响规律,并利用固定效应模型估算各环境因子主效应和高阶交互效应对沉积物吸附阿特拉津的贡献.结果表明:4种环境因子主效应对沉积物吸附阿特拉津的影响均较大(显著性水平0.05),其中曝气强度与离子强度促进沉积物吸附阿特拉津,温度与pH抑制沉积物吸附阿特拉津;4种环境因子的二阶交互效应对沉积物吸附阿特拉津的影响也较大(显著性水平0.05),效应估计值依次为温度×pH值=-73.53,曝气强度×pH值=-59.03,温度×离子强度=33.19,pH值×离子强度=27.55;在三阶交互作用中,仅有曝气强度×温度×pH值可促进沉积物吸附阿特拉津(显著性水平0.05).%In order to fully reveal the migration and transformation of the pesticide atrazine in natural water bodies we studied the characteristics of atrazine adsorption on the sediments influenced by a variety of environmental factors (such as pH, ionic strength, aeration rate, and temperature) via the simulation by means of self-designed natural water environment adsorption/desorption system experimental device based on 24 full factorial experimental design, and then employed the fixed effect model to analyze the contribution from the mathematical quantitative perspective about the main effects of various environmental factors and higher-order interaction effects to adsorption of atrazine on the sediments. It was found that the main effects of the four selected environmental factors (pH, ionic strength, aeration rate, and temperature) all have a significant impact (significance level of 0. 05) to atrazine adsorption on the sediments, in which the aeration rate and the ionic strength significantly promote atrazine adsorption on sediments, while the temperature and p

  13. Rapid and extensive alteration of phosphorus speciation during oxic storage of wet sediment samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kraal

    Full Text Available The chemical forms of phosphorus (P in sediments are routinely measured in studies of P in modern and ancient marine environments. However, samples for such analyses are often exposed to atmospheric oxygen during storage and handling. Recent work suggests that long-term exposure of pyrite-bearing sediments can lead to a decline in apatite P and an increase in ferric Fe-bound P. Here, we report on alterations in P speciation in reducing modern Baltic Sea sediments that we deliberately exposed to atmospheric oxygen for a period of either one week or one year. During oxidation of the sediment, extensive changes occurred in all measured P reservoirs. Exchangeable P all but disappeared during the first week of exposure, likely reflecting adsorption of porewater PO4 by Fe(III (oxyhydroxides (i.e. ferric Fe-bound P formation. Detrital and organic P were also rapidly affected: decreases in both reservoirs were already observed after the first week of exposure to atmospheric oxygen. This was likely because of acidic dissolution of detrital apatite and oxidation of organic matter, respectively. These processes produced dissolved PO4 that was then scavenged by Fe(III (oxyhydroxides. Interestingly, P in authigenic calcium phosphates (i.e. apatite: authigenic Ca-P remained unaffected after the first week of exposure, which we attributed to the shielding effect of microfossils in which authigenic Ca-P occurs in Baltic Sea sediments. This effect was transient; a marked decrease in the authigenic Ca-P pool was observed in the sediments after one year of exposure to oxygen. In summary, we show that handling and storage of wet sediments under oxic conditions can lead to rapid and extensive alteration of the original sediment P speciation.

  14. Yeasts from the sediment samples of the EEZ along the southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prabhakaran, N.; Gupta, R.

    Fiftyeight yeast isolates were obtained from the benthic sediment samples of 19 stations during R.V. Gaveshani Cruise No. 187 of the Exclusive Economic Zone along the southwest coast of India. The depths ranged from 20 to 1,055 m. Asporogenous yeast...

  15. Shifting sources and transport paths for the late Quaternary Escanaba Trough sediment fill (northeast Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffa, G.G.; De Rosa, R.; Normark, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Escanaba Trough, which forms the southernmost part of the axial valley of the actively spreading Gorda Ridge, is filled with several hundred meters of sediment of presumed late Quaternary age. Surficial sediment samples from gravity cores, deeper samples (as much as 390 m) from Site 35 of the Deep Sea Drilling Program (Leg 5), and the acoustic character of the sediment fill observed on seismic-reflection profiles indicate that much of the sediment fill is of turbidite origin. Gross composition and heavy- mineral analyses of sand samples show that two distinct petrofacies comprise the sediment fill. The lower part of the fill was derived primarily from the Klamath River source of northern California while the younger fill, including the surficial sand beds, are from the Columbia River drainage much farther north. The Escanaba Trough sediment provides an opportunity to evaluate concepts for paleogeographic and paleotectonic reconstructions that are based on facies analysis and compositional and textural data for the volcanic components because both intrabasinal and extrabasinal sources are present as well as coeval (neovolcanic) and non coeval (paleovolcanic) sourcre This study of a modern basin shows, that although the sediment sources could be identified, it was useful to have some knowledge of the sediment pathway(s), the effects of diagenesis, and the possible effects of sediment sorting as a result of long transport distances from the source area for some components. Application of these same techniques to ancient deposits without benefit of the additional parameters will face limitations.

  16. Distribution Characteristics, Sources and Pollution Assessment of Trace Elements in Surficial Sediments of the Coastal Wetlands, Northeastern Hainan Island%海南东北部滨海湿地沉积物微量元素分布特征、来源及污染评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卫坤; 甘华阳; 闭向阳; 王家生

    2016-01-01

    Totally 128 surficial sediments samples were collected from the coastal wetlands, northeastern Hainan Island and analyzed for their concentrations of 14 elements including Al2 O3 , Fe2 O3 , MnO, Cu, Ni, Sr, Zn, V, Pb, Cr, Zr, As, Cd and Hg, TOC and grain sizes. The mean concentrations of trace metals V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Cd and Hg were (40. 13 ± 32. 65), (35. 92 ± 26. 90), (13. 03 ± 11. 46), (11. 56 ± 10. 27), (48. 75 ± 27. 00), (5. 48 ± 1. 60), (18. 70 ± 8. 66), (0. 054 ± 0. 045), (0. 050 ± 0. 050)μg•g-1 , respectively, which were much lower than those in Pearl River Estuary, Yangzi River Estuary, Bohai Bay, upper crust and average shale. The average concentrations of Sr and Zr were much higher, reaching up to (1 253. 60 ± 1 649. 58) μg•g-1 and (372. 40 ± 516. 49)μg•g-1 , respectively. The spatial distribution patterns of Al2 O3 , Fe2 O3 , MnO, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, Pb, Cr, Cd and Hg concentrations were the same as each other except for those of As, Sr and Zr. Generally, relatively high concentrations of these elements only appeared in the Haikou Bay, Nandu estuary, Dongzhai Harbor, Qinglan Harbor and Xiaohai in study area. The factor analysis revealed that the trace elements Al2 O3, Fe2 O3 , MnO, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, Pb, Cr and part of Hg were mainly originated from the rock material by natural weathering processes, while the Cd and a part of Hg were from the biological source controlled by TOC. As and part of MnO were influenced by anthropogenic source, especially by aquacultures. Zr and some MnO were derived from heavy minerals dominated by the coarse grain of sediments. In contrast to the ERL, ERM and the results of enrichment factors ( EF) , the environment of study area was good in general and the degree of contamination by trace elements was low on the whole. However, there are still some places where anthropogenic input have caused serious enrichments of trace elements and the occasional adverse effect on benthic organism induced by Ni could

  17. Enantiomer fractions of chlordane components in sediment from U.S. Geological Survey sites in lakes and rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, E.M.; Foreman, W.T.; Van Metre, P.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Rounds, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Spatial, temporal, and sediment-type trends in enantiomer signatures were evaluated for cis- and trans-chlordane (CC, TC) in archived core, suspended, and surficial-sediment samples from six lake, reservoir, and river sites across the United States. The enantiomer fractions (EFs) measured in these samples are in good agreement with those reported for sediment, soil, and air samples in previous studies. The chlordane EFs were generally close to the racemic value of 0.5, with CC values ranging from 0.493 to 0.527 (usually >0.5) and TC values from 0.463 to 0.53 (usually <0.5). EF changes with core depth were detected for TC and CC in some cores, with the most non-racemic values near the top of the core. Surficial and suspended sediments generally have EF values similar to the top core layers but are often more non-racemic, indicating that enantioselective degradation is occurring before soils are eroded and deposited into bottom sediments. We hypothesize that rapid losses (desorption or degradation) from suspended sediments of the more bioavailable chlordane fraction during transport and initial deposition could explain the apparent shift to more racemic EF values in surficial and top core sediments. Near racemic CC and TC in the core profiles suggest minimal alteration of chlordane from biotic degradation, unless it is via non-enantioselective processes. EF values for the heptachlor degradate, heptachlor epoxide (HEPX), determined in surficial sediments from one location only were always non-racemic (EF ??? 0.66), were indicative of substantial biotic processing, and followed reported EF trends.

  18. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Scientific rationale supporting use of freely dissolved concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Parkerton, Thomas F.; Adams, Rachel G.

    2014-01-01

    Passive sampling methods (PSMs) allow the quantification of the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree ) of an organic contaminant even in complex matrices such as sediments. Cfree is directly related to a contaminant's chemical activity, which drives spontaneous processes including diffusive uptake...... point using passive samplers with different surface to volume ratios. Sampling in the kinetic regime is also possible and generally involves the application of performance reference compounds for the calibration. Based on previous research on hydrophobic organic contaminants, it is concluded that Cfree...

  19. [Detection of trace elements in the sediment of Lop Nur samples by ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; An, Deng-Di; Dlinur, Mlik; Li, Jiang; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Ji, Heng-Ying; Zhu, Yan-Lei

    2012-06-01

    Twenty eight trace elements in the sediment of Lop Nur in different latitude and longitude were tested by ICP-MS. The results showed that the metal contents in the soil profile followed a growing trend from the surface to the bottom. And the essential element P for living body in each sample was very low, and was the lowest on the surface, while was matched in the other four layers. The results will help to understand the ecosystem evolution of Lop Nur drying up after the sediment deposition.

  20. Determination of radioactivity levels and hazards of soil and sediment samples in Firtina Valley (Rize, Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaz, A.; Kuecuekoemeroglu, B. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon, TR 61080 (Turkey); Keser, R.; Okumusoglu, N.T.; Korkmaz, F. [Department of Physics, University of Rize, Rize, TR 53100 (Turkey); Karahan, G. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center P.O. Box 1, Atatuerk Airport, Istanbul, TR 34381 (Turkey); Cevik, U. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon, TR 61080 (Turkey)], E-mail: ugurc@ktu.edu.tr

    2007-11-15

    The natural radioactivity levels in soil and sediment samples of Firtina Valley have been determined. To our knowledge, there seems to be no information about radioactivity level in the Firtina Valley soils and sediments so far. For this reason, soil and sediment samples were collected along the Firtina Valley and analysis on the collected samples were carried out to determine {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs radioisotopes using high purity germanium detector. The activity concentrations obtained for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Ac, {sup 208}Tl, {sup 40}K and {sup 137}Cs are given in the unit of Bq/kg. The results have been compared with other radioactivity measurements in different country's soils and sediments. The radium equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), the absorbed dose rate (D), the external hazard index (H{sub ex}), the annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) and the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) were also calculated and compared with the international recommended values.

  1. River Sediment Analysis by Slurry Sampling FAAS: Determination of Copper, Zinc and Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Flávia L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental procedure for direct sediment analysis was developed. Using this procedure, copper, zinc and lead were determined and quantitative recoveries for these metals were accomplished at a low cost and with minimal sample manipulation. The influence of the nitric acid concentration on the slurry preparation, as well as the sediment particle size was investigated. Sediment slurries were treated with 6.0 mol L-1 nitric acid and 2% (m/v ammonium chloride, and sonicated for 15 minutes in an ultrasonic bath before quantification by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Using these conditions for a certified reference material, the percentage of recovery for copper, zinc and lead were 96.4 ± 4.9, 97.0 ± 4.0 and 99.7 ± 4.0, respectively.

  2. Uncertainty in predictions of seabed sediment classes based on grab samples and acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Murray; Dove, Dayton; Green, Sophie; Stewart, Heather; Marchant, Ben; Diesing, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Mapping seabed habitats is an essential prerequisite to policy and management decisions. The texture of the seabed sediments, defined with respect to the proportions of gravel, sand and mud size fractions, is a basic property that distinguishes sedimentary seabed habitats under the EUNIS habitat classification scheme. EUNIS sediment habitats are defined on this 2-D texture triangle. The composition of the seabed sediments at an unsampled site can be predicted by additive log-ratio cokriging from grab samples, and it is possible to include acoustic backscatter and bathymetry data to improve the precision of these predictions. In this presentation we shall show how this is achieved. The prediction distribution on the texture triangle can be summarized to express the uncertainty of these kriging predictions. Probabilities can be computed for each EUNIS texture class, and the uncertainty expressed with respect either to the probability of the most probable class, or the information content of the set of class probabilities summarized by their entropy.

  3. Characterizing spatial structure of sediment E. coli populations to inform sampling design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, Gregory S; Jamieson, Rob C; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Bezanson, Greg S; Yost, Chris K

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli can persist in streambed sediments and influence water quality monitoring programs through their resuspension into overlying waters. This study examined the spatial patterns in E. coli concentration and population structure within streambed morphological features during baseflow and following stormflow to inform sampling strategies for representative characterization of E. coli populations within a stream reach. E. coli concentrations in bed sediments were significantly different (p = 0.002) among monitoring sites during baseflow, and significant interactive effects (p = 0.002) occurred among monitoring sites and morphological features following stormflow. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression revealed that water velocity and effective particle size (D 10) explained E. coli concentration during baseflow, whereas sediment organic carbon, water velocity and median particle diameter (D 50) were important explanatory variables following stormflow. Principle Coordinate Analysis illustrated the site-scale differences in sediment E. coli populations between disconnected stream segments. Also, E. coli populations were similar among depositional features within a reach, but differed in relation to high velocity features (e.g., riffles). Canonical correspondence analysis resolved that E. coli population structure was primarily explained by spatial (26.9–31.7 %) over environmental variables (9.2–13.1 %). Spatial autocorrelation existed among monitoring sites and morphological features for both sampling events, and gradients in mean particle diameter and water velocity influenced E. coli population structure for the baseflow and stormflow sampling events, respectively. Representative characterization of streambed E. coli requires sampling of depositional and high velocity environments to accommodate strain selectivity among these features owing to sediment and water velocity heterogeneity.

  4. Inversion of river-bottom sediment parameters using mechanically sampled specimens and subbottom profiling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Zheng; Yang, Yong; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Jun

    2017-06-01

    The study of river dynamics requires knowledge of physical parameters, such as porosity, permeability, and wave propagation velocity, of river-bottom sediments. To do so, sediment properties are determined on mechanically sampled specimens and from subbottom profiling. However, mechanical sampling introduces disturbances that affect test results, with the exception of grain-size distribution. In this study, we perform inversion of acoustic data using the grain-size distribution of mechanically sampled specimens and the relation between porosity and permeability from the Kozeny-Carman equation as prior information. The wave reflection coefficient of the water-silt interface is extracted from the raw subbottom profile. Based on the effective density fluid model, we combine the Kozeny-Carman equation and the wave reflection coefficient. We use experimental data from two Yellow River reservoirs to obtain the wave velocity and density of multiple sections and their spatial variations, and find that the inversion and testing results are in good agreement.

  5. Preconcentration and determination of heavy metals in water, sediment and biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkhanloo Hamid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple, sensitive and accurate column preconcentration method was developed for the determination of Cd, Cu and Pb ions in river water, urine and sediment samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the retention of the analytes on a mixed cellulose ester membrane (MCEM column from buffered sample solutions and then their elution from the column with nitric acid. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of the sample and eluent and flow rates of the sample were evaluated. The effects of diverse ions on the preconcentration were also investigated. The recoveries were >95 %. The developed method was applied to the determination of trace metal ions in river water, urine and sediment samples, with satisfactory results. The 3δ detection limits for Cu, Pb and Cd were found to be 2, 3 and 0.2 μg dm−3, respectively. The presented procedure was successfully applied for determination of the copper, lead and cadmium contents in real samples, i.e., river water and biological samples.

  6. Sediment Sampling for Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Mobile Bay and Mississippi Sound in 2013 (NODC Accession 0116480)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sediment samples were collected at ten sites within Mobile Bay and Mississippi Sound on January 28, 2013, for PAH analysis. All samples tested were below detection...

  7. Archival policies and collections database for the Woods Hole Science Center's marine sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Brian J.; Kelsey, Sarah A.

    2007-01-01

    The Woods Hole Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been an active member of the Woods Hole research community, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for over 40 years. In that time there have been many projects that involved the collection of sediment samples conducted by USGS scientists and technicians for the research and study of seabed environments and processes. These samples were collected at sea or near shore and then brought back to the Woods Hole Science Center (WHSC) for analysis. While at the center, samples are stored in ambient temperature, refrigerated and freezing conditions ranging from +2º Celsius to -18º Celsius, depending on the best mode of preparation for the study being conducted or the duration of storage planned for the samples. Recently, storage methods and available storage space have become a major concern at the WHSC. The core and sediment archive program described herein has been initiated to set standards for the management, methods, and duration of sample storage. A need has arisen to maintain organizational consistency and define storage protocol. This handbook serves as a reference and guide to all parties interested in using and accessing the WHSC's sample archive and also defines all the steps necessary to construct and maintain an organized collection of geological samples. It answers many questions as to the way in which the archive functions.

  8. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of soil and sediment samples from Siwa Oasis, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Wael M.; Ali, Khaled; El-Samman, Hussein M.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.; Gundorina, Svetlana F.; Duliu, Octavian G.

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study geochemical peculiarities of the Siwa Oasis in the Western Egyptian Desert. A total of 34 elements were determined in soil and sediment samples (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Yb, Hf, Ta, Th, and U). For data interpretation Cluster analysis was applied. Comparison with the available literature data was carried out.

  9. Stereochemistry of amino acids in surface samples of a marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, G. E.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    In two surface samples of marine sediment, the percentages of D-alanine and D-aspartic acid are significantly higher than the other D-amino acids and are similar to the range found in soils. The percentage of D-glutamic acid is also higher than the other amino acids but less than D-alanine and D-aspartic acid. These D-amino acids may come mainly from bacteria.

  10. Heavy metals in Morocco Lagoon and river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, L. G.; El Moumni, B.; Collavini, F.; Frignani, M.; Albertazzi, S.

    2003-05-01

    Analyses of Mn, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were carried out in a short core from a salt marsh of the Nador Lagoon (north-eastem Morocco) and in surficial sediment samples collected in the Martil river, which borders the industrial town of Tétouan. Three soit samples and a reservoir sediment were also collected around the town to check the effects of atmospheric delivery of contaminants. ^{137}Cs and ^{210}Pb activity-depth profiles were used to establish a chronology for the core, obtaining an apparent accumulation rate of 0.41 cm y^{-1}. The concentrations of anthropogenic metals in this marsh sediment are low and probably represent natural backgrounds. A recent decrease can be an effect of changing grain size. The Martil River sediments are slightly contaminated by Cu and Pb, whereas the soil samples present anomalous values of Cd and Zn.

  11. Mercury and Methylmercury in Southern Baltic Sea Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miotk M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Surficial sediment samples were collected in several areas of the southern Baltic Sea during cruises of R/V Oceania in spring 2009 and 2010 for all stations and in autumn 2009 for Gdansk Deep and Gotland Deep. Samples were collected with a gravity corer. The top five centimeters of sediment were sampled by cutting it away with a plastic spatula, mixed and stored frozen (-20°C in polyethylene bags until analyses in the laboratory. Sediment cores were analysed for total mercury [HgTOT]and methylmercury [MeHg]. Total Hg concentrations in sediments were between 5,81 ng·g-1 in Odra Eustary and 225 ng·g-1 in Gdansk Deep. Lowest concentration of methylmercury were recorded in Odra Estuary; 61,29 pg·g-1. Highest concentration of MeHg were found in Vistula Estuary, 940,07 pg·g-1.

  12. Mercury Fractionation in Superficial Sediment and Paddy Soil Samples from Tianjin, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhaoji; Fei, Yuhong; Wu, Guoqing; Qian, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Sediment and soil samples from the Beitang River (BR) and the Haihe River (HR) in Tianjin were analyzed to investigate the extent of mercury contamination. The results show that total mercury (THg) contents in the BR and HR sediments were 2241 ± 1024 and 653 ± 450 ng g(-1), and THg in rice paddy soils were 907 ± 345 and 328 ± 286 ng g(-1), respectively. Industrial and domestic sewage were regarded as the main sources of mercury in the two river basins. Sediment-bound mercury in the BR and the HR were found to be predominantly associated with the organic-bound fraction (55 %) and residual fraction and (54 %), while soil-bound mercury was mainly in organic-bound fraction in paddy soils (61 % and 57 %, respectively). The availability of this element (soluble and exchangeable and specifically sorbed fraction) seemed restricted, but significantly higher in the paddy soils than in sediments. Higher soluble and exchangeable, specifically sorbed fraction and organic-bound fraction may promote the higher toxic methylmercury and bioavailable fraction formation in the soils during the rice cultivation.

  13. Photobacterium marinum sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a sediment sample from Palk Bay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, T.N.R.; VijayaBhaskar, Y.; Bhumika, V.; AnilKumar, P.

    and fermentative type of metabolism, non spore forming, facultative anaerobes. The DNA G + C content range for the genus Photobacterium is between 39-50.6 mol%. Genus Photobacterium belongs to the family Vibrionaceae. Some members of the genus are bioluminescent... the samples, temperature was 31oC and salinity was 32.62 ppt. Approximately 100 mg of the sediment sample was suspended in 900 ml of sterile saline water (3% NaCl w/v) and subjected to shaking for 2 h. The supernatant was serially diluted and 100 µl...

  14. Toxicological evaluation of sediment samples from Burns Harbor, Porter County, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Chicago District is authorized to maintain the water depths in Burns Harbor at navigable levels. In order to maintain these levels, sediments must be dredged and disposed of at approved disposal sites. To make a 404 (b) 1 open-water disposal evaluation, the dredged sediment may be evaluated through a series of toxicological tests to assess its potential for causing an adverse environmental effect. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted by USACE to perform these freshwater toxicity tests. The tests were designed to simulate conditions that organisms living within an aquatic dredged material disposal site might experience during disposal operations, and included both bedded-sediment (solid-phase) and suspended-sediment (elutriate) tests. Test samples were collected by USACE personnel and composited into three test treatments representing potential dredging areas (Management Units {number_sign}1, {number_sign}2, and {number_sign}3). Four toxicological tests were conducted in support of this program. The solid-phase tests included the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and the midge, Chironomus tentans. The elutriate tests included the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Daphnia magna. Testing was conducted following standard procedures provided by USACE which are consistent with ASTM protocols and the Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Discharge in Inland and Near Coastal Waters -- Testing Manual (Draft) Inland Testing Manual (EPA/USACE 1993), known as the ``Draft Inland Testing Manual.`` The suitability of sediment representing the management units for open-water disposal was evaluated following the guidelines contained in the Draft Inland Testing Manual.

  15. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusdado, Pedro; Guedes, Magno; Silva, André; Marques, Francisco; Pinto, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Lourenço, André; Mendonça, Ricardo; Santana, Pedro; Corisco, José; Almeida, Susana Marta; Portugal, Luís; Caldeira, Raquel; Barata, José; Flores, Luis

    2016-09-09

    This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus' estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional) human-based sampling.

  16. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Deusdado

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus’ estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional human-based sampling.

  17. Sediment Sampling in Estuarine Mudflats with an Aerial-Ground Robotic Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusdado, Pedro; Guedes, Magno; Silva, André; Marques, Francisco; Pinto, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Paulo; Lourenço, André; Mendonça, Ricardo; Santana, Pedro; Corisco, José; Almeida, Susana Marta; Portugal, Luís; Caldeira, Raquel; Barata, José; Flores, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robotic team suited for bottom sediment sampling and retrieval in mudflats, targeting environmental monitoring tasks. The robotic team encompasses a four-wheel-steering ground vehicle, equipped with a drilling tool designed to be able to retain wet soil, and a multi-rotor aerial vehicle for dynamic aerial imagery acquisition. On-demand aerial imagery, properly fused on an aerial mosaic, is used by remote human operators for specifying the robotic mission and supervising its execution. This is crucial for the success of an environmental monitoring study, as often it depends on human expertise to ensure the statistical significance and accuracy of the sampling procedures. Although the literature is rich on environmental monitoring sampling procedures, in mudflats, there is a gap as regards including robotic elements. This paper closes this gap by also proposing a preliminary experimental protocol tailored to exploit the capabilities offered by the robotic system. Field trials in the south bank of the river Tagus’ estuary show the ability of the robotic system to successfully extract and transport bottom sediment samples for offline analysis. The results also show the efficiency of the extraction and the benefits when compared to (conventional) human-based sampling. PMID:27618060

  18. The Elbe flood in August 2002--organic contaminants in sediment samples taken after the flood event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Burkhard; Jantzen, Eckard; Knoth, Wilhelm; Krüger, Frank; Lepom, Peter; Oetken, Matthias; Reincke, Heinrich; Sawal, Georg; Schwartz, René; Uhlig, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    In the course of this study 37 sediment samples were analyzed. They were taken after the flooding in September 2002 along the Elbe and at the mouths of its major tributaries. The sampling program covered the entire river stretch that was affected by the floods, from Obristvi (Czech Republic) to the Elbe estuary (North Sea) on the German coast. Analyses were performed for dioxins, nonylphenols, nonylphenol ethoxylates, bisphenol A, DEHP, musk fragrances, polybrominated diphenylethers, chloroalkylphosphates, organochlorine compounds, PAH, and organotin compounds. The results show that only a few weeks after the flood, contaminant concentrations in solid matter were comparable to those prevailing beforehand. Significant sources of contaminant input proved to be the tributaries Vltava (Moldau), Bilina (both in the Czech Republic), and the Mulde (Germany), as well as industrial and municipal sewage treatment works (STW) located along the Elbe. Further point sources are to be found in still water zones such as harbors and abandoned channels. These sources are activated when erosive action stirs up older sediments. Statistical analyses of the congener distribution of the dioxins provided evidence on the sources of these contaminants and freight levels in different river sections. The chemical analyses were complemented by results of ecotoxicological investigations with two sediment organisms (Chironomus riparius and Potamopyrgus antipodarum).

  19. Metal quantification in water and sediment samples of billings reservoir by SR-TXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, Sergio Arnaud; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mails: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; sergioarnaud@hotmail.com; Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br

    2007-07-01

    Billings is the largest reservoir water of the metropolitan Sao Paulo area, with approximately 100km{sup 2} of water. Its basin hydrographic occupies more than 500km{sup 2} in six cities. It concentrates the largest industrial park of South America and only its margins are busy for almost a million inhabitants. The quality of its waters is, therefore, constant of concern of the whole society. In this work the Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X Ray Fluorescence (SR-TXRF) is applied for the identification and quantification of metals in waters and sediments of the Billings dam. A comparison of the levels of metals found with the maximum permissive limits established by the Brazilian legislation was made. The purpose of social context is to contribute for the preservation of the local springs and the rational use of its waters. For the field work they were chosen 19 collection points, included the margins and the central portion of the dam, in agreement with similar approaches the those adopted by the Company of Technology of Environmental Sanitation of Sao Paulo State (CETESB).The water and sediment samples, as well as the certified and standard samples, were analyzed at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, SP, Brazil. Results indicate that the water and the sediments of the reservoir have concentrations above the legal limits. (author)

  20. Determination of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 224}Ra in sediments samples by liquid scintillation counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, M. [Facultad de Fisica. Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, apdo 1065, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080-Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: mvilla@us.es; Moreno, H.P. [E.T.S. Arquitectura. Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012-Sevilla (Spain); Manjon, G. [E.T.S. Arquitectura. Av. Reina Mercedes, 2, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012-Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed for a rapid determination of the activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 224}Ra in sediments by liquid scintillation counting. The importance of the method lies in its application to the measurement of sediments where the Ra-isotopes activity concentration has been increased due to an anthropomorphic enhancement based on releases of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). A sample pre-treatment, including a digestion with aqua regia and a precipitation of hydroxides, was applied to samples before the radium extraction, which was made by co-precipitation with barium. Measurements were done in a low background scintillation spectrometer Quantulus 1220, which can separate and detect simultaneously {alpha} and {beta} particles. Additionally, some improvements are suggested for a better {alpha} and {beta} interference correction of the results. The obtaining of radiochemical yields is also improved using {sup 133}Ba as tracer, which decays by emission of conversion electrons and {gamma}-rays; the wide range of radiochemical yields obtained confirms the need of this analyses. The procedure has been applied to the measurement of riverbed sediments from an estuary in the south-west of Spain, affected in the past by direct and indirect phosphogypsum discharges.

  1. Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This database was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical data from central Colorado in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessment, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessment, and medical geology. The Microsoft Access database serves as a geochemical data warehouse in support of the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 70 analytical laboratory and field methods for 47,478 rock, sediment, soil, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of the USGS or by contract with commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects. In addition, geochemical data from 7,470 sediment and soil samples collected and analyzed under the Atomic Energy Commission National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (henceforth called NURE) have been included in this database. In addition to data from 2,377 samples collected and analyzed under CCAP, this dataset includes archived geochemical data originally entered into the in-house Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database (used by the USGS from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s) and the in-house PLUTO database (used by the USGS from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s). All of these data are maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB and from the NURE database were used to generate most of this dataset. In addition, USGS data that have been excluded previously from the NGDB because the data predate earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  2. Isolation strategies of marine-derived actinomycetes from sponge and sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameş-Kocabaş, E Esin; Uzel, Ataç

    2012-03-01

    During the last two decades, discoveries of new members of actinomycetes and novel metabolites from marine environments have drawn attention to such environments, such as sediment and sponge. For the successful isolation of actinomycetes from marine environments, many factors including the use of enrichment and pre-treatment techniques, and the selection of growth media and antibiotic supplements should be taken into account. High-throughput cultivation is an innovative technique that mimics nature, eliminates undesired, fast-growing bacteria and creates suitable conditions for rare, slow-growing actinomycetes. This review comprehensively evaluates the traditional and innovative techniques and strategies used for the isolation of actinomycetes from marine sponge and sediment samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Surficial geologic map of the Ivanpah 30' x 60' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California, and Clark County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This map was prepared as part of a suite of surficial geologic maps covering the northern Mojave Desert to investigate neotectonic features and map soils of relevance for ecological properties. The map covers an area of the eastern Mojave Desert that includes the Cinder Cones, Cima Dome, Ivanpah Valley, and Lanfair Valley and includes major mountain chains of the Providence, New York, and Ivanpah Mountains, all within the Mojave National Preserve. Surficial geology includes expansive pediments, broad valley-bottom sediment tracts, and dune fields of the Devils Playground. Two Quaternary fault zones are identified, as well as several others that probably are Quaternary.

  4. Fisheries Sediment Data (WIGLEY65 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a part of the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) Seafloor Surficial Sediment (Deck 41) Data File. Deck 41 is an original data file created by the Marine...

  5. Arsenic pollution and fractionation in sediments and mine waste samples from different mine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larios, Raquel; Fernandez-Martinez, Rodolfo [Unidad de Espectroscopia, Division de Quimica, Departamento de Tecnologia, CIEMAT. Av. Complutense, 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez, Rodrigo [Dpto. de Explotacion y Prospeccion de Minas, Universidad de Oviedo, ETS de Ingenieros de Minas, C/Independencia, 13, E-33004 Oviedo (Spain); Rucandio, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.rucandio@ciemat.es [Unidad de Espectroscopia, Division de Quimica, Departamento de Tecnologia, CIEMAT. Av. Complutense, 40, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-01

    A characterization of arsenic pollution and its associations with solid mineral phases in sediments and spoil heap samples from four different abandoned mines in Spain is performed. Three of them were mercury mines located in the same mining district, in the province of Asturias, and the other one, devoted to arsenic mining, is in the province of Leon. A sequential extraction procedure, especially developed for arsenic, was applied for the study of arsenic partitioning. Very high total arsenic concentrations ranging 300-67,000 mg{center_dot}kg{sup -1} were found. Arsenic fractionation in each mine is broadly in accordance with the mineralogy of the area and the extent of the mine workings. In almost all the studied samples, arsenic appeared predominantly associated with iron oxyhydroxides, especially in the amorphous form. Sediments from cinnabar roasted piles showed a higher arsenic mobility as a consequence of an intense ore treatment, posing an evident risk of arsenic spread to the surroundings. Samples belonging to waste piles where the mining activity was less intense presented a higher proportion of arsenic associated with structural minerals. Nevertheless, it represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic fractionation in sediments from different mining areas is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sequential extraction scheme especially designed for arsenic partitioning is applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As associations with mineral pools is in accordance to the mineralogy of each area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As distribution and mobility in each area depends on the extent of mining activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As occurs mainly associated with amorphous iron oxyhydroxides in all samples.

  6. Determination of methylmercury in marine sediment samples: Method validation and occurrence data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, Luis; Vassileva, Emilia, E-mail: e.vasileva-veleva@iaea.org

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method for MeHg determination at trace level in marine sediments is completely validated. • Validation is performed according to ISO-17025 and Eurachem guidelines. • The extraction efficiency of four sample preparation procedures is evaluated. • The uncertainty budget is used as a tool for evaluation of main uncertainty contributors. • Comparison with independent methods yields good agreement within stated uncertainty. - Abstract: The determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in sediment samples is a difficult task due to the extremely low MeHg/THg (total mercury) ratio and species interconversion. Here, we present the method validation of a cost-effective fit-for-purpose analytical procedure for the measurement of MeHg in sediments, which is based on aqueous phase ethylation, followed by purge and trap and hyphenated gas chromatography–pyrolysis–atomic fluorescence spectrometry (GC–Py–AFS) separation and detection. Four different extraction techniques, namely acid and alkaline leaching followed by solvent extraction and evaporation, microwave-assisted extraction with 2-mercaptoethanol, and acid leaching, solvent extraction and back extraction into sodium thiosulfate, were examined regarding their potential to selectively extract MeHg from estuarine sediment IAEA-405 certified reference material (CRM). The procedure based on acid leaching with HNO{sub 3}/CuSO{sub 4}, solvent extraction and back extraction into Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} yielded the highest extraction recovery, i.e., 94 ± 3% and offered the possibility to perform the extraction of a large number of samples in a short time, by eliminating the evaporation step. The artifact formation of MeHg was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC–ICP–MS), using isotopically enriched Me{sup 201}Hg and {sup 202}Hg and it was found to be nonexistent. A full validation approach in line with ISO 17025 and

  7. Interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at an artificial reef site on the inner continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineault, Nicole A.; Trembanis, Arthur C.; Miller, Douglas C.; Capone, Vince

    2013-04-01

    The influence of reef structures on seafloor surface sediments has implications for marine spatial planning and coastal development, including use of the coastal zone for offshore wind energy. We present results of interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at the Redbird artificial reef site, located on the continental shelf offshore of Delaware Bay. The Redbird reef is composed of NYC subway cars, barges, tugboats, and other sunken objects. Since objects were added sporadically between 1996 and 2009, the survey area acts as a natural laboratory to study the evolution of the surrounding seafloor at a structural reef habitat through time. Annual side-scan surveys from 2008 through 2011, and one bathymetric survey in 2010 provide information about surface geology and morphology. Local wave and current data for this time period were analyzed to determine the main morphological agents. Automated backscatter segmentation show that three bottom types dominate and that these large-scale (>10 m) surface sediment patterns persist from year to year. Grab samples reveal that the bottom types are silty sand with clay and sandy gravel. Clear sediment and biological patterns emerged revealing the influence of the objects on the seafloor. Comet-shaped moats of sandy gravel surround single objects and grow to form large-scale coalesced patches around groups of objects. Alignment of sediment patches suggests the periodic hydrodynamic influence of seasonal storms. The abundance and diversity of organisms increases with decreasing clay/silt content. Evidence of scour includes the removal of fine sediments, the formation of moats 1-30 m in diameter and 0.5-1 m deep around the reef objects, and the >1 m settling of objects into the seafloor. Data suggest subway cars reached equilibrium with the environment in 6-7 years, but that larger objects or clusters of objects take a longer time to equilibrate and have farther-reaching effects. Knowledge of local wave and current climate

  8. Sampling interrill water, sediment and nutrient fluxes across vegetation boundaries in the Jornada Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A.; Wainwright, J.; Powell, M.; Brazier, R.

    2003-04-01

    Sediment and nutrients transported in interrill runoff are an important component of biophysical processes in semi-arid environments. However, the fluxes of interrill runoff, sediment and nutrients are diffuse and spatially variable. Methods to estimate these quantities typically employ bounded runoff plots under simulated or natural rainfall. These methods are difficult to install over large areas (e.g. vegetation boundaries), time consuming, and present problems for sampling. In addition, the existence of plot boundaries draws into question the validity of flux measurements, particularly those made on plots established for several years. Here, we describe and present results from simple instrumentation for point measurement of interrill water, sediment and nutrient fluxes. This instrumentation has been installed at over 90 locations across boundaries between tarbush, grass, creosotebush and mesquite communities within the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. Results show, in some cases, as much as an order-of-magnitude difference in fluxes either side of vegetation boundaries. Quantification of these fluxes is important for understanding the relationships that exist among vegetation communities in this type of environment, for understanding the functioning of the environment at a landscape scale, and for determining the processes of vegetation change in semi-arid environments.

  9. Ecotoxicological assessment of aquatic sediments with Caenorhabditis elegans (Nematoda) -- A method for testing liquid medium and whole-sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traunspurger, W.; Haitzer, M.; Hoess, S.; Beier, S. [Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Zoologisches Inst.; Ahlf, W. [TU Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Steinberg, C. [Inst. fuer Gewaesseroekologie und Binnenfischerei, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    The authors present a method using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to assess toxicity in liquid medium and whole-sediment setups. Test duration is 72 h; endpoints are body length, number of eggs inside worms, percentage of gravid worms, and number of offspring per worm. The effect of CdCl{sub 2} on C. elegans in liquid-phase exposures is described as an example. Results from a field study with cadmium polluted sediments from the River Elbe (Germany) suggest that nematodes may be useful organisms in assessing toxicity of sediments in the whole phase.

  10. Acute and chronic toxicity of sediment samples from Guanabara Bay (RJ during the rainy period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Alves Maranho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Guanabara Bay is a marine-estuarine environment of high ecological and socio-economic importance, subject to a variety of environmental impacts. Sediment is the eventual repository for most substances introduced into water bodies and may, therefore, provide an integrated measure of the environmental quality, which can be assessed by many different approaches. In this project, the quality of sediments from Guanabara Bay was evaluated by the ecotoxicological approach: whole-sediment toxicity tests, using Tiburonella viscana, and porewater, elutriate and sediment-water interface chronic toxicity tests, using embryos of Lytechinus variegatus, were applied. Sediments were collected at 14 sampling stations, distributed across the bay. Chronic tests showed significant toxicity in most of the sediment samples. Sediments from stations 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12 and 15 showed acute toxicity as well. The results of the different tests were well correlated, and their integration showed that the sediments analyzed were considered unsuitable for aquatic life, resulting in the environmental degradation of Guanabara Bay. In this context, the control of pollution sources and multi-purpose management are required to improve the environmental quality.A Baía de Guanabara é um ambiente marinho-estuarino de grande relevância ecológica e sócio-econômica, e sujeita a uma ampla gama de impactos ambientais. O sedimento é o principal destino para a maioria das substâncias introduzidas nos corpos d'água, podendo fornecer uma medida integrada da qualidade ambiental, a qual pode ser avaliada por várias abordagens. Neste projeto, a qualidade de sedimentos da Baía de Guanabara foi por uma abordagem ecotoxicológica, por meio de testes de toxicidade aguda de sedimento integral, utilizando Tiburonella viscana, e testes de toxicidade crônica de água intersticial, elutriato e interface sedimento-água, utilizando embriões de Lytechinus variegatus. Os sedimentos foram

  11. Radiocarbon sample data and calibrated ages of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release is a spreadsheet including radiocarbon sample information and calibrated ages of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore of Palos...

  12. Toxicity Tests of Whole Sediment Samples Using the Hyallella (H. azteca) Survival and Growth Tests (ASTM E 1283-93)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 10-day toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca were conducted with sediment samples collected by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bloomington, Indiana facility to...

  13. Arsenic pollution and fractionation in sediments and mine waste samples from different mine sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios, Raquel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Álvarez, Rodrigo; Rucandio, Isabel

    2012-08-01

    A characterization of arsenic pollution and its associations with solid mineral phases in sediments and spoil heap samples from four different abandoned mines in Spain is performed. Three of them were mercury mines located in the same mining district, in the province of Asturias, and the other one, devoted to arsenic mining, is in the province of León. A sequential extraction procedure, especially developed for arsenic, was applied for the study of arsenic partitioning. Very high total arsenic concentrations ranging 300-67,000 mg·kg(-1) were found. Arsenic fractionation in each mine is broadly in accordance with the mineralogy of the area and the extent of the mine workings. In almost all the studied samples, arsenic appeared predominantly associated with iron oxyhydroxides, especially in the amorphous form. Sediments from cinnabar roasted piles showed a higher arsenic mobility as a consequence of an intense ore treatment, posing an evident risk of arsenic spread to the surroundings. Samples belonging to waste piles where the mining activity was less intense presented a higher proportion of arsenic associated with structural minerals. Nevertheless, it represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A scuba diving direct sediment sampling methodology on benthic transects in glacial lakes: procedure description, safety measures, and tests results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Alfonso

    2014-11-01

    This work presents an in situ sediment sampling method on benthic transects, specifically intended for scientific scuba diver teams. It was originally designed and developed to sample benthic surface and subsurface sediments and subaqueous soils in glacial lakes up to a maximum depth of 25 m. Tests were conducted on the Sabocos and Baños tarns (i.e., cirque glacial lakes) in the Spanish Pyrenees. Two 100 m transects, ranging from 24.5 to 0 m of depth in Sabocos and 14 m to 0 m deep in Baños, were conducted. In each test, 10 sediment samples of 1 kg each were successfully collected and transported to the surface. This sampling method proved operative even in low visibility conditions (sampling tests were conducted in Sabocos and Truchas tarns. This sampling methodology can be easily adapted to accomplish underwater sampling campaigns in nonglacial lakes and other continental water or marine environments.

  15. Sidescan-Sonar Imagery and Surficial Geologic Interpretations of the Sea Floor in Central Rhode Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Denny, J.F.; Haupt, T.A.; Crocker, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to interpret the surficial geology of areas along the northeastern coast of the United States. During 2004, the NOAA Ship RUDE conducted Hydrographic Survey H11321 in Rhode Island Sound. This sidescan-sonar and bathymetry survey covers an area of 93 km? located 12 km southeast of Brenton Point, RI in water depths of 28-39 m (fig. 1). The purpose of this report is to delineate sea floor features and sedimentary environments of this area in central Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11321 and seismic-reflection data from a previous USGS field study (Needell and others, 1983a). This is important for the study of benthic habitats and provides a framework for future research. Prior work in this area includes the mapping of surface sediments and surficial geology. McMaster (1960) collected sediment samples from Rhode Island Sound and Narragansett Bay and mapped our study area as having a sandy sea floor. In addition, one sample of sand from the National Ocean Service (NOS) Hydrographic Database came from a location in the northeast part of our study area in 1939 (fig. 2; Poppe and others, 2003). McMaster and others (1968) used seismic-reflection profiles to map the locations of a cuesta of Cretaceous sediments crossing Rhode Island Sound and post-Cretaceous drainage channels. Knebel and others (1982) identified sedimentary environments in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan sonographs. Needell and others (1983b) studied the Quaternary geology and mapped the structure, sedimentary environments, and geologic hazards in Rhode Island Sound using sidescan-sonar and seismic-reflection data. Sidescan-sonar and bathymetric data from NOAA Survey H11320, which overlaps the far eastern edge of our study area, was interpreted to consist of basins surrounded by a moraine and bathymetric highs composed of till with areas of rocks

  16. Assessment of sediment contamination and sampling design in Savona Harbour, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Ombretta; Massabò, Marco; Fissore, Francesca; Moranda, Arianna

    2015-02-15

    A method for assessing environmental contamination in harbour sediments and designing the forthcoming monitoring activities in enlarged coastal ecosystems is proposed herein. The method is based on coupling principal component analysis of previous sampling campaigns with a discrete optimisation of a value for money function. The objective function represents the utility derived for every sum of money spent in sampling and chemical analysis. The method was then used to assess actual contamination and found to be well suited for reducing the number of chemicals to be searched during extended monitoring activities and identifying the possible sources of contamination. Data collected in Savona Harbour (Porto Vado), Italy, where construction of a new terminal construction is planned, were used to illustrate the procedure. 23 chemicals were searched for within a total of 213 samples in 68 sampling points during three monitoring campaigns. These data were used to test the procedure. Subsequently, 28 chemicals were searched for within 14 samples in 10 sampling points and collected data were used to evaluate the experimental error and to validate the proposed procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Spreading of sediment due to underwater blasting and dredging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Bach, Lis; Bollwerk, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    leads to a wider spreading of the organic part of the sediment. Almost all material less than 2 μm, including surficial clay minerals and much organic material, was transported away from the construction site and its vicinity, which could imply mobilization and export of pollutants. Environmental...... or maybe even increasing the spreading of sediment, depending on, e.g., the resilience of the flora and fauna and the surficial sediment and the pollution therein....

  18. The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causseaux, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida, contains potable water throughout most of the county and is a potential source of water to augment the public supply that is presently imported from adjacent counties. The county accounts for 38 percent of the public supply consumption of ground water in the 11-county area of west-central Florida and 68 percent of this water is imported from two adjacent counties. The surficial aquifer has a saturated thickness of more than 30 feet throughout most of the county. Specific capacity per foot of screen for wells is less than 0.1 gallon per minute per foot of drawdown in some parts of the county, but yield is sufficient in most of the county for many small uses with shallow-well pumps. Minimum potential yield varies from 5 gallons per minute in the northern part of the county to more than 30 gallons per minute in the south. Concentrations of iron are high enough in parts of the county to cause staining. Chloride concentrations are less than 100 milligrams per liter in most of the county and do not pose a problem for many uses. (USGS)

  19. Microbial processes and communities in sediment samples along a transect across the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Martin; Straaten, Nontje; Mazzini, Adriano

    2015-04-01

    The Lusi eruption represents one of the largest ongoing sedimentary hosted geothermal systems. This eruption started in 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake that stroke Java Island. Since then it has been spewing boiling mud from a central crater with peaks reaching 180.000 m3 per day. Today an area of about 8 km2 is covered by locally dried mud breccia where a network of hundreds of satellite seeping pools is active. Numerous investigations focused on the study of offshore microbial colonies that commonly thrive at offshore methane seeps and mud volcanoes, however very little has been done for onshore seeping structures. Lusi represents a unique opportunity to complete a comprehensive study of onshore microbial communities fed by the seepage of CH4 and CO2 as well as of heavier liquid hydrocarbons originating from several km below the surface. We conducted a sampling campaign at the Lusi site collecting samples of fresh mud close to the erupting crater using a remote controlled drone. In addition we completed a transect towards outer parts of the crater to collect older, weathered samples for comparison. In all samples active microorganisms were present. The highest activities for CO2 and CH4 production as well as for CH4 oxidation and hydrocarbon degradation were observed in medium-age mud samples collected roughly in the middle of the transect. Rates for aerobic methane oxidation were high, as was the potential of the microbial communities to degrade hydrocarbons (oils, alkanes, BTEX tested). The data suggests a transition of microbial populations from an anaerobic, hydrocarbon-driven metabolism in fresher samples from center or from small seeps to more generalistic, aerobic microbial communities in older, more consolidated sediments. Currently, the microbial communities in the different sediment samples are analyzed using quantitative PCR and T-RFLP combined with MiSeq sequencing. This study represents an initial step to better understand onshore seepage

  20. Pulp-mill related polychlorinated organic compounds in Baltic Sea sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Per (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Solna (Sweden)); Rappe, C.; Kjeller, L.O. (Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Chemistry); Kierkegaard, A. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Applied Environmental Research); Haakansson, L. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Sciences); Jonsson, Bjoern (County Adm. Board, Umeaa (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    Sediment samples from the Baltic basin were analyzed for PCDD/Fs, alkyl-CDFs, chloroguaiacols and EOCl. The EOCl distribution pattern in the Iggesund pulp-mill area shows high sediment concentrations close to the mill, and decreasing concentrations with increasing distance from the mill. Two series of alkyl-CDFs have been identified. The PCDD/Fs in offshore surficial sediments from the Baltic proper show a typical incineration pattern, while sediments collected in the vicinity of the mill show enhanced levels of 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD, 2,3,7,8- and 1,2,7,8-tetraCDF, and 1,2,3,7,8-pentaCDD. These PCDD/F congeners are statistically correlated to di-, tri-, and tetrachloroguaiacols, alkyl-CDFs, EOCl, and to the distance from the pulp mill, indicating the same source and transportation regime. Principal component analysis of the data set supports this conclusion. The three 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-substituted PCDD/F congeners have formerly been found in high concentrations in sediments and crab hepatopancreas close to a pulp mill on the Swedish west coast. Our results from a pulp mill on the Swedish east coast support the conclusion that these congeners are typically associated with pulp bleaching. Deep layer sediments have significantly lower levels of PCDD/Fs. The isomer profiles are different in the surficial and the deep sediments, indicating a more natural preindustrial production of PCDD/Fs. (53 refs., 7 figs.).

  1. Soil and sediment sample analysis for the sequential determination of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, H; Levent, D; Barci, V; Barci-Funel, G; Hurel, C

    2008-02-15

    A new sequential method for the determination of both natural (U, Th) and anthropogenic (Sr, Cs, Pu, Am) radionuclides has been developed for application to soil and sediment samples. The procedure was optimised using a reference sediment (IAEA-368) and reference soils (IAEA-375 and IAEA-326). Reference materials were first digested using acids (leaching), 'total' acids on hot plate, and acids in microwave in order to compare the different digestion technique. Then, the separation and purification were made by anion exchange resin and selective extraction chromatography: transuranic (TRU) and strontium (SR) resins. Natural and anthropogenic alpha radionuclides were separated by uranium and tetravalent actinide (UTEVA) resin, considering different acid elution medium. Finally, alpha and gamma semiconductor spectrometer and liquid scintillation spectrometer were used to measure radionuclide activities. The results obtained for strontium-90, cesium-137, thorium-232, uranium-238, plutonium-239+240 and americium-241 isotopes by the proposed method for the reference materials provided excellent agreement with the recommended values and good chemical recoveries. Plutonium isotopes in alpha spectrometry planchet deposits could be also analysed by ICPMS.

  2. An Evaluation of Contaminant Flux Rates from Sediments of Sinclair Inlet, WA, Using a Benthic Flux Sampling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    typically penetrated from 1 to 5 mm into the sediment column. The sediment penetration of oxygen agrees well with data reported by Wester - lund (1989...solution and minimize oxidation of sample during the measurement. 3. Rinse sulfide and reference electrodes into waste container and blot dry with absorbent...standardization techniques. 1. Preparation a. Wash crystals of Na2S-9H20 with deionized water and blot dry. b. Weigh approximately 12 g of Na2S*9H20 and

  3. Sediment Monitoring and Benthic Faunal Sampling Adjacent to the Barbers Point Ocean Outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1986-2010 (NODC Accession 9900098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic fauna and sediment in the vicinity of the Barbers Point (Honouliuli) ocean outfall were sampled from 1986-2010. To assess the environmental quality, sediment...

  4. Sediment monitoring and benthic faunal sampling adjacent to the Sand Island ocean outfall, Oahu, Hawaii, 1986-2010 (NODC Accession 9900088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic fauna and sediment in the vicinity of the Sand Island ocean outfall were sampled from 1986-2010. To assess the environmental quality, sediment grain size and...

  5. Marine sediments and palaeoclimatic variations since the Late Pleistocene: An overview for the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    A large number of surfacial and sub-surface sediments from the Arabian Sea have been studied to enhance our understanding of palaeoclimatic variations over the Indian region. Bsically the surficial sediments have been studied for their living...

  6. Bed-Sediment Sampling and Analysis for Physical and Chemical Properties of the Lower Mississippi River near Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Robert A.; Wagner, Daniel M.; Evans, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    In February 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District, investigated the presence of inorganic elements and organic compounds in bed sediments of the lower Mississippi River. Selected sites were located in the navigation channel near river miles 737, 773, and 790 near Memphis, Tennessee. Bed-sediment samples were collected using a Shipek grab sampler mounted to a boom crane with a motorized winch. Samples then were processed and shipped to the U.S. Geological Survey Sediment Laboratory in Rolla, Missouri, the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, and to TestAmerica Laboratory, Inc. in West Sacramento, California. Samples were analyzed for grain size, inorganic elements (including mercury), and organic compounds. Chemical results were tabulated and listed with sediment-quality guidelines and presented with the physical property results. All of the bed material samples collected during this investigation yielded concentrations that were less than the Consensus-Based Probable Effect Concentration guidelines. The physical properties were tabulated and listed using a standard U.S. Geological Survey scale of sizes by class for sediment analysis. All of the samples collected during this investigation indicated a percent composition mostly comprised of sand, ranging from less than 0.125 millimeters to less than 2 millimeters.

  7. Surficial geological tools in fluvial geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.; O'connor, James; Oguchi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental scientists are increasingly asked how rivers and streams have been altered by past environmental stresses, whether rivers are subject to physical or chemical hazards, how they can be restored and how they will respond to future environmental changes. These questions present substantive challenges to the discipline of fluvial geomorphology as they require a long-term understanding of river-system dynamics. Complex and non-linear responses of rivers to environmental stresses indicate that synoptic or short-term historical views of rivers will often give an incomplete understanding. Fluvial geomorphologists can address questions involving complex river behaviours by drawing from a tool box that includes the principles and methods of geology applied to the surficial geological record. A central concept in Earth Sciences holds that ‘the present is the key to the past’ (Hutton 1788, cited in Chorley et al. 1964), that is, understanding of current processes permits the interpretation of past deposits. Similarly, an understanding of the past can be key to predicting the future. A river’s depositional history can be indicative of trends or episodic behaviours that can be attributed to particular environmental stresses or forcings. Its history may indicate the role of low-frequency events such as floods or landslides in structuring a river and its floodplain or a river’s depositional history can provide an understanding of its natural characteristics to serve as a reference condition for assessments and restoration. However, the surficial geological record contained in river deposits is incomplete and biased and it presents numerous challenges of interpretation. The stratigraphic record in general has been characterized as ‘ … a lot of holes tied together with sediment’ (Ager 1993). Yet this record is critical in the development of integrated understanding of fluvial geomorphology because it provides information that is not available from other

  8. Concentration of Antifouling Biocides and Metals in Sediment Core Samples in the Northern Part of Hiroshima Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Tsunemasa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Ot alternative antifoulants in sediment is the focus of this research. Much research had been done on surface sediment, but in this report, the accumulation in the sediment core was studied. The Ot alternative antifoulants, Diuron, Sea-Nine211, and Irgarol 1051, and the latter’s degradation product, M1, were investigated in five samples from the northern part of Hiroshima Bay. Ot compounds (tributyltin (TBT and triphenyltin (TPT were also investigated for comparison. In addition, metal (Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn levels and chronology were measured to better understand what happens after accumulation on the sea floor. It was discovered that Ot alternative antifoulant accumulation characteristics in sediment were like Ot compounds, with the concentration in the sediment core being much higher than surface sediment. The concentration in sediment seems to have been affected by the regulation of Ot compounds in 1990, due to the concentration of Ot alternative antifoulants and Ot compounds at the survey point in front of the dock, showing an increase from almost the same layer after the regulation.

  9. Comparison of total Hg results in sediment samples from Rio Grande reservoir determine by NAA and CV AAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Robson L., E-mail: robsonf@cetesbnet.sp.gov.br [Centro Tecnologico de Saneamento Basico (ELAI/CETESB), SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Laboratorio de Quimica Inorganica; Bevilacqua, Jose Eduardo [Centro Tecnologico de Saneamento Basico (CETESB), SP, Sao Paulo (Brazil). UNIFIEO - Centro Universitario FIEO; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica (LAN/CRPq)

    2011-07-01

    The Rio Grande reservoir is located in the Metropolitan area of Sao Paulo and it is used for recreation purposes and as source water for drinking water production. During the last decades has been detected mercury contamination in the sediments of this reservoir, mainly in the eastern part, near the main affluent of the reservoir, in the Rio Grande da Serra and Ribeirao Pires counties. In the present study bottom sediment samples were collected in four different sites into four sampling campaigns during the period of September 2008 to January 2010. The samples were dried at room temperature, ground and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Total Hg determination in the sediment samples was carried out by two different analytical techniques: neutron activation analysis (NAA) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). The methodology validation, in terms of precision and accuracy, was performed by reference materials, and presented a recovery of 83 to 108%. The total Hg results obtained by both analytical techniques ranged from 3 to 71 mg kg-1 and were considered similar by statistical analysis, even though NAA technique furnishes the total concentration while CV AAS using the 3015 digestion procedure characterizes only the bioavailable Hg. These results confirm that both analytical techniques were suitable to detect the Hg concentration levels in the Rio Grande sediments studied. The Hg levels in the sediment of the Rio Grande reservoir confirm the anthropogenic origin for this element in this ecosystem. (author)

  10. Analysis of sediment, water, and biological samples from the Bay Farm Borrow Area, San Francisco Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thom, R.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. (Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The Bay Farm Borrow Area (BFBA) of San Francisco Bay, California, is under consideration as a dredged-material disposal site by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). As part of the analysis of the site, information is required on the quality of benthic biota, sediment, and water in the BFBA. The objective of this report was to provide data on infauna communities, sediment, and water chemistry from samples collected from the BFBA. The samples were collected, and the data will be analyzed by Science Applications International (SAIC). A total of four samples for sediment chemistry, four samples for water chemistry, and 7 samples for infauna communities were analyzed by the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL). Water analyses included tests for dissolved organic carbon, total suspended solids, four metals, butyltins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), four phenols, and total phenol. Sediment samples were analyzed for percent solids, total organic carbon, total oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, grain size, 10 metals, butyltins, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides, PAHs, four phenols, and total phenol. The data along with controls and spike recovery analyses, are presented in tables, and the results are discussed in the text. The quality assurance/quality control criteria were met for the analyses as were the detection limits specified by the sponsor.

  11. Additional Sediment/Soil Sampling Conducted at the Little Sioux Bend Shallow Water Habitat Project Site during October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of...0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 - 2 2 - 4 4 - 6 6 - 8 8 - 10 Percent Compostion of Sediment/Soil Samples Collected at Site LS-D1 D ep th In te rv... Compostion of Sediment/Soil Samples Collected at Site LS-D2 D ep th In te rv al (f ee t) Gravel - Fine Sand - Coarse Sand - Medium Sand - Fine Silt

  12. Determination of TBT in water and sediment samples along the Argentine Atlantic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waisbaum, R G; Rodriguez, C; Nudelman, N Sbarbati

    2010-11-01

    Cases of imposex have been reported for some organisms living in areas of the Argentine Atlantic coast. Since this is one of the known effects of the anti-fouling agent tributyltin (TBT), quantitative determinations of organotins in samples of water and sediments collected from sites along the Argentine coast were carried out. Severe cases of imposex were first reported for two gastropod species living in the Mar del Plata area, and determinations of TBT in samples collected from this site gave extremely high values and showed a close correlation between the degree of imposex and TBT concentration. Recent investigations in the area have shown a significant decrease. Surveys were also conducted in sites that exhibit highly irregular coastal profiles to examine the relevance of physical environments. Alarming concentrations of TBT were determined in most of the sites where heavy boat traffic and/or marine activities occur, demonstrating the urgent need for regulations to avoid further input of TBT. Reports from other sites in South America reveal that this should be a subject of regional concern in order to avoid severe damage to the biodiversity of regional marine organisms.

  13. Assessment of metal concentrations in sediments from Lake Bafa (Western Anatolia): an index analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilgor, Sinem; Kucuksezgin, Filiz; Ozel, Erdeniz

    2012-09-01

    Metals, organic carbon contents were determined in surficial and core sediment samples from Lake Bafa, Western Anatolia in 2010. The ranges of Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cr, Zn and Hg contents of sediments from the Bafa Lake were 9.4-35 g kg(-1), 250-780, 2.3-20, 5.8-55, 1.2-480, 63-278, 26.6-79.9 and 0.013-0.273 mg kg(-1), respectively. The mean metal concentrations in surficial sediments obtained in this study decreased in the following order; Fe > Mn > Ni > Cr > Zn > Cu > Pb > Hg for Bafa lake. Total organic carbon concentrations of the bottom sediments from the Bafa Lake varied between 0.35% and 3.58%. The mean concentrations of metal were lower than the background levels in earth crust except Cr and Ni in the core sediments. The metal levels were evaluated according to the New Geo-accumulation Index, enrichment and contamination factors. The results confirmed that the Bafa Lake is not facing serious environmental pollution risk due to metal contamination except Hg. The levels of Cr, Ni, Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn generally appear to be uniformly distributed with depth except Hg and Pb due to anthropogenic sources in the core sediments.

  14. Effects of Surfactant Adsorption on Surficial Wettability of Nonwoven Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bing; TANG Bing; LI Rui-xia; WU Da-cheng

    2002-01-01

    All types of surfactants (cationic, anionic and nonionic)reported in this paper could enhance the surficiai wettability of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nonwoven fabrics. However, the effects of cationic and nonionic surfactants were better.The longer the treatment time of surfactants on the nonwoven fabrics, the better the surficial wettability.The surficial rewetting time would no longer change above a certain treatment time. The rewettability of nonwoven fabrics could be evidently improved just when the concentration of surfactants was just above the CMC,except for sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (LAS). The finer the fibers and the looser the structures, the better the surficial rewettability of nonwoven fabrics.

  15. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  16. Concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated naphthalenes in surface sediment samples from Wuxi, Suzhou, and Nantong, in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linli; Zhang, Lifei; Dong, Liang; Huang, Yeru; Li, Xiaoxiu

    2015-11-01

    The concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) were determined in surface sediment samples from Wuxi, Suzhou, and Nantong, in the Yangtze River Delta (East China), which has become urbanized rapidly. The total PCN (tri- to octachlorinated naphthalenes) concentrations in the samples from Wuxi, Suzhou, and Nantong were 0.89-40, 2.8-4600, and 0.60-34 ng/gdry weight, respectively. Unexpectedly high PCN concentrations were found in four of the sediment samples. The PCN concentrations were much higher in the samples from the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal than in the samples from the Yangtze River. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations (determined from the concentrations of the "dioxin-like" PCNs) ranged from 1.45×10(-7) to 2.16 ng TEQ/g, and the congeners CN-66/67 and CN-73 were the predominant contributors to the TEQs. Independent samples t-tests were performed, and no significant differences were found between the PCN concentrations in the samples from the metropolitan area and the development zone when the four development-zone samples that contained very high PCN concentrations were excluded. The PCN profiles were dominated by the hexa- to octachlorinated naphthalene homologs. The CN-66/67 to CN-71/72 and CN-66 to CN-67 concentration ratios were used to identify specific PCN sources. Emissions from chemical and other industrial plants were found to have strongly influenced the PCN concentrations in sediment in the study area.

  17. Analytical Results for 42 Fluvial Tailings Cores and 7 Stream Sediment Samples from High Ore Creek, Northern Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.

    1998-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acid-generation and toxic-metal solubility. Sediments, fluvial tailings and water from High Ore Creek have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of the Boulder River below Basin, Montana. A study of 42 fluvial tailings cores and 7 stream sediments from High Ore Creek was undertaken to determine the concentrations of environmentally sensitive elements (i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) present in these materials, and the mineral phases containing those elements. Two sites of fluvial deposition of mine-waste contaminated sediment on upper High Ore Creek were sampled using a one-inch soil probe. Forty-two core samples were taken producing 247 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) using a total mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements described above are present at very high concentrations (to 22,000 ppm As, to 460 ppm Ag, to 900 ppm Cd, 4,300 ppm Cu, 46,000ppm Pb, and 50,000 ppm Zn). Seven stream-sediment samples were also analyzed by ICP-AES for total element content and for leachable element content. Results show that the sediment of High Ore Creek has elevated levels of ore-related metals throughout its length, down to the confluence with the Boulder River, and that the metals are, to a significant degree, contained in the leachable phase, namely the hydrous amorphous iron- and manganese-hydroxide coatings on detrital sediment particles.

  18. A seasonal comparison of surface sediment characteristics in Chincoteague Bay, Maryland and Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Alisha M.; Marot, Marci E.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.; Bernier, Julie C.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2016-02-03

    Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague Bay and Tom's Cove, between Assateague Island and the Delmarva Peninsula in late March/early April 2014 and October 2014. The sampling efforts were part of a larger U.S. Geological Survey study to assess the effects of storm events on sediment distribution in back-barrier environments of the United States. By sampling during the spring and fall, a more complete understanding of seasonal variability in the area can help determine baseline conditions. The objective of this study was to characterize the sediments of Chincoteague Bay in order to create baseline conditions to incorporate with the hydrodynamic and sediment transport models used to evaluate pre- and post-storm change and compare with future field measurements.

  19. Multi-proxy geochemical analyses of Indus Submarine Fan sediments sampled by IODP Expedition 355: implications for sediment provenance and palaeoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; George, Simon C.; Bendle, James; Liddy, Hannah; Clift, Peter D.; Pandey, Dhananjai K.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Andò, Sergio; Tiwari, Manish; Khim, Boo-Keun; Griffith, Elizabeth; Steinke, Stephan; Suzuki, Kenta; Lee, Jongmin; Newton, Kate; Tripathi, Shubham; Expedition 355 Scientific Party

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between the development of the Asian summer monsoon and the growth of mountains in South and Central Asia is perhaps the most compelling example of the relationship between climate and the solid Earth. Understanding this relationship is crucial in the context of understanding past changes and for predicting future impacts in the Monsoon region. Both rapid and gradual mountain uplift influence the surrounding environments and regional climate. The sedimentary record of the Indus Fan offers a unique opportunity to study the climatic changes that occurred in South Asia and their link to the intensity of the erosion during the late Cenozoic. Although some paleoclimate reconstructions in the region can be partly addressed by studies onshore, the dominance of erosional processes in such a mountainous region ensures such records are fragmentary and limited in coverage. Thus ocean drilling is the best way to recover long sequences and to test the possible relations among mountain uplift, erosion, sediment deposition and climate (including carbon burial, chemical weathering and CO2 drawdown). The sediments and sedimentary rocks from the Indian continental margin, adjoining the Arabian Sea, were drilled during the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355. Drilling operations at Site U1456 penetrated through 1109.4 m of sediment and sedimentary rocks. The oldest sediment recovered at this site is dated to 13.5-17.7 Ma, with about 390 m of mass transport deposit. This study provides a multiproxy approach for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions in the Arabian Sea area. We use a wide variety of organic geochemical data coupled with inorganic chemistry, mineralogy, and isotopic analyses. For direct comparison among various data sets, we divided whole round residue from the interstitial water samples among different laboratories, with each receiving 50-300 g (dry mass). The preliminary results include initial sediment provenance data based on bulk

  20. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of water and sediment samples from gypsum mining area in channel catfish ovary (CCO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternjej, Ivančica; Gaurina Srček, Višnja; Mihaljević, Zlatko; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2013-12-01

    Man-made activities such as mining generate certain amounts of metal contaminated wastes which can reach aquatic environment and cause the serious effects on different organisms and ecosystem. Chemical analysis of the environmental samples is the most direct approach to reveal their pollution status but it cannot always provide information on biological effects to different organisms, including fish. This study was aimed to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of water and sediment samples from gypsum mining area using the channel catfish ovary (CCO) cell line. Results obtained by the WST-1 assay and alkaline comet assay revealed that exposure of CCO cells to the same concentrations of contaminated water and sediment samples caused significant decrease in cell viability and increased DNA damages. Chemical analysis of water and sediment samples showed that increased concentrations of strontium, aluminum and iron were mainly responsible for the observed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in CCO cells. The study suggested that fish CCO cells could be useful biological test-system for water and sediment cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessments. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Equilibrium passive sampling as a tool to study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Baltic Sea sediment pore-water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, Susann-Cathrin; Hursthouse, Andrew; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) was applied to provide the first large scale dataset of freely dissolved concentrations for 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Baltic Sea sediment cores. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated glass fibers were used for ex-situ equilibrium sampling followed...

  2. Comparison of Different Extraction Approaches for Heavy Metal Partitioning in Sediment Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.B.ARAIN1,; T.G.KAZI; M.K.JAMALI; J.A.BAIG; H.I.AFRIDI; N.JALBANI; R.A.SARFRAZ

    2009-01-01

    Three extraction methods,ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE),microwave assisted extraction (MSE),and conven tional single extraction (CSE),in conjunction with the modified three-stage BCR sequential extraction procedure (SEP)were applied to examine the contents of Cd,Cu,Cr,Ni,Pb and Zn from lake sediment samples,to know whether these techniques can reduce extraction time and improve reproducibility.The SEP and developed alternative single extraction methods were validated by the analysis of certified reference material BCR 601.By the use of optimized sonication and microwave conditions,steps 1,2 and 3 of the BCR sequential extraction methods (excluding the hydrogen peroxide digestion in step 3,which was not performed with sonication and microwave) could be completed in 15-30 min and 60150 s,respectively.The recoveries of total extractable metal contents in BCR 601,obtained by three single extractions ranged from 93.3%-102%,88.9%-104% and 81.2%-96.2% for CSE,USE and MSE,respectively.The precision of the single extraction methods was found in the range of 3.7%-9.4% for all metals (n=6).

  3. Terrestrial Ecosystems - Surficial Lithology of the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has generated a new classification and map of the lithology of surficial materials for the contiguous United States. This was...

  4. Surficial Geologic Map and Groundwater Resources of Woodstock, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG06-5 DeSimone, D., 2006,�Surficial Geologic Map and Groundwater Resources of Woodstock, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open-File Report...

  5. Surficial Geologic Map of the Bristol Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG13-2 Springston, G, and Kim, J, 2013, Surficial Geologic Map of the Bristol Quadrangle, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  6. Optimizing sample pretreatment for compound-specific stable carbon isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino sugars are quantitatively significant constituents of soil and marine sediment, but their sources and turnover in environmental samples remain poorly understood. The stable carbon isotopic composition of amino sugars can provide information on the lifestyles of their source organisms and can be monitored during incubations with labeled substrates to estimate the turnover rates of microbial populations. However, until now, such investigation has been carried out only with soil samples, partly because of the much lower abundance of amino sugars in marine environments. We therefore optimized a procedure for compound-specific isotopic analysis of amino sugars in marine sediment employing gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The whole procedure consisted of hydrolysis, neutralization, enrichment, and derivatization of amino sugars. Except for the derivatization step, the protocol introduced negligible isotopic fractionation, and the minimum requirement of amino sugar for isotopic analysis was 20 ng, i.e. equivalent to ~ 8 ng of amino sugar carbon. Our results obtained from δ13C analysis of amino sugars in selected marine sediment samples showed that muramic acid had isotopic imprints from indigenous bacterial activities, whereas glucosamine and galactosamine were mainly derived from organic detritus. The analysis of stable carbon isotopic compositions of amino sugars opens a promising window for the investigation of microbial metabolisms in marine sediments and the deep marine biosphere.

  7. Geochronological arguments for a close relationship between surficial formation profiles and environmental crisis (c. 3000-2000 BP) in Gabon (Central Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Flehoc, Christine; Ebang-Obiang, Michel; Rigollet, Christophe; Prian, Jean-Pierre; Prognon, François

    2013-07-01

    We present new 14C data on charcoal fragments recovered from the lower (coarse-grained Stone Line) and upper (fine-grained Cover Horizon) portions of surficial formation profiles in Gabon. These data and others compiled from the literature enable a reconstruction of the Upper Holocene geological regional history of Gabon. The connection between the geological events recorded in the surficial formations and the Upper Holocene environmental crisis is discussed and a scenario connecting geological events with climatic and environmental changes is proposed. Such a scenario suggests that following the climatic crisis, the reconstitution of soils by aeolian sedimentation could have been an important factor of Bantu expansion.

  8. Analytical results and sample locations of reanalyzed NURE stream-sediment and soil samples for the Humboldt River basin mineral-environmental assessment, northern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, H. W.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), began a study in 1996 to describe to the geochemistry of the Humboldt River Basin. The principal sample media evaluated are stream-sediment and soil samples retrieved from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) archives located in Denver, Colorado. Samples were retrieved from the Wells, McDermitt, Vya, Lovelock, Winnemucca, Elko, Ely, Millett, Reno, and Tonopah 1? x 2? quadrangles in northern Nevada. The data are appropriate for large-scale reconnaissance resource evaluations and landscape geochemical-geoenvironmental evaluations. The analytical results are presented in this report.

  9. Sedimentation Pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH Blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg R Brooks

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess (234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation, suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4-5 month period. Further, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess (234Th depths, accumulation rates, and (234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  10. Geochemistry of modern sediments from San Quintín coastal lagoon, Baja California: Implication for provenance

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Walter Daesslé; Gabriel Rendón-Márquez; Víctor F. Camacho-Ibar; Efraín A. Gutiérrez-Galindo; Evgueny Shumilin; Eduardo Ortiz-Campos

    2009-01-01

    A detailed regional grid of 97 surficial sediment samples is studied for the San Quintín coastal lagoon, which is a shallow embayment located adjacent to a “regionally-rare” intraplate-type basaltic terrain known as San Quintín volcanic fi eld. The infl uence that this unique lithology and other potencial sources have on the recent sediment geochemistry is discussed on the basis of geochemical, petrographic and sedimentological results. The sandy silts and silts in the lagoon are enriched in ...

  11. Evaluation of toxicity of sediment samples collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments collected from the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Hidalgo Co in southern Texas, USA. A...

  12. PRECISION OF DIALYSIS (PEEPER) SAMPLING OF CADMIUM IN MARINE SEDIMENT INTERSTITIAL WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isolating and analyzing interstitial water (IW) during sediment toxicity tests enables researchers to relate concentrations of contaminants to responses of organisms, particularly when IW is a primary route of exposure to bioavailable contaminants by benthic dwelling organisms. W...

  13. Wetland Paleoecological Study of Coastal Louisiana: Sediment Cores and Diatom Samples Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Wetland sediment data was collected from coastal Louisiana as part of a pilot study to develop a diatom-based proxy for past wetland water chemistry and the...

  14. Wetland Paleoecological Study of Coastal Louisiana: Sediment Cores and Diatom Samples Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Wetland sediment data was collected from coastal Louisiana as part of a pilot study to develop a diatom-based proxy for past wetland water chemistry and the...

  15. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  16. Determination of organochlorinated compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment sample IAEA-408. Results from a world-wide intercalibration exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, J P; de Mora, S J; Cattini, C; Carvalho, F P

    2000-10-01

    A sediment sample from the intertidal mudflats of the Tagus estuary was prepared, homogenised and distributed globally to laboratories as the IAEA-408 intercomparison material for the analyses of organochlorinated pesticides, PCBs and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHs). A total of 48 laboratories from 36 countries reported their results. The data from participants show that there still remain some difficulties with the accurate determination of organic contaminants such as pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). More consistent interlaboratory results were obtained for PCBs congeners. The final results of this intercomparison exercise enable individual participants to assess their performance and, where necessary, to introduce appropriate modifications in their analytical procedures. Furthermore, as a series of statistical criteria was fulfilled for a number of compounds, the sample IAEA-408 can now be used as a reference material for quality control in the determination of some persistant organic pollutants (POPs) in marine sediment samples.

  17. Marinomonas profundimaris sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea sediment sample of the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Dong, Chunming; Li, Fuying; Shao, Zongze

    2014-09-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain D104(T), which was isolated from deep-sea subsurface sediment sample from the Arctic Ocean. The bacterium was found to be Gram-negative, oxidase negative and catalase weakly positive, rod shaped, motile by means of polar flagellum. The organism grows between 4 and 37 °C (optimum 25-28 °C) and 0.5-6 % NaCl (optimum 3 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain D104(T) belongs to the genus Marinomonas, with highest sequence similarities of 97.7 % to Marinomonas ushuaiensis DSM 15871(T), followed by M. dokdonensis DSW10-10(T) (96.9 %), M. arenicola KMM 3893(T) (96.7 %), M. arctica 328(T) (96.6 %) and other 18 species of the genus Marinomonas (94.4-96.5 %). The average nucleotide identity and estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain D104(T) and M. ushuaiensis DSM 15871(T) were 84.24 % and 20.80 ± 2.33 % respectively. The principal fatty acids were C16:0, sum in feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c), sum in feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c) and C12:1 3OH. The G + C content of the chromosomal DNA was determined to be 44.8 mol%. The respiratory quinone was found to be Q8 (100 %). Polar lipids include phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine as major phospholipids and aminolipid and phospholipid as minor components. The results of the genotypic and phenotypic analyses indicate that strain D104(T) represents a novel species of the genus Marinomonas, for which the name Marinomonas profundimaris sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain D104(T) (=MCCC 1A07573(T) = LMG 27696(T)).

  18. Comparison of the sample collection strategies for the investigation of pollution stage of some heavy metals in marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baysal A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, sampling collection strategies were compared for the determination of some heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Ni and investigate their effects on the marine pollution. The sampling area is a natural bay using as a shipbuilding industries for three decades especially. To determine the permanent heavy metal pollution in this area, the sediment samples were taken different strategies; i the bay were divided square pieces which is 200 m length, and the samples were taken this distance (total 71 point, ii the samples were taken along the shore, then 200 m away the shore and 400 m away the shore (total 58 point. After the sample collection using ISO 5667-12 and EPA sampling procedure, the samples were prepared for the metal analysis. Acid treated samples were analyze by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. As a results both strategies were (are compared for investigation of some heavy metals pollution in marine sediment. The preliminary results were found between below LOD and 401.0 mg/kg for lead, and between 0.10 and 1005.0 mg/kg for chromium. Finally, the permanent heavy metal pollution is investigated in this bay.

  19. Dating of pollen samples from the sediment core of Lake St Anne in the East Carpathian Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubay, Katalin; Katalin Magyari, Enikö; Braun, Mihály; Schabitz, Frank; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Lake St Anne (950 m a.s.l.) is situated in the Ciomadul volcano crater, the youngest volcano in the Carpathians. Aims driving forward the studies there are twofold, one is dating the latest eruption of the Ciomadul volcano and the other is the multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of this region. The sediment of Lake St Anne was sampled several times already, but never reached the bottom of the lake before. During the winter of 2013 at a new core location drilling started at 600 cm water depth and finally reached the bottom of the lake sediment at approximately 2300 cm including water depth. As for all multi-proxy studies essential requirement was to build a reliable chronology. Sediments were dated by radiocarbon method. Previous radiocarbon dates were measured on plant macrofossils, charcoal, Cladocera eggs, chironomid head capsules and bulk lake sediments. Lake St Anne has volcanic origin and there is intensive upwelling of CO2it is important to study and take into consideration, whether there is any local reservoir effect at the case of samples where it could be problematic. Furthermore the late part of the sediment section (between 15,000 and 30,000 cal. yr BP) has low organic matter content (less than 2-4%) with scarcity of datable plant macrofossil material. In this review a different fraction of pollen samples with terrestrial origin was tested and studied as a novel sample type for the radiocarbon dating. Pollen samples were extracted from the lake sediment cores. This type of organic material could be an ideal candidate for radiocarbon based chronological studies as it has terrestrial source and is present in the whole core in contrast with the terrestrial macrofossils. Although the pollen remains were present in the whole core, in many cases their amount give a challenge even for the AMS technic. Samples were measured with EnvironMICADAS AMS and its gas ion source in the HEKAL laboratory (Debrecen, Hungary). We examine the reliability the

  20. Hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality of a confined sand unit in the surficial aquifer system, Hunter Army Airfield, Chatham County, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    An 80-foot-deep well (36Q397, U.S. Geological Survey site identification 320146081073701) was constructed at Hunter Army Airfield to assess the potential of using the surficial aquifer system as a water source to irrigate a ballfield complex. A 300-foot-deep test hole was drilled beneath the ballfield complex to characterize the lithology and water-bearing characteristics of sediments above the Upper Floridan aquifer. The test hole was then completed as well 36Q397 open to a 19-foot-thick shallow, confined sand unit contained within the surficial aquifer system. A single-well, 24-hour aquifer test was performed by pumping well 36Q397 at a rate of 50 gallons per minute during July 13-14, 2011, to characterize the hydrologic properties of the shallow, confined sand unit. Two pumping events prior to the aquifer test affected water levels. Drawdown during all three pumping events and residual drawdown during recovery periods were simulated using the Theis formula on multiple changes in discharge rate. Simulated drawdown and residual drawdown match well with measured drawdown and residual drawdown using values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific storage, which are typical for a confined sand aquifer. Based on the hydrologic parameters used to match simulated drawdown and residual drawdown to measured drawdown and residual drawdown, the transmissivity of the sand was determined to be about 400 feet squared per day. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the sand was determined to be about 20 feet per day. Analysis of a water-quality sample indicated that the water is suitable for irrigation. Sample analysis indicated a calcium-carbonate type water having a total dissolved solids concentration of 39 milligrams per liter. Specific conductance and concentrations of all analyzed constituents were below those that would be a concern for irrigation, and were below primary and secondary water-quality criteria levels.

  1. Analysis of sup(210)Pb in sediment trap samples and sediments from the northern Arabian Sea: Evidence for boundary scavenging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Borole, D.V.

    samples varied from 11 to 108 dpm g sup(-1) at 1024 m and 58 dpm g sup(-1) to 588 dpm g sup(-1) at 3024 m. The mean annual sup(210)Pb flux increased from 0.27 dpm cm sup(-2) yr sup(-1) in the 1024 m trap to 0.65 dpm cm sup(-2) yr sup(-1) in the 3024 m trap...

  2. Equilibrium Sampling to Determine the Thermodynamic Potential for Bioaccumulation of Persistent Organic Pollutants from Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew; Wickström, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory is currently the most widely used approach for linking sediment pollution by persistent hydrophobic organic chemicals to bioaccumulation. Most applications of the EqP approach assume (I) a generic relationship between organic carbon-normalized chemical...... chemical concentrations in the silicone, and applying lipid/silicone partition ratios to yield concentrations in lipid at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sediment (CLip⇌Sed). Furthermore, we evaluated the validity of assumption II by comparing CLip⇌Sed of selected persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic...... pollutants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB)) to lipid-normalized concentrations for a range of biota from a Swedish background lake. PCBs in duck mussels, roach, eel, pikeperch, perch and pike were mostly below the equilibrium partitioning level relative to the sediment, i...

  3. New procedure for recovering extra- and intracellular DNA from marine sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, M.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a ubiquitous biological compound in aquatic sediment and soil. Despite major methodological advances, analysis of DNA from sediment is still technically challenging, not just because of the co-elution of inhibitory substances, but also due to co-elution of extracellular DNA, which potentially leads to an overestimate of the actual diversity. Previous studies suggested that eDNA might play an important role in biogeochemical element cycling, horizontal gene transfer and stabilization of biofilm structures. Several protocols based on the precipitation of eDNA e.g. with CTAB and ethanol have already been published. However, using these methods we did not succeed in quantifying very low amounts of eDNA (e.g. PCR can be performed. To evaluate the new extraction method two sediments with rather opposing composition were analyzed. Sediment from the South Pacific Gyre, the most oligotrophic oceanic region on earth and organic-rich Baltic Sea sediment (Northern Germany) were processed. Using this new procedure high purity genomic iDNA and eDNA with a molecular size range between 20 bp and 50k bp can be simultaneously recovered even from very oligotrophic sediment with very low cell abundances. The main fraction of recovered eDNA was suitable for downstream applications like PCR and had a molecular size that indicates minimal shearing. Despite about two decades of research many questions about deep subsurface life remain unanswered. The fact that microbes can be found even in deep oligotrophic marine sediment raises the fundamental questions of the types and availability of substrates and their biogeochemical cycling. This is the first study that provides evidence that eDNA is an important potential substrate for microorganisms in the deep biosphere. Also, our results show a link between cell counts and eDNA content, indicating that the eDNA pool in the investigated sediment consist mainly of microbial DNA. Comparative sequence analysis of

  4. Results of Sediment Sampling and Elutriate Testing at the Proposed Glovers Point Shallow Water Habitat Project Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Manganese ; Warmwater Aquatic Life Class A and Public Drinking Water Constituent Acute Standard Chronic Standard Public Drinking Water Standard...sediment/soil samples at the proposed Glovers Point project site were less than the Nebraska chronic and public drinking water criteria for Manganese ...Warmwater Aquatic Life Class A, Agricultural Water Supply, and Aesthetics. It has designated the use of public drinking water supply to the river

  5. A method of measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu in high U content marine sediments by sector field ICP-MS and its application to Fukushima sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    An accurate and precise analytical method is highly needed for the determination of Pu isotopes in marine sediments for the long-term marine environment monitoring that is being done since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The elimination of uranium from the sediment samples needs to be carefully checked. We established an analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS in this work. A uranium decontamination factor of 2 × 10(6) was achieved, and the U concentrations in the final sample solutions were typically below 4 pg mL(-1), thus no extra correction of (238)U interferences from the Pu spectra was needed. The method was suitable for the analysis of (241)Pu in marine sediments using large sample amounts (>10 g). We validated the method by measuring marine sediment reference materials and our results agreed well with the certified and the literature values. Surface sediments and one sediment core sample collected after the nuclear accident were analyzed. The characterization of (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the surface sediments and the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes showed that there was no detectable Pu contamination from the nuclear accident in the marine sediments collected 30 km off the plant site.

  6. Chryseomicrobium palamuruense sp. nov., a haloalkalitolerant bacterium isolated from a sediment sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindi, Pavan Kumar; Ashwitha, Kodaparthi; Rani, A Swaroopa

    2016-09-01

    A novel Gram-stain-positive, rod shaped, motile bacterium, designated strain PU1T, was isolated from a sediment sample collected from a drainage near hostel of Palamuru University, Mahabubnagar district, T.S, India (16°43'23″N 77°58'49″E). Cells of strain PU1T are positive for catalase, oxidase, phosphatase, lipase and urease, and negative for gelatinase, amylase, protease, cellulase, lysine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase. The fatty acids were dominated by saturated fatty acids (82.7 %), with a high abundance of iso-C15 : 0 (48.8 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (7.3 %), iso-C16 : 0 (11.9 %), C16 : 1ω7c alcohol (11.8 %) and iso-C17 : 0 (5.3 %). Strain PU1T contained MK-8 as the major respiratory quinone and diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine make up the phospholipid composition. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contains meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diamino acid and cell-wall sugars are d-glucose and d-galactose. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated Chryseomicrobium imtechense and Chryseomicrobiumamylolyticum, members of family Planococcaceae within the phylum Firmicutes, are the closest related species with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 99 %. Other members of the family Planococcaceae had sequence similarities of 99 %, and DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain PU1T and Chryseomicrobium imtechense MW 10T, Chryseomicrobiumamylolyticum JC16T were 38 and 32 % respectively. The G+C content of DNA of strain PU1T is 48.5 mol%. Based on the above-mentioned phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain PU1T represents a novel species of the genus Chryseomicrobium for which the name Chryseomicrobiumpalamuruense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PU1T(=CCUG 59101T=JCM 16712T=KCTC 13722T=NBRC106750T).

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyl source attribution in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA, using multivariate similarity among congener profiles in sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacela, Dave; Beltman, Douglas J; Lipton, Joshua

    2002-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener concentrations measured in 1,189 sediment samples from Green Bay (MI/WI, USA), Lake Michigan (MI/WI, USA), and the Fox River (WI, USA) were analyzed statistically to evaluate whether PCB congener profiles in outer Green Bay are more similar to those observed in inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan. Similarities among PCB profiles were assessed with complementary multivariate analysis techniques: Principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis, and classification trees. The PCA indicated that profiles in outer Green Bay are distinct from those of inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan but are more similar to those of inner Green Bay. The outer bay profiles are dissimilar to profiles that would result from a simple process of mixing contaminated sediments from the inner bay with Lake Michigan sediments and, therefore, support the conclusion that contaminants in outer Green Bay come from discharges of the Fox River. Several classification trees based on small sets of congener proportions defined simple rules that consistently distinguished the regional profiles. Application of these rules to classify the outer bay samples suggests that the profiles of less than 7% of outer bay samples are similar to Lake Michigan profiles. These results are interpreted with respect to physical transport and chemical weathering processes that may account for the observed differences.

  8. The influence of pyrolysis and matrix modifiers on determination of Cr and Pb in sediment samples by GFAAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risfidian Mohadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Influence of pyrolysis and matrix modifiers on determination of Cr and Pb in sediment samples using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. The sediment samples including three certified reference materials (CRMs are reported. Analyses were performed using microwave assisted dissolution. The matrix modifiers Mg(NO32, Pd+Mg(NO32 and NH4H2PO4were shown to be optimazed. The recovery for Cr and Pb in CRMs in the case of sample dissolution was found to be between 81 to 91% for Cr and 94 to 98% for Pb of the certified values, respectively. Keywords: Sediment, Pyrolysis, Matrix modifiers, Cr, Pb Abstrak (Indonesia: Pengaruh pirolisis dan matriks pengubah pada penentuan Cr dan Pb dalam sampel sedimen menggunakan tungku grafit spektroskopi serapan atom telah diteliti. Sampel sedimen termasuk tiga bahan referensi bersertifikat (CRMs dilaporkan dianalisis dengan menggunakan bantuan microwave ekstraktor. Matriks pengubah Mg(NO32, Pd+Mg(NO32 dan NH4H2PO4 telah digunakan dan menghasilkan nilai temu balik untuk Cr dan Pb dalam CRMs ditemukan antara 81-91% untuk Cr dan 94-98 % untuk Pb dari nilai sertifikat masing-masing. Katakunci: Sedimen, Pirolisis, Matrix modifiers, Cr, Pb

  9. Characterisation of fugitive and accidental PCB emissions from a hazardous waste incinerator : spruce needle, snow and sediment sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froese, K.L. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Public Health Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Blais, J.M. [Alberta Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Muir, D.C.G. [Environment Canada, National Water research Inst., Burlington, ON (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    A pipe rupture at a hazardous waste incineration facility resulted in the release of large quantities of PCBs and polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans into the environment. The accident occurred in October 1996, but was not reported until three weeks later which made it difficult to estimate the extent of the regional exposure and the impact of these releases on the ecosystem and human health. Spruce needles were used to provide data related to vegetative accumulation of lipophilic contaminants. Snow samples were used to get information regarding PCB deposition and sorption in the snow in the months following the accident. Radiometrically dated lake sediments were used to obtain information on changes in PCB deposition through time for a single location. Initial results show that needle samples within 2 km of the incinerator contain PCBs at five times the concentration of samples from 50 to 20 km from the plant. Snow samples within 2 km of the plant showed a 10-fold increase over distant samples. Sediment samples also showed a 10-fold increase in PCB concentrations above background values.

  10. Potential effects of deepening the St. Johns River navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system, Jacksonville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Jason C.; Spechler, Rick M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed dredging a 13-mile reach of the St. Johns River navigation channel in Jacksonville, Florida, deepening it to depths between 50 and 54 feet below North American Vertical Datum of 1988. The dredging operation will remove about 10 feet of sediments from the surficial aquifer system, including limestone in some locations. The limestone unit, which is in the lowermost part of the surficial aquifer system, supplies water to domestic wells in the Jacksonville area. Because of density-driven hydrodynamics of the St. Johns River, saline water from the Atlantic Ocean travels upstream as a saltwater “wedge” along the bottom of the channel, where the limestone is most likely to be exposed by the proposed dredging. A study was conducted to determine the potential effects of navigation channel deepening in the St. Johns River on salinity in the adjacent surficial aquifer system. Simulations were performed with each of four cross-sectional, variable-density groundwater-flow models, developed using SEAWAT, to simulate hypothetical changes in salinity in the surficial aquifer system as a result of dredging. The cross-sectional models were designed to incorporate a range of hydrogeologic conceptualizations to estimate the effect of uncertainty in hydrogeologic properties. The cross-sectional models developed in this study do not necessarily simulate actual projected conditions; instead, the models were used to examine the potential effects of deepening the navigation channel on saltwater intrusion in the surficial aquifer system under a range of plausible hypothetical conditions. Simulated results for modeled conditions indicate that dredging will have little to no effect on salinity variations in areas upstream of currently proposed dredging activities. Results also indicate little to no effect in any part of the surficial aquifer system along the cross section near River Mile 11 or in the water-table unit along the cross

  11. Map showing abundance and distribution of copper in oxide residues of stream-sediment samples, Medford 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon-California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Charles L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.

    1985-01-01

    Stream-sediment sampling in the Medford 1o x 2o quadrangle was undertaken to provide to aid in assessment of the mineral resource potential of the quadrangle. This map presents data on the abundance and distribution of copper in the oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) of stream sediments and in the minus-0.18-mm sieve fraction of selected stream sediments collected in the quadrangle. 

  12. Distribution and environmental impacts of heavy metals and radioactivity in sediment and seawater samples of the Marmara Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otansev, Pelin; Taşkın, Halim; Başsarı, Asiye; Varinlioğlu, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the natural and anthropogenic radioactivity levels in the sediment samples collected from the Marmara Sea in Turkey were determined. The average activity concentrations (range) of (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were found to be 23.8 (13.8-34.2) Bq kg(-1), 18.8 (6.4-25.9) Bq kg(-1), 23.02 (6.3-31.1) Bq kg(-1), 558.6 (378.8-693.6) Bq kg(-1) and 9.14 (4.8-16.3) Bq kg(-1), respectively. Our results showed that the average activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (238)U and (232)Th in the sediment samples were within the acceptable limits; whereas the average activity concentration of (40)K in the sediment samples was higher than the worldwide average concentration. The average radium equivalent activity, the average absorbed dose rate and the average external hazard index were calculated as 100.01 Bq kg(-1), 48.32 nGy h(-1) and 0.27, respectively. The average gross alpha and beta activity in the seawater samples were found to be 0.042 Bq L(-1) and 13.402 Bq L(-1), respectively. The gross alpha and beta activity concentrations increased with water depth in the same stations. The average heavy metal concentrations (range) in the sediment samples were 114.6 (21.6-201.7) μg g(-1) for Cr, 568.2 (190.8-1625.1) μg g(-1) for Mn, 39.3 (4.9-83.4) μg g(-1) for Cu, 85.5 (11.0-171.8) μg g(-1) for Zn, 32.9 (9.1-73.1) μg g(-1) for Pb and 49.1 (6.8-103.0) μg g(-1) for Ni. S5 station was heavily polluted by Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb. The results showed that heavy metal enrichment in sediments of the Marmara Sea was widespread.

  13. Recovery and validation of historical sediment quality data from coastal and estuarine areas: An integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.; Mecray, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental parameters has been compiled for Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay. This work illustrates methodologies for rescuing and validating sediment data from heterogeneous historical sources. It greatly expands spatial and temporal data coverage of estuarine and coastal sediments. The database contains about 3500 samples containing inorganic chemical, organic, texture and other environmental data dating from 1955 to 1994. Cooperation with local and federal agencies as well as universities was essential in locating and screening documents for the database. More than 80% of references utilized came from sources with limited distribution (gray literature). Task sharing was facilitated by a comprehensive and clearly defined data dictionary for sediments. It also served as a data entry template and flat file format for data processing and as a basis for interpretation and graphical illustration. Standard QA/QC protocols are usually inapplicable to historical sediment data. In this work outliers and data quality problems were identified by batch screening techniques that also provide visualizations of data relationships and geochemical affinities. No data were excluded, but qualifying comments warn users of problem data. For Boston Harbor, the proportion of irreparable or seriously questioned data was remarkably small (organic contaminants spanned 3 orders of magnitude for many elements or compounds. Data from the historical database provide alternatives to dated cores for measuring changes in surficial sediment contamination level with time. The data indicate that spatial inhomogeneity in harbor environments can be large with respect to sediment-hosted contaminants. Boston Inner Harbor surficial sediments showed decreases in concentrations of Cu, Hg, and Zn of 40 to 60% over a 17-year period.A comprehensive database of sediment chemistry and environmental parameters has been compiled for Boston Harbor and

  14. Assessment of bacterial community composition in response to uranium levels in sediment samples of sacred Cauvery River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriya, Jayaraman; Chandra Shekar, Mootapally; Nathani, Neelam Mustakali; Suganya, Thangaiyan; Bharathiraja, Subramanian; Krishnan, Muthukalingan

    2017-01-01

    Global industrialization is a major cause of effluent discharge from industries up to alarming concentrations. Especially, uranium concentrations in water bodies are of great concern, as its radioactivity significantly affects the persistent diversity of microbiota. Recently, continuous application of pesticides in the agricultural lands and accumulation of quartz that enter the Cauvery River has significantly increased the concentration of uranium (U) and other heavy metals. To perceive the impact of uranium on bacterial diversity in Cauvery River, sediment samples collected from polluted (UP) site with 32.4 Bq/K of U concentration and control (UNP) site were scrutinized for bacterial diversity through metagenomic analysis of the V3 region of 16S rDNA by Illumina sequencing. Taxonomic assignment revealed that the unpolluted sample was dominated by Bacteroidetes (27.7 %), and Firmicutes (25.9 %), while sediment sample from the highly polluted site revealed abundance of Proteobacteria (47.5 %) followed by Bacteroidetes (22.4 %) and Firmicutes (14.6 %). Among Proteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria was the most prevalent group followed by alpha, delta, epsilon, and beta in the uranium-polluted sample. Rare and abundant species analysis revealed that species like Idiomarina loihiensis was abundant in the pollutant sample; however, it was rare (uranium and metal accumulation on the bacterial communities and further confirmed the promising candidature of specific bacterial species as bioindicators of contamination.

  15. Enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index applied to sediment samples from the Guarapiranga reservoir, Brazil, for metal and trace element assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Guilherme M.; Figueiredo, Ana M.G.; Silva, Paulo S.C.; Favaro, Deborah I., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.b, E-mail: anamaria@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica; Franklin, Robson L., E-mail: robsonf@cetesbnet.sp.gov.b [Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental (EAAI/CETESB), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Quimica Inorganica e Radioatividade

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to assess sediment contamination by metals and other trace elements in five sampling points of the Guarapiranga Reservoir. Two collection campaigns were undertaken and the samples were analyzed by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) in order to determine the following elements: major (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb , Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Zn) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu). Soil samples were collected in the Guarapiranga Park, located next to the reservoir. Composite top soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected in lines across the park at every 30m and were also analyzed by INAA. EF values was calculated using Sc as the conservative element for normalization purposes and soil from Guarapiranga region was used as background levels for the elements analyzed. EF > 1.5 were obtained for the elements As, Sb and Zn, with highest values for Zn (1.6sampling points near the water supply catchment point from the Water Treatment Agency of Sao Paulo State, indicating anthropogenic contribution. As for the other elements, a 0.5sediments can be classified as moderately contaminated. (author)

  16. Distribution of natural radionuclide concentrations in sediment samples in Didim and Izmir Bay (Aegean Sea-Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aközcan, S

    2012-10-01

    Natural and artificial radionuclide pollutants of the marine environment have been recognized as a serious environmental concern. The natural radioactivity activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K were measured by gamma spectrometry in sediment samples collected from two different areas in Aegean Sea Turkish Coast. There is no information about radioactivity level in the study areas sediments so far. The results showed that the concentrations of activity in the sediment samples are 9 ± 0.6 Bq kg(-1)-12 ± 0.7 Bq kg(-1), 7 ± 0.4 Bq kg(-1)-16 ± 1.0 Bq kg(-1), 6 ± 0.3 Bq kg(-1)-16 ± 1.0 Bq kg(-1) and 250 ± 13 Bq kg(-1)-665 ± 33 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. In general, the distribution of activity concentrations along the coast of the Aegean Sea area were in the same order as international levels.

  17. Review of samples of sediment, tailings, and waters adjacent to the Cactus Queen gold mine, Kern County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cactus Queen Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert in Kern County, California. The Cactus Queen gold-silver (Au-Ag) deposit is similar to other Au-Ag deposits hosted in Miocene volcanic rocks that consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions. The volcanic rocks were emplaced onto a basement of Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks. A part of the Cactus Queen Mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Staff from the BLM initially sampled the mine area and documented elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in tailings and sediment. BLM then requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure and characterize As and other geochemical constituents in sediment, tailings, and waters on the part of the mine on Federal lands. This report is made in response to the request by the BLM, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the potential removal of As-contaminated mine waste from the Cactus Queen Mine as a means of reducing As release and exposure to humans and biota. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of sediments, mine tailings, and surface waters at the Cactus Queen Mine on January 27, 2008. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  18. Relationship between water chemistry and sediment mineralogy in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N. (Univ. de Perpignan, France); Thompson, J.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical compositions of waters collected from the Cerro Prieto geothermal production wells and hydrothermal emanations are different. Compared to the Cerro Prieto well waters, the surficial waters generally contain significantly less potassium, slightly less calcium and chloride, and significantly more magnesium and sulfate. In comparison to the unaltered sediments, the changes in the mineralogy of the altered sediments appear to be controlled by the type of emanation (well, spring, mud pot, geyser, fumarole, or cold pool). However, an increase in quartz and potassium feldspar percentages seems to be characteristic of the majority of the sediments in contact with geothermal fluids. Preliminary attempts to model the chemical processes occurring in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field using chemical equilibrium calculations are reported. For this purpose the chemical compositions of thermal waters (well and surficial emanation) were used as input data to make calculations with SOLMNEQ and WATEQ2 computer programs. Then the theoretical mineral composition of altered sediments was predicted and compared to the mineralogy actually observed in the solid samples.

  19. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water, sediment, soil, and biological samples from different industrial areas in Zhejiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junxia; Lin, Zhenkun [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Lin, Kuangfei [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology/State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Chunyan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang, Wei [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology/State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cui, Changyuan [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Lin, Junda [Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Dong, Qiaoxiang, E-mail: dqxdong@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Huang, Changjiang, E-mail: cjhuang5711@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Institute of Watershed Science and Environmental Ecology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined PBDE concentrations in various matrices from different industrial areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated PBDE levels were found in areas with low-voltage electrical manufactures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Areas with e-waste recycling activities also had higher PBDE concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE content and composition in water samples varied from one area to another. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PBDE composition in sediment/soil and biological samples was predominated by BDE-209. - Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used extensively in electrical and electronic products, but little is known about their distribution in the environment surrounding the manufacturing factories. This study reports PBDE contamination in various matrices from the location (Liushi, Zhejiang province) that produces more than 70% of the low-voltage electrical appliances in China. Additionally, PBDE contamination was compared with other industries such as the e-waste recycling business (Fengjiang) in the same region. Specifically, we measured seven PBDE congeners (BDEs - 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, and 209) in water, sediment, soil, plant, and animal tissues from four different areas in this region. The present study revealed elevated PBDE concentrations in all matrices collected from Liushi and Fengjiang in comparison with highly industrialized areas without significant PBDE contamination sources. In water samples, there were large variations of PBDE content and composition across different areas. In sediment/soil and biological samples, BDE-209 was the predominant congener and this could be due to the abundant usage of deca-BDE mixtures in China. Our findings provide the very first data on PBDE contamination in the local environments surrounding the electronics industry, and also reveal widespread PBDE contamination in highly industrialized coastal regions of China.

  20. A comparative study of the radiological hazard in sediments samples from drinking water purification plants supplied from different sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams A.M. Issa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radiation level has been determined for 135 sediment samples from forty-six drinking water purification plants supplied from different sources (Nile River, Ibrahimia Canal and Bahr Yousif Canal aiming to evaluate the radiation hazard. The concentration of natural radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K has been investigated by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl 3″ × 3″ detector. The results showed that the concentrations of average activity in the sediment samples collected from Nile River, Ibrahimia Canal and Bahr Yousif Canal are (29 ± 2, 30 ± 2 and 240 ± 8 Bq kg−1, (47 ± 3, 46 ± 8 and 258 ± 12 Bq kg−1 and (28 ± 2, 27 ± 3 and 219 ± 18 Bq kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The distributions of average activity concentrations of samples under investigation are within the world values although some extreme values have been determined. Radiological hazard effects such as: absorbed dose rate (D, outdoor and indoor annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE, radium equivalent activities (Raeq, hazard indices (Hex and Hin, gamma index (Iγ, excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR and annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE for the corresponding samples were also estimated.

  1. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls in a contaminated lake ecosystem: Combining equilibrium passive sampling of sediment and water with total concentration measurements of biota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T.; Figueiredo, Kaisa;

    2015-01-01

    of hydrophobic organic chemicals in biota lipids. The authors' aim was to assess the equilibrium status of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in a contaminated lake ecosystem and along its discharge course using equilibrium sampling devices for measurements in sediment and water and by also analyzing biota...... in model lipids. Overall, the studied ecosystem appeared to be in disequilibrium for the studied phases: sediment, water, and biota. Chemical activities of PCBs were higher in sediment than in water, which implies that the sediment functioned as a partitioning source of PCBs and that net diffusion occurred...... from the sediment to the water column. Measured lipid-normalized PCB concentrations in biota were generally below equilibrium lipid concentrations relative to the sediment (CLip ⇌Sed ) or water (CLip ⇌W ), indicating that PCB levels in the organisms were below the maximum partitioning levels...

  2. On the Connections Between Surficial Processes and Stratigraphy in River Deltas

    CERN Document Server

    Puma, Michael J; Paola, Chris; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    We explore connections between surficial deltaic processes (e.g. avulsion, deposition) and the stratigraphic record using a simple numerical model of delta-plain evolution, with the aim of constraining these connections and thus improving prediction of subsurface features. The model represents channel dynamics using a simple but flexible cellular approach, and is unique in that it explicitly includes backwater effects that are known to be important in low-gradient channel networks. The patterns of channel deposits in the stratigraphic record vary spatially due to variation in avulsion statistics with radial distance from the delta's source of water and sediment. We introduce channel residence time as an important statistical measure of the surface channel kinematics. The model suggests that the mean channel residence time anywhere within the delta is nicely described by a power law distribution showing a cutoff that depends on radial distance. Thicknesses of channel deposits are not uniquely determined by the...

  3. Surficial Geologic Map of the Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson, Kentucky, Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David W.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Counts, Ronald C.; Martin, Steven L.; Andrews, William M.; Newell, Wayne L.; Murphy, Michael L.; Thompson, Mark F.; Taylor, Emily M.; Kvale, Erik P.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    The geologic map of the Evansville, Indiana, and Henderson, Kentucky, area depicts and describes surficial deposits according to their origin and age. Unconsolidated alluvium and outwash fill the Ohio River bedrock valley and attain maximum thickness of 33-39 m under Diamond Island, Kentucky, and Griffith Slough, south of Newburgh, Indiana. The fill is chiefly unconsolidated, fine- to medium-grained, lithic quartz sand, interbedded with clay, clayey silt, silt, coarse sand, granules, and gravel. Generally, the valley fill fines upward from the buried bedrock surface: a lower part being gravelly sand to sandy gravel, a middle part mostly of sand, and a surficial veneer of silt and clay interspersed with sandy, natural levee deposits at river's edge. Beneath the unconsolidated fill are buried and discontinuous, lesser amounts of consolidated fill unconformably overlying the buried bedrock surface. Most of the glaciofluvial valley fill accumulated during the Wisconsin Episode (late Pleistocene). Other units depicted on the map include creek alluvium, slackwater lake (lacustrine) deposits, colluvium, dune sand, loess, and sparse bedrock outcrops. Creek alluvium underlies creek floodplains and consists of silt, clayey silt, and subordinate interbedded fine sand, granules, and pebbles. Lenses and beds of clay are present locally. Silty and clayey slackwater lake (lacustrine) deposits extensively underlie broad flats northeast of Evansville and around Henderson and are as thick as 28 m. Fossil wood collected from an auger hole in the lake and alluvial deposits of Little Creek, at depths of 10.6 m and 6.4 m, are dated 16,650+-50 and 11,120+-40 radiocarbon years, respectively. Fossil wood collected from lake sediment 16 m below the surface in lake sediment was dated 33,100+-590 radiocarbon years. Covering the hilly bedrock upland is loess (Qel), 3-7.5 m thick in Indiana and 9-15 m thick in Kentucky, deposited about 22,000-12,000 years before present. Most mapped surficial

  4. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramohan, J. [E.G.S Pillay Engineering College, Nagapattinam, 611002, Tamilnadu (India); Tholkappian, M. [Sri Vari College of Education, Then Arasampattu, Tiruvannamalai, 606611, Tamilnadu (India); Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R., E-mail: ravisankarphysics@gmail.com [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Tiruvannamalai 606603, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-08-28

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ≤ 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg{sup −1} with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 238}U, ≤ 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 232}Th and 300.34 Bqkg{sup −1} to 449.08 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 40}K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed gamma does rate (D{sub R}), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  5. Surficial geology of Hannibal Quadrangle, Oswego County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.

    1981-01-01

    The location and extent of 10 kinds of surficial deposits in part of Hannibal quadrangle, Oswego County, N.Y., are mapped on a 7.5-minute U.S. Geological Survey topographic map. The map was compiled to indicate the lithology and potential for ground-water development at any specific location. (USGS)

  6. Digital data set describing surficial geology in the conterminous US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set describes surficial geology of the conterminous United States. The data set was generated from a U.S. Geological Survey 1:7,500,000-scale map...

  7. Surficial geology of the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a 100-meter cell resolution raster dataset consisting of 1:750,000-scale surficial geology for California and 1:500,000-scale for Nevada, and parts of Utah,...

  8. Sample preparation method for the ER-CALUX bioassay screening of (xeno-)estrogenic activity in sediment extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Corine J; Leonards, Pim E G; Kapiteijn, Wendy; Bakker, Joop F; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette; Klamer, Hans J C

    2007-11-01

    The application of bioassays to assess the occurrence of estrogenic compounds in the environment is increasing in both a scientific and statutory context. The availability of appropriate validated methods for sample pre-treatment and analysis is crucial for the successful implementation of bioassays. Here, we present a sample preparation method for the bioassay screening of estrogenic activity in sediment with the in vitro Estrogen Receptor mediated Chemical Activated LUciferase gene eXpression (ER-CALUX) assay. The method makes use of an Accelerated Solvent (ASE) or Soxhlet extraction with a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone (3:1, v/v), followed by clean up of the extract by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). Recoveries of a panel of 17 pollutants differing largely in physical-chemical properties from spiked sediment were determined and appeared to be on average about 86%. Furthermore, the estrogenic potencies of all test compounds were individually assessed by determination of concentration-response relationships in the ER-CALUX assay. Concentration dependent estrogenic potency was found for 14 of the 17 compounds, with potencies of about 10(5) to 10(7) fold lower than the natural estrogenic hormone 17beta-estradiol. Anti-estrogenic potency was assessed by testing combinations of estradiol and individual test compounds, but was found for none of the compounds. The low estrogenic activity of the test compounds in the spiking mixture was well recovered during GPC treatment of the pure mixture, but did not contribute significantly to the background estrogenic activity present in the spiked sediment. Application of the method to field samples showed that estrogenic activity can be found at different types of locations, and demonstrated that levels between locations may vary considerably over relatively short distances.

  9. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons level between suspended solid and sediment samples of Pengkalan Chepa River, Kelantan state, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslim, Noor Zuhartini Md; Babaheidari, Seyedreza Hashemi; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi

    2015-09-01

    Sixteen type of common Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) which consist of naphthalene, acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]-perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]-pyrene and dibenz[a,h]-anthracene in suspended solid and sediment samples of Pengkalan Chepa River, Kelantan state, Malaysia were investigated. The analysis samples were taken from six different sites of Pengkalan Chepa River during sunny day. The samples were subjected to a series of pre-treatment before the level of PAHs can be determined. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was the prime method for the analysis of PAHs level. A total of 16 PAHs concentration in suspended solid of the whole Pengkalan Chepa River was found to be 2144.6 ng/g dry weights. This concentration was about eight times more than 16 PAHs concentration in sediment which found to be 266.5 ng/g dry weights.

  10. Soil, Groundwater, Surface Water, and Sediments of Kennedy Space Center, Florida: Background Chemical and Physical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalzer, Paul A.; Hensley, Melissa A.; Mota, Mario; Hall, Carlton R.; Dunlevy, Colleen A.

    2000-01-01

    This study documented background chemical composition of soils, groundwater, surface; water, and sediments of Kennedy Space Center. Two hundred soil samples were collected, 20 each in 10 soil classes. Fifty-one groundwater wells were installed in 4 subaquifers of the Surficial Aquifer and sampled; there were 24 shallow, 16 intermediate, and 11 deep wells. Forty surface water and sediment samples were collected in major watershed basins. All samples were away from sites of known contamination. Samples were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, aroclors, chlorinated herbicides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total metals, and other parameters. All aroclors (6) were below detection in all media. Some organochlorine pesticides were detected at very low frequencies in soil, sediment, and surface water. Chlorinated herbicides were detected at very low frequencies in soil and sediments. PAH occurred in low frequencies in soiL, shallow groundwater, surface water, and sediments. Concentrations of some metals differed among soil classes, with subaquifers and depths, and among watershed basins for surface water but not sediments. Most of the variation in metal concentrations was natural, but agriculture had increased Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn.

  11. Sediment Texture and Geomorphology of the Sea Floor from Fenwick Island, Maryland to Fisherman's Island, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are a qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefile defining surficial sediment type and distribution, and geomorphology, for nearly 1,400 square...

  12. Holocene fluctuations of Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru based on lacustrine and surficial geologic archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, J. S.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Beal, S. A.; Smith, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Peru's Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC; 13.9°S, 70.8°W, ~5200-5670 m asl) is an important site for understanding tropical paleoclimate, mainly because of annually layered ice cores that provide an ~1800 year long record of tropical paleoclimatic conditions (e.g., Thompson et al., 2013). Here, we present a detailed record of QIC fluctuations using surficial deposits and lake sediments that extend back to late glacial time. We compare the late Holocene records of QIC 10Be-dated moraines and ice core data with lake sediments from a nearby glacially fed lake to establish the framework we use to interpret a Holocene long sediment record from a glacially fed lake. We also examine sediments from a nearby non-glacial lake to constrain non-glacial clastic input. We collected two ~5 m-long sediment cores, one from Laguna Challpacocha, which is currently fed by QIC meltwater, and one from the Laguna Yanacocha, which has not received QIC meltwater since ~12.3 ka. Changes in magnetic susceptibility, loss on ignition, bulk density and X-ray fluorescence chemistry combined with 14C and 210Pb chronologies provide information about sediment transported to the lakes. Retreat from the late Holocene extent defined by the 10Be-dated moraine record (~0.52 ka) is contemporaneous with a sharp transition from organic to clastic sedimentation in the Challpacocha core at ~ 0.52 ka. This implies that glacially-sourced clastic sedimentation, as tracked by loss on ignition, Ti counts and bulk density, increased during ice cap recession. Based on these same proxy data, we suggest the following Holocene history of QIC: QIC receded from the Challpacocha basin by ~10.6 ka. Increased clastic sedimentation at 8.2 - 4.1, 3.6 - 2.7 ka and from 0.55 ka - present are interpreted as times of ice cap recession. The increased clastic sedimentation at ~8.2 - 4.1 ka is consistent with surficial deposits near the present-day ice margin that indicate that at ~7.0 - 4.6 ka QIC was smaller than at present (Buffen et al

  13. Spatial distribution of contaminants in sediments of two rivers crossing Tangier (northern Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barroso, M R; Benhamou, Y; Coello, D; El Moumni, B; García-Morales, J L

    2010-02-01

    The distribution and accumulation of heavy metals in the sediments of two rivers which cross various agglomerations of Tangier city, Morocco, were investigated. Surficial sediment samples were collected during 2005 and characterized for metal content (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr and Ni), organic matter, total nitrogen, and n-hexane extractable material (HEM). The organic components (organic carbon, total nitrogen and HEM) show a slightly increasing enrichment from the upstream to the downstream of the emissary. An evaluation of the heavy metal pollution status of both tributaries was carried out using the metal pollution index (MPI). The results revealed the importance of anthropic pressure and the zones influenced by industrial discharges, which keep the metals Pb, Cr and Ni at high levels. Comparison with international regulatory guidelines for sediments revealed serious contamination of Cr, Zn and Ni.

  14. An improved protocol for DNA extraction from alkaline soil and sediment samples for constructing metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Digvijay; Satyanarayana, T

    2011-09-01

    An improved single-step protocol has been developed for extracting pure community humic substance-free DNA from alkaline soils and sediments. The method is based on direct cell lysis in the presence of powdered activated charcoal and polyvinylpolypyrrolidone followed by precipitation with polyethyleneglycol and isopropanol. The strategy allows simultaneous isolation and purification of DNA while minimizing the loss of DNA with respect to other available protocols for metagenomic DNA extraction. Moreover, the purity levels are significant, which are difficult to attain with any of the methods reported in the literature for DNA extraction from soils. The DNA thus extracted was free from humic substances and, therefore, could be processed for restriction digestion, PCR amplification as well as for the construction of metagenomic libraries.

  15. Passive PE Sampling in Support of In Situ Remediation of Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    expendable items: including materials such as the ponar dredge, PE frames and hardware, sink rope, vehicle rental, and handheld GPS rental. • Field labor...of a boat, personal protection equipment (PPE), permitting, baseline characterization (i.e., hydraulic or bathymetry assessment), and reporting. 38...sample bottles, ice for samples, and paper towels, while PE sampling equipment would include a roll of sink rope, the assembled PE samplers, and the

  16. A procedure for estimating Bacillus cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples - A potential exploration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacterial spores of the Bacillus cereus group in soils and stream sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of several types of concealed mineral deposits, including vein-type gold deposits. The B. cereus assay is rapid, inexpensive, and inherently reproducible. The test, currently under investigation for its potential in mineral exploration, is recommended for use on a research basis. Among the aerobic spore-forming bacilli, only B. cereus and closely related strains produce an opaque zone in egg-yolk emulsion agar. This characteristic, also known as the Nagler of lecitho-vitellin reaction, has long been used to rapidly indentify and estimate presumptive B. cereus. The test is here adapted to permit rapid estimation of B. cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples. Relative standard deviation was 10.3% on counts obtained from two 40-replicate pour-plate determinations. As many as 40 samples per day can be processed. Enough procedural detail is included to permit investigation of the test in conventional geochemical laboratories using standard microbiological safety precautions. ?? 1985.

  17. A New 62-sample Record of the Mono Lake Excursion Waveform from the Depocenter Sediments of Summer Lake, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, R. M.; McCuan, D. T.; Horton, R. A.; Verosub, K. L.

    2011-12-01

    A new core from Summer Lake, Oregon provides the primary datset for a composite, 62-sample record of the Mono Lake Excursion (MLE) waveform. The magnetograms and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) are consistent with those associated with the MLE record from Mono Lake (e.g., Liddicoat and Coe, 1979). The added detail from this new record firmly establishes three distinct VGP clusters centered first on easternmost Asia/Siberia, then on Europe, and, finally, on North America. The jumps between clusters involve typically one sample, which represents only a few decades of time. The excursion is bracketed by tephra of known age (the Mount St. Helens Cy 46.0 ± 6 ka and the Wono 27.3 ± 0.3 14C kyr B.P.) and the age of the excursion is ~28 14C kyr B.P based on an average of five radiocarbon ages from below, within and above the excursion interval. A second waveform that exhibits shallowing inclinations and easterly declination swings upsection is truncated by a prominent unconformity. These PSV features and the associated RPI leading up to this unconformity correlate with those of the onset of the Laschamp Excursion (Lund et al., 2005). Both radiocarbon and PSV correlations support missing sediment from the Summer Lake record between 42.5 and 38 GISP2 ka. This sediment hiatus correlates to unconformities or lowstands in other Great Basin lakes suggesting a Heinrich 4-induced drought that affected much of western North America.

  18. Sediment flux and source in northern Yellow Sea by 210Pb technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fengye; LI Xuegang; SONG Jinming; WANG Guizhi; CHENG Peng; GAO Shu

    2006-01-01

    Sedimentation of fine-grained deposits on coastal zones and continental shelves are important because of the association with chemical pollutants, and the implication to the impact on biological processes, the stratigraphic correlations, and changes in sedimentary environments. The Yellow Sea continental shelf receives large quantities of sediment from the Huanghe (Yellow) River. Unfortunately, little attention has been yet paid to the sedimentation on the shallow shelf and its features, and the vertical sediment flux in the area is poorly understood. In this study, nine cores were collected in northern Yellow Sea by the R/V Science 1 in September, 1998 and 1999 to examine the sedimentation rate, sediment flux and the provenance with 210Pb analysis. The 210Pb activity profiles showed that the vertical sediment flux ranged from 0.06 to 1.18 g/cm2·a in the region. In central part of the area, there was a patch of fine-grained mud, with the flux below 0.33 g/cm2·a. Most profiles were featured in two-segment model. Differences in the profiles reflected spatial and temporal variations in hydrodynamic and sedimentary processes. In order to determine the provenance and sedimentary setting in the area, the geochemistry of Ca, Fe, Sr, Cu, Ti and Rb in 11 surficial sediment samples were studied, which showed that in the central northern Yellow Sea, the mud deposit was from multi-source but mainly from the Huanghe River.

  19. Implications of Texture and Erodibility for Sediment Retention in Receiving Basins of Coastal Louisiana Diversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehui Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Mississippi River deltaic plain has been the subject of abundant research over recent decades, there is a paucity of data concerning field measurement of sediment erodibility in Louisiana estuaries. Two contrasting receiving basins for active diversions were studied: West Bay on the western part of Mississippi River Delta and Big Mar, which is the receiving basin for the Caernarvon freshwater diversion. Push cores and water samples were collected at six stations in West Bay and six stations in Big Mar. The average erodibility of Big Mar sediment was similar to that of Louisiana shelf sediment, but was higher than that of West Bay. Critical shear stress to suspend sediment in both West Bay and Big Mar receiving basins was around 0.2 Pa. A synthesis of 1191 laser grain size data from surficial and down-core sediment reveals that silt (4–63 μm is the largest fraction of retained sediment in receiving basins, larger than the total of sand (>63 μm and clay (<4 μm. It is suggested that preferential delivery of fine grained sediment to more landward and protected receiving basins would enhance mud retention. In addition, small fetch sizes and fragmentation of large receiving basins are favorable for sediment retention.

  20. Surficial Geology of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    Much of the ground surface around Mount Rainier volcano is directly underlain by loose geologic deposits that veneer the hard rock formations. Examples of these deposits are sand and gravel bars along the rivers, ridges of loose rock debris beside the glaciers, and sloping aprons of rock fragments beneath almost every cliff. Even though they are generally thin and inconspicuous when compared with the rock formations, these surficial deposits are clues to geologic events that have profoundly influenced the shape of the park's landscape. Thus, from the character and extent of glacial deposits one can judge the age and size of former glaciers that carved the cirques and deep canyons of the park; from the mudflows which streamed down nearly every valley one can infer the age and size of huge landslides of the past that helped determine Mount Rainier's present shape; and from the pumice deposits some of the volcano's recent eruptive activity can be reconstructed. The map (plate 1, in pocket) that accompanies this description of the surficial deposits of Mount Rainier National Park shows the location of the various geologic formations, and the explanation shows the formations arranged in order of their relative age, with the oldest at the bottom. The text describes the surficial deposits in sequence from older to younger. A discussion of the pumice deposits of the park, which were not mapped, is followed by a description of the formations shown on the geologic map. Inspection of the geologic map may lead the viewer to question why the surficial deposits are shown in more detail in a zone several miles wide around the base of the volcano than elsewhere. This is partly because the zone is largely near or above timberline, relatively accessible, and the surficial deposits there can be readily recognized, differentiated, and mapped. In contrast, access is more difficult in the heavily timbered parts of the park, and surficial deposits there are generally blanketed by a dense

  1. Nitrogen fixation (Acetylene reduction) in the sediments of the pluss-see : with special attention to the role of sedimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    Sediments of productive lakes are usually rich in organic matter and, except for a thin surficial layer, anaerobic. These conditions seem to be favourable for heterotrophic nitrogen fixation. However, these sediments also contain relatively high ammonium concentrations. Ammonium represses

  2. Continuous-flow fractionation of selenium in contaminated sediment and soil samples using rotating coiled column and microcolumn extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonina, Elena Yu; Fedotov, Petr S; Wennrich, Rainer

    2012-01-15

    Dynamic fractionation is considered to be an attractive alternative to conventional batch sequential extraction procedures for partitioning of trace metals and metalloids in environmental solid samples. This paper reports the first results on the continuous-flow dynamic fractionation of selenium using two different extraction systems, a microcolumn (MC) packed with the solid sample and a rotating coiled column (RCC) in which the particulate matter is retained under the action of centrifugal forces. The eluents (leachants) were applied in correspondence with a four-step sequential extraction scheme for selenium addressing "soluble", "adsorbed", "organically bound", and "elemental" Se fractions extractable by distilled water, phosphate buffer, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and sodium sulphite solutions, respectively. Selenium was determined in the effluent by using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Contaminated creek sediment and dumped waste (soil) samples from the abandoned mining area were used to evaluate resemblances and discrepancies of two continuous-flow methods for Se fractionation. In general, similar trends were found for Se distribution between extractable and residual fractions. However, for the dumped waste sample which is rich in organic matter, the extraction in RCC provided more effective recovery of environmentally relevant Se forms (the first three leachable fractions). The most evident deviation was observed for "adsorbed" Se (recoveries by RCC and MC are 43 and 7 mg kg(-1), respectively). The data obtained were correlated with peculiarities of samples under investigation and operational principles of RCC and MC.

  3. Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer

  4. Chemical Data for Rock, Sediment, Biological, Precipitate, and Water Samples from Abandoned Copper Mines in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Munk, LeeAnn

    2007-01-01

    In the early 20th century, approximately 6 million metric tons of copper ore were mined from numerous deposits located along the shorelines of fjords and islands in Prince William Sound, Alaska. At the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites (fig. 1), rocks containing Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb sulfide minerals are exposed to chemical weathering in abandoned mine workings and remnant waste piles that extend into the littoral zone. Field investigations in 2003 and 2005 as well as analytical data for rock, sediment, precipitate, water, and biological samples reveal that the oxidation of sulfides at these sites is resulting in the generation of acid mine drainage and the transport of metals into the marine environment (Koski and others, 2008; Stillings and others, 2008). At the Ellamar and Threeman sites, plumes of acidic and metal-enriched water are flowing through beach gravels into the shallow offshore environment. Interstitial water samples collected from beach sediment at Ellamar have low pH levels (to ~3) and high concentrations of metals including iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, lead, and mercury. The abundant precipitation of the iron sulfate mineral jarosite in the Ellamar gravels also signifies a low-pH environment. At the Beatson mine site (the largest copper mine in the region) seeps containing iron-rich microbial precipitates drain into the intertidal zone below mine dumps (Foster and others, 2008). A stream flowing down to the shoreline from underground mine workings at Beatson has near-neutral pH, but elevated levels of zinc, copper, and lead (Stillings and others, 2008). Offshore sediment samples at Beatson are enriched in these metals. Preliminary chemical data for tissue from marine mussels collected near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson sites reveal elevated levels of copper, zinc, and lead compared to tissue in mussels from other locations in Prince William Sound (Koski and others, 2008). Three papers presenting results of this ongoing investigation of

  5. Contribution of priority PAHs and POPs to Ah receptor-mediated activities in sediment samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported.

  6. Daphnia magna Straus, 1820 response to sediment samples from a contaminated river ( Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Regina Terra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The Sinos River, a tributary of Guaíba Lake, is 200 km long from the headwaters to the mouth and is influenced by several sources of pollution. A study to learn more about conditions in this river was performed in the middle and lower reaches. The study evaluated the effects of sediment contamination by xenobiotics on the survival and reproduction of Daphnia magna. METHODS: Eight sediment samples were collected per site from Dec/2007 to Aug/2009, as a substrate for 480 young cladocera (2-26 h old at the beginning of the trials in chronic toxicity tests (21 days. For this purpose, D. magna individuals were exposed to sediment and M4 culture medium, at a proportion of 1:4 (v:v using 50 mL beakers, kept at 20 ºC ± 2 ºC in 16h light:8h dark cycles. The test organisms came from lots with LC50-24h = 1.04 mgK2Cr2O7 ± 0.11 mg. Percentage survival and reproduction were considered to define acute and/or chronic responses. Duncan (p < 0.05 and T (p < 0.05 Tests, ANOVA and Spearman correlation of the biological data were used as statistical complementation. The Spearman correlation was also applied looking for dependencies between the rainfall measured at the sites and the biological parameters but there was no evidence of correlation. The presence of acute toxicity was diagnosed for the sample in which survival was less than 80%, and for chronic toxicity when the mean number of neonates was less than 20 daphniids. RESULTS: Reproductive delays were found coinciding with physical and chemical parameters, as well as the presence of metals at values that were not in accordance with the law. Statistical analysis suggested the predominance of point sources of contamination. An effect on survival was observed in 17% of the samples, and on reproduction in 87%. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that pollutants discharged into the Sinos River remain and can interfere in the equilibrium of the trophic network, since they increase mortality and diminish the

  7. Marine sediment sample pre-processing for macroinvertebrates metabarcoding: mechanical enrichment and homogenization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Aylagas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabarcoding is an accurate and cost-effective technique that allows for simultaneous taxonomic identification of multiple environmental samples. Application of this technique to marine benthic macroinvertebrate biodiversity assessment for biomonitoring purposes requires standardization of laboratory and data analysis procedures. In this context, protocols for creation and sequencing of amplicon libraries and their related bioinformatics analysis have been recently published. However, a standardized protocol describing all previous steps (i.e. processing and manipulation of environmental samples for macroinvertebrate community characterization is lacking. Here, we provide detailed procedures for benthic environmental sample collection, processing, enrichment for macroinvertebrates, homogenization, and subsequent DNA extraction for metabarcoding analysis. Since this is the first protocol of this kind, it should be of use to any researcher in this field, having the potential for improvement.

  8. Analyses of hydrocarbons in BLM sediment intercalibration sample from Santa Barbara basin and spiked with API South Louisiana crude oil. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, J W; Tripp, B W; Sass, J

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report is made of a BLM intercalibration sediment sample from the Santa Barbara basin spiked with South Louisiana crude oil. The two subsamples reported were analyzed by a procedure described in the appendix for which a separate abstract was written. Because of the high oil content of the sediment the usual thin layer chromatography procedure resulted in an overloaded plate. An appendix was indexed separately. (JSR)

  9. Investigating how fundamental parameters of XRF sample preparation and analysis affect the observed elemental concentration: an experiment using fluvial sediment from Sabah, Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higton, Sam; Walsh, Rory

    2015-04-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is an important technique for measuring the concentrations of geochemical elements and inorganic contaminants adsorbed to sediments as an input to sediment tracing methods used to evaluate sediment transport dynamics in river catchments. In addition to traditional laboratory-based XRF instruments, the advent of increasingly advanced portable handheld XRF devices now mean that samples of fluvial sediment can be analysed in the field or in the laboratory following appropriate sample preparation procedures. There are limitations and sources of error associated with XRF sample preparation and analysis, however. It is therefore important to understand how fundamental parameters involved in sample preparation and analysis, such as sample compression and measurement exposure duration, affect observed variability in measurement results. Such considerations become important if the resulting measurement variability is high relative to the natural variability in element concentrations at a sample site. This paper deployed a simple experimental design to assess the impacts of varying a number of sample preparation and XRF analysis parameters on recorded measurements of elemental concentrations of the fine fraction (weight and sample quantity was sufficient to satisfy the assumption of 'infinite thickness' of sample. Standard plastic sample cups were used for both the Rigaku laboratory machine and the Niton portable XRF machine. A computer-controlled desktop laboratory stand was used in conjunction with the Niton handheld XRF analyser to ensure consistent repeated measurements. Parameters investigated related to sample preparation included consistent mechanical compression of samples within the sample cup and film thickness. Parameters investigated related to XRF analysis included the XRF machine selected and measurement exposure duration. As XRF is a non-destructive technique, wherever possible the same sample material was used to test different

  10. Nature and Composition of Planetary Surficial Deposits and Their Relationship to Planetary Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary soils constitute micron to meter sized debris blankets covering all or parts of the surfaces of many planetary bodies. Recent results from the Martian surface, by the MER rovers and Phoenix lander, the Huygens probe at Titan and perhaps even the NEAR mission to asteroid 433 Eros suggest a continuum between classic planetary soils, such as those on the Moon, and conventional sediments, such as those on Earth. Controls on this variation are governed by complex interactions related to (1) impact and volcanic history, (2) presence and nature of atmospheres (and thus climate), (3) occurrence, composition and physical state of near-surface volatiles (e.g., water, methane), and (4) presence and nature of crustal tectonics, crustal evolution, and so forth. The Moon represents one extreme where surficial deposits result almost exclusively from impact processes. Absence of water and air restrict further reworking or transport on a significant scale after initial deposition. Disruption and mixing of lunar soils takes place but is related to impact gardening operating on relatively local scales and largely in a vertical sense; alteration is restricted to space weathering. The effect is that lunar soils are compositionally variable and match the composition of the crust in the vicinity of where they form. Thus lunar soils in the highlands are fundamentally different in composition than those on maria. Earth provides the other extreme where the highly dynamic geochemical and geophysical nature of the surface precludes preservation of classic planetary soils, although analogs may exist in ejecta blankets and eolian loess. Instead, a complex suite of sedimentary deposits form in response to chemical and physical weathering, erosion, transport and deposition by a variety of mechanisms involving water, wind, ice and biology. Although there is substantial sedimentary lithological differentiation (e.g., shales, sands, carbonates, evaporites), greatly influenced by the

  11. Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  12. Review of samples of water, sediment, tailings, and biota at the Little Bonanza mercury mine, San Luis Obispo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Goldstein, Daniel N.; Brussee, Brianne E.; May, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The Little Bonanza mercury (Hg) mine, located in San Luis Obispo County, California, is a relatively small mine with, a historical total Hg production of about 1,000 flasks. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of the previously unnamed west fork of Las Tablas Creek (WF Las Tablas Creek), which flows into the Nacimiento Reservoir. Wasterock and tailings eroded from the Little Bonanza Hg Mine have contributed Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of WF Las Tablas Creek. The mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at and downstream from the minesite. This report is in response that request, from the lead agency which is mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Little Bonanza minesite as a means of reducing Hg transport to WF Las Tablas Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, wasterock, sediment, water, and biota at the Little Bonanza Mine that was completed on April 6, 2010. Conditions during sampling were dry and no rain had occurred in the watershed for several weeks. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could produce elevated levels of monomethyl mercury (MMeHg) in WF Las Tablas Creek and in biota.

  13. Procedures for Handling and Chemical Analysis of Sediment and Water Samples,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    However, ammonium acetate may yield low results with (a) samples containing 1:1 type clay minerals such as kaolin or halloysite, or (b) highly... sulphuric acid solution: extract two to three times with equal volumes of benzene. Silica gel: dewtetivate by adding deionized distillei water, 1.5...Cleanup is often unnecessary when the FPD is used, as there are low backtground interferences. High concentration of sulphur in the extract, however, may

  14. Arsenic, Antimony, Chromium, and Thallium Speciation in Water and Sediment Samples with the LC-ICP-MS Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jabłońska-Czapla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation is a very important subject in the environmental protection, toxicology, and chemical analytics due to the fact that toxicity, availability, and reactivity of trace elements depend on the chemical forms in which these elements occur. Research on low analyte levels, particularly in complex matrix samples, requires more and more advanced and sophisticated analytical methods and techniques. The latest trends in this field concern the so-called hyphenated techniques. Arsenic, antimony, chromium, and (underestimated thallium attract the closest attention of toxicologists and analysts. The properties of those elements depend on the oxidation state in which they occur. The aim of the following paper is to answer the question why the speciation analytics is so important. The paper also provides numerous examples of the hyphenated technique usage (e.g., the LC-ICP-MS application in the speciation analysis of chromium, antimony, arsenic, or thallium in water and bottom sediment samples. An important issue addressed is the preparation of environmental samples for speciation analysis.

  15. Regional Geochemical Results from the Reanalysis of NURE Stream Sediment Samples - Eagle 3? Quadrangle, East-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crock, J.G.; Briggs, P.H.; Gough, L.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Brown, Z.A.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents reconnaissance geochemical data for a cooperative study in the Fortymile Mining District, east-central Alaska, initiated in 1997. This study has been funded by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program. Cooperative funds were provided from various State of Alaska sources through the Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Results presented here represent the initial reconnaissance phase for this multidisciplinary cooperative study. In this phase, 239 sediment samples from the Eagle 3? Quadrangle of east-central Alaska, which had been collected and analyzed for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation program (NURE) of the 1970's (Hoffman and Buttleman, 1996; Smith, 1997), are reanalyzed by newer analytical methods that are more sensitive, accurate, and precise (Arbogast, 1996; Taggart, 2002). The main objectives for the reanalysis of these samples were to establish lower limits of determination for some elements and to confirm the NURE data as a reliable predictive reconnaissance tool for future studies in Alaska's Eagle 3? Quadrangle. This study has wide implications for using the archived NURE samples and data throughout Alaska for future studies.

  16. Surficial geology of the sea floor in Long Island Sound offshore of Plum Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Danforth, W.W.; Blackwood, D.S.; Schaer, J.D.; Ostapenko, A.J.; Glomb, K.A.; Doran, E.F.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been working cooperatively to interpret surficial sea-floor geology along the coast of the Northeastern United States. NOAA survey H11445 in eastern Long Island Sound, offshore of Plum Island, New York, covers an area of about 12 square kilometers. Multibeam bathymetry and sidescan-sonar imagery from the survey, as well as sediment and photographic data from 13 stations occupied during a USGS verification cruise are used to delineate sea-floor features and characterize the environment. Bathymetry gradually deepens offshore to over 100 meters in a depression in the northwest part of the study area and reaches 60 meters in Plum Gut, a channel between Plum Island and Orient Point. Sand waves are present on a shoal north of Plum Island and in several smaller areas around the basin. Sand-wave asymmetry indicates that counter-clockwise net sediment transport maintains the shoal. Sand is prevalent where there is low backscatter in the sidescan-sonar imagery. Gravel and boulder areas are submerged lag deposits produced from the Harbor Hill-Orient Point-Fishers Island moraine segment and are found adjacent to the shorelines and just north of Plum Island, where high backscatter is present in the sidescan-sonar imagery.

  17. Accelerated solvent extraction followed by on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to ion trap LC/MS/MS for analysis of benzalkonium chlorides in sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.

    2002-01-01

    Benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) were successfully extracted from sediment samples using a new methodology based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by an on-line cleanup step. The BACs were detected by liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using an electrospray interface operated in the positive ion mode. This methodology combines the high efficiency of extraction provided by a pressurized fluid and the high sensitivity offered by the ion trap MS/MS. The effects of solvent type and ASE operational variables, such as temperature and pressure, were evaluated. After optimization, a mixture of acetonitrile/water (6:4 or 7:3) was found to be most efficient for extracting BACs from the sediment samples. Extraction recoveries ranged from 95 to 105% for C12 and C14 homologues, respectively. Total method recoveries from fortified sediment samples, using a cleanup step followed by ASE, were 85% for C12BAC and 79% for C14-BAC. The methodology developed in this work provides detection limits in the subnanogram per gram range. Concentrations of BAC homologues ranged from 22 to 206 ??g/kg in sediment samples from different river sites downstream from wastewater treatment plants. The high affinity of BACs for soil suggests that BACs preferentially concentrate in sediment rather than in water.

  18. Applicability of solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography atomic emission detection (GC-MIP AED) for the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpinteiro, J.; Rodriguez, I.; Cela, R. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The performance of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) applied to the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples is systematically evaluated. Matrix effects and influence of blank signals on the detection limits of the method are studied in detail. The interval of linear response is also evaluated in order to assess the applicability of the method to sediments polluted with butyltin compounds over a large range of concentrations. Advantages and drawbacks of including an SPME step, instead of the classic liquid-liquid extraction of the derivatized analytes, in the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples are considered in terms of achieved detection limits and experimental effort. Analytes were extracted from the samples by sonication using glacial acetic acid. An aliquot of the centrifuged extract was placed on a vial where compounds were ethylated and concentrated on a PDMS fiber using the headspace mode. Determinations were carried out using GC-MIP AED. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of wastewater-associated contaminants in the bed sediment of Hempstead Bay, New York, before and after Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shawn C.; Phillips, Patrick; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Browne, James

    2016-01-01

    Changes in bed sediment chemistry of Hempstead Bay (HB) have been evaluated in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which resulted in the release of billions of liters of poorly-treated sewage into tributaries and channels throughout the bay. Surficial grab samples (top 5 cm) collected before and (or) after Hurricane Sandy from sixteen sites in HB were analyzed for 74 wastewater tracers and steroid hormones, and total organic carbon. Data from pre- and post-storm comparisons of the most frequently detected wastewater tracers and ratios of steroid hormone and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations indicate an increased sewage signal near outfalls and downstream of where raw sewage was discharged. Median concentration of wastewater tracers decreased after the storm at sites further from outfalls. Overall, changes in sediment quality probably resulted from a combination of additional sewage inputs, sediment redistribution, and stormwater runoff in the days to weeks following Hurricane Sandy.

  20. The quality of our Nation's waters: water quality in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain surficial aquifer system, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, and Virginia, 1988-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, Judith M.; Ator, Scott W.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Harned, Douglas C.; Schubert, Christopher E.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain is made up of unconfined aquifers that underlie most of the area. This aquifer system is a critical renewable source of drinking water and is the source of most flow to streams and of recharge to underlying confined aquifers. Millions of people rely on the surficial aquifer system for public and domestic water supply, in particular in the densely populated areas of Long Island, New York, and in southern New Jersey, but also in more rural areas. Because the aquifer sediments are permeable and the water table is shallow, the surficial aquifer system is vulnerable to contamination from chemicals that are applied to the land surface and carried into groundwater with infiltrating rainfall and snowfall.

  1. Toxicological evaluation of sediment samples spiked with human pharmaceutical products: Energy status and neuroendocrine effects in marine polychaetes Hediste diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranho, L A; André, C; DelValls, T A; Gagné, F; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2015-08-01

    There is a lack of studies about the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical products on marine environment. To predict possible adverse effects of pharmaceutical products on benthic biota, polychaetes Hediste diversicolor were exposed for 14-days to pharmaceutical-spiked sediments under laboratory conditions. Carbamazepine (CBZ), ibuprofen (IBP) and propranolol (PRO) at concentrations of 500ngg(-1), 50ngg(-1), 5ngg(-1), 0.5ngg(-1) and 0.05ngg(-1), fluoxetine (FX) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) at concentrations of 100ngg(-1), 10ngg(-1), 1ngg(-1), 0.1ngg(-1) and 0.01ngg(-1), including environmental concentrations (underlined), were spiked in marine sediment samples. After the exposure, cellular energy status (total lipids content - TLP; and mitochondrial electron transport activity - MET), metabolism of monoamines (monoamine oxidase activity - MAO) and inflammation properties (cyclooxygenase activity - COX) were observed in polychaetes. CBZ increased TLP content and MET activity, and decreased MAO activity in polychaetes. IBP did not interfere on the TLP level, but on the MET and MAO activities (environmental concentrations). FX did not cause changes in the energy status. Therefore, environmental concentration diminished MAO activity. EE2 did not affect the energy status, however, MAO activity was significantly lower in polychaetes exposed to environmental concentration. PRO increased TLP level in polychaetes, but not MET activity. MAO activity was significantly lower for polychaetes exposed to environmental concentration. Except FX, all pharmaceuticals showed anti-inflammatory properties confirmed by the decrease of COX activity. Pharmaceutical products affected H. diversicolor physiology and health. As a benthic top predator, adverse effects on sea-worms can potentially culminate in ecosystem perturbations.

  2. Understanding bioavailability and toxicity of sediment-associated contaminants by combining passive sampling with in vitro bioassays in an urban river catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan-Ying; Tang, Janet Yat Man; Jin, Ling; Escher, Beate I

    2013-12-01

    Bioavailable and bioaccessible fractions of sediment-associated contaminants are considered as better dose metrics for sediment-quality assessment than total concentrations. The authors applied exhaustive solvent extraction and nondepletive equilibrium sampling techniques to sediment samples collected along the Brisbane River in South East Queensland, Australia, which range from pristine environments to urban and industry-impacted areas. The wide range of chemicals expected prevents comprehensive chemical analysis, but a battery of cell-based bioassays sheds light on mixture effects of chemicals in relation to various modes of toxic action. Toxic effects were expressed as bioanalytical equivalent concentrations (BEQs) normalized to the organic carbon content of each sediment sample. Bioanalytical equivalent concentrations from exhaustive extraction agreed fairly well with values estimated from polydimethylsiloxane passive sampling extracts via the constant organic carbon to polydimethylsiloxane partition coefficient. Agreement was best for bioassays indicative of photosynthesis inhibition and oxidative stress response and discrepancy within a factor of 3 for the induction of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. For nonspecific cytotoxicity, BEQ from exhaustive extraction were 1 order of magnitude higher than values from equilibrium sampling, possibly because of coextraction of bioactive natural organic matter that led to an overestimation of toxicity in the exhaustive extracts, which suggests that passive sampling is better suited in combination with bioanalytical assessment than exhaustive extraction.

  3. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  4. Investigating the use of 232Th/230Th as a dust proxy using co-located seawater and sediment samples from the low-latitude North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, George H.; Ng, Hong Chin; Robinson, Laura F.; McManus, Jerry F.; Mohamed, Kais J.; McGee, David

    2017-10-01

    The thorium isotope ratio 232Th/230Th can be measured in seawater and sediment samples, and has been used as a proxy to reconstruct lithogenic fluxes to the oceans for the modern day and the Pleistocene. There has not yet been a systematic study testing the proxy using the 232Th/230Th ratio in seawater and the ratio recorded in the underlying sediment. In this study we use co-located core-top sediments and seawater samples from five seamount sites spanning the tropical North Atlantic to investigate the link between seawater and sediment 232Th/230Th ratios across a range of water depths. Our results indicate that a broad correlation exists between seawater and sedimentary 232Th/230Th ratios. Both seawater and sedimentary 232Th/230Th ratios record a signal consistent with decreasing lithogenic input east to west, from Africa to South America. However, calculated 232Th fluxes for the core-top sediment samples indicate a strong dependence on depth, with up to a factor of ∼4 difference from shallow (2900 m). This depth dependence is likely caused by either a deficit of 230Th burial at depth compared to the production in the overlying water column, through addition of 232Th, or by a combination of the two. By comparing seawater and sedimentary 232Th/230Th ratios we derive an apparent fractional solubility of 232Th of 29 ± 3%, in reasonable agreement with the upper end of existing estimates.

  5. Samples collected along transects off the Eastern United States in 1938 (STETSON38 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This study was undertaken to provide information on the characteristics and distribution of surficial sediments off the eastern United States. Accordingly, long...

  6. Samples collected along transects off the Eastern United States in 1938 (STETSON38 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This study was undertaken to provide information on the characteristics and distribution of surficial sediments off the eastern United States. Accordingly, long...

  7. The quantification of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in sediment samples using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with μECD detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscalu, Alina M; Morse, Dave; Reiner, Eric J; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2017-03-01

    The analysis of persistent organic pollutants in environmental samples is a challenge due to the very large number of compounds with varying chemical and physical properties. Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex mixtures of chlorinated n-alkanes with varying chain lengths (C10 to C30) and degree of chlorination (30 to 70% by weight). Their physical-chemical properties make these compounds persistent in the environment and able to bioaccumulate in living organisms. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled with micro-electron capture detection (μECD) was used to separate and quantify short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCP) in sediment samples. Distinct ordered bands were observed in the GC × GC chromatograms pointing to group separation. Using the Classification function of the ChromaTOF software, summary tables were generated to determine total area counts to set up multilevel-calibration curves for different technical mixes. Fortified sediment samples were analyzed by GC × GC-μECD with minimal extraction and cleanup. Recoveries ranged from 120 to 130%. To further validate the proposed method for the analysis of SCCPs, the laboratory participated in interlaboratory studies for the analysis of standards and sediment samples. The results showed recoveries between 75 and 95% and z-score values <2, demonstrating that the method is suitable for the analysis of SCCPs in soil/sediment samples. Graphical abstract Quantification of SCCPs by 2D-GC-μECD.

  8. A comparison of four porewater sampling methods for metal mixtures and dissolved organic carbon and the implications for sediment toxicity evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Danielle; Brumbaugh, William G; MacDonald, Donald D

    2017-06-09

    Evaluations of sediment quality conditions are commonly conducted using whole-sediment chemistry analyses but can be enhanced by evaluating multiple lines of evidence, including measures of the bioavailable forms of contaminants. In particular, porewater chemistry data provide information that is directly relevant for interpreting sediment toxicity data. Various methods for sampling porewater for trace metals and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which is an important moderator of metal bioavailability, have been employed. The present study compares the peeper, push point, centrifugation, and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) methods for the quantification of 6 metals and DOC. The methods were evaluated at low and high concentrations of metals in 3 sediments having different concentrations of total organic carbon and acid volatile sulfide and different particle-size distributions. At low metal concentrations, centrifugation and push point sampling resulted in up to 100 times higher concentrations of metals and DOC in porewater compared with peepers and DGTs. At elevated metal levels, the measured concentrations were in better agreement among the 4 sampling techniques. The results indicate that there can be marked differences among operationally different porewater sampling methods, and it is unclear if there is a definitive best method for sampling metals and DOC in porewater. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-10. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc., on behalf of SETAC.

  9. Organic contaminants, trace and major elements, and nutrients in water and sediment sampled in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Ludtke, Amy S.; Mueller, David K.; Scott, Jonathon C.

    2012-01-01

    Beach water and sediment samples were collected along the Gulf of Mexico coast to assess differences in contaminant concentrations before and after landfall of Macondo-1 well oil released into the Gulf of Mexico from the sinking of the British Petroleum Corporation's Deepwater Horizon drilling platform. Samples were collected at 70 coastal sites between May 7 and July 7, 2010, to document baseline, or "pre-landfall" conditions. A subset of 48 sites was resampled during October 4 to 14, 2010, after oil had made landfall on the Gulf of Mexico coast, called the "post-landfall" sampling period, to determine if actionable concentrations of oil were present along shorelines. Few organic contaminants were detected in water; their detection frequencies generally were low and similar in pre-landfall and post-landfall samples. Only one organic contaminant--toluene--had significantly higher concentrations in post-landfall than pre-landfall water samples. No water samples exceeded any human-health benchmarks, and only one post-landfall water sample exceeded an aquatic-life benchmark--the toxic-unit benchmark for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) mixtures. In sediment, concentrations of 3 parent PAHs and 17 alkylated PAH groups were significantly higher in post-landfall samples than pre-landfall samples. One pre-landfall sample from Texas exceeded the sediment toxic-unit benchmark for PAH mixtures; this site was not sampled during the post-landfall period. Empirical upper screening-value benchmarks for PAHs in sediment were exceeded at 37 percent of post-landfall samples and 22 percent of pre-landfall samples, but there was no significant difference in the proportion of samples exceeding benchmarks between paired pre-landfall and post-landfall samples. Seven sites had the largest concentration differences between post-landfall and pre-landfall samples for 15 alkylated PAHs. Five of these seven sites, located in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, had diagnostic

  10. Surficial geologic map of the Red Rock Lakes area, southwest Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Chesley-Preston, Tara L.; Sojda, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The Centennial Valley and Centennial Range continue to be formed by ongoing displacement on the Centennial fault. The dominant fault movement is downward, creating space in the valley for lakes and the deposition of sediment. The Centennial Valley originally drained to the northeast through a canyon now represented by a chain of lakes starting with Elk Lake. Subsequently, large landslides blocked and dammed the drainage, which created Lake Centennial, in the Centennial Valley. Sediments deposited in this late Pleistocene lake underlie much of the valley floor and rest on permeable sand and gravel deposited when the valley drained to the northeast. Cold Pleistocene climates enhanced colluvial supply of gravelly sediment to mountain streams and high peak flows carried gravelly sediment into the valley. There, the lower gradient of the streams resulted in deposition of alluvial fans peripheral to Lake Centennial as the lake lowered through time to the level of the two present lakes. Pleistocene glaciers formed in the high Centennial Range, built glacial moraines, and also supplied glacial outwash to the alluvial fans. Winds from the west and south blew sand to the northeast side of the valley building up high dunes. The central part of the map area is flat, sloping to the west by only 0.6 meters in 13 kilometers (2 feet in 8 miles) to form a watery lowland. This lowland contains Upper and Lower Red Rock Lakes, many ponds, and peat lands inside the “water plane,” above which are somewhat steeper slopes. The permeable sands and gravels beneath Lake Centennial sediments provide a path for groundwater recharged from the adjacent uplands. This groundwater leaks upward through Lake Centennial sediments and sustains wetland vegetation into late summer. Upper and Lower Red Rock Lakes are formed by alluvial-fan dams. Alluvial fans converge from both the south and the north to form outlet thresholds that dam the two shallow lakes upstream. The surficial geology aids in

  11. As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb pressurized liquid extraction with acetic acid from marine sediment and soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: jmoreda@udc.es; Alonso-Rodriguez, Elia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Mahia, Purificacion [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); University Institute of Environment, University of A Coruna, Pazo de Longora, Lians, E-15179. Oleiros (Spain); Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); Prada-Rodriguez, Dario [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna. Campus da Zapateira s/n. E-15071. A Coruna (Spain); University Institute of Environment, University of A Coruna, Pazo de Longora, Lians, E-15179. Oleiros (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bermejo-Barrera, Adela [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-12-15

    Rapid leaching procedures by Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) have been developed for As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb leaching from environmental matrices (marine sediment and soil samples). The Pressurized Liquid Extraction is completed after 16 min. The released elements by acetic acid Pressurized Liquid Extraction have been evaluated by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The optimum multi-element leaching conditions when using 5.0 ml stainless steel extraction cells, were: acetic acid concentration 8.0 M, extraction temperature 100 deg. C, pressure 1500 psi, static time 5 min, flush solvent 60%, two extraction steps and 0.50 g of diatomaceous earth as dispersing agent (diatomaceous earth mass/sample mass ratio of 2). Results have showed that high acetic acid concentrations and high extraction temperatures increase the metal leaching efficiency. Limits of detection (between 0.12 and 0.5 {mu}g g{sup -1}) and repeatability of the over-all procedure (around 6.0%) were assessed. Finally, accuracy was studied by analyzing PACS-2 (marine sediment), GBW-07409 (soil), IRANT-12-1-07 (cambisol soil) and IRANT-12-1-08 (luvisol soil) certified reference materials (CRMs). These certified reference materials offer certified concentrations ranges between 2.9 and 26.2 {mu}g g{sup -1} for As, from 0.068 to 2.85 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Cd, between 26.4 and 90.7 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Cr, from 9.3 to 40.0 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Ni and between 16.3 and 183.0 {mu}g g{sup -1} for Pb. Recoveries after analysis were between 95.7 and 105.1% for As, 96.2% for Cd, 95.2 and 100.6% for Cr, 95.7 and 103% for Ni and 94.2 and 105.5% for Pb.

  12. Bathymetry of the Levant basin: interaction of salt-tectonics and surficial mass movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Reshef, Moshe; Buch-Leviatan, Orna; Groves-Gidney, Gavrielle; Karcz, Zvi; Makovsky, Yizhaq; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2015-04-01

    A new high resolution bathymetric map of the Levant Basin between Israel and the Eratosthenes Seamount reveals previously undetected folds, faults and channels. The map facilitates a regional map-view analysis of structures that were previously examined only in cross section. The systematic mapping of morpho-structural elements in the entire basin is followed by a kinematic interpretation that distinguished between two main processes sculpting the seabed from bottom and top: salt tectonics and sediment transport. We show that the contractional domain related to salt tectonics is far more complex than previously thought. Ridges, previously interpreted as contractional folds are, in fact, surficial undulations of the seabed reminiscent of sediment waves. Moreover, other folds previously interpreted as downdip contraction of the westward gliding Plio-Quaternary section are, in some parts of the basin, caused by updip climbing of this section eastwards as a result of the regional pattern of salt flow away from the Nile Cone. In the context of sediment transport, we show that the northern Sinai continental slope is covered by a dense net of turbidite channels, whereas the Levant slope has no channels at all. Particularly interesting is the Levant Turbidite Channel, described and named here for the first time. This feature begins at the southeastern corner of the Mediterranean at water depths of ~1100 m, continues along the valley between the Sinai and Levant slopes, and reaches the deepest part of the basin, in water depths of ~2500 m, northeast of the Eratosthenes seamount. However, this prominent feature cannot be explained by the current drainage, consisting of two minor rivers that enter the basin at that point, and thus most likely reflects periods of wetter climate and/or lower sea-level, when these rivers were more active and possibly connected to the submarine channel system.

  13. Genotoxic and teratogenic effect of freshwater sediment samples from the Rhine and Elbe River (Germany) in zebrafish embryo using a multi-endpoint testing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Käufer, M; Gartiser, S; Hafner, C; Schiwy, S; Keiter, S; Gründemann, C; Hollert, H

    2015-11-01

    The embryotoxic potential of three model sediment samples with a distinct and well-characterized pollutant burden from the main German river basins Rhine and Elbe was investigated. The Fish Embryo Contact Test (FECT) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) was applied and submitted to further development to allow for a comprehensive risk assessment of such complex environmental samples. As particulate pollutants are constructive constituents of sediments, they underlay episodic source-sink dynamics, becoming available to benthic organisms. As bioavailability of xenobiotics is a crucial factor for ecotoxicological hazard, we focused on the direct particle-exposure pathway, evaluating throughput-capable endpoints and considering toxicokinetics. Fish embryo and larvae were exposed toward reconstituted (freeze-dried) sediment samples on a microcosm-scale experimental approach. A range of different developmental embryonic stages were considered to gain knowledge of potential correlations with metabolic competence during the early embryogenesis. Morphological, physiological, and molecular endpoints were investigated to elucidate induced adverse effects, placing particular emphasis on genomic instability, assessed by the in vivo comet assay. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the extent of induced cell death, since cytotoxicity can lead to confounding effects. The implementation of relative toxicity indices further provides inter-comparability between samples and related studies. All of the investigated sediments represent a significant ecotoxicological hazard by disrupting embryogenesis in zebrafish. Beside the induction of acute toxicity, morphological and physiological embryotoxic effects could be identified in a concentration-response manner. Increased DNA strand break frequency was detected after sediment contact in characteristic non-monotonic dose-response behavior due to overlapping cytotoxic effects. The embryonic zebrafish toxicity model along with the in vivo comet

  14. Interannual heavy element and nutrient concentration trends in the top sediments of Venice Lagoon (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiol, Mauro; Facca, Chiara; Visin, Flavia; Sfriso, Adriano; Pavoni, Bruno

    2014-12-15

    The elemental composition of surficial sediments of Venice Lagoon (Italy) in 1987, 1993, 1998 and 2003 were investigated. Zn and Cr concentrations resulted in higher than background levels, but only Cd and Hg were higher than legal quality standards (Italian Decree 2010/260 and Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC). Contaminants with similar spatial distribution are sorted into three groups by means of correlation analysis: (i) As, Co, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn; (ii) Ni, Cr; (iii) Hg. Interannual concentrations are compared by applying a factor analysis to the matrix of differences between subsequent samplings. A general decrease of heavy metal levels is observed from 1987 to 1993, whereas particularly high concentrations of Ni and Cr are recorded in 1998 as a consequence of intense clam fishing, subsequently mitigated by better prevention of illegal harvesting. Due to the major role played by anthropogenic sediment resuspension, bathymetric variations are also considered.

  15. Examination of factors dominating the sediment-water diffusion flux of DDT-related compounds measured by passive sampling in an urbanized estuarine bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Shi, Lei; Song, Lin; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2016-12-01

    The fate of hydrophobic organic compounds in aquatic environment are largely determined by their exchange at sediment-water interface, which is highly dynamic and subject to rapidly evolving environmental conditions. In turn, environmental conditions may be governed by both physicochemical parameters and anthropogenic events. To examine the importance of various impact factors, passive sampling devices were deployed at the seafloor of Hailing Bay, an urbanized estuarine bay in Guangdong Province of South China to measure the sediment-water diffusion fluxes of several metabolites of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and o,p'-DDD. The physicochemical properties of water (temperature, pH, salinity and dissolved oxygen) and surface sediment (sediment organic matter, physical composition, pH, water content, colony forming unit and catalase activity) were also measured. The results showed that the diffusion fluxes of o,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE at sites A1 and A2 near a fishing boat maintenance facility ranged from 0.42 to 4.73 ng m(-2) d(-1) (from sediment to overlying water), whereas those at offshore sites varied between -0.03 and -3.02 ng m(-2) d(-1) (from overlying water to sediment), implicating A1 and A2 as the sources of the target compounds. The distribution patterns of the diffusion fluxes of the target compounds were different from those of water and sediment parameters (water temperature, salinity, sediment texture, pH, colony forming unit and catalase activity) at six sampling sites. This finding suggested that none of these parameters were critical in dictating the sediment-water diffusion fluxes. Besides, decreases in the contents of kerogen and black carbon by 6.7% and 11% would enhance the diffusion fluxes of the target compounds by 11-14% and 12-23%, respectively, at site A1, indicating that kerogen and black carbon were the key factors in mediating the sediment-water diffusion fluxes of DDT-related compounds in field

  16. Testing single-grain quartz OSL methods using sediment samples with independent age control from the Bordes-Fitte rockshelter (Roches d'Abilly site, Central France)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, Andrew Sean; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter;

    2016-01-01

    We present quartz single-grain dose distributions for four well-bleached and unmixed sediment samples with independent age control (22–48 ka), from the archaeologically important Bordes-Fitte rockshelter at Roches d'Abilly, France. This site has previously been dated using 14C AMS dating and stan...

  17. Biolonical validation of a sample preparation method for ER-CALUX bioanalysis of estrogenic activity in sediment using mixtures of xeno-estrogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, C.J.; Houten, Van Y.K.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Brouwer, A.; Lamoree, M.H.; Legler, J.

    2006-01-01

    The combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of environmental pollutants in the in vitro ER-CALUX (chemical activated luciferase gene expression) bioassay were examined to biologically validate a sample preparation method for the analysis of estrogenic compounds in sediment. The method used accelerat

  18. Deep-water zooplankton in the Mediterranean Sea: Results from a continuous, synchronous sampling over different regions using sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Carugati, L.; Boldrin, A.; Calafat, A.; Canals, M.; Fabres, J.; Finlay, K.; Heussner, S.; Miserocchi, S.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.

    2017-08-01

    Information on the dynamics of deep-sea biota is extremely scant particularly for long-term time series on deep-sea zooplankton. Here, we present the results of a deep-sea zooplankton investigation over one annual cycle based on samples from sediment trap moorings in three sub-basins along the Mediterranean Sea. Deep-sea zooplankton assemblages were dominated by copepods, as in shallow waters, only in the Adriatic Sea (>60% of total abundance), but not in the deep Ionian Sea, where ostracods represented >80%, neither in the deep Alboran Sea, where polychaetes were >70%. We found that deep-sea zooplankton assemblages: i) are subjected to changes in their abundance and structure over time, ii) are characterized by different dominant taxa in different basins, and iii) display clear taxonomic segregation between shallow and near-bottom waters. Zooplankton biodiversity decreases with increasing water depth, but the equitability increases. We suggest here that variations of zooplankton abundance and assemblage structure are likely influenced by the trophic condition characterizing the basins. Our findings provide new insights on this largely unknown component of the deep ocean, and suggest that changes in the export of organic matter from the photic zone, such as those expected as a consequence of global change, can significantly influence zooplankton assemblages in the largest biome on Earth.

  19. Climatic change and permafrost. Record from surficial deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L. David

    1990-01-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of surficial deposits and the floral and faunal remains they contain provide information that is useful for interpreting both paleoclimatic and past permafrost conditions. Surficial deposits thus provide a record of climatic change and permafrost history. This record suggests that initiation of permafrost in lowland areas of the Southern Arctic Archipelago and continents of the northern hemisphere may have occurred about 2,400,000 years ago during the pronounced cooling that led to the first major glaciation of late Cenozoic time. Since then, climate has been relatively cold but cyclically variable, characterized by the growth and shrinkage of large, continental ice sheets. Permafrost has expanded and contracted in response to these climatic changes, and we can expect the present permafrost conditions to change in response to future climatic changes. To predict the response of permafrost and the landscape to future climatic change we should: (1) Define relations between climate and the modern landscape; (2) establish long-term records of past climatic change and landscape response; and (3) determine the paleoenvironments of past warm periods as possible analogs for future global warming.

  20. Hurricane Katrina Sediment Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August 2005, causing widespread devastation along the Gulf Coast of the United States. EPA emergency response personnel worked with FEMA and state and local agencies to respond to the emergencies throughout the Gulf.

  1. Hurricane Katrina Sediment Sampling

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August 2005, causing widespread devastation along the Gulf Coast of the United States. EPA emergency response personnel worked...

  2. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment in...

  3. National Geochemical Database: Sediment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geochemical analysis of sediment samples from the National Geochemical Database. Primarily inorganic elemental concentrations, most samples are of stream sediment...

  4. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Cr in marine sediment samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR CS AAS) and direct solid sample analysis has been developed. The application of fast programs in combination with direct solid sampling allows to eliminate the drying and pretreatment steps, however makes impossible the use of liquid standards for calibration. Iridium treated platforms were applied throughout the present study. Calibration technique based on the use of solid certified reference materials (marine sediments) similar to the nature of the analyzed sample and statistics of regression analysis were applied to the real sediment samples. The instrumental parameters were optimized in order to obtain reproducible and interference free analytical signals. The ISO-17025 requirements and Eurachem guidelines were followed in the validation of the proposed analytical procedure. Accordingly, blanks, selectivity, calibration, linearity, working range, trueness, repeatability reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification and expanded uncertainty (k = 2) for all investigated elements were assessed. Two different approaches for the estimation of measurement uncertainty were applied and obtained results compared. The major contributors to the combined uncertainty of the analyte mass fraction were found to be the homogeneity of the samples and the microbalance precision. The influence of sample particle sizes on the total combined uncertainty was also evaluated. Traceability to SI system of units of the obtained by the proposed analytical procedure results was demonstrated. Additionally, validation of the methodology developed was effectuated by the comparison of the obtained results with independent method e.g. ICP-MS with external calibration. The use of solid sampling HR CS AAS for the determination of trace elements in marine sediment matrix gives significant advantages

  5. Geno-toxicity assay of sediment and water samples from the Upper Silesia post-mining areas, Poland by means of Allium-test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, S.; Oudalova, A.; Michalik, B.; Dikareva, N.; Dikarev, V. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology & Agroecology RAAS, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    Genotoxic potential of two environmental compartments (water and sediment) from the Upper Silesia Coal Basin (USCB), Poland were evaluated and compared by employing root meristem cells of Allium cepa. The clear genotoxic effect of water and sediment sampled was shown, with an important contribution of severe types of cytogenetic abnormalities. The most biologically relevant pollutants were revealed through multivariate statistical analysis of relationships between biological effects registered and the environment contamination. Overall, results of simultaneous use of conventional monitoring methods and biological tests suggested that contemporary levels of persistent pollutants in post-mining areas of the USCB may enhance the risk both for human health and biological components of natural ecosystems.

  6. Multielementar determination by neutron activation in sediment samples from Tartarugalzinho region, Amapa State, Brazil; Determinacao multielementar em amostras de sedimentos da regiao do Tartarugalzinho, Amapa, por ativacao neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, Maria C.; Favaro, Debora I.T.; Vasconcellos, Marina B.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Sonia M.B. de; Melfi, Adolfo J. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Fostier, Anne H. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Quimica Analitica; Guimaraes, Jean R.D. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica; Forti, Maria C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    1999-11-01

    In the present work, sediment samples collected in the Tartarugalzinho region, State of Amapa, were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of the elements As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Na, Rb, Sc, Se, Ta, Th, U, Zn and Zr and the rare earth elements Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb could be determined. Analysis of the reference materials Buffalo River Sediment (NIST SRM 2704) and Soil 7 (IAEA) showed the accuracy and precision of the method. (author) 4 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  7. Sediment Texture Units of the Sea Floor from Nahant to Northern Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts (NAH_CCB_sedcover polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  8. Sediment Texture Units of the Sea Floor from Nahant to Northern Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts (NAH_CCB_sedcover polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  9. Sediment carbon fate in phreatic karst (Part 1): Conceptual model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husic, A.; Fox, J.; Agouridis, C.; Currens, J.; Ford, W.; Taylor, C.

    2017-06-01

    Recent research has paid increased attention to quantifying the fate of carbon pools within fluvial networks, but few, if any, studies consider the fate of sediment organic carbon in fluviokarst systems despite that karst landscapes cover 12% of the earth's land surface. The authors develop a conceptual model of sediment carbon fate in karst terrain with specific emphasis upon phreatic karst conduits, i.e., those located below the groundwater table that have the potential to trap surface-derived sediment and turnover carbon. To assist with their conceptual model development, the authors study a phreatic system and apply a mixture of methods traditional and novel to karst studies, including electrical resistivity imaging, well drilling, instantaneous velocimetry, dye tracing, stage recording, discrete and continuous sediment and water quality sampling, and elemental and stable carbon isotope fingerprinting. Results show that the sediment transport carrying capacity of the phreatic karst water is orders of magnitude less than surface streams during storm-activated periods promoting deposition of fine sediments in the phreatic karst. However, the sediment transport carrying capacity is sustained long after the hydrologic event has ended leading to sediment resuspension and prolonged transport. The surficial fine grained laminae occurs in the subsurface karst system; but unlike surface streams, the light-limited conditions of the subsurface karst promotes constant heterotrophy leading to carbon turnover. The coupling of the hydrological processes leads to a conceptual model that frames phreatic karst as a biologically active conveyor of sediment carbon that recharges degraded organic carbon back to surface streams. For example, fluvial sediment is estimated to lose 30% of its organic carbon by mass during a one year temporary residence within the phreatic karst. It is recommended that scientists consider karst pathways when attempting to estimate organic matter stocks

  10. Ecological implications of heavy metal concentrations in the sediments of Burullus Lagoon of Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongyuan; Salem, Alaa; Xu, Zhuang; Zhang, Weiguo

    2010-02-01

    This paper examines the spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Pb and Ni) from three short sediment cores collected from Burullus lagoon of the Nile delta, Egypt. 210Pb and 137Cs measurement is applied to understand sedimentation rate and related chronology. Remarkably low isotopic activities and intensive bioturbation in the lagoonal sediments rendered age determination difficult. Samples with detectable 137Cs in the upper core sediments together with sediment lithology could help infer a sedimentation rate of about 2.0 mm yr -1, thereby indicating post-dam (after 1964) sedimentation of the upper 10-cm core sediments. Our results demonstrate that most heavy metals in the surficial sediments after normalization to Al decrease seaward, showing a function of distance to the sewerage outlet on the inland lake coast. Also, there is an upwardly increasing trend of normalized heavy metals, especially in the upper 10-cm core sediments. Relevancy analysis has identified Mn, Pb and Cd as the diagnostic heavy metals in Burullus lagoon, most likely derived from Tanta and Kafrelsheihk, the major downtowns in the central Nile delta plain, from where wastewaters are directly discharging into the lake via canal networks. Although Burullus lagoon is presently least affected by pollution as compared to other major lagoons of the Nile delta, the increasing quantities of diagnostic metals, especially Mn, are extremely toxic, as they are potentially linked to the risks of digestive issues and pancreatic cancer reportedly. The situation calls for a rational planning for sewerage treatment in the protected Burullus coast.

  11. Heavy metals in sediments of a large, turbid tropical lake affected by anthropogenic discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales-Hoz, L.; Carranza-Edwards, A.; Lopez-Hernandez, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia

    2000-01-01

    Bottom-water data and trace metal concentration of Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Co, Zn, and organic matter in surficial sediment samples from 13 sampling stations of Lake Chapala in Mexico were studied. The lake is turbid with a great amount of flocculated sediments as a result of wind mixing, sediment re-suspension, and Lerma River discharges. Al distribution pattern in sediments was used as an indicator of the Lerma River discharges into Lake Chapala. The highest values of Cu (33.27 ppm), Cr (81.94 ppm), Pb (99.8 ppm), and Zn (149.7 ppm) were detected in sediments near the lake outlet. The bioavailable metal fraction is low for all metals except Pb, which shows 65-93% of the total metal concentration in bioavailable form. The minimum energy zone in the lake was related to organic matter concentration and was located in the SE part of the lake. An analysis of the studied parameters shows two zones: eastern zone (fluvio-deltaic) and central-western zone (lacustrine). (orig.)

  12. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in core sediment samples in Gulf of Izmir, Aegean Sea, Turkey (by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Kurt, Dilek

    2017-04-01

    Heavy metal and radionuclide analysis studies are crucial in explaining biotic and abiotic interactions in ecosystems. This type of analysis is highly needed in environments such as coastal areas, gulfs or lakes where human activities are generally concentrated. Sediments are one of the best biological indicators for the environment since the pollution accumulates in the sediments by descent to the sea floor. In this study, sediments were collected from the Gulf of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey) considering the accumulated points of domestic and industrial wastes to make an anthropogenic pollution analysis. The core sediments had different depths of 0.00-30.00 m at four different locations where Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Incialti and Cesmealti in the Gulf of Izmir. The purpose of the study was determining Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the drilling samples to assess their levels and spatial distribution in crucial areas of the Aegean Sea by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with microwave digestion techniques. The heavy metal concentrations found in sediments varied for Cd: sediments were relatively unpolluted. The potential ecological risk assessment was not found in Cesmealti while Karsiyaka and Inciralti had higher levels in parts of investigating heavy metals. Keywords: Gulf of Izmir, heavy metals, ICP-OES, pollution, sediment.

  13. Effects of sampling methods on the quantity and quality of dissolved organic matter in sediment pore waters as revealed by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Hur, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Despite literature evidence suggesting the importance of sampling methods on the properties of sediment pore waters, their effects on the dissolved organic matter (PW-DOM) have been unexplored to date. Here, we compared the effects of two commonly used sampling methods (i.e., centrifuge and Rhizon sampler) on the characteristics of PW-DOM for the first time. The bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, and excitation-emission matrixes coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) of the PW-DOM samples were compared for the two sampling methods with the sediments from minimal to severely contaminated sites. The centrifuged samples were found to have higher average values of DOC, UV absorption, and protein-like EEM-PARAFAC components. The samples collected with the Rhizon sampler, however, exhibited generally more humified characteristics than the centrifuged ones, implying a preferential collection of PW-DOM with respect to the sampling methods. Furthermore, the differences between the two sampling methods seem more pronounced in relatively more polluted sites. Our observations were possibly explained by either the filtration effect resulting from the smaller pore size of the Rhizon sampler or the desorption of DOM molecules loosely bound to minerals during centrifugation, or both. Our study suggests that consistent use of one sampling method is crucial for PW-DOM studies and also that caution should be taken in the comparison of data collected with different sampling methods.

  14. Assessments of radioactivity concentration of natural radionuclides and radiological hazard indices in sediment samples from the East coast of Tamilnadu, India with statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, R; Chandramohan, J; Chandrasekaran, A; Prince Prakash Jebakumar, J; Vijayalakshmi, I; Vijayagopal, P; Venkatraman, B

    2015-08-15

    This paper reports on the distribution of three natural radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in coastal sediments from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam along the East coast of Tamilnadu to establish baseline data for future environmental monitoring. Sediment samples were collected by a Peterson grab samples from 10m water depth parallel to the shore line. Concentration of natural radionuclides were determined using a NaI(Tl) detector based γ-spectrometry. The mean activity concentration is ⩽2.21, 14.29 and 360.23Bqkg(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The average activity of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K is lower when compared to the world average value. Radiological hazard parameters were estimated based on the activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K to find out any radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The radiological hazard parameters such as radium equivalent activity (Raeq), absorbed gamma dose rates in air (DR), the annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE), annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), external hazard index (Hex) internal hazard index (Hin), activity utilization index (AUI) and excess lifetime cancer (ELCR) associated with the radionuclides were calculated and compared with internationally approved values and the recommended safety limits. Pearson correlation, principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) have been applied in order to recognize and classify radiological parameters in sediments collected at 22 sites on East coast of Tamilnadu. The values of radiation hazard parameters were comparable to the world averages and below the recommended values. Therefore, coastal sediments do not to pose any significant radiological health risk to the people living in nearby areas along East coast of Tamilnadu. The data obtained in this study will serve as a baseline data in natural radionuclide concentration in sediments along the coastal East coast of Tamilnadu. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  15. Surficial geologic map of the Walden 30' x 60' quadrangle, Jackson, Larimer, and Routt counties, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one of a series of four 30' x 60' surficial geologic maps (1:100,000 scale) intended to provide basic geologic information for planning for energy resource development and growth in northwestern Colorado. An effort is made to characterize all surficial materials, regardless of origin. Hence, residuum is given much more emphasis than is customary, and this results in several departures from conventional geologic maps: bedrock geology is deemphasized; the part of the map symbol denoting geologic age is omitted for surficial units because all surficial units shown are believed to be of Quaternary age; and faults are not shown because none in this map area was observed to displace surficial materials.

  16. Simulation of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons remobilization from a river sediment using laboratory experiments supported by passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belles, Angel; Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Alary, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Resuspension of bedded sediments was simulated under laboratory-controlled conditions in order to assess the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) remobilized in the dissolved fraction during one short and vigorous mixing. The desorbed amount of PAH was compared to the exchangeable fraction, the total amount of PAH sorbed on the sediment particles, and the dissolved PAH amount contained in the interstitial pore waters in order to evaluate the contribution of each fraction to the total amount of PAH released. To monitor the desorption of PAH and measure low trace level concentrations, passive samplers were used in an experimental open flow through exposure simulator. Results show that for the selected sediment, a substantial fraction of sorbed PAH (69 % of the total amount) is not available for remobilization in a depleted medium. Obtained data pinpoint that over 9 days, only 0.007 % of PAH are desorbed by passive diffusion through a water-sediment interface area of 415 cm(2) and that an intense resuspension event of 15 min induces desorption of 0.015 % of PAH during the following 9 days. Results also highlight that during resuspension simulation, modifications of the sediment and the water body occurred since partitioning constants of some pollutants between sediment and water have significantly decreased.

  17. High rates of denitrification and nitrate removal in cold seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Bowles, Marshall; Joye, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    We measured denitrification and nitrate removal rates in cold seep sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. Heterotrophic potential denitrification rates were assayed in time-series incubations. Surficial sediments inhabited by Beggiatoa exhibited higher heterotrophic potential denitrification rates (32 μ N reduced day−1) than did deeper sediments (11 μ N reduced day−1). Nitrate removal rates were high in both sediment horizons. These nitrate removal rates translate into rapid turnover times (...

  18. Production of gelatinase enzyme from Bacillus spp isolated from the sediment sample of Porto Novo Coastal sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanmugasundaram Senthil Balan; Rajendiran Nethaji; Sudalayandi Sankar; Singaram Jayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In this study, gelatinase producing bacteria were probed from sediment samples of Porto Novo Coastal sites, India. Screening and identification of potential strain were done followed by optimization of physico-chemical parameters; bulk production and gelatinase extraction were carried out. Methods: For probing of gelatinase potential producer primary and secondary screening was carried out for qualitative and quantitative estimation. Optimization of physico-chemical parameters for improved production of gelatinase enzyme and large scale of gelatinase was produced. Gelatinase precipitation was standardized using different saturation rates of ammonium sulphate from 10 to 100% at 4℃.Results: There were 8 morphologically different gelatinase producing bacteria were initially delved through primary screening tests. Bacillus spp produced maximum gelatinase activity (2.1U/mL) in secondary screening test. Optimizing its abiotic and biotic factors, maximum enzyme activity was achieved at 48h incubation period (2.2U/mL), 2.5 pH (2.5U/mL), 35℃ temperature (2.55U/mL), 0.8% lactose (2.6U/mL), 1.4% gelatin (2.9U/mL) as the ideal carbon source and nitrogen source, 1% salinity (2.9U/mL) and 3ml of inoculum containing 5.6×106/ mL (3.3U/mL). From the optimized factors, bulk production was carried out and saturation rate of 40% ammonium sulphate, precipitated out maximum enzyme with lowered dry weight indicates its enzyme purity and recovered enzyme showed 4.1U/mg of activity. Conclusion: The study revealed that the isolated strain Bacillus spp has its potentiality for industrial scale production and the results will stand as a base line data for the application of gelatinase in future.

  19. Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

  20. Contribution of priority PAHs and POPs to Ah receptor-mediated activities in sediment samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens C Otte

    Full Text Available The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM. One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02-0.906 µg/g dw. Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported.

  1. Contribution of Priority PAHs and POPs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities in Sediment Samples from the River Elbe Estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Jens C.; Keiter, Steffen; Faßbender, Christopher; Higley, Eric B.; Rocha, Paula Suares; Brinkmann, Markus; Wahrendorf, Dierk-Steffen; Manz, Werner; Wetzel, Markus A.; Braunbeck, Thomas; Giesy, John P.; Hecker, Markus; Hollert, Henner

    2013-01-01

    The estuary of the River Elbe between Hamburg and the North Sea (Germany) is a sink for contaminated sediment and suspended particulate matter (SPM). One major concern is the effect of human activities on the hydrodynamics, particularly the intensive dredging activities in this area that may result in remobilization of sediment-bound pollutants. The aim of this study was to identify pollutants contributing to the toxicological risk associated with re-suspension of sediments in the Elbe Estuary by use of an effect-directed analysis that combines chemical and biological analyses in with specific fractionation techniques. Sediments were collected from sites along the Elbe Estuary and a site from a small harbor basin of the Elbe Estuary that is known to be polluted. The sixteen priority EPA-PAHs were quantified in organic extracts of sediments. In addition, dioxin equivalents of sediments were investigated by use of the 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay with RTL-W1 cells and the Ah receptor-mediated luciferase transactivation assay with H4IIE-luc cells. Quantification of the 16 priority PAHs revealed that sediments were moderately contaminated at all of the sites in the Elbe River Estuary (<0.02–0.906 µg/g dw). Sediments contained relatively small concentrations of dioxin equivalents (Bio-TEQ) with concentrations ranging from 15.5 to 322 pg/g dw, which were significantly correlated with dioxin equivalents calculated based on toxicity reference values and concentrations of PAH. The concentration of Bio-TEQ at the reference site exceeded 200,000 pg/g dw. In a potency balance the 16 PAHs explained between 47 and 118% of the Bio-TEQ in the luciferase assay, which can be explained by the constant input of PAHs bound to SPM from the upper course of the Elbe River into its estuary. Successful identification of a significant portion of dioxin-like activity to priority PAHs in complex environmental samples such as sediments has rarely been reported. PMID:24146763

  2. Results of soil, ground-water, surface-water, and streambed-sediment sampling at Air Force Plane 85, Columbus, Ohio, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, prepared the Surface- and Ground- Water Monitoring Work Plan for Air Force Plant 85 (AFP 85 or Plant), Columbus, Ohio, under the Air Force Installation Restoration Program to characterize any ground-water, surface-water, and soil contamination that may exist at AFP 85. The USGS began the study in November 1996. The Plant was divided into nine sampling areas, which included some previously investi gated study sites. The investigation activities included the collection and presentation of data taken during drilling and water-quality sampling. Data collection focused on the saturated and unsatur ated zones and surface water. Twenty-three soil borings were completed. Ten monitoring wells (six existing wells and four newly constructed monitoring wells) were selected for water-quality sam pling. Surface-water and streambed-sediment sampling locations were chosen to monitor flow onto and off of the Plant. Seven sites were sampled for both surface-water and streambed-sediment quality. This report presents data on the selected inorganic and organic constituents in soil, ground water, surface water, and streambed sediments at AFP 85. The methods of data collection and anal ysis also are included. Knowledge of the geologic and hydrologic setting could aid Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, Restoration Division, and its governing regulatory agencies in future remediation studies.

  3. Effect of water-table fluctuations on the degradation of Sphagnum phenols in surficial peats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Swain, Eleanor Y.; Muhammad, Aminu B.; Allton, Kathryn; Belyea, Lisa R.; Laing, Christopher G.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2013-04-01

    A much improved understanding of how water-table fluctuations near the surface affect decomposition and preservation of peat-forming plant litter and surficial peats is needed in order to predict possible feedbacks between the peatland carbon cycle and the global climate system. In this study peatland plants (bryophytes and vascular plants), their litter and peat cores were collected from the Ryggmossen peatland in the boreonemoral zone of central Sweden. The extracted insoluble residues from whole plant tissues were depolymerized using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM) in the presence of both unlabelled and 13C-labelled tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) which yielded both vascular plant- and Sphagnum-derived phenols. Methylated 4-isopropenylphenol (IUPAC: 1-methoxy-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)benzene), methylated cis- and trans-3-(4'-hydroxyphen-1-yl)but-2-enoic acid (IUPAC: (E/Z)-methyl 3-(4-methoxyphenyl)but-2-enoate), and methylated 3-(4'-hydroxyphen-1-yl)but-3-enoic acid (IUPAC: methyl 3-(4-methoxyphenyl)but-3-enoate) (van der Heijden et al., 1997) are confirmed as TMAH thermochemolysis products of "bound" sphagnum acid and also as being specific to Sphagnum mosses. These putative biomarkers were also significant components in the unlabelled TMAH thermochemolysis products from the depolymerization of ultrasonically extracted samples from eight peat cores, one from a hummock and one from a hollow at each of the four stages along the bog plateau-to-swamp forest gradient. We have proposed and measured two parameters namely (i) σ which is defined as the total amount of these four molecules normalised to 100 mg of OC; and (ii) an index (SR%) which is the ratio of σ to the Λ parameter giving a measure of the relative amounts of "bound" sphagnum acid to the "bound" vascular plant phenols in peat moss and the surficial peat layers. Changes in σ and SR% down the bog plateau (BP), bog margin (BM) and fen lagg (FL) cores in the Ryggmossen mire indicates

  4. Microbial Communities in Sediments across the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Louisiana continental Shelf (LCS) is a dynamic system that receives discharges from two large rivers. It has a stratified water column that is mixed by winter storms, hypoxic bottom water from spring to fall, and a muddy seafloor with highly mixed surficial sediments. Spatia...

  5. Organic carbon in the sediments of Mandovi estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    Total organic carbon (TOC) in surficial sediments in Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India varies widely from 0.1 to 3% (av. 1.05%). Highest values of TOC (2.4-3%) lie close to the mouth region and indicate no definite trend in its variation in the estuarine...

  6. [Analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in sediment samples from the mouth of the Daliao River by HRGC/ECNI-LRMS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Hai-jun; Zou, Li-li; Tian, Yu-zeng; Chen, Ji-ping

    2010-08-01

    An analytical method for quantifying short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) by high-resolution gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion low-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ECNI-LRMS) was presented. The cleanup procedure with an acid silica gel column and activated neutral alumina column was optimized to remove the interferences. As illustration of the application of the method to environmental samples, it is found that lower chlorinated C10 and C11 compounds were the main SCCPs compounds in six sediment samples from the mouth of the Daliao River. The concentrations of SCCPs in sediments were determined to be in the range of 64.9-407.0 ng/g and showed a decreasing tendency from the shore to the remote location.

  7. Regional surficial geochemistry of the northern Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, S.; Folger, H.; Kotlyar, B.; Mossotti, V.G.; Coombs, M.J.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    2006-01-01

    The regional distribution of arsenic and 20 other elements in stream-sediment samples in northern Nevada and southeastern Oregon was studied in order to gain new insights about the geologic framework and patterns of hydrothermal mineralization in the area. Data were used from 10,261 samples that were originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program in the 1970s. The data are available as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02-0227. The data were analyzed using traditional dot maps and interpolation between data points to construct high-resolution raster images, which were correlated with geographic and geologic information using a geographic information system (GIS). Wavelength filters were also used to deconvolute the geochemical images into various textural components, in order to study features with dimensions of a few kilometers to dimensions of hundreds of kilometers. The distribution of arsenic, antimony, gold, and silver is different from distributions of the other elements in that they show a distinctive high background in the southeast part of the area, generally in areas underlain by the pre-Mesozoic craton. Arsenic is an extremely mobile element and can be used to delineate structures that served as conduits for the circulation of metal-bearing fluids. It was used to delineate large crustal structures and is particularly good for delineation of the Battle Mountain-Eureka mineral trend and the Steens lineament, which corresponds to a post-Miocene fault zone. Arsenic distribution patterns also delineated the Black Rock structural boundary, northwest of which the basement apparently consists entirely of Miocene and younger crust. Arsenic is also useful to locate district-sized hydrothermal systems an d clusters of systems. Most important types of hydrothermal mineral deposit in the northern Great Basin appear to be strongly associated with arsenic; this is less

  8. Anomalous distribution of fluoride and phosphorus forms in surface sediments along eastern Egyptian Mediterranean Sea coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Ghada F; Khalil, Mona Kh; Draz, Suzanne E O

    2016-07-01

    The study focused on the distribution of fluoride, total phosphorus, and four phosphorus fractions in some sites along the Egyptian Mediterranean Sea coast. The geochemical parameters and textures of 30 surficial sediment samples from six sectors were determined. The sediment's geochemical parameters (total carbonates (TCO3) and total organic carbon (TOC), exchangeable and carbonate-associated phosphorus (Pex), iron- and aluminum-associated phosphorus (POH), calcium-associated phosphate/apatite (PHCl), residual phosphorus (PR), total phosphorus (TP), calcium (Cas), magnesium (Mgs), and fluoride (Fs)) showed variable values. The rank of phosphorus fractions in the sediments PHCl > PR > POH > Pex reflected that the eastern Egyptian coast was still uncontaminated. Generally, Pex levels gave a gradual increase in the offshore direction, while POH values varied along the stations of each sector. Also, the presented data indicated that the apatite-P fraction was the main storage of the phosphate in the sediments with a contribution to TP ranging from 58 to 87 %. The highest and lowest average fluoride contents (0.49 ± 0.10 and 0.25 ± 0.31 mg/g) were determined in the Port Said and Damietta sectors, respectively. Interestingly, the variability of both phosphorus and fluoride levels in the investigated area seemed to be accompanied with the sediment's character beside the proximity to potential effluent sources.

  9. Occurrence of microbial indicators and Clostridium perfringens in wastewater, water column samples, sediments, drinking water, and Weddell seal feces collected at McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T; Smith, James J; Edwards, Diane D; McFeters, Gordon A

    2004-12-01

    McMurdo Station, Antarctica, has discharged untreated sewage into McMurdo Sound for decades. Previous studies delineated the impacted area, which included the drinking water intake, by using total coliform and Clostridium perfringens concentrations. The estimation of risk to humans in contact with the impacted and potable waters may be greater than presumed, as these microbial indicators may not be the most appropriate for this environment. To address these concerns, concentrations of these and additional indicators (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci, coliphage, and enteroviruses) in the untreated wastewater, water column, and sediments of the impacted area and drinking water treatment facility and distribution system at McMurdo Station were determined. Fecal samples from Weddell seals in this area were also collected and analyzed for indicators. All drinking water samples were negative for indicators except for a single total coliform-positive sample. Total coliforms were present in water column samples at higher concentrations than other indicators. Fecal coliform and enterococcus concentrations were similar to each other and greater than those of other indicators in sediment samples closer to the discharge site. C. perfringens concentrations were higher in sediments at greater distances from the discharge site. Seal fecal samples contained concentrations of fecal coliforms, E. coli, enterococci, and C. perfringens similar to those found in untreated sewage. All samples were negative for enteroviruses. A wastewater treatment facility at McMurdo Station has started operation, and these data provide a baseline data set for monitoring the recovery of the impacted area. The contribution of seal feces to indicator concentrations in this area should be considered.

  10. The contribution of bank and surface sediments to fluvial sediment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contribution of bank and surface sediments to fluvial sediment transport of the Pra River. ... Sediment source studies involving a simple mixing model was undertaken in the ... For bank erosion, river channel bank materials were sampled.

  11. Geogenic distribution and baseline concentrations of Cu and Zn in surficial soil of Guiyang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji; WANG Shijie; OUYANG Ziyuan; LI Ruiling

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the environmentally geochemical characteristics of heavy metal pollu tants such as Cu and Zn in the surficial soil of Guiyang, the capital city of Guizhou Province. The baseline concentrations of heavy metals in soil and the geochemical norms have been established to distinguish natural or artificial influence on the environment. Using the statistically analytical methods, we have established the baseline of Cu in Guiyang ( 18.8 mg/kg) and the soil ( over 68.4 mg/kg) may suffer Cu contamination. The data of Zn are 46.3 mg/kg and 112.0 mg/kg. Geoaccumulation index analysis indicated that the surficial soil that has suffered non-pollution to mid-pollution of Cu accounts for 38%, 38%, and 22% for mid-pollution, and only 2% between mid-pollution to severe pollution. Surficial soil that has suffered non-pollution to mid-pollution of Zn accounts for 41%, 50%, and 7% for mid-pollution, and only 2% between mid-pollution to severe pollution. The maximal degree of Cu contamination is 5.09 in the surficial soil of Guiyang. Surficial soil that has not suffered Cu pollution accounts for 53.2%. The total pollution degree of Cu is slightly over zero. So the surficial soil of Guiyang has suffered slight Cu pollution. The maximum value of Zn contamination degree is 2.85 in the surficial soil of Guiyang. 77.8% of the surficial soil has not yet suffered any Zn pollution. The total pollution degree of Zn is less than zero.So the surficial soil in Guiyang is free from pollution of Zn.

  12. Relations between continuous real-time turbidity data and discrete suspended-sediment concentration samples in the Neosho and Cottonwood Rivers, east-central Kansas, 2009-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Guy M.

    2014-01-01

    The Neosho River and its primary tributary, the Cottonwood River, are the primary sources of inflow to the John Redmond Reservoir in east-central Kansas. Sedimentation rate in the John Redmond Reservoir was estimated as 743 acre-feet per year for 1964–2006. This estimated sedimentation rate is more than 80 percent larger than the projected design sedimentation rate of 404 acre-feet per year, and resulted in a loss of 40 percent of the conservation pool since its construction in 1964. To reduce sediment input into the reservoir, the Kansas Water Office implemented stream bank stabilization techniques along an 8.3 mile reach of the Neosho River during 2010 through 2011. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Water Office and funded in part through the Kansas State Water Plan Fund, operated continuous real-time water-quality monitors upstream and downstream from stream bank stabilization efforts before, during, and after construction. Continuously measured water-quality properties include streamflow, specific conductance, water temperature, and turbidity. Discrete sediment samples were collected from June 2009 through September 2012 and analyzed for suspended-sediment concentration (SSC), percentage of sediments less than 63 micrometers (sand-fine break), and loss of material on ignition (analogous to amount of organic matter). Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely measured SSC samples, and turbidity or streamflow to estimate continuously SSC. Continuous water-quality monitors represented between 96 and 99 percent of the cross-sectional variability for turbidity, and had slopes between 0.91 and 0.98. Because consistent bias was not observed, values from continuous water-quality monitors were considered representative of stream conditions. On average, turbidity-based SSC models explained 96 percent of the variance in SSC. Streamflow-based regressions explained 53 to 60 percent of the variance. Mean squared

  13. Chemical quality of water, sediment, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Jones, S.A.; Moring, J. Bruce; Mahler, B.J.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence, trends, and sources of numerous inorganic and organic contaminants were evaluated in Mountain Creek Lake, a reservoir in Dallas, Texas. The study, done in cooperation with the Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command, was prompted by the Navy?s concern for potential off-site migration of contaminants from two facilities on the shore of Mountain Creek Lake, the Naval Air Station Dallas and the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant. Sampling of stormwater (including suspended sediment), lake water, bottom sediment (including streambed sediment), and fish was primarily in Mountain Creek Lake but also was in stormwater outfalls from the Navy facilities, nearby urban streams, and small streams draining the Air Station. Volatile organic compounds, predominantly solvents from the Reserve Plant and fuel-related compounds from the Air Station, were detected in stormwater from both Navy facilities. Fuel-related compounds also were detected in Mountain Creek Lake at two locations, one near the Air Station inlet where stormwater from a part of the Air Station enters the lake and one at the center of the lake. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds at the two lake sites were small, all less than 5 micrograms per liter. Elevated concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, and zinc, from 2 to 4 times concentrations at background sites and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial bottom sediments in Cottonwood Bay, near stormwater outfalls from the Reserve Plant. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, compared to background and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial sediments in Cottonwood Bay. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, indicative of urban sources, also were detected in Cottonwood Creek, which drains an urbanized area apart from the Navy facilities. Elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls were

  14. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, R.A.; De Boer, W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous

  15. Laboratory, Field, and Analytical Procedures for Using Passive Sampling in the Evaluation of Contaminated Sediments: User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardless of the remedial technology invoked to address contaminated sediments in the environment, there is a critical need to have tools for assessing the effectiveness of the remedy. In the past, these tools have included chemical and biomonitoring of the water column and sedi...

  16. INTERIM REPORT ON THE EVOLUTION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE EICHROM TECHNOLOGIES PROCEPT RAPID DIOXIN ASSAY FOR SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demonstration of screening technologies for determining the presence of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in soil and sediment was conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's(EPA's) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in Saginaw, Michigan in 2004. T...

  17. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, R.A.; Boer, W. de; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous

  18. Corroded planktic foraminifer (Globorotalia menardii) in the southern Bay of Bengal sediment trap sample of February 1992

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohan, R.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    ) Sedimentation under deep sea storms. Nature, v.309, pp.220-225. HONJO, S. (1977) Biogenic carbonate particles in the ocean; do they dissolve in the water column?. In: N.R. Andersen and A. Malahoff, (Eds.), The fate of fossil fuel CO2 in the Oceans. Plenum...

  19. Use of a (137)Cs re-sampling technique to investigate temporal changes in soil erosion and sediment mobilisation for a small forested catchment in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Paolo; Walling, Des E; Alewell, Christine; Callegari, Giovanni; Mabit, Lionel; Mallimo, Nicola; Meusburger, Katrin; Zehringer, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Soil erosion and both its on-site and off-site impacts are increasingly seen as a serious environmental problem across the world. The need for an improved evidence base on soil loss and soil redistribution rates has directed attention to the use of fallout radionuclides, and particularly (137)Cs, for documenting soil redistribution rates. This approach possesses important advantages over more traditional means of documenting soil erosion and soil redistribution. However, one key limitation of the approach is the time-averaged or lumped nature of the estimated erosion rates. In nearly all cases, these will relate to the period extending from the main period of bomb fallout to the time of sampling. Increasing concern for the impact of global change, particularly that related to changing land use and climate change, has frequently directed attention to the need to document changes in soil redistribution rates within this period. Re-sampling techniques, which should be distinguished from repeat-sampling techniques, have the potential to meet this requirement. As an example, the use of a re-sampling technique to derive estimates of the mean annual net soil loss from a small (1.38 ha) forested catchment in southern Italy is reported. The catchment was originally sampled in 1998 and samples were collected from points very close to the original sampling points again in 2013. This made it possible to compare the estimate of mean annual erosion for the period 1954-1998 with that for the period 1999-2013. The availability of measurements of sediment yield from the catchment for parts of the overall period made it possible to compare the results provided by the (137)Cs re-sampling study with the estimates of sediment yield for the same periods. In order to compare the estimates of soil loss and sediment yield for the two different periods, it was necessary to establish the uncertainty associated with the individual estimates. In the absence of a generally accepted procedure

  20. Sediment-Tracing Technology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    flattening of the profile of 210Pb activity versus depth in the surficial sediment layers, and degradation of the 137Cs peak (Appleby 2001). In the CRS model...parameters can be diagnostic of mineral type and origin; they are sensitive to chemical and thermal transformations and can reflect the ambient magnetic...feldspar, calcite , and water. When the magnetic field is removed, diamagnetism is lost. b. Paramagnetism: When a magnetic field is applied to a

  1. Analytical results and sample locality map for rock, stream-sediment, and soil samples, Northern and Eastern Coloado Desert BLM Resource Area, Imperial, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Harley D.; Chaffee, Maurice A.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In 1996-1998 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a geochemical study of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) 5.5 million-acre Northern and Eastern Colorado Desert Resource Area (usually referred to as the NECD in this report), Imperial, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, southeastern California (figure 1). This study was done in support of the BLM's Coordinated Management Plan for the area. This report presents analytical data from this study. To provide comprehensive coverage of the NECD, we compiled and examined all available geochemical data, in digital form, from previous studies in the area, and made sample-site plots to aid in determining where sample-site coverage and analyses were sufficient, which samples should be re-analyzed, and where additional sampling was needed. Previous investigations conducted in parts of the current study area included the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program studies of the Needles and Salton Sea 1? x 2? quadrangles; USGS studies of 12 BLM Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) (Big Maria Mountains, Chemehuevi Mountains, Chuckwalla Mountains, Coxcomb Mountains, Mecca Hills, Orocopia Mountains, Palen-McCoy, Picacho Peak, Riverside Mountains, Sheephole Valley (also known as Sheep Hole/Cadiz), Turtle Mountains, and Whipple Mountains); and USGS studies in the Needles and El Centro 1? x 2? quadrangles done during the early 1990s as part of a project to identify the regional geochemistry of southern California. Areas where we did new sampling of rocks and stream sediments are mainly in the Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range and in Joshua Tree National Park, which extends into the west-central part of the NECD, as shown in figure 1 and figure 2. This report contains analytical data for 132 rock samples and 1,245 stream-sediment samples collected by the USGS, and 362 stream-sediment samples and 189 soil samples collected during the NURE program. All samples are from the Northern and Eastern Colorado

  2. Sedimentological characteristics of the surficial deposits of the Jal Az-Zor area, Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, D.; Kittaneh, W.; Shublaq, W.

    1988-10-01

    and carbonates) are controlled by the chemistry and hydrodynamics of the groundwater which in turn are controlled mostly by the climatic conditions, during their development, and the lithology of the host sediments. Arid and semi-arid climatic and paleoclimatic conditions are considered the most critical factors affecting the depositional and diagenetic processes impacting surficial deposits of the Jal Az-Zor area.

  3. Isochron of Holocene marine (Qmn and Qmd) sediment thickness on the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and Northern Cape Cod Bay (qmiso Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  4. Isochron of Holocene fluvial and estuarine (Qfe) sediment thickness beneath the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and Northern Cape Cod Bay (qfeiso Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  5. Isochron of Holocene marine (Qmn and Qmd) sediment thickness on the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and Northern Cape Cod Bay (qmiso Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  6. Isochron of Holocene fluvial and estuarine (Qfe) sediment thickness beneath the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and Northern Cape Cod Bay (qfeiso Esri binary grid; UTM, Zone 19N, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are qualitatively derived interpretive polygon shapefiles and selected source raster data defining surficial geology, sediment type and distribution, and...

  7. Surficial weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sarah M; Root, Robert A; Perdrial, Nicolas; Maier, Raina; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-15

    Mine wastes introduce anthropogenic weathering profiles to the critical zone that often remain unvegetated for decades after mining cessation. As such, they are vulnerable to wind and water dispersion of particulate matter to adjacent ecosystems and residential communities. In sulfide-rich ore tailings, propagation to depth of the oxidative weathering front controls the depth-variation in speciation of major and trace elements. Despite the prevalence of surficial mine waste deposits in arid regions of the globe, few prior studies have been conducted to resolve the near-surface profile of sulfide ore tailings weathered under semi-arid climate. We investigated relations between gossan oxidative reaction-front propagation and the molecular speciation of iron and sulfur in tailings subjected to weathering under semi-arid climate at an EPA Superfund Site in semi-arid central Arizona (USA). Here we report a multi-method data set combining wet chemical and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) methods to resolve the tight coupling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) geochemical changes in the top 2 m of tailings. Despite nearly invariant Fe and S concentration with depth (130-140 and 100-120 g kg(-1), respectively), a sharp redox gradient and distinct morphological change was observed within the top 0.5 m, associated with a progressive oxidative alteration of ferrous sulfides to (oxyhydr)oxides and (hydroxy)sulfates. Transformation is nearly complete in surficial samples. Trends in molecular-scale alteration were co-located with a decrease in pH from 7.3 to 2.3, and shifts in Fe and S lability as measured via chemical extraction. Initial weathering products, ferrihydrite and gypsum, transform to schwertmannite, then jarosite-group minerals with an accompanying decrease in pH. Interestingly, thermodynamically stable phases such as goethite and hematite were not detected in any samples, but ferrihydrite was observed even in

  8. Surficial weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sarah M.; Root, Robert A.; Perdrial, Nicolas; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-01

    Mine wastes introduce anthropogenic weathering profiles to the critical zone that often remain unvegetated for decades after mining cessation. As such, they are vulnerable to wind and water dispersion of particulate matter to adjacent ecosystems and residential communities. In sulfide-rich ore tailings, propagation to depth of the oxidative weathering front controls the depth-variation in speciation of major and trace elements. Despite the prevalence of surficial mine waste deposits in arid regions of the globe, few prior studies have been conducted to resolve the near-surface profile of sulfide ore tailings weathered under semi-arid climate. We investigated relations between gossan oxidative reaction-front propagation and the molecular speciation of iron and sulfur in tailings subjected to weathering in a semi-arid climate at an EPA Superfund Site in central Arizona (USA). Here we report a multi-method data set combining wet chemical and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) methods to resolve the tight coupling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) geochemical changes in the top 2 m of tailings. Despite nearly invariant Fe and S concentration with depth (130-140 and 100-120 g kg-1, respectively), a sharp redox gradient and distinct morphological change was observed within the top 0.5 m, associated with a progressive oxidative alteration of ferrous sulfides to (oxyhydr)oxides and (hydroxy)sulfates. Transformation is nearly complete in surficial samples. Trends in molecular-scale alteration were co-located with a decrease in pH from 7.3 to 2.3, and shifts in Fe and S lability as measured via chemical extraction. Initial weathering products, ferrihydrite and gypsum, transform to schwertmannite, then jarosite-group minerals with an accompanying decrease in pH. Interestingly, thermodynamically stable phases such as goethite and hematite were not detected in any samples, but ferrihydrite was observed even in samples with

  9. Comparison of action of mixed permanent chemical modifiers for cadmium and lead determination in sediments and soils by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Otto, Magdalena

    2010-09-15

    Slurry sampling atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used to the determination of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in soils and sediments using permanent modifiers. Comparison of action of mixed permanent modifiers niobium (Nb)/iridium (Ir) and tungsten (W)/iridium (Ir) were studied in detail. The effect of amount of Ir, W and Nb on analytical signals of Cd and Pb was examined. The optimal amounts of modifiers for Cd and Pb determination were stated. Niobium carbide formation on graphite surface was studied for different pyrolysis temperatures. Finally for Cd determination in sediments and soils 200 microg of Nb mixed with 5 microg of Ir was used as permanent modifiers and 15 microg of Nb mixed with 200 microg of Ir for Pb determination. Suspensions were prepared in 5% HNO(3). The analytical procedure was optimized carefully basing on data from pyrolysis and atomization curves studies. Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate was used additionally as matrix modifier during Cd determination in samples in order to prevent interferences coming from matrix components. The analysis of CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed approach. The precision and accuracy of Cd and Pb determination by the described method for soils and sediments were acceptable.

  10. Assessment of Water Quality and Heavy Metal Levels in Water and Bottom Sediment Samples from Mokwé Lagoon, Accra, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Addo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with the physicochemical characteristics of water samples from the Mokwé Lagoon in addition to trace heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn in the lagoon water and bottom sediments. The results indicated relatively high ionic content which was reflected in high conductivity, total dissolved Solids, alkalinity, hardness and chloride levels; and low nutrient content. The trace heavy metal levels in the lagoon water were found within good range of international guideline limits for natural waters. In contrast, the metallic levels in the sediment were high. The levels of metal contamination and distribution in the sediment samples were assessed using geoaccumulation index, enrichment factor, contamination factor and pollution load factor. The metal index analysis indicated high enrichment of the metals (especially Cr and Ni which reflected anthropogenic effects of contamination attributable to several sources. The study calls for constant environmental monitoring to forestall any heavy metal hazard which could be detrimental to the aquatic ecosystem of the lagoon.

  11. Microwave assisted aqua regia extraction of thallium from sediment and coal fly ash samples and interference free determination by continuum source ETAAS after cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeravali, Noorbasha N; Madhavi, K; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2013-01-30

    A simple cloud point extraction method is described for the separation and pre-concentration of thallium from the microwave assisted aqua regia extracts of sediment and coal fly ash samples. The method is based on the formation of extractable species of thallium and its interaction with hydrophobic solubilizing sites of Triton X-114 micelles in the presence of aqua regia and electrolyte NaCl. These interactions of micelles are used for extraction of thallium from a bulk aqueous phase into a small micelles-rich phase. The potential chloride interferences are eliminated effectively, which enabled interference free determination of thallium from aqua regia extracts using continuum source ETAAS. The parameters affecting the extraction process are optimized. Under the optimized conditions, pre-concentration factor and limit of detection are 40 and 0.2 ng g(-1), respectively. The recoveries are in the range of 95-102%. A characteristic mass, 13 pg was obtained. The accuracy of the method is verified by analyzing certified reference materials such as NIST 1633b coal fly ash, NIST 1944 marine sediment and GBW 07312 stream sediments. The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified values and method is also applied to real samples.

  12. Improving Antarctic Surficial Geology Maps through Spectroscopic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral identification of lithologic units can be effectively used to improve legacy and outdated geologic maps for exposed rock outcrops in Antarctica. High resolution, multispectral satellite imagery provides a comprehensive view of surface geology in Antarctica and unique lithologic spectral signatures are used to identify geologic unit extent and distribution. Although lack of ancillary data and low solar illumination angles at high latitudes introduce difficulties such as terrain and nadir shadows in polar regions, this study utilizes 8-band WorldView-2 imagery to (1) separate spectrally distinguishable geologic units and map contacts in remote regions and (2) map and identify individual units in areas with detailed supporting information from previous in-situ observations and field campaigns (e.g., the McMurdo Dry Valleys) using textural and spectral image analysis. This ability to remotely identify surficial lithology at sub-meter scale enables detailed geologic interpretations for highly inaccessible areas and may potentially decrease the need for costly logistics, field work and reconnaissance.

  13. Integrating Passive Sampling Methods into Management of Contaminated Sediment Sites: A Guide for Department of Defense Remedial Project Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    feed on fish and invertebrates, while others can affect wildlife through direct contact or ingestion; regardless, both effects are influenced by and...impact on toxicity - Risk Characterization Weight of Evidence Weight of Evidence Fish tissue is the standard; linkage to criteria used by DOD...Understanding the influence of contaminants on an aquatic system involves understanding exposure concentrations in surface waters, sediment, and biota. These

  14. Attributes for NHDPlus Catchments (Version 1.1) for the Conterminous United States: Surficial Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the area of surficial geology types in square meters compiled for every catchment of NHDPlus for the conterminous United States. The source...

  15. Geology, Surficial, Neuse River Basin Mapping Project Surficial Geology - LIDAR �Äö?Ñ?¨ Ongoing project in Middle Coastal Plain to characterize geomorphology, surficial geology, shallow aquifers and confining units; shape file with surficial geology interpreted from LI, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, NC DENR / Div. of Land Resources / Geological Survey Section.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geology, Surficial dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from LIDAR information as of 2007. It is described as 'Neuse...

  16. Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG2016-3 Springston, G., 2016, Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  17. A Surficial Hydrogeologic Framework for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The hydrogeologic framework was developed from a combination of the physiography and the predominant texture of surficial geologic units in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal...

  18. Surficial Geologic Map of the Pico Peak, Vermont 7.5 Minute Quadrangle

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — "Digital data from VG12-1 Wright, S., 2012, Surficial Geologic Map of the Pico Peak, Vermont 7.5 Minute Quadrangle: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  19. Overlying surficial deposits and absent areas for the Madison Limestone, Black Hills area, South Dakota.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set describes areas where the Madison Limestone is directly overlain by surficial deposits, as well as those areas where the Madison Limestone is absent...

  20. Overlying surficial deposits and absent areas for Minnekahta Limestone in the Black Hills area, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set describes areas where the Minnekahta Limestone is directly overlain by surficial deposits, as well as those areas where the Minnekahta Limestone is...

  1. Surficial geologic map of the Knox Mountain area, Marshfield and Peacham, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG08-4 Springston, G. and Kim, J., 2008, Surficial geologic map of the Knox Mountain area, Marshfield and Peacham, Vermont: VGS Open-File Report...

  2. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  3. An integrated geochemical, geophysical and mineralogical study of river sediments in alpine area and soil samples near steel plant, in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, M. I.; Meisel, T.

    2012-04-01

    Concentration of nickel and chromium in any part of the ecosystem is important for environmental concerns in particular human health due to the reason that some species of them can cause health problem e.g. dermatitis and cancer. Sediment samples collected form a river Vordernberger Bach (Leoben, Austria) in an alpine region and soil samples collected in an area adjacent to steel production unit in same narrow valley were investigated. In previous studies a correlation between magnetic susceptibility values and concentration of nickel and chromium showed that a magnetic susceptibility meter can be used to point out the contaminated areas as in-situ device. The purpose of the whole study is to understand the real (point or diffuse, anthropogenic or geogenic) sources of contamination of soils, water and river sediments through heavy metal deposition. Unseparated, magnetic and non-magnetic fractions of soil samples were investigated for geochemical and mineralogical aspects with XRF, ICP-MS, EMPA, Multi-Functional Kappabridge (MFK1) and laser ablation coupled with ICP-MS. Mineralogical study of sediment samples for several sampling points with higher Ni and Cr content was performed. Sediment samples were sieved below 1.4 mm and then a concentrate of heavy minerals was prepared in the field through panning. Concentrated heavy minerals were then subjected for heavy liquid separation in the laboratory. Separated magnetic and non-magnetic fractions below 0.71/0.1 mm and density greater than 2.9 g/cm3 were selected for mineralogical investigation. The abundance of typical anthropogenic particles, e.g., spherical, tinder, roasted ores, iron and steel mill slag was observed under the microscope. Magnetite (mostly anthropogenic), maghemite, chromspinel, chromite (type I & II), (Ca,Al)-ferrite, wustite, apatite (anthropogenic), olivine mixed crystals, calcium silicate and spinel (anthropogenic) are found in magnetic fraction. Non-magnetic fractions contain hematite, siderite

  4. Aluminum dialkyl phosphinate flame retardants and their hydrolysates: analytical method and occurrence in soil and sediment samples from a manufacturing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yumin; Liu, Jingfu; Liang, Yong; Hao, Zhineng; Liu, Jiyan; Liu, Yuchen; Sun, Xue

    2014-03-18

    Aluminum dialkyl phosphinates (ADPs) are emerging phosphorus flame retardants due to their superior characteristics, but their analytical method, and occurrence and fate in environments have never been reported. For the first time, we developed a method for the analysis of trace ADPs and their hydrolysates (dialkyl phosphinic acids, DPAs), and studied their occurrences and fates in soils and sediments. We found that ADPs are hardly dissolved in water and organic solvents, but are dissolved and hydrolyzed to DPAs in 30 mM NH3·H2O, thus both ADPs and DPAs can be determined by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) in the form of DPAs. ADPs and DPAs in soil and sediment samples were determined by (i) extracting both ADPs and DPAs with 75 mM NH3 · H2O, and selectively extract DPAs only with formic acid-water-methanol (5:5:90, v/v/v); (ii) quantifying the total content of ADPs and DPAs, and DPAs by LC-MS/MS analysis of the DPA contents in the former and the latter extract, respectively; and (iii) calculating ADPs from the content difference between the former and the latter extracts. The limit of quantifications (LOQs) of the proposed method were 0.9-1.0 μg/kg, and the mean recoveries ranged from 69.0% to 112.4% with relative standard deviations ≤ 21% (n = 6). In soil and sediment samples around a manufacturing plant, ADPs and DPAs were detected in surface soils in the ranges of 3.9-1279.3 and 1.0-448.6 μg/kg, respectively. While ADPs were found in all the samples of the soil and sediment cores from the drain outlet and the waste residue treatment site at levels ranging from 30.8 to 4628.0 μg/kg, DPAs were found in more than 90% of these samples with concentrations in the range of 1.1-374.6 μg/kg. The occurrences of ADPs and DPAs are not in correlation with the total organic carbon, whereas the occurrences of DPAs are highly correlated with the sample pH. Our study also suggests that the DPAs in the samples sourced

  5. Study of matrix effects and spectral interferences in the determination of lead in sediments, sludges and soils by SR-ETAAS using slurry sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Marianela; Cerutti, Soledad; Martinez, Luis D; Smichowski, Patricia; Gil, Raúl A

    2010-07-15

    An interference-free, fast, and simple method is proposed for Pb determination in environmental solid samples combining slurry sampling and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Samples were ground to an adequate particle size and slurries were prepared by weighing from 0.05 g to 0.20 g of dry sediment, adding nitric acid, and a solution containing 0.1% Triton X-100. Ultrasonic agitation was employed for slurries homogenization. Analytical variables including acid pre-treatment conditions, particle size, slurry stability, temperature program of the graphite furnace, and type and concentration of the chemical modifier were studied. The undesirable effects of potential non-specific and spectral interferences on Pb signal were also taken into account. Continuum source and self-reversal methods for background correction were evaluated and compared. For calibration, synthetic acid solutions of Pb were employed. Calibration was linear within the range 1-30 microg L(-1) and 5-30 microg L(-1) when the 217.0 nm and 283.3 nm analytical lines were used. Correlation coefficients of 0.9992 and 0.9997 were obtained. Using optimized conditions, limits of detection (3sigma) of 0.025 microg g(-1) and 0.1 microg g(-1) were achieved for the 217.0 nm and 283.3 nm analytical lines, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of lead in soil, contaminated soil, municipal sludge, and sediment samples. The accuracy was assessed by the analysis of two certified reference materials: municipal sludge (QC MUNICIPAL SLUDGE A) and lake sediment (TRAP-LRM from IJS). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. EBSSED database-Surficial sediments of the eastern Bering Sea continental shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to facilitate descriptions of groundfish habitat over a large portion of the EBS shelf, the NMFS/AFSC has assembled a single comprehensive database of the...

  7. On the surficial sediments of the fresh water Naini Lake, Kumaun Himalaya, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jauhari, P.; Hashimi, N.H.

    The 1.4 km long and 0.45-0.25 km wide crescent shaped Naini Lake in the Nainital District of Kumaun Himalaya, India is divided by an east-west running transverse Central Ridge into two sub-basins. These northwest and southeast sub...

  8. Sup(10)Be variation in surficial sediments of the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Aldahan, A.; Possnert, G.; Selvaraj, K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Chen, C.T.A.

    , Geochim. Cosmo- chim. Acta 60 (1996) 213. [8] V.K. Banakar, S.M. Gupta, V.K. Padmavathi, Mar. Geol. 96 (1991) 167. [9] D.V. Borole, Deep-Sea Res. 40 (1993) 761. [10] B.L.K. Somayajulu, P. Sharma, J. Beer, G. Bonani, H.J. Hofmann, E. Morenzoni, M. Nessi, M...

  9. Otoliths in continental shelf and slope surficial sediments off Saurashtra, Arabian Sea, India and their significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; John, S.; Rana, R.S.

    is in progress and will be reported in due course. This preliminary report which is the first report from the northern Arabian Sea on fossil fish otolith may help as an additional tool in the reconstruction of paleoenvironment and in assessing the latitudinal...

  10. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Punyu, V.R.; Harji, R.R.; Bhosle, N.B.; Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.

    . Tetracyclic and tri- cyclic terpanes are found in crude oil and fossil fuel, respectively (Moldowan and Seifert 1983; Aboul-Kassim and Simoneit 1996; Sanchez and Permanyer 2006). These were detected at stations 3, 5, 6, 12 and 19. The mass fragmentograms... 456–468. Mackenzie A S, Brassel S C, Eglington J and Maxwell J R 1982 Chemical fossils: The geological fate of steroids; Science 217 491–504. Maioli O L G, Rodrigues K C, Knoppers B A and Azevedo D A 2011 Distribution and sources of aliphatic and poly...

  11. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  12. Channel morphometry, sediment transport, and implications for tectonic activity and surficial ages of Titan basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Richard; Clayton, Jordan A.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluvial features on Titan and drainage basins on Earth are remarkably similar despite differences in gravity and surface composition. We determined network bifurcation (Rb) ratios for five Titan and three terrestrial analog basins. Tectonically-modified Earth basins have Rb values greater than the expected range (3.0–5.0) for dendritic networks; comparisons with Rb values determined for Titanbasins, in conjunction with similarities in network patterns, suggest that portions of Titan's north polar region are modified by tectonic forces. Sufficient elevation data existed to calculate bed slope and potential fluvial sedimenttransport rates in at least one Titanbasin, indicating that 75 mm water ice grains (observed at the Huygens landing site) should be readily entrained given sufficient flow depths of liquid hydrocarbons. Volumetric sedimenttransport estimates suggest that ~6700–10,000 Titan years (~2.0–3.0 x 105 Earth years) are required to erode this basin to its minimum relief (assuming constant 1 m and 1.5 m flows); these lowering rates increase to ~27,000–41,000 Titan years (~8.0–12.0 x 105 Earth years) when flows in the north polar region are restricted to summer months.

  13. Diversity and bioactive potentials of culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the surficial sediments of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Nilayangod, C.; Jasmin, C.; Vinothkumar, S.; Parameswaran, P.S.; Nair, S.

    . BMC Bioinform 12:385 Pai SS et al (2010) Penaeus monodon larvae can be protected from Vibrio harveyi infection by pre-emptive treatment of a rearing system with antagonistic or non-antagonistic bacterial probiotics. Aquac Res 41:847–860 Paulmier A...). Preparation of organic extracts Organic extract of 131 isolates was prepared using ethyl acetate as solvent. Bacterial isolates for the production of secondary metabolites were prepared in basal medium. Briefly, 100 ll of bacterial inoculum (1.0 OD at 600 nm...

  14. Pushpoint sampling for defining spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations in sediment pore water near the ground-water / surface-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Massey, Andrew J.; Campo, Kimberly W.

    2005-01-01

    During four periods from April 2002 to June 2003, pore-water samples were taken from river sediment within a gaining reach (Mill Pond) of the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, with a temporary pushpoint sampler to determine whether this device is an effective tool for measuring small-scale spatial variations in concentrations of volatile organic compounds and selected field parameters (specific conductance and dissolved oxygen concentration). The pore waters sampled were within a subsurface plume of volatile organic compounds extending from the nearby Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site to the river. Samples were collected from depths of 10, 30, and 60 centimeters below the sediment surface along two 10-meter-long, parallel transects extending into the river. Twenty-five volatile organic compounds were detected at concentrations ranging from less than 1 microgram per liter to hundreds of micrograms per liter (for example, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 490 micrograms per liter; cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 290 micrograms per liter). The most frequently detected compounds were either chlorobenzenes or chlorinated ethenes. Many of the compounds were detected only infrequently. Quality-control sampling indicated a low incidence of trace concentrations of contaminants. Additional samples collected with passive-water-diffusion-bag samplers yielded results comparable to those collected with the pushpoint sampler and to samples collected in previous studies at the site. The results demonstrate that the pushpoint sampler can yield distinct samples from sites in close proximity; in this case, sampling sites were 1 meter apart horizontally and 20 or 30 centimeters apart vertically. Moreover, the pushpoint sampler was able to draw pore water when inserted to depths as shallow as 10 centimeters below the sediment surface without entraining surface water. The simplicity of collecting numerous samples in a short time period (routinely, 20 to 30 per day) validates the use of a

  15. A whole sample toxicity assessment to evaluate the sub-lethal toxicity of water and sediment elutriates from a lake exposed to diffuse pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, N; Pereira, R; de Figueiredo, D R; Marques, C R; Pereira, M J; Gonçalves, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of diffuse pollution in aquatic systems is of great concern due to the difficult to measure and regulate it. As part of an ecological risk assessment (ERA), this study aims to use a whole sample toxicity assessment to evaluate the toxicity of water and sediment from Lake Vela, a lake that has been exposed to diffuse pollution. In this way, standard (algae: Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata; cladoceran: Daphnia magna) and local species (algae: Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; cladoceran: Daphnia longispina) were exposed to surface water, and sediment elutriates were collected seasonally from two sites at Lake Vela: one near the east bank (ES), surrounded by agricultural lands; and the other near the west bank (WS), surrounded by a forest. The results confirmed the seasonal contamination of both environmental compartments by pesticides, including organochlorine pesticides, and the presence of high concentrations of nutrients. Although both sites were contaminated, higher levels of pesticides and nutrients were detected in ES, particularly in the sediments. Bioassays showed that water samples (100% concentration) collected in summer and autumn significantly affected the growth rate of P. subcapitata, which could be attributed to the presence of pesticides. Likewise, they revealed an apparent toxicity of elutriates for P. subcapitata and for both daphnids, in summer and autumn. In fact, although pesticides were not detected in elutriates, high levels of un-ionized ammonia were recorded, which is considered highly toxic to aquatic life. By comparing the several species, P. subcapitata was revealed to be the most sensitive one, followed by the daphnids, and then by A. flos-aquae. Results obtained in this study underlined the importance of whole samples toxicity assessment for characterizing the ecological effects of complex mixtures from diffuse inputs, in the ERA processes.

  16. Isotopic Composition of Carbon Dioxide Released from Confidence Hills Sediment as Measured by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J.; Archer, P., Jr.; Conrad, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Jones, J.; Ming, D.; McAdam, A.; Morris, R.; Navarro-Gozalez, R.; Owen, T.; Steele, A.; Summons, R.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2014, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity" rover drilled into the sediment at the base of Mount Sharp in a location namsed Cionfidence Hills (CH). CH marked the fifth sample pocessed by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite since Curiosity arrived in Gale Crater, with previous analyses performed at Rocknest (RN), John Klein (JK), Cumberland (CB), and Windjana (WJ). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples has indicated H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phases in the samples, often at abundances that would be below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. By examining the temperatures at which gases are evolved from samples, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases when their identities are unclear to CheMin. SAM may also detect gases evolved from amorphous material in solid samples, which is not suitable for analysis by CheMin. Finally, the isotopic composition of these gases may suggest possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. We will discuss C isotope ratios of CO2 evolved from the CH sample as measured with SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw comparisons to samples previously analyzed by SAM.

  17. Mercury concentrations in amphipods and fish of the Saint Lawrence River (Canada) are unrelated to concentrations of legacy mercury in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Peter V; Norris, Kristin; Berquist, Michelle; Campbell, Linda M; Ridal, Jeffrey J

    2014-10-01

    Past industrial activity at Cornwall, Ontario, Canada has contaminated Lake Saint Francis, a fluvial lake on the Saint Lawrence River, with mercury (Hg). A spatial survey of Hg concentrations in sediments, amphipods, and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in 2008 inferred current sources of Hg to the lake and spatial variations in risks to human consumers. Patterns of total and methyl Hg concentrations in sediment reflected upstream inputs, declining concentrations downstream, and highest concentrations at north shore sites near industrial sources; concentrations were lowest on the south shore because river currents limit north-south advective exchange. Surprisingly, concentrations of total or methyl Hg in sediments and pore water were unrelated to concentrations in amphipods and yellow perch. Concentrations in biota, and risks to consumers of fish, were highest at north shore sites near tributaries, and not at the most contaminated industrial sites. These results suggest that 'legacy' Hg in surficial sediments is not bioavailable to aquatic biota; tributaries and atmospheric deposition are possible sources of bioavailable Hg; and that sediment remediation would not resolve issues of Hg in fish. Fish consumption advisories for the entire lake based on single samples of fish could over- or under-protect consumers, depending on sampling location. To understand the actual risk to fish consumers for a large and complex lake system with multiple sources of Hg, more intensive sampling is needed to assess the spatial distribution of risk.

  18. Determination of vanadium species in sediment, mussel and fish muscle tissue samples by liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, Marinela [Universidad del Zulia, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica, Laboratorio de Quimica Ambiental, Maracaibo 4011, Zulia (Venezuela)]. E-mail: M.Colina@shu.ac.uk; Gardiner, P.H.E. [Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rivas, Zulay [Instituto para la Conservacion del Lago de Maracaibo (ICLAM), Maracaibo, Plaza de las Banderas (Venezuela); Troncone, Federico [Instituto para la Conservacion del Lago de Maracaibo (ICLAM), Maracaibo, Plaza de las Banderas (Venezuela)

    2005-05-04

    Vanadium is introduced into the environment during the extraction of petrochemical products and in the production of steels and insecticides. In this study, a liquid chromatographic method for the separation of V(IV) and V(V) as ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) complexes was developed using reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry detection. A C-8 reversed-phase column, 15 cm long, was used to separate the species. A solution containing ammonium acetate 0.06 M, tetrabutylammonium hydroxide 10 mM, ammonium di-phosphate 10 mM and EDTA 2.5 mM at pH 6 was used as the mobile phase in order to avoid the use of organic solvents that reduce the sensitivity of the determination. To prevent changes in distribution of the vanadium species, samples should be prepared freshly. The method developed was applied to the study the vanadium speciation in sediment, mussel and fish muscle samples collected from Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. The concentration ranges of V(IV) and V(V) in sediment samples were 0.7-61 and 1.4-2.3 {mu}g g{sup -1}, respectively. The method is simple and has adequate sensitivity for these practical applications.

  19. Major and Trace-Element Data from Stream-Sediment and Rock Samples Collected in the Taylor Mountains 1:250,000-Scale Quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Gregory K.; Mueller, Seth H.; Wang, Bronwen; Brown, Zoe Ann; Beischer, Greg A.

    2007-01-01

    In the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the drainage basins throughout most of the Taylor Mountains 1:250,000-scale quadrangle, in southwestern Alaska. The purpose of the study was to locate areas of potential interest for ore minerals, provide data that may be used to determine regional-scale element baselines, and provide data for the concurrent U.S. Geological Survey geologic mapping and mineral resource assessment effort. This report provides the stream-sediment sample data for the study.

  20. Changes in the Precambrian ocean U cycle linked to the evolution of surficial redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, C. A.; Bekker, A.; Scott, C.; Gill, B. C.; Lyons, T. W.

    2009-12-01

    The rise of atmospheric oxygen between 2.47 and 2.32 Ga undoubtedly had a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles and particularly, the intensity of oxidative continental weathering. While the timing of atmospheric oxygenation is well-constrained, the redox -state of the deep ocean throughout the Proterozoic is less known. The distribution of redox-sensitive elements, such as uranium and molybdenum, in ancient sedimentary rocks provides insight into the response of the deep ocean to this dramatic geochemical change. Here we present a compilation of U concentrations in marine black shales, from the Archean to the present to track the coupled redox evolution of the atmosphere and oceans, and to decipher changes in the uranium cycle itself. Since riverine delivery represents the only significant source of uranium to the oceans, and scavenging by organic matter-rich sediments beneath suboxic to anoxic waters represents the only significant sink, uranium concentrations in black shales hold a record of the evolution of the uranium cycle through time. Temporal changes in the concentrations of U in black shales can be attributed to two first-order controls: variable delivery of riverine U to the ocean, a reflection of levels of oxygen in the atmosphere, and the extent of ocean anoxic conditions. The compiled data show a series of changes in the uranium cycle through time. Phanerozoic uranium enrichments are associated with ocean-wide anoxic events coupled with a fully developed oxidative continental weathering cycle. Enrichments are muted in Proterozoic sediments, reflecting either a weaker riverine delivery of uranium to the oceans, and/or a strong sink associated with widespread anoxia. Authigenic uranium enrichments significantly above crustal levels, which reflect strong oxidative continental weathering, do not appear until several hundred million years after the Great Oxidation Event. We propose that the U cycle in the Archean oceans was dominated by the

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in harbor sediments from Sea Lots, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Azad; Peterman, Paul; Echols, Kathy; Feltz, Kevin; Tegerdine, George; Manoo, Anton; Maraj, Dexter; Agard, John; Orazio, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in nearshore marine surficial sediments from three locations in Trinidad. Sediments were sampled at Sea Lots on the west coast, in south Port-of-Spain Harbor, south of Sea Lots at Caroni Lagoon National Park, and on Trinidad's east coast at Manzanilla. Total PCB concentrations in Sea Lots sediments ranged from 62 to 601 ng/g (dry weight {dw}), which was higher than at Caroni and Manzanilla, 13 and 8 ng/g dw, respectively. Total OCP concentrations at Sea Lots were ranged from 44.5 to 145 ng/g dw, compared with 13.1 and 23.8 n/g (dw), for Caroni and Manzanilla respectively. The concentrations of PCBs and of some OCPs in sediments from Sea Lots were above the Canadian interim sediment quality guidelines. To date, this data is the first report on the levels of PCBs and other organochlorine compounds from Trinidad and Tobago.

  2. Organic chemistry of fluids from sediment-buried young basement: discrete sampling from ODP borehole 1301A & 1025C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Cowen, J. P.; Amend, J. P.; Albert, D. B.; Glazer, B. T.; Rappe, M.; Jungbluth, S.; Matzinger, M.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems profoundly influence seawater chemistry. However, the extent to which hydrothermal systems impact the quantity and the quality of the deep ocean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool remains unclear. To study the organic chemistry within sedimented ridge flank basement aquifers, discrete low temperature (~65°C & ~40°C) basement fluids were collected from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program boreholes via Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit (CORK) observatories at 1301A (47°45N, 127°45W) and 1025C (47°53N, 128°39W) on the eastern flank of Juan de Fuca Ridge. The basement age is 1.24 Ma and 3.5 Ma at 1025C and 1301A, respectively. Basement fluids were collected using a new clean pumping system (Mobile Pump Valve Unit, or MPVU) and stored in acid-cleaned 60 L Large Volume Tedlar Bags (LVBS). A stainless steel fluid delivery line extends from the basement to the seafloor at 1301A; whereas fluids rise up the middle of the iron casing at 1025C. Here, concentration and preliminary characterization of the DOC will be presented, including labile organic components such as dissolved free and combined amino acids (DFAA & DCAA) and low molecular weight organic acids (LMW-OA). Our data show that compared to seawater levels, the DOC concentration in the younger basement fluid (1025C) was about one-half and in the older (1031A) was less than one-third. Relative to bottom seawater, the basement fluids are also depleted in SO42-, PO43-, NO3- and NO2-, but enriched in NH4+, H2S, Mn and Fe. Microbially mediated reduction of nitrate, sulfate, iron, and manganese and an array of heterotrophic metabolisms may explain these observations. Phylogenic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences from borehole 1301A fluids further support the presence of chemolithoautotrophic and heterotrophic organisms. Our preliminary results show that some dissolved free amino acids were slightly enriched in the 1301A basement fluid relative to bottom seawater. Thermodynamic calculations

  3. Water quality in the surficial aquifer near agricultural areas in the Delaware Coastal Plain, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Brandon J.; Mensch, Laura L.; Denver, Judith M.; Cruz, Roberto M.; Nardi, Mark R.

    2017-07-27

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Delaware Department of Agriculture, developed a network of wells to monitor groundwater quality in the surficial aquifer of the Delaware Coastal Plain. Well-drained soils, a flat landscape, and accessible water in the Delaware Coastal Plain make for a productive agricultural setting. As such, agriculture is one of the largest industries in the State of Delaware. This setting enables the transport of chemicals from agriculture and other land uses to shallow groundwater. Efforts to mitigate nutrient transport to groundwater by the implementation of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) have been ongoing for several decades. To measure the effectiveness of BMPs on a regional scale, a network of 48 wells was designed to measure shallow groundwater quality (particularly nitrate) over time near agricultural land in the Delaware Coastal Plain. Water characteristics, major ions, nutrients, and dissolved gases were measured in groundwater samples collected from network wells during fall 2014. Wells were organized into three groups based on their geochemical similarity and these groups were used to describe nitrate and chloride concentrations and factors that affect the variability among the groups. The results from this study are intended to establish waterquality conditions in 2014 to enable comparison of future conditions and evaluate the effectiveness of agricultural BMPs on a regional scale.

  4. Chincoteague Bay calculated shear stress data from the spring and fall sampling trips of 2014 and preliminary modeled bottom shear stress values provided by the Wood’s Hole USGS office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  5. Chincoteague Bay calculated shear stress data from the spring and fall sampling trips of 2014 and preliminary modeled bottom shear stress values provided by the Wood’s Hole USGS office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  6. Chincoteague Bay calculated shear stress data from the spring and fall sampling trips of 2014 and preliminary modeled bottom shear stress values provided by the Wood’s Hole USGS office.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted a seasonal collection of surficial sediments from Chincoteague...

  7. A rapid procedure for the determination of thorium, uranium, cadmium and molybdenum in small sediment samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Application in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yen; Weinman, B.; Cronin, T.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Anderson, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid procedure that allows precise analysis of Mo, Cd, U and Th in sediment samples as small as 10 mg by using a novel approach that utilizes a "pseudo" isotope dilution for Th and conventional isotope dilution for Mo, Cd and U by ICP-MS. Long-term reproducibility of the method is between 2.5 and 5% with an advantage of rapid analysis on a single digestion of sediment sample and the potential of adding other elements of interest if so desired. Application of this method to two piston cores collected near the mouth of the Patuxent River in Chesapeake Bay showed that the accumulation of authigenic Mo and Cd varied in response to the changing bottom water redox conditions, with anoxia showing consistent oscillations throughout both pre-industrial and industrial times. Accumulation of authigenic U shows consistent oscillations as well, without any apparent increase in productivity related to anoxic trends. Degrees of Mo and Cd enrichment also inversely correlate to halophilic microfaunal assemblages already established as paleoclimate proxies within the bay indicating that bottom water anoxia is driven in part by the amount of freshwater discharge that the area receives. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of a synergetic effect between Rh as permanent chemical modifier and acetylacetone as complexing agent in Sc determination in sediment slurry samples by ETAAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Araceli Veronica [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084 971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Perez, Carlos Alberto [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, P.O. Box 6192, 13084 971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda, Marco Aurelio Zezzi [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084 971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: zezzi@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-02-14

    In the present work, scandium was determined in sediment slurry samples (from three different rivers) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Slurries were prepared by weighting 100 mg of dry sediment samples ({<=}53 {mu}m particle sizes) and adding 6 ml of HCl:HNO{sub 3}:HF (3:1:2, v/v). Accurate results were only possible due to the synergetic effect between Rh as permanent chemical modifier and acetylacetone (Acac) as complexing agent. The same platform was used for 400 heating cycles. The performance of the chemical modification was evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and some figures of merit (precision and detectability). The best analytical conditions were attained using 1500 and 2550 deg. C as pyrolysis and atomization temperatures. The scandium content in the liquid phase of the slurries ranged from 61 to 73%, thus indicating, in this study, that both liquid and solid phases play an important role in slurry analyses. An amount of 5.0-20.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} Sc linear range as well as LOD and LOQ of 0.19 and 0.62 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively, were obtained under these conditions. The accuracy was checked by using microwave-assisted decomposition, and the results compared to those obtained with the proposed methodology (slurry analysis). By checking both sets of the results, there is no statistical difference at the 95% confidence levels.

  9. The relationship between land management, fecal indicator bacteria, and the occurrence of Campylobacter and Listeria spp. in water and sediments during synoptic sampling in the S. Fork Broad River Watershed, N.E. Georgia, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J. K.; Molina, M.; Sidle, R. C.; Sullivan, K.; Oakley, B.; Berrang, M.; Meinersmann, R.

    2013-12-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens stored in the bed sediments of streams and rivers may be mobilized into the water column affecting overall water quality. Furthermore, land management may play an important role in the concentrations of FIB and the occurrence of pathogens in stream water and sediments. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between FIB and pathogens in stream water and sediment based on three land management-affected categories: agricultural, forest, and waters receiving treated municipal wastewater. Two synoptic sampling events were conducted under baseflow conditions (Listeria spp. were measured in stream water and sediment samples collected at 15 locations (six agricultural (AG); six forested (FORS); and three receiving discharge from water pollution control plants (WPCP)) in the S. Fork Broad River watershed located in northeast Georgia, USA. Mean E. coli and E. faecalis concentrations were highest in the AG stream water samples (3.08 log MPN 100 mL -1 for E. coli and 3.07 log CFU 100 mL -1 for E. faecalis ) and lowest in the FORS water samples for E. coli (2.37 log MPN 100 mL -1 ) and WPCP water samples for E. faecalis (2.53 log CFU 100 mL -1 ). E. coli concentrations (2.74 log MPN 100 mL -1 ) in the WPCP streams were intermediate. Similar to water samples, E. coli concentrations were highest in the AG sediments (4.31 log MPN g -1 ), intermediate in the WPCP sediments (4.06 log MPN g -1 ), and lowest in the FORS sediments (3.46 log MPN g -1 ). In contrast to E. coli, E. faecalis concentrations were lower (1.10 to 1.31 log CFU g -1 ) and relatively more constant than E. coli in sediments over the three land management categories. Campylobacter was detected in 27% of the water samples and 8% of the sediment samples. The highest occurrence of Campylobacter detection was in the AG streams (15% of the water samples; 5% of the sediment samples). Listeria was detected in 76% of the water samples and 65% of the sediment

  10. Ecotoxicological assessment of sediment, suspended matter and water samples in the upper Danube River. A pilot study in search for the causes for the decline of fish catches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Steffen; Rastall, Andrew; Kosmehl, Thomas; Wurm, Karl; Erdinger, Lothar; Braunbeck, Thomas; Hollert, Henner

    2006-09-01

    Fish populations, especially those of the grayling (Thymallus thymallus), have declined over the last two decades in the upper Danube River between Sigmaringen and Ulm, despite intensive and continuous stocking and improvement of water quality since the 1970s. Similar problems have been reported for other rivers, e.g. in Switzerland, Great Britain, the United States and Canada. In order to assess if ecotoxicological effects might be related to the decline in fish catch at the upper Danube River, sediment, suspended matter and waste water samples from sewage treatment plants were collected at selected locations and analyzed in a bioanalytical approach using a battery of bioassays. The results of this pilot study will be used to decide if a comprehensive weight-of-evidence study is needed. Freeze-dried sediments and suspended particulate matters were extracted with acetone in a Soxhlet apparatus. Organic pollutants from sewage water were concentrated using XAD-resins. In order to investigate the ecotoxicological burden, the following bioassays were used: (1) neutral red assay with RTL-W1 cells (cytotoxicity), (2) comet assay with RTL-W1 cells (genotoxicity), (3) Arthrobacter globiformis dehydrogenase assay (toxicity to bacteria), (4) yeast estrogen screen assay (endocrine disruption), (5) fish egg assay with the zebrafish (Danio rerio; embryo toxicity) and (6) Ames test with TA98 (mutagenicity). The results of the in vitro tests elucidated a considerable genotoxic, cytotoxic, mutagenic, bacteriotoxic, embryotoxic and estrogenic burden in the upper Danube River, although with a very inhomogeneous distribution of effects. The samples taken from Riedlingen, for example, induced low embryo toxicity, but the second highest 17beta-estradiol equivalent concentration (1.8 ng/L). Using the fish egg assay with native sediments, a broad range of embryotoxic effects could be elucidated, with clear-cut dose-response relationships for the embryotoxic effects of contaminated

  11. Optimization of GC-ICPMS system parameters for the determination of butyltin compounds in Hungarian freshwater origin sediment and mussel samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uveges, Márta; Abrankó, László; Fodor, Péter

    2007-09-30

    The optimization and application of gas chromatograph coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (GC-ICPMS) (equipped with a commercially available interface) for the speciation of butyltin compounds in freshwater origin sediment and mussel samples is described. Optimization focused on the system parameters that have the greatest effect on signal intensity such as plasma power, ion lenses and make up gas flow (in the interface). Xenon (Xe) containing argon gas (Ar) was applied as tuning gas providing continuous Xe signal for the optimization of system parameters. It was found that plasma power and make up gas are interrelated variables and provide a set of paired optimum values at each power settings. The absolute optimum values obtained at 800W plasma power and 1.2Lmin(-1) make up gas flow rate when 7mm sample depth was adjusted. The optimum settings obtained were then checked by means of a test solution (tetraethyltin dissolved in hexane). Same optimum conditions were found when tin (Sn) transient signals were monitored. Detection limits were calculated for the three species using the optimized system parameters. Detection limits are the following: for monobutyltin (MBT) 5.6ngSnkg(-1), for dibutyltin (DBT) 6.6ngSnkg(-1) and for tributyltin (TBT) 3.4ngSnkg(-1) obtained. Determination of the butyltin compounds were carried out by means of species-specific isotope dilution analysis. The spike solution contained all species investigated but with altered isotopic composition. Each species were enriched in their (119)Sn isotope. Concentrations found in Hungarian freshwater origin mussel and sediment samples ranged between 19 and 39ngg(-1)for MBT, between 1.2 and 6.3ngg(-1) for DBT and between 1.2 and 3.2ngg(-1) for TBT indicated as Sn in dry weight. Validation of the method was done by means of certified reference materials (BCR CRM 646 and 477). Good agreement was found between certified and experimental values. Normalized deviation (E(n)) was also

  12. Application of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry for Reference Measurements of Cadmium. Copper, Mercury, Lead, Zinc and Methyl Mercury in Marine Sediment Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileva E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine sediment was selected as a test sample for the laboratory inter-comparison studies organized by the Environment Laboratoryes of the International Atomic Energy. The analytical procedure to establish the reference values for the Cd, Cu, Hg, Methyl Hg, Pb and Zn amount contents was based on Isotope Dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ID ICP-MS applied as a primary method of measurement..The Hg and Methyl Hg determination will be detailed more specifically because of the problems encountered with this element, including sample homogeneity issues, memory effects and possible matrix effects during the ICP- MS measurement stage. Reference values, traceable to the SI, with total uncertainties of less than 2% relative expanded uncertainty (k=2 were obtained for Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb and around 5% for Hg and CH3Hg.

  13. Validation of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb measurements in soil and sediment samples through high resolution gamma ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Danila Carrijo da Silva; Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da; Bonifacio, Rodrigo Leandro; Guerrero, Eder Tadeu Zenun [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas

    2013-07-01

    Radionuclides found in ore extraction waste materials are a great source of concern regarding public health and environmental safety. One technique to determine the concentration of substances is high resolution gamma ray spectrometry using HPGe. Validating a measurement technique is essential to warrant high levels of quality to any scientific work. The Laboratory of Pocos de Caldas of the Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy partakes into a Quality Management System project, seeking Accreditation under ISO/IEC 17025 through the validation of techniques of chemical and radiometric analysis of environmental samples from water, soil and sediment. The focus of the Radon Laboratory at LAPOC is validation of Ra-226, Ra-228 and Pb-210 concentration determinations in soil and sediment through a gamma spectrometer system. The stages of this validation process included sample reception and preparation, detector calibration and sample analyses. Dried samples were sealed in metallic containers and analyzed after radioactive equilibrium between Ra-226 and daughters Pb-214 and Bi-214. Gamma spectrometry was performed using CANBERRA HPGe detector and gamma spectrum software Genie 2000. The photo peaks used for Ra-226 determination were 609 keV and 1020 keV of Bi-214 and 351 keV of Pb-214. For the Ra-228 determination a photopeak of 911 keV was used from its short half-life daughter Ac-228 (T1/2 = 6.12 h). For Pb-210, the photopeak of 46.5 keV was used, which, due to the low energy, self-absorption correction was needed. Parameters such as precision, bias/accuracy, linearity, detection limit and uncertainty were evaluated for that purpose. The results have pointed to satisfying results. (author)

  14. Slurry sampling high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for direct beryllium determination in soil and sediment samples after elimination of SiO interference by least-squares background correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husáková, Lenka; Urbanová, Iva; Šafránková, Michaela; Šídová, Tereza

    2017-12-01

    In this work a simple, efficient, and environmentally-friendly method is proposed for determination of Be in soil and sediment samples employing slurry sampling and high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-ETAAS). The spectral effects originating from SiO species were identified and successfully corrected by means of a mathematical correction algorithm. Fractional factorial design has been employed to assess the parameters affecting the analytical results and especially to help in the development of the slurry preparation and optimization of measuring conditions. The effects of seven analytical variables including particle size, concentration of glycerol and HNO3 for stabilization and analyte extraction, respectively, the effect of ultrasonic agitation for slurry homogenization, concentration of chemical modifier, pyrolysis and atomization temperature were investigated by a 2(7-3) replicate (n = 3) design. Using the optimized experimental conditions, the proposed method allowed the determination of Be with a detection limit being 0.016mgkg(-1) and characteristic mass 1.3pg. Optimum results were obtained after preparing the slurries by weighing 100mg of a sample with particle size acid was found satisfactory for the analyte stabilization. Accurate data were obtained with the use of matrix-free calibration. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysis of two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 2702 Inorganics in Marine Sediment and IGI BIL-1 Baikal Bottom Silt) and by comparison of the results obtained for ten real samples by slurry sampling with those determined after microwave-assisted extraction by inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (TOF-ICP-MS). The reported method has a precision better than 7%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase induction potency in sediment samples from rivers Lepenica and Morawa. Surrounding area of Kragujevac ''hot spot''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoric, S.; Andric, N.; Kovacevic, R. [Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Sciences, Dept. of Biology and Ecology; Sudji, J. [Institute of Occupational Health, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Klanova, J. [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology; Jovetic, S.; Vojinovic-Miloradov, M. [Novi Sad Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Sciences, Dept of Chemistry

    2004-09-15

    Introduction Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and induction of CYP1A1 izozyme, whose activity can be determined by measuring activity of 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) in various species and test systems, are well known bioanalyses for assessment of toxicity of persistent toxic compounds (PTCs). Whereas analytical methods determine the concentrations of known substances, bioanalyses with EROD as an end point may also detect the joint activities of nonanalyzed EROD inducing compounds in environmental samples. The main environmental effects of the bombardments (in 1999) of factory Zastava-Kragujevac were damaged transformers which contained Pyralene oil, leaking of several tons of PCBs into the rivers Zdraljica, Lepenica and Morava, and contamination of groundwater by PCBs and heavy metals. Up to 2,500 kg of oil containing PCBs was released into the environment. Extremely high levels of PCBs were detected in water ecosystems in the area of accident - in the river Lepenica PCB levels were 400-1000mg/l of water. As a consequence of explosions, fires, and PCB combustions, very high levels of PCDDs/Fs were found in soil samples from that area (up to 100,000ng I-TEQ/kg) few months after bombardments. Very high levels of PCBs and PCDDs/Fs were also found in samples taken around the transformers of the power plant (70-74 g/kg of PCBs and 10,200 ng I-TEQ/kg of PCDDs/Fs). Right after spillage there was a flood wave from the river Lepenica that caused transport and sedimentation of the pollutants along nearby agricultural area. In 2000, UNEP/UNOPS Clean-up Project YUG 00-R71 was performed for clean up action of environmental damage of hot spots in SCG. However, further investigations which covered hot spot Kragujevac as a zone possibly contaminated with PCBs revealed that there are still ppm concentrations of PCBs as determined by GC/ECD. In this study we explored if these contaminants still in sediments from rivers Lepenica and Morava. Sediment samples

  16. Selective extraction of chromium(VI) using a leaching procedure with sodium carbonate from some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elci, Latif, E-mail: elci@pamukkale.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Pamukkale University, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Divrikli, Umit; Akdogan, Abdullah; Hol, Aysen; Cetin, Ayse [Department of Chemistry, Pamukkale University, 20017 Denizli (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    Speciation of chromium in some plant leaves, soil and sediment samples was carried out by selective leaching of Cr(VI) using a sodium carbonate leaching procedure. Total chromium from the samples was extracted using aqua regia and oxidative acid digestion, respectively. The concentrations of chromium species in the extracts were determined using by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Uncoated graphite furnace tubes were used as an atomizer. Due to the presence of relatively high amounts of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the resulting samples, the possible influences of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on the absorbance signals were checked. There is no interference of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on the chromium absorbance up to 0.1 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. A limit of detection (LOD) for determination of Cr(VI) in 0.1 Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution by GFAAS was found to be 0.93 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The procedure was applied to environmental samples. The relative standard deviation, R.S.D. as precision for 10 replicate measurements of 20 {mu} L{sup -1} Cr in processed soil sample was 4.2%.

  17. Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, copper, chromium, nickel, lead and thallium in total digested sediment samples and available fractions by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ET AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, María Á; Carrillo, Génesis

    2012-08-15

    This study describes the optimization and validation of a quick and simple method for the simultaneous determination of total content and available fractions of As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl in sediments by ET AAS, which has been proved to be useful for environmental research. The optimization was carried out using a 3(3) Box-Behnken factorial design which was applied to matrices of total digestion and to stages 1 and 2 of the modified BCR sequential extraction scheme for sediments in order to determine the appropriate atomization temperatures and masses for the chemical modifiers: Pd(NO(3))(2) and Mg(NO(3))(2). The simultaneous determination of the elements in all matrices considered was performed, without the use of chemical modifiers at atomization temperatures of 1700 °C for Cd and Tl, and 2100 °C for As, Cu, Cr, Ni and Pb, using a standard calibration curve for calibration purposes. The characteristic masses and limits of detection obtained were 36.5, 1.8, 6.5, 28, 34, 46.5 and 48 ρg and 0.11, 0.001, 0.022, 0.04, 0.2, 0.03 and 0.003 μg g(-1) for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Tl, respectively. The analytical procedure was validated by analyzing three sediment certified reference materials (CRM NCS DC 73315 and LKSD-4 for total content and BCR 701 for available fractions). Good accuracy was obtained (tested statistically, P=0.05, and shown by the high recovery for each element in each matrix), except for total As in the matrix of total digestion, where losses of the analyte could be attributed to sample treatment with HNO(3). The precision of the procedure was between 0.6% and 6%.

  18. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Yellowknife Bay Sediments: Measurements by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A. E.; Grotzinger,J. P.; Jones, J. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Miller, K.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Owen, T. C.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater in Au-gust 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instru-ment suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) “Curiosity” rover has analyzed solid samples from the martian regolith in three locations, beginning with a scoop of aeolian deposits from the Rocknest (RN) sand shadow. Curiosity subsequently traveled to Yellowknife Bay, where SAM analyzed samples from two separate holes drilled into the Sheepbed Mudstone, designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phas-es, in most cases at abundances below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of tem-peratures at which gases are evolved from solid sam-ples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gas-es may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from the JK and CB mudstone samples as measured with SAM’s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw com-parisons to RN.

  19. High rates of denitrification and nitrate removal in cold seep sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Marshall; Joye, Samantha

    2011-03-01

    We measured denitrification and nitrate removal rates in cold seep sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. Heterotrophic potential denitrification rates were assayed in time-series incubations. Surficial sediments inhabited by Beggiatoa exhibited higher heterotrophic potential denitrification rates (32 μM N reduced day(-1)) than did deeper sediments (11 μM N reduced day(-1)). Nitrate removal rates were high in both sediment horizons. These nitrate removal rates translate into rapid turnover times (cold seeps and the requirement for novel mechanisms to provide nitrate to the sediment microbial community.

  20. Colloidal mercury (Hg) distribution in soil samples by sedimentation field-flow fractionation coupled to mercury cold vapour generation atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, A; Terzano, R; Medici, L; Beciani, M; Pagnoni, A; Blo, G

    2012-01-01

    Diverse analytical techniques are available to determine the particle size distribution of potentially toxic elements in matrices of environmental interest such as soil, sediments, freshwater and groundwater. However, a single technique is often not exhaustive enough to determine both particle size distribution and element concentration. In the present work, the investigation of mercury in soil samples collected from a polluted industrial site was performed by using a new analytical approach which makes use of sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) coupled to cold vapour generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-ETAAS). The Hg concentration in the SdFFF fractions revealed a broad distribution from about 0.1 to 1 μm, roughly following the particle size distributions, presenting a maximum at about 400-700 nm in diameter. A correlation between the concentration of Hg in the colloidal fraction and organic matter (O.M.) content in the soil samples was also found. However, this correlation is less likely to be related to Hg sorption to soil O.M. but rather to the presence of colloidal mercuric sulfide particles whose size is probably controlled by the occurrence of dissolved O.M. The presence of O.M. could have prevented the aggregation of smaller particles, leading to an accumulation of mercuric sulfides in the colloidal fraction. In this respect, particle size distribution of soil samples can help to understand the role played by colloidal particles in mobilising mercury (also as insoluble compounds) and provide a significant contribution in determining the environmental impact of this toxic element.

  1. Calibration of handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) equipment for optimum determination of elemental concentrations in sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Piña, K Gabriela; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; González-Yajimovich, O

    2016-12-01

    Handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometers (XRFs) represent a more practical, efficient and economic tool to determine the elemental composition of solid inorganic and organic samples than conventional analytical techniques. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that handheld XRFs could be a precise, accurate and reliable tool to analyze up to 27 different elements. This objective was accomplished through the optimization of an empirical calibration curve that, in addition to include certified reference materials (CRM), it also introduced new approaches, such as the use of solid CRM mixtures and combinations of organic and inorganic matrices. These approaches significantly increased the number of calibration points and eliminated hiatuses in the calibration curve. Several factors were evaluated before construction of the calibration curve: incidence time of the X-ray beam, type of film through which the X-ray beams reach the samples, container type, minimum sample volume and sample moisture content. Results show that single elements can be analyzed with variable exposure times or, alternatively, multielemental analyses can be carried out with a constant exposure time (180s). Costs can be reduced by using Ziploc(®) bags as sample containers, but the number of measurable elements drops from 27 to 21, while the possibility of contamination increases.

  2. OSL dating of Glacial Sediments from New Zealand and Olympic Mountains: Using Stratigraphy to our Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenour, T. M.; Thackray, G. D.; Shulmeister, J.

    2012-12-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating provides an age estimate for the last time sediment was exposed to light. In glacial environments solar resetting of the luminescence signal prior to deposition is not assured and can lead to significant age overestimates. Sediments derived from glacial settings also commonly have other deleterious properties such as weak quartz luminescence signals, feldspar contamination and high levels of electron thermal transfer. Despite these potential problems, OSL commonly provides the only means to date glacial deposits due to limited material for radiocarbon and/or surface exposure dating, discrepancies between the age of a landform and the targeted underlying sediment, or deposit age beyond the range for radiocarbon. As part of a larger project to reconstruct MIS 3/4 glacial chronologies, OSL samples were collected from the Rangitata and Clutha River basins along the eastern Southern Alps, New Zealand and from the Hoh and Queets River basins, western Olympic Mountains, Washington USA. Samples for quartz OSL dating were collected from carefully selected shallow-water and well-sorted facies of glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine sediments to select sediments most likely to have been exposed to light prior to deposition. OSL dating is preferred over other dating methods in the study areas because evidence for multiple pre-LGM glaciations is commonly preserved as buried and over-run packages of diamicton, outwash and lacustrine sediment, excluding application of surface-exposure techniques. Further, where the sediments are in fact associated with surficial landforms, detailed description of the underlying stratigraphy permits interpretation of the glacial processes at work and thus provides a more thorough understanding of the relevance of the ages to the advance. Results indicate that while some samples contain evidence for partial bleaching, most show symmetric equivalent dose distributions, and ages are in stratigraphic order

  3. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dong-Xing; Williams, Paul N; Xu, Hua-Cheng; Li, Gang; Luo, Jun; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-10-05

    Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. (Ferrihydrite)DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001-0.5molL(-1) NaNO3) and pH (4-8), while (PZ)DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment-water and hotspot-bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using (PZ)DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP-MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrogeology and Migration of Septic-Tank Effluent in the Surficial Aquifer System in the Northern Midlands Area, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1992-01-01

    The northern Midlands area in Palm Beach County is an area of expected residential growth, but its flat topography, poor drainage, and near-surface marl layers retard rainfall infiltration and cause frequent flooding. Public water supplies and sewer services are not planned for the area, thus, residents must rely on domestic wells and septic tanks. The water table in the northern Midlands area is seldom more than 5 feet below land surface, and regional ground-water flows are east, southwest, and south from the north-central part of the area where ground-water levels are highest. Ground-water quality in the western part of the area and in the Loxahatchee Slough is greatly influenced by residual seawater emplaced during the Pleistocene Epoch. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the surficial aquifer system in these areas often exceed secondary drinking-water standards. Residual seawater has been more effectively flushed from the more permeable sediments elsewhere in the eastern and southwestern parts of the study area. Test at three septic-tank sites showed traces of effluent in ground water (38-92 feet from the septic tank outlets) and that near-surface marl layers greatly impede the downward migration of the effluent in the surficial aquifer system throughout the northern midlands.

  5. Stream-sediment samples reanalyzed for major, rare earth, and trace elements from ten 1:250,000-scale quadrangles, south-central Alaska, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Shew, Nora B.; Labay, Keith A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; O'Leary, Richard M.; Detra, David E.

    2010-01-01

    During the 1960s through the 1980s, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted reconnaissance geochemical surveys of the drainage basins throughout most of the Anchorage, Bering Glacier, Big Delta, Gulkana, Healy, McCarthy, Mount Hayes, Nabesna, Talkeetna Mountains, and Valdez 1:250,000-scale quadrangles in Alaska as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). These geochemical surveys provide data necessary to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources on public and other lands, and provide data that may be used to determine regional-scale element baselines. This report provides new data for 366 of the previously collected stream-sediment samples. These samples were selected for reanalysis because recently developed analytical methods can detect additional elements of interest and have lower detection limits than the methods used when these samples were originally analyzed. These samples were all analyzed for arsenic by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS), for gold, palladium, and platinum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after lead button fire assay separation (FA/ICP-MS), and for a suite of 55 major, rare earth, and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-AES-MS) after sodium peroxide sinter at 450 degrees Celsius.

  6. Selected analytical challenges in the determination of pharmaceuticals in drinking/marine waters and soil/sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Kumirska, Jolanta; Borecka, Marta; Caban, Magda; Paszkiewicz, Monika; Pazdro, Ksenia; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2016-03-20

    Recent developments and improvements in advanced instruments and analytical methodologies have made the detection of pharmaceuticals at low concentration levels in different environmental matrices possible. As a result of these advances, over the last 15 years residues of these compounds and their metabolites have been detected in different environmental compartments and pharmaceuticals have now become recognized as so-called 'emerging' contaminants. To date, a lot of papers have been published presenting the development of analytical methodologies for the determination of pharmaceuticals in aqueous and solid environmental samples. Many papers have also been published on the application of the new methodologies, mainly to the assessment of the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals. Although impressive improvements have undoubtedly been made, in order to fully understand the behavior of these chemicals in the environment, there are still numerous methodological challenges to be overcome. The aim of this paper therefore, is to present a review of selected recent improvements and challenges in the determination of pharmaceuticals in environmental samples. Special attention has been paid to the strategies used and the current challenges (also in terms of Green Analytical Chemistry) that exist in the analysis of these chemicals in soils, marine environments and drinking waters. There is a particular focus on the applicability of modern sorbents such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in sample preparation techniques, to overcome some of the problems that exist in the analysis of pharmaceuticals in different environmental samples.

  7. Hypoxic cyclicity in sediments of Soledad Basin, Baja Mexico: A record of high-frequency climate fluctuations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, A. E.; Brooks, G. R.; Lea, C.

    2007-05-01

    The sedimentary record in Soledad Basin, 45 km west of Baja, Mexico, shows high-frequency oscillations in hypoxia, which can be linked to fluctuations in climate. Soledad Basin, a semi-enclosed basin with a sill depth of 290m, has been shown to exhibit variable levels of hypoxia throughout the geologic past. Located at the intersection of the California Current and California Undercurrent, Soledad Basin is highly responsive to changes in current strength and upwelling, the combination of which creates fluctuations in hypoxia. During climatic cool periods, the California Current is weakened decreasing upwelling and biologic productivity along the Baja Borderland. This causes increased hypoxia in Soledad Basin. The California Undercurrent is also weakened during these cooler periods and brings less nutrients and oxygen to the basin further increasing hypoxia. Since Soledad Basin sediments are undisturbed and have accumulated rapidly, this is a prime location to study high frequency variations in hypoxia in the sedimentary record. The objective of this study was to examine how and to what extent hypoxic events have been recorded in the sedimentary record of Soledad Basin, and gain insight into what controls these events. Surface sediment samples and a single 1.1m gravity core were collected aboard the S.S.V. Robert C. Seamans on a SEA Semester cruise in October 2005. The core was taken at a depth of 490 m near the deepest point of the basin. The core contained laminated sediments consisting of >95% mud. Using 210Pb analysis, a sedimentation rate of 15 cm over the past 100 years was determined, which is consistent with previous research. Trace metal analyses were performed at the cm-scale on selected intervals between 0.34-0.44m and 0.78-0.92m. These intervals correspond to dark organic-rich (>15% organic content) laminations alternating with lighter layers containing less organic material (<15% organic content). All sediments were found to be enriched in Molybdenum

  8. Factors affecting the movement and persistence of nitrate and pesticides in the surficial and upper Floridan aquifers in two agricultural areas in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Berndt, M.P.; Crandall, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the degree of confinement, redox conditions, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the main factors that control the persistence of nitrate and pesticides in the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) and overlying surficial aquifer beneath two agricultural areas in the southeastern US. Groundwater samples were collected multiple times from 66 wells during 1993–2007 in a study area in southwestern Georgia (ACFB) and from 48 wells in 1997–98 and 2007–08 in a study area in South Carolina (SANT) as part of the US Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. In the ACFB study area, where karst features are prevalent, elevated nitrate-N concentrations in the oxic unconfined UFA (median 2.5 mg/L) were significantly (p = 0.03) higher than those in the overlying oxic surficial aquifer (median 1.5 mg/L). Concentrations of atrazine and deethylatrazine (DEA; the most frequently detected pesticide and degradate) were higher in more recent groundwater samples from the ACFB study area than in samples collected prior to 2000. Conversely, in the SANT study area, nitrate-N concentrations in the UFA were mostly <0.06 mg/L, resulting from anoxic conditions and elevated DOC concentrations that favored denitrification. Although most parts of the partially confined UFA in the SANT study area were anoxic or had mixed redox conditions, water from 28 % of the sampled wells was oxic and had low DOC concentrations. Based on the groundwater age information, nitrate concentrations reflect historic fertilizer N usage in both the study areas, but with a lag time of about 15–20 years. Simulated responses to future management scenarios of fertilizer N inputs indicated that elevated nitrate-N concentrations would likely persist in oxic parts of the surficial aquifer and UFA for decades even with substantial decreases in fertilizer N inputs over the next 40 years.

  9. Spatial sediment variability in a tropical tide dominated estuary: Sources and drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Silvia H. M.; Ferreira, Paulo A. L.; Martins, Maria V. A.; Siegle, Eduardo; Amaral, Paula G. C.; Figueira, Rubens C. L.; Yamashita, Cintia; Rodrigues, André R.; Mahiques, Michel M.

    2016-12-01

    Surficial sediment composition and spatial variability reflect the dynamics and level of natural and anthropogenic impact in estuarine systems. The aim of this study is to evaluate some key environmental and sedimentary variables, as well as to evaluate the current environmental quality in the tide-dominated Caravelas estuarine system (Brazil). Sixty-five surficial sediment samples were studied for grain size as well as calcium carbonate, total organic carbon, total nitrogen, metals, semi-metals and rare earth elements and for organic matter δ13C. Based on the spatial distribution of these data and summarizing our findings, three sectors can be individualized in the Caravelas estuarine system: i. Barra Velha inlet; ii. the main channel of the Caravelas estuary, and iii. the channel interconnecting Caravelas and Nova Viçosa estuaries. In the inlet the sedimentary organic matter is provided essentially by marine sources, which corroborates the small continental input. Freshwater dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon occur in the interconnecting channel, proving the occurrence of the residual transport towards the Caravelas estuary, with continental contribution towards Caravelas River. The geochemical fingerprint indicates that the Barreiras Group, composed by Neogene terrigenous deposits, located west of the study area, as an important source of terrigenous material to the entire Caravelas estuary system. The higher values of heavy rare earth elements (between 20 and 30 mg kg-1) in the northern sector of the study area may be related to the high degree of chemical weathering in magmatic or metamorphic rocks, which occur to the north of the study area.

  10. Variation and Distribution of Sediments in a Mixed Glacifluvial-Aeolian System in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. J.; Bullard, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    There is a clear association between the distribution of wind-blown sediments and the former extent of ice sheets and glaciers. Glacial erosion processes produce significant quantities of fine sediments that are washed out from beneath glaciers by meltwater. Once deposited and desiccated, aeolian processes may transport them across the landscape resulting in the formation of sand dunes and loess, and adding dust to the atmosphere. This research reports the use of digital imaging and laser sizing to obtain the grain size distribution and textural attributes of sand and dust in Sandflugtdalen, a valley adjacent to the West Greenland ice sheet. An initial assessment of the rates of sand and dust transport, made using semi-isokinetic directional sediment samplers, indicate that the flux of aeolian sediment comprises clays, silts and sand-sized particles. Digital imaging of the surficial sediment deposits provides a rapid means of sampling the large, spatially and temporally variable, proglacial valley. Sediments were initially photographed during June 2007 and then resampled after a 9-week interval. The grain size distribution and surface texture were computed using a calibrated autocorrelation method. It is estimated that individual particles may be resolved down to a size of 0.045 mm. The regions of aeolian entrainment, transport and deposition are directly linked to the development and distribution of sediments on the proglacial floodplain, which varies considerably in terms of surface roughness. On the floodplain close to the ice sheet, aeolian flux is controlled by sediment supply and lag formation and the total surface roughness is determined by the combination of grain-scale roughness and topography. Further down valley, recycling of sediments by aeolian and fluvial activity is significant and wind speed becomes an important controlling factor. Within the dunefields, surface roughness is principally determined by topography and vegetation. Close to the ice sheet

  11. Determination of boron in marine sediment samples by ICP-AES%ICP-AES测定海洋沉积物中的硼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛文彩; 林学辉; 徐磊

    2011-01-01

    A method for the determination of boron in Marine Sediment Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry is established. The samples were decomposed by mixed acid of HF-H3PO4-HNO3-HC1O4 in a pressurized acid digestion system and the addition of H3PO4 avoid the volatilization of Boron effetely. In the given conditions, the detection limit of Boron was 0.0046)j.g/Ml. Several marine sediment reference materials were used to verify the accuracy and precision of the method, .According to the results, the measured values was in accordance with the certified values, and the recovery rate was in the range of 91%~96.5%. It showed that the method was simple, rapid and accurate with important application.%利用HF- H3PO4-HNO3-HClO4四酸溶矿,ICP-AES测定海洋沉积物中的硼(B).采用电热板加热进行封闭溶矿,通过加入H3PO4有效地抑制B的挥发损失.在最佳条件下硼的检出限为0.0046μg/mL.用海洋沉积物标准物质对方法进行精密度和准确度验证,测定值与标准值吻合,精密度小于5%,回收率在91% ~ 96.5%之间.结果表明本方法简便、快速、测定精度高、实用性强.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF MERCURY IN HYPOLIMNETIC LAKE SEDIMENTS OF VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research is to characterize concentrations of total methylmercury in waters and surficial sediments of Vermont and New Hampshire lakes, and to relate these data to commonly measured water column chemical parameters and watershed-level physical attributes. The primary goal of...

  13. Modeling the effect of nonuniform sediment on the dynamics of offshore tidal sandbanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Wemmenhove, Rik; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.; Hoeijmakers, Harry W. M.; Kruyt, N. P.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Tidal sandbanks are large-scale bed features present in many shallow shelf seas. Here we investigate the effect of nonuniform sediment on their dynamics, with a particular aim to explain observed surficial grain size variations over tidal sandbanks from a process-based modeling perspective. To t

  14. Physical, Chemical, Ecological, and Age Data and Trench Logs from Surficial Deposits at Hatch Point, Southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Harland L.; Miller, Mark E.; Yount, James C.; Reheis, Marith C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Belnap, Jayne; Lamothe, Paul J.; McGeehan, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data and describes the methodology for physical, chemical and ecological measurements of sediment, soil, and vegetation, as well as age determinations of surficial deposits at Hatch Point, Canyon Rims area, Colorado Plateau, southeastern Utah. The results presented in this report support a study that examines geomorphic and soil factors that may influence boundaries between shrubland and grassland ecosystems in the study area. Shrubland ecosystems dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) and grassland ecosystems dominated by native perennial grasses (for example, Hilaria jamesii and Sporabolis sp.) are high-priority conservation targets for the Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and other resource managers because of their diversity, productivity, and vital importance as wildlife habitat. These ecosystems have been recognized as imperiled on a regional scale since at least the mid-1990s due to habitat loss (type conversions), land-use practices, and invasive exotic plants. In the Intermountain West, the exotic annual cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) is recognized as one of the most pervasive and serious threats to the health of native sagebrush and grassland ecosystems through effects on fire regimes and resource conditions experienced by native species.

  15. Distribution of total mercury in surface sediments of the western Jade Bay, Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huafang; Liebezeit, Gerd; Ziehe, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    A total of 114 surface sediment samples was equidistantly collected in the western part of the Jade Bay, southern North Sea, to analyse total mercury contents as well as grain size distribution and total organic carbon (TOC) contents. Total mercury was determined by oxygen combustion-gold amalgamation. Validation, precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated and controlled with two certified reference materials (HISS-1 and MESS-3). Total mercury contents varied between 8 and 243 ng/g dry sediment with a mean value of 103 ng/g dw. The mercury levels in surface sediments showed an inhomogeneous spatial distribution with higher contents in near-dike areas. The values are mostly in the range of natural background values (50–100 ng/g dw) and positively related to TOC and clay/silt contents (Jade Bay are not mercury contaminated. These results also suggested that the current mercury contents of Jade Bay surficial sediments are mostly affected by atmospheric deposition and re-emission.

  16. Final Remedial Investigation Sampling Plan Addendum. Milan Army Ammunition Plant Remedial Investigation Southern Study Area (Operable Unit No. 5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    planned to address these areas. Other field activities will consist of documenting (mapping) surficial extent of these areas via visual inspection...mapping) surficial extent of these areas via visual inspection & field measurements. All sampling activities will be performed with site clearance

  17. Experimental Approaches to Understanding Surficial Processes on Mars: The Stony Brook Experience 2000-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, S. M.; Dehouck, E.; Hurowitz, J.; Lindsley, D. H.; Schoonen, M. A.; Tosca, N. J.; Zhao, Y. Y. S.

    2016-12-01

    Starting with Pathfinder and Global Surveyor, recent missions to Mars have provided great opportunity for low-temperature experimental geochemistry investigations of the Martian sedimentary record by providing geochemical and mineralogical data that can be used as meaningful tests for experiments. These missions have documented a long-lived, complex and dynamic sedimentary rock cycle, including "source-to-sink" sedimentary systems and global paleoenvironmental transitions through time. We designed and constructed an experimental facility, beginning in 2000, specifically to evaluate surficial processes on Mars. Our experimental philosophy has been to (1) keep apparatus simple and flexible, and if feasible maintain sample access during experiments; (2) use starting materials (minerals, rocks) close to known Mars compositions (often requiring synthesis); (3) address sedimentary processes supported by geological investigations at Mars; (4) begin with experiments at standard conditions so they are best supported by thermodynamics; (5) support experiments with thermodynamic-kinetic-mass balance modeling in both design and interpretation, and by high quality chemical, mineralogical and textural lab analyses; (6) interpret results in the context of measurements made at Mars. Although eliciting much comment in proposal and manuscript reviews, we have not attempted to slavishly maintain "Mars conditions", doing so only to the degree required by variables being tested in any given experiments. Among the problems we have addressed are (1) Amazonian alteration of rock surfaces; (2) Noachian-Hesperian chemical weathering; (3) epithermal alteration of `evolved' igneous rocks; (4) mineral surface chemical reactivity from aeolian abrasion; (5) evaporation of mafic brines; (6) early diagenesis of sedimentary iron mineralogy; (7) trace element and halogen behavior during chemical weathering and diagenesis; (8) photochemical influences on halogen distribution and speciation; (9) post

  18. Spatial distribution and pollution assessment of mercury in sediments of Lake Taihu, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxiao Chen; Binghui Zheng; Xia Jiang; Zheng Zhao; Yuzhu Zhan; Fengjiao Yi; Jiaying Ren

    2013-01-01

    Spatial distribution patterns of total mercury (THg) in 36 surficial sediment samples representing five regions of Lake Taihu were assessed using the ArcGis geostatistical analyst module.The pollution levels of THg were also evaluated from the same five lake regions.Concentrations of THg were in a ranged of 23-168 ng/g (mean 55 ng/g) in surfical sediments,which was significantly higher than those established baseline levels of the lake.Results of THg indicated that the northern region exhibited notably higher values,the bay regions showed elevated values relative to open areas,and the lakeside regions were higher than those observed in the central area.Lake Taihu suffered moderate to high Hg pollution,and expressed clear Hg enrichment status according to monomial pollution index Igeo and human activity factors.The concentrations of THg in the surticial sediments of Lake Taihu showed moderate-strong variation (coefficient of variation 52%).Geostatistical analysis indicated a weak spatial self-correlation,suggesting the contamination of Hg in Lake Taihu is primarily the result of anthropogenic activities.

  19. Evaluating the potential effects of hurricanes on long-term sediment accumulation in two micro-tidal sub-estuaries: Barnegat Bay and Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marot, Marci E.; Smith, Christopher G.; Ellis, Alisha M.; Wheaton, Cathryn J.

    2016-06-23

    Barnegat Bay, located along the eastern shore of New Jersey, was significantly impacted by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a multidisciplinary study of sediment transport and hydrodynamics to understand the mechanisms that govern estuarine and wetland responses to storm forcing. This report details the physical and chemical characteristics of surficial and downcore sediments from two areas within the bay. Eleven sites were sampled in both the central portion of the bay near Barnegat Inlet and in the southern portion of the bay in Little Egg Harbor. Laboratory analyses include Be-7, Pb-210, bulk density, porosity, x-radiographs, and grain-size distribution. These data will serve as a critical baseline dataset for understanding the current sedimentological regime and can be applied to future storms for understanding estuarine and wetland evolution.

  20. Fault Growth and Propagation and its Effect on Surficial Processes within the Incipient Okavango Rift Zone, Northwest Botswana, Africa (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekwana, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) is suggested to be a zone of incipient continental rifting occuring at the distal end of the southwestern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS), therefore providing a unique opportunity to investigate neotectonic processes during the early stages of rifting. We used geophysical (aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric), Shuttle Radar Tomography Mission, Digital Elevation Model (SRTM-DEM), and sedimentological data to characterize the growth and propagation of faults associated with continental extension in the ORZ, and to elucidate the interplay between neotectonics and surficial processes. The results suggest that: (1) fault growth occurs by along axis linkage of fault segments, (2) an immature border fault is developing through the process of “Fault Piracy” by fault-linkages between major fault systems, (3) significant discrepancies exits between the height of fault scarps and the throws across the faults compared to their lengths in the basement, (4) utilization of preexisting zones of weakness allowed the development of very long faults (> 25-100 km) at a very early stage of continental rifting, explaining the apparent paradox between the fault length versus throw for this young rift, (5) active faults are characterized by conductive anomalies resulting from fluids, whereas, inactive faults show no conductivity anomaly; and 6) sedimentlogical data reveal a major perturbation in lake sedimentation between 41 ka and 27 ka. The sedimentation perturbation is attributed to faulting associated with the rifting and may have resulted in the alteration of hydrology forming the modern day Okavango delta. We infer that this time period may represent the age of the latest rift reactivation and fault growth and propagation within the ORZ.

  1. Bacteria contribute to sediment nutrient release and reflect progressed eutrophication-driven hypoxia in an organic-rich continental sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Sinkko

    Full Text Available In the sedimental organic matter of eutrophic continental seas, such as the largest dead zone in the world, the Baltic Sea, bacteria may directly participate in nutrient release by mineralizing organic matter or indirectly by altering the sediment's ability to retain nutrients. Here, we present a case study of a hypoxic sea, which receives riverine nutrient loading and in which microbe-mediated vicious cycles of nutrients prevail. We showed that bacterial communities changed along the horizontal loading and vertical mineralization gradients in the Gulf of Finland of the Baltic Sea, using multivariate statistics of terminal restriction fragments and sediment chemical, spatial and other properties of the sampling sites. The change was mainly explained by concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, which showed strong positive correlation with Flavobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. These bacteria predominated in the most organic-rich coastal surface sediments overlain by oxic bottom water, whereas sulphate-reducing bacteria, particularly the genus Desulfobacula, prevailed in the reduced organic-rich surface sediments in the open sea. They correlated positively with organic nitrogen and phosphorus, as well as manganese oxides. These relationships suggest that the bacterial groups participated in the aerobic and anaerobic degradation of organic matter and contributed to nutrient cycling. The high abundance of sulphate reducers in the surficial sediment layers reflects the persistence of eutrophication-induced hypoxia causing ecosystem-level changes in the Baltic Sea. The sulphate reducers began to decrease below depths of 20 cm, where members of the family Anaerolineaceae (phylum Chloroflexi increased, possibly taking part in terminal mineralization processes. Our study provides valuable information on how organic loading affects sediment bacterial community compositions, which consequently may

  2. Distinction between sortable silts and aggregated particles in muddy intertidal sediments of the East Frisian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tae Soo; Flemming, Burghard W.; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    In muddy sediments, the distinction between sortable silt and aggregated silty clay is important for the understanding of fine particle dynamics because both have different hydraulic properties. The Wadden Sea of the southern North Sea is severely depleted in fine-grained sediments mainly due to high energy levels along the diked coastline. As a result, muddy sediments are restricted to a narrow belt along the diked mainland shore. In the present study, the mechanism by which this mud is deposited and how floc deposition and break-up are reflected in the size distribution, has been investigated. For this purpose, surficial sediments from four intertidal nearshore transects were monitored and repeatedly sampled in the course of two years. High-resolution grain-size analyses were performed by an automated settling tube and a Sedigraph particle analyser for the sand and mud fractions, respectively. The grain size frequency distributions of the fine fractions demonstrate that the Wadden Sea muds are composed of two subpopulations, a well-sorted coarse silt and an unsorted silty clay population. A depletion of grain size around 8 μm (7 phi) demarcates the grain-size boundary between the two populations, suggesting that the finer mud population (changing energy regimes lead to apparent seasonal sedimentation patterns in the back-barrier tidal basins. Furthermore, in the course of sample preparation, the flocs and aggregates are broken down into their constituent particles. This mechanical artefact in the size distributions produces an artificial seasonal fining/coarsening pattern. It was found that the comparison of clay/silt and effect of climate change further promotes depletion of fine-grained sediments in the basin.

  3. Selective trace enrichment of acidic pharmaceuticals in real water and sediment samples based on solid-phase extraction using multi-templates molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yan-Ping; Dai, Chao-Meng; Zhang, Ya-Lei; Ling-Chen

    2013-01-03

    A novel multi-templates molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), using acidic pharmaceuticals mixture (ibuprofen (IBP), naproxen (NPX), ketoprofen (KEP), diclofenac (DFC), and clofibric acid (CA)) as the template, was prepared as solid-phase extraction (SPE) material for the quantitative enrichment of acidic pharmaceuticals in environmental samples and off-line coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Washing solvent was optimized in terms of kind and volume for removing the matrix constituents nonspecifically adsorbed on the MIP. When 1L of water sample spiked at 1μg/L was loaded onto the cartridge, the binding capacity of the MIP cartridge were 48.7μg/g for KEP, 60.7μg/g for NPX, 52μg/g for CA, 61.3μg/g for DFC and 60.7μg/g for IBP, respectively, which are higher than those of the commercial single template MIP in organic medium (e.g. toluene) reported in the literature. Recoveries of the five acidic pharmaceuticals extracted from 1L of real water samples such as lake water and wastewater spiked at 1μg/L were more than 95%. The recoveries of acidic pharmaceuticals extracted from 10-g sediment sample spiked at the 10ng/g level were in the range of 77.4-90.6%. To demonstrate the potential of the MIP obtained, a comparison with commercial C18 SPE cartridge was performed. Molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) cartridge showed higher recoveries than commercial C18 SPE cartridge for acidic pharmaceuticals. These results showed the suitability of the MISPE method for the selective extraction of a group of structurally related compounds such as acidic pharmaceuticals.

  4. Stream-sediment samples reanalyzed for major, rare earth, and trace elements from seven 1:250,000-scale quadrangles, south-central Alaska, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Bruce M.; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Shew, Nora B.; Labay, Keith A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; O'Leary, Richard M.; Detra, David E.

    2010-01-01

    During the 1960s through the 1980s, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted reconnaissance geochemical surveys of drainage basins throughout most of the Iliamna, Lake Clark, Lime Hills, and Talkeetna 1:250,000-scale quadrangles and parts of the McGrath, Seldovia, and Tyonek 1:250,000-scale quadrangles in Alaska. These geochemical surveys provide data necessary to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources and provide data that may be used to determine regional-scale element baselines. This report provides new data for 1,075 of the previously collected stream-sediment samples. The new analyses include a broader spectrum of elements and provide data that are more precise than the original analyses. All samples were analyzed for arsenic by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, for gold, palladium, and platinum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after lead button fire assay separation, and for a suite of 55 major, rare earth, and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after sodium peroxide sinter at 450 degrees Celsius.

  5. A preliminary study on thermoluminescence characteristics of sediments from the North Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Huahua; SHI Xuefa; WU Yonghua; YANG Gang; WEI Jianwei; REN Xiangwen

    2007-01-01

    Thirty-eight surficial deposit samples were collected from the equatorial North Pacific, and the natural thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of both bulk and clay fraction samples (<2 μm fractions) were studied by the FJ427-A1 automatic TL Dosimeter for the first time. With the measurements of clay mineral composition, element composition by XRD and ICP, the correlations between TL intensity and sedimentary environment proxies were analyzed, such as water depth, ratio of FeO to Fe2O3 contents, LOI, and major clay mineral concentration, and it was found the bulk sample's TL signal was stronger than the clay ones. Usually, increase in the clay components may result in the decrease of TL intensity. From the shape of TL curves, the pelagic sediments can be divided into two groups: the majority group has two glow peaks, in general, the first peak is broad and flat, but the second narrow and sharp; the minority group only has a single peak because the first is absent. The peak centers of TL curves are almost fixed, falling in the temperature sections 230~260 and 390~405 ℃ respectively. Lorentz model packed in the Origin 7.5 was chosen to deal with the TL curves. From the processing results, three parameters (H, C and A), corresponding to the height, center, and kurtosis of TL curve, were obtained to describe the curve characteristics. The correlations between TL curve parameters and sedimentary environment proxies were also calculated. On the basis of the above work, the relationship between TL characteristics and sediment type, mineral composition, sedimentary environment of surface sediments was discussed in the study area, and a conclusion is: sediments from the environment of shallower water, higher organic contents and weaker reductivity have stronger TL signals.

  6. Alaska Geochemical Database, Version 2.0 (AGDB2)--including “best value” data compilations for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2) contains new geochemical data compilations in which each geologic material sample has one “best value” determination for each analyzed species, greatly improving speed and efficiency of use. Like the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/) before it, the AGDB2 was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This relational database, created from the Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) that was released in 2011, serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables in several different formats describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel and analyzed in U.S. Geological Survey laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various U.S. Geological Survey programs and projects from 1962 through 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB2 includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the U.S. Geological Survey Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the U.S. Geological Survey PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate

  7. Surficial geology of the Chicxulub impact crater, Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Kevin O.; Ocampo, Adriana C.; Duller, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    The Chicxulub impact crater in northwestern Yucatan, Mexico is the primary candidate for the proposed impact that caused mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The crater is buried by up to a kilometer of Tertiary sediment and the most prominent surface expression is a ring of sink holes, known locally as cenotes, mapped with Landsat imagery. This 165 +/- 5 km diameter Cenote Ring demarcates a boundary between unfractured limestones inside the ring, and fractured limestones outside. The boundary forms a barrier to lateral ground water migration, resulting in increased flows, dissolution, and collapse thus forming the cenotes. The subsurface geology indicates that the fracturing that created the Cenote Ring is related to slumping in the rim of the buried crater, differential thicknesses in the rocks overlying the crater, or solution collapse within porous impact deposits. The Cenote Ring provides the most accurate position of the Chicxulub crater's center, and the associated faults, fractures, and stratigraphy indicate that the crater may be approximately 240 km in diameter.

  8. Multielement geochemical dataset of surficial materials for the northern Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Mary Jane; Kotlyar, Boris B.; Ludington, Steve; Folger, Helen W.; Mossotti, Victor G.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents geochemical data generated during mineral and environmental assessments for the Bureau of Land Management in northern Nevada, northeastern California, southeastern Oregon, and southwestern Idaho, along with metadata and map representations of selected elements. The dataset presented here is a compilation of chemical analyses of over 10,200 stream-sediment and soil samples originally collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation's (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program of the Department of Energy and its predecessors and reanalyzed to support a series of mineral-resource assessments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The dataset also includes the analyses of additional samples collected by the USGS in 1992. The sample sites are in southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho, northeastern California, and, primarily, in northern Nevada. These samples were collected from 1977 to 1983, before the development of most of the present-day large-scale mining infrastructure in northern Nevada. As such, these data may serve as an important baseline for current and future geoenvironmental studies. Largely because of the very diverse analytical methods used by the NURE HSSR program, the original NURE analyses in this area yielded little useful geochemical information. The Humboldt, Malheur-Jordan-Andrews, and Winnemucca-Surprise studies were designed to provide useful geochemical data via improved analytical methods (lower detection levels and higher precision) and, in the Malheur-Jordan-Andrews and Winnemucca Surprise areas, to collect additional stream-sediment samples to increase sampling coverage. The data are provided in *.xls (Microsoft Excel) and *.csv (comma-separated-value) format. We also present graphically 35 elements, interpolated ("gridded") in a geographic information system (GIS) and overlain by major geologic trends, so that users may view the variation in elemental concentrations over the

  9. Three perspectives on bedload transport at a sandy gravel beach (Advocate Harbour, Nova Scotia) with focus on sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, N.; Hay, A. E.; Guest, T.; Hatcher, M. G.; Cheel, R. A.; Barclay, D. J.; Zedel, L. J.; Lake, C. B.

    2012-12-01

    Bedload transport is the major transport mode for coarse sediment in coastal zones. Understanding its mechanisms requires knowledge of the driving force (hydrodynamics), the stabilizing force (sediment properties), and the bed characteristics (bed roughness, bed slope, bedforms). During a 3-week-long field experiment at Advocate Beach, Nova Scotia, bedload transport was targeted from three perspectives: (i) The water column: using a new acoustic Doppler profiler (MFDop), 3D flow velocities were monitored to assess bed shear stress over a range of conditions. Additionally, sediment concentrations close to the bed (~10 cm) were determined by water sampling under calm conditions (0.15-0.6 g/l) and within the shorebreak (1-50 g/l). (ii) The bed: rotary sonars were used to observe the development of ripples and bed elevation change as a measure of ongoing sediment transport. Also, the net displacement of 20 marked cobbles on the seabed surface was measured, revealing significant changes in transport direction and distance (ranging from 0 to 50 m). (iii) The sediment properties: grain size ranged from medium sand to small cobbles. The finer-grained particles were rounded, but showed an elliptic to plate-like shape. Grain size distributions varied significantly across the shoreface as well as under different hydrodynamic conditions. Observed beach cusps were strongly sorted (coarse pebbles at the horns, coarse sand in the bays). Direct shear tests were carried out to determine peak shear strengths of the sediment and friction angles. Peak shear strengths under low normal stress (0.47 kPa) can be compared best to surficial sediment conditions, and did not exceed 9 kPa in the case of the sands. The sediment showed a surprisingly strong dilative behavior during shearing and high friction angles considering the grain size, the low load and low density conditions during the tests. Thus, grain shape and the particle re-organization under shearing played important roles. Finally

  10. Sedimentary characteristics, dispersal patterns and pathways of sediments in the eastern Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Najeeb; Ligi, Marco; Mitchell, Neil; Bonatti, Enrico; Alnomani, Salem

    2013-04-01

    Fluvial sediments from wadis (seasonal streams) located in the northern and southern sections of the eastern Red Sea coast are transported occasionally along the coast and offshore areas. However, aeolian quartz and biogenic inputs are also important components of the surficial sediments of Holocene age. In one core collected immediately northeast of Thetis Deep in 700 m of water, at approximately 50 cm sediment depth, a boundary between the Holocene and Pleistocene is marked by iron pans approximately 2-3 cm in thickness. This core and dredged samples contain carbonate crusts believed to have formed during high temperature and hyper-saline conditions prevalent during the time of formation. The presence of mica in littoral areas in the north and in the deeper waters towards the south in the vicinity of Thetis Deep suggests dispersal towards the south-southeast, which can be explained by wind-driven currents with a northwesterly dominant wind direction. The Tertiary mountains covered by the red soils near the eastern Red Sea coast are the source of kaolinite in the Red Sea. Floccules rich in kaolinite associated with fine-grained sediments and medium sand-sized mica indicate a low energy environment. They are common in some lagoons and deeper waters of the Red Sea. Some channels apparent in multibeam sonar data leading to the deeps may not necessarily have been created by sedimentary flows here as most fine particle transport appears to be occurring in suspension. Wadis are more active in the south compared to the north because of relatively higher rainfall. Since the detrital input from land is limited by the absence of rivers draining into the Red Sea the sedimentation rate of terrigenous particles is low, aeolian quartz is prominent, authigenic pyrite formation is common and biogenic material is abundant in the form of calcium carbonate.

  11. Characterization of sediment and measurement of groundwater levels and temperatures, Camas National Wildlife Refuge, eastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Rattray, Gordon W.

    2016-11-02

    The Camas National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in eastern Idaho, established in 1937, contains wetlands, ponds, and wet meadows that are essential resting and feeding habitat for migratory birds and nesting habitat for waterfowl. Initially, natural sources of water supported these habitats. However, during the past few decades, climate change and changes in surrounding land use have altered and reduced natural groundwater and surface water inflows such that the wetlands, ponds, and wet meadows are now maintained through water management and groundwater pumping. These water management activities have proven to be inefficient and costly, prompting the Refuge to develop alternative water management options that are more efficient and less expensive. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is studying the hydrogeology at the Refuge to provide information for developing alternative water management options.The hydrogeologic studies at the Refuge included characterizing the type, distribution, and hydraulic conductivity of surficial sediments and measuring water levels and temperatures in monitoring wells. Four monitoring wells and seven soil probe coreholes were drilled at the Refuge. Seven water level and temperature data loggers were installed in the wells and water levels and temperatures were continuously recorded from November 2014 to June 2016. Sediment cores were collected from the coreholes and sediment type and distribution were characterized from drillers’ notes, geophysical logs, corehole samples, and particle grain-size analysis. The hydraulic conductivities of sediments were estimated using the measured average grain size and the assumed textural maturity of the sediment, and ranged from about 20 to 290 feet per day.

  12. Sediment Types, PA Lake Erie bottom substrate and sediment type acquired through ponar bottom grab samples and underwater video., Published in 2014, Not Applicable scale, Pennsylvania Coastal Resources Management Program.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Sediment Types dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2014. It is described as 'PA...

  13. Determination of lead in samples of zooplankton, water, and sediments in a Mexican reservoir: evidence for lead biomagnification in lower/intermediate trophic levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Franchini, Isidoro; Mejía Saavedra, Jesús; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2008-08-01

    We have determined lead concentration of water, sediment, and zooplankton samples of El Niágara, a reservoir in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Our results include the first report of bioconcentration factor (BCF) obtained in an actual ecosystem (as opposed to the experimental setups in the laboratory) for a rotifer species; Asplanchna brigthwellii (BCF ca. 49 300). The BCF of this predatory zooplanktonic species (A. brigthwellii) are up to four times greater than those of two grazing zooplanktonic species (Daphnia similis and Moina micrura). In this contaminated reservoir that lacks fishes, Asplanchna, and Culex sp. together with ducks and other bigger invertebrates might represent the top predators. Our data suggest that biomagnification of lead through at least one trophic level can occur in freshwater systems. Biomagnification in A. brigthwellii might be explained in part by predation of this voracious predator on young of the herbivorous cladoceran, M. micrura. Our findings stand opposite to the current theoretical framework where lead biomagnification occurs only in lower trophic levels.

  14. Geology, Surficial, Surficial Geology of the Powhatan 7.5-minute Quadrangle, Published in 1999, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, NC DENR / Div. of Land Resources / Geological Survey Section.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geology, Surficial dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 1999. It is described...

  15. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) personnel have supported US Air Force (USAF) ballistic missile flight tests for about 15 years for Peacekeeper and Minuteman missiles launched at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Associated re-entry vehicles (RV's) re-enter at Regan Test Site (RTS) at the US Army base at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) where LLNL has supported scoring, recovery operations for RV materials, and environmental assessments. As part of ongoing USAF ballistic missile flight test programs, LLNL is participating in an updated EA being written for flights originating at VFAB. Marine fauna and sediments (beach-sand samples) were collected by US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and LLNL at Illeginni Island and Boggerik Island (serving as a control site) at Kwajalein Atoll. Data on the concentration of DU (hereafter, U) and Be in collected samples was requested by USFWS and NMFS to determine whether or not U and Be in RV's entering the Illeginni area are increasing U and Be concentrations in marine fauna and sediments. LLNL agreed to do the analyses for U and Be in support of the EA process and provide a report of the results. There is no statistically significant difference in the concentration of U and Be in six species of marine fauna from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands (p - 0.14 for U and p = 0.34 for Be). Thus, there is no evidence that there has been any increase in U and Be concentrations in marine fauna as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of U in beach sand at Illeginni is the same as soil and beach sand in the rest of the Marshall Islands and again reflects an insignificant impact from the flight test program. Beach sand from Illeginni has a mean concentration of Be higher than that from the control site, Boggeik Island. Seven of 21 samples from Ileginni had detectable Be. Four samples had a concentration of Be ranging from 4 to 7 ng g {sup -1} (4 to 7 parts per

  16. Abundance of Dioxygenase Genes Similar to Ralstonia sp. Strain U2 nagAc Is Correlated with Naphthalene Concentrations in Coal Tar-Contaminated Freshwater Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisi, Hebe M.; Chewning, Christopher S.; Morgan, Katherine H.; Menn, Fu-Min; Easter, James P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    We designed a real-time PCR assay able to recognize dioxygenase large-subunit gene sequences with more than 90% similarity to the Ralstonia sp. strain U2 nagAc gene (nagAc-like gene sequences) in order to study the importance of organisms carrying these genes in the biodegradation of naphthalene. Sequencing of PCR products indicated that this real-time PCR assay was specific and able to detect a variety of nagAc-like gene sequences. One to 100 ng of contaminated-sediment total DNA in 25-μl reaction mixtures produced an amplification efficiency of 0.97 without evident PCR inhibition. The assay was applied to surficial freshwater sediment samples obtained in or in close proximity to a coal tar-contaminated Superfund site. Naphthalene concentrations in the analyzed samples varied between 0.18 and 106 mg/kg of dry weight sediment. The assay for nagAc-like sequences indicated the presence of (4.1 ± 0.7) × 103 to (2.9 ± 0.3) × 105 copies of nagAc-like dioxygenase genes per μg of DNA extracted from sediment samples. These values corresponded to (1.2 ± 0.6) × 105 to (5.4 ± 0.4) × 107 copies of this target per g of dry weight sediment when losses of DNA during extraction were taken into account. There was a positive correlation between naphthalene concentrations and nagAc-like gene copies per microgram of DNA (r = 0.89) and per gram of dry weight sediment (r = 0.77). These results provide evidence of the ecological significance of organisms carrying nagAc-like genes in the biodegradation of naphthalene. PMID:15240274

  17. Speciation analysis of mercury in sediments, zoobenthos and river water samples by high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to atomic fluorescence spectrometry following preconcentration by solid phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margetinova, Jana; Houserova-Pelcova, Pavlina [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, Brno CZ 613 00 (Czech Republic); Kuban, Vlastimil [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, Brno CZ 613 00 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: kuban@mendelu.cz

    2008-05-19

    A high-pressure microwave digestion was applied for microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of mercury species from sediments and zoobenthos samples. A mixture containing 3 mol L{sup -1} HCl, 50% aqueous methanol and 0.2 mol L{sup -1} citric acid (for masking co-extracted Fe{sup 3+}) was selected as the most suitable extraction agent. The efficiency of proposed extraction method was better than 95% with R.S.D. below 6%. A preconcentration method utilizing a 'homemade' C18 solid phase extraction (SPE) microcolumns was developed to enhance sensitivity of the mercury species determination using on-column complex formation of mercury-2-mercaptophenol complexes. Methanol was chosen for counter-current elution of the retained mercury complexes achieving a preconcentration factor as much as 1000. The preconcentration method was applied for the speciation analysis of mercury in river water samples. The high-performance liquid chromatography-cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometric (HPLC/CV-AFS) method was used for the speciation analysis of mercury. The complete separation of four mercury species was achieved by an isocratic elution of aqueous methanol (65%/35%) on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (4.6 mm x 150 mm, 5 {mu}m) using the same complexation reagent (2-mercaptophenol). The limits of detection were 4.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for methylmercury (MeHg{sup +}), 1.4 {mu}g L{sup -1} for ethylmercury (EtHg{sup +}), 0.8 {mu}g L{sup -1} for inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), 0.8 {mu}g L{sup -1} for phenylmercury (PhHg{sup +})

  18. Geological sampling data and benthic biota classification: Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Seth D.; Pappal, Adrienne L.; Huntley, Emily C.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Schwab, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Sea-floor sample collection is an important component of a statewide cooperative mapping effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM). Sediment grab samples, bottom photographs, and video transects were collected within Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay in 2010 aboard the research vesselConnecticut. This report contains sample data and related information, including analyses of surficial-sediment grab samples, locations and images of sea-floor photography, survey lines along which sea-floor video was collected, and a classification of benthic biota observed in sea-floor photographs and based on the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS). These sample data and analyses information are used to verify interpretations of geophysical data and are an essential part of geologic maps of the sea floor. These data also provide a valuable inventory of benthic habitat and resources. Geographic information system (GIS) data, maps, and interpretations, produced through the USGS and CZM mapping cooperative, are intended to aid efforts to manage coastal and marine resources and to provide baseline information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change.

  19. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Surficial Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This tabular data set represents the area of surficial geology types in square meters compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs,...

  20. Surficial Geologic Map of the Southern Two-Thirds of the Woodbury Quadrangle, Vermont, Washington County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG2015-3 Springston, G, Thomas, E, and Kim, J, 2015,�Surficial Geologic Map of the Southern Two-Thirds of the Woodbury Quadrangle, Vermont,...

  1. Surficial geology within the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, Sioux County, North Dakota, and Corson County, South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains information about the surficial geology for the area within the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, Sioux County, North Dakota, and Corson...

  2. A study of radionuclides, metals and stable lead isotope ratios in sediments and soils in the vicinity of natural U-mineralisation areas in the Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frostick, A., E-mail: Alison.Frostick@cdu.edu.au [Charles Darwin University, School of Environment and Life Sciences, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Bollhoefer, A. [ERISS, GPO Box 461, Darwin NT 0801 (Australia); Parry, D. [AIMS, PO Box 41775, Casuarina NT 0811 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Australian guidelines recommend that tailings materials from uranium (U) mining and milling be contained without any detrimental impact on the environment for at least 1000 years. Natural analogue sites are being investigated to determine if they can provide data on the rates of natural erosion processes which occur over these timescales, for input into predictive geomorphic computer models. This paper presents radionuclide, metal and stable lead (Pb) isotope data from sediment cores and surface soils in the vicinity of two mineralised areas in the Alligator Rivers Region. Surface scrapes from the natural Anomaly no. 2, south of the Ranger mineral lease, exhibit radiogenic {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb ratios, and elevated U and metal concentrations typical for a near surface U anomaly. In contrast, samples taken from the Koongarra mineral lease (KML) show radionuclide activity and metal concentrations similar to natural areas elsewhere in the Alligator Rivers Region and Pb isotope ratios are closer to present day average crustal ratios (PDAC), as the orebodies at KML are covered by surficial sand. A sediment core collected from Anbangbang Billabong, downstream of KML, exhibits small variations in Pb isotope ratios that indicate that approximately 1% of the upper sediments in the sediment core may be derived from material originating from the U anomaly at Koongarra.

  3. A Moderate D/H Ratio for a Surficial Water Reservoir on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Tomohiro; Alexander, C. M. O. D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Martian surface morphology implies that Mars was once warm enough to maintain persistent liquid water on its surface and that water played a significant role in the formation of weathered/altered terrains [e.g., 1, 2, 3]. Volatiles exhaled by volcanic activity would have been the dominant greenhouse gases and would have significantly affected the Martian climate. The enrichment of some volatile elements in the atmosphere, which would have dissolved in surface water, could also have influenced water chemistry (e.g., acidity) and played a significant role in weathering and aqueous alteration processes. While much of this picture is qualitative, Martian meteorites contain records of major Martian volatile reservoirs. This study characterizes Martian surficial volatile reservoirs based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of volatile abundances and H-isotopes of glassy phases (groundmass glass [GG] and impact melt [IM]) in Martian basalts (shergottites). Although these meteorites are of igneous origin, some glassy phases underwent impact-induced modification that trapped surficial and atmospheric volatile components [4, 5]; e.g., inert gases contained in IMs from EETA79001 (EETA79) match the relative abundances of modern Martian atmosphere [6]. Analyses of these glassy phases demonstrate that surficial volatile reservoirs have distinct D/H ratios from their magmatic volatiles.

  4. Assessment of metal concentrations in sediment samples from Billings Reservoir, Rio Grande tributary, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Avaliacao da concentracao de metais em amostras de sedimento do Reservatorio Billings, Braco Rio Grande, Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostelmann, Eleine

    2006-07-01

    The present study chemically characterized sediment samples from the Billings reservoir, Rio Grande tributary, in the Metropolitan region of Sao Paulo, by determining metal concentration and other elements of interest. The chosen chemical parameters for this characterization were Aluminum, Arsenic, Barium, Cadmium, Copper, Chromium, Iron, Lead, Manganese, Mercury, Nickel, Selenium and Zinco. These parameters are also used in the water quality index, with the exception of Selenium. The concentrations were determined through different analytical techniques such as atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS, GFAAS and CVAAS), optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and neutron activation analysis. These analytical methodologies were assessed for precision, accuracy and detection and/or quantification limits for the sediment elements in question. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique for each element and its concentration were also discussed. From these assessments the most adequate technique was selected for the routine analysis of sediment samples for each element concentration determination. This assessment verified also that digestion in a closed microwave system with nitric acid is efficient for the evaluation of extracted metals of environmental interest. The analytical techniques chosen were equally efficient for metals determination. In the case of Cd and Pb, the FAAS technique was selected due to better results than ICP OES, as it does not present matrix interference. The concentration values obtained for metals As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) TEL and PEL values. (author)

  5. Slurry sampling of sediments and coals for the determination of Sn by HG-GF AAS with retention in the graphite tube treated with Th or W as permanent modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Mariana Antunes; Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Curtius, Adilson Jose [Departamento de Quimica da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2004-10-01

    A method for the determination of Sn in slurry samples of sediment and coal by hydride generation graphite furnace electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-GF AAS) is proposed. The slurries were prepared by mixing the ground sample (particle size {<=}50 {mu}m) with 2.0 mol L{sup -1} HCl for the sediment samples or with 2.0 mol L{sup -1} HCl+1.0% v/v HF in a saturated boric acid medium for the coal samples. The slurry was placed in an ultrasonic bath for 30 min, before and after standing for 24 h, with occasional manual stirring. The graphite tube was treated with 0.5 mg of Th or W as a permanent modifier. Sn determination was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry at the optimized retention temperatures of 450 and 300 C for Th and W treatment, respectively. With this coupling, kinetic interference in the formation of the hydrides is avoided, and excellent detection limits can be obtained by using peak height. For the chemical vapor generation device, an optimized volume of 2 mL of sample slurry and an optimized NaBH{sub 4} concentration of 5% m/v were employed. The vapor produced was transported and retained on the graphite tube surface, which was further heated for Sn atomization. The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing five certified sediments and three coals. By using the external calibration against aqueous standard solutions, the results obtained were in agreement with the certified values only for the sediment samples. For the coal samples, an addition calibration curve, obtained for one certified coal, was necessary to achieve accurate results. The obtained limits of detection were 0.03 {mu}g g{sup -1} for sediment and 0.09 {mu}g g{sup -1} for coal with Th as permanent modifier. The relative standard deviations were lower than 15%, demonstrating an adequate precision for slurry analysis. Sediment and coal samples from Santa Catarina, Brazil, were also analyzed. (orig.)

  6. Surficial geologic map of the Norton-Manomet-Westport-Sconticut Neck 23-quadrangle area in southeast Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Byron D.; Stone, Janet R.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, Mary L.; Kincare, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The surficial geologic map shows the distribution of nonlithified earth materials at land surface in an area of 23 7.5-minute quadrangles (919 mi2 total) in southeastern Massachusetts. Across Massachusetts, these materials range from a few feet to more than 500 ft in thickness. They overlie bedrock, which crops out in upland hills and as resistant ledges in valley areas. The geologic map differentiates surficial materials of Quaternary age on the basis of their lithologic characteristics (such as grain size and sedimentary structures), constructional geomorphic features, stratigraphic relationships, and age. Surficial materials also are known in engineering classifications as unconsolidated soils, which include coarse-grained soils, fine-grained soils, and organic fine-grained soils. Surficial materials underlie and are the parent materials of modern pedogenic soils, which have developed in them at the land surface. Surficial earth materials significantly affect human use of the land, and an accurate description of their distribution is particularly important for assessing water resources, construction aggregate resources, and earth-surface hazards, and for making land-use decisions. This work is part of a comprehensive study to produce a statewide digital map of the surficial geology at a 1:24,000-scale level of accuracy. This report includes explanatory text (PDF), quadrangle maps at 1:24,000 scale (PDF files), GIS data layers (ArcGIS shapefiles), metadata for the GIS layers, scanned topographic base maps (TIF), and a readme.txt file.

  7. Generalized surficial geologic map of the Fort Irwin area, San Bernadino: Chapter B in Geology and geophysics applied to groundwater hydrology at Fort Irwin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David M.; Menges, Christopher M.; Lidke, David J.; Buesch, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The geology and landscape of the Fort Irwin area, typical of many parts of the Mojave Desert, consist of rugged mountains separated by broad alluviated valleys that form the main coarse-resolution features of the geologic map. Crystalline and sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic and older in age, form most of the mountains with lesser accumulations of Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. In detail, the area exhibits a fairly complex distribution of surficial deposits resulting from diverse rock sources and geomorphology that has been driven by topographic changes caused by recent and active faulting. Depositional environments span those typical of the Mojave Desert: alluvial fans on broad piedmonts, major intermittent streams along valley floors, eolian sand dunes and sheets, and playas in closed valleys that lack through-going washes. Erosional environments include rocky mountains, smooth gently sloping pediments, and badlands in readily eroded sediment. All parts of the landscape, from regional distribution of mountains, valleys, and faults to details of degree of soil development in surface materials, are portrayed by the surficial geologic map. Many of these attributes govern infiltration and recharge, and the surface distribution of permeable rock units such as Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks provides a basis for evaluating potential groundwater storage. Quaternary faults are widespread in the Fort Irwin area and include sinistral, east-striking faults that characterize the central swath of the area and the contrasting dextral, northwest-striking faults that border the east and west margins. Bedrock distribution and thickness of valley-fill deposits are controlled by modern and past faulting, and faults on the map help to identify targets for groundwater exploration.

  8. Properties of samples containing natural gas hydrate from the JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, determined using Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    As part of an ongoing laboratory study, preliminary acoustic, strength, and hydraulic conductivity results are presented from a suite of tests conducted on four natural-gas-hydrate-containing samples from the Mackenzie Delta JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well. The gas hydrate samples were preserved in pressure vessels during transport from the Northwest Territories to Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where multistep tests were performed using GHASTLI (Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument), which recreates pressure and temperature conditions that are stable for gas hydrate. Properties and changes in sediment behaviour were measured before, during, and after controlled gas hydrate dissociation. Significant amounts of gas hydrate occupied the sample pores and substantially increased acoustic velocity and shear strength.

  9. Assessment of metal and trace element contamination in water, sediment, plants, macroinvertebrates, and fish in Tavasci Marsh, Tuzigoot National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Brasher, Anne M.D.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Tavasci Marsh is a large freshwater marsh within the Tuzigoot National Monument in central Arizona. It is the largest freshwater marsh in Arizona that is unconnected to the Colorado River and is designated as an Important Bird Area by the Audubon Society. The marsh has been altered significantly by previous land use and the monument’s managers are evaluating the restoration of the marsh. In light of historical mining activities located near the marsh from the first half of the 20th century, evaluations of water, sediment, plant, and aquatic biota in the marsh were conducted. The evaluations were focused on nine metals and trace elements commonly associated with mining and other anthropogenic activities (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) together with isotopic analyses to understand the presence, sources and timing of water and sediment contaminants to the marsh and the occurrence in aquatic plants, dragonfly larvae, and fish. Results of water analyses indicate that there were two distinct sources of water contributing to the marsh during the study: one from older high elevation recharge entering the marsh at Shea Spring (as well as a number of unnamed seeps and springs on the northeastern edge of the marsh) and the other from younger low elevation recharge or from Pecks Lake. Water concentrations for arsenic exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standard of 10 μg/L at all sampling sites. Surface waters at Tavasci Marsh may contain conditions favorable for methylmercury production. All surficial and core sediment samples exceeded or were within sample concentration variability of at least one threshold sediment quality guideline for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Several sediment sites were also above or were within sample concentration variability of severe or probable effect sediment quality guidelines for As, Cd, and Cu. Three sediment cores collected in the marsh have greater metal and trace element concentrations

  10. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes in surficial materials at the Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwestern Alaska: can the mineralizing fingerprint be detected through cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Forni, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit is covered by tundra and glacigenic sediments. Pb-Sr-Nd measurements were done on sediments and soils to establish baseline conditions prior to the onset of mining operations and contribute to the development of exploration methods for concealed base metal deposits of this type. Pebble rocks have a moderate range for 206Pb/204Pb = 18.574 to 18.874, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.484 to 15.526, and 208,Pb/204Pb = 38.053 to 38.266. Mineralized granodiorite shows a modest spread in 87Sr/86Sr (0.704354–0.707621) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512639–0.512750). Age-corrected (89 Ma) values for the granodiorite yield relatively unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 207Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, and positive values of ɛNd (1.00–4.52) that attest to a major contribution of mantle-derived source rocks. Pond sediments and soils have similar Pb isotope signatures and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values that resemble the mineralized granodiorites. Glacial events have obscured the recognition of isotope signatures of mineralized rocks in the sediments and soils. Baseline radiogenic isotope compositions, prior to the onset of mining operations, reflect natural erosion, transport and deposition of heterogeneous till sheets that included debris from barren rocks, mineralized granodiorite and sulfides from the Pebble deposit, and other country rocks that pre- and postdate the mineralization events. Isotopic variations suggest that natural weathering of the deposit is generally reflected in these surficial materials. The isotope data provide geochemical constraints to glimpse through the extensive cover and together with other geochemical observations provide a vector to concealed mineralized rocks genetically linked with the Pebble deposit.

  11. High-resolution measurement and mapping of tungstate in waters, soils and sediments using the low-disturbance DGT sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Dong-Xing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Williams, Paul N. [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Xu, Hua-Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Gang [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Luo, Jun, E-mail: esluojun@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ma, Lena Q. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Two high-resolution diffusive gradients in thin-films samplers were characterized. • For the first time DGT was applied to study the bioavailability of W in soils. • 1D and 2D high resolution profiling of W fluxes across the SWI were obtained. • The apparent diffusion W fluxes across two micro-interfaces were calculated. - Abstract: Increasing tungsten (W) use for industrial and military applications has resulted in greater W discharge into natural waters, soils and sediments. Risk modeling of W transport and fate in the environment relies on measurement of the release/mobilization flux of W in the bulk media and the interfaces between matrix compartments. Diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) is a promising passive sampling technique to acquire such information. DGT devices equipped with the newly developed high-resolution binding gels (precipitated zirconia, PZ, or ferrihydrite, PF, gels) or classic/conventional ferrihydrite slurry gel were comprehensively assessed for measuring W in waters. {sup Ferrihydrite}DGT can measure W at various ionic strengths (0.001–0.5 mol L{sup −1} NaNO{sub 3}) and pH (4–8), while {sup PZ}DGT can operate across slightly wider environmental conditions. The three DGT configurations gave comparable results for soil W measurement, showing that typically W resupply is relatively poorly sustained. 1D and 2D high-resolution W profiling across sediment—water and hotspot—bulk media interfaces from Lake Taihu were obtained using {sup PZ}DGT coupled with laser ablation ICP–MS measurement, and the apparent diffusion fluxes across the interfaces were calculated using a numerical model.

  12. Distribution, enrichment, and potential toxicity of trace metals in the surface sediments of Sundarban mangrove ecosystem, Bangladesh: a baseline study before Sundarban oil spill of December, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok; Ramanathan, Al; Prasad, M B K; Datta, Dilip; Kumar, Manoj; Sappal, Swati Mohan

    2016-05-01

    The distribution, enrichment, and ecotoxicity potential of Bangladesh part of Sundarban mangrove was investigated for eight trace metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn) using sediment quality assessment indices. The average concentration of trace metals in the sediments exceeded the crustal abundance suggesting sources other than natural in origin. Additionally, the trace metals profile may be a reflection of socio-economic development in the vicinity of Sundarban which further attributes trace metals abundance to the anthropogenic inputs. A total of eleven surficial sediment samples were collected along a vertical transect along the freshwater-saline water gradient. The sediment samples were digested using EPA 3051 method and were analyzed on ICP-MS. Geo-accumulation index suggests moderately polluted sediment quality with respect to Ni and As and background concentrations for Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, As, and Cd. Contamination factor analysis suggested low contamination by Zn, Cr, Co, and Cd, moderate by Fe, Mn, Cu, and Pb while Ni and As show considerable and high contamination, respectively. Enrichment factors for Ni, Pb, and As suggests high contamination from either biota or anthropogenic inputs besides natural enrichment. As per the three sediment quality guidelines, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni, Co, and As would be more of a concern with respect to ecotoxicological risk in the Sundarban mangroves. The correlation between various physiochemical variables and trace metals suggested significant role of fine grained particles (clay) in trace metal distribution whereas owing to low organic carbon content in the region the organic complexation may not be playing significant role in trace metal distribution in the Sundarban mangroves.

  13. Microbial methylation of mercury in upper Wisconsin river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, S.M.; Winfrey, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The microbial methylation of Hg was studied in water and sediments from the Upper Wisconsin River by quantifying the methylation of radioactive Hg(II) (/sup 203/Hg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/). Methylation activity was near detection limits in the water, highest in surface sediments (0 to 4 cm), and decreased with increasing sediment depth. Methylation had a temperature optimum of 35/sup 0/C. Organically enriched sediments exhibited higher methylation activity than less eutrophic sediments. Methylation activity in sediments was stimulated by the addition of peptone but not by glucose or starch. Oxygenation of sediments inhibited methylation activity. A summertime peak in methylation activity, observed in water, floc, and sediments, was related to factors other than temperature. More than 98% of the added /sup 203/Hg(II) was bound to sediments within 4 hr of inoculation, while more than 3% was methylated during a 10-day incubation. As much as 7% of the added /sup 203/Hg(II) was methylated in other experiments, suggesting that bound Hg is available for methylation. These data suggest that organic-rich surficial sediments in the Upper Wisconsin River have the potential to produce significant amounts of toxic methylmercury during late summer months.

  14. Evaluation of a protocol for the quantification of black carbon in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Örjan; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Kukulska, Zofia; Andersson, Mette; Largeau, Claude; Rouzaud, Jean-NoëL.; Reddy, Christopher M.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2001-12-01

    Formation of highly condensed black carbon (BC) from vegetation fires and wood fuel combustion presumably transfers otherwise rapidly cycling carbon from the atmosphere-biosphere cycle into a much slower cycling geological form. Recently reported BC fractions of total organic carbon (TOC) in surficial marine sediments span a wide range (2-90%), leaving it presently unclear whether this variation reflects natural processes or is largely due to method differences. In order to elucidate the importance of BC to carbon burial the specificity of applied methods needs to be constrained. Here the operating range and applicability of a commonly used chemothermal oxidation (CTO) method is evaluated using putative BC standards, potentially interfering substances, and natural matrix standards. Test results confirm the applicability of the method to marine sediments. Integrity tests with model substrates suggest applicability to low-carbon soils but only with a lower specificity to seawater particulate matter. The BC content of marine sediment samples in a set of studies employing the CTO method proved to be consistent with associated geochemical information. The radiocarbon content of the BC isolate in an environmental matrix standard was shown to be similar to the radiocarbon signature of pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), here serving as molecular markers of combustion (fraction modern fM of BC was 0.065 ± 0.014 and of PAHs 0.056 ± 0.020), while being clearly distinct from the radiocarbon content of the bulk TOC (fM = 0.61 ± 0.08). Urgent questions such as the global accumulation rate of black carbon in soils and sediments may prove approachable with the chemothermal oxidation technique of BC quantification.

  15. Late Quaternary eolian dust in surficial deposits of a Colorado Plateau grassland: Controls on distribution and ecologic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.; Neff, J.C.; Goldstein, H.; Yount, J.

    2006-01-01

    in these surficial deposits during the late Quaternary are important to modern ecosystem dynamics because some plants today utilize nutrients deposited as long ago as about 12-15 ky and because variations in fine-grained (silt) sediment, including eolian dust, influence soil-moisture capacity.

  16. Map of Western Copper River Basin, Alaska, Showing Lake Sediments and Shorelines, Glacial Moraines, and Location of Stratigraphic Sections and Radiocarbon-Dated Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John R.; Galloway, John P.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to make available basic data on radiocarbon dating of 61 organic samples from 40 locations in the western Copper River Basin and adjacent uplands and in the uppermost Matanuska River Valley. The former distribution of late Quaternary glacial lakes and of glaciers as mapped from field work and photo interpretation is provided as background for interpretation of the radiocarbon dates and are the basic data needed for construction of the late Quaternary chronology. The glacial boundaries, formed and expressed by moraines, ice-contact margins, marginal channels, deltas, and other features, are obscured by a drape of glaciolacustrine deposits in a series of glacial lakes. The highest lake, represented by bottom sediments as high as 914 m to 975 m above sea level, extends from Fog Lakes lowland on Susitna River upstream into the northwestern part of the Copper River Basin (the part now draining to Susitna River) where it apparently was held in by an ice border. It was apparently dammed by ice from the Mt. McKinley area, by Talkeetna G1acier, and may have had a temporary drainage threshold at the headwaters of Chunilna Creek. No shorelines have been noted within the map area, although Nichols and Yehle (1961) reported shorelines within the 914-975 m range in the Denali area to the north of that mapped. Recent work by geologic consultants for the Susitna Hydroelectric Project has confirmed the early inferences (Karlstrom, 1964) about the existence of a lake in the Susitna canyon, based originally on drilling by the Bureau of Reclamation about 35 years ago. According to dating of deposits at Tyone Bluff (map locations 0, P), Thorson and others (1981) concluded that a late Wisconsin advance of the glaciers between 11,535 and 21,730 years ago was followed by a brief interval of lacustrine sedimentation, and was preceded by a long period of lake deposition broken by a lowering of the lake between 32,000 and about 25,000 years ago. An alternate

  17. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of gas hydrate- and pore-water samples obtained from gas hydrate-bearing sediment cores retrieved from a mud volcano in the Kukuy Canyon, Lake Baikal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, H.; Hachikubo, A.; Krylov, A.; Sakagami, H.; Ohashi, M.; Bai, J.; Kataoka, S.; Yamashita, S.; Takahashi, N.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan); Khlystov, O.; Zemskaya, T.; Grachev, M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk (Russian Federation). Limnological Inst.

    2008-07-01

    This paper provided details of a method developed to obtain gas hydrate water samples from a mud volcano in Lake Baikal, Russia. Chemical and isotopic analyses were conducted to examine the hydrate and pore water samples as well as to evaluate the original water involved in shallow gas hydrate accumulations in the region. Lake sediment core samples were retrieved from the bottom of the lake with gravity corers. A squeezer was used to take pore water samples from the sediments. Hydrate samples were taken from a gas hydrate placed on a polyethylene funnel. Dissolved hydrate water was filtered through a membrane into bottles. Both samples were kept under chilled or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Ion chromatography was used to determine concentrations of anions and hydrogen carbonate ions. Sodium and magnesium concentrations were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. An absorption spectrometer was used to determine potassium and calcium concentrations, and a mass spectrometer was used to analyze stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Results of the study suggested that the gas dissolved in pore water and adsorbed on the surfaces of sediment particles was not the original gas from the hydrates retrieved at the mud volcano. Original gas hydrate-forming fluids were chemically different from the pore- and lake-water samples. The oxygen isotopic composition of the gas hydrate water samples correlated well with hydrogen values. It was concluded that ascending fluid and water delivered the gas into the gas stability zone, and is the main gas hydrate-forming fluid in the area of study. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Surficial and vertical distribution of heavy metals in different estuary wetlands in the Pearl river, South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Honggang; Cui, Baoshan [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Kejiang [Xinjiang Research Center of Water and Wastewater Treatment, Xinjiang Deland Co., LTD., Urumqi (China)

    2012-10-15

    A total of 87 soil profiles sampled from five types of wetlands in the Pearl River estuary were analyzed to investigate the surficial and vertical distributions of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn). The results show that wetlands directly connected with rivers (e.g., riparian wetlands, estuarine wetlands, and mangrove wetlands) has much higher metal concentrations than those indirectly connected with rivers (e.g., pond wetlands and reclaimed wetlands). The river water is the major pollution source for all investigated heavy metals. The vertical distribution of heavy metals can be classified into three patterns: (i) linear distribution pattern. The concentration of heavy metals gradually decreases with an increase in soil depth (for riparian and estuarine wetlands); (ii) irregular and stable pattern (for pond and reclaimed wetlands); and (iii) middle enrichment pattern (for mangrove wetlands). In addition to river-borne inputs, a variety of vegetation composition, hydraulic conditions, and human activities also contribute to the variation in distribution of heavy metals in different wetlands. Soil properties (e.g., particle size, pH, salinity, and SOM) also affect the distribution of trace metals in each soil layer. The major pollution source of heavy metals is industrial wastewater. Other sources include agriculture and domestic premises, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides a sound basis for the risk assessment of heavy metals in the studied wetlands and for wetland conservation in general. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Impact of dam construction on river banks evolution and sediment dynamics. A case study from the Po River (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, V.; Pellegrini, C.; Crose, L.; Del Bianco, F.; Mercorella, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers draining densely populated landscapes are extremely impacted by modern human engineering: armored beds, artificial levees and dams modified natural fluvial dynamics, and consequently, the evolution of alluvial plains, deltas and coastal environments. Dams, in particular, segmented the longitudinal continuity of the river and reduced (or even interrupted) the export of sediment toward the sea. Here we investigate the impact of the Isola Serafini dam on the upstream portion of the Po River (Italy) influenced by backwater, by using an integrated approach of aerial and satellite images, longitudinal cross-sections, grain size analysis, backscatter data and multibeam bathymetry. The analysis of aerial photographs, acquired every 10 yr since the dam construction in 1960, and of longitudinal cross-sections, allows understanding how the river adjusts its profile in response to the backwater and quantifying areas of net river banks erosion and deposition in meanders. The drowning of the reaches influenced by backwater reduced the progradation of point bars and promoted the deposition of fine grained sediments, as highlighted by grain size analysis on surficial sediment sampled across and along the river course. Calibrated back-scatter data with grain-size distributions of two selected meanders, under the backwater effect and beyond, show how sands are progressively replaced by fine-grained sediments in the meander belt and in the river axis, mainly reflecting the reduction of flow velocity, inferred also by river bed roughness. The understanding of river and sediment dynamics under the influence of backwater due to dam construction is useful when studying pristine systems in which natural backwater affects their evolution, as in the case of the formation of standing water bodies during the drowning of an incised valley.

  20. Ultrasound-assisted leaching-dispersive solid-phase extraction followed by liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediment samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Ariel R; Lana, Nerina B; Martinez, Luis D; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2010-06-30

    Ultrasound-assisted leaching-dispersive solid-phase extraction followed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (USAL-DSPE-DLLME) technique has been developed as a new analytical approach for extracting, cleaning up and preconcentrating polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from sediment samples prior gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) analysis. In the first place, PBDEs were leached from sediment samples by using acetone. This extract was cleaned-up by DSPE using activated silica gel as sorbent material. After clean-up, PBDEs were preconcentrated by using DLLME technique. Thus, 1 mL acetone extract (disperser solvent) and 60 microL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) were added to 5 mL ultrapure water and a DLLME technique was applied. Several variables that govern the proposed technique were studied and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the method detection limits (MDLs) of PBDEs calculated as three times the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) were within the range 0.02-0.06 ng g(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicates were or =0.9991. Validation of the methodology was carried out by standard addition method at tw