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Sample records for surfactant protein-b 121ins2

  1. Surfactant protein-B 121ins2 heterozygosity, reduced pulmonary function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant protein-B gene...

  2. Surfactant protein-B 121ins2 heterozygosity, reduced pulmonary function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant protein-B gen....... Individuals heterozygous for this mutation have partial absence of surfactant protein-B and could be at risk of lung disease when exposed to additional risk factors for impaired surfactant function such as tobacco smoking....

  3. Surfactant Protein-B 121ins2 Heterozygosity, Reduced Pulmonary Function and COPD in Smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    2 mutation have reduced lung function and increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among smokers. METHODS: We genotyped 47,600 individuals from the adult Danish general population and recorded smoking habits, spirometry and hospital admissions due to COPD. The study.......2-4.8) for spirometry defined COPD and of 2.2(1.0-5.1) for hospitalization due to COPD. Among never smokers, 121ins2 heterozygotes did not differ from wildtypes in lung function or risk of COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Surfactant protein-B 121ins2 heterozygosity is associated with reduced lung function and increased risk for COPD...... that the effect of genotype differ by smoking status. Among smokers, 121ins2 heterozygotes had 9% reduced FEV1%predicted(p=0.0008), 6% reduced FVC%predicted(p=0.01) and 6% reduced FEV1/FVC(p=0.00007), compared with wildtypes. Also among smokers, 121ins2 heterozygotes had odds ratios of 2.4(95%CI 1...

  4. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...

  5. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and Surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients

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    Rizzi Sabina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. Objectives To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls. Methods 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. Results 1 Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2 In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p Conclusions 1 Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2 In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  7. Surface film formation in vitro by infant and therapeutic surfactants: role of surfactant protein B.

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    Danhaive, Olivier; Chapin, Cheryl; Horneman, Hart; Cogo, Paola E; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant provides an alveolar surface-active film that is critical for normal lung function. Our objective was to determine in vitro film formation properties of therapeutic and infant surfactants and the influence of surfactant protein (SP)-B content. We used a multiwell fluorescent assay measuring maximum phospholipid surface accumulation (Max), phospholipid concentration required for half-maximal film formation (½Max), and time for maximal accumulation (tMax). Among five therapeutic surfactants, calfactant (highest SP-B content) had film formation values similar to natural surfactant, and addition of SP-B to beractant (lowest SP-B) normalized its Max value. Addition of budesonide to calfactant did not adversely affect film formation. In tracheal aspirates of preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, SP-B content correlated with ½Max and tMax values, and SP-B supplementation of SP-B-deficient infant surfactant restored normal film formation. Reconstitution of normal surfactant indicated a role for both SP-B and SP-C in film formation. Film formation in vitro differs among therapeutic surfactants and is highly dependent on SP-B content in infant surfactant. The results support a critical role of SP-B for promoting surface film formation.

  8. Surfactant protein B inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids

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    Grier, Bonnie L.; Waite, B. Moseley; Veldhuizen, Ruud A.; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Seeds, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids (PL) by secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) contributes to surfactant damage in inflammatory airway diseases such as acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We and others have reported that each sPLA2 exhibits specificity in hydrolyzing different PLs in pulmonary surfactant and that the presence of hydrophilic surfactant protein A (SP-A) alters sPLA2-mediated hydrolysis. This report tests the hypothesis that hydrophobic SP-B also inhibits sPLA2-mediated surfactant hydrolysis. Three surfactant preparations were used containing varied amounts of SP-B and radiolabeled tracers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (PG): 1) washed ovine surfactant (OS) (pre- and postorganic extraction) compared with Survanta (protein poor), 2) Survanta supplemented with purified bovine SP-B (1–5%, wt/wt), and 3) a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (DPPC:POPC:POPG, 40:40:20) prepared as vesicles and monomolecular films in the presence or absence of SP-B. Hydrolysis of PG and PC by Group IB sPLA2 (PLA2G1A) was significantly lower in the extracted OS, which contains SP-B, compared with Survanta (P = 0.005), which is SP-B poor. Hydrolysis of PG and PC in nonextracted OS, which contains all SPs, was lower than both Survanta and extracted OS. When Survanta was supplemented with 1% SP-B, PG and PC hydrolysis by PLA2G1B was significantly lower (P hydrolysis by both PLA2G1B and Group IIA sPLA2 (PLA2G2A). In films, PLA2G1B hydrolyzed surfactant PL monolayers at surface pressures ≤30 mN/m (P hydrolysis can occur. These results suggest the hydrophobic SP, SP-B, protects alveolar surfactant PL from hydrolysis mediated by multiple sPLA2 in both vesicles (alveolar subphase) and monomolecular films (air-liquid interface). PMID:22037357

  9. Design of Surfactant Protein B Peptide Mimics Based on the Saposin Fold for Synthetic Lung Surfactants.

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    Walther, Frans J; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-B is a 79-residue polypeptide crucial for the biophysical and physiological function of endogenous lung surfactant. SP-B is a member of the Saposin or Saposin-like proteins (SAPLIP) family of proteins that share an overall three-dimensional folding pattern based on secondary structures and disulfide connectivity and exhibit a wide diversity of biological functions. Here we review the synthesis, molecular biophysics and activity of synthetic analogs of Saposin proteins designed to mimic those interactions of the parent proteins with lipids that enhance interfacial activity. Saposin proteins generally interact with target lipids as either monomers or multimers via well-defined amphipathic helices, flexible hinge domains, and insertion sequences. Based on the known 3D-structural motif for the Saposin family, we show how bioengineering techniques may be used to develop minimal peptide constructs that maintain desirable structural properties and activities in biomedical applications. One important application is the molecular design, synthesis and activity of Saposin mimics based on the SP-B structure. Synthetic lung surfactants containing active SP-B analogs may be potentially useful in treating diseases of surfactant deficiency or dysfunction including the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  10. Biophysical mimicry of lung surfactant protein B by random nylon-3 copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, Michelle T; Mowery, Brendan P; Czyzewski, Ann M; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Barron, Annelise E

    2010-06-16

    Non-natural oligomers have recently shown promise as functional analogues of lung surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C), two helical and amphiphilic proteins that are critical for normal respiration. The generation of non-natural mimics of SP-B and SP-C has previously been restricted to step-by-step, sequence-specific synthesis, which results in discrete oligomers that are intended to manifest specific structural attributes. Here we present an alternative approach to SP-B mimicry that is based on sequence-random copolymers containing cationic and lipophilic subunits. These materials, members of the nylon-3 family, are prepared by ring-opening polymerization of beta-lactams. The best of the nylon-3 polymers display promising in vitro surfactant activities in a mixed lipid film. Pulsating bubble surfactometry data indicate that films containing the most surface-active polymers attain adsorptive and dynamic-cycling properties that surpass those of discrete peptides intended to mimic SP-B. Attachment of an N-terminal octadecanoyl unit to the nylon-3 copolymers, inspired by the post-translational modifications found in SP-C, affords further improvements by reducing the percent surface area compression to reach low minimum surface tension. Cytotoxic effects of the copolymers are diminished relative to that of an SP-B-derived peptide and a peptoid-based mimic. The current study provides evidence that sequence-random copolymers can mimic the in vitro surface-active behavior of lung surfactant proteins in a mixed lipid film. These findings raise the possibility that random copolymers might be useful for developing a lung surfactant replacement, which is an attractive prospect given that such polymers are easier to prepare than are sequence-specific oligomers.

  11. HIV Infection and Circulating Levels of Prosurfactant Protein B and Surfactant Protein D.

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    Shiels, Meredith S; Kirk, Gregory D; Drummond, M Bradley; Dhillon, Dilsher; Hanash, Samir M; Taguchi, Ayumu; Engels, Eric A

    2018-01-17

    Prosurfactant protein B (pro-SFTPB) and surfactant protein D (SFTPD) are markers of lung inflammation and damage. We estimated geometric mean pro-SFTPB and SFTPD levels in 500 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 300 HIV-uninfected injection drug users, adjusting for smoking and other covariates. Pro-SFTPB levels were significantly higher among people with HIV (PWH) (adjusted geometric mean, 21.4 vs 18.1 ng/mL; P = .03), and were higher with lower CD4 counts (P trend = .001), higher HIV RNA (P trend = .05), and without highly active antiretroviral therapy (P = .03). These associations were not observed for SFTPD. Serum levels of pro-SFTPB are elevated among PWH and are associated with immunosuppression and uncontrolled viremia. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Depth profiles of pulmonary surfactant protein B in phosphatidylcholine bilayers, studied by fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, A; Casals, C; Plasencia, I

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SP-B) has been isolated from porcine lungs and reconstituted in bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) to characterize the extent of insertion of the protein into phospholipid bilayers. The parameters...

  13. Association of surfactant protein B gene with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Wang, B; Zhou, H-X; Liang, B-M; Chen, H; Ma, C-L; Xiao, J; Deng, J; Yan, L; Chen, Y-P; Chen, C-L; Chen, F; Ou, X-M; Feng, Y-L

    2014-11-01

    Genetic predisposition, in addition to smoking, is known to play a key role in susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several candidate genes have been proposed for COPD, including surfactant protein B (SFTPB). However, large studies in populations with different ethnic backgrounds and environments are required to clarify the role of SFTPB in COPD. We investigated the association of SFTPB polymorphisms with COPD susceptibility and lung function in a Chinese Han population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SFTPB gene were genotyped in 680 COPD patients and 687 controls. Allele frequencies and genotype distributions were compared between cases and controls and the potential relationships between these SNPs and lung function were investigated. Associations between haplotypes and COPD susceptibility were also assessed. The SFTPB exon polymorphism rs1130866 significantly protected subjects from COPD (adjusted P = 0.004) and was associated with an increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) (adjusted P = 0.014). SFTPB variants are associated with COPD susceptibility and lung function in the Chinese Han population.

  14. Developmental and Genetic Regulation of Human Surfactant Protein B in vivo

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    Hamvas, Aaron; Heins, Hillary B.; Guttentag, Susan H.; Wegner, Daniel J.; Trusgnich, Michelle A.; Bennet, Kate W.; Yang, Ping; Carlson, Christopher S.; An, Ping; Cole, F. Sessions

    2009-01-01

    Background Genetic and developmental disruption of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression causes neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Objectives: To assess developmental and genetic regulation of SP-B expression in vivo. Methods To evaluate in vivo developmental regulation of SP-B, we used immunoblotting to compare frequency of detection of mature and pro-SP-B peptides in developmentally distinct cohorts: 24 amniotic fluid samples, unfractionated tracheal aspirates from 101 infants ≥34 weeks’ gestation with (75) and without (26) neonatal RDS, and 6 nonsmoking adults. To examine genetic regulation, we used univariate and logistic regression analyses to detect associations between common SP-B (SFTPB) genotypes and SP-B peptides in the neonatal RDS cohort. Results We found pro-SP-B peptides in 24/24 amniotic fluid samples and in 100/101 tracheal aspirates from newborn infants but none in bronchoalveolar lavage from normal adults (0/6) (p < 0.001). We detected an association (p = 0.0011) between pro-SP-B peptides (Mr 40 and 42 kDa) and genotype of a nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism at genomic position 1580 that regulates amino-terminus glycosylation. Conclusions Pro-SP-B peptides are more common in developmentally less mature humans. Association of genotype at genomic position 1580 with pro-SP-B peptides (Mr 40 and 42 kDa) suggests genetic regulation of amino terminus glycosylation in vivo. PMID:18776725

  15. Surfactant protein B gene polymorphism in preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome

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    P.P.R. Lyra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is multifactorial and multigenic. Studies have suggested that polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B gene are associated with the pathogenesis of RDS. The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms in preterm babies with and without RDS. We studied 151 neonates: 79 preterm babies without RDS and 72 preterm newborns with RDS. The following four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at -18, C/T at 1580, A/G at 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714. The polymorphisms were detected by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping. The genotypes were determined using PCR-based converted restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The control group consisted of 42 (53% girls and 37 (47% boys. Weight ranged from 1170 to 3260 g and mean gestational age (GA was 33.9 weeks (range: 29 to 35 weeks and 6 days. The RDS group consisted of 31 (43% girls and 41 (57% boys. Weight ranged from 614 to 2410 g and mean GA was 32 weeks (range: 26 to 35 weeks. The logistic regression model showed that GA was the variable that most contributed to the occurrence of RDS. The AG genotype of the A/G polymorphism at position 9306 of the SP-B gene was a protective factor in this population (OR = 0.1681; 95%CI = 0.0426-0.6629. We did not detect differences in the frequencies of the other polymorphisms between the two groups of newborns.

  16. Surface activity of pulmonary surfactant protein B : from biophysical properties to clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemel, Robert Victor

    2002-01-01

    The global aim of our studies was to obtain more information about the mechanisms involved in the action of the hydrophobic surfactant components, with a special attention for SP-B. To reach this goal, many different assays and devices were used, including a pressure driven captive bubble

  17. Critical structural and functional roles for the N-terminal insertion sequence in surfactant protein B analogs.

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    Frans J Walther

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., approximately residues 8-25 and 63-78, confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1-7 attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity.FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary alpha-helix and secondary beta-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR, predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a "saposin-like" fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B.Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of native SP-B.

  18. Depth profiles of pulmonary surfactant protein B in phosphatidylcholine bilayers, studied by fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, A; Casals, C; Plasencia, I

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SP-B) has been isolated from porcine lungs and reconstituted in bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) to characterize the extent of insertion of the protein into phospholipid bilayers. The parameters...... for the interaction of SP-B with DPPC or PC using different reconstitution protocols have been estimated from the changes induced in the fluorescence emission spectrum of the single protein tryptophan. All the different reconstituted SP-B-phospholipid preparations studied had similar Kd values for the binding...... that there are significant differences in the extent of insertion of the protein, depending on the method of reconstitution. SP-B reconstituted from lipid/protein mixtures in organic solvents is inserted more deeply in PC or DPPC bilayers than the protein reconstituted by addition to preformed phospholipid vesicles...

  19. Surfactant protein B polymorphisms, pulmonary function and COPD in 10,231 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Dahl, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The surfactant protein (SP)-B gene may influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and, thus, personalised medicine. We tested whether functional polymorphisms in SP-B (rs1130866 (1580T>C), rs2077079 (-18A>C) and rs3024791 (-384G>A)) associate with reduced lung function and risk of COPD...... polymorphisms. In conclusion, the functional rs1130866, rs2077079 and rs3024791 polymorphisms in the SP-B gene are not associated with reduced lung function or risk of COPD, making it unlikely that these variants will be useful in personalised medicine....

  20. Surfactant protein B polymorphisms are associated with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection, but not with asthma

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    Heinzmann Andrea

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant proteins (SP are important for the innate host defence and essential for a physiological lung function. Several linkage and association studies have investigated the genes coding for different surfactant proteins in the context of pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or respiratory distress syndrome of preterm infants. In this study we tested whether SP-B was in association with two further pulmonary diseases in children, i. e. severe infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus and bronchial asthma. Methods We chose to study five polymorphisms in SP-B: rs2077079 in the promoter region; rs1130866 leading to the amino acid exchange T131I; rs2040349 in intron 8; rs3024801 leading to L176F and rs3024809 resulting in R272H. Statistical analyses made use of the Armitage's trend test for single polymorphisms and FAMHAP and FASTEHPLUS for haplotype analyses. Results The polymorphisms rs3024801 and rs3024809 were not present in our study populations. The three other polymorphisms were common and in tight linkage disequilibrium with each other. They did not show association with bronchial asthma or severe RSV infection in the analyses of single polymorphisms. However, haplotypes analyses revealed association of SP-B with severe RSV infection (p = 0.034. Conclusion Thus our results indicate a possible involvement of SP-B in the genetic predisposition to severe RSV infections in the German population. In order to determine which of the three polymorphisms constituting the haplotypes is responsible for the association, further case control studies on large populations are necessary. Furthermore, functional analysis need to be conducted.

  1. Surfactant protein B and A concentrations are increased in neonatal pneumonia.

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    D'Aronco, Sara; Simonato, Manuela; Vedovelli, Luca; Baritussio, Aldo; Verlato, Giovanna; Nobile, Stefano; Giorgetti, Chiara; Nespeca, Matteo; Carnielli, Virgilio P; Cogo, Paola E

    2015-10-01

    Term newborns with pneumonia show a reduced pulmonary compliance due to multiple and ill-defined factors. Surfactant proteins' (SPs) changes could have a role in the reduced compliance but the matter is still unsettled. The aim of this study was to clarify the meaning of SPs changes during pneumonia in term newborns. In 28 term ventilated newborns, 13 with pneumonia and 15 with no lung disease, we measured SP-B, SP-A, disaturated-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), and total phospholipids (PL) concentrations in tracheal aspirates at intubation and close to extubation. We also measured DSPC kinetics using (U-(13)C-PA)dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine. At baseline, SP-B, expressed as % of PL, was significantly different between the groups, being 3.5-fold higher in pneumonia than controls. Conversely, SP-A did not vary between the groups. At extubation, SP-B and SP-A concentrations had decreased significantly in newborns with pneumonia, while there was no significant change in controls. DSPC t1/2 was significantly shorter in the pneumonia group (11.8 (5.5-19.8) h vs. 26.6 (19.3-63.6) h, P = 0.011). In term newborns with pneumonia, SP-B increases with respect to PL, and DSPC is turned over at a faster rate. Disease's resolution is associated with the restoration of the normal ratio between SP-B and PL.

  2. Differential susceptibility of transgenic mice expressing human surfactant protein B genetic variants to Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced pneumonia.

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    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Rimei; Xu, Yongan; Zuo, Yi Y; Cooney, Robert N; Wang, Guirong

    2016-01-08

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) is essential for lung function. Previous studies have indicated that a SP-B 1580C/T polymorphism (SNP rs1130866) was associated with lung diseases including pneumonia. The SNP causes an altered N-linked glycosylation modification at Asn129 of proSP-B, e.g. the C allele with this glycosylation site but not in the T allele. This study aimed to generate humanized SP-B transgenic mice carrying either SP-B C or T allele without a mouse SP-B background and then examine functional susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia in vivo. A total of 18 transgenic mouse founders were generated by the DNA microinjection method. These founders were back-crossed with SP-B KO mice to eliminate mouse SP-B background. Four founder lines expressing similar SP-B levels to human lung were chosen for further investigation. After intratracheal infection with 50 μl of Pseudomonas aeruginosa solution (1 × 10(6) CFU/mouse) or saline in SP-B-C, SP-B-T mice the mice were sacrificed 24 h post-infection and tissues were harvested. Analysis of surfactant activity revealed differential susceptibility between SP-B-C and SP-B-T mice to bacterial infection, e.g. higher minimum surface tension in infected SP-B-C versus infected SP-B-T mice. These results demonstrate for the first time that human SP-B C allele is more susceptible to bacterial pneumonia than SP-B T allele in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of surfactant protein B polymorphisms of healthy term newborns with preterm newborns having respiratory distress syndrome

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    P.P.R. Lyra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B gene have been associated with the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. The objective of the present study was to compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms between preterm babies with RDS and healthy term newborns. We studied 50 preterm babies with RDS (inclusion criteria - newborns with RDS and gestational age between 28 and 33 weeks and 6 days, and 100 healthy term newborns. Four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at nucleotide -18, C/T at nucleotide 1580, A/G at nucleotide 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714, by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping by cRFLP. The healthy newborns comprised 42 female and 58 male neonates; 39 were white and 61 non-white. The RDS group comprised 21 female and 29 male preterm neonates; 28 were white and 22 non-white. Weight ranged from 640 to 2080 g (mean: 1273 g; mean gestational age was 31 weeks and 2 days (range: 28-33 weeks and 6 days. When white children were analyzed separately, a statistically significant difference in the G/C polymorphism at 8714 was observed between groups (P = 0.028. All other genotype frequencies were similar for both groups when sex and race were analyzed together. Analysis of the SP-B polymorphism G/C at nucleotide 8714 showed that among white neonates the GG genotype was found only in the RDS group at a frequency of 17% and the GC genotype was more frequently found in healthy term newborns. These data demonstrate an association of GG genotype with RDS.

  4. Synergistic Effect of Caffeine and Glucocorticoids on Expression of Surfactant Protein B (SP-B) mRNA

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    Fehrholz, Markus; Bersani, Iliana; Kramer, Boris W.; Speer, Christian P.; Kunzmann, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Administration of glucocorticoids and caffeine is a common therapeutic intervention in the neonatal period, but possible interactions between these substances are still unclear. The present study investigated the effect of caffeine and different glucocorticoids on expression of surfactant protein (SP)-B, crucial for the physiological function of pulmonary surfactant. We measured expression levels of SP-B, various SP-B transcription factors including erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4 (ErbB4) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), as well as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) after administering different doses of glucocorticoids, caffeine, cAMP, or the phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor rolipram in the human airway epithelial cell line NCI-H441. Administration of dexamethasone (1 µM) or caffeine (5 mM) stimulated SP-B mRNA expression with a maximal of 38.8±11.1-fold and 5.2±1.4-fold increase, respectively. Synergistic induction was achieved after co-administration of dexamethasone (1 mM) in combination with caffeine (10 mM) (206±59.7-fold increase, pglucocorticoids and caffeine, achieved by accumulation of intracellular cAMP. This effect was mediated by a caffeine-dependent phosphodiesterase inhibition and by upregulation of both ErbB4 and the GR. These results suggested that caffeine is able to induce the expression of SP-transcription factors and affects the signaling pathways of glucocorticoids, amplifying their effects. Co-administration of caffeine and corticosteroids may therefore be of benefit in surfactant homeostasis. PMID:23272120

  5. Comparative study of the effects of PM1-induced oxidative stress on autophagy and surfactant protein B and C expressions in lung alveolar type II epithelial MLE-12 cells.

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    Bai, Ru; Guan, Longfei; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinxia; Rui, Wei; Zhang, Fang; Ding, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    There is a strong link between smaller air pollution particles and a range of serious health conditions. Thus, there is a need for understanding the impacts of airborne fine particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter of PM1) on lung alveolar epithelial cells. In the present study, mouse lung epithelial type II cell MLE-12 cells were used to examine the intracellular oxidative responses and the surfactant protein expressions after exposure to various concentrations of PM1 collected from an urban site and a steel-factory site (referred as uPM1 and sPM1 hereafter, respectively). Physicochemical characterization of PM1 was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity and autophagy induced by PM1 were assessed by using comprehensive approaches after MLE-12 cells were exposed to different concentrations of PM1 for various times. Expression of surfactant proteins B and C in MLE-12 cells was determined by Western blotting. All of the tested PM1 induced cytotoxicity evidenced by significant decrease of cell viability and increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in the exposed cells compared with the unexposed cells. A similar pattern of increase of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities was also observed. PM1-induced autophagy was evidenced by an increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3) puncta, accumulation of LC3II, and increased levels of beclin1. Data from Western blotting showed significant decrease of surfactant protein B and C expressions. Relatively high concentrations of transition metals, including Fe, Cu and Mn, may be responsible for the higher toxicity of sPM1 compared with uPM1. Moreover, pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Chelex (a metal chelating agent, which removes a large suite of metals from PM1) prevented the increase of

  6. Acidic pH triggers conformational changes at the NH2-terminal propeptide of the precursor of pulmonary surfactant protein B to form a coiled coil structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares-Hidalgo, A; Pérez-Gil, J; Estrada, P

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B is synthesized as a larger precursor, proSP-B. We report that a recombinant form of human SP-BN forms a coiled coil structure at acidic pH. The protonation of a residue with pK=4.8±0.06 is the responsible of conformational changes detected by circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence emission. Sedimentation velocity analysis showed protein oligomerisation at any pH condition, with an enrichment of the species compatible with a tetramer at acidic pH. Low 2,2,2,-trifluoroethanol concentration promoted β-sheet structures in SP-BN, which bind Thioflavin T, at acidic pH, whereas it promoted coiled coil structures at neutral pH. The amino acid stretch predicted to form β-sheet parallel association in SP-BN overlaps with the sequence predicted by several programs to form coiled coil structure. A synthetic peptide ((60)W-E(85)) designed from the sequence of the amino acid stretch of SP-BN predicted to form coiled coil structure showed random coil conformation at neutral pH but concentration-dependent helical structure at acidic pH. Sedimentation velocity analysis of the peptide indicated monomeric state at neutral pH (s20, w=0.55S; Mr~3kDa) and peptide association (s20, w=1.735S; Mr=~14kDa) at acidic pH, with sedimentation equilibrium fitting to a Monomer-Nmer-Mmer model with N=6 and M=4 (Mr=14692Da). We propose that protein oligomerisation through coiled-coil motifs could then be a general feature in the assembly of functional units in saposin-like proteins in general and in the organization of SP-B in a functional surfactant, in particular. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, P.; Alan Hatton, T.; Eastoe, J.

    2015-01-01

    Surfactants are ubiquitous, being important commodity chemicals with wide industrial applications, and essential components of living organisms. With stimuli-responsive surfactants, self-assembly and physicochemical properties of a wide variety of materials may be readily manipulated, both reversibly and irreversibly. Until recently, magnetically responsive surfactants had not been reported. This review reports the recent progress in magnetoresponsive surfactants, covering control of interfac...

  8. [Deficiency of surfactant protein: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milet, María Beatriz; Mena N, Patricia; Pérez, Héctor I; Espinoza, Tatiana

    Congenital surfactant deficiency is a condition infrequently diagnosed in newborns. A clinical case is presented of surfactant protein B deficiency. A review is performed on the study, treatment and differential diagnosis of surfactant protein deficiencies and infant chronic interstitial lung disease. The case is presented of a term newborn that developed respiratory distress, recurrent pulmonary opacification, and a transient response to the administration of surfactant. Immunohistochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of surfactant protein B deficiency. Pulmonary congenital anomalies require a high index of suspicion. Surfactant protein B deficiency is clinically progressive and fatal in the majority of the cases, similar to that of ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 3 (ABCA3) deficiency. Protein C deficiency is insidious and may present with a radiological pulmonary interstitial pattern. Due to the similarity in the histological pattern, genetic studies help to achieve greater certainty in the prognosis and the possibility of providing adequate genetic counselling. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of Vitelline Protein B as a Microencapsulating Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficht, Allison R. (Inventor); Carson, Ken (Inventor); Sheffield, Cynthia (Inventor); Waite, John Herbert (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention includes compositions and methods for the use of an encapsulation additive having between about 0.1 to about 30 percent isolated and purified vitelline protein B to provide for mixed and extended release formulations.

  10. Colloid and surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Yun Hwan; Lee, Jeong Jung; Cho, Sun Chae; Ryeo, Su Dong

    1995-08-01

    This book consists of two parts about colloid and surfactant. The first parts has explanations colloid and surface science, which deal with creation and properties of colloidal particles, surfactant and micelle colloid, property of surfactant, membranes, absorption of surface science, electrokinetic phenomenon, emulsion, foam and rheology. The second part mentions surfactant on anionic surfactant with five types, amphoteric surface active agent, non-ionic surface active agent and use of surfactant.

  11. [Exogenous surfactant therapy: new synthetic surfactants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, Th

    2008-06-01

    There are numerous pulmonary conditions in which qualitative or quantitative anomalies of the surfactant system have been demonstrated. In premature newborns with immature lungs, a functional deficit in surfactant is the main physiopathologic mechanism of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Since the landmark pilot study of Fujiwara, published more than 20 years ago, the efficacy of exogenous surfactant for the treatment of neonatal RDS has been established by numerous controlled studies and meta-analyses. Enlightened by a growing insight into both the structure and function of the different surfactant components, a new generation of synthetic surfactants has been developed. Various complementary approaches have confirmed the fundamental role of the two hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, in the surfactant system, thus opening the way to the design of analogues, either by chemical synthesis or expression in a prokaryotic system. An example of these peptide-containing synthetic surfactant preparations, lucinactant (Surfaxin), has been recently tested in comparison to a synthetic surfactant that does not contain protein as well as to animal derived surfactant preparations. Major clinical outcomes between lucinactant and animal-derived surfactant preparations were fund similar in two randomized controlled trials, opening the way to a new generation of synthetic surfactants in the near future.

  12. Evolution of surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardesai, Smeeta; Biniwale, Manoj; Wertheimer, Fiona; Garingo, Arlene; Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) due to surfactant deficiency is the most common cause of respiratory failure in preterm infants. Tremendous progress has been made since the original description that surfactant deficiency is the major cause of RDS. Surfactant therapy has been extensively studied in preterm infants and has been shown to significantly decrease air leaks and neonatal and infant mortality. Synthetic and animal-derived surfactants from bovine as well as porcine origin have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. Animal-derived surfactants generally result in faster weaning of respiratory support, shorter duration of invasive ventilation, and decreased mortality when compared to first- or second-generation of synthetic surfactants, but some of the second-generation synthetic surfactants are at least not inferior to the animal-derived surfactants. Using a higher initial dose of porcine derived surfactant may provide better outcomes when compared with using lower doses of bovine surfactants, likely, due to compositional difference and/or the dose. Third-generation synthetic surfactant containing peptide analogs of surfactant protein B and C are currently being studied. Less invasive intra-tracheal surfactant administration techniques in spontaneously breathing neonate receiving noninvasive ventilator support are also being evaluated. In the present era, prophylactic surfactant is not recommended as it may increase the risk of lung injury or death. In the future, surfactants may be used as vector to deliver steroids, or used in combination with molecules, such as, recombinant Club Cell Protein-10 (rhCC-10) to improve pulmonary outcomes. Also, noninvasive surfactant administration techniques, such as aerosolization or atomization of surfactant may play a greater role in the future.

  13. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R [Manteca, CA; Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Zifer, Thomas [Manteca, CA; Jamison, Gregory M [Albuquerque, NM; Loy, Douglas A [Albuquerque, NM; Rahimian, Kamyar [Albuquerque, NM; Long, Timothy M [Urbana, IL; Wheeler, David R [Albuquerque, NM; Staiger, Chad L [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  14. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R [Manteca, CA; Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Zifer, Thomas [Manteca, CA; Jamison, Gregory M [Albuquerque, NM; Loy, Douglas A [Albuquerque, NM; Rahimian, Kamyar [Albuquerque, NM; Long, Timothy M [Urbana, IL; Wheeler, David R [Albuquerque, NM; Staiger, Chad L [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  15. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants. © 2013.

  16. Gemini (dimeric) Surfactants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gemini, surfactants, micelle. Figure 1. Schematic repre- sentation of the gemini sur- factant structure. B S Sekhon. A gemini surfactant (GS) consists of two conventional surfactant molecules chemically bonded together by a spacer. The two terminal hydrocarbon tails can be short or long; the two polar head groups can be ...

  17. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  18. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Surfactant dysfunction Surfactant dysfunction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  19. Fundamentals of surfactant sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofsaess, Hans; Zhang Kun

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new sputter technique, utilizing the steady-state coverage of a substrate surface with up to 10 16 cm -2 of foreign atoms simultaneously during sputter erosion by combined ion irradiation and atom deposition. These atoms strongly modify the substrate sputter yield on atomic to macroscopic length scales and therefore act as surfactant atoms (a blend of 'surface active agent'). Depending on the surfactant-substrate combination, the novel technique allows enhanced surface smoothing, generation of novel surface patterns, shaping of surfaces and formation of ultra-thin films. Sputter yield attenuation is demonstrated for sputtering of Si and Fe substrates and different surfactant species using 5 keV Xe ions at different incidence angles and fluences up to 10 17 cm -2 . Analytical approaches and Monte Carlo simulations are used to predict the sputtering yield attenuation as function of surfactant coverage. For sputtering of Si with Au surfactants we observe high sputter yields despite a steady-state surfactant coverage, which can be explained by strong ion-induced interdiffusion of substrate and surfactant atoms and the formation of a buried Au x Si surfactant layer in dynamic equilibrium.

  20. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo.

  1. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of

  2. Surfactants in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  3. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Gregory M [Albuquerque, NM; Wheeler, David R [Albuquerque, NM; Loy, Douglas A [Tucson, AZ; Simmons, Blake A [San Francisco, CA; Long, Timothy M [Evanston, IL; McElhanon, James R [Manteca, CA; Rahimian, Kamyar [Albuquerque, NM; Staiger, Chad L [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  4. New surfactant with SP-B and C analogs gives survival benefit after inactivation in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Seehase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory distress syndrome in preterm babies is caused by a pulmonary surfactant deficiency, but also by its inactivation due to various conditions, including plasma protein leakage. Surfactant replacement therapy is well established, but clinical observations and in vitro experiments suggested that its efficacy may be impaired by inactivation. A new synthetic surfactant (CHF 5633, containing synthetic surfactant protein B and C analogs, has shown comparable effects on oxygenation in ventilated preterm rabbits versus Poractant alfa, but superior resistance against inactivation in vitro. We hypothesized that CHF 5633 is also resistant to inactivation by serum albumin in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nineteen preterm lambs of 127 days gestational age (term = 150 days received CHF 5633 or Poractant alfa and were ventilated for 48 hours. Ninety minutes after birth, the animals received albumin with CHF 5633 or Poractant alfa. Animals received additional surfactant if P(aO(2 dropped below 100 mmHg. A pressure volume curve was done post mortem and markers of pulmonary inflammation, surfactant content and biophysiology, and lung histology were assessed. CHF 5633 treatment resulted in improved arterial pH, oxygenation and ventilation efficiency index. The survival rate was significantly higher after CHF 5633 treatment (5/7 than after Poractant alfa (1/8 after 48 hours of ventilation. Biophysical examination of the surfactant recovered from bronchoalveolar lavages revealed that films formed by CHF 5633-treated animals reached low surface tensions in a wider range of compression rates than films from Poractant alfa-treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time a synthetic surfactant containing both surfactant protein B and C analogs showed significant benefit over animal derived surfactant in an in vivo model of surfactant inactivation in premature lambs.

  5. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  7. Coacervation with surfactants: From single-chain surfactants to gemini surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Coacervation is a spontaneous process during which a colloidal dispersion separates into two immiscible liquid phases: a colloid-rich liquid phase in equilibrium with a diluted phase. Coacervation is usually divided into simple coacervation and complex coacervation according to the number of components. Surfactant-based coacervation normally contains traditional single-chain surfactants. With the development of surfactants, gemini surfactants with two amphiphilic moieties have been applied to form coacervation. This review summarizes the development of simple coacervation and complex coacervation in the systems of single-chain surfactants and gemini surfactants. Simple coacervation in surfactant solutions with additives or at elevated temperature and complex coacervation in surfactant/polymer mixtures by changing charge densities, molecular weight, ionic strength, pH, or temperature are reviewed. The comparison between gemini surfactants and corresponding monomeric single-chain surfactants reveals that the unique structures of gemini surfactants endow them with higher propensity to generate coacervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is not the major surfactant phospholipid species in all mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Carol J; Postle, Anthony D; Orgeig, Sandra; Possmayer, Fred; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Panda, Amiya K; Jürgens, Klaus D; Milsom, William K; Nag, Kaushik; Daniels, Christopher B

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, lowers the surface tension in terminal air spaces and is crucial for lung function. Within an animal species, surfactant composition can be influenced by development, disease, respiratory rate, and/or body temperature. Here, we analyzed the composition of surfactant in three heterothermic mammals (dunnart, bat, squirrel), displaying different torpor patterns, to determine: 1) whether increases in surfactant cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipid (PL) saturation occur during long-term torpor in squirrels, as in bats and dunnarts; 2) whether surfactant proteins change during torpor; and 3) whether PL molecular species (molsp) composition is altered. In addition, we analyzed the molsp composition of a further nine mammals (including placental/marsupial and hetero-/homeothermic contrasts) to determine whether phylogeny or thermal behavior determines molsp composition in mammals. We discovered that like bats and dunnarts, surfactant Chol increases during torpor in squirrels. However, changes in PL saturation during torpor may not be universal. Torpor was accompanied by a decrease in surfactant protein A in dunnarts and squirrels, but not in bats, whereas surfactant protein B did not change in any species. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)16:0/16:0 is highly variable between mammals and is not the major PL in the wombat, dunnart, shrew, or Tasmanian devil. An inverse relationship exists between PC16:0/16:0 and two of the major fluidizing components, PC16:0/16:1 and PC16:0/14:0. The PL molsp profile of an animal species is not determined by phylogeny or thermal behavior. We conclude that there is no single PL molsp composition that functions optimally in all mammals; rather, surfactant from each animal is unique and tailored to the biology of that animal.

  9. Pulmonary haptoglobin (pHp) is part of the surfactant system in the human lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mahdi; Goldmann, Torsten

    2012-11-20

    Since the existence of pHp was demonstrated, it has been shown that this molecule and its receptor CD163 are regulated by different stimuli. Furthermore, a comparably fast secretion of pHp was described as well as the immuno-stimulatory effects. The intention of this study was to elucidate the role of pHp in the human lungs further. Here we show, by means of confocal microscopy and immune-electron-microscopy, a clear co-localization of pHp with surfactant protein-B in lamellar bodies of alveolar epithelial cells type II. These results are underlined by immunohistochemical stainings in differently fixed human lung tissues, which show pHp in vesicular and released form. The images of the released form resemble the intended position of surfactant in the human alveolus. pHp is secreted by Alveolar epithelial cells type II as previously shown. Moreover, pHp is co-localized with Surfactant protein-B. We conclude that the presented data shows that pHp is a native part of the surfactant system in the human lung. http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2563584738239912.

  10. Comparative evaluation of heterologous production systems for recombinant pulmonary surfactant protein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eSalgado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercial surfactant products derived from animal lungs are used for the treatment of respiratory diseases in premature neonates. These products contain lipids and the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and C, which help to lower the surface tension in the lungs. Surfactant products are less effective when pulmonary diseases involve inflammatory complications because two hydrophilic surfactant proteins (A and D are lost during the extraction process, yet surfactant protein D (SP-D is a component of the innate immune system that helps to reduce lung inflammation. The performance of surfactant products could therefore be improved by supplementing them with an additional source of SP-D. Recombinant SP-D is produced in mammalian cells and bacteria (Escherichia coli, and also experimentally in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mammalian cells produce full-size SP-D, but the yields are low and the cost of production is high. In contrast, bacteria produce a truncated form of SP-D, which is active in vitro and in vivo, and higher yields can be achieved at a lower cost. We compare the efficiency of production of recombinant SP-D in terms of the total yields achieved in each system and the amount of SP-D needed to meet the global demand for the treatment of pulmonary diseases, using respiratory distress syndrome as a case study.

  11. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rausch

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  12. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. I. GLYCOLIPIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirog T. Р.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to surface-active glycolipids. The general characteristics, the physiological role of the rhamnolipids, trehalose lipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and their traditional producers — the representatives of the genera Pseudozyma, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Candida are given. The detailed analysis of the chemical structure, the stages of the biosynthesis and the regulation of some low molecular glycolipids are done. The own experimental data concerning the synthesis intensification, the physiological role and the practical use of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants, which are a complex of the glyco-, phospho-, amino- and neutral lipids (glycolipids of all strains are presented by trehalose mycolates are summarized. It was found that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants have protective, antimicrobial and antiadhesive properties. It was shown that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants preparation of cultural liquid intensified the degradation of oil in water due to the activation of the natural petroleum-oxidizing microflora.

  13. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  14. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-01-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs

  15. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  16. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  17. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  18. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles

  19. Surfactant Membrane Phases Containing Mixtures of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Campo, Liliana; Warr, G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We describe the structure and stability of sponge and lamellar phases comprising mixtures of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants. Such mixtures can show limited miscibility with each other, forming for example coexisting populations of hydrocarbon rich and fluorocarbon rich micelles under some circumstances. Our system is based on the well-characterised lamellar and sponge phases of cetylpyridinium chloride, hexanol and 0.2M brine, into which the partially fluorinated surfactant N-1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluorooctylpyridinium chloride is incorporated. By probing the structures with SAXS (small angle x-ray scattering) and SANS (small angle neutron scattering) using contrast variation, and by characterizing the dynamic properties with dynamic light scattering, we will describe the effect of incorporating the fluorinated surfactant on the phase equilibria and properties of the surfactant membrane structures. (authors)

  20. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant

  1. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Walther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS.Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB, a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight, the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS assays.Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary

  2. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  3. High postoperative serum levels of surfactant type B as novel prognostic markers for congenital heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Is?k

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Congenital heart diseases are observed in 5 to 8 of every 1000 live births. The presence of a valuable biomarker during the surgical periods may aid the clinician in a more accurate prognosis during treatment. Methods: For this reason, surfactant protein B plasma levels may help to evaluate patients with cardiac problems diminishing the alveolocapillary membrane stability. In this study, plasma levels of this biomarker were measured in the preoperative and postoperative periods. This study was conducted to detect the differences between pulmonary hypertensive and normotensive patients. The differences before and after cardiopulmonary bypass were examined. Results: The differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time, cross-clamp time , inotropic support dose, and duration of intensive care of patients with and without pulmonary hypertensive were found to be statistically significant (P<0.05. The results revealed that this pathophysiological state was related to other variables that were studied. We believe that the differences in preoperative and postoperative SPB levels could be attributed to alveolocapillary membrane damage and alveolar surfactant dysfunction. We found that this pathophysiological condition was significantly associated with postoperative parameters. Conclusion: The findings of the current study showed that surfactant protein B was present in the blood of patients with a congenital heart disease during the preoperative period. Long by-pass times may exert damage to the alveolocapillary membrane in patients with pulmonary hypertension and preoperative heart failure, and it is recommended to keep the option of surfactant therapy in mind during the postoperative course at the intensive care unit before preparing the patients for extubation.

  4. Fungal growth on anion surfactant medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Nobuo; Abe, Niichiro

    2009-12-01

    Before the present study, no fungi using anion surfactant as a nutrient had been identified, although some fungi were known to use nonion surfactant. Washing water collected from 63 washing machines was inoculated onto 0.1% LAS (Sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate) anion surfactant media to identify fungi that can feed on anion-surfactant. Small dark colonies of fungi were found on several of the Petri-dishes from 12 days after inoculation. These were identified as Cladophialophora boppii and Exophiala spinifera using morphological features and rDNA data. A number of the isolates of C. boppii specifically were recognized as using anion surfactant as a nutrient. The growth characteristics of the two fungal species were examined on surfactant media of three kinds. Apart from anion surfactant, the fungi were also able to grow on nonion surfactant and on soap. The application of these fungi for environmental cleansing after detergent pollution is also discussed.

  5. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  6. Surfactant Therapy of ALI and ARDS

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendran, K; Willson, D; Notter, RH

    2011-01-01

    This article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its utility in mitigating clinical acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Biophysical research has documented that lung surfactant dysfunction can be reversed or mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration, and multiple studies in animals with ALI/ARDS have shown that respiratory function and pulmonary mechanics in vivo can be improved by exogenous surfactant administration. Exoge...

  7. Cationic surfactants as the hydrolytic micellar catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Janošcová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Cationic surfactants as the hydrolytic micellar catalysts Petra Janošcová The effectiveness of hydrolytic cleavage of the pesticide fenitrothionin cationic surfactants micellar media has been tested. All used surfactants increased the rate of fenitrothionhydrolysis, which was the evidence of micellar catalysis. For some surfactants decreases has been evident at the highest rate of hydrolysis concentrations. It has been the result of a phenomenon called the effect of empty micelles. High hydro...

  8. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the

  9. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on

  10. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  11. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  12. Calcium-tolerant anionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, Alexander

    1995-01-01

    One of the problems of applying anionic surfactants in, for example, laundry detergents is the precipitation of calcium salts. Much effort has been directed towards avoiding precipitation. There are at least three ways for tackling the problem. The first involves the use of a large quantity of

  13. Surfactant -- Where Are We in 2003?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JF Lewis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant research has progressed over the past several years to the extent that exogenous surfactant administration in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is now being evaluated. Unfortunately, clinical responses have been variable, and we now need to take a look at how surfactant is altered in this disease so that more effective treatment strategies can be developed. This review briefly discusses the biophysical and host defense properties of surfactant, the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV on the endogenous surfactant system and the most recent clinical data involving exogenous surfactant administration in patients with ARDS. Discussions regarding future directions of surfactant research both in ARDS and diseases other than acute lung injury are included.

  14. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  15. A conservative SPH method for surfactant dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, S.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a Lagrangian particle method is proposed for the simulation of multiphase flows with surfactant. The model is based on the multiphase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework of Hu and Adams (2006) [1]. Surface-active agents (surfactants) are incorporated into our method by a scalar quantity describing the local concentration of molecules in the bulk phase and on the interface. The surfactant dynamics are written in conservative form, thus global mass of surfactant is conserved exactly. The transport model of the surfactant accounts for advection and diffusion. Within our method, we can simulate insoluble surfactant on an arbitrary interface geometry as well as interfacial transport such as adsorption or desorption. The flow-field dynamics and the surfactant dynamics are coupled through a constitutive equation, which relates the local surfactant concentration to the local surface-tension coefficient. Hence, the surface-tension model includes capillary and Marangoni-forces. The present numerical method is validated by comparison with analytic solutions for diffusion and for surfactant dynamics. More complex simulations of an oscillating bubble, the bubble deformation in a shear flow, and of a Marangoni-force driven bubble show the capabilities of our method to simulate interfacial flows with surfactants.

  16. Exploring the Leishmania Hydrophilic Acylated Surface Protein B (HASPB) Export Pathway by Live Cell Imaging Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Lorna; Price, Helen; O'Toole, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania major is a human-infective protozoan parasite transmitted by the bite of the female phlebotomine sand fly. The L. major hydrophilic acylated surface protein B (HASPB) is only expressed in infective parasite stages suggesting a role in parasite virulence. HASPB is a "nonclassically" secreted protein that lacks a conventional signal peptide, reaching the cell surface by an alternative route to the classical ER-Golgi pathway. Instead HASPB trafficking to and exposure on the parasite plasma membrane requires dual N-terminal acylation. Here, we use live cell imaging methods to further explore this pathway allowing visualization of key events in real time at the individual cell level. These methods include live cell imaging using fluorescent reporters to determine the subcellular localization of wild type and acylation site mutation HASPB18-GFP fusion proteins, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to analyze the dynamics of HASPB in live cells, and live antibody staining to detect surface exposure of HASPB by confocal microscopy.

  17. Lactoferrin binding protein B - a bi-functional bacterial receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas K H Ostan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed outer membrane-bound lipoprotein that comprises part of the lactoferrin (Lf receptor complex in Neisseria meningitidis and other Gram-negative pathogens. Recent studies have demonstrated that LbpB plays a role in protecting the bacteria from cationic antimicrobial peptides due to large regions rich in anionic residues in the C-terminal lobe. Relative to its homolog, transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB, there currently is little evidence for its role in iron acquisition and relatively little structural and biophysical information on its interaction with Lf. In this study, a combination of crosslinking and deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, information-driven computational docking, bio-layer interferometry, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to probe LbpB:hLf complexes. The formation of a 1:1 complex of iron-loaded Lf and LbpB involves an interaction between the Lf C-lobe and LbpB N-lobe, comparable to TbpB, consistent with a potential role in iron acquisition. The Lf N-lobe is also capable of binding to negatively charged regions of the LbpB C-lobe and possibly other sites such that a variety of higher order complexes are formed. Our results are consistent with LbpB serving dual roles focused primarily on iron acquisition when exposed to limited levels of iron-loaded Lf on the mucosal surface and effectively binding apo Lf when exposed to high levels at sites of inflammation.

  18. The nucleolar RNA-binding protein B-36 is highly conserved among plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiltinan, M J; Schelling, M E; Ehtesham, N Z; Thomas, J C; Christensen, M E

    1988-08-01

    The nucleolar protein B-36 is an RNA-associated protein which has a number of properties in common with pre-mRNA-binding proteins (hnRNP proteins). Like the hnRNP proteins, B-36 appears to be evolutionarily conserved among various eukaryotes (protists and several animal species). The conservation of B-36 throughout the plant kingdom has been investigated using a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies previously shown to recognize a minimum of four different epitopes in Physarum B-36, the protein used to generate the monoclonal antibodies. Two of the epitopes (I and III) are widely conserved in 34 kDa proteins (presumably B-36 homologues) from the various species tested (Chlamydomonas, moss, fern, oat, onion, carrot, and bean). Using immunofluorescence localization in moss and carrot protoplasts, the cross-reacting proteins were shown to be restricted to the nucleolus, further confirming their probable homology to B-36. Epitopes I and III are also unique to the B-36 homologues as demonstrated by the failure of any other bands to cross-react. Another epitope (IV) was specifically recognized in the plant B-36 homologues but exhibited greatly reduced affinity for the monoclonal antibody relative to Physarum B-36. The remaining epitope (II), unlike the others, exhibited variable conservation in the plant B-36 homologues and, in addition, was present in several other seemingly unrelated proteins. Finally, several of the plant species exhibited two cross-reacting variants at roughly the 34 kDa position and in at least one of these cases a single monoclonal antibody was able to distinguish between the two variants, a result indicating that the variants do have bona fide structural differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Surfactants in tribology, v.3

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture and use of almost every consumer and industrial product rely on application of advanced knowledge in surface science and tribology. These two disciplines are of critical importance in major economic sectors, such as mining, agriculture, manufacturing (including metals, plastics, wood, computers, MEMS, NEMS, appliances), construction, transportation, and medical instruments, transplants, and diagnostic devices. An up-to-date reference with contributions by experts in surface science and tribology, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 3 discusses some of the underlying tribological a

  20. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Surfactant Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is being increasingly applied in the oil industry and several different technologies have emerged during, the last decades in order to optimize oil recovery after conventional recovery methods have been applied. Surfactant flooding is an EOR technique in which the phase...... behavior inside the reservoir can be manipulated by the injection of surfactants and co-surfactants, creating advantageous conditions in order to mobilize trapped oil. Correctly designed surfactant systems together with the crude oil can create microemulsions at the interface between crude oil and water......, thus reducing the interfacial tension (IFT) to ultra low (0.001 mN/m), which consequently will mobilize the residual oil and result in improved oil recovery. This EOR technology is, however, made challenging by a number of factors, such as the adsorption of surfactant and co-surfactant to the rock...

  1. Acute Pathophysiological Effects of Intratracheal Instillation of Budesonide and Exogenous Surfactant in a Neonatal Surfactant-depleted Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Yang

    2010-08-01

    Conclusions: Intratracheal instillation of surfactant or surfactant plus budesonide can improve oxygenation and pulmonary histologic outcome in neonatal surfactant-depleted lungs. The additional use of budesonide does not disturb the function of the exogenous surfactant. Intratracheal administration of a corticosteroid combined with surfactant may be an effective method for alleviating local pulmonary inflammation in severe RDS.

  2. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  3. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions between surfactants and hydrolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Krister

    2017-12-05

    Hydrolytic enzymes are combined with surfactants in many types of formulations, for instance detergents and personal care products. If the surfactant interacts with the enzyme there may be conformational changes that eventually lead to loss of the enzymatic activity. From a practical point of view it is important to understand the nature and magnitude of these interactions. After an introduction of the topic the review briefly discusses enzyme catalyzed reactions where surfactants are substrates for the enzyme. The rest of the review relates to associations between surfactants and hydrolytic enzymes without the surfactant being a substrate in the reaction. A discussion about general principles for such interactions is followed by a survey of the relevant literature related to four important types of hydrolytic enzymes: lipases, proteases, amylases and cellulases. It is shown in the review that the effect exerted by the surfactant differs between the different types of enzymes; it is therefore difficult to make general statements about which surfactants are most detrimental to the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. However, as a general rule nonionic surfactants can be regarded as more benign to an enzyme than anionic and cationic surfactants. This difference can be ascribed to the difference in binding mode. Whereas a nonionic surfactant only binds to the enzyme through hydrophobic interactions, an ionic surfactant can bind by a combination of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interaction. This latter type of binding can be strong and lead to conformational changes already at very low surfactant concentration, often far below its critical micelle concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase transitions in surfactant monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casson, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Two-dimensional phase transitions have been studied in surfactant monolayers at the air/water interface by sum-frequency spectroscopy and ellipsometry. In equilibrium monolayers of medium-chain alcohols C n H 2n+1 OH (n = 9-14) a transition from a two-dimensional crystalline phase to a liquid was observed at temperatures above the bulk melting point. The small population of gauche defects in the solid phase increased only slightly at the phase transition. A model of the hydrocarbon chains as freely rotating rigid rods allowed the area per molecule and chain tilt in the liquid phase to be determined. The area per molecule, chain tilt and density of the liquid phase all increased with increasing chain length, but for each chain length the density was higher than in a bulk liquid hydrocarbon. In a monolayer of decanol adsorbed at the air/water interface a transition from a two-dimensional liquid to a gas was observed. A clear discontinuity in the coefficient of ellipticity as a function of temperature showed that the transition is first-order. This result suggests that liquid-gas phase transitions in surfactant monolayers may be more widespread than once thought. A solid-liquid phase transition has also been studied in mixed monolayers of dodecanol with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and with a homologous series of cationic surfactants (alkyltrimethylammonium bromides: C n TABs, n = 12, 14, 16). The composition and structure of the mixed monolayers was studied above and below the phase transition. At low temperatures the mixed monolayers were as densely packed as a monolayer of pure dodecanol in its solid phase. At a fixed temperature the monolayers under-went a first-order phase transition to form a phase that was less dense and more conformationally disordered. The proportion of ionic surfactant in the mixed monolayer was greatest in the high temperature phase. As the chain length of the C n TAB increased the number of conformational defects

  6. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform

  7. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  8. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  9. Altered surfactant homeostasis and recurrent respiratory failure secondary to TTF-1 nuclear targeting defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carnielli Virgilio P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of genes affecting surfactant homeostasis, such as SFTPB, SFTPC and ABCA3, lead to diffuse lung disease in neonates and children. Haploinsufficiency of NKX2.1, the gene encoding the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 - critical for lung, thyroid and central nervous system morphogenesis and function - causes a rare form of progressive respiratory failure designated brain-lung-thyroid syndrome. Molecular mechanisms involved in this syndrome are heterogeneous and poorly explored. We report a novel TTF-1 molecular defect causing recurrent respiratory failure episodes in an infant. Methods The subject was an infant with severe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome followed by recurrent respiratory failure episodes, hypopituitarism and neurological abnormalities. Lung histology and ultrastructure were assessed by surgical biopsy. Surfactant-related genes were studied by direct genomic DNA sequencing and array chromatine genomic hybridization (aCGH. Surfactant protein expression in lung tissue was analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. For kinetics studies, surfactant protein B and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates after intravenous administration of stable isotope-labeled 2H2O and 13C-leucine; fractional synthetic rate was derived from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry 2H and 13C enrichment curves. Six intubated infants with no primary lung disease were used as controls. Results Lung biopsy showed desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and lamellar body abnormalities suggestive of genetic surfactant deficiency. Genetic studies identified a heterozygous ABCA3 mutation, L941P, previously unreported. No SFTPB, SFTPC or NKX2.1 mutations or deletions were found. However, immunofluorescence studies showed TTF-1 prevalently expressed in type II cell cytoplasm instead of nucleus, indicating defective nuclear targeting. This pattern has not been reported in human

  10. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  12. of surfactant replacement therapy at Johannesburg Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To assess the impact of surfactant replacement therapy (SRl) on the outcome of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) and to assess the cost implications of a policy of selective administration of artificial surfactant. Design. The short-term outcome of 103 newborns ventilated for HMD (61 selected for SRT according to ...

  13. Surfactant protein D in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Marianne; Juvonen, Pekka Olavi; Holmskov, Uffe

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collectin that plays an important role in the innate immune system. The role of SP-D in the metabolism of surfactant is as yet quite unclear. The aims of this study were to establish normal values of SP-D in the umbilical cord blood and capillary blood of mature...

  14. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  15. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  16. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  17. Surfactants and submicron sea spray generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sellegri, K.; O'Dowd, C.D.; Yoon, Y.J.; Jennings, S.G.; Leeuw, G. de

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been carried out to elucidate the role of surfactants on the primary marine aerosol production of submicron marine aerosols. A synthetic surfactant SDS was used in conjunction with artificially generated seawater, and the resultant bubble-mediated aerosol produced was

  18. Microheterogeneity of the growth-associated neuronal protein B-50 (GAP 43). Contribution of phosphorylation by protein kinase C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Schotman, P.; Nielander, H.B.; Rozen, A.J. van; Frankena, H.; Schrama, L.H.

    1989-01-01

    The neuron-specific, growth-associated protein B-50, also known as GAP-43, F1 and neuromodulin, shows a striking heterogeneous behaviour in many chromatographic and electrophoretic systems. A modulatory function has been proposed for the protein in receptor-mediated processes in the presynaptic

  19. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Birkun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia.

  20. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  1. The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8) in Motoneuron Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmini, Paola; Cristofani, Riccardo; Galbiati, Mariarita; Cicardi, Maria E; Meroni, Marco; Ferrari, Veronica; Vezzoli, Giulia; Tedesco, Barbara; Messi, Elio; Piccolella, Margherita; Carra, Serena; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) are two motoneuron diseases (MNDs) characterized by aberrant protein behavior in affected cells. In familial ALS (fALS) and in SBMA specific gene mutations lead to the production of neurotoxic proteins or peptides prone to misfold, which then accumulate in form of aggregates. Notably, some of these proteins accumulate into aggregates also in sporadic ALS (sALS) even if not mutated. To prevent proteotoxic stresses detrimental to cells, misfolded and/or aggregated proteins must be rapidly removed by the protein quality control (PQC) system. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) is a chaperone induced by harmful events, like proteasome inhibition. HSPB8 is expressed both in motoneuron and muscle cells, which are both targets of misfolded protein toxicity in MNDs. In ALS mice models, in presence of the mutant proteins, HSPB8 is upregulated both in spinal cord and muscle. HSPB8 interacts with the HSP70 co-chaperone BAG3 and enhances the degradation of misfolded proteins linked to sALS, or causative of fALS and of SBMA. HSPB8 acts by facilitating autophagy, thereby preventing misfolded protein accumulation in affected cells. BAG3 and BAG1 compete for HSP70-bound clients and target them for disposal to the autophagy or proteasome, respectively. Enhancing the selective targeting of misfolded proteins by HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 to autophagy may also decrease their delivery to the proteasome by the BAG1-HSP70 complex, thereby limiting possible proteasome overwhelming. Thus, approaches aimed at potentiating HSPB8-BAG3 may contribute to the maintenance of proteostasis and may delay MNDs progression.

  2. The Role of the Heat Shock Protein B8 (HSPB8 in Motoneuron Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rusmini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA are two motoneuron diseases (MNDs characterized by aberrant protein behavior in affected cells. In familial ALS (fALS and in SBMA specific gene mutations lead to the production of neurotoxic proteins or peptides prone to misfold, which then accumulate in form of aggregates. Notably, some of these proteins accumulate into aggregates also in sporadic ALS (sALS even if not mutated. To prevent proteotoxic stresses detrimental to cells, misfolded and/or aggregated proteins must be rapidly removed by the protein quality control (PQC system. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8 is a chaperone induced by harmful events, like proteasome inhibition. HSPB8 is expressed both in motoneuron and muscle cells, which are both targets of misfolded protein toxicity in MNDs. In ALS mice models, in presence of the mutant proteins, HSPB8 is upregulated both in spinal cord and muscle. HSPB8 interacts with the HSP70 co-chaperone BAG3 and enhances the degradation of misfolded proteins linked to sALS, or causative of fALS and of SBMA. HSPB8 acts by facilitating autophagy, thereby preventing misfolded protein accumulation in affected cells. BAG3 and BAG1 compete for HSP70-bound clients and target them for disposal to the autophagy or proteasome, respectively. Enhancing the selective targeting of misfolded proteins by HSPB8-BAG3-HSP70 to autophagy may also decrease their delivery to the proteasome by the BAG1-HSP70 complex, thereby limiting possible proteasome overwhelming. Thus, approaches aimed at potentiating HSPB8-BAG3 may contribute to the maintenance of proteostasis and may delay MNDs progression.

  3. Probing the interaction of brain fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP with model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Dyszy

    Full Text Available Brain fatty acid-binding protein (B-FABP interacts with biological membranes and delivers polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs via a collisional mechanism. The binding of FAs in the protein and the interaction with membranes involve a motif called "portal region", formed by two small α-helices, A1 and A2, connected by a loop. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and electron spin resonance to probe the changes in the protein and in the membrane model induced by their interaction. Spin labeled B-FABP mutants and lipidic spin probes incorporated into a membrane model confirmed that B-FABP interacts with micelles through the portal region and led to structural changes in the protein as well in the micelles. These changes were greater in the presence of LPG when compared to the LPC models. ESR spectra of B-FABP labeled mutants showed the presence of two groups of residues that responded to the presence of micelles in opposite ways. In the presence of lysophospholipids, group I of residues, whose side chains point outwards from the contact region between the helices, had their mobility decreased in an environment of lower polarity when compared to the same residues in solution. The second group, composed by residues with side chains situated at the interface between the α-helices, experienced an increase in mobility in the presence of the model membranes. These modifications in the ESR spectra of B-FABP mutants are compatible with a less ordered structure of the portal region inner residues (group II that is likely to facilitate the delivery of FAs to target membranes. On the other hand, residues in group I and micelle components have their mobilities decreased probably as a result of the formation of a collisional complex. Our results bring new insights for the understanding of the gating and delivery mechanisms of FABPs.

  4. Small Protein B upregulates sensor kinase bvgS expression in Aeromonas veronii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu eLiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Earlier studies reveal that Small Protein B (SmpB, a class of well-conserved tmRNA-binding proteins, is essential for the trans-translation process, which functions as a system for translation surveillance and ribosome rescue. Here, we report a previously unrecognized mechanism by which SmpB alone positively regulates the expression of a sensor kinase, BvgS, in Aeromonas veronii. A reporter plasmid was constructed in which the promoter of bvgS was used to control the expression of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene. When the reporter plasmid was co-transformed with a SmpB expression construct into E. coli, the relative fluorescence intensity increased about 3-fold. Transformation with a truncated form of smpB gene showed that the C-terminus had little effect, while N-terminus unexpectedly increased eGFP production. Next, a series of SmpB mutants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. When the mutants SmpB (G11S or SmpB (E32AG was used in the experiment, eGFP expression dropped significantly compared with that of wild type SmpB. Further,purified SmpB was shown to bind the promoter regions of bvgS in the agarose gel retardation assay. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that eGFP transcript levels increased approximately 25-fold in the presence of SmpB. Likewise, bvgS transcripts decreased significantly in smpB knockout A. veronii. Similar to BvgS inhibition, smpB knockout in A. veronii displayed a reduced capability in salt tolerance. Collectively, the data presented here will facilitate a deeper understanding of SmpB-mediated regulatory circuits as a transcriptional factor in A. veronii.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering study of doxorubicin–surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The binding affinity of doxorubicin within the micelle carrier is enhanced through complex formation of drug and anionic surfactant, aerosol OT (AOT). Electrostatic binding of doxorubicin with negatively charged surfactants leads to the formation of hydrophobic drug–surfactant complexes. Surfactant-induced partitioning of ...

  6. Characterizing adsorption of associating surfactants on carbonates surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Guoqing; Puerto, Maura; Wehowsky, Anna; Miller, Clarence; Hirasaki, George J; Biswal, Sibani L

    2018-03-01

    The adsorption of anionic surfactants onto positively charged carbonate minerals is typically high due to electrostatic interactions. By blending anionic surfactants with cationic or zwitterionic surfactants, which naturally form surfactant complexes, surfactant adsorption is expected to be influenced by a competition between surfactant complexes and surfactant-surface interactions. The adsorption behavior of surfactant blends known to form complexes was investigated. The surfactants probed include an anionic C 15-18 internal olefin sulfonate (IOS), a zwitterionic lauryl betaine (LB), and an anionic C 13 -alcohol polyethylene glycol ether carboxylic acid (L38). An analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) was developed to measure three individual surfactant concentrations from a blended surfactant solution. The adsorption of the individual surfactants and surfactant blends were systematically investigated on different mineral surfaces using varying brine solutions. LB adsorption on calcite surfaces was found to be significantly increased when blended with IOS or L38 since it forms surfactant complexes that partition to the surface. However, the total adsorption of the LB-IOS-L38 solution on dolomite decreased from 3.09 mg/m 2 to 1.97 mg/m 2 when blended together compared to summing the adsorption values of individual surfactants, which highlights the importance of mixed surfactant association. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  8. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  9. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  10. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  12. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed. © 2013.

  13. Mechanism of bacterial inactivation by cationic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlova, I.B.; Samoylenko, I.I.

    1985-03-01

    The mechanism of bacteriocidal action of the cationic surfactant dimethylbenzylammonium chloride was studied on exposure of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecium, Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli to different concentrations of the agent and determinations of survival plots. The data showed that the surfactant was bacteriocidal for all the bacteria tested at a concentration of 0.0001%, but more efficient in the case of the gram positives. Electron microscopy showed considerable damage and dissarrangement of the cytoplasmic membrane, indicating that the killing mechanism involved this organelle. It appears that cationic surfactants may constitute effective disinfectant preparations. 9 references, 2 figures.

  14. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  15. Isolation of Surfactant-Resistant Bacteria from Natural, Surfactant-Rich Marine Habitats▿

    OpenAIRE

    Plante, Craig J.; Coe, Kieran M.; Plante, Rebecca G.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental remediation efforts often utilize either biodegradative microbes or surfactants, but not in combination. Coupling both strategies holds the potential to dramatically increase the rate and extent of remediation because surfactants can enhance the bioavailability of contaminants to microbes. However, many surfactants permeabilize bacterial cell membranes and are effective disinfectants. An important goal then is to find or genetically modify microorganisms that possess both desira...

  16. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 1 of the review gives information on the composition and properties of a pulmonary surfactant and quantitative and qual itative impairments in the pulmonary surfactant system in different neonatal and adult abnormalities and describes the composition of commercial synthetic and natural surfactants. The results of surfactant therapy for respiratory distress syndrome and other lung diseases with secondary surfactant deficiency in the newborns are analyzed.

  17. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  18. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  19. Poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant polymers

    OpenAIRE

    VACHEETHASANEE, KATANCHALEE; WANG, SHUWU; QIU, YONGXING; MARCHANT, ROGER E.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of structurally well-defined surfactant polymers that undergo surface-induced self-assembly on hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with poly(ethylene oxide) and hexanal pendant groups. The poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) was synthesized by hydrolysis of poly(N-vinyl formamide) following free radical polymerization of N-vinyl formamide. Hexanal and aldehyde-terminated poly (ethyleneoxide) (PEO) were simultaneously att...

  20. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  1. Thermodynamics of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100-cationic surfactants mixtures at the cloud point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batigoec, Cigdem; Akbas, Halide; Boz, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Non-ionic surfactants are used as emulsifier and solubilizate in such as textile, detergent and cosmetic. → Non-ionic surfactants occur phase separation at temperature as named the cloud point in solution. → Dimeric surfactants have attracted increasing attention due to their superior surface activity. → The positive values of ΔG cp 0 indicate that the process proceeds nonspontaneous. - Abstract: This study investigates the effects of gemini and conventional cationic surfactants on the cloud point (CP) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solutions. Instead of visual observation, a spectrophotometer was used for measurement of the cloud point temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of these mixtures were calculated at different cationic surfactant concentrations. The gemini surfactants of the alkanediyl-α-ω-bis (alkyldimethylammonium) dibromide type, on the one hand, with different alkyl groups containing m carbon atoms and an ethanediyl spacer, referred to as 'm-2-m' (m = 10, 12, and 16) and, on the other hand, with -C 16 alkyl groups and different spacers containing s carbon atoms, referred to as '16-s-16' (s = 6 and 10) were synthesized, purified and characterized. Additions of the cationic surfactants to the TX-100 solution increased the cloud point temperature of the TX-100 solution. It was accepted that the solubility of non-ionic surfactant containing polyoxyethylene (POE) hydrophilic chain was a maximum at the cloud point so that the thermodynamic parameters were calculated at this temperature. The results showed that the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG cp 0 ), the enthalpy (ΔH cp 0 ) and the entropy (ΔS cp 0 ) of the clouding phenomenon were found positive in all cases. The standard free energy (ΔG cp 0 ) increased with increasing hydrophobic alkyl chain for both gemini and conventional cationic surfactants; however, it decreased with increasing surfactant concentration.

  2. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  3. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1998-01-01

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV

  4. Size control of surfactant vesicles made by a mixture of cationic surfactants and organic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Han, Young-Soo; Jang, Jong-Dae; Seong, Baek-Seok

    2014-10-01

    Spontaneous size-controllable vesicles that are prepared by a mixture of surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths (n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide, C(n)TAB) and an organic derivative (5-methyl salicylic acid, 5mS) in aqueous solution have been investigated. When the organic derivative 5mS is mixed with the C(n)TAB surfactants in aqueous solution, the surfactant vesicles are spontaneously formed above a certain 5mS concentration. Small angle neutron scattering reveals that the core radius of surfactant vesicles is clearly increased from ca. 31 nm to ca. 97 nm with the alkyl chain length of surfactants while the bilayer thickness of the vesicles is nearly constant. The structure of surfactant vesicles maintains against temperature change ranging from 30 degrees C to 45 degrees C, showing no structural change. These results can provide thermally stable surfactant vesicles with various sizes and constant bilayer thickness that may possess a different permeability and may allow the surfactant vesicle to be used in gene or drug delivery for a variety of goods.

  5. Surfactant Delivery into the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James; Filoche, Marcel

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a multiscale, compartmentalized model of surfactant and liquid delivery into the lung. Assuming liquid plug propagation, the airway compartment accounts for the plug's volume deposition (coating) on the airway wall, while the bifurcation compartment accounts for plug splitting from the parent airway to the two daughter airways. Generally the split is unequal due to gravity and geometry effects. Both the deposition ratio RD (deposition volume/airway volume), and the splitting ratio, RS, of the daughters volumes are solved independently from one another. Then they are used in a 3D airway network geometry to achieve the distribution of delivery into the lung. The airway geometry is selected for neonatal as well as adult applications, and can be advanced from symmetric, to stochastically asymmetric, to personalized. RD depends primarily on the capillary number, Ca, while RS depends on Ca, the Reynolds number, Re, the Bond number, Bo, the dose volume, VD, and the branch angles. The model predicts the distribution of coating on the airway walls and the remaining plug volume delivered to the alveolar region at the end of the tree. Using this model, we are able to simulate and test various delivery protocols, in order to optimize delivery and improve the respiratory function.

  6. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  7. Role of linker groups between hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties of cationic surfactants on oligonucleotide-surfactant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhiya, Deenan; Dias, Rita S; Shome, Anshupriya; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Björn; Maiti, Souvik

    2009-12-15

    The interaction between DNA and amino-acid-based surfactants with different linker groups was investigated by gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide exclusion assays, circular dichroism, and melting temperature determinations. The studies showed that the strength of the interaction between the oligonucleotides and the surfactants is highly dependent on the linker of the surfactant. For ester surfactants, no significant interaction was observed for surfactant-to-DNA charge ratios up to 12. On the other hand, amide surfactants were shown to interact strongly with the oligonucleotides; these surfactants could displace up to 75% of the ethidium bromide molecules bound to the DNA and induced significant changes in the circular dichroism spectra. When comparing the headgroups of the surfactants, it was observed that surfactants with more hydrophobic headgroups (proline vs alanine) interacted more strongly with the DNA, in good agreement with previous studies.

  8. The effects of alkylammonium counterions on the aggregation of fluorinated surfactants and surfactant ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottage, Matthew J; Greaves, Tamar L; Garvey, Christopher J; Tabor, Rico F

    2016-08-01

    The effects of organic counterions with varying carbon number on surfactant aggregation have been analysed by coupling perfluorooctanoate surfactant anions with various alkylammonium counterions. Both the degree of substitution (primary to tertiary) and alkyl chain length (0-3 carbons) of the counterions were varied to provide a comprehensive matrix of geometries and lipophilicities. Surface activity was measured using pendant drop tensiometry, while temperature-controlled small-angle neutron scattering was used to probe changes in aggregation morphology. It was found that the use of such alkylammonium counterions resulted in a strong preference for bilayer formation even at low surfactant concentration (surfactant-rich lamellar phase coexists with a dilute micellar phase. The results indicate that aggregation is controlled by a delicate balance of counterion size, hydrophilicity and diffuseness of charge, providing new methods for the subtle control of surfactant solutions. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  10. Isolation of surfactant-resistant bacteria from natural, surfactant-rich marine habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J; Coe, Kieran M; Plante, Rebecca G

    2008-08-01

    Environmental remediation efforts often utilize either biodegradative microbes or surfactants, but not in combination. Coupling both strategies holds the potential to dramatically increase the rate and extent of remediation because surfactants can enhance the bioavailability of contaminants to microbes. However, many surfactants permeabilize bacterial cell membranes and are effective disinfectants. An important goal then is to find or genetically modify microorganisms that possess both desirable degradative capabilities and the ability to thrive in the presence of surfactants. The guts of some marine invertebrates, particularly deposit feeders, have previously been shown to contain high levels of biosurfactants. Our primary aim was to mine these natural, surfactant-rich habitats for surfactant-resistant bacteria. Relative to sediment porewaters, the gut contents of two polychaete deposit feeders, Nereis succinea and Amphitrite ornata, exhibited a significantly higher ratio of bacteria resistant to both cationic and anionic surfactants. In contrast, bacteria in the gut fluids of a holothuroid, Leptosynapta tenuis, showed surfactant susceptibility similar to that of bacteria from sediments. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the majority of surfactant-resistant isolates were previously undescribed species of the genus Vibrio or were of a group most closely related to Spongiobacter spp. We also tested a subset of resistant bacteria for the production of biosurfactants. The majority did produce biosurfactants, as demonstrated via the oil-spreading method, but in all cases, production was relatively weak under the culture conditions employed. Novel surfactant-resistant, biosurfactant-producing bacteria, and the habitats from which they were isolated, provide a new source pool for potential microorganisms to be exploited in the in situ bioremediation of marine sediments.

  11. Isolation of Surfactant-Resistant Bacteria from Natural, Surfactant-Rich Marine Habitats▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Craig J.; Coe, Kieran M.; Plante, Rebecca G.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental remediation efforts often utilize either biodegradative microbes or surfactants, but not in combination. Coupling both strategies holds the potential to dramatically increase the rate and extent of remediation because surfactants can enhance the bioavailability of contaminants to microbes. However, many surfactants permeabilize bacterial cell membranes and are effective disinfectants. An important goal then is to find or genetically modify microorganisms that possess both desirable degradative capabilities and the ability to thrive in the presence of surfactants. The guts of some marine invertebrates, particularly deposit feeders, have previously been shown to contain high levels of biosurfactants. Our primary aim was to mine these natural, surfactant-rich habitats for surfactant-resistant bacteria. Relative to sediment porewaters, the gut contents of two polychaete deposit feeders, Nereis succinea and Amphitrite ornata, exhibited a significantly higher ratio of bacteria resistant to both cationic and anionic surfactants. In contrast, bacteria in the gut fluids of a holothuroid, Leptosynapta tenuis, showed surfactant susceptibility similar to that of bacteria from sediments. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the majority of surfactant-resistant isolates were previously undescribed species of the genus Vibrio or were of a group most closely related to Spongiobacter spp. We also tested a subset of resistant bacteria for the production of biosurfactants. The majority did produce biosurfactants, as demonstrated via the oil-spreading method, but in all cases, production was relatively weak under the culture conditions employed. Novel surfactant-resistant, biosurfactant-producing bacteria, and the habitats from which they were isolated, provide a new source pool for potential microorganisms to be exploited in the in situ bioremediation of marine sediments. PMID:18586977

  12. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  13. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Zachary A; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S; Mecca, Jodi M; Tucker, Christopher J; Squires, Todd M

    2014-03-11

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 10(3)-10(4) times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants.

  15. Surfactant use with nitrate-based bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.H.; Hutchins, S.R.; West, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents results of an initial survey on the effect of six surfactants on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in bioremediation applications using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Aquifer material from Park City, Kansas, was used for the study. The three atomic surfactants chosen were Steol CS-330, Dowfax 8390 and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS); the three nonionic surfactants were T-MAZ-60, Triton X-100, and Igepal CO-660. Both Steol CS-330 and T-MAZ-60 biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. The Steol inhibited biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes (BTEXTMB). Only toluene was rapidly degraded in the presence of T-MAZ-60. Biodegradation of all compounds, including toluene, appears to be inhibited by Dowfax 8390 and SDBS. No biodegradation of Dowfax 8390 or SDBS was observed. SDBS inhibited denitrification, but Dowfax 8390 did not. For the microcosms containing Triton X-100 or Igepal CO-660, removal of toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, 1,3,5-TMB, and 1,2,4-TMB were similar to their removals in the no-surfactant treatment. These two surfactants did not biodegrade, did not inhibit biodegradation of the alkylbenzenes, and did not inhibit denitrification. Further studies are continuing with aquifer material from Eglin Air Force Base

  16. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-MartInez, Alfredo; Maldonado, Amir

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions

  17. Syntheses of surfactants from oleochemical epoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwel Siegfried

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar-based surfactants were obtained in good yields (up to 100% under mild conditions (70°C, methanol or mixtures of methanol and water by ring-opening of terminal epoxides with aminopolyols, derived from glucose. Reaction of N-methyl glucamine with epoxides from even-numbered C4-C18 alpha-olefins or from terminal unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters leads to linear products, while corresponding reactions with N-dodecyl glucamine or glucamine yield surfactants with different Y-structures. Products obtained by conversion of omega-epoxy fatty acid methyl esters were saponificated with NaOH or hydrolyzed enzymatically to sodium salts or free acids respectively, which are amphoteric surfactants. Studies of the surfactants at different pH-values demonstrate different surface active properties in aqueous solutions. Critical micelle concentrations (c.m.c. in a range between 2 and 500mg/l and surface tensions of 25-40mN/m were measured for several of the synthesized sugar-based surfactants. The ring-opening products are rather poor foamers, whereas some of the corresponding hydrobromides show good foaming properties.

  18. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  19. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  20. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  1. Recent food applications of microbial surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Marcia; Silva, Sumária Sousa E

    2016-07-20

    Owing to their natural origin and environmental compatibility, interest in microbial surfactants or biosurfactants has gained attention during last few years. These characteristics fulfill the demand of regulatory agencies and society to use more sustained and green chemicals. Microbial-derived surfactants can replace synthetic surfactants in a great variety of industrial applications as detergents, foaming, emulsifiers, solubilizers, and wetting agents. Change in the trend of consumers toward natural from synthetic additives and the increasing health and environmental concerns have created demand for new "green" additives in foods. Apart from their inherent surface-active properties, biosurfactants have shown antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities against food pathogens; therefore, biosurfactants can be versatile additives or ingredients of food processing. These interesting applications will be discussed in this review.

  2. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  3. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  4. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  5. Brine-resistant sulfonate surfactants for enhanced oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stournas, S.

    1983-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations of surfactant waterflooding is the instability of the commonly employed surfactants in the usual ionic environments of oil reservoirs. A specific modification to the usual structure of sulfonate surfactants not only makes them immune to high concentrations of monovalent and divalent cations, but also enables them to act as stabilizer of the common surfactants and to displace tertiary oil in brines of high salinity and divalent ion content.

  6. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengwu Wang; Xiaoyi Zhang; Jiwei Hu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies o...

  7. Novel surfactant-selective membrane electrode based on polyelectrolyte-surfactant complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, Ivan; Scherbinina, Tatiana; Fetin, Petr; Makarov, Ivan; Bilibin, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Novel class of active ionophores for surfactant selective electrodes is proposed. PVC membrane doped with polyelectrolyte-surfactant stoichiometric complex is used for ion-selective electrode construction responsive to cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide and related surfactants. New ionophore is quite stable and completely insoluble in aqueous media in wide range of pH. The electrode displays nearly Nernstian slope in CTAB concentration range 10(-6)-10(-3)M. Polyelectrolyte platform allows to design wide range of different ionophores responsive to cationic organic substances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  9. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN WATER-SOLUBLE NONIONIC POLYMERS AND SURFACTANT AGGREGATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRACKMAN, JC; ENGBERTS, JBFN; Herb, CA; Prudhomme, RK

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the chemical structure and charge of the surfactant on polymer-micelle interaction has been studied using various ionic and non-ionic surfactants, and surfactants of which the charge can be varied by (de)protonation. Octylthioglucoside, dodecyldimethylamine-oxide, alkylphosphates,

  10. Phenanthrene partitioning in sediment-surfactant-fresh/saline water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongwen; Wu Wenling; Wang Lei

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of salinity on the effectiveness of surfactants in the remediation of sediments contaminated with phenanthrene (PHE). This is an example of a more general application of surfactants in removing hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from contaminated soil/sediment in saline environments via in-situ enhanced sorption or ex-situ soil washing. Salinity effects on surfactant micelle formation and PHE partitioning into solution surfactant micelles and sorbed surfactant were investigated. The critical micelle concentration of surfactants decreased, and PHE partition between surfactant micelles and water increased with increasing salinity. Carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K ss ) of PHE onto the sorbed cationic surfactant increased significantly with increasing salinity, which illustrates a more pronounced immobilization of PHE by cationic surfactant in a saline system. Reduction of PHE sorption by anionic surfactant was more pronounced in the saline system, indicating that the anionic surfactant has a higher soil washing effectiveness in saline systems. - The effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced remediation technology was promoted when applying it in estuarine environment with a higher salinity.

  11. The Inhibiting or Accelerating Effect of Different Surfactants on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    The course of differential capacity curves of the electric double layer at the mercury electrode/surfactant solution interface was described for three different surfactants from different groups. Using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) it was found that the surfactants had a varying effect on the kinetics of electroreduction of Zn2+ ...

  12. Micellization of a Cationic Surfactant in Mixed Aqueous and Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reception

    surfactant molecules arrange themselves in bulk solutions into aggregates otherwise called micelles when the interface is fully saturated with the surfactant molecules. Micelle formation is driven by hydrophobic effect but opposed by electrostatic repulsion of the ionic head group (Jiang et al., 2009). Cationic surfactants like ...

  13. Adsorption of anionic surfactants in limestone medium during oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbolat, Serhat; Bagci, Suat [Middle East Technical Univ., Dept. of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-07-15

    Foam-forming surfactant performance was evaluated by several experimental methods (interfacial tension, foam stability, corefloods) using commercial surfactants. There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in water flood. To provide effective mobility control, the injected surfactant must propagate from the injection well toward the production well. One of the important parameters affecting propagation of foam-forming surfactant through the reservoir is the retention of surfactant due to its adsorption on reservoir rock. The determination of the adsorption of foam-forming surfactants in limestone reservoirs is important for the residual oil recovery efficiency. Adsorption measurements, recovery efficiencies, and surfactant and alkaline flooding experiments carried out with the representative of the selected surfactants alkaline solutions, linear alkyl benzene sulphonic acid (LABSA), sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), and NaOH in a limestone medium. These surfactants were selected with respect to their foaming ability. Calibration curves formed by pH measurements were used to determine the correct adsorption amount of the used surfactants and recovery efficiency of these surfactants compared with base waterflooding. The results showed that LABSA adsorbed more than SLES in limestone reservoirs. The recovery efficiency of SLES was higher than the recovery efficiency of LABSA, and they decreased the recovery efficiency with respect to only the water injection case. (Author)

  14. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  15. Conformational Stability of the NH2-Terminal Propeptide of the Precursor of Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángeles Bañares-Hidalgo

    Full Text Available Assembly of pulmonary surfactant lipid-protein complexes depends on conformational changes coupled with proteolytic maturation of proSP-B, the precursor of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B, along the surfactant biogenesis pathway in pneumocytes. Conformational destabilization of the N-terminal propeptide of proSP-B (SP-BN triggers exposure of the mature SP-B domain for insertion into surfactant lipids. We have studied the conformational stability during GdmCl- or urea-promoted unfolding of SP-BN with trp fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. Binding of the intermediate states to bis-ANS suggests their molten globule-like character. ΔG0H2O was ~ 12.7 kJ·mol-1 either with urea or GdmCl. None of the thermal transitions of SP-BN detected by CD correspond to protein unfolding. Differential scanning calorimetry of SP-BN evidenced two endothermic peaks involved in oligomer dissociation as confirmed with 2 M urea. Ionic strength was relevant since at 150 mM NaCl, the process originating the endotherm at the highest temperature was irreversible (Tm2 = 108.5°C with an activation energy of 703.8 kJ·mol-1. At 500 mM NaCl the process became reversible (Tm2 = 114.4°C and data were fitted to the Non-two States model with two subpeaks. No free thiols in the propeptide could be titrated by DTNB with or without 5.7 M GdmCl, indicating disulfide bonds establishment.

  16. Re-dissolution and de-compaction of DNA-cationic surfactant complexes using non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbyn, Conrad P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Gemici, Rabia; Dias, Rita S; Miguel, Maria G

    2009-12-28

    Addition of a cationic surfactant to a solution of DNA causes the formation of compacted DNA-cationic surfactant complexes which precipitate from aqueous solution. It has been shown previously that addition of anionic surfactant will re-dissolve and de-compact the DNA-cationic surfactant complexes and we find that addition of non-ionic surfactants of the alkylpolyoxyethylene type can be used similarly. In principle, these de-compaction and re-dissolution processes could occur either by stripping of the cationic surfactant from the DNA into mixed micelles with the non-ionic surfactant or by solubilisation of the DNA-cationic surfactant complexes within the non-ionic micelles. Solubility phase-boundary measurements, fluorescence microscopy observations of the de-compaction process and light scattering results indicate that de-compaction and re-dissolution occur by the stripping mechanism, even for non-ionic surfactants where the favourable attractive electrostatic interaction between the two surfactants is absent. Using measurements of critical micelle concentrations and calculations based on regular solution mixed micelle theory, we show that re-dissolution and de-compaction of the DNA-cationic surfactant complexes occurs when the concentration of free monomeric cationic surfactant is reduced (by incorporation into mixed micelles) below a critical value.

  17. Thermodynamics of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100-cationic surfactants mixtures at the cloud point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batigoec, Cigdem [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Akbas, Halide, E-mail: hakbas34@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Boz, Mesut [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Trakya University, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Non-ionic surfactants are used as emulsifier and solubilizate in such as textile, detergent and cosmetic. > Non-ionic surfactants occur phase separation at temperature as named the cloud point in solution. > Dimeric surfactants have attracted increasing attention due to their superior surface activity. > The positive values of {Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0} indicate that the process proceeds nonspontaneous. - Abstract: This study investigates the effects of gemini and conventional cationic surfactants on the cloud point (CP) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solutions. Instead of visual observation, a spectrophotometer was used for measurement of the cloud point temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of these mixtures were calculated at different cationic surfactant concentrations. The gemini surfactants of the alkanediyl-{alpha}-{omega}-bis (alkyldimethylammonium) dibromide type, on the one hand, with different alkyl groups containing m carbon atoms and an ethanediyl spacer, referred to as 'm-2-m' (m = 10, 12, and 16) and, on the other hand, with -C{sub 16} alkyl groups and different spacers containing s carbon atoms, referred to as '16-s-16' (s = 6 and 10) were synthesized, purified and characterized. Additions of the cationic surfactants to the TX-100 solution increased the cloud point temperature of the TX-100 solution. It was accepted that the solubility of non-ionic surfactant containing polyoxyethylene (POE) hydrophilic chain was a maximum at the cloud point so that the thermodynamic parameters were calculated at this temperature. The results showed that the standard Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0}), the enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub cp}{sup 0}) and the entropy ({Delta}S{sub cp}{sup 0}) of the clouding phenomenon were found positive in all cases. The standard free energy ({Delta}G{sub cp}{sup 0}) increased with increasing hydrophobic alkyl chain for both gemini and conventional cationic

  18. Pulmonary surfactant proteins and polymer combinations reduce surfactant inhibition by serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Karen W.; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H. William

    2011-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition that can be associated with capillary leak of serum into alveoli causing inactivation of surfactant. Resistance to inactivation is affected by types and concentrations of surfactant proteins, lipids, and polymers. Our aim was to investigate the effects of different combinations of these three components. A simple lipid mixture (DPPC/POPG) or a more complex lipid mixture (DPPC/POPC/POPG/cholesterol) was used. Native surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C obtained from pig lung lavage were added either singly or combined at two concentrations. Also, non-ionic polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran and the anionic polymer hyaluronan were added either singly or in pairs with hyaluronan included. Non-ionic polymers work by different mechanisms than anionic polymers, thus the purpose of placing them together in the same surfactant mixture was to evaluate if the combination would show enhanced beneficial effects. The resulting surfactant mixtures were studied in the presence or absence of serum. A modified bubble surfactometer was used to evaluate surface activities. Mixtures that included both SP-B and SP-C plus hyaluronan and either dextran or polyethylene glycol were found to be the most resistant to inhibition by serum. These mixtures, as well as some with either SP-B or SP-C with combined polymers were as or more resistant to inactivation than native surfactant. These results suggest that improved formulations of lung surfactants are possible and may be useful in reducing some types of surfactant inactivation in treating lung injuries. PMID:21741354

  19. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  20. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  1. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiko, David J [Woodridge, IL

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  2. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  3. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd...

  4. Lung Surfactant - The Indispensable Component of Respiratory ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. Lung Surfactant - The Indispensable Component of Respiratory Mechanics. Shweta Saxena. Research News Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 91-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Topological transformation of a surfactant bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant lamellar phases are often complicated by the formation of multilamellar (onions) under shear, which can originate simply by shaking the sample. A systematic study has been performed on the C10E3-D2O system in which different bilayer structures under a steady shear flow were investigated...

  6. EFFECT OF SURFACTANTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of non ionic surfactant on the mechanical properties of acetaminophen-wax matrix tablet and hence its implication on dissolution profile. Acetaminophen-wax matrix granules were prepared by melt granulation technique. This was formed by triturating acetaminophen ...

  7. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...

  8. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanohydroxyapatite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through a microwave coupled hydrothermal method using CTAB as a template. A successful synthesis of nanosized HAP spheres, rods and fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant. The concentration ...

  9. Surfactant free metal chalcogenides microparticles consisting of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANYASINAIDU GOTTAPU

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... Abstract. A versatile methodology for the production of organic surfactant-free metal chalcogenide microparticles consisting of nano crystallites at room temperature in a short time is described. The reaction of various metal sources with LiBH4 in the presence of either S or Se yielded their corresponding ...

  10. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Nanohydroxyapatite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through a microwave cou- pled hydrothermal method using CTAB as a template. A successful synthesis of nanosized HAP spheres, rods and fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant.

  11. Surfactants, interfaces and pores : a theoretical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huinink, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of surfactants in porous media by theoretical means. The influence of curvature of a surface on the adsorption has been studied with a mean field lattice (MFL) model, as developed by Scheutjens and Fleer. An analytical theory has been

  12. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  13. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 012, India. MS received 17 ... fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant. The concentration of the ... shown that many clinical applications of HAp mainly depend on shape ...

  14. Intratracheal atomized surfactant provides similar outcomes as bolus surfactant in preterm lambs with respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, Ilaria; Tingay, David G; Zannin, Emanuela; Bianco, Federico; Tagliabue, Paolo; Mosca, Fabio; Lavizzari, Anna; Ventura, Maria Luisa; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Black, Don; Sourial, Magdy; Dellacá, Raffaele L

    2016-07-01

    Aerosolization of exogenous surfactant remains a challenge. This study is aimed to evaluate the efficacy of atomized poractant alfa (Curosurf) administered with a novel atomizer in preterm lambs with respiratory distress syndrome. Twenty anaesthetized lambs, 127 ± 1 d gestational age, (mean ± SD) were instrumented before birth and randomized to receive either (i) positive pressure ventilation without surfactant (Control group), (ii) 200 mg/kg of bolus instilled surfactant (Bolus group) at 10 min of life or (iii) 200 mg/kg of atomized surfactant (Atomizer group) over 60 min from 10 min of life. All lambs were ventilated for 180 min with a standardized protocol. Lung mechanics, regional lung compliance (electrical impedance tomography), and carotid blood flow (CBF) were measured with arterial blood gas analysis. Dynamic compliance and oxygenation responses were similar in the Bolus and Atomizer groups, and both better than Control by 180 min (all P < 0.05; two-way ANOVA). Both surfactant groups demonstrated more homogeneous regional lung compliance throughout the study period. There were no differences in CBFConclusion:In a preterm lamb model, atomized surfactant resulted in similar gas exchange and mechanics as bolus administration. This study suggests evaluation of supraglottic atomization with this system when noninvasive support is warranted.

  15. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-07

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders.

  16. Influence of stability of polymer surfactant on oil displacement mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Li, Chengliang; Pi, Yanming; Wu, Di; He, Ying; Geng, Liang

    2018-02-01

    At present, most of the oilfields of China have entered the late stage of high water-cut development, and three oil recovery technique has become the leading technology for improving oil recovery. With the improvement of three oil recovery techniques, the polymer surfactant flooding technology has been widely promoted in oil fields in recent years. But in the actual field experiment, it has been found that the polymer surfactant has chromatographic separation at the extraction end, which indicates that the property of the polymer surfactant has changed during the displacement process. At present, there was few literature about how the stability of polymer surfactant affects the oil displacement mechanism. This paper used HuaDing-I polymer surfactant to conduct a micro photolithography glass flooding experiment, and then compared the oil displacement law of polymer surfactant before and after static setting. Finally, the influence law of stability of polymer surfactant on the oil displacement mechanism is obtained by comprehensive analysis.

  17. Status of surfactants as penetration enhancers in transdermal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iti Som

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are found in many existing therapeutic, cosmetic, and agro-chemical preparations. In recent years, surfactants have been employed to enhance the permeation rates of several drugs via transdermal route. The application of transdermal route to a wider range of drugs is limited due to significant barrier to penetration across the skin which is associated with the outermost stratum corneum layer. Surfactants have effects on the permeability characteristics of several biological membranes including skin. They have the potential to solubilize lipids within the stratum corneum. The penetration of the surfactant molecule into the lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum is strongly dependent on the partitioning behavior and solubility of surfactant. Surfactants ranging from hydrophobic agents such as oleic acid to hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate have been tested as permeation enhancer to improve drug delivery. This article reviews the status of surfactants as permeation enhancer in transdermal drug delivery of various drugs.

  18. Influence of Surfactants on Sodium Chloride Crystallization in Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Mohsin J; Liefferink, Rinse W; Schlegel, Simon J; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Daniel; Shahidzadeh, Noushine

    2017-05-02

    We study the influence of different surfactants on NaCl crystallization during evaporation of aqueous salt solutions. We found that at concentrations of sodium chloride close to saturation, only the cationic surfactant CTAB and the nonionic surfactant Tween 80 remain stable. For the nonionic surfactant, the high concentration of salt does not significantly change either the critical micellar concentration (CMC) or the surface tension at the CMC; for the cationic surfactant, the CMC is reduced by roughly 2 orders of magnitude upon adding the salt. The presence of both types of surfactants in the salt solution delays the crystallization of sodium chloride with evaporation. This, in turn, leads to high supersaturation which induces the rapid precipitation of a hopper crystal in the bulk. The crystallization inhibitor role of these surfactants is shown to be mainly due to the passivation of nucleation sites at both liquid/air and solid/liquid interfaces rather than a change in the evaporation rate which is found not to be affected by the presence of the surfactants. The adsorption of surfactants at the liquid/air interface prevents the crystallization at this location which is generally the place where the precipitation of sodium chloride is observed. Moreover, sum frequency generation spectroscopy measurements show that the surfactants are also present at the solid/liquid interface. The incorporation of the surfactants into the salt crystals is investigated using a novel, but simple, method based on surface tension measurements. Our results show that the nonionic surfactant Tween 80 is incorporated in the NaCl crystals but the cationic surfactant CTAB is not. Taken together, these results therefore allow us to establish the effect of the presence of surfactants on sodium chloride crystallization.

  19. The impact of nonionic surfactant additives on the nonequilibrium association between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes and ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegyver, Edit; Mészáros, Róbert

    2014-03-28

    The effect of uncharged surfactant additives on the oppositely charged polyion/ionic surfactant complexation is usually described as a direct equilibrium association between the polyelectrolyte molecules and free mixed micelles analogous to the polyion/colloidal particle interactions. This approach predicts that the binding of the ionic surfactant to the polyelectrolyte molecules can be completely suppressed by increasing the nonionic-to-ionic surfactant ratio. In the present work, it is shown that the addition of nonionic surfactants to poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/sodium dodecyl sulfate mixtures considerably enhances the binding of the anionic surfactant to the polycation in the dilute surfactant concentration regime. The dynamic light scattering, turbidity, electrophoretic mobility and fluorescence spectroscopic measurements are consistent with the synergic binding of the ionic and nonionic surfactants to the polyelectrolyte molecules. The enhanced surfactant binding could be utilized for the preparation of stable colloidal dispersions of novel polyion/mixed surfactant nanoparticles over a wide composition range provided that adequate mixing protocols are used. These results clearly indicate that the nonionic surfactant additives can be successfully used to tune the nonequilibrium association of oppositely charged macromolecules and amphiphiles.

  20. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Krzysztoń, Rafał; Kida, Wojciech; Andrzejewska, Weronika; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3- decyloxymethyl) pentane chloride (gemini surfactant) on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase. PMID:23571492

  1. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoashi, Toshihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Passeron, Thierry; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanosomes are organelles specialized for the production of melanin pigment and are specifically produced by melanocytic cells. More than 150 pigmentation-related genes have been identified, including glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB). A recent proteomics analysis revealed that GPNMB is localized in melanosomes, and GPNMB is a membrane-bound glycoprotein that shows high homology with a well-known melanosomal structural protein, Pmel17/gp100. In this study, we show that GPNMB is expressed in melanocytes of normal human skin, as well as in human melanoma cells. GPNMB is heavily glycosylated and is enriched in mature (stage III and IV) melanosomes in contrast to MART-1 and Pmel17, which are abundant in early (stage I and II) melanosomes. MART-1 and Pmel17 play critical roles in the maturation of early melanosomes; thus, we speculate that GPNMB might be important in the functions of late melanosomes, possibly their transport and/or transfer to keratinocytes. We also demonstrate that a secreted form of GPNMB is released by ectodomain shedding from the largely Golgi-modified form of GPNMB and that the PKC and Ca2+ intracellular signaling pathways regulate that shedding. We conclude that GPNMB is a melanosomal protein that is released by proteolytic ectodomain shedding and might be a useful and specific histological marker of melanocytic cells.—Hoashi, T., Sato, S., Yamaguchi, Y., Passeron, T., Tamaki, K., Hearing, V. J. Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein b, a melanocytic cell marker, is a melanosome-specific and proteolytically released protein. PMID:20056711

  2. Application of peptide gemini surfactants as novel solubilization surfactants for photosystems I and II of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Shuhei; Umezaki, Katsunari; Noji, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Taga, Keijiro; Dewa, Takehisa; Ito, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toshiki; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2013-09-17

    We designed novel peptide gemini surfactants (PG-surfactants), DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D, which can solubilize Photosystem I (PSI) of Thermosynecoccus elongatus and Photosystem II (PSII) of Thermosynecoccus vulcanus in an aqueous buffer solution. To assess the detailed effects of PG-surfactants on the original supramolecular membrane protein complexes and functions of PSI and PSII, we applied the surfactant exchange method to the isolated PSI and PSII. Spectroscopic properties, light-induced electron transfer activity, and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that PSI and PSII could be solubilized not only with retention of the original supramolecular protein complexes and functions but also without forming aggregates. Furthermore, measurement of the lifetime of light-induced charge-separation state in PSI revealed that both surfactants, especially DKDKC12D, displayed slight improvement against thermal denaturation below 60 °C compared with that using β-DDM. This degree of improvement in thermal resistance still seems low, implying that the peptide moieties did not interact directly with membrane protein surfaces. By conjugating an electron mediator such as methyl viologen (MV(2+)) to DKDKC12K (denoted MV-DKDKC12K), we obtained derivatives that can trap the generated reductive electrons from the light-irradiated PSI. After immobilization onto an indium tin oxide electrode, a cathodic photocurrent from the electrode to the PSI/MV-DKDKC12K conjugate was observed in response to the interval of light irradiation. These findings indicate that the PG-surfactants DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D provide not only a new class of solubilization surfactants but also insights into designing other derivatives that confer new functions on PSI and PSII.

  3. Interactions in mixed micellar systems of an amphoteric chelating surfactant and ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanedal, Ida; Persson, Gerd; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-02-11

    Mixtures of ionic surfactants and the chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) have been examined in terms of interactions in mixed micellar systems. The amphoteric 4-C12-DTPA is zwitterionic with a negative net charge at the studied pH levels. The investigated ionic surfactants were the cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DoTAC), the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the zwitterionic dimethyldodecylamine-N-oxide (DDAO). The surfactants all have the same hydrophobic chain lengths, and the results are evaluated in terms of headgroup interactions. 4-C12-DTPA interacts with different ionic surfactants by accepting or donating protons to the aqueous solution to increase the attractive interactions between the two surfactants; i.e., the protonation equilibrium of 4-C12-DTPA is shifted in different directions depending on whether there are predominant repulsions between positively or negatively charged groups in the mixed micelles. This was monitored by measuring pH vs concentration in the mixed systems. By measuring the pH, it was also possible to study the shift in the protonation equilibrium at increasing concentration, as the composition in the micelles approaches the composition in the total solution. Following the approach of Rubingh's regular solution theory, the interaction parameter β for mixed micelle formation was calculated from the cmc values determined by NMR diffusometry. Synergism in mixed micelle formation and negative β parameters were found in all of the investigated systems. As expected, the most negative β parameter was found in the mixture with DoTAC, followed by DDAO and SDS. The self-diffusion in the 4-C12-DTPA/DoTAC system was also discussed. The self-diffusion coefficient vs concentration plots show two distinctly different curves, depending on the surfactant that is present in excess.

  4. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a

  5. Cycle-Induced Flow and Surfactant Transport in an Alveolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H. H.

    2002-11-01

    The flow and transport in an alveolus are of fundamental importance to partial liquid ventilation, surfactant transport, pulmonary drug administration, cell-cell signaling pathways and gene therapy. We model the system in which an alveolus is partially filled with liquid in the presence of surfactants. Assuming a circular interface due to sufficiently strong surface tension, we can apply two-dimensional bipolar coordinates to describe the system. We then combine analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Stokes flow and the surfactant concentration. In the absence of surfactants, there is no steady streaming because of reversibility of the Stokes flow. The presence of surfactants however induces a non-trivial cycle-averaged surfactant concentration gradient along the interface that generates steady streaming. The steady streaming patterns (e.g., number of vortices) depend on the parameters, especially on the ratio of inspiration to expiration periods (I:E ratio). Either smaller or larger I:E ratio exhibits two primary vortices but the direction of primary vortices for small I:E is opposite to large I:E. Extension to soluble surfactants is also discussed. For sufficiently high surfactant bulk concentration, the surfactant transport is sorption-controlled and soluble surfactants diminish the size of steady vortices near the alveolar opening. For the estimated steady velocity u 10-5 cm/s, the corresponding Peclet number is 10-7/ D_m. Therefore, for Dm <= 10-7 cm^2/s, the convective transport dominates.

  6. Tuning of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in aqueous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of charged (anionic) silica nanoparticles with ionic and nonionic surfactants has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surfactants used are anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and nonionic decaoxyethylene n-dodecylether (C12E10). The measurements are carried out at fixed concentration (1 wt%) of silica nanoparticles and with surfactant concentration varied in the range 0-2 wt%. It is found that there is no direct interaction between the nanoparticles and the surfactant (SDS) when they both are similarly charged. Both the silica nanoparticles and micelles coexist individually with no significant change in the structure of the micelles with respect to that in the pure surfactant solution. On the other hand, the presence of oppositely charged surfactant (DTAB) leads to the aggregation of silica nanoparticles even with very low surfactant concentration. The aggregation of silica nanoparticles is characterized by fractal structure and its fractal dimension remains constant with the increase in the surfactant concentration. In the case of nonionic surfactant, it interacts with the individual silica nanoparticles. The interaction is examined using two models: one that considers the surfactant layer coating on silica nanoparticles and a second one where the surface of the nanoparticles is decorated by the micelles. Contrast variation SANS measurements confirm the uniform decoration of nonionic micelles on the nanoparticles.

  7. Tuning of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in aqueous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V K

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of charged (anionic) silica nanoparticles with ionic and nonionic surfactants has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The surfactants used are anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and nonionic decaoxyethylene n-dodecylether (C 12 E 10 ). The measurements are carried out at fixed concentration (1 wt%) of silica nanoparticles and with surfactant concentration varied in the range 0-2 wt%. It is found that there is no direct interaction between the nanoparticles and the surfactant (SDS) when they both are similarly charged. Both the silica nanoparticles and micelles coexist individually with no significant change in the structure of the micelles with respect to that in the pure surfactant solution. On the other hand, the presence of oppositely charged surfactant (DTAB) leads to the aggregation of silica nanoparticles even with very low surfactant concentration. The aggregation of silica nanoparticles is characterized by fractal structure and its fractal dimension remains constant with the increase in the surfactant concentration. In the case of nonionic surfactant, it interacts with the individual silica nanoparticles. The interaction is examined using two models: one that considers the surfactant layer coating on silica nanoparticles and a second one where the surface of the nanoparticles is decorated by the micelles. Contrast variation SANS measurements confirm the uniform decoration of nonionic micelles on the nanoparticles.

  8. How to overcome surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokra, Daniela; Calkovska, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is caused by meconium components, by plasma proteins leaking through the injured alveolocapillary membrane and by substances originated in meconium-induced inflammation. Surfactant inactivation in MAS may be diminished by several ways. Firstly, aspirated meconium should be removed from the lungs to decrease concentrations of meconium inhibitors coming into the contact with surfactant in the alveolar compartment. Once the endogenous surfactant becomes inactivated, components of surfactant should be substituted by exogenous surfactant at a sufficient dose, and surfactant administration should be repeated, if oxygenation remains compromised. To delay the inactivation by inhibitors, exogenous surfactants may be enriched with surfactant proteins, phospholipids, or other substances such as polymers. Finally, to diminish an adverse action of products of meconium-induced inflammation on both endogenous and exogenously delivered surfactant, anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered. A combined therapeutic approach may result in better outcome in patients with MAS and in lower costs of treatment. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. [ANTIMICROBIAL ACTION OF NOCARDIA VACCINII IMV B-7405 SURFACTANTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirog, T P; Beregova, K A; Savenko, I V; Shevchuk, T A; Iutynska, G O

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants on some bacteria (including pathogens of genera Proteus, Staphylococcus, Enterobacter), yeast of Candida species and fungi (Aspergillus niger R-3, Fusarium culmorum T-7). The antimi- crobial properties of surfactant were determined in suspension culture by Koch method and also by index of the minimum inhibitory concentration. Surfactants were extracted from supernatant of cultural liquid by mixture of chloroform and methanol (2:1). It is shown that the antimicrobial properties of N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactant depended on the degree of purification (supernatant, solution of surfactant), concentration and exposure. Survival of Escherichia coli IEM-1 and Bacillus subtilis BT-2 (both vegetative cells and spores) after treatment for 1-2 hours with surfactants solution and the supernatant (the surfactant concentration 21 µg/ml) was 3-28%. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants on studied bacteria, yeast and micromycetes were 11.5-85.0; 11.5-22.5 and 165.0-325.0 µ/ml respectively. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants are comparable to those of the known microbial surfactants. The possibility of using the supernatant of culture liquid as an effective antimicrobial agent noticeably simplifies and reduces the cost of the technology of its obtaining.

  10. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  11. Molecular simulation of surfactant-assisted protein refolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng; Liu, Zhixia; Zhang, Minlian; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2005-04-01

    Protein refolding to its native state in vitro is a challenging problem in biotechnology, i.e., in the biomedical, pharmaceutical, and food industry. Protein aggregation and misfolding usually inhibit the recovery of proteins with their native states. These problems can be partially solved by adding a surfactant into a suitable solution environment. However, the process of this surfactant-assisted protein refolding is not well understood. In this paper, we wish to report on the first-ever simulations of surfactant-assisted protein refolding. For these studies, we defined a simple model for the protein and the surfactant and investigated how a surfactant affected the folding behavior of a two-dimensional lattice protein molecule. The model protein and model surfactant were chosen such that we could capture the important features of the folding process and the interaction between the protein and the surfactant, namely, the hydrophobic interaction. It was shown that, in the absence of surfactants, a protein in an "energy trap" conformation, i.e., a local energy minima, could not fold into the native form, which was characterized by a global energy minimum. The addition of surfactants created folding pathways via the formation of protein-surfactant complexes and thus enabled the conformations that fell into energy trap states to escape from these traps and to form the native proteins. The simulation results also showed that it was necessary to match the hydrophobicity of surfactant to the concentration of denaturant, which was added to control the folding or unfolding of a protein. The surfactants with different hydrophobicity had their own concentration range on assisting protein refolding. All of these simulations agreed well with experimental results reported elsewhere, indicating both the validity of the simulations presented here and the potential application of the simulations for the design of a surfactant on assisting protein refolding.

  12. Interactions of Phospholipid Vesicles with Cationic and Anionic Oligomeric Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Qiao, Fulin; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2017-07-27

    This work studied the interactions of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) with cationic ammonium surfactants and anionic sulfate or sulfonate surfactants of different oligomeric degrees, including cationic monomeric DTAB, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 Br 2 , and trimeric DDAD as well as anionic monomeric SDS, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 (SO 3 ) 2 , and trimeric TED-(C 10 SO 3 Na) 3 . The partition coefficient P of these surfactants between the DOPC vesicles and water was determined with isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) by titrating concentrated DOPC solution into the monomer solution of these surfactants. It was found that the P value increases with the increase of the surfactant oligomeric degree. Moreover, the enthalpy change and the Gibbs free energy for the transition of these surfactants from water into the DOPC bilayer become more negative with increasing the oligomeric degree. Meanwhile, the calcein release experiment proves that the surfactant with a higher oligomeric degree shows stronger ability of changing the permeability of the DOPC vesicles. Furthermore, the solubilization of the DOPC vesicles by these oligomeric surfactants was studied by ITC, turbidity, and dynamic light scattering, and thus the phase boundaries for the surfactant/lipid mixtures have been determined. The critical surfactant to lipid ratios for the onset and end of the solubilization for the DOPC vesicles derived from the phase boundaries decrease remarkably with increasing the oligomeric degree. Overall, the surfactant with a larger oligomerization degree shows stronger ability in incorporating into the lipid bilayer, altering the membrane permeability and solubilizing lipid vesicles, which provides comprehensive understanding about the effects of structure and shape of oligomeric surfactant molecules on lipid-surfactant interactions.

  13. Moving liquid surfactant as a way of assessing the properties of surfactant, liquids and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, A. O.; Titov, O. P.; Titov, M. O.; Karbainov, A. N.

    2011-04-01

    In the study of surface phenomena of the main and only instrumentally-defined parameters are surface tension and wetting angle, including in the field of nanotechnology. These indicators were introduced more than 200 years ago, and any new inventions in this field was no more. The university developed a new method and device for determining the surface activity. The basis of the method and device is the use of video cameras to record the droplet size and changes on the surface of the liquid layer of known thickness from the impact of drops of surfactant (surfactant). Committed changes are then processed using computer software and calculated parameters, which can be characterized by a surfactant and surface properties, which is fluid and very liquid. Determine the surface tension or contact angle is not necessary. Measures of surface activity using the method and device are: The amount of fluid that can move one kilogram of surfactant. The value of this index varies from tens of nanometers to hundreds of thousands of units. The indicator can be converted to energy units, joules. The amount of fluid confined by a surface per unit time is calculated based on the first indicator, complements the characterization of surfactant and may be an indicator of surface characteristics and fluid. Propagation speed of the capillary and microwaves. This indicator complements the first two.

  14. Hydrogels of sodium alginate in cationic surfactants: Surfactant dependent modulation of encapsulation/release toward Ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Suraya; Chat, Oyais Ahmad; Maswal, Masrat; Ashraf, Uzma; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmad

    2015-11-20

    The interaction of cetyltrimethylammoium bromide (CTAB) and its gemini homologue (butanediyl-1,4-bis (dimethylcetylammonium bromide), 16-4-16 with biocompatible polymer sodium alginate (SA) has been investigated in aqueous medium. Addition of K2CO3 influences viscoelastic properties of surfactant impregnated SA via competition between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Viscosity of these polymer-surfactant systems increases with increase in concentration of K2CO3, and a cryogel is formed at about 0.5M K2CO3 concentration. The thermal stability of gel (5% SA+0.5M K2CO3) decreases with increase in surfactant concentration, a minimum is observed with increase in 16-4-16 concentration. The impact of surfactant addition on the alginate structure vis-à-vis its drug loading capability and release thereof was studied using Ibuprofen (IBU) as the model drug. The hydrogel with 16-4-16 exhibits higher IBU encapsulation and faster release in comparison to the one containing CTAB. This higher encapsulation-cum-faster release capability has been related to micelle mediated solubilization and greater porosity of the hydrogel with gemini surfactant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of novel fluorinated surfactants in aqueous film forming foams and commercial surfactant concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Lisa A; Mabury, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies comparing the results of total organofluorine-combustion ion chromatography (TOF-CIC) to targeted analysis of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have shown that a significant yet variable portion of the total organofluorine in environmental and biological samples is in the form of unknown PFASs. A portion of this unknown organofluorine likely originates in proprietary fluorinated surfactants not included in LC-MS/MS analyses and not fully characterized by the environmental science community, which may enter the environment through use in aqueous film forming foams (AFFFs) for firefighting. Contamination of water, biota, and soils with various PFASs due to AFFF deployment has been documented. Ten fluorinated AFFF concentrates, 9 of which were obtained from fire sites in Ontario, Canada, and two commercial fluorinated surfactant concentrates were characterized in order to identify novel fluorinated surfactants. Mixed-mode ion exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) fractionated fluorinated surfactants based on ionic character. High resolution mass spectrometry assigned molecular formulas to fluorinated surfactant ions, while collision induced dissociation (CID) spectra assisted structural elucidation. LC-MS/MS detected isomers and low abundance fluorinated chain lengths. In total, 12 novel and 10 infrequently reported PFAS classes were identified in fluorinated chain lengths from C3 to C15 for a total of 103 compounds. Further research should examine the environmental fate and toxicology of these PFASs, especially their potential as perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA) precursors.

  16. O/W emulsions stabilised by both low molecular weight surfactants and colloidal particles: The effect of surfactant type and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2010-12-01

    The stability against coalescence of O/W emulsions in the presence of both surfactants and colloidal particles was investigated. In particular the effect of the surfactant type and concentration in these emulsifier mixtures on the O/W emulsions' stability was studied. Two types of surfactants were selected; those that have the ability to stabilise O/W emulsions on their own (O/W surfactants) and those that cannot (W/O surfactants). Tween 60 and Sodium Caseinate were selected as the O/W surfactants and lecithin as the W/O surfactant. Oil-in-water emulsions prepared with both particles and any of the three surfactants were stable against coalescence but, depending on the type of surfactant, the behaviour of the systems was found to depend on surfactant concentration. The droplet sizes of emulsions stabilised by mixed emulsifier systems containing low concentrations of O/W surfactants (Tween 60 or Sodium Caseinate) were smaller than those solely stabilised by either the surfactant or particles alone. At intermediate O/W surfactants concentrations, the droplet sizes of the emulsions increased. Further increases in the O/W surfactants' concentration, resulted in the complete removal of particles from the interface with the system now behaving as a surfactant-only stabilised emulsion. The behaviour of emulsions stabilised by emulsifier mixtures containing W/O surfactants was not dependent on the concentration of surfactant: no removal of particles was observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of bovine serum albumin with cationic imidazolium and quaternary ammonium gemini surfactants: effects of surfactant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Ao, Mingqi; Xu, Guiying; Liu, Teng; Zhang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of BSA with a series of cationic imidazolium gemini surfactants ([C(n)-s-C(n)im]Br(2), n=10, 12, 14, s=2, 4, 6), quaternary ammonium surfactants (C(12)C(2)C(12)), and their corresponding monomers ([C(12)mim]Br and DTAB) are investigated by fluorescence using pyrene as a molecular probe, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and UV-visible absorption spectra. These surfactants are used to elucidate the effects of surfactant hydrophilic head group, spacer length, and hydrophobic chain length on the conformation of BSA. The results of fluorescence spectra and CD show that the imidazolium gemini surfactants with shorter spacers or with longer hydrophobic chains have a larger effect on BSA unfolding, and the imidazolium gemini surfactant interacts with BSA more strongly than its corresponding monomer and the quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant. These conclusions have been confirmed by the binding constants (K(a)) and binding sites (n) for the BSA/surfactant system. Stern-Volmer quenching constants K(SV) of cationic surfactants binding to BSA are obtained, indicating that the probable quenching mechanism is initiated by ground-state complex formation rather than by dynamic collision. Moreover, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the surfactants mainly interact with tryptophan residues of BSA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. On the rheology of mixed systems of hydrophobically modified polyacrylate microgels and surfactants: Role of the surfactant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luís; Lindman, Björn; Klotz, Björn; Böttcher, Axel; Haake, Hans-Martin; Antunes, Filipe E

    2018-03-01

    The rheological control of suspensions is of key interest in the formulation design. A chemically cross-linked hydrophobically modified poly(acrylic acid) (HMCL-PAA), used as rheology modifier, is pH sensitive and shows swelling behavior above a critical pH due to the ionization of the acrylic acid groups. At low pH, HMCL-PAA suspensions are liquid and turbid. The binding of surfactants to HMCL-PAA, at low pH conditions, can result in significant changes on rheology and transparency of the polymeric suspensions, due to the swelling of the microgel particles. The influence of surfactants addition on the rheological properties and transparency of HMCL-PAA suspensions was determined. A systematic study was performed using different types of surfactants (ionic, non-ionic and zwitterionic). The gelation efficiency of HMCL-PAA suspensions at low pH is strongly dependent on surfactant architecture: ionic surfactants are found to be much more efficient than non-ionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Ionic surfactants lead to a liquid-to-gel transition accompanied by an increase of transparency of the suspensions. Among the ionic surfactants, anionics show stronger interactions with the polymer. Also the surfactant hydrophobicity is relevant; the more hydrophobic the surfactant, the stronger is the binding to the polymer and thus the larger the particle swelling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium behaviour of surfactant systems

    OpenAIRE

    Reissig, Louisa

    2010-01-01

    In binary systems, surfactant molecules can self-assemble into a large variety of structures depending on their chemical structure, concentration and temperature. The properties and stability of the phases, their coexistence regions and the formation of metastable structures is of great importance not only for fundamental understanding, but also for applications in many fields including industry and medicine. This thesis presents studies of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium b...

  20. Dynamics of contracting surfactant-covered filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Xu, Qi; Basaran, Osman

    2013-11-01

    When drops are produced from a nozzle, a thin liquid thread connects the primary drop that is about to form to the rest of the liquid in the nozzle. Often, the thread becomes disconnected from both the primary drop and the remnant liquid mass hanging from the nozzle and thereby gives rise to a free filament. Due to surface tension, the free filament then contracts or recoils. During recoil, the filament can either contract into a single satellite droplet or break up into several small satellites. Such satellite droplets are undesirable in applications where they can, for example, cause misting in a manufacturing environment and mar product quality in ink-jet printing. In many applications, the filaments are coated with a monolayer of surfactant. In this work, we study the dynamics of contraction of slender filaments of a Newtonian fluid that are covered with a monolayer of surfactant when the surrounding fluid is a passive gas. Taking advantage of the fact that the filaments are long and slender, we use a 1D-slender-jet approximation of the governing system of equations consisting of the Navier-Stokes system and the convection-diffusion equation for surfactant transport. We solve the 1D system of equations by a finite element based numerical method.

  1. Influence of metacide - surfactant complexes on agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orynkul Esimova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexes based on surfactants and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (metacide are important for agriculture. This paper considers compositions of known bactericidal metacide with different surfactants: anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulphate (DDSNa and nonionic surfactant Tween 80 (monooleate of oxyethylenated anhydrosorbitols. The effect of individual components and associates of metacide and surfactants on productivity and infection of cereals was studied. According to the study, the highest productivity and infection rate were shown by the associate of metacide and Tween-80. At concentration of Tween-80 in aqueous solution equal to 0.001% in combination with metacide, efficiency was 98% at 0% infection. The surface tension and the wetting of metacide, DDSNa, Tween-80, and associates of metacide with surfactants were studied. In comparison with individual components, metacide-DDSNa and metacide-Tween-80 associates have higher surface activity.

  2. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding...... lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential...... in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic...

  3. Antibacterial Activities of Surfactants in the Laundry Detergents and Isolation of the Surfactant Resistant Aquatic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Yoko; Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

     Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (POLE) are major surfactants contained in the laundry detergents. In the present study, the antibacterial activities of the surfactants to aquatic microorganisms were compared. When freshwater samples from a small river in Okayama city were treated with each of the surfactants, only LAS showed the significant antibacterial activity. Several strains, which survived after the treatment with 2.0% LAS, were isolated and identified by sequencing of 16S rDNA. All strains were classified into the family Enterobacteriaceae. However, this family was not a major member of the aquatic microflora, suggesting that the bacteria in Enterobacteriaceae have a common property of LAS-resistance in the river water.

  4. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Christopher Cheng-Hwa; Ma, Sze

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 u...

  5. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD.

  6. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Elliott

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung

  7. Nanoparticle-enabled delivery of surfactants in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourafkan, Ehsan; Hu, Zhongliang; Wen, Dongsheng

    2018-06-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on the reservoir rocks surface is a serious issue in many energy and environment related areas. Learning from the concept of drug delivery in the nano-medicine field, this work proposes and validates the concept of using nanoparticles to deliver a mixture of surfactants into a porous medium. TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) are used as carriers for a blend of surfactants mixtures including anionic alkyl aryl sulfonic acid (AAS) and nonionic alcohol ethoxylated (EA) at the optimum salinity and composition conditions. The transport of NPs through a core sample of crushed sandstone grains and the adsorption of surfactants are evaluated. By using TiO 2 NPs, the adsorption of surfactant molecules can be significantly reduced, i.e. half of the initial adsorption value. The level of surfactant adsorption reduction is related to the NPs transport capability through the porous medium. An application study shows that comparing to surfactant flooding alone, the total oil recovery can be increased by 7.81% of original oil in place (OOIP) by using nanoparticle bonded surfactants. Such work shows the promise of NP as an effective surfactant carrier for sandstone reservoirs, which could have many potential applications in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and environmental remediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fractal Aggregation in Silica Nanoparticle and Surfactant Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.

    2011-07-01

    The role of cationic surfactant on particle aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We show that the aggregation is characterized by the fractal structure. The fractal dimension is found to be same irrespective of varying the surfactant and its concentration. These results are explained on the basis of that the aggregation of particles mediated by the oppositely charged surfactant micelles between them and governed by the diffusion limited aggregation. Both adsorbed and free micelles coexists and the number of adsorbed micelles does not change with varying surfactant concentration however decreases with the increase in the size of the micelle.

  9. Surfactants have multi-fold effects on skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemery, Emmanuelle; Briançon, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Yves; Oddos, Thierry; Gohier, Annie; Boyron, Olivier; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is responsible for the barrier properties of the skin and the role of intercorneocyte skin lipids, particularly their structural organization, in controlling SC permeability is acknowledged. Upon contacting the skin, surfactants interact with the SC components leading to barrier damage. To improve knowledge of the effect of several classes of surfactant on skin barrier function at three different levels. The influence of treatments of human skin explants with six non-ionic and four ionic surfactant solutions on the physicochemical properties of skin was investigated. Skin surface wettability and polarity were assessed through contact angle measurements. Infrared spectroscopy allowed monitoring the SC lipid organization. The lipid extraction potency of surfactants was evaluated thanks to HPLC-ELSD assays. One anionic and one cationic surfactant increased the skin polarity by removing the sebaceous and epidermal lipids and by disturbing the organization of the lipid matrix. Another cationic surfactant displayed a detergency effect without disturbing the skin barrier. Several non-ionic surfactants disturbed the lipid matrix organization and modified the skin wettability without any extraction of the skin lipids. Finally two non-ionic surfactants did not show any effect on the investigated parameters or on the skin barrier. The polarity, the organization of the lipid matrix and the lipid composition of the skin allowed describing finely how surfactants can interact with the skin and disturb the skin barrier function.

  10. Surfactant Effects on Lipid-Based Vesicles Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bnyan, Ruba; Khan, Iftikhar; Ehtezazi, Touraj; Saleem, Imran; Gordon, Sarah; O'Neill, Francis; Roberts, Matthew

    2018-01-11

    Understanding the effect of surfactant properties is critical when designing vesicular delivery systems. This review evaluates previous studies to explain the influence of surfactant properties on the behavior of lipid vesicular systems, specifically their size, charge, stability, entrapment efficiency, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Generally, the size of vesicles decreases by increasing the surfactant concentration, carbon chain length, the hydrophilicity of the surfactant head group, and the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance. Increasing surfactant concentration can also lead to an increase in charge, which in turn reduces vesicle aggregation and enhances the stability of the system. The vesicles' entrapment efficiency not only depends on the surfactant properties but also on the encapsulated drug. For example, the encapsulation of a lipophilic drug could be enhanced by using a surfactant with a low hydrophilic-lipophilic balance value. Moreover, the membrane permeability of vesicles depends on the surfactant's carbon chain length and transition temperature. In addition, surfactants have a clear influence on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics such as sustaining drug release, enhancing the circulation time of vesicles, improving targeting and cellular uptake. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inactivation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Nonionic Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asculai, Samuel S.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rancourt, Martha W.; Kupferberg, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Nonionic surface-active agents possessing ether or amide linkages between the hydrophillic and hydrophobic portions of the molecule rapidly inactivated the infectivity of herpes simplex viruses. The activity stemmed from the ability of nonionic surfactants to dissolve lipid-containing membranes. This was confirmed by observing surfactant destruction of mammalian cell plasma membranes and herpes simplex virus envelopes. Proprietary vaginal contraceptive formulations containing nonionic surfactants also inactivated herpes simplex virus infectivity. This observation suggests that nonionic surfactants in appropriate formulation could effectively prevent herpes simplex virus transmission. Images PMID:208460

  12. Perfluorinated surfactants in surface and drinking waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutlarek, Dirk; Exner, Martin; Färber, Harald

    2006-09-01

    In this paper recent results are provided of an investigation on the discovery of 12 perfluorinated surfactants (PS) in different surface and drinking waters (Skutlarek et al. 2006 a, Skutlarek et al. 2006 b). In the last years, many studies have reported ubiquitous distribution of this group of perfluorinated chemicals, especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in the environment, particularly in wildlife animal and human samples (Giesy and Kannan 2001, Houde et al. 2006, Prevedouros et al. 2006). Perfluorinated surfactants (e.g. PFOS and PFOA) have shown different potentials for reproductory interference and carcinogenity in animal experiments as well as partly long half-lives in humans (Guruge et al. 2006, FSA UK 2006a, FSA UK 2006b, 3M 2005, OECD 2002, Yao and Zhong 2005). They possess compound-dependent extreme recalcitrance against microbiological and chemical degradation and, in addition, they show variable potentials for bioaccumulation in animals and humans (Houde et al. 2006). Surface and drinking water samples were collected from different sampling sites: Surface waters: samples taken from the rivers Rhine, Ruhr, Moehne and some of their tributaries. Further samples were taken from the Rhine-Herne-Canal and the Wesel-Datteln-Canal. Drinking waters: samples taken in public buildings of the Rhine-Ruhr area. After sample clean-up and concentration by solid-phase extraction, the perfluorinated surfactants were determined using HPLC-MS/MS. All measured concentrations (sum of seven mainly detected components) in the Rhine river and its main tributaries (mouths) were determined below 100 ng/L. The Ruhr river (tributary of the Rhine) showed the highest concentration (94 ng/L), but with a completely different pattern of components (PFOA as major component), as compared with the other tributaries and the Rhine river. Further investigations along the Ruhr river showed remarkably high concentrations of PS in the upper reaches of

  13. Influences and mechanisms of surfactants on pyrene biodegradation based on interactions of surfactant with a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Lizhong; Li, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation has been proposed as a promising technology for the treatment of organic polluted soils; however its application has been hindered by the controversial influences and mechanisms of surfactants on the biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds. To address this problem, effects of five surfactants on the sorption and biodegradation of pyrene by Klebsiella oxytoca PYR-1, as well as their interactions with bacterial cell surface and membrane lipids were investigated. We found that surfactants enhanced or inhibited pyrene biodegradation depending on their effects on the sorption of pyrene onto bacterial cell, which occurred mainly through modifying cell surface hydrophobicity (such as Tween series surfactants) or disrupting bacterial membrane (such as Triton X-100), respectively. A relatively high positive correlation (Psurfactant, indicating that surfactant-induced sorption played the dominant role during pyrene biodegradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TOXICITY COMPARISON OF BIOSURFACTANTS AND SYNTHETIC SURFACTANTS USED IN OIL SPILL REMEDIATION TO TWO ESTUARINE SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative environmental toxicities of synthetic and biogenic surfactants used in oil spill remediation efforts are not well understood. Acute and chronic toxicities of three synthetic surfactants and three microbially produced surfactants were determined and compared in this s...

  15. Influence of pulmonary surfactant on in vitro bactericidal activities of amoxicillin, ceftazidime, and tobramycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van 't Veen (Annemarie); J.W. Mouton (Johan); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); P. Dekkers; B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe influence of a natural pulmonary surfactant on antibiotic activity was investigated to assess the possible use of exogenous surfactant as a vehicle for antibiotic delivery to the lung. The influence of surfactant on the bactericidal activity of

  16. Immune response in rabbit ovaries following infection of a recombinant myxoma virus expressing rabbit zona pellucida protein B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Wenyi; Holland, Michael; Janssens, Peter; Seamark, Robert; Kerr, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the autoimmune response in rabbit ovaries following infection with a recombinant myxoma virus expressing rabbit zona pellucida protein B (MV-ZPB). A specific IgG antibody response to ZPB was elicited in the serum of infected rabbits and the antibody strongly bound to the zona pellucida of oocytes in secondary and tertiary follicles. T cell infiltration in the ovary was detected in a small proportion of the infected rabbits. In spite of this, the mean number of preovulatory and tertiary follicles in the ovary was significantly reduced at 30 days postinfection compared with that of the infected and uninfected controls. Histological analysis revealed that the cortex and medulla of these ovaries had accumulated a large number of probably luteinized cells and there were no follicles in these areas, indicating the ovaries were in a severe pathological condition. The data suggest that the delivery of ZP antigens using a recombinant myxoma virus is a prospective way to develop immunocontraceptive vaccines for rabbit population control, but that more understanding of the kinetics of the autoimmune response induced by viral delivery is needed

  17. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  18. Surfactant-Solvent Interaction Effects on the Micellization of Cationic Surfactants in a Carboxylic Acid-Based Deep Eutectic Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Fernandez, Adrian; Hammond, Oliver S; Jackson, Andrew J; Arnold, Thomas; Doutch, James; Edler, Karen J

    2017-12-19

    Deep eutectic solvents have been demonstrated to support amphiphile self-assembly, providing potential alternatives as structure-directing agents in the synthesis of nanostructures, and drug delivery. Here we have expanded on this recent research to investigate the self-assembly of alkyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants in choline chloride:malonic acid deep eutectic solvent and mixtures of the solvent with water. Surface tension and small-angle neutron scattering were used to determine the behavior of the amphiphiles. Surfactants were found to remain active in the solvent, and surface tension measurements revealed changes in the behavior of the surfactants with different levels of hydration. Small-angle neutron scattering shows that in this solvent the micelle shape depends on the surfactant chain length, varying from globular micelles (aspect ratio ∼2) for short chain surfactants to elongated micelles (aspect ratio ∼14) for long chain surfactants even at low surfactant concentration. We suggest that the formation of elongated micelles can be explained through the interaction of the solvent with the surfactant headgroup, since ion-ion interactions between surfactant headgroups and solvent may modify the morphology of the micelles. The presence of water in the deep eutectic solvents promotes an increase in the charge density at the micelle interface and therefore the formation of less elongated, globular micelles.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced control of track-etch pore morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel', P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Orelovich, O.L.; Samojlova, L.I.; Vutsadakis, V.A.; Root, D.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of surfactants on the process of chemical development of ion tracks in polymers is studied. Based on the experimental data, a mechanism of the surfactant effect on the track-etch pore morphology is proposed. In the beginning of etching the surfactant is adsorbed on the surface and creates a layer that is quasi-solid and partially protects the surface from the etching agent. However, some etchant molecules diffuse through the barrier and react with the polymer surface. This results in the formation of a small hole at the entrance to the ion track. After the hole has attained a few annometers in diameter, the surfactant molecules penetrate into the track and cover its walls. Further diffusion of the surfactant into the growing pore is hindered. The adsorbed surfactant layer is not permeable for large molecules. In contrast, small alkali molecules and water molecules diffuse into the track and provide the etching process enlarging the pore. At this stage the transport of the surfactant into the pore channel can proceed only due to the lateral diffusion in the adsorbed layer. The volume inside the pore is free of surfactant molecules and grows at a higher rate than pore entrance. After a more prolonged etching the bottle-like (or 'cigar-like') pore channels are formed. The bottle-like shape of the pore channels depends on the etching conditions such as alkali and surfactant concentration, temperature, and type of the surfactant. The use of surfactants enables one to produce track-etch membranes with improved flow rate characteristics compared with those having cylindrical pores with the same nominal pore diameters

  20. Identifying the Imprint of Surfactant Stabilisation in Whitecap Foam Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, A. H.; Deane, G. B.; Stokes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Surfactants are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and can affect climatically-relevant processes such as air-sea gas exchange, sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, and air-sea momentum transfer. Surfactants are amphiphilic and help form the physically and chemically distinct ocean surface microlayer (SML), however, the spatial distribution, concentration and composition of the SML is not well understood, especially under conditions of vigorous wave breaking. Like the SML, breaking waves also influence physical exchange processes at the air-sea interface, and oceanic whitecap foam coverage is commonly used to quantify bubble-mediated exchange processes. However, surfactants can increase the lifetime of foam over clean water conditions, potentially complicating the use of whitecap coverage to parameterise air-sea gas exchange and SSA production flux. A better understanding of how surfactants affect the evolution of whitecap foam is needed to improve whitecap parameterisations of bubble-mediated processes, and may also provide a remote sensing approach to map the spatial distribution of surfactants at the water surface. Here we present results from a laboratory study that looked at whitecap foam evolution in "clean" and "surfactant-added" seawater regimes. We find that the whitecap foam area growth timescale is largely insensitive to the presence of surfactants, but that surfactant stabilization of whitecap foam becomes important during the whitecap foam area decay phase. The timescale at which this occurs appears to be consistent for breaking waves of different scale and intensity. A simple method is then used to isolate the surfactant signal and derive an equivalent "clean" seawater foam decay time for the whitecaps in the "surfactant-added" regime. The method is applied to oceanic whitecaps and results compared to the laboratory whitecaps from the "clean" and "surfactant-added" regimes.

  1. MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF CARBOHYDRATE-BASED SURFACTANTS IN SURFACTANT WATER OIL SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBUUREN, AR; BERENDSEN, HJC

    Molecular dynamics simulations of two monolayers of carbohydrate-based surfactants (decyl alpha-glucoside and decyl beta-glucoside) at the interface between liquid decane and liquid water have been performed with the purpose to study the properties of these monolayers on a molecular and atomic

  2. RELATION BETWEEN SURFACTANT STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF SPHERICAL MICELLES - 1-ALKYL-4-ALKYLPYRIDINIUM HALIDE SURFACTANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NUSSELDER, JJH; ENGBERTS, JBFN

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed study of the properties of spherical micelles formed from 18 1-alkyl-4-alkylpyridinium iodides. Structural variations in the surfactants include (i) branching of the 4-alkyl chain while keeping the number of carbons in the chain invariant and (ii) variation of the

  3. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  4. Surfactant-like properties of extractants molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauduin, Pierre; Bauer, Caroline; Bance, Amelie; Gassin, Gaelle; Diat, Olivier; Zemb, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Solvent extraction is based on aqueous phase/oil/extractant systems with the extractant being exclusively soluble in oil and which perform the extraction of ions (or salts) from the aqueous phase. The present contribution aims at investigating solvent extraction systems using a classical approach in surfactant science. The discussion is based on the description of the phase diagrams topology and on molecular geometrical considerations. A thermodynamic model was developed by considering the packing constraints of extractant molecules in the film forming extractant reverse micelles present in oil. It enabled the prediction of water solubility in the reverse micelles as well as the size of the micelles obtained experimentally. (authors)

  5. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-alpha was reduced in Spd-/- mice (45% difference). SP-D was proatherogenic in the mouse model used. The effect is likely to be due to the observed disturbances of plasma lipid metabolism and alteration of the inflammatory process, which underlie the reduced susceptibility to atherosclerosis in Spd-/- mice....

  6. The Krafft temperature of surfactant solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manojlović Jelena Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our main motivation to revisit the solution properties of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide is related to the clear requirement for better control of the adsorption parameters to form uniform self-assembled monolayers on muscovite mica substrates. To readily monitor the temporal evolution of structural details in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, we realized a rather simple conductivity experiment. Conductivity measurements were carried out as a function of temperature, to look closer into the Krafft temperature behavior of this surfactant. We measured the electrical conductivity of different concentrations of aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions, below and above the critical micells concentration.

  7. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  8. A liquid CO2-compatible hydrocarbon surfactant: experiment and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants soluble in liquid CO2 are rare and knowledge on interfacial and self-assembly behaviour is fragmented. We found that polyoxyethylene (5) isooctylphenyl ether is interfacially active at the water–liquid CO2 interface. Water–liquid CO2 interfacial tension was measured at various surfactant

  9. Binding of alkylpyridinium chloride surfactants to sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    Binding of cationic surfactants to anionic polymers is well studied. However, the surfactant binding characteristics at very low concentration near the start of binding and at high concentration, where charge compensation may Occur. are less well known. Therefore, the binding characteristics of

  10. Nonionic surfactant Brij35 effects on toluene biodegradation in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... behaviors of toluene in a composite bead biofilter were investigated. The toluene dissolved in the water phase was enhanced by the addition of surfactant into aqueous solution and the enhancing effect was more pronounced in the surfactant concentration less than critical micelle concentration. For the.

  11. New mechanisms for phase separation in polymer-surfactant mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, E.P.K.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Borisov, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    The cooperative association of ionic surfactants with polymer chains leads to quite novel features in the phase behaviour of polymer solutions. Using an analytic mean-field model, we analyze phase equilibria in solutions of neutral polymers mixed with ionic surfactants. We predict the possibilities

  12. Perfluoroalkyl Epoxides: Synthesis and Conversion into Ionic Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhamid Ayari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Perfluoroalkylated surfactants having a quaternary ammonium surrounded by three hydroxyl groups as hydrophilic moiety and a perfluoroalkyl chain as tail were obtained by coupling diethanolamine with perfluoroalkylated epoxide followed by quaternisation. The amphiphilic properties of these surfactants were investigated by measuring their surface and interfacial tensions.

  13. Influence of salts on dynamics properties of drag reducing surfactants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Myška, Jiří; Lin, Z.; Štěpánek, Petr; Zakin, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 97, 2/3 (2001), s. 251-266 ISSN 0377-0257 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060804; GA ČR GA101/99/1431 Keywords : influence of salts * zwitterionic surfactants * cationic surfactants Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.347, year: 2001

  14. Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The present work investigated the influence of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles (ANPs) prepared through precipitation. ANPs were fabricated using absolute ethanol containing surfactants (Tween80, Span80 and mixtures of Tween80 and Span80 with ratios of 25/75, 50/50 and ...

  15. Effect of Surfactants on Plasmid DNA Stability and Release from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of surfactants on plasmid DNA during preparation and release from polylactic glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. Methods: Various surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic (Span, Tween, Triton X100, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate), were added during the ...

  16. Photoisomerization of merocyanine 540 in polymer-surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photoisomerization of merocyanine 540 (MC540) in a polymer-surfactant aggregate is studied using picosecond time resolved emission spectroscopy. The aggregate consists of the polymer, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and the surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). With increase in the concentration of SDS in an ...

  17. Nonionic surfactant Brij35 effects on toluene biodegradation in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonionic surfactant effects on the toluene dissolved in the water phase and biodegradation kinetic behaviors of toluene in a composite bead biofilter were investigated. The toluene dissolved in the water phase was enhanced by the addition of surfactant into aqueous solution and the enhancing effect was more pronounced ...

  18. The cost and effectiveness of surfactant replacement therapy at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To assess the impact of surfactant replacement therapy (SRl) on the outcome of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) and to assess the cost implications of a policy of selective administration of artificial surfactant. Design. The short-term outcome of 103 newborns ventilated for HMD (61 selected for SRT according to ...

  19. Polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate ester surfactants - current knowledge and knowledge gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    information on fluorochemicals. Polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate ester surfactants (PAPs) belong to the group of polyfluorinated alkyl surfactants. They have been detected in indoor dust and are widely used in food-contact materials, from which they have the ability to migrate into food. Toxicological data...

  20. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Micellar solution of nonionic surfactant -dodecyloligo ethyleneoxide surfactant, decaoxyethylene monododecyl ether [CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)10OH], C12E10 in D2O solution have been analysed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60°C) both in the presence and absence of ...

  1. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) with brucite like structure was modified with various anionic surfactants containing sulfonate, carboxyl, phosphonate and sulfate end group through ion-exchange method. XRD reports indicated that the sulfonate group containing surfactants led to an adsorption process whereas the sulfate ...

  2. Polymeric surfactants for enhanced oil recovery : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raffa, Patrizio; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Picchioni, Francesco

    Chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is surely a topic of interest, as conventional oil resources become more scarce and the necessity of exploiting heavy and unconventional oils increases. EOR methods based on polymer flooding, surfactant-polymer flooding and alkali-surfactant-polymer flooding are

  3. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Layered double hydroxides (LDH) with brucite like structure was modified with various anionic surfactants containing sulfonate, carboxyl, phosphonate and sulfate end group through ion-exchange method. XRD reports indicated that the sulfonate group containing surfactants led to an adsorption process whereas.

  4. Surfactants assist in lipid extraction from wet Nannochloropsis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongchong; Xiao, Ye; Lin, Weiguo; Zhu, Junying; De la Hoz Siegler, Hector; Zong, Mingsheng; Rong, Junfeng

    2017-11-01

    An efficient approach involving surfactant treatment, or the modification and utilization of surfactants that naturally occur in algae (algal-based surfactants), was developed to assist in the extraction of lipids from wet algae. Surfactants were found to be able to completely replace polar organic solvents in the extraction process. The highest yield of algal lipids extracted by hexane and algal-based surfactants was 78.8%, followed by 78.2% for hexane and oligomeric surfactant extraction, whereas the lipid yield extracted by hexane and ethanol was only 60.5%. In addition, the saponifiable lipids extracted by exploiting algal-based surfactants and hexane, or adding oligomeric surfactant and hexane, accounted for 78.6% and 75.4% of total algal lipids, respectively, which was more than 10% higher than the lipids extracted by hexane and ethanol. This work presents a method to extract lipids from algae using only nonpolar organic solvents, while obtaining high lipid yields and high selectivity to saponifiables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Surfactant-assisted liquefaction of particulate carbonaceous substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A slurry of carbonaceous particles such as coal containing an oil soluble polar substituted oleophilic surfactant, suitably an amine substituted long chain hydrocarbon, is liquefied at high temperature and high hydrogen presence. The pressure of surfactant results in an increase in yield and the conversion product contains a higher proportion of light and heavy oils and less asphaltene than products from other liquefaction processes.

  6. Colloidal stability influenced by inhomogeneous surfactant assemblies in confined spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodar-Reyes, A.B.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a molecular-level self-consistent field approach was used to show that some surfactants assemblies (with local cylindrical structure) can bridge between two surfaces that in turn are covered by surfactant bilayers. The stability of such a connection is related to a higher end-cap (free)

  7. Surfactant Proteins in Smoking-Related Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Papiris, Spyridon; Papadaki, Georgia; Manali, Effrosyni D; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a highly surface-active mixture of proteins and lipids that is synthesized and secreted in the alveoli by type II epithelial cells and is found in the fluid lining the alveolar surface. The protein part of surfactant constitutes two hydrophilic proteins (SP-A and SP-D) that regulate surfactant metabolism and have immunologic functions, and two hydrophobic proteins (SP-B and SP-C), which play a direct role in the organization of the surfactant structure in the interphase and in the stabilization of the lipid layers during the respiratory cycle. Several studies have shown that cigarette smoke seems to affect, in several ways, both surfactant homeostasis and function. The alterations in surfactants' biophysical properties caused by cigarette smoking, contribute to the development of several smoking related lung diseases. In this review we provide information on biochemical and physiological aspects of the pulmonary surfactant and on its possible association with the development of two major chronic diseases of the lung known to be related to smoking, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Additional information on the possible role of surfactant protein alterations and/or dysfunction in the combination of these two conditions, recently described as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are also provided.

  8. Phase Behavior of Laundry Surfactants in Polar Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuart, Marc C.A.; Pas, John C. van de; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2006-01-01

    Laundry surfactants are usually mixtures of ionic and nonionic detergents that exhibit a complex phase behavior. Here the ternary phase behavior of an isotropic and a liquid crystalline (LC) surfactant mixture has been examined in water/solvent systems. The size of the LC area in the ternary phase

  9. New Y-shaped surfactants from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tammar Hussein; Hussen, Rusnah Syahila Duali; Heidelberg, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A series of sugar-based surfactants, involving a single hydrophobic chain (C12) and two side-by-side arranged head groups, was prepared form simple glucose precursors. All surfactants were highly water soluble and exhibited exclusively micellar assemblies. This behavior makes them interesting candidates for oil in water emulsifiers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Method of separating a surfactant from a liquid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, A.W.; Lems, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of separating a surfactant from a liquid, such as a wastewater stream from an industrial laundry. In accordance with the invention, the liquid is cooled to below the Krafft temperature of the surfactant and subjected to centrifugal forces for the separation

  11. The Transfer-Messenger RNA-Small Protein B System Plays a Role in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaohui; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Huiqing; Gao, Qingqing; Xiong, Liping; Gao, Ruxia; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is capable of colonizing outside of the intestinal tract and evolving into a systemic infection. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is a member of the ExPEC group and causes avian colibacillosis. Transfer-mRNA-small protein B (tmRNA-SmpB)-mediated trans-translation is a bacterial translational control system that directs the modification and degradation of proteins, the biosynthesis of which has stalled or has been interrupted, facilitating the rescue of ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends of defective mRNAs that lack a stop codon. We found that disruption of one, or both, of the smpB or ssrA genes significantly decreased the virulence of the APEC strain E058, as assessed by chicken infection assays. Furthermore, the mutants were obviously attenuated in colonization and persistence assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the transcription levels of the transcriptional regulation gene rfaH and the virulence genes kpsM, chuA, and iss were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain. Macrophage infection assays showed that the mutant strains reduced the replication and/or survival ability in the macrophage HD11 cell line compared to that of the parent strain, E058. However, no significant differences were observed in ingestion by macrophages and in chicken serum resistance between the mutant and the wild-type strains. These data indicate that the tmRNA-SmpB system is important in the pathogenesis of APEC O2 strain E058. PMID:24013628

  12. Downregulation of heat shock protein B8 decreases osteogenic differentiation potential of dental pulp stem cells during in vitro proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, M; Li, C; Dietrich, M A; Richard, M; Yao, S

    2018-04-01

    Tissue-derived stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), reduce differentiation capability during in vitro culture. We found that cultured DPSCs reduce expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8) and GIPC PDZ domain containing family member 2 (Gipc2). Our objectives were to evaluate the changes in DPSC composition during in vitro proliferation and to determine whether HspB8 and Gipc2 have function in differentiation potential of DPSCs. Different passages of rat DPSCs were evaluated for changes in CD90+ and/or CD271+ stem cells and changes in osteogenic potential. Real-time RT-PCR and immunostaining were conducted to determine expression of HspB8 and Gipc2. Expression of the genes in DPSCs was knocked down by siRNA, followed by osteogenic induction to evaluate the function of the genes. About 90% of cells in the DPSC cultures were CD90+ and/or CD271+ cells without dramatic change during in vitro proliferation. The DPSCs at passages 3 to 5 (P3 to P5) possess strong osteogenic potential, but such potential was greatly reduced at later passages. Expression of HspB8 and Gipc2 was significantly reduced at P11 versus P3. Knock-down of HspB8 expression abolished osteogenic potential of the DPSCs, but knock-down of Gipc2 had no effect. CD90+ and CD271+ cells are the major components of DPSCs in in vitro culture. High-level expression of HspB8 was critical for maintaining differentiation potential of DPSCs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Delivery and performance of surfactant replacement therapies to treat pulmonary disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for optimal pulmonary function throughout life. An absence or deficiency of surfactant can affect the surfactant pool leading to respiratory distress. Even if the coupling between surfactant dysfunction and the underlying disease is not always well understood, using exogenous surfactants as replacement is usually a standard therapeutic option in respiratory distress. Exogenous surfactants have been extensively studied in animal models and clinical trials. The present article provides an update on the evolution of surfactant therapy, types of surfactant treatment, and development of newer-generation surfactants. The differences in the performance between various surfactants are highlighted and advanced research that has been conducted so far in developing the optimal delivery of surfactant is discussed. PMID:23919474

  14. Animal derived surfactant extract versus protein free synthetic surfactant for the prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, Stephanie; Pfister, Robert H; Soll, Roger

    2015-08-24

    A wide variety of surfactant preparations have been developed and tested including synthetic surfactants and surfactants derived from animal sources. Although clinical trials have demonstrated that both synthetic surfactant and animal derived surfactant preparations are effective, comparison in animal models has suggested that there may be greater efficacy of animal derived surfactant products, perhaps due to the protein content of animal derived surfactant. To compare the effect of animal derived surfactant to protein free synthetic surfactant preparations in preterm infants at risk for or having respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Searches were updated of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2014), PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE (1975 through November 2014). All languages were included. Randomized controlled trials comparing administration of protein free synthetic surfactants to administration of animal derived surfactant extracts in preterm infants at risk for or having respiratory distress syndrome were considered for this review. Data collection and analysis were conducted according to the standards of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Fifteen trials met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed that the use of animal derived surfactant rather than protein free synthetic surfactant resulted in a significant reduction in the risk of pneumothorax [typical relative risk (RR) 0.65, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.77; typical risk difference (RD) -0.04, 95% CI -0.06 to -0.02; number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) 25; 11 studies, 5356 infants] and a marginal reduction in the risk of mortality (typical RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.99; typical RD -0.02, 95% CI -0.04 to -0.00; NNTB 50; 13 studies, 5413 infants).Animal derived surfactant was associated with an increase in the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis [typical RR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.76; typical RD 0.02, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04; number needed to treat to harm (NNTH) 50; 8

  15. Interaction between surfactant and titania in a detergent nanofluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Redjeki, Athiek Sri

    2017-11-01

    Interaction between surfactant palm primary alkyl sulfonate (palm PAS) and tinania (TiO2) in nanofluid system have been studied. In this experiment, nanofluid is prepared as follow: a certain amount of titania is dispersing in a water as a host fluid, and then dissolving a certain amount of palm PAS into water and stirred followed with sonication. Characterisation of nanofluid is conducted by FTIR for chemical structure and UV Vis spectrofotometer for absorbance. The result shows a synergize interaction between surfactant and nanofluid. The presence of titania in surfactant solution will reduce the surfactantsurface tension from 32,7 mN/m to 31,5 mN/m and the presence of surfactant in nanofluid, will stabilize nanofluid system. The optimum ratio of titania : surfactant is 1 : 10 (w/w).

  16. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of the review considers the problem of surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in adults and young and old children. It gives information on the results of surfactant therapy and prevention of ARDS in patients with severe concurrent trauma, inhalation injuries, complications due to complex expanded chest surgery, or severe pneumonias, including bilateral pneumonia in the presence of A/H1N1 influenza. There are data on the use of a surfactant in obstetric care and prevention of primary graft dysfunction during lung transplantation. The results of longterm use of surfactant therapy in Russia, suggesting that death rates from ARDS may be substantially reduced (to 20% are discussed. Examples of surfactant therapy for other noncritical lung diseases, such as permanent athelectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and asthma, as well tuberculosis, are also considered.

  17. NMR study of the dynamics of cationic gemini surfactant 14-2-14 in mixed solutions with conventional surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Lu, Xing-Yu; Chen, Hong; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Liu, Mai-Li; Luo, Ping-Ya; Du, You-Ru

    2009-06-18

    Three kinds of conventional surfactants, namely, two nonionic surfactants [polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) and Triton X-100 (TX-100)], one cationic surfactant [n-tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB)], and an anionic surfactant [sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS)}, were mixed into the quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant [C(14)H(29)N(+)(CH(3))(2)](2)(CH(2))(2).2Br(-) (14-2-14) in aqueous solution. The exchange rate constants between 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution were detected using two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods: one-dimensional (1D) line shape analysis and two-dimensional (2D) exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). The results obtained from these two methods were consistent. Both showed that mixing a nonionic conventional surfactant, either Brij-35 or TX-100, enhanced the exchange process between the 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution. In contrast, the anionic surfactant SDS and the cationic surfactant TTAB slowed the process slightly.

  18. A multicenter, randomized trial comparing synthetic surfactant with modified bovine surfactant extract in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, E; Vollman, J; Giebner, D; Maurer, M; Dreyer, G; Bailey, L; Anderson, M; Mefford, L; Beaumont, E; Sutton, D; Puppala, B; Mangurten, HH; Secrest, J; Lewis, WJ; Carteaux, P; Bednarek, F; Welsberger, S; Gosselin, R; Pantoja, AF; Belenky, A; Campbell, P; Patole, S; Duenas, M; Kelly, M; Alejo, W; Lewallen, P; DeanLieber, S; Hanft, M; Ferlauto, J; Newell, RW; Bagwell, J; Levine, D; Lipp, RW; Harkavy, K; Vasa, R; Birenbaum, H; Broderick, KA; Santos, AQ; Long, BA; Gulrajani, M; Stern, M; Hopgood, G; Hegyi, T; Alba, J; Christmas, L; McQueen, M; Nichols, N; Brown, M; Quissell, BJ; Rusk, C; Marks, K; Gifford, K; Hoehn, G; Pathak, A; Marino, B; Hunt, P; Fox, [No Value; Sharpstein, C; Feldman, B; Johnson, N; Beecham, J; Balcom, R; Helmuth, W; Boylan, D; Frakes, C; Magoon, M; Reese, K; Schwersenski, J; Schutzman, D; Soll, R; Horbar, JD; Leahy, K; Troyer, W; Juzwicki, C; Anderson, P; Dworsky, M; Reynolds, L; Urrutia, J; Gupta, U; Adray, C

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of a synthetic surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal, Burroughs-Wellcome Co) and a modified bovine surfactant extract (Survanta, Ross Laboratories) in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design. Multicenter, randomized trial. Setting. Thirty-eight

  19. Identification of phases of various oil, surfactant/ co-surfactants and water system by ternary phase diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Haroon K; Peh, Kok K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select appropriate surfactants or blends of surfactants and oil to study the ternary phase diagram behavior and identify various phases obtained from the oil and surfactant/surfactant mixture combinations of different HLB. The phases include conventional emulsion, gel/viscous and transparent/translucent microemulsion. Pseudoternary phase diagrams of water, oil and S/Smix of various HLB values range of 9.65-15 were constructed by using water titration method at room temperature. Visual analysis, conductivity and dye dilution test (methylene blue) were performed after each addition and mixing of water, to identify phases as microemulsion, o/w or w/o emulsion (turbid/milky) and transparent gel/turbid viscous. High gel or viscous area was obtained with Tween 80 and surfactant mixture of Tween 80 and Span 80 with all oils. The results indicated that non-ionic surfactants and PG of different HLB values exhibited different pseudoternary phase diagram characteristics but no microemulsions originated from mineral and olive oils. The w/o emulsion occupied a large area in the ternary phase triangle when HLB value of the surfactant/Smix decreased. The o/w emulsion area was large with increasing HLB value of surfactant/Smix.

  20. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  1. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with [3H]choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day

  2. Reversal of multidrug resistance by surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, D. M.; Linsenmeyer, M. E.; Chojnowski, G.; Kriegler, A. B.; Nink, V.; Webster, L. K.; Sawyer, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cremophor EL, a pharmacologically inactive solubilising agent, has been shown to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR). Using flow cytometric evaluation of equilibrium intracellular levels of daunorubicin (DNR), we found that eight other surface active agents will also reverse MDR. All the active detergents contain polyethoxylated moieties but have no similarities in their hydrophobic components. The properties of three polyethoxylated surfactants that showed the lowest toxicities, Cremophor, Tween 80 and Solutol HS15, were examined in more detail. The concentrations of Tween 80 and Solutol required to reverse DNR exclusion were 10-fold lower than for Cremophor. However while concentrations greater than or equal to 1:10(2) of the former two surfactants resulted in breakdown of cells, even 1:10 of Cremophor did not lyse cells. Studies of the effects of Cremophor on the uptake and efflux of DNR in normal and MDR cell types showed that Cremophor increases intracellular DNR primarily by locking the rapid efflux from the cells. This blockage of drug efflux may be mediated by a substantial alteration in the fluidity of cell membranes induced by Cremophor, as shown by decreased fluorescence anisotropy of a membrane probe. Consistent with these data, coinjection of adriamycin plus Cremophor into mice carrying a multidrug resistant P388 transplantable tumour significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared with adriamycin treatment alone. PMID:1637678

  3. The binding and insertion of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants into lipid bilayers: the effects of the surfactant size and salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-02-28

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants with hydrocarbon tails of different sizes were simulated with lipid bilayers at different salt concentrations. Starting with the random position of ionic surfactants outside the bilayer, surfactants with long tails mostly insert into the bilayer, while those with short tails show the insertion of fewer surfactant molecules, indicating the effect of the tail length. In particular, surfactants with a tail of two or four hydrocarbons insert and reversibly detach from the bilayer, while the inserted longer surfactants cannot be reversibly detached because of the strong hydrophobic interaction with lipid tails, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Longer surfactants insert more deeply and irreversibly into the bilayer and thus increase lateral diffusivities of the bilayer, indicating that longer surfactants more significantly disorder lipid bilayers, which also agrees with experiments regarding the effect of the tail length of ionic surfactants on membrane permeability and toxicity. Addition of NaCl ions weakens the electrostatic interactions between headgroups of surfactants and lipids, leading to the binding of fewer surfactants into the bilayer. In particular, our simulation findings indicate that insertion of ionic surfactants can be initiated by either the hydrophobic interaction between tails of surfactants and lipids or the electrostatic binding between imidazolium heads and lipid heads, and the strength of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions depends on the tail length of surfactants.

  4. Perfluorinated Alcohols Induce Complex Coacervation in Mixed Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Samuel I; Collins, Christopher M; Khaledi, Morteza G

    2016-03-15

    Recently, we reported a unique and nearly ubiquitous phenomenon of inducing simple and complex coacervation in solutions of a broad variety of individual and mixed amphiphiles and over a wide range of concentrations and mole fractions. This paper describes a novel type of biphasic separation in aqueous solutions of mixed cationic-anionic (catanionic) surfactants induced by hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP). The test cases included mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (surfactants with different carbon chain lengths) as well as dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) with SDS (surfactants with the same carbon chain lengths). The CTAB-SDS-HFIP coacervate systems can be produced at many different mole ratios of surfactant, but DTAB-SDS-HFIP formed only coacervates at equimolar (1:1) mole ratios of DTAB and SDS. The phase-transition behavior of both systems was studied over a wide range of surfactant and HFIP concentrations at the stoichiometric (1:1) mole ratio of cationic/anionic surfactants. The chemical compositions of each of the two phases (aqueous-rich and coacervate phases) were studied with regard to the concentrations of HFIP, water, and individual surfactants. It is revealed that the surfactant-rich phase (coacervate phase) contains a large percentage of fluoroalcohol relative to the aqueous phase and is enriched in both surfactants but contains a small percentage of water. Surprisingly, the concentration of water in the coacervate phase increases as the total HFIP concentration is increased while the concentration of HFIP in the coacervate phase remains relatively constant, which means a larger amount of water associated with HFIP molecules is extracted into the coacervate phase, which results in the growth of the phase. The volume of the coacervate phase increases with an increase in surfactant concentration and total HFIP %. The coacervate phase is highly enriched in the two amphiphilic ions (DTA(+) and DS

  5. Is surfactant a promising additive drug in ALI/ARDS-patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marcus J.; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2004-01-01

    The rationale for surfactant replacement therapy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is to restore the normal composition of the surfactant system, as well as to overcome ongoing inactivation of present surfactant. Indeed, surfactant replacement therapy call normalize the

  6. Is surfactant a promising additive drug in ALI/ARDS-patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, MJ; Kesecioglu, J

    The rationale for surfactant replacement therapy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is to restore the normal composition of the surfactant system, as well as to overcome ongoing inactivation of present surfactant. Indeed, surfactant replacement therapy call normalize the

  7. Serum and sputum surfactants -A and -D in multidrug-resistant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormal production and function of surfactants are associated with pulmonary diseases. Also, pulmonary infections alter surfactant metabolism. Due to lack of information on the levels of surfactants A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) in Nigerian tuberculosis (TB) patients, this study assessed these surfactants in both sputum and ...

  8. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    preferentially to sugars on a broad spectrum of pathogen surfaces and thereby facilitating immune functions including viral neutralization, clearance of bacteria, fungi and apoptotic and necrotic cells, modulation of allergic reactions, and resolution of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D can interact with receptor...... lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential...... in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic...

  9. Itaconic Acid Based Surfactants: I. Synthesis and Characterization of Sodiumn-Octyl Sulfoitaconate Diester Anionic Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Cao, Fengzhi; Li, Tong; Zhang, Shuai; Gao, Chuanhui; Wu, Yumin

    A novel itaconate-based surfactant, namely sodium n -octyl sulfoitaconate diester (SOSID), has been synthesized from itaconic acid (IA) and n -octanol by sulfonation and esterification reaction processes. The effects of reaction temperature, reaction time, molar ratios of n -octanol to IA and the catalyst dosage on the esterification were investigated. The chemical structure of the surfactants SOSID was characterized by means of LC-MS and confirmed by FT-IR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The surface tension γ and the critical micelle concentration (CMC) were determined as 25.02 mN/m and 4.0 × 10 -4 mol/L by using surface tensiometer at 20 °C. Further investigations showed that SOSID possess excellent wetting, emulsifying and lime soap dispersing properties.

  10. Rheology of cellulose nanofibrils in the presence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quennouz, Nawal; Hashmi, Sara M; Choi, Hong Sung; Kim, Jin Woong; Osuji, Chinedum O

    2016-01-07

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) present unique opportunities for rheology modification in complex fluids. Here we systematically consider the effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the rheology of dilute CNF suspensions. Neat suspensions are transparent yield-stress fluids which display strong shear thinning and power-law dependence of modulus on concentration, G' ∼ c(2.1). Surfactant addition below a critical mass concentration cc produces an increase in the gel modulus with retention of optical clarity. Larger than critical concentrations induce significant fibril aggregation leading to the loss of suspension stability and optical clarity, and to aggregate sedimentation. The critical concentration was the lowest for a cationic surfactant (DTAB), cc ≈ 0.08%, while suspension stability was retained for non-ionic surfactants (Pluronic F68, TX100) at concentrations up to 8%. The anionic surfactant SDS led to a loss of stability at cc ≈ 1.6% whereas suspension stability was not compromised by anionic SLES up to 8%. Dynamic light scattering data are consistent with a scenario in which gel formation is driven by micelle-nanofibril bridging mediated by associative interactions of ethoxylated surfactant headgroups with the cellulose fibrils. This may explain the strong difference between the properties of SDS and SLES-modified suspensions. These results have implications for the use of CNFs as a rheology modifier in surfactant-containing systems.

  11. Photosensitive microgels containing azobenzene surfactants of different charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimka, Selina; Lomadze, Nino; Rabe, Maren; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lehmann, Maren; von Klitzing, Regine; Rumyantsev, Artem M; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Santer, Svetlana

    2016-12-21

    We report on light sensitive microgel particles that can change their volume reversibly in response to illumination with light of different wavelengths. To make the anionic microgels photosensitive we add surfactants with a positively charged polyamine head group and an azobenzene containing tail. Upon illumination, azobenzene undergoes a reversible photo-isomerization reaction from a trans- to a cis-state accompanied by a change in the hydrophobicity of the surfactant. Depending on the isomerization state, the surfactant molecules are either accommodated within the microgel (trans-state) resulting in its shrinkage or desorbed back into water (cis-isomer) letting the microgel swell. We have studied three surfactants differing in the number of amino groups, so that the number of charges of the surfactant head varies between 1 and 3. We have found experimentally and theoretically that the surfactant concentration needed for microgel compaction increases with decreasing number of charges of the head group. Utilization of polyamine azobenzene containing surfactants for the light triggered remote control of the microgel size opens up a possibility for applications of light responsive microgels as drug carriers in biology and medicine.

  12. The effect of surfactant on pollutant biosorption of Trametes versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Ülküye Dudu; Silah, Hülya; Akbaş, Halide; Has, Merve

    2016-04-01

    The major problem concerning industrial wastewater is treatment of dye and heavy metal containing effluents. Industrial effluents are also contained surfactants that are used as levelling, dispersing and wetting agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surfactant on textile dye biosorption properties of a white rot fungus named Trametes versicolor. Reactive dyes are commonly used in textile industry because of their advantages such as brightness and excellent color fastness. A recative textile dye, called Everzol Black, was used in this study. The low-cost mollasses medium is used for fungal growth. The usage of mollases, the sugar refinery effluent as a source of energy and nutrients, gained importance because of reducing the cost and also reusing another waste. In biosorption process the effect of surfactant on dye removal properties of T. versicolor was examined as a function of pH, dye consentration and surfactant concentration. The results of this study showed that the surfactant enhanced the dye removal capacity of Trametes versicolor. The dye and surfactant molecules were interacted electrostatically and these electrostatic interactions improved dye removal properties of filamentous fungus T. versicolor. The results of this study recommended the use of surfactants as an inducer in textile wastewater treatment technologies.

  13. Studies on Anionic Surfactant Structure in the Aggregation with (Hydroxypropylcellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M. de Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence probing, viscosity and light scattering measurements have been combined to study the aggregation of different anionic surfactants mainly in dilute solutions (0.5% w/v of (hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC MW 173,000, in moderate ionic strength (NaCl 0.1 mol.L-1. The set of surfactants includes natural cholesterol derivatives, sodium cholate (CS and sodium deoxycholate (DC, and the alkylsulphate, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS. At 298 K the critical surfactant concentration related to aggregate/HPC formation (C1 decreases for SDS and DC whereas it increases slightly for CS. At 312 K the C1 values for CS and DC are slightly shifted toward higher values whereas it is not changed for SDS. All surfactant/HPC systems increase C1 values as the HPC concentration increases to 1.2%. Above C1 the viscosity increases for all surfactant/HPC systems but it is sharper in the increasing order CS, DC and SDS. The hydrodynamic behavior indicates that CS induces higher diffusion to HPC than SDS and DC. The aggregation in the surfactant/HPC systems is analyzed through the feature of surfactant/aggregate structure (size, charge density, etc.

  14. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the...

  15. Surfactant selection for a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoska, Agnes; Vázquez, María; Janssen, Marcel; Wijffels, René H; Cuaresma, María; Vílchez, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    A novel liquid foam-bed photobioreactor has been shown to hold potential as an innovative technology for microalgae production. In this study, a foam stabilizing agent has been selected which fits the requirements of use in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. Four criteria were used for an optimal surfactant: the surfactant should have good foaming properties, should not be rapidly biodegradable, should drag up microalgae in the foam formed, and it should not be toxic for microalgae. Ten different surfactants (nonionic, cationic, and anionic) and two microalgae genera (Chlorella and Scenedesmus) were compared on the above-mentioned criteria. The comparison showed the following facts. Firstly, poloxameric surfactants (Pluronic F68 and Pluronic P84) have acceptable foaming properties described by intermediate foam stability and liquid holdup and small bubble size. Secondly, the natural surfactants (BSA and Saponin) and Tween 20 were easily biodegraded by bacteria within 3 days. Thirdly, for all surfactants tested the microalgae concentration is reduced in the foam phase compared to the liquid phase with exception of the cationic surfactant CTAB. Lastly, only BSA, Saponin, Tween 20, and the two Pluronics were not toxic at concentrations of 10 CMC or higher. The findings of this study indicate that the Pluronics (F68 and P84) are the best surfactants regarding the above-mentioned criteria. Since Pluronic F68 performed slightly better, this surfactant is recommended for application in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Novel fluorinated gemini surfactants with γ-butyrolactone segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tokuzo; Okada, Kazuyuki; Oida, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    In this work, novel γ-butyrolactone-type monomeric and dimeric (gemini) surfactants with a semifluoroalkyl group [Rf- (CH2)3-; Rf = C4F9, C6F13, C8F17] as the hydrophobic group were successfully synthesized. Dimethyl malonate was dimerized or connected using Br(CH2)sBr (s = 0, 1, 2, 3) to give tetraesters, and they were bis-allylated. Radical addition of fluoroalkyl using Rf-I and an initiator, i.e., 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile for C4F9 or di-t-butyl peroxide for C6F13 and C8F17, was perform at high temperature, with prolonged heating, to obtain bis(semifluoroalkyl)-dilactone diesters. These dilactone diesters were hydrolyzed using KOH/EtOH followed by decarboxylation in AcOH to afford γ-butyrolactonetype gemini surfactants. Common 1 + 1 semifluoroalkyl lactone surfactants were synthesized using the same method. Their surfactant properties [critical micelle concentration (CMC), γCMC, pC20, ΓCMC, and AG] were investigated by measuring the surface tension of the γ-hydroxybutyrate form prepared in aqueous tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution. As expected, the CMC values of the gemini surfactants were more than one order of magnitude smaller than those of the corresponding 1 + 1 surfactants. Other properties also showed the excellent ability of the gemini structure to reduce the surface tension. These surfactants were easily and quantitatively recovered by acidification. The monomeric surfactant was recovered in the γ-hydroxybutyric acid form, and the gemini surfactant as a mixture of γ-butyrolactone and γ-hydroxybutyric acid forms.

  17. Gemini ester quat surfactants and their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczyński, Jacek; Frąckowiak, Renata; Włoch, Aleksandra; Kleszczyńska, Halina; Witek, Stanisław

    2013-03-01

    Cationic gemini surfactants are an important class of surface-active compounds that exhibit much higher surface activity than their monomeric counterparts. This type of compound architecture lends itself to the compound being easily adsorbed at interfaces and interacting with the cellular membranes of microorganisms. Conventional cationic surfactants have high chemical stability but poor chemical and biological degradability. One of the main approaches to the design of readily biodegradable and environmentally friendly surfactants involves inserting a bond with limited stability into the surfactant molecule to give a cleavable surfactant. The best-known example of such a compound is the family of ester quats, which are cationic surfactants with a labile ester bond inserted into the molecule. As part of this study, a series of gemini ester quat surfactants were synthesized and assayed for their biological activity. Their hemolytic activity and changes in the fluidity and packing order of the lipid polar heads were used as the measures of their biological activity. A clear correlation between the hemolytic activity of the tested compounds and their alkyl chain length was established. It was found that the compounds with a long hydrocarbon chain showed higher activity. Moreover, the compounds with greater spacing between their alkyl chains were more active. This proves that they incorporate more easily into the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane and affect its properties to a greater extent. A better understanding of the process of cell lysis by surfactants and of their biological activity may assist in developing surfactants with enhanced selectivity and in widening their range of application.

  18. Analysis of the structure and surfactant activity of novel formulations containing exogenous pulmonary surfactant and glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimato, Alejandra; Hoyos Obando, Andres; Facorro, Graciela; Martínez Sarrasague, María

    2016-11-01

    Exogenous pulmonary surfactant (EPS) could be used as carrier of glucocorticoids (GCs) in therapy for respiratory diseases. We formulated novel combination drug products containing bovine EPS and one GC (10wt%): beclomethasone (Be), budesonide (Bu) or fluticasone (Flu), and studied the GCs action on the surface activity and biophysical properties of EPS. Subtype ratio was evaluated by phospholipid determination; surface tension (ST) with a pulsating bubble surfactometer and conformational changes by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR). GCs were incorporated into EPS in more than 80%. None of them generated disaggregation of surfactant, only Bu was found in the light subtype. Bu and Be caused minimal changes in fluidity on polar region of bilayers, but these changes were not enough to inactivate the surfactant. Flu did not significantly alter any biophysical properties or surface activity. These novel combination EPS-GC products might be a promising strategy in the therapy of pulmonary diseases as the incorporation of the GCs tested did not cause detrimental effects on EPS functionality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  20. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haracz, S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Hilgendorff, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Rybka, J.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Giersig, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  1. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haracz, S.; Hilgendorff, M.; Rybka, J.D.; Giersig, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  2. Complex phase behavior in solvent-free nonionic surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillmyer, M.A.; Bates, F.S.; Almdal, K.

    1996-01-01

    Unsolvated block copolymers and surfactant solutions are ''soft materials'' that share a common set of ordered microstructures, A set of polyethyleneoxide-polyethylethylene (PEG-PEE) block copolymers that are chemically similar to the well-known alkane-oxyethylene (C(n)EO(m)) nonionic surfactants...... was synthesized here. The general phase behavior in these materials resembles that of both higher molecular weight block copolymers and lower molecular weight nonionic surfactant solutions. Two of the block copolymers exhibited thermally induced order-order transitions and were studied in detail by small...

  3. Amino acid–based surfactants: New antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Marques, A M; Bustelo, M; Espuny, M J; Pérez, L

    2016-02-01

    The rapid increase of drug resistant bacteria makes necessary the development of new antimicrobial agents. Synthetic amino acid-based surfactants constitute a promising alternative to conventional antimicrobial compounds given that they can be prepared from renewable raw materials. In this review, we discuss the structural features that promote antimicrobial activity of amino acid-based surfactants. Monocatenary, dicatenary and gemini surfactants that contain different amino acids on the polar head and show activity against bacteria are revised. The synthesis and basic physico-chemical properties have also been included.

  4. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  5. Surfactant-based critical phenomena in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, Eric W.; Paulaitis, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to characterize by experiment and theoretically both the kinetics of phase separation and the metastable structures produced during phase separation in a microgravity environment. The particular systems we are currently studying are mixtures of water, nonionic surfactants, and compressible supercritical fluids at temperatures and pressures where the coexisting liquid phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). In this report, we describe experiments to locate equilibrium isopycnic phases and to determine the 'local' phase behavior and critical phenomena at nearby conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition. In addition, we report the results of preliminary small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments to characterize microstructures that exist in these mixtures at different fluid densities.

  6. Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1994-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ''smearable'' contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles

  7. Computer simulation-molecular-thermodynamic framework to predict the micellization behavior of mixtures of surfactants: application to binary surfactant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Jaisree; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2013-05-30

    We present a computer simulation-molecular-thermodynamic (CSMT) framework to model the micellization behavior of mixtures of surfactants in which hydration information from all-atomistic simulations of surfactant mixed micelles and monomers in aqueous solution is incorporated into a well-established molecular-thermodynamic framework for mixed surfactant micellization. In addition, we address the challenges associated with the practical implementation of the CSMT framework by formulating a simpler mixture CSMT model based on a composition-weighted average approach involving single-component micelle simulations of the mixture constituents. We show that the simpler mixture CSMT model works well for all of the binary surfactant mixtures considered, except for those containing alkyl ethoxylate surfactants, and rationalize this finding molecularly. The mixture CSMT model is then utilized to predict mixture CMCs, and we find that the predicted CMCs compare very well with the experimental CMCs for various binary mixtures of linear surfactants. This paper lays the foundation for the mixture CSMT framework, which can be used to predict the micellization properties of mixtures of surfactants that possess a complex chemical architecture, and are therefore not amenable to traditional molecular-thermodynamic modeling.

  8. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kozak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3-decyloxymethyl pentane chloride (gemini surfactant on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase.

  9. Surfactant nebulisation prevents the adverse effects of surfactant therapy on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in rabbits with severe respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant replacement therapy for the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome has shown beneficial effects on lung function and survival. Recently, rapid fluctuations of haemodynamics and cerebral perfusion following surfactant instillation have beer, described and an association with the

  10. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    intratracheal instillation of CRP into rat lungs. Insertion of CRP into surfactant membranes was investigated through monolayer techniques. The effect of CRP on membrane structure was studied through differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy using large and giant unilamellar......The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after...... vesicles. Our results indicate that CRP inserts into surfactant membranes and drastically increases membrane fluidity, resulting in surfactant inactivation. At 10% CRP/phospholipid weight ratio, CRP causes disappearance of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence distinctive of surfactant...

  11. Surfactant-assisted sacrificial template-mediated synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopyand photoluminescence studies. Influence of surfactant and solvents on morphology and luminescence of the final product in sacrificial template-assisted method has been investigated in detail.

  12. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Paulo B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-14

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayer are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayer at Iiquidhapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the confirmational order of surfactant monolayers.

  13. Dictionary of surfactants English/German and German/English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekmann, K.

    1987-01-01

    This dictionary is supplement to the monograph ''Surfactants in Consumer Products'' edited by Professor Dr. J. Falbe. It comprises approximately 3.200 keywords of the chemistry, technology and applications of surfactants in English/German and German/English. In the monograph the physical-chemical principles of action of the surfactants, their production and their application in laundry detergents, dishwashing detergents and cleaning agents as well as in cosmetics and toiletries are discussed. The technological aspects of application and formulation along with those of production and manufacturing processes are illustrated. Ecological and toxicological questions are probed in depth. Finally, important economic data concerning this branch of industry as well as an attempt to provide a perspective with regard to the future of the surfactant market round out the picture.

  14. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, David

    2002-07-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each polyelectrolyte-surfactant particle in the region of the CAC, and just beyond, contains many polyelectrolyte chains, held together essentially by micelle bridges. These particles, however, remain net positively charged, and therefore stable. At the other end of the binding range of the surfactant, so many internal micelles are present that the polymer-surfactant particles are now net negatively charged. Indeed binding stops since no further micelles can be accommodated. Again, the particles are stable. However, there exists a range of surfactant concentrations, lying within the range referred to above, where the net charge is reduced sufficiently that the polymer-surfactant particles will flocculate to form much larger structures. The onset of this second range might be termed the 'critical flocculation concentration' (CFC), and the end, the 'critical stabilisation concentration' (CSC). In this work, the CFC and

  15. Tunable Oleo-Furan Surfactants by Acylation of Renewable Furans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Sung; Joseph, Kristeen E.; Koehle, Maura; Krumm, Christoph; Ren, Limin; Damen, Jonathan N.; Shete, Meera H.; Lee, Han Seung; Zuo, Xiaobing; Lee, Byeongdu; Fan, Wei; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Lobo, Raul F.; Tsapatsis, Michael; Dauenhauer, Paul J.

    2016-11-23

    An important advance in fluid surface control was the amphiphilic surfactant comprised of coupled molecular structures (i.e. hydrophilic and hydrophobic) to reduce surface tension between two distinct fluid phases. However, implementation of simple surfactants has been hindered by the broad range of applications in water containing alkaline earth metals (i.e. hard water), which disrupt surfactant function and require extensive use of undesirable and expensive chelating additives. Here we show that sugar-derived furans can be linked with triglyceride-derived fatty acid chains via Friedel-Crafts acylation within single layer (SPP) zeolite catalysts. These alkylfuran surfactants independently suppress the effects of hard water while simultaneously permitting broad tunability of size, structure, and function, which can be optimized for superior capability for forming micelles and solubilizing in water.

  16. Surfactants and the attachment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2-phenylidole (DAPI) staining, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and spectrophotometry for their efficacy in preventing adhesion and removing Ps. Aeruginosa attached to 3CR12 stainless steel coupons and glass. All the surfactants tested ...

  17. Effect of surfactant concentration to aggregations of nanogold particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangthanu, Methawee; Pattanaporkratana, Apichart

    2017-09-01

    This research presents a study of aggregation of colloidal gold nanoparticles using 400 nm diameter gold nanoparticles mixed with a surfactant (Plantacare 2000) at various concentrations. When observed under a microscope, we found that the nanoparticles aggregated to form nearly spherical clusters at the beginning of the formation, and then sedimented to the bottom of the container. These clusters moved with Brownian’s motion and collided with each other in the horizontal plane, forming branch-like clusters in 2D. The appearance and size of the clusters were different depending on the concentration of surfactant. The clusters’ size and appearance were rarely changed after mixing with surfactant for 90 minutes, and we found that the cluster’s shapes were nearly spherical at low surfactant concentration (c = 0.25%). At surfactant concentration between 0.50% - 5.00%, the aggregates formed branch-like clusters with skinnier branches and smaller sizes at higher surfactant concentration. Moreover, we also found that, at surfactant concentrations between 2.50% - 5.00%, nanoparticles and aggregates stuck to the bottom of the glass container quickly and rarely moved after 10 minutes. At c = 0.25%, the 2D fractal dimension of the aggregates was measured to be D = 1.88 ± 0.04, since the aggregates were nearly spherical. The fractal dimension decreased to the minimum of D = 1.50 ± 0.12 at c = 1.50%, similar to D ∼ 1.45 found in diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA). At surfactant concentration above 1.50%, the fractal dimension increased until it reached the value of D ∼ 1.66 at c = 5.00%.

  18. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  19. Dynamic modeling of surfactant flooding in low permeable argillaceous reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, A. N.; Gunkin, A. S.; Rogachev, M. К

    2017-10-01

    This article reveals the current state and problems of the Russian oil production sector. Physicochemical enhanced oil recovery methods are proposed as a solution. The investigation of surfactant treatment efficiency and their integrated effect on oil and reservoir rock is conducted as well as its applicability analysis for low permeable poly-mineral reservoir. The results of dynamic modeling of oil displacement by the developed surfactant composition in a low permeable reservoir are presented.

  20. Structural studies of lamellar surfactant systems under shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Recent experimental studies on concentrated surfactant systems are reviewed. Particular attention is focused on the transformation from planar lamellar sheets to multilamellar vesicles. It is discussed whether both of these states are thermodynamic stable, or if the MLV is an artifact of shear...... induced factors. Recent studies includes the dependence on shear, and dependence on salt and cosurfactants, and thereby related lamellar defects. The review include moreover the demonstration that polymeric amphiphiles dramatically enhance the quality of classical surfactants. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science...

  1. Dispersion of nanoparticulate suspensions using self-assembled surfactant aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    The dispersion of particles is critical for several industrial applications such as paints, inks, coatings, and cosmetics. Several emerging applications such as abrasives for precision polishing, and drug delivery systems are increasingly relying on nanoparticulates to achieve the desired performance. In the case of nanoparticles, the dispersion becomes more challenging because of the lack of fundamental understanding of dispersant adsorption and interparticle force prediction. Additionally, many of these processes use severe processing environments such as high normal forces (>100 mN/m), high shear forces (>10,000 s -1), and high ionic strengths (>0.1 M). Under such processing conditions, traditionally used dispersants based on electrostatics, and steric force repulsion mechanism may not be adequate. Hence, the development of optimally performing dispersants requires a fundamental understanding of the dispersion mechanism at the atomic/molecular scale. This study explores the use of self-assembled surfactant aggregates at the solid-liquid interface for dispersing nanoparticles in severe processing environments. Surfactant molecules can provide a feasible alternative to polymeric or inorganic dispersants for stabilizing ultrafine particles. The barrier to aggregation in the presence of surfactant molecules was measured using atomic force microscopy. The barrier heights correlated to suspension stability. To understand the mechanism for nanoparticulate suspension stability in the presence of surfactant films, the interface was characterized using zeta potential, contact angle, adsorption, and FT-IR (adsorbed surfactant film structure measurements). The effect of solution conditions such as pH and ionic strength on the suspension stability, and the self-assembled surfactant films was also investigated. It was determined that a transition from a random to an ordered orientation of the surfactant molecules at the interface was responsible for stability of

  2. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  3. Use of surfactants to control island size and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrell, Jason; Liu, Feng; Stringfellow, Gerald B.

    2017-08-15

    Methods of controlling island size and density on an OMVPE growth film may comprise adding a surfactant at a critical concentration level, allowing a growth phase for a first period of time, and ending the growth phase when desired island size and density are achieved. For example, the island size and density of an OMVPE grown InGaN thin film may be controlled by adding an antimony surfactant at a critical concentration level.

  4. Interactions of cationic trimeric, gemini and monomeric surfactants with trianionic curcumin in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meina; Wu, Chunxian; Tang, Yongqiang; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2014-05-21

    Interactions of trianionic curcumin (Cur(3-)) with a series of cationic surfactants, monomeric surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), dimeric surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) and trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD), have been investigated in aqueous solution of pH 13.0. Surface tension and spectral measurements indicate that the cationic surfactants display a similar surfactant concentration dependent interaction process with Cur(3-), involving three interaction stages. At first the three cationic surfactants electrostatically bind on Cur(3-) to form the surfactant-Cur(3-) complex. Then the bound and unbound cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) aggregate into surfactant-Cur(3-) mixed micelles through hydrophobic interactions above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants (CMCC) in the presence of Cur(3-). Finally excess unbound surfactants self-assemble into micelles like those without Cur(3-). For all the three surfactants, the addition of Cur(3-) only decreases the critical micelle concentration of 12-6-12 but does not affect the critical micelle concentration of DTAB and DTAD. As the oligomeric degree of surfactants increases, the intermolecular interaction of the cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) increases and the surfactant amount needed for Cur(3-) encapsulation decreases. Compared with 12-6-12, either the weaker interaction of DTAB with Cur(3-) or stronger interaction of DTAD with Cur(3-) limits the stability or solubility of Cur(3-) in surfactant micelles. Therefore, gemini surfactant 12-6-12 is the best choice to effectively suppress Cur(3-) degradation at very low concentrations. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, surface tension and (1)H NMR results reveal that 12-6-12 and Cur(3-) form a (12-6-12)2-Cur(3-) complex and start to form micelles at extremely decreased concentrations, where either 12-6-12 or Cur(3-) works as a bridge

  5. Improvement of bagasse become lignosulfonate surfactant for oil industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiati, R.; Prakoso, S.; Siregar, S.; Marhaendrajana, T.; Wahyuningrum, D.; Fajriah, S.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this research is to use bagasse as a raw material as an effort to enhance the petroleum acquisition. There are two steps of processing bagasse into surfactant lignosulfonate which are the separation process of lignin from bagasse and the sulfonation process of lignin into lignosulfonate. The formation of surfactant lignosulfonate is a result of reaction between ion lignin with bisulfit. The sulfonate group/cluster at lignosulfonate are hydrophilic group which causes lignosulfonate to have amphipathic structure (surfactant). The comparison uses infrared test result against the formed component in surfactant sodium lignosulfonate from bagasse. With the two crude oil samples used in phase test, it turned out that at some light petroleum sample which were mixed with surfactant lignosulfonate formed a middle phase emulsion, with middle phase emulsion stability happening after the second day with a comparison of 10 – 50%. Meanwhile the heavy crude oil did not form a middle phase emulsion at all. Therefore, it can be concluded that bagasse has enough potential to be processed into surfactant lignosulfonate and to be used as injection fluid in the EOR process in oil industries.

  6. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  7. Respiratory Mechanics and Gas Exchange: The Effect of Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the lung is to exchange gases, primarily oxygen and carbon dioxide, between the atmosphere and the circulatory system. To enable this exchange, the airways in the lungs terminate in some 300 million alveoli that provide adequate surface area for transport. During breathing, work must be done to stretch various tissues to accommodate a greater volume of gas. Considerable work must also be done to expand the liquid lining (hypophase) that coats the interior surfaces of the alveoli. This is enabled by a surface active lipo-protein complex, known as pulmonary surfactant, that modifies the surface tension at the hypophase-air interface. Surfactants also serve as physical barriers that modify the rate of gas transfer across interfaces. We develop a mathematical model to study the action of pulmonary surfactant and its determinative contributions to breathing. The model is used to explore the influence of surfactants on alveolar mechanics and on gas exchange: it relates the work of respiration at the level of the alveolus to the gas exchange rate through the changing influence of pulmonary surfactant over the breathing cycle. This work is motivated by a need to develop improved surfactant replacement therapies to treat serious medical conditions.

  8. Effect of Surfactants on the Growth of Individual Cloud Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, A. A.; Li, W.; Gerard, V.; Noziere, B.; Cohen, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    Accurately predicting cloud droplet growth and lifetime remains a large uncertainty in estimates of Earth's changing energy budget. Current findings suggest that surface-active organic compounds and other surfactants in cloud droplets can affect the rate and magnitude of water condensation onto and evaporation from droplets affecting a myriad of cloud properties. This idea represents a significant change from prior thinking that focused solely on solubility as the chemical influence on water uptake to droplets. Recent observations show that surfactants extracted from atmospheric aerosol particles can considerably reduce the surface tension of water, making them important factors in cloud droplet growth that were until recently considered to be negligible. Using the surfactant Igepal CA-630, which has properties similar to that of surfactants extracted from atmospheric aerosol samples, model cloud droplets were created in the laboratory. The evaporation and condensation of the individual droplets were investigated using an aerosol optical trap with Raman spectroscopy. With a change in relative humidity (RH) from 70% to 80%, droplets containing both Igepal and NaCl had much larger changes in droplet radii than droplets containing NaCl only, demonstrating a significant effect of surface tension depression on evaporation and condensation. Given an increase in RH in the atmosphere, this could lead to droplets containing surfactants growing larger than those without surfactants and a substantial change in CCN activity.

  9. Effect of ethyleneoxide groups of anionic surfactants on lipase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Solange S; Alves, Luís; Sebastião, Marco; Medronho, Bruno; Almeida, Zaida L; Faria, Tiago Q; Brito, Rui M M; Moreno, Maria J; Antunes, Filipe E

    2016-09-01

    The use of enzymes in laundry and dish detergent products is growing. Such tendency implies dedicated studies to understand surfactant-enzyme interactions. The interactions between surfactants and enzymes and their impact on the catalytic efficiency represent a central problem and were here evaluated using circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and enzyme activity determinations. This work focuses on this key issue by evaluating the role of the ethyleneoxide (EO) groups of anionic surfactants on the structure and activity of a commercial lipase, and by focusing on the protein/surfactant interactions at a molecular level. The conformational changes and enzymatic activity of the protein were evaluated in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS also denoted as SLE 0 S) and of sodium lauryl ether sulfate with two EO units (SLE 2 S). The results strongly suggest that the presence of EO units in the surfactant polar headgroup determines the stability and the activity of the enzyme. While SDS promotes enzyme denaturation and consequent loss of activity, SLE 2 S preserves the enzyme structure and activity. The data further highlights that the electrostatic interactions among the protein groups are changed by the presence of the adsorbed anionic surfactants being such absorption mainly driven by hydrophobic interactions. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1276-1282, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Studies on interaction of poly(sodium acrylate) and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) with cationic surfactants: effects of polyelectrolyte molar mass, chain flexibility, and surfactant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yilin

    2010-08-19

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, turbidity, and steady-state fluorescence measurements have been used to study interactions of cationic ammonium gemini surfactant (C(12)C(6)C(12)Br(2)) and single-chain surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) with anionic polyelectrolytes poly(sodium styrenesulfonates) (NaPSS) and poly(sodium acrylates) (NaPAA) with different molar masses. Without any surfactants, NaPSS with lower molar mass has already self-aggregated into aggregates, whereas NaPAA has no aggregation at any molar mass. All of the polyelectrolytes show a remarkable interaction with the cationic surfactants. Compared with DTAB, C(12)C(6)C(12)Br(2) can bind to NaPSS and NaPAA at a very low concentration and has stronger interactions with NaPSS and NaPAA. The flexible NaPAA shows moderately endothermic enthalpies while interacting with the surfactants, but the interaction of the stiff NaPSS with the surfactants exhibits highly exothermic enthalpies. Moreover, the interaction of the stiff NaPSS with the surfactants strongly depends on the polyelectrolyte molar mass, but the polyelectrolyte molar mass almost does not affect the interaction of the flexible NaPAA with the surfactants. Especially, the effect of the polyelectrolyte molar mass becomes more significant when the polyelectrolytes interact with gemini surfactant than with single-chain surfactant. It is revealed that the effects of polyelectrolyte molar mass, chain flexibility, and surfactant architecture on surfactant/polyelectrolyte interactions confine each other.

  11. Mechanism of the immobilization of surfactants on polymeric surfaces by means of an argon plasma treatment: influence of the chemical structure of surfactant substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, J.P.; Lens, J.P.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    In this article, a study on the mechanism of the immobilization of surfactants on polymeric surfaces by means of an argon plasma treatment is described. The unsaturated surfactant sodium 10-undecenoate [C11(:)] and the saturated surfactant sodium dodecanoate (C12) were immobilized on poly(ethylene)

  12. Pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA in experimental surfactant dysfunction treated with surfactant installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, K.; John, J.; Lachmann, B.; Robertson, B.; Wollmer, P.

    1997-02-01

    Background: Breakdown of the alveolo-capillary barrier is a characteristic feature of respiratory distress syndrome. Restoration of alveolo-capillary barrier function may be an important aspect of surfactant replacement therapy. We examined the effect of surfactant installation on alveolo-capillary barrier function in an experimental model of surfactant dysfunction by measuring pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA. Methods: Nineteen rabbits were tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated. Surfactant dysfunction was induced by administration of a synthetic detergent in aerosol form. Detergent was given to 13 rabbits; seven rabbits were then treated with installation of natural surfactant, whereas six rabbits received saline. Six rabbits were used as untreated controls. An aerosol of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was administered to all animals and the pulmonary clearance was measured with a gamma camera. Results: {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA cleared from the lungs with a half-life of 71{+-}22 min in the control animals, 21.4{+-}7.4 min in the surfactant-treated animals and 5.8{+-}1.5 min in the saline-treated animals. The difference in half-life between groups was highly significant (P<0.001). There was no change in arterial oxygenation or compliance in controls or in animals treated with saline. In animals treated with surfactant, a small transient reduction in arterial oxygen tension and a more long-standing reduction in compliance were observed. Conclusion: Surfactant treatment thus significantly attenuated the effect of detergent treatment but did not restore alveolo-capillary transfer of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA to normal. (AU) 26 refs.

  13. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-03-21

    Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of model perfumes on surfactant and mixed surfactant self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, J; Tucker, I; Green, A; Grainger, D; Jones, C; Ford, G; Roberts, C; Hubbard, J; Petkov, J; Thomas, R K; Grillo, I

    2008-11-04

    The impact of some model perfumes on surfactant self-assembly has been investigated, using small-angle neutron scattering. A range of different model perfumes, with differing degrees of hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, have been explored, and in order of increasing hydrophobicity include phenyl ethanol (PE), rose oxide (RO), limonene (LM), linalool (LL), and dihydrogen mercenol (DHM). The effect of their solubilization on the nonionic surfactant micelles of dodecaethylene monododecyl ether (C12EO12) and on the mixed surfactant aggregates of C12EO12 and the cationic dialkyl chain surfactant dihexadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DHDAB) has been quantified. For PE and LL the effect of their solubilization on the micelle, mixed micelle/lamellar and lamellar regimes of the C12EO12/DHDAB mixtures, has also been determined. For the C12EO12 and mixed DHDAB/C12EO12 micelles PE is solubilized predominantly at the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface, whereas the more hydrophobic perfumes, from RO to DHM, are solubilized predominantly in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. For the C12EO12 micelles, with increasing perfume concentration, the more hydrophobic perfumes (RO to DHM) promote micellar growth. Relatively modest growth is observed for RO and LM, whereas substantial growth is observed for LL and DHM. In contrast, for the addition of PE the C12EO12 micelles remain as relatively small globular micelles, with no significant growth. For the C12EO12/DHDAB mixed micelles, the pattern of behavior with the addition of perfume is broadly similar, except that the micellar growth with increasing perfume concentration for the more hydrophobic perfumes is less pronounced. In the Lbeta (Lv) region of the DHDAB-rich C12EO12/DHDAB phase diagram, the addition of PE results in a less structured (less rigid) lamellar phase, and ultimately a shift toward a structure more consistent with a sponge or bicontinuous phase. In the mixed L1/Lbeta region of the phase diagram PE induces a slight

  15. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: clab@whu.edu.cn [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Jiaguo, E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation.

  16. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation

  17. Surfactant-bound monolithic columns for CEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Congying; He, Jun; Jia, Jinping; Fang, Nenghu; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2009-11-01

    A novel anionic surfactant bound monolithic stationary phase based on 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid is designed for CEC. The monolith possessing bonded undecanoyl groups (hydrophobic sites) and carboxyl groups (weak cationic ion-exchange sites) were evaluated as a mixed-mode stationary phase in CEC for the separation of neutral and polar solutes. Using a multivariate D-optimal design the composition of the polymerization mixture was modeled and optimized with five alkylbenzenes and seven alkyl phenyl ketones as test solutes. The D-optimal design indicates a strong dependence of electrochromatographic parameters on the concentration of 11-acrylaminoundecanoic acid monomer and porogen (water) in the polymerization mixture. A difference of 6, 8 and 13% RSD between the predicted and the experimental values in terms of efficiency, resolution and retention time, respectively, indeed confirmed that the proposed approach is practical. The physical (i.e. morphology, porosity and permeability) and chromatographic properties of the monolithic columns were thoroughly investigated. With the optimized monolithic column, high efficiency separation of N-methylcarbamates pesticides and positional isomers was successfully achieved. It appears that this type of mixed-mode monolith (containing both chargeable and hydrophobic sites) may have a great potential as a new generation of CEC stationary phase.

  18. Self-Assembly of Nanoparticle Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Michael T.

    Self-assembly utilizes non-covalent forces to organize smaller building blocks into larger, organized structures. Nanoparticles are one type of building block and have gained interest recently due to their unique optical and electrical properties which have proved useful in fields such as energy, catalysis, and advanced materials. There are several techniques currently used to self-assemble nanoparticles, each with its own set of benefits and drawbacks. Here, we address the limited number of techniques in non-polar solvents by introducing a method utilizing amphiphilic gold nanoparticles. Grafted polymer chains provide steric stabilization while small hydrophilic molecules induce assembly through short range attractive forces. The properties of these self-assembled structures are found to be dependent on the polymer and small molecules surface concentrations and chemistries. These particles act as nanoparticle surfactants and can effectively stabilize oil-water interfaces, such as in an emulsion. In addition to the work in organic solvent, similar amphiphilic particles in aqueous media are shown to effectively stabilize oil-in-water emulsions that show promise as photoacoustic/ultrasound theranostic agents.

  19. Glyphosate: Surfactant herbicide poisoning - Is it mild?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Venugopal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate Surfactant is a nonselective widely used herbicide in agriculture, forestry, industrial weed control, lawn, garden and aquatic environments. They have favorable toxicity with occupational and accidental exposures. The toxicity in humans is mucosal and gastrointestinal irritation, hypotension, metabolic acidosis, pulmonary insufficiency, and oliguria. Patient may appear asymptomatic for many hours before slowly lapse into a hypotensive, apparently nonhypovolaemic shock that can often ends fatally. We hereby report a case of a 25-year-old male patient who was admitted to our tertiary care hospital following suicidal consumption of around 250-300 ml of herbicide containing glyphosate (glypho; . Initially, gastric lavage done and the patient was managed with intubation and mechanical ventilation. He also developed acute renal failure, and renal function reverted to normal after four sittings of hemodialysis. Patient was successfully treated and discharged home. This case report emphasizes on timely systemic supportive measure as the sole method of treatment since this poison has no specific antidote.

  20. Alkyl-imidazolium glycosides: non-ionic-cationic hybrid surfactants from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Abbas Abdulameer; Tabandeh, Mojtaba; Heidelberg, Thorsten; Hussen, Rusnah Syahila Duali; Ali, Hapipah Mohd

    2015-08-14

    A series of surfactants combining carbohydrate and imidazolium head groups were prepared and investigated on their assembly behavior. The presence of the imidazolium group dominated the interactions of the surfactants, leading to high CMCs and large molecular surface areas, reflected in curved rather than lamellar surfactant assemblies. The carbohydrate, on the other hand, stabilized molecular assemblies slightly and reduced the surface tension of surfactant solutions considerably. A comparative emulsion study discourages the use of pure alkyl imidazolium glycosides owing to reduced assembly stabilities compared with APGs. However, the surfactants are believed to have potential as component in carbohydrate based surfactant mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. (Cationic + nonionic) mixed surfactant aggregates for solubilisation of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S.K.; Chaudhary, G.R.; Mehta, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical micelle concentration of mixed surfactant has been measured. • Aqueous solubility and alkaline stability of curcumin has been significantly improved. • Location of curcumin within micelles has been evaluated. • Scavenging activity of curcumin has been improved. • Non-intercalative binding with ct-DNA has been observed. - Abstract: Curcumin is a potential drug for variety of diseases. Major limitations of curcumin are low water solubility, rapid hydrolytic degradation in alkaline medium and poor bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, highly potential mixed micellar system has been prepared. In order to reduce inter ionic repulsion and precipitation of surfactants, (cationic + non-ionic) mixed system have been chosen that directly influence its applicability. Hydrophobic chain of non-ionic surfactant significantly influences the cmc of mixed surfactant system as indicated by fluorescence and conductivity data. UV–visible spectroscopy analyses show that solubility, stability and antioxidant property of the curcumin is remarkably improved depending on cmc and aggregation number (N agg ) of mixed surfactants, where N agg plays crucial role. Generally, curcumin undergoes complete degradation in slight basic medium, but stability has been maintained up to 8 h at pH-13 using formulated mixed micelles (only (20 to 25)% degraded). Location of curcumin which is monitored using emission spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and 1 H NMR spectroscopy techniques play the most important role. Observed results show that the major population of curcumin is located at the polar region and some are in hydrophobic region of the mixed micelles. To ensure the effect of mixed surfactants and curcumin loaded mixed surfactants on DNA, the interaction parameter indicates non-interclative interactions.

  2. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog; Ramarao, Poduri

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation

  3. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raman Preet, E-mail: ramanpreetsingh@hotmail.com [Evalueserve SEZ (Gurgaon) Pvt. Ltd. (India); Jain, Sanyog [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Ramarao, Poduri, E-mail: ramaraop@yahoo.com [Central University of Punjab, School of Basic and Applied Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  4. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog; Ramarao, Poduri

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  5. Effect of protic ionic liquid and surfactant structure on partitioning of polyoxyethylene non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolnicki, Inga L; FitzGerald, Paul A; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2014-08-25

    The partitioning constants and Gibbs free energies of transfer of poly(oxyethylene) n-alkyl ethers between dodecane and the protic ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium nitrate (PAN) are determined. EAN and PAN have a sponge-like nanostructure that consists of interpenetrating charged and apolar domains. This study reveals that the ILs solvate the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the amphiphiles differently. The ethoxy groups are dissolved in the polar region of both ILs by means of hydrogen bonds. The environment is remarkably water-like and, as in water, the solubility of the ethoxy groups in EAN decreases on warming, which underscores the critical role of the IL hydrogen-bond network for solubility. In contrast, amphiphile alkyl chains are not preferentially solvated by the charged or uncharged regions of the ILs. Rather, they experience an average IL composition and, as a result, partitioning from dodecane into the IL increases as the cation alkyl chain is lengthened from ethyl to propyl, because the IL apolar volume fraction increases. Together, these results show that surfactant dissolution in ILs is related to structural compatibility between the head or tail group and the IL nanostructure. Thus, these partitioning studies reveal parameters for the effective molecular design of surfactants in ILs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Surfactant selection principle for reducing critical micelle concentration in mixtures of oppositely charged gemini surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhang; Fan, Yaxun; Tian, Maozhang; Wang, Ruijuan; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2014-07-15

    Cationic quaternary ammonium gemini surfactants C(n)H(2n+1)(CH3)2N(+)CH2CHCHCH2(CH3)2N(+)C(n)H(2n+1)2Br(-) (C(n)C4C(n), n = 12, 8, 6) with alkyl spacers, C(n)H(2n+1)(CH3)2N(+)CH2CHOHCHOHCH2(CH3)2N(+)C(n)H(2n+1)2Br(-) (C(n)C4(OH)2C(n), n = 12, 8, 6, 4) with two hydroxyl groups in alkyl spacers, and cationic ammonium single-chain surfactants C(n)H(2n+1)(CH3)2N(+)Br(-) (C(n)TAB, n = 12, 8, 6) have been chosen to fabricate oppositely charged surfactant mixtures with anionic sulfonate gemini surfactant C12H25N(CH2CH2CH2SO3(-))CH2CH2CH2(CH3)2N(CH2CH2CH2SO3(-))C12H252Na (C12C3C12(SO3)2). Surface tension, electrical conductivity, and isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) were used to study their surface properties, aggregation behaviors, and intermolecular interactions. The mixtures of C12C3C12(SO3)2/C(n)C4(OH)2C(n) (n = 12, 8) and C12C3C12(SO3)2/C12C4C12 show anomalous larger critical micelle concentration (CMC) than C12C3C12(SO3)2, while the mixtures of C12C3C12(SO3)2/C(n)C4(OH)2C(n) (n = 6, 4), C12C3C12(SO3)2/C(n)C4(OH)2C(n) (n = 6, 4), and C12C3C12(SO3)2/C(n)TAB (n = 12, 8, 6) exhibit much lower CMC than C12C3C12(SO3)2. The results indicate that strong hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains assisted by strong electrostatic attractions between the headgroups and hydrogen bonds between the spacers lead to the formation of less surface active premicellar aggregates in bulk solution, resulting in the increase of CMC. If these interactions are weakened or inhibited, less surface active premicellar aggregates are no longer formed in the mixtures, and thus the CMC values are reduced. The work reveals that the combination of two surfactants with great self-assembling ability separately may have strong intermolecular binding interactions; however, their mixtures do not always generate superior synergism properties. Only moderate intermolecular interaction can generate the strongest synergism in CMC reduction.

  7. Enterobacter agglomerans lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in pulmonary surfactant as a factor in the pathogenesis of byssinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucca, A J; Brogden, K A; Engen, R

    1988-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Enterobacter agglomerans and pulmonary surfactant mixtures were centrifuged in discontinuous sucrose gradients to determine whether LPS bound to surfactant and examined in a Langmuir trough with a Wilhelmy balance to determine whether LPS altered the surface activity of surfactant. The LPS was found to bind to the surfactant and altered its surface tension properties. The binding of LPS to surfactant in the lung may change the physiological properties of surfactant and be a possible mechanism for the pathogenesis of byssinosis.

  8. Surfactant uptake dynamics in mammalian cells elucidated with quantitative coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Okuno

    Full Text Available The mechanism of surfactant-induced cell lysis has been studied with quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microspectroscopy. The dynamics of surfactant molecules as well as intracellular biomolecules in living Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL cells has been examined for a low surfactant concentration (0.01 w%. By using an isotope labeled surfactant having CD bonds, surfactant uptake dynamics in living cells has been traced in detail. The simultaneous CARS imaging of the cell itself and the internalized surfactant has shown that the surfactant molecules is first accumulated inside a CHL cell followed by a sudden leak of cytosolic components such as proteins to the outside of the cell. This finding indicates that surfactant uptake occurs prior to the cell lysis, contrary to what has been believed: surface adsorption of surfactant molecules has been thought to occur first with subsequent disruption of cell membranes. Quantitative CARS microspectroscopy enables us to determine the molecular concentration of the surfactant molecules accumulated in a cell. We have also investigated the effect of a drug, nocodazole, on the surfactant uptake dynamics. As a result of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization by nocodazole, the surfactant uptake rate is significantly lowered. This fact suggests that intracellular membrane trafficking contributes to the surfactant uptake mechanism.

  9. Ecotoxicological characterization of polyoxyethylene glycerol ester non-ionic surfactants and their mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Lechuga, Manuela; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated the aquatic toxicity of new non-ionic surfactants derived from renewable raw materials, polyoxyethylene glycerol ester (PGE), and their binary mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants. Toxicity of pure PGEs was determined using representative organisms from different trophic levels: luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia magna). Relationships between toxicity and the structural parameters such as unit of ethylene oxide (EO) and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) were evaluated. Critical micellar concentration (CMC) in the conditions of the toxicity test was also determined. It was found that the toxicity of the aqueous solutions of PGE decreased when the number of EO units in the molecule, HLB, and CMC increased. PGEs showed lower CMC in marine medium, and the toxicity to V. ficheri is lower when the CMC was higher. Given their non-polar nature, narcosis was expected to be the primary mode of toxic action of PGEs. For the mixture of surfactants, we observed that the mixtures with PGE that had the higher numbers of EO units were more toxic than the aqueous solutions of pure surfactants. Moreover, we found that concentration addition was the type of action more likely to occur for mixtures of PGE with lower numbers of EO units with non-ionic surfactants (alkylpolyglucoside and fatty alcohol ethoxylate), whereas for the mixture of PGE with lower EO units and anionic surfactant (ether carboxylic derivative), the most common response type was response addition. In case of mixtures involving amphoteric surfactants and PGEs with the higher numbers of EO units, no clear pattern with regard to the mixture toxicity response type could be observed.

  10. Modification of shape oscillations of an attached bubble by surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihon J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents (surfactants, e.g. washing agents strongly modifies properties of gas-liquid interface. We have carried out extensive experiments, in which we study effect of surfactants on the shape oscillations of a bubble, which is attached at a tip of a capillary. In the experiments, shape oscillations of a bubble are invoked by a motion of a capillary, to which the bubble is injected. Decaying oscillations are recorded and their frequency and damping are evaluated. By changing the excitation frequency, three lowest oscillation modes are studied. Experiments were repeated in aqueous solution of several surfactants (terpineol, SDS, CTAB, Triton X-100, Triton X-45 at various concentrations. Generally, these features are observed: Initially a surfactant addition leads to an increase of the oscillation frequency (though surface tension is decreasing; this effect can be attributed to the increasing interfacial elasticity. The decay time of oscillation is strongly decreasing, as a consequence of energy dissipation linked with Marangoni stresses. At a certain critical concentration, frequency decreases abruptly and the decay time passes by a minimum. With further addition of surfactant, frequency decreases, and the decay time slightly lengthens. Above critical micelle concentration, all these parameters stabilize. Interestingly, the critical concentration, at which frequency drop occurs, depends on mode order. This clearly shows that the frequency drop and minimum decay time are not a consequence of some abrupt change of interfacial properties, but are a consequence of some phenomena, which still need to be explained.

  11. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  12. Controlling block copolymer phase behavior using ionic surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India E-mail: debes.phys@gmail.com (India)

    2016-05-23

    The phase behavior of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide-poly(ethylene oxide) PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer [P85 (EO{sub 26}PO{sub 39}EO{sub 26})] in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution as a function of temperature has been studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations (1 wt%) of block copolymer and surfactants. Each of the individual components (block copolymer and surfactant) and the nanoparticle–surfactant mixed system have been examined at varying temperature. The block copolymer P85 forms spherical micelles at room temperature whereas shows sphere-to-rod like micelle transition at higher temperatures. On the other hand, SDS surfactant forms ellipsoidal micelles over a wide temperature range. Interestingly, it is found that phase behavior of mixed micellar system (P85 + SDS) as a function of temperature is drastically different from that of P85, giving the control over the temperature-dependent phase behavior of block copolymers.

  13. Surfactant from neonatal to pediatric ICU: bench and bedside evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, A; Brat, R; Aguilera, S S; Tissieres, P; De Luca, D

    2014-12-01

    Surfactant is a cornerstone of neonatal critical care for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome of preterm babies. However, other indications have been studied for various clinical conditions both in term neonates and in children beyond neonatal age. A high degree of evidence is not yet available in some cases and this is due to the complex and not yet totally understood physiopathology of the different types of pediatric and neonatal lung injury. We here summarise the state of the art of the bench and bedside knowledge about surfactant use for the respiratory conditions usually cared for in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Future research direction will also be presented. On the whole, surfactant is able to improve oxygenation in infection related respiratory failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and meconium aspiration syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage with surfactant solution is currently the only means to reduce mortality or need for extracorporeal life support in neonates with meconium aspiration. While surfactant bolus or lavage only improves the oxygenation and ventilatory requirements in other types of postneonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there seems to be a reduction in the mortality of small infants with RSV-related ARDS.

  14. Polydiacetylene sensor interaction with food sanitizers and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueyuan; Northcutt, Julie; Hanks, Tim; Miller, Ian; Pennington, Bill; Jelinek, Raz; Han, Inyee; Dawson, Paul

    2017-04-15

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) vesicles are of interest as biosensors, particularly for pathogenic bacteria. As part of a food monitoring system, interaction with food sanitizers/surfactants was investigated. PDA vesicles were prepared by inkjet-printing, photopolymerized and characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The optical response of PDA vesicles at various concentrations verses a fixed sanitizer/surfactant concentration was determined using a two variable factorial design. Sanitizer/surfactant response at various concentrations over time was also measured. Results indicated that only Vigilquat and TritonX-100 interacted with PDA vesicles giving visible colour change out of 8 sanitizers/surfactants tested. PDA vesicle concentration, sanitizer/surfactant concentration, and time all had a significant (P<0.0001) effect on colour change. As they are highly sensitive to the presence of Vigilquat and TritonX-100, PDA sensors could be used to detect chemical residues as well as for detection of various contaminants in the food industry. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Modification of shape oscillations of an attached bubble by surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobecká, L.; Vejražka, J.; Tihon, J.

    2013-04-01

    Surface-active agents (surfactants, e.g. washing agents) strongly modifies properties of gas-liquid interface. We have carried out extensive experiments, in which we study effect of surfactants on the shape oscillations of a bubble, which is attached at a tip of a capillary. In the experiments, shape oscillations of a bubble are invoked by a motion of a capillary, to which the bubble is injected. Decaying oscillations are recorded and their frequency and damping are evaluated. By changing the excitation frequency, three lowest oscillation modes are studied. Experiments were repeated in aqueous solution of several surfactants (terpineol, SDS, CTAB, Triton X-100, Triton X-45) at various concentrations. Generally, these features are observed: Initially a surfactant addition leads to an increase of the oscillation frequency (though surface tension is decreasing); this effect can be attributed to the increasing interfacial elasticity. The decay time of oscillation is strongly decreasing, as a consequence of energy dissipation linked with Marangoni stresses. At a certain critical concentration, frequency decreases abruptly and the decay time passes by a minimum. With further addition of surfactant, frequency decreases, and the decay time slightly lengthens. Above critical micelle concentration, all these parameters stabilize. Interestingly, the critical concentration, at which frequency drop occurs, depends on mode order. This clearly shows that the frequency drop and minimum decay time are not a consequence of some abrupt change of interfacial properties, but are a consequence of some phenomena, which still need to be explained.

  16. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, W.C.; Slauson, D.O.; Dahlstrom, M.; Gorman, C.

    1974-01-01

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  17. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yakout

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effectiveness on adsorption rate were studied. Cationic surfactant, Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was selected for the experiments. A series of batch experiments were performed to determine the sorption isotherms of surfactants to PAC. The results showed that carbon structure affect mainly on the surfactant adsorption. Surfactant equilibrium data fitted very well to the binary langmuir model. The pseudo first-,second- order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied. Both, the external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms involve in CTAB sorption.

  18. A level-set method for two-phase flows with soluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian-Jun; Shi, Weidong; Lai, Ming-Chih

    2018-01-01

    A level-set method is presented for solving two-phase flows with soluble surfactant. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the bulk surfactant and the interfacial surfactant equations. In particular, the convection-diffusion equation for the bulk surfactant on the irregular moving domain is solved by using a level-set based diffusive-domain method. A conservation law for the total surfactant mass is derived, and a re-scaling procedure for the surfactant concentrations is proposed to compensate for the surfactant mass loss due to numerical diffusion. The whole numerical algorithm is easy for implementation. Several numerical simulations in 2D and 3D show the effects of surfactant solubility on drop dynamics under shear flow.

  19. Phase diagrams to optimize surfactant solutions for oil and DNAPL recovery in aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, R.; Gelinas, P.J.; Masson, A.

    1993-01-01

    Phase diagrams can be used to optimize the composition of surfactant solutions (cosurfactant/surfactant) designed for the recovery of DNAPLs at residual saturation in aquifer formations. The study also shows that the combination of cosurfactant (alcohol) and surfactant is more effective than the use of alcohols or surfactants separately. The suggested approach is based on miscible oil displacement using surfactant solutions that promote immiscible oil displacement. The goal of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of optimized surfactant solutions to restore oil and DNAPL-contaminated results show that alcohol/surfactant systems can be used to solubilize chlorinated solvents (TCE, PCE) and light oils (gasoline, diesel). For the dissolution of heavy and viscous oils (motor oil, ATF, creosote, Ville Mercier oil), an organic solvent must be added to the alcohol/surfactant system

  20. Surfactant treatment before reperfusion improves the immediate function of lung transplants in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, ME; Petersen, AH; Hofstede, G; Haagsman, HP; Oetomo, SB; Prop, J

    An impaired function of alveolar surfactant can cause lung transplant dysfunction early after reperfusion. In this study it was investigated whether treatment with surfactant before reperfusion improves the immediate function of lung transplants and whether an improved transplant function was

  1. Surfactants in runoff water at different locations in Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, W N F W; Latif, M T; Wahid, N B A; Razak, I S; Suratman, S

    2014-03-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the composition of surfactants in runoff water in the semi-urban area of Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. Runoff samples were collected from five different locations with contrasting functional activities and the colorimetric method was used to analyze the concentrations of surfactants as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) for anionic surfactants and as disulphine blue active substances (DBAS) for cationic surfactants. The results showed that the highest surfactant concentrations of MBAS and DBAS in runoff water were recorded in the samples collected at the residential area, with the concentrations of 3.192 ± 0.727 and 0.170 ± 0.028 μmol/L, respectively. Anionic surfactants as MBAS were found to dominate the concentration of surfactants in both runoff and rainwater. The concentrations of both anionic and cationic surfactants in runoff water were recorded as being higher than in rainwater.

  2. Meconium-induced inflammation and surfactant inactivation: specifics of molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopincova, Jana; Calkovska, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome in light of meconium-induced inflammation and inflammatory surfactant inactivation, related to both endogenous and therapeutic exogenous surfactant. The wide effect of meconium on surfactant properties is divided into three points. Direct effect of meconium on surfactant properties refers mainly to fragmentation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and other surfactant phospholipids together with cleavage of surfactant proteins. Initiation of inflammatory response due to activation of receptors by yet unspecified compounds involves complement and Toll-like receptor activation. A possible role of lung collectins, surfactant proteins A and D, which can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory reactions, is discussed. Initiation of inflammatory response by specified compounds in meconium reflects inflammatory functioning of cytokines, bile acids, and phospholipases contained in meconium. Unifying sketch of many interconnections in all these actions aims at providing integrated picture of inflammatory surfactant inactivation.

  3. Effects of anthropogenic surfactants on the conversion of marine dissolved organic carbon and microgels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Ruei-Feng; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2017-04-15

    The possible impact of three types of anthropogenic surfactants on the ability of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form self-assembled microgels was evaluated. The behavior of existing native microgels was also examined in the presence of surfactants. These results reveal that the release of surfactants even at low concentrations into the aquatic environment could effectively hinder the self-assembly of DOC polymers. The extent of the size reduction had the following order: anionic, cationic, and non-ionic. Furthermore, charged surfactants can disrupt existing native microgels, converting large assemblies into smaller particles. One possible mechanisms is that surfactants are able to enhance the stability of DOC polymers and disrupt aggregates due to their surface charges and protein-denaturing activities. These findings suggest that the ecological system is altered by anthropogenic surfactants, and provide useful information for ecological assessments of different types of surfactants and raise warnings about surfactant applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surfactant for dye-penetrant inspection is insensitive to liquid oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    LOX insensitive solvent is blended into a mixture of commercially available surfactants to clean metal surfaces which are to be investigated by the dye-penetrant method. The surfactant mixture is applied before and after application of the dye.

  5. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine half-life and pool size measurements in premature baboons developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. Janssen; V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio); P.E. Cogo (Paola); S.R. Seidner; I.H.I. Luijendijk; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); A.H. Jobe (Alan); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBecause minimal information is available about surfactant metabolism in bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we measured half-lives and pool sizes of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in very preterm baboons recovering from respiratory distress syndrome and developing

  6. Surfactant treatment in premature infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, AAE; Keli, SO; van der Meulen, GN; Wiersma, H; Arias, M; Angelista, IR; Muskiet, FD

    Surfactant replacement therapy for Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) in premature neonates has been established as an effective treatment, although significant mortality and morbidity remain. In Curacao, surfactant became available as a therapeutic option in 1994. A retrospective cohort study was

  7. In vitro surfactant structure-toxicity relationships: implications for surfactant use in sexually transmitted infection prophylaxis and contraception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela S Inácio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The need for woman-controlled, cheap, safe, effective, easy-to-use and easy-to-store topical applications for prophylaxis against sexually transmitted infections (STIs makes surfactant-containing formulations an interesting option that requires a more fundamental knowledge concerning surfactant toxicology and structure-activity relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report in vitro effects of surfactant concentration, exposure time and structure on the viability of mammalian cell types typically encountered in the vagina, namely, fully polarized and confluent epithelial cells, confluent but non-polarized epithelial-like cells, dendritic cells, and human sperm. Representatives of the different families of commercially available surfactants--nonionic (Triton X-100 and monolaurin, zwitterionic (DDPS, anionic (SDS, and cationic (C(nTAB (n = 10 to 16, C(12PB, and C(12BZK--were examined. Triton X-100, monolaurin, DDPS and SDS were toxic to all cell types at concentrations around their critical micelle concentration (CMC suggesting a non-selective mode of action involving cell membrane destabilization and/or destruction. All cationic surfactants were toxic at concentrations far below their CMC and showed significant differences in their toxicity toward polarized as compared with non-polarized cells. Their toxicity was also dependent on the chemical nature of the polar head group. Our results suggest an intracellular locus of action for cationic surfactants and show that their structure-activity relationships could be profitably exploited for STI prophylaxis in vaginal gel formulations. The therapeutic indices comparing polarized epithelial cell toxicity to sperm toxicity for all surfactants examined, except C(12PB and C(12BZK, does not justify their use as contraceptive agents. C(12PB and C(12BZK are shown to have a narrow therapeutic index recommending caution in their use in contraceptive formulations. CONCLUSIONS

  8. In vitro surfactant structure-toxicity relationships: implications for surfactant use in sexually transmitted infection prophylaxis and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Ângela S; Mesquita, Katia A; Baptista, Marta; Ramalho-Santos, João; Vaz, Winchil L C; Vieira, Otília V

    2011-01-01

    The need for woman-controlled, cheap, safe, effective, easy-to-use and easy-to-store topical applications for prophylaxis against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) makes surfactant-containing formulations an interesting option that requires a more fundamental knowledge concerning surfactant toxicology and structure-activity relationships. We report in vitro effects of surfactant concentration, exposure time and structure on the viability of mammalian cell types typically encountered in the vagina, namely, fully polarized and confluent epithelial cells, confluent but non-polarized epithelial-like cells, dendritic cells, and human sperm. Representatives of the different families of commercially available surfactants--nonionic (Triton X-100 and monolaurin), zwitterionic (DDPS), anionic (SDS), and cationic (C(n)TAB (n = 10 to 16), C(12)PB, and C(12)BZK)--were examined. Triton X-100, monolaurin, DDPS and SDS were toxic to all cell types at concentrations around their critical micelle concentration (CMC) suggesting a non-selective mode of action involving cell membrane destabilization and/or destruction. All cationic surfactants were toxic at concentrations far below their CMC and showed significant differences in their toxicity toward polarized as compared with non-polarized cells. Their toxicity was also dependent on the chemical nature of the polar head group. Our results suggest an intracellular locus of action for cationic surfactants and show that their structure-activity relationships could be profitably exploited for STI prophylaxis in vaginal gel formulations. The therapeutic indices comparing polarized epithelial cell toxicity to sperm toxicity for all surfactants examined, except C(12)PB and C(12)BZK, does not justify their use as contraceptive agents. C(12)PB and C(12)BZK are shown to have a narrow therapeutic index recommending caution in their use in contraceptive formulations. Our results contribute to understanding the mechanisms involved in

  9. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  10. Formation and characterization of zein-propylene glycol alginate-surfactant ternary complexes: Effect of surfactant type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Sun, Cuixia; Wei, Yang; Zhan, Xinyu; Mao, Like; Gao, Yanxiang

    2018-08-30

    In this study, zein, propylene glycol alginate (PGA) and surfactant ternary complexes were fabricated by antisolvent co-precipitation method. Two types of surfactants (rhamnolipid and lecithin) were applied to generate zein-PGA-rhamnolipid (Z-P-R) and zein-PGA-lecithin (Z-P-L) ternary complexes, respectively. Results showed that the surfactant types significantly affected the properties of ternary complexes. The formation of ternary complexes was mainly due to the non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interactions among zein, PGA and surfactants. Moreover, the thermal stability of ternary complexes was enhanced with increasing the levels of both surfactants. Notably, ternary complex dispersions exhibited better stability against pH from 2 to 8. Furthermore, a compact network structure was observed in Z-P-R ternary complex, while Z-P-L ternary complex remained the spherical structure. These findings would provide new insights into the development of novel delivery system and expand the options, when zein-based complexes were utilized under different environment conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas D.; Hiller, John M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  12. The interaction of a model active pharmaceutical with cationic surfactant and the subsequent design of drug based ionic liquid surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Sara; Brown, Paul; Ferguson, Steven; Khan, Rafaqat Ali; Ismail, Bushra; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Sayed, Murtaza; Khan, Asad Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Interactions of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) with surfactants remain an important research area due to the need to improve drug delivery systems. In this study, UV-Visible spectrophotometry was used to investigate the interactions between a model low molecular weight hydrophilic drug sodium valproate (SV) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Changes in the spectra of SV were observed in pre- and post-micellar concentrations of CTAB. The binding constant (Kb) values and the number of drug molecules encapsulated per micelle were calculated, which posed the possibility of mixed micelle formation and strong complexation between SV and CTAB. These results were compared to those of a novel room temperature surface active ionic liquid, which was synthesized by the removal of inorganic counterions from a 1:1 mixture of CTAB and SV. In this new compound the drug now constitutes a building block of the carrier and, as such, has considerably different surfactant properties to its building blocks. In addition, enhanced solubility in a range of solvents, including simulated gastric fluid, was observed. The study provides valuable experimental evidence concerning the performance of drug based surfactant ionic liquids and how their chemical manipulation, without altering the architecture of the API, leads to control of surfactant behavior and physicochemical properties. In turn, this should feed through to improved and controlled drug release rates and delivery mechanisms, and the prevention of precipitation or formation of polymorphs typical of crystalline form APIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spontaneous surface self-assembly in protein-surfactant mixtures: interactions between hydrophobin and ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P

    2014-05-08

    The synergistic interactions between certain ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the protein hydrophobin result in spontaneous self-assembly at the air-water interface to form layered surface structures. The surface structures are characterized using neutron reflectivity. The formation of the layered surface structures is promoted by the hydrophobic interaction between the polysorbate alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the globular hydrophobin and the interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and hydrophilic regions of the protein. The range of the ethoxylated polysorbate concentrations over which the surface ordering occurs is a maximum for the more hydrophobic surfactant polyoxyethylene(8) sorbitan monostearate. The structures at the air-water interface are accompanied by a profound change in the wetting properties of the solution on hydrophobic substrates. In the absence of the polysorbate surfactant, hydrophobin wets a hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate mixtures where multilayer formation occurs result in a significant dewetting of hydrophobic surfaces. The spontaneous surface self-assembly for hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures and the changes in surface wetting properties provide a different insight into protein-surfactant interactions and potential for manipulating surface and interfacial properties and protein surface behavior.

  14. Surfactant-Assisted Pressurized Liquid Extraction at Room Temperature for Radix glycyrrhizae by a New Class of Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Ming Yuan; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald; Ong, Eng Shi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory-assembled surfactant-assisted pressurized liquid extraction system at room temperature was used for the extraction of glycyrrhizin (GLY) in Radix glycyrrhizae. Environmentally friendly saccharide fatty acid ester such as glucose oleic acid ester is proposed to replace chemical-based surfactants. As the chemical properties of the surfactant obtained were unknown initially, lipase-catalyzed synthesis and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry were used to ascertain the identity. Surfactant-assisted pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was carried out dynamically and the extraction efficiencies of the proposed method using different concentration of glucose oleic acid ester were compared with sonication using an organic solvent (ethanol/water, 70:30). The extraction efficiencies of GLY in Radix glycyrrhizae using surfactant-assisted PLE was observed to be higher compared with sonication. The method precision was found to vary from 1.3 to 5.1% (relative standard deviation, RSD, n= 6) on different days. The new method demonstrated the possibility for the extraction to be carried out at room temperature for the production of botanical extracts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Segregation in like-charged polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures can be precisely tuned via manipulation of the surfactant mass ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Peter W; Lopez, Sonia G; Burr, Jocelyn; Taboada, Pablo; Yeates, Stephen G

    2013-04-09

    In this study, we consider segregative phase separation in aqueous mixtures of quaternary ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDQ) and alkyl (C12, 70%; C14 30%) dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (BAC) upon the addition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (pDADMAC) as a function of both concentration and molecular weight. The nature of the surfactant type is dominant in determining the concentration at which separation into an upper essentially surfactant-rich phase and lower polyelectrolyte-rich phase is observed. However, for high-molecular-weight pDADMAC there is a clear indication of an additional depletion flocculation effect. When the BAC/DDQ ratio is tuned, the segregative phase separation point can be precisely controlled. We propose a phase separation mechanism for like-charged quaternary ammonium polyelectrolyte/surfactant/water mixtures induced by a reduction in the ionic atmosphere around the surfactant headgroup and possible ion pair formation. An additional polyelectrolyte-induced depletion flocculation effect was also observed.

  16. Modification of Deeply Buried Hydrophobic Interfaces by Ionic Surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Tamam; D Pontoni Z Sapir; S Yefet; S Sloutskin; B Ocko; H Reichert; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    Hydrophobicity, the spontaneous segregation of oil and water, can be modified by surfactants. The way this modification occurs is studied at the oil-water interface for a range of alkanes and two ionic surfactants. A liquid interfacial monolayer, consisting of a mixture of alkane molecules and surfactant tails, is found. Upon cooling, it freezes at T{sub s}, well above the alkane's bulk freezing temperature, T{sub b}. The monolayer's phase diagram, derived by surface tensiometry, is accounted for by a mixtures-based theory. The monolayer's structure is measured by high-energy X-ray reflectivity above and below T{sub s}. A solid-solid transition in the frozen monolayer, occurring approximately 3 C below T{sub s}, is discovered and tentatively suggested to be a rotator-to-crystal transition.

  17. Growth Mechanism of Gold Nanorods in Binary Surfactant System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Seo, Sun-Hwa; Joe, Ara; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Jang, Eue-Soon [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In order to reveal the growth mechanism of gold nanorods (GNRs) in a binary surfactant system, we synthesized various GNRs by changing the concentration of the surfactants, AgNO{sub 3}, and HBr in the growth solution. We found that the benzyldime thylhexadecylammoniumchloride surfactant had weak interaction with the gold ions, but it could reduce the membrane fluidity. In addition, we could dramatically decrease the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration required for GNR growth by adding an HBr solution. Notably, Ag{sup +} ions were necessary to break the symmetry of the seed crystals for GNR growth, but increasing the concentration of Ag{sup +} and Br{sup -} ions caused a decrease in the template size.

  18. Mathematical Modelling of Surfactant Self-assembly at Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We present a mathematical model to describe the distribution of surfactant pairs in a multilayer structure beneath an adsorbed monolayer. A mesoscopic model comprising a set of ordinary differential equations that couple the rearrangement of surfactant within the multilayer to the surface adsorption kinetics is first derived. This model is then extended to the macroscopic scale by taking the continuum limit that exploits the typically large number of surfactant layers, which results in a novel third-order partial differential equation. The model is generalized to allow for the presence of two adsorbing boundaries, which results in an implicit free-boundary problem. The system predicts physically observed features in multilayer systems such as the initial formation of smaller lamellar structures and the typical number of layers that form in equilibrium.

  19. Effect of surfactants on the spectrofluorimetric properties of zearalenone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appell, Michael; Bosma, Wayne B.

    2011-01-01

    The chemiluminescent properties of the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone in the presence of aqueous micellar media were investigated using steady state fluorescence techniques. Micelles of surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and non-ionic Triton X-100 enhanced the fluorescence intensity of zearalenone in aqueous solutions. The binding constants have been determined and indicate zearalenone has the highest affinity for Triton X-100, followed by CTAB, and then by SDS. The encapsulation of zearalenone by the micelles studied is spontaneous and exothermic. The selective microenvironments provided by organized micellar systems offer an attractive medium to modulate fluorescence detection of zearalenone. - Highlights: → Surfactants can selectively modulate the fluorescence detection of zearalenone. → Binding studies provide information on the zearalenone-surfactant interactions. → Fluorescence intensity of zearalenone is related to the micelle microenvironment.

  20. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction

  1. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, D., E-mail: debes@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: debes@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  2. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  3. Surfactants enhance recovery of poorly soluble drugs during microdialysis sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koplin, Sebastian; Kumpugdee-Vollrath, Mont; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this project was to investigate the applicability of a recently developed in vitro microdialysis-sampling approach in connection with a dissolution-/permeation (D/P) system, especially the impact of surfactants within the perfusion fluid. The D/P-system is based on side-by-side chambers...... drug-dissolution (-release) and drug permeation. Furthermore, it should allow quantification of the unbound (free) drug concentration. In the first step, it was assessed, if the addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to the perfusate of the microdialysis system affects...... celecoxib, i.e. the fraction of drug, which is not associated with taurocholate surfactant micelles. In buffer, the measured concentrations matched the overall CXB concentrations. By the use of SDS-containing perfusates microdialysis sampling enabled reliable quantification of minute amounts of free CXB...

  4. Modification of deeply buried hydrophobic interfaces by ionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Lilach; Pontoni, Diego; Sapir, Zvi; Yefet, Shai; Sloutskin, Eli; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Reichert, Harald; Deutsch, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobicity, the spontaneous segregation of oil and water, can be modified by surfactants. The way this modification occurs is studied at the oil–water interface for a range of alkanes and two ionic surfactants. A liquid interfacial monolayer, consisting of a mixture of alkane molecules and surfactant tails, is found. Upon cooling, it freezes at Ts, well above the alkane’s bulk freezing temperature, Tb. The monolayer’s phase diagram, derived by surface tensiometry, is accounted for by a mixtures-based theory. The monolayer’s structure is measured by high-energy X-ray reflectivity above and below Ts. A solid–solid transition in the frozen monolayer, occurring approximately 3 °C below Ts, is discovered and tentatively suggested to be a rotator-to-crystal transition. PMID:21422287

  5. The adsorption of surfactant at the amorphous polymer solution interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, Valerie A.

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto amorphous polymers at the solid-solution interface is of direct relevance to many industrial sectors ranging from food, pharmaceuticals, paints, paper and photographic colour films. Although it is widely accepted that surfactants play the underpinning role in these applications, little is currently understood about the interactions between surfactants and polymeric materials at the molecular level. This lack of progress is mainly due to the inability of most existing techniques in probing this type of structural information at the wet interface. Specular neutron reflection (SNR) is a recently developed technique capable of detecting structural information with resolution down to a few angstroms (A). When combined with deuterium labeling, it is possible to distinguish the surfactant from the polymeric species at the interface. The aim of this work is to explore the appropriate experimental approach that utilizes the potential of neutron reflection to unravel molecular information about the actions of surfactants. A major progress that was made in the project was the -development of experimental protocols for the formation of smooth polymeric thin films onto neutron transparent substrates. This experimental process was substantially supported by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), a home-based laboratory optical system that was also highly sensitive to film thickness and composition. This exploratory work has mainly used model polymeric samples that are of broader implications to various technological applications. A nonionic alkyl ethoxylate surfactant, such as C 12 E 5 was chosen because its interfacial behaviour has been widely examined. Measurements were made over a wide concentration range around the critical micellar concentration (cmc), using specially designed cells. In the case of PMMA (poly(methylmethacrylate)), adsorption of C 12 E 5 was found to be completely reversible with no observable penetration of the surfactant into the

  6. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Rudy E.; Zhong, Yu

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  7. Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants. Membrane perturbation and skin irritation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A S Almeida

    Full Text Available Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line, frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of ³¹P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and molecular dynamics (MD simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by ³¹P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism.

  8. Inhaled Surfactant Therapy in Newborns in Artificial Lung Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of inhaled surfactant therapy in neonatal infants with respiratory failure.Subjects and methods. The trial enrolled 13 premature neonatal infants; their mean gestational age was 31.8±2.8 weeks and the birth weight was 1825±600.9 g. They had a oneminute Apgar score of 4.3±1.4. All the neonates needed mechanical ventilation (MV atbirth because the leading clinical sign was respiratory failure caused by acute intranatal hypoxia, neonatal amniotic fluid aspiration, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and cerebral ischemia. Curosurf was injected in a dose of 174.7±21 mg/kg in the infants with neonatal RDS at 35 minutes of life. All the babies included in the study were noted to have severe disease and prolonged MV. After stabilization of their status, the neonates received combination therapy involving surfactantBL inhalation to reduce the duration of MV. The dose of the agent was 75 mg. Results. After surfactantBL inhalation, effective spontaneous respiration occurred in 69.2% of the newborn infants; successful extubation was carried out. The median duration ofMV after surfactant BL inhalation was 22 hours (4—68 hours. There were no reintubated cases after inhalation therapy. Following surfactantBL inhalation, 4 (30.8% patients remained to be on MV as a control regimen; 3 of them had highfre quency MV. SurfactantBL inhalation made it possible to change the respiratory support regimen and to reduce MV parame ters in these babies. 

  9. Surfactant in the gas mantle of the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C B; Wood, P G; Loptako, O V; Codd, J R; Johnston, S D; Orgeig, S

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant occurs in cyclically inflating and deflating, gas-holding structures of vertebrates to reduce the surface tension of the inner fluid lining, thereby preventing collapse and decreasing the work of inflation. Here we determined the presence of surfactant in material lavaged from the airspace in the gas mantle of the pulmonate snail Helix aspersa. Surfactant is characterized by the presence of disaturated phospholipid (DSP), especially disaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC), lavaged from the airspace, by the presence of lamellated osmiophilic bodies (LBs) in the airspaces and epithelial tissue, and by the ability of the lavage to reduce surface tension of fluid in a surface balance. Lavage had a DSP/phospholipid (PL) ratio of 0.085, compared to 0.011 in membranes, with the major PL being PC (45.3%). Cholesterol, the primary fluidizer for pulmonary surfactant, was similar in lavage and in lipids extracted from cell homogenates (cholesterol/PL: 0.04 and 0. 03, respectively). LBs were found in the tissues and airspaces. The surface activity of the lavage material is defined as the ability to reduce surface tension under compression to values much lower than that of water. In addition, surface-active lipids will vary surface tension, increasing it upon inspiration as the surface area expands. By these criteria, the surface activity of lavaged material was poor and most similar to that shown by pulmonary lavage of fish and toads. Snail surfactant displays structures, a biochemical PL profile, and biophysical properties similar to surfactant obtained from primitive fish, teleost swim bladders, the lung of the Dipnoan Neoceratodus forsteri, and the amphibian Bufo marinus. However, the cholesterol/PL and cholesterol/DSP ratios are more similar to the amphibian B. marinus than to the fish, and this similarity may indicate a crucial physicochemical relationship for these lipids.

  10. Interaction of diazepam with surfactants. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorometric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Guardia, M.; Rodilla, F.

    1986-03-01

    The interaction of diazepam with non-ionic, anionic and cationic surfactants has been studied spectrophotometrically and fluorometrically. It has been verified that the absorption spectrum of diazepam is not modified in micellar medium. However, a dramatic five-fold increase in fluorescence sensitivity is observed in the presence of sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS). The experimental conditions, temperature, pH and surfactant concentration have been optimized to improve the fluorometric determination of diazepam and a detection limit of 0,04 ppmhas been obtained.

  11. Lung Surfactant and Its Use in Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the present views of lung surfactant (LS functions with emphasis on its protective and barrier properties and ability to maintain local and adaptive immunity. The composition of commercial LS formulations is analyzed. Data on qualitative and quantitative LS abnormalities are presented in various diseases in neonates and adults. The results of clinical trials of different LS formulations in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults are analyzed in detail. Recent data on the results of and prospects for surfactant therapy for bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis are given. 

  12. Surfactant protein D in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohwy, Thomas; Otkjaer, Kristian; Madsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) shows antimicrobial and immuno-regulatory properties and has recently been detected in the basal layers of normal human skin. This molecule potentially plays an important role in inflammatory skin diseases and therefore SP-D content and location was exami......The collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) shows antimicrobial and immuno-regulatory properties and has recently been detected in the basal layers of normal human skin. This molecule potentially plays an important role in inflammatory skin diseases and therefore SP-D content and location...

  13. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Silje Vermedal; Lindegaard, Hanne Merete; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2008-01-01

    Innate immune system abnormalities, e.g., mannan-binding lectin (MBL) genotype variants, have been demonstrated to modify the disease course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shares important structural and functional properties with MBL suggesting that SP-D may be an addi......Innate immune system abnormalities, e.g., mannan-binding lectin (MBL) genotype variants, have been demonstrated to modify the disease course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shares important structural and functional properties with MBL suggesting that SP-D may...

  14. Expeditious Synthesis of Dianionic-Headed 4-Sulfoalkanoic Acid Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianghui; Xu, Jiaxi

    2017-04-16

    4-Sulfoalkanoic acids are a class of important dianionic-headed surfactants. Various 4-sulfoalkanoic acids with straight C8, C10, C12, C14, C16, and C18 chains were synthesized expeditiously through the radical addition of methyl 2-((ethoxycarbonothioyl)thio)acetate to linear terminal olefins and subsequent oxidation with peroxyformic acid. This is a useful and convenient strategy for the synthesis of dianionic-headed surfactants with a carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid functionalities in the head group region.

  15. Controlling Active Liquid Crystal Droplets with Temperature and Surfactant Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Jake; Milas, Peker; Ross, Jennifer

    Active matter is the study of driven many-body systems that span length scales from flocking birds to molecular motors. A previously described self-propelled particle system was made from liquid crystal (LC) droplets in water with high surfactant concentration to move particles via asymmetric surface instabilities. Using a similar system, we investigate the driving activity as a function of SDS surfactant concentration and temperature. We then use an optical tweezer to trap and locally heat the droplets to cause hydrodynamic flow and coupling between multiple droplets. This system will be the basis for a triggerable assembly system to build and couple LC droplets. DOD AROMURI 67455-CH-MUR.

  16. Performance improvement of ionic surfactant flooding in carbonate rock samples by use of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Ahmadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various surfactants have been used in upstream petroleum processes like chemical flooding. Ultimately, the performance of these surfactants depends on their ability to reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water. The surfactant concentration in the aqueous solution decreases owing to the loss of the surfactant on the rock surface in the injection process. The main objective of this paper is to inhibit the surfactant loss by means of adding nanoparticles. Sodium dodecyl sulfate and silica nanoparticles were used as ionic surfactant and nanoparticles in our experiments, respectively. AEROSIL® 816 and AEROSIL® 200 are hydrophobic and hydrophilic nanoparticles. To determine the adsorption loss of the surfactant onto rock samples, a conductivity approach was used. Real carbonate rock samples were used as the solid phase in adsorption experiments. It should be noted that the rock samples were water wet. This paper describes how equilibrium adsorption was investigated by examining adsorption behavior in a system of carbonate sample (solid phase and surfactant solution (aqueous phase. The initial surfactant and nanoparticle concentrations were 500–5000 and 500–2000 ppm, respectively. The rate of surfactant losses was extremely dependent on the concentration of the surfactant in the system, and the adsorption of the surfactant decreased with an increase in the nanoparticle concentration. Also, the hydrophilic nanoparticles are more effective than the hydrophobic nanoparticles.

  17. Exogenous surfactant kinetics in infant respiratory distress syndrome : A novel method with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torresin, M; Zimmermann, LJI; Cogo, PE; Cavicchioli, P; Badon, T; Giordano, G; Zacchello, F; Sauer, PJJ; Carnielli, VP

    Little is known about surfactant metabolism in newborn infants, since radioactive isotopes cannot be used in humans. We describe here a new method for studying exogenous surfactant pharmacokinetics in vivo. We measured surfactant half-life, pool size, and turnover time in eight preterm infants

  18. Contrast media inhibit exogenous surfactant therapy in rats with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesecioglu, Jozef; Haitsma, Jack J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of various contrast media on the pulmonary surfactant system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by lung lavage, the effects of surfactant suspended in saline were compared with surfactant suspended in the contrast

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF A 2ND DOSE OF EXOGENOUS SURFACTANT IN RABBITS WITH SEVERE RESPIRATORY-FAILURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLOTZ, FB; STEVENS, H; HEIKAMP, A; OETOMO, SB

    Newborn infants with respiratory distress who fail to respond to surfactant treatment receive a second dose of surfactant. The effect of this strategy on the distribution of surfactant to the lung is unknown. We therefore investigated the distribution of the first (100 mg/kg body weight) and second

  20. Laser-heating-induced displacement of surfactants on the water surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, E.H.G.; Bonn, D.; Cantin, S.; Roke, S.; Bonn, M.

    2012-01-01

    We report a combined vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and ellipsometry study of different surfactants on water as a function of surfactant density. Vibrational SFG spectra of surfactants on the water surface in a Langmuir trough have been

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering study of structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Chinchalikar, Akshay J; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, Vinod K; Schweins, Ralf

    2013-09-10

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements have been carried out from the multicomponent system composed of Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant in an aqueous system under the solution condition that all the components are negatively charged. Although the components are similarly charged, strong structural evolutions among them have been observed. The complexes of different components in pairs (nanoparticle-protein, nanoparticle-surfactant, and protein-surfactant) have been examined to correlate the role of each component in the three-component nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. The nanoparticle-protein system shows depletion interaction induced aggregation of nanoparticles in the presence of protein. Both nanoparticle and surfactant coexist individually in a nanoparticle-surfactant system. In the case of a protein-surfactant system, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micelle-like clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The structure of the three-component (nanoparticle-protein-surfactant) system is found to be governed by the synergetic effect of nanoparticle-protein and protein-surfactant interactions. The nanoparticle aggregates coexist with the structures of protein-surfactant complex in the three-component system. The nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein is enhanced in this system as compared to the corresponding two-component systems.

  2. New gluconamide-type cationic surfactants: Interactions with DNA and lipid membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Misiak, P.; Wilk, K. A.; Kral, Teresa; Wozniak, E.; Pruchnik, H.; Frackowiak, R.; Hof, Martin; Rózycka-Roszak, B.

    180-181, OCT-NOV (2013), s. 44-54 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Glucose-derived surfactant * Soft surfactant * Cationic surfactant Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2013

  3. Use of functionalized surfactants in flame atomic analysis: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Research results in the following areas are briefly summarized: basic properties of surfactants, micelles, and cyclodextrins as they relate to chemical analysis; use of functionalized surfactants, micelles, and cyclodextrins in spectroscopic analysis; macromolecular separation theory and mechanism; use of functionalized surfactants and cyclodextrins in separations; capillary work for future coupling of spectroscopic and LC projects

  4. EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS ON FLUORANTHENE MINERALIZATION BY SPHINGOMONAS PAUCIMOBILIS STRAIN EPA 505

    Science.gov (United States)

    Past results from surfactant-enhanced biodegradation studies have been equivocal because of inhibitory effects of the surfactants and a poor understanding of the characteristics of PAH-degrading microorganisms that make them responsive to surfactants. We have studied the minerali...

  5. Evaluation of anionic surfactants effects on the skin barrier function based on skin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasaka, Mana; Kubota, Koji; Yamasaki, Emi; Yang, Jianzhong; Takata, Sadaki

    2018-01-23

    Anionic surfactants are often used for cleaning and pharmaceutical purposes because of their strong surfactancy and foaming property. However, they are rarely ingested orally, the skin is a part of the human body most affected by surfactants. Barrier function of the skin is very strong, but the anionic surfactants can cause serious damages to it. Recently, amino acid-based surfactants have attracted attention as a safer option owing to their biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity examinations revealed that the amino acid-based surfactants are superior to sulfate-based surfactants. However, a systematical and comprehensive study related to the effect of these surfactants on skin barrier function has not yet been reported. In this work, skin permeation test using the skin of hairless mice and HPLC method is carried out. The material transmission speed through skin in a steady state was different between each surfactant treatment. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of surfactants on skin barrier function and defined Transmission Index as an index for the degree of effect of surfactants. Glutamate series amino acid-based surfactant were effective to Transmission Index and we guessed the cause was due to adsorption. Based on the finding this study, we suggest using adsorptive property as a measure to the effect on the skin barrier function.

  6. Micellar solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs: effect of surfactant and solubilizate molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarov, Zahari; Katev, V; Radeva, D; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D

    2018-04-01

    This study aims to clarify the role of surfactant and drug molecular structures on drug solubility in micellar surfactant solutions. (1) Rationale for surfactant selection is provided; (2) the large data set can be used for validation of the drug solubility parameters used in oral absorption models. Equilibrium solubility of two hydrophobic drugs and one model hydrophobic steroid in micellar solutions of 19 surfactants was measured by HPLC. The drug solubilization locus in the micelles was assessed by UV spectrometry. Danazol is solubilized much more efficiently than fenofibrate by ionic surfactants due to ion-dipole interactions between the charged surfactant head groups and the polar steroid backbone. Drug solubilization increases linearly with the increase of hydrophobic chain length for all studied surfactant types. Addition of 1-3 ethylene oxide (EO) units in the head group of dodecyl sulfate surfactants reduces significantly the solubilization of both studied drugs and decreases linearly the solubilization locus polarity of fenofibrate. The locus of fenofibrate solubilization is in the hydrophobic core of nonionic surfactant micelles and in the palisade layer of ionic surfactant micelles. Highest drug solubility can be obtained by using surfactants molecules with long chain length coupled with hydrophilic head group that provides additional drug-surfactant interactions (i.e. ion-dipole) in the micelles.

  7. Inactivation of pulmonary surfactant due to serum-inhibited adsorption and reversal by hydrophilic polymers: experimental

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeusch, H William; de la Serna, Jorge Bernardino; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The rate of change of surface pressure, pi, in a Langmuir trough following the deposition of surfactant suspensions on subphases containing serum, with or without polymers, is used to model a likely cause of surfactant inactivation in vivo: inhibition of surfactant adsorption due to competitive a...

  8. Comparison of rSP-C surfactant with natural and synthetic surfactants after late treatment in a rat model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Dietrich; Germann, Paul-Georg; Hauschke, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    In a previous paper we showed that an SP-C containing surfactant preparation has similar activity as bovine-derived surfactants in a rat lung lavage model of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In this study surfactant was given ten minutes after the last lavage (early treatment). In the present investigation we were interested how different surfactant preparations behave when they are administered 1 h after the last lavage (late treatment). Four protein containing surfactants (rSP-C surfactant, bLES, Infasurf and Survanta) were compared with three protein-free surfactants (ALEC, Exosurf and the phospholipid (PL) mixture of the rSP-C surfactant termed PL surfactant) with respect to their ability to improve gas exchange in this more stringent model when surfactant is given one hour after the last lavage. For better comparison of the surfactants the doses were related to phospholipids. The surfactants were given at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg−1 body weight. The surfactants were compared to an untreated control group that was only ventilated for the whole experimental period. Tracheotomized rats (8–12 per dose and surfactant) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min−1, inspiration expiration ratio of 1 : 2, peak inspiratory pressure of 28 cmH2O at positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Animals were ventilated for one hour after the last lavage and thereafter the surfactants were intratracheally instilled. During the whole experimental period the ventilation was not changed. Partial arterial oxygen pressures (PaO2, mmHg) at 30 min and 120 min after treatment were used for statistical comparison. All protein containing surfactants caused a dose-dependent increase of the reduced PaO2 values at 30 min after treatment. The protein-free surfactants showed only weak dose-dependent increase in PaO2 values at this time. This difference between the

  9. Properties of binary surfactant systems of nonionic surfactants C12E10, C12E23, and C12E42 with a cationic gemini surfactant in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changchao; Li, Rongqiang; Yang, Hui; Wang, Jinben

    2011-04-15

    Properties of binary surfactant systems of nonionic surfactants poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) lauryl ethers (C(12)E(10), C(12)E(23), C(12)E(42)) with a cationic gemini surfactant, butanediyl-α,ω-bis(tetradecyldimethylammonium bromide) (14-4-14), have been investigated by Steady-state Fluorescence (FL), zeta potential, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (CryoTEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Through FL measurements, critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the three binary systems for different mixing mole fractions is determined and the values fall between those of pure constituent surfactants. Ideal CMC (CMC(ideal)), mole fraction in aggregates (X), interaction parameter (β), activity coefficients (f(1) and f(2)), and excess free energy of mixing (ΔG(ex)) have been calculated. All these parameters indicate nonideal behavior and synergistic interactions between the constituent surfactants, which is explained in terms of electrostatic attraction between headgroups of constituent surfactants and reduction of electrostatic repulsion between headgroups of 14-4-14 due to the presence of nonionic surfactants. DLS, TEM and CryoTEM results show that nonionic surfactants facilitate the formation of larger aggregates. Micelles and vesicles in larger size compared with those of 14-4-14 coexist in the mixed solutions. Both surfactant composition and PEO chain length are found to play a strong effect on the properties of the binary systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surfactant adsorption at the salt/water interface: comparing the conformation and interfacial water structure for selected surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becraft, Kevin A; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2005-03-24

    We report in situ spectroscopic measurements monitoring the adsorption of a series of carboxylate surfactants onto the surface of the semisoluble, ionic solid fluorite (CaF2). We employ the surface-specific technique, vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy (VSFS), to examine the effect that surfactant adsorption has on the bonding interactions and orientation of interfacial water molecules through the alteration of the electric properties in the interfacial region. In addition, we report on the chain length and headgroup dependence of the formation of hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers on the surface of the solid phase. Differences in chain length and headgroup functionality lead to large changes in the adsorption behavior and structuring of the monolayers formed and the interactions of interfacial water molecules with these monolayers. Fundamental studies such as these are essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the surfactant adsorption process, information that is important for industrially relevant processes such as mineral ore flotation, waste processing, and petroleum recovery.

  11. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  12. Aerobic biodegradation of amphoteric amine-oxide-based surfactants: Effect of molecular structure, initial surfactant concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Lechuga, Manuela; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    The present study was designed to provide information regarding the effect of the molecular structure of amphoteric amine-oxide-based surfactants and the initial surfactant concentration on their ultimate biodegradation. Moreover, given this parameter's pH-dependence, the effect of pH was also investigated. Three amine-oxide-based surfactants with structural differences in their hydrophobic alkyl chain were tested: Lauramine oxide (AO-R 12 ), Myristamine oxide (AO-R 14 ) and Cocamidopropylamine oxide (AO-Cocoamido). We studied the ultimate biodegradation using the Modified OECD Screening Test at initial surfactant concentrations ranged from 5 to 75 mg L -1 and at pH levels from 5 to 7.4. The results demonstrate that at pH 7.4, amine-oxide-based surfactants are readily biodegradable. In this study, we concluded that ω-oxidation can be assumed to be the main biodegradation pathway of amine-oxides and that differences in the biodegradability between them can be explained by the presence of an amide group in the alkyl chain of AO-Cocoamido; the CN fission of the amide group slows down their mineralization process. In addition, the increase in the concentration of the surfactant from 5 to 75 mg L -1 resulted in an increase in the final biodegradation of AO-R 12 and AO-R 14 . However, in the case of AO-Cocoamido, a clear relationship between the concentration and biodegradation cannot be stated. Conversely, the biodegradability of AO-R 12 and AO-R 14 was considerably lower in an acid condition than at a pH of 7.4, whereas AO-Cocoamido reached similar percentages in acid conditions and at a neutral pH. However, microorganisms required more time to acclimate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Surfactant treatment before first breath for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm lambs: comparison of a peptide-containing synthetic lung surfactant with porcine-derived surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zyl JM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Johann M van Zyl,1 Johan Smith2 1Division of Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa; 2Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Tygerberg Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Tygerberg, South Africa Background: In a recent study utilizing a saline-lavaged adult rabbit model, we described a significant improvement in systemic oxygenation and pulmonary shunt after the instillation of a novel synthetic peptide-containing surfactant, Synsurf. Respiratory distress syndrome in the preterm lamb more closely resembles that of the human infant, as their blood gas, pH values, and lung mechanics deteriorate dramatically from birth despite ventilator support. Moreover, premature lambs have lungs which are mechanically unstable, with the advantage of being able to measure multiple variables over extended periods. Our objective in this study was to investigate if Synsurf leads to improved systemic oxygenation, lung mechanics, and histology in comparison to the commercially available porcine-derived lung surfactant Curosurf® when administered before first breath in a preterm lamb model. Materials and methods: A Cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia on 18 time-dated pregnant Dohne Merino ewes at 129–130 days gestation. The premature lambs were delivered and ventilated with an expiratory tidal volume of 6–8 mL/kg for the first 30 minutes and thereafter at 8–10 mL/kg. In a randomized controlled trial, the two surfactants tested were Synsurf and Curosurf®, both at a dose of 100 mg/kg phospholipids (1,2-dipalmitoyl-L-α-phosphatidylcholine; 90% in Synsurf, 40% in Curosurf®. A control group of animals was treated with normal saline. Measurements of physiological variables, blood gases, and lung mechanics were made before and after surfactant and saline replacement and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180

  14. The effect of pressure on the phase behavior of surfactant systems: An experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; von Solms, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced oil recovery is employed in many mature oil reservoirs to maintain or increase the reservoir recovery factor. In this context, surfactant flooding has recently gained interest again. Surfactant flooding is the injection of surfactants (and co-surfactants) into the reservoir, in order...... is influenced to an even greater extent. It was concluded that at certain compositions of the surfactant system (near to the phase boundary found at atmospheric pressure) the increase in pressure changed the phase behavior (for example causing the system to move from two phases to three or vice versa...

  15. Acute sleep deprivation increases serum levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Christian; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Nilsson, Emil K; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Vågesjö, Evelina; Massena, Sara; Pettersson, Ulrika; Christoffersson, Gustaf; Phillipson, Mia; Broman, Jan-Erik; Lannfelt, Lars; Zetterberg, Henrik; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether total sleep deprivation (TSD) affects circulating concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 calcium binding protein B (S-100B) in humans. These factors are usually found in the cytoplasm of neurons and glia cells. Increasing concentrations of these factors in blood may be therefore indicative for either neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or both. In addition, amyloid β (Aβ) peptides 1-42 and 1-40 were measured in plasma to calculate their ratio. A reduced plasma ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 is considered an indirect measure of increased deposition of Aβ 1-42 peptide in the brain. Subjects participated in two conditions (including either 8-h of nocturnal sleep [22:30-06:30] or TSD). Fasting blood samples were drawn before and after sleep interventions (19:30 and 07:30, respectively). Sleep laboratory. 15 healthy young men. TSD increased morning serum levels of NSE (P = 0.002) and S-100B (P = 0.02) by approximately 20%, compared with values obtained after a night of sleep. In contrast, the ratio of Aβ peptides 1-42 to 1-40 did not differ between the sleep interventions. Future studies in which both serum and cerebrospinal fluid are sampled after sleep loss should elucidate whether the increase in serum neuron-specific enolase and S100 calcium binding protein B is primarily caused by neuronal damage, impaired blood brain barrier function, or is just a consequence of increased gene expression in non-neuronal cells, such as leukocytes.

  16. The introduction of surfactant replacement therapy into South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the private sector neonatal care is less structured. Following the introduction of the artificial surfactant (Survanta) in November 1991 it was considered important to monitor its use in the public and private sectors. In collaboration with the marketing company a data sheet containing demographic information and clinical ...

  17. Surfactant-assisted sacrificial template-mediated synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heena Khajuria

    route38,39 in the absence and presence of surfactant. CTAB and in two different solvent media (water and ethylene glycol). In literature, various reports are avail- ..... Eu3+ flower architecture in sacrificial template-assisted synthesis. Nature of the solvent appears to play a crucial role in the crystal structure of nanoparticles.

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    celle above a concentration called critical micelle concentration (CMC) where their properties are different from those of the ... It is well-known that SANS is an ideal technique to study the micellar structure of surfactants [8,9] and this has also ... ment at the Dhruva reactor, Mumbai [11]. The mean wavelength of the incident.

  19. A PIV Study of Drop-interface Coalescence with Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Dong, Teng; Angeli, Panagiota

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the coalescence of a drop with an aqueous-organic interface was studied by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The effect of surfactants on the drop surface evolution, the vorticity field and the kinetic energy distribution in the drop during coalescence were investigated. The coalescence took place in an acrylic rectangular box with 79% glycerol solution at the bottom and Exxsol D80 oil above. The glycerol solution drop was generated through a nozzle fixed at 2cm above the aqueous/oil interface and was seeded with Rhodamine particles. The whole process was captured by a high-speed camera. Different mass ratios of non-ionic surfactant Span80 to oil were studied. The increase of surfactant concentration promoted deformation of the interface before the rupture of the trapped oil film. At the early stages after film rupture, two counter-rotating vortices appeared at the bottom of the drop which then travelled to the upper part. The propagation rates, as well as the intensities of the vortices decreased at high surfactant concentrations. At early stages, the kinetic energy was mainly distributed near the bottom part of the droplet, while at later stages it was distributed near the upper part of the droplet. Programme Grant MEMPHIS, Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC).

  20. The influence of nonionic surfactant Brij 30 on biodegradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zero-order kinetics with diffusion limitation was regarded as the most adequate biochemical reaction kinetic model. The microbial growth rate and biochemical reaction rate were inhibited at higher surfactant content and toluene inlet concentration. The degree of inhibitive effect was more pronounced at lower toluene inlet ...

  1. Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of surfactants on size and structure of amylose nanoparticles prepared by precipitation. YAN DONG, YANJIAO CHANG, QIAN WANG, JIN TONG and JIANG ZHOU∗. Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), College of Biological and Agricultural Engineering,. Jilin University, 5988 Renmin Street, ...

  2. Surfactant-assisted sacrificial template-mediated synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heena Khajuria

    and photoluminescence studies. Influence of surfactant and solvents on morphology and luminescence of the final product in sacrificial template-assisted method has been investigated in detail. Keywords. Sacrificial template; nanorods; luminescence; phosphor. 1. Introduction. Lanthanide ion based nanomaterials have ...

  3. Determination of non ionic surfactants (BIAS) in aqueous samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capri, S.; Patrolecco, L.; Zanette, M.; Marcomini, A.

    1996-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to solve the inconsistencies of the regulatory semispecific method for the determination of nonionic surfactants (BIAS) in aqueous samples and to evaluate precision, accuracy and applicability concentration range. Significant improvements of the protocol IRSA E-013 were introduced and the BIAS method was recently published, in revised form, in the IRSA Handbook of Water Analysis (Method 5160)

  4. Liquid Tubule Formation and Stabilization Using Cellulose Nanocrystal Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xubo; Shi, Shaowei; Li, Yanan; Forth, Joe; Wang, Dong; Russell, Thomas P

    2017-10-02

    Structured liquids, generated by the interfacial formation, assembly, and jamming of nanoparticle (NP)-surfactants at liquid/liquid interfaces, maintain all the desirable characteristics of each liquid, while providing a spatially structured framework. Herein, we show that rod-like cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based NP-surfactants, termed CNC-surfactants, are formed rapidly at the liquid/liquid interface, assemble into a monolayer, and, when jammed, offer a robust assembly with exceptional mechanical properties. Plateau-Rayleigh (PR) instabilities of a free-falling jet of an aqueous medium containing the CNCs into a toluene solution of amine end-functionalized polystyrene are completely suppressed, allowing the jetting of aqueous tubules that are stabilized when the CNC-surfactants are jammed at the interface. These results open a new platform for the additive manufacturing techniques, for example, three-dimensional (3D) printing, of all-liquid constructs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evaluation of bacterial surfactant toxicity towards petroleum degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tânia M S; Procópio, Lorena C; Brandão, Felipe D; Leão, Bruna A; Tótola, Marcos R; Borges, Arnaldo C

    2011-02-01

    The acute toxicity of bacterial surfactants LBBMA111A, LBBMA155, LBBMA168, LBBMA191 and LBBMA201 and the synthetic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri was evaluated by measuring the reduction of light emission (EC(20)) by this microorganism when exposed to different surfactant concentrations. Moreover, the toxic effects of different concentrations of biological and synthetic surfactants on the growth of pure cultures of isolates Acinetobacter baumannii LBBMA04, Acinetobacter junni LBBMA36, Pseudomonas sp. LBBMA101B and Acinetobacter baumanni LBBMAES11 were evaluated in mineral medium supplemented with glucose. The EC(20) values obtained confirmed that the biosurfactants have a significantly lower toxicity to V. fischeri than the SDS. After 30 min of exposure, bacterial luminescence was almost completely inhibited by SDS at a concentration of 4710 mg L(-1). Growth reduction of pure bacterial cultures caused by the addition of biosurfactants to the growth medium was lower than that caused by SDS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of surfactants on the survival and sorption of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Devamita; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Lyon, William G; Wilson, John T

    2002-10-01

    There is an increasing concern about the protection of groundwater from contamination by enteric viruses and the prevention of outbreaks of waterborne diseases. Knowledge of survivability and transport of viruses from their point of origin is necessary to determine their potential effects on the neighboring groundwater systems. The distribution of virus is, in turn, dependent on the physical and chemical compositions of the surrounding soil and subsurface systems. For the present study, we have determined the effects of different surfactants (cationic, anionic, nonionic, and biological) and natural organic matter (NOM) on bacteriophages. Results indicated that surfactants and NOM adversely affect phage survival in binary systems, with surfactants being the most harmful. Studies with ternary systems also showed that the presence of surfactants reduced sorption of phages on sorbents either by occupying available sorption sites on the sorbent material or by displacing the sorbed phages from the sorbent surface. Water contact angles of the selected phages and different sorbent surfaces have been measured. Experimental data demonstrated that the sorption of hydrophobic viruses was favored by hydrophobic sorbents, while the sorption of hydrophilic viruses was favored by hydrophilic sorbents.

  7. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cO Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 71, No. 5. — journal of. November 2008 physics pp. 1079–1083. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in water micellar solutions. RAJEWSKA ALDONA. Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Swierk-Otwock, Poland. E-mail: aldonar@cyf.gov.pl. Abstract.

  8. The influence of nonionic surfactant Brij 30 on biodegradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... kinetic behaviors of toluene in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/peat/KNO3/ (granular activated carbon) GAC composite bead biofilter ... The maximum elimination capacity decreased with increasing surfactant content. The addition of nonionic ... Chan and Peng, 2008). Toluene is a widely used industrial chemical.

  9. NMR Investigation of Equilibrium Micelle of Two Head Surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Meong Soo; Nam, Ki Dae [School of Chemical Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea); Jeong, Hwan Kyeong [AMLCD Division Semiconductor Samsung Electronics, Chunan (Korea); Lee, Hyang Woo [Department of Cosmetology, Keochang Provincial College, Keochang (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    The two-headed surfactant, disodium 4-n-alkyl-3-sulfonato succinate, has been synthesized by the monoesterification of maleic anhydride and n-alkanol(C{sub 8} {approx} C{sub 12}) and addition of sodium bisulfite to the corresponding monoester. The equilibrium micellar properties formed by these aqueous compounds, and the conformations of the alkyl long chain length that comprised of the interior of micellar, have been investigated using a combination of 1-D NMR and homonuclear/heteronuclear 2-D NMR techniques. The cmc' and the aggregation numbers determined from the NMR experiments were in an agreement with previous results found in the literatures for other types of two-headed surfactant systems. The amphiphiles had high cmc' and low aggregation numbers compared to single-headed surfactants of a comparable chain length. All these results were attributed to the addition a second headgroup to a single-headed, single-tailed surfactant. 27 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Atomistic simulations of surfactant adsorption kinetics at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer control and enhancement is an important and challenging problem in a variety of industrial and technological applications including aircraft thermal management. The role of additives in nucleate boiling and phase change in general has long been recognized and studied experimentally and modeled theoretically but in-depth description and atomistic understanding of the multiscale processes involved are still needed for better prediction and control of the heat transfer efficiency. Surfactant additives have been experimentally observed to either enhance or inhibit the boiling heat transfer depending on the surfactant concentration and chemistry and, on a molecular level, their addition leads to dynamic surface tension and changes in interfacial and transfer properties, thus contributing to the complexity of the problem. We present our atomistic modeling study of the interfacial adsorption kinetics of aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) systems at a range of concentrations at room and boiling temperatures. Classical molecular dynamics and Umbrella Sampling simulations were used to study the surfactant transport properties and estimate the adsorption and desorption rates at liquid-vacuum and liquid-solid interfaces. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from AFOSR Thermal Science Program and the Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center for computing time and resources.

  11. The Determination of Anionic Surfactants in Natural and Waste Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, P. T.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results of an experiment suitable for measuring subpart per million concentrations of anionic surfactants in natural waters and waste effluents are provided. The experiment required only a spectrophotometer or filter photometer and has been successfully performed by students in an undergraduate environmental…

  12. Small angle neutron scattering study of two nonionic surfactants in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nonionic surfactants in water micellar solutions. RAJEWSKA ALDONA. Institute of ... water solution for concentration c = 0.17% (dilute regime) at different temperatures in the range t = 10–35°C by small .... which yields the pair distance distribution function p(r), where r is the distance in real space. The point, at which the p(r) ...

  13. Adsorption of a multicomponent rhamnolipid surfactant to soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, Wouter H.; Brusseau, Mark L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption of rhamnolipid, a multicomponent biosurfactant with potential application in soil remediation, to two sandy soils was investigated using batch and column studies. The surfactant mixture contained six anionic components differing in lipid chain length and number of rhamnose moieties.

  14. Dispersion and rheology of surfactant-mediated silver nanoparticle suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Nan; Huang, Chih-Ta; Tseng, Wenjea J.; Wei, Ming-Hsiung

    2010-11-01

    Polycrystalline silver (Ag) nanoparticles were dispersed in solvent mixtures consisting of 2-butoxyethyl acetate (BCA) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether acetate (CA) in a BCA:CA weight ratio of 5:1. Three commercially available polymeric surfactants were used, and the gravitational sedimentation, agglomerate-size distribution, isothermal adsorption, and rheological behavior of the nanoparticle suspensions were examined. One of the surfactants (hereafter termed 9250) was found effective in stabilizing the Ag nanoparticle suspensions. Both the adsorption isotherm and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential adsorption of the 9250 surfactant molecules on the nanoparticle surface, forming a Langmuir-type monolayer adsorption in the given solvents so that a steric stabilization was rendered. An optimal surfactant concentration of 5 wt.% (in terms of the solids weight) was determined experimentally. In addition, the Ag suspensions with a broad range of solids concentration (ϕ = 1-16 vol.%) showed a shear-thinning flow character over a shear-rate range from 1 to 4000 s-1, revealing that an attractive interparticle interaction was operative. Relative viscosity (ηr) of the nanoparticle suspensions deviated from the linearity when ϕ was greater than ˜10 vol.%; at which, the attractive potential began to dominate the interparticle interactions. This ηr-ϕ dependence was compared with various existing models and the (viscosity) predictive capability of the models was discussed.

  15. Proteins and protein/surfactant mixtures at interfaces in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, F.J.G.

    2000-01-01

    The research described in this thesis covers a number of aspects of the relation between surface properties and foaming properties of proteins, low molecular surfactants and mixtures thereof. This work is the result of a question of the industrial partners if it is possible to understand

  16. Surfactant double layer stabilized magnetic nanofluids for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tombacz, E; Hajdu, A; Illes, E; Majzik, A [Department of Colloid Chemistry, University of Szeged (Hungary); Bica, D; Vekas, L [Center of Fundamental and Advanced Technical Research, Romanian Academy-Timisoara Division (Romania)], E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu

    2008-05-21

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with surfactant double layers in order to prepare water based magnetic fluids (MFs). The effects of head group (sulfonate, carboxylate) and alkyl chain length (11-17 C atoms) and the combination of surfactants were studied. Adsorption, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and electrophoretic mobility measurements were performed. The quantity of surfactant varied between 0.3 and 0.5 g, i.e. their specific amount ranges over 1.5-2 mmol g{sup -1} magnetite in MFs. The adsorption isotherm of Na oleate on magnetite proved the double layer formation with 2 mmol g{sup -1} saturation value in good harmony with the empirical doses. The effect of diluting MFs, pH and salt concentration was studied. The pH-dependent stability and the salt tolerance of MFs were different owing to the dissociation of the outermost hydrophilic groups and the hydrophobic interactions scaling with the alkyl chain length of surfactant. The hydrophobic interactions are favored only for oleic and myristic acid double layers. In these MFs, aggregation cannot be observed even in fairly dilute systems up to the physiological salt concentration around neutral pH 6-8 favored in biomedical application. The stable oleic and myristic acid double layers can hinder effectively the aggregation of magnetite particles due to the combined steric and electrostatic stabilization.

  17. Packing states of multilamellar vesicles in a nonionic surfactant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    under shear. Here, we focused only in the MLV region, L-alpha(*), of a temperature sensitive surfactant system (C12E4-water) to investigate the packing of multilamellar vesicles as a function of temperature under constant shear. Two sets of temperature scan experiments were performed in the L...

  18. Genetic and environmental influences of surfactant protein D serum levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    The collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important component of the pulmonary innate immune system, but SP-D is also present on extrapulmonary epithelial surfaces and in serum, where it has been used as a biomarker for pulmonary disease states. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms...

  19. Linking surfactant protein SP-D and IL-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qaseem, Asif S; Sonar, Sanchaita; Mahajan, Lakshna

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an innate immune molecule that plays a protective role against lung infection, allergy, asthma and inflammation. In vivo experiments with murine models have shown that SP-D can protect against allergic challenge via a range of mechanisms including inhibition...

  20. Structural characterisation of human proteinosis surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, T.; Leth-Larsen, R.; Holmskov, U.

    2000-01-01

    Human surfactant protein-A (SP-A) has been purified from a proteinosis patient and characterised by a combination of automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. The complete protein sequence was characterised. The major part of SP-A was shown to consist of SP-A2 gene product, and only...

  1. Microbial production of surfactants and their commercial potential.

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, J D; Banat, I M

    1997-01-01

    Many microorganisms, especially bacteria, produce biosurfactants when grown on water-immiscible substrates. Biosurfactants are more effective, selective, environmentally friendly, and stable than many synthetic surfactants. Most common biosurfactants are glycolipids in which carbohydrates are attached to a long-chain aliphatic acid, while others, like lipopeptides, lipoproteins, and heteropolysaccharides, are more complex. Rapid and reliable methods for screening and selection of biosurfactan...

  2. Surfactant-free Colloidal Particles with Specific Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Casper; Bossert, Nelli; Mank, Quinten J; Winter, Marcel G T; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J

    2017-09-26

    Colloidal particles with specific binding affinity are essential for in vivo and in vitro biosensing, targeted drug delivery, and micrometer-scale self-assembly. Key to these techniques are surface functionalizations that provide high affinities to specific target molecules. For stabilization in physiological environments, current particle coating methods rely on adsorbed surfactants. However, spontaneous desorption of these surfactants typically has an undesirable influence on lipid membranes. To address this issue and create particles for targeting molecules in lipid membranes, we present here a surfactant-free coating method that combines high binding affinity with stability at physiological conditions. After activating charge-stabilized polystyrene microparticles with EDC/Sulfo-NHS, we first coat the particles with a specific protein and subsequently covalently attach a dense layer of poly(ethyelene) glycol. This polymer layer provides colloidal stability at physiological conditions as well as antiadhesive properties, while the protein coating provides the specific affinity to the targeted molecule. We show that NeutrAvidin-functionalized particles bind specifically to biotinylated membranes and that Concanavalin A-functionalized particles bind specifically to the glycocortex of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. The affinity of the particles changes with protein density, which can be tuned during the coating procedure. The generic and surfactant-free coating method reported here transfers the high affinity and specificity of a protein onto colloidal polystyrene microparticles.

  3. Early surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airways ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of nasal continuous positive airways pressure. (NCPAP) in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS) reduces the need for mechanical ventilation (MV)1 and decreases mortality.2 MV in preterm infants is further reduced by early administration of porcine surfactant (Curosurf) followed by immediate ...

  4. Adsorption and micellization of surfactants : comparison of theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to extend the knowledge of micellization and adsorption of surfactants in aqueous solutions or the solid /electrolyte interface. To this end experimental results for well defined systems have been compared with theoretical calculations.

    The theoretical

  5. Influence of non ionic surfactants on the release characteristic of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The granules were evaluated for flow and packing properties. The formed granules were then encapsulated and the in vitro dissolution profile, release kinetics and mechanism were studied. The tap and bulk densities were not affected by the presence of any of the non ionic surfactants as there was no statistically significant ...

  6. Surfactants non-monotonically modify the onset of Faraday waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2017-11-01

    When a water-filled container is vertically vibrated, subharmonic Faraday waves emerge once the driving from the vibrations exceeds viscous dissipation. In the presence of an insoluble surfactant, a viscous boundary layer forms at the contaminated surface to balance the Marangoni and Boussinesq stresses. For linear gravity-capillary waves in an undriven fluid, the surfactant-induced boundary layer increases the amount of viscous dissipation. In our analysis and experiments, we consider whether similar effects occur for nonlinear Faraday (gravity-capillary) waves. Assuming a finite-depth, infinite-breadth, low-viscosity fluid, we derive an analytic expression for the onset acceleration up to second order in ɛ =√{ 1 / Re } . This expression allows us to include fluid depth and driving frequency as parameters, in addition to the Marangoni and Boussinesq numbers. For millimetric fluid depths and driving frequencies of 30 to 120 Hz, our analysis recovers prior numerical results and agrees with our measurements of NBD-PC surfactant on DI water. In both case, the onset acceleration increases non-monotonically as a function of Marangoni and Boussinesq numbers. For shallower systems, our model predicts that surfactants could decrease the onset acceleration. DMS-0968258.

  7. Poloxamer-Decorated Polymer Nanoparticles for Lung Surfactant Compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Bohr, Adam; Ruge, Christian A

    2017-01-01

    (styrene) and poly(lactide) nanoparticle-induced lung surfactant inhibition could be related to the type and content of the applied poloxamer. Escalations of the adsorbed coating layer thickness (>3 nm) as well as concentration (brush- rather than mushroom-like conformation of poly(ethylene glycol), chain...

  8. defluorination of drinking water using surfactant modified zeolites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    The unmodified zeolite NaLSX was incapable of adsorbing fluoride ions but the surfactant modified zeolite adsorbed fluoride. The fluoride adsorption capacity of the modified zeolite was. pH dependent and peaked at pH 6.0 – 7.0. INTRODUCTION. Groundwater is often presumed to be fairly safe for consumption compared ...

  9. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria isolation and surfactant influence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrocarbons are substantially insoluble in water, often remaining partitioned in the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). However, there had been little or no attempts to advance the bioavailability of hydrocarbons through the use of surfactants. This study was conducted based on the need to isolate hydrocarbon degrading ...

  10. Antibiotic and surfactant effects on lysine accumulation by Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of antibiotics and surfactants on lysine accumulation in the culture broth of three strains of Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium SP 86, B. megaterium SP 76 and B. megaterium SP 14) were investigated. Lincomycin, neomycin and tetracycline stimulated lysine increase in B. megaterium SP 76 and B. megaterium ...

  11. Defluorination of drinking water using surfactant modified zeolites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the removal of fluoridefrom groundwater by employing surfactant modified zeolites (SMZ) synthesized using locallyavailable kaolin material as precursor. The zeolite synthesis involved calcination of kaolin, alkaline fusion and hydrothermal treatment. The final product was modified with 5g/L ...

  12. Early surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airways ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To determine if the administration of porcine surfactant 100 mg/kg within 24 hours after birth, to infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP) and inspired oxygen (FiO2) 0.3 - 0.4, decreased the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) during the first ...

  13. Constraint and flow: Poiseuille shear response of a surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. To minimize their free energy in aqueous solution, surfactant molecules self-assemble to form some basic morphologies – globular micelles, highly extended thead- like micelles and membrane bilayers – which themselves order to display a rich variety of mesophase symmetries and properties. In membrane ...

  14. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    MS received 12 October 2004; revised 10 January 2005. Abstract. Layered ... son 2004). Bifunctional short chain anionic surfactant such as tartrate and succinate intercalated Zn/Cr LDH was prepared by Prevot and co-workers (1998). Terephthalate ..... He L, Yin S and Sato T 2003 Solid State Chem. 77 51. Isupov V P and ...

  15. Influence of surfactants on the microstructure of dental zirconia ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'icheva, A. A.; Michalina, N. A.; Podzorova, L. I.; Pen'kova, O. I.; Kutsev, S. V.; Berezina, S.

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the influence of different surfactants included in the synthesis of precursor powders on the microstructure of ceramic material to search for an optimal agents providing an uniform grain microstructure required for accurate medical products with a high degree of surface cleanliness. (authors)

  16. Novel Surfactants and Their Applications, Including Mustard Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-30

    started with the oxidation of arhydroxy carboxylate ester 23 to give ar’. oxo carboxylate ester 24; compound 23 was obtained by the esterification of 19 with...of 43 with formaldehyde gave triamine 44, which was converted into surfactant 32aby quaternization with methyl iodide. The iodide counterion of 32a

  17. Genetic and environmental influences of surfactant protein D serum levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, G.L.; Hjelmborg, J.V.; Kyvik, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    The collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important component of the pulmonary innate immune system, but SP-D is also present on extrapulmonary epithelial surfaces and in serum, where it has been used as a biomarker for pulmonary disease states. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms ...

  18. Comparative insight into surfactants mediated amyloidogenesis of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Khan, Javed M; Siddiqi, Mohammad K; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan H

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions have an important role in the protein aggregation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of charge and hydrophobicity of oppositely charged surfactants i.e., anionic (AOT and SDS) and cationic (CTAB and DTAB) on hen egg white lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. We have employed various methods such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, ThT, Congo red and ANS dye binding assays, far-UV CD, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy. At lower molar ratio, both anionic and cationic surfactants promote amyloid fibril formation in lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. The aggregation was proportionally increased with respect to protein concentration and hydrophobicity of surfactant. The morphology of aggregates at both the pH was fibrillar in structure, as visualized by dye binding and microscopic imaging techniques. Initially, the interaction between surfactants and lysozyme was electrostatic and then hydrophobic as investigated by ITC. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge and hydrophobicity during amyloid fibril formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of microemulsions with soybean oil-based surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emulsions are widely applied in food, cosmeceutical and medicinal formulations. Smaller and highly stable droplets of emulsions are important for their application. This research reports that by using soybean oil-based surfactants, the higher stabilized oil-in-water emulsions were obtained via an ul...

  20. Antibiotic and surfactant effects on lysine accumulation by Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... The effects of antibiotics and surfactants on lysine accumulation in the culture broth of three strains of. Bacillus megaterium (B. megaterium SP 86, B. megaterium SP 76 and B. megaterium SP 14) were investigated. Lincomycin, neomycin and tetracycline stimulated lysine increase in B. megaterium SP 76.

  1. Extraction and Characterization of Surfactants from Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozière, Barbara; Gérard, Violaine; Baduel, Christine; Ferronato, Corinne

    2017-04-21

    Surface-active compounds, or surfactants, present in atmospheric aerosols are expected to play important roles in the formation of liquid water clouds in the Earth's atmosphere, a central process in meteorology, hydrology, and for the climate system. But because specific extraction and characterization of these compounds have been lacking for decades, very little is known on their identity, properties, mode of action and origins, thus preventing the full understanding of cloud formation and its potential links with the Earth's ecosystems. In this paper we present recently developed methods for 1) the targeted extraction of all the surfactants from atmospheric aerosol samples and for the determination of 2) their absolute concentrations in the aerosol phase and 3) their static surface tension curves in water, including their Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC). These methods have been validated with 9 references surfactants, including anionic, cationic and non-ionic ones. Examples of results are presented for surfactants found in fine aerosol particles (diameter <1 μm) collected at a coastal site in Croatia and suggestions for future improvements and other characterizations than those presented are discussed.

  2. Hydrocarbon-degrading Bacteria Isolation and Surfactant Influence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKARE

    2012-08-07

    Aug 7, 2012 ... Hydrocarbons are substantially insoluble in water, often remaining partitioned in the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL). However, there had been little or no attempts to advance the bioavailability of hydrocarbons through the use of surfactants. This study was conducted based on the need to isolate.

  3. Confinement-induced symmetry breaking of interfacial surfactant layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.; Koopal, L.K.; Goloub, T.P.; Vermeer, A.W.P.; Kijlstra, J.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction forces between mesoscopic objects are fundamental to soft-condensed matter and are among the prime targets of investigation in colloidal systems. Surfactant molecules are often used to tailor these interactions. The forces are experimentally accessible and for a first theoretical

  4. Lung Surfactant-The Indispensable Component of Respiratory ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. Lung Surfactant - The Indispensable Component of Respiratory Mechanics. Shweta Saxena. Research News Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 91-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Photoisomerization of merocyanine 540 in polymer–surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    in an aqueous solution of MC540 containing PVP, the emission quantum yield and lifetime of MC540 increase markedly. This indicates marked retardation in the nonradiative photoisomerization process of MC540, when it binds to the polymer- surfactant aggregate. The critical association concentration of SDS for binding to ...

  6. Evaluation and application of surfactants synthesized from asphalt components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Souaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis, characterization, surface activity and applications of nonionic surfactants derived from the asphalt components (maltenes M are presented. These compounds were synthesized by the sulfonation of (maltene, then the prepared maltene sulfonic acid (MS was reacted with hexadecylamine giving maltene sulfonamide product (A which undergoes an alkali-catalyzed ethoxylation at (135–150 °C. Several surfactants (M-10 to M-40 were formed with different ethylene oxide units (from 10 up to 40 and were characterized by molecular weight determinations, elemental analyses and FTIR analysis. Surface tension, as a function of concentration of the surfactants in the aqueous media, was measured at 25 °C. From these measurements, the critical micelle concentration (CMC, the maximum surface excess concentration (Гmax, Minimum area per molecule (Amin, effectiveness of surface reduction (ПCMC and the efficiency (pC20 were calculated. The prepared surfactants were applied as emulsifying agents for making asphalt emulsions. Storage stability, (Saybolt Furol viscosity, settlement (water content difference %, coating ability and water resistance were measured. The results indicated that M-20 (maltene sulfonamide ethoxylated with 20 units of ethylene oxides gives a maximum stability.

  7. Surfactant-Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) Implementation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    contaminants (e.g., creosote ) when temperature augmentation for viscosity reduction is not otherwise feasible. The surfactant flooding wellfield will...Section 4.3) to terminate continued hydraulic control measures, for remediation by chemical oxidation, vacuum-enhanced pumping, enhanced bioremediation

  8. The late administration of surfactant | Ballot | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current recommendations for surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) in the treatment of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) are to administer the drug as soon as possible after starting ventilation in order to prevent ventilator lung damage. We present a review of 18 infants (gestational age 32,4 ± 1,9 weeks and birth weight 1 ...

  9. Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Curacao - Conventional versus surfactant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, AAE; van der Meulen, GN; Wiersma, HE; Keli, SO

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) and to evaluate the efficacy of surfactant treatment at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the St Elisabeth Hospital, Curaqao, Netherlands, Antilles, This was a retrospective cohort study of 86

  10. Degradation of Surfactants in Hydroponic Wheat Root Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; McCoy, Lashelle; Flanagan, Aisling

    Hygiene water recycling in recirculating hydroponic systems can be enhanced by plant roots by providing a substrate and root exudates for bacterial growth. However, reduced plant growth can occur during batch mode additions of high concentrations of surfactant. An analog hygiene water stream containing surfactants (Steol CS330, Mirataine CB) was added to a hydroponically-grown wheat plant root zone. The plants were grown at 700 mol mol-1 CO2, a photosynthetic photon flux of 300 mol m-2 s-1, and a planting density of 380 plants m-2. Volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficients were determined using the fermentative/dynamic outgassing method to maintain adequate oxygen mass transfer rates in the root zone. This analysis suggested an optimal flow rate of the hydroponic solution of 5 L min-1. The hydroponic system was inoculated with biofilm from a bioreactor and rates of surfactant degradation were measured daily based on reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD). The COD decreased from 400 to 100 mg L-1 after 2 days following batch addition of the analog hygiene water to the hydroponic system. Measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration and solution temperature suggest that the root zone was provided adequate aeration to meet both oxygen demands from plant and microbial respiration during the degradation of the surfactant. Results from this study show that hydroponic systems can be used to enhance rates of hygiene water processing.

  11. Comprehensive study of tartrazine/cationic surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahir, Afshin Asadzadeh; Javadian, Soheila; Razavizadeh, Bi Bi Marzieh; Gharibi, Hussein

    2011-12-15

    Interaction of a food dye, tartrazine, with some cationic conventional and gemini surfactants, tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB), N,N'-ditetradecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (14,4,14), and N,N'-didodecyl-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-butanediyl-diammonium dibromide (12,4,12), were first investigated comprehensively employing conductometry, tensiometry, and UV-visible spectroscopy. Tartrazine was found to behave in the same manner as aromatic counterions. The formation of ion pairs reflected as a considerable increase of the surfactant efficiency in tensiometry plots and their stoichiometry were determined by Job's method of continuous variations. For the tartrazine/TTAB system, nonionic DS(3), ionic DS(2-), and/or DS(2)(-) ion pairs, their small premicelles, and tartrazine-rich micelles were constituted as well as dye-containing TTAB-rich micelles. Insoluble J-aggregates of DS(-) ion pairs and cylindrical surfactant-rich micelles were also formed in tartrazine/gemini surfactant systems and recognized by transmission electron microscopy. The zeta potential and the size of the aggregates were determined using dynamic light scattering and confirmed the suggested models for the processes happening in each system. Cyclic voltammetry was applied successfully to track all of these species using tartrazine's own reduction peak current for the first time.

  12. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  13. Effect of Surfactant on Characteristics of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karn-orachai, K.; Ruktanonchai, U.; Smith, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) have showed a great promise as an alternative drug carrier being used for intravenous and dermal application. SLNs formulation consists of solid lipid core with drug and surfactant. Type of surfactants can influence on the formation of SLN and their physico-chemical properties of lipid nanoparticles. This work focuses on basic properties of drug-free Compritol ATO 888 based SLN systems being form by using cationic and nonionic surfactant. Cetyl pyridinium chloride and Tween 80 were employed, respectively, as cationic and nonionic surfactants, and that the studied free-drug SLN systems are denoted as F-SLN-C and F-SLN-T accordingly. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the F-SLN-C system has spherical-like morphology, while the F-SLN-T system has disk-like one. Effects of surfactant on the physical properties of lipid nanoparticles are investigated in the absence of model drug to avoid the interaction between drug and surfactant. Fresh particles were studied within 2-3 days after preparation. Its hydrodynamic diameters were found at 178 nm and 157 nm for F-SLN-C and F-SLN-T, respectively whereas zeta potentials were in range of 70 to 80 mV and -15 to -25 mV for FSLN- C and F-SLN-T, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to quantify the crystallinity of SLN systems in terms of a recrystallization index (%RI). It was found that the % RI of F-SLN-C was slightly higher than that of F-SLN-T in which F-SLNC tends to separate itself from SLN faster than lipid in F-SLN-T. Raman spectroscopy and mapping were used to investigate the components distribution of SLN matrix. Spherical-like particle was observed with FSLN- C, while disk-like particle was found with F-SLN-T. The results demonstrate surfactant play an important role on SLN physical characteristics for example size, crystallinity and morphology. (author)

  14. SP-A-enriched surfactant for treatment of rat lung transplants with SP-A deficiency after storage and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, ME; Hofstede, GJH; Petersen, AH; Batenburg, JJ; Haagsman, HP; Oetomo, SB; Prop, J

    2002-01-01

    Background. The function of pulmonary surfactant is affected by lung transplantation, contributing to impaired lung transplant function. A decreased amount of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) after reperfusion is believed to contribute to the impaired surfactant function. Surfactant treatment has been

  15. Maintained inspiratory activity during proportional assist ventilation in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation: phrenic nerve and pulmonary stretch receptor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory activity is a prerequisite for successful application of patient triggered ventilation such as proportional assist ventilation (PAV. It has recently been reported that surfactant instillation increases the activity of slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors (PSRs followed by a shorter inspiratory time (Sindelar et al, J Appl Physiol, 2005 [Epub ahead of print]. Changes in lung mechanics, as observed in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and after surfactant treatment, might therefore influence the inspiratory activity when applying PAV early after surfactant treatment. Objective To investigate the regulation of breathing and ventilatory response in surfactant-depleted young cats during PAV and during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP early after surfactant instillation in relation to phrenic nerve activity (PNA and the activity of PSRs. Methods Seven anesthetized, endotracheally intubated young cats were exposed to periods of CPAP and PAV with the same end-expiratory pressure (0.2–0.5 kPa before and after lung lavage and after surfactant instillation. PAV was set to compensate for 75% of the lung elastic recoil. Results Tidal volume and respiratory rate were higher with lower PaCO2 and higher PaO2 during PAV than during CPAP both before and after surfactant instillation (p Conclusion PSR activity and the control of breathing are maintained during PAV in surfactant-depleted cats early after surfactant instillation, with a higher ventilatory response and a lower breathing effort than during CPAP.

  16. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Paulo Barbeitas

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayers are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayers at liquid/vapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the conformational order of surfactant monolayers. The first part of the Thesis is concerned with surfactant monolayers at the air/water interface (Langmuir films). Surface crystallization of an alcohol Langmuir film and of liquid alkanes are studied and their phase transition behaviors are found to be of different nature, although driven by similar intermolecular interactions. The effect of crystalline order of Langmuir monolayers on the interfacial water structure is also investigated. It is shown that water forms a well-ordered hydrogen-bonded network underneath an alcohol monolayer, in contrast to a fatty acid monolayer which induces a more disordered structure. In the latter case, ionization of the monolayer becomes more significant with increase of the water pH value, leading to an electric-field-induced ordering of interfacial water molecules. We also show that the orientation and conformation of fairly complicated molecules in a Langmuir monolayer can be completely mapped out using a combination of SFG and second harmonic generation (SHG). For a quantitative analysis of molecular orientation at an interface, local-field corrections must be included. The second part is a study of self-assembled surfactant monolayers at the

  17. A theoretical study of bubble motion in surfactant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping

    1999-08-01

    We examine the effect of surfactants on a spherical gas bubble rising steadily in an infinite fluid at low and order one Reynolds number with order one and larger Peclet numbers. Our mathematical model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a convection- diffusion equation together with appropriate interfacial conditions. The nonlinearity of the equations and boundary conditions, and the coupling between hydrodynamics and surfactant transport make the problem very challenging. When a bubble rises in a fluid containing surface-active agents, surfactant adsorbs onto the bubble surface at the leading edge, convects to the trailing edge by the surface flow and desorbs into the bulk along the interface. This adsorption develops a surface concentration gradient on the interface that makes the surface tension at the back end relatively lower than that at the front end, and thus retards the bubble velocity. Because of surfactant impurities unavoidably present in materials, this retardation can cause a problem in materials processing in space and glass processing when bubbles are created during chemical reactions. Thus the study of how to remobilize (remove the surfactant gradient on the surface) the bubble surface becomes necessary. Many studies have been done on this retarding effects of the surfactant on a moving bubble. However, most were focused on the retarding effect due to a trace amount of surfactant, in which case the bubble velocity monotonically decreases as the bulk concentration increases. The question of how to remobilize the bubble surface remains unanswered. In this work, we will show that the bubble velocity can be controlled by remobilizing the bubble interface using the surfactant concentration. This technique not only can be used to maximize the bubble velocity, but also can be used to maximize mass transfer on purifying materials and extracting materials from mixtures. In the first part of the work, we illustrate numerically that the

  18. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders.

  19. Impact of surfactant type for ionic liquid pretreatment on enhancing delignification of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Chen, Xi-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Han, Ye-Ju; Potprommanee, Laddawan; Liu, Jing-Yong; Liao, Yu-Ling; Ning, Xun-An; Sun, Shui-Yu; Huang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an environmentally friendly method for pretreating rice straw by using 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl) as an ionic liquid (IL) assisted by surfactants. The impacts of surfactant type (including nonionic-, anionic-, cationic- and bio-surfactant) on the ionic liquid pretreatment were investigated. The bio-surfactant+IL-pretreated rice straw showed significant lignin removal (26.14%) and exhibited higher cellulose conversion (36.21%) than the untreated (16.16%) rice straw. The cellulose conversion of the rice straw pretreated with bio-surfactant+IL was the highest and the lowest was observed for pretreated with cationic-surfactant+IL. Untreated and pretreated rice straw was thoroughly characterized through SEM and AFM. In conclusion, the results provided an effective and environmental method for pretreating lignocellulosic substrates by using green solvent (ionic liquid) and biodegradable bio-surfactant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An experimental investigation of the effects of surfactants on the severity of vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowal, M.G.; Dowling, M.F.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1993-01-01

    Dilute aqueous solutions of two surface active agents (surfactants) were tested for their ability to suppress spontaneous steam explosions in molten tin/water systems. At 800C, 12 g of tin were dropped into aqueous solutions of a nonionic surfactant (nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether) and an ionic surfactant (dodecylbenzene sulfonate sodium salt) with concentrations of 5, 10, and 50 wppm. The data indicate that surfactants reduce the severity of steam explosions. On average, the surfactant solutions resulted in a 65% reduction in average peak pressures when compared with the deionized water results. However, very little difference in the mitigating effect of the surfactant solutions was observed as the concentration was increased beyond 5 wppm. Particle-size distribution results also indicated a mitigating effect on steam explosion severity, as a 19% reduction in participating melt mass fraction was observed when the surfactants were used

  1. Solution Properties of Dissymmetric Sulfonate-type Anionic Gemini Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Akiba, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Dissymmetric and symmetric anionic gemini surfactants, N-alkyl-N'-alkyl-N,N'dipropanesulfonylethylenediamine (CmCnSul, where m and n represent alkyl chain lengths of m-n = 4-16, 6-14, 8-12, 10-10, and 12-12), were synthesized by two- or three-step reactions. Their physicochemical properties were characterized by equilibrium surface tension measurements, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of pyrene, and dynamic light scattering. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the dissymmetric surfactants C4C16Sul, C6C14Sul, and C8C12Sul was slightly lower than that of the symmetric surfactant C10C10Sul. The occupied area per molecule (A) of C8C12Sul was smaller than that of C10C10Sul, indicating that C8C12Sul has a high surface activity. However, the increase in the degree of dissymmetry from C8C12Sul to C6C14Sul and then to C4C16Sul resulted in high surface tension and large A. Based on the surface tension, the standard free energies of micellization (∆G°mic) and adsorption (∆G°ads), the efficiency of surface adsorption (pC20), and the effectiveness of surface adsorption (CMC/C20) were obtained. These parameters suggested that C8C12Sul formed micelles more readily than the other surfactants. The properties determined from the surface tension indicated that C8C12Sul's ability is intermediate between those of C10C10Sul and C12C12Sul. The pyrene fluorescence and dynamic light scattering results revealed that the micelle size depends on the longer of the two alkyl chains in dissymmetric surfactants.

  2. Polymer-surfactant interactions studied by titration microcalorimetry : Influence of polymer hydrophobicity, electrostatic forces, and surfactant aggregational state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kevelam, J; van Breemen, J.F.L.; Blokzijl, W.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1996-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry has been applied to investigate the interactions between hydrophobically-modified water-soluble polymers and surfactants. The following polymers were used in this study: poly(sodium acrylate-co-n-alkyl methacrylate) (A), where n-alkyl = C9H19, C12H25, and C18H37

  3. Hydrolysis of Surfactants Containing Ester Bonds: Modulation of Reaction Kinetics and Important Aspects of Surfactant Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Dan; Stjerndahl, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-assembly on the hydrolysis kinetics of surfactants that contain ester bonds are discussed. A number of examples on how reaction rates and apparent reaction orders can be modulated by changes in the conditions, including an instance of apparent zero-order kinetics, are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that the examples on…

  4. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  6. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andrew P; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2016-01-28

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the "free" (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit).

  7. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered.

  8. Meconium Impairs Pulmonary Surfactant by a Combined Action of Cholesterol and Bile Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Echaide, Mercedes; Cruz, Antonio; Taeusch, H. William; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for meconium-induced inactivation of pulmonary surfactant as part of the meconium aspiration syndrome in newborn infants, to our knowledge, are not clearly understood. Here we have studied the biophysical mechanisms of how meconium affects surface activity of pulmonary surfactant and whether the membrane-perturbing effects of meconium can be mimicked by exposure of surfactant to a mixture of bile acids and cholesterol. Surface activity of pulmonary surfactant complexes purified from animal lungs was analyzed in the absence and in the presence of meconium in standard surface balances and in a captive bubble surfactometer. We have also evaluated accumulation of surfactant at the air-liquid interface by what we believe to be a novel microtiter plate fluorescent assay, and the effect of meconium components on surfactant membrane fluidity using Laurdan fluorescence thermotropic profiles and differential scanning calorimetry thermograms. Rapid interfacial adsorption, low surface tension upon film compression, efficient film replenishment upon expansion, and thermotropic properties of surfactant complexes are all adversely affected by meconium, and, in a similar manner, they are affected by cholesterol/taurocholate mixtures but not by taurocholate alone. We conclude that inhibition of surfactant by meconium can be mimicked by a bile salt-promoted incorporation of excess cholesterol into surfactant complexes. These results highlight the potential pathogenic role of cholesterol-mobilizing agents as a crucial factor resulting in cholesterol induced alterations of structure and dynamics of surfactant membranes and films. PMID:21281579

  9. Study of the Gemini Surfactants' Self-Assembly on Graphene Nanosheets: Insights from Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorsargol, M; Sohrabi, B; Dehestani, M

    2018-04-06

    Understanding the mechanism of adsorption and self-assembly of surfactants on graphene is highly important to perform better optimization of the graphene dispersion process. Because of Gemini surfactants' special structure, they have a high charge capacity, high hydrophobicity, and unique self-assembly properties compared to single-chain surfactants. Therefore, Gemini surfactants with their small concentrations are expected to disperse and stabilize graphene nanosheets in aqueous solutions more effectively. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study adsorption and self-assembly of single-chain cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C 12 TAB) and its same family Gemini surfactant dimethylene-α,β-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) ([12-2-12]Br 2 ) on graphene nanosheets. The results showed that assemblies morphology formed on graphene is affected by surfactant structure. We observed that increasing surface coverage, especially for [12-2-12]Br 2 , leads to a transmission in adsorption mechanism and most [12-2-12]Br 2 head groups tend toward the aqueous phase and prevent water molecules from accessing graphene surface. It can be concluded from morphological assessments that [12-2-12]Br 2 is more effective than C 12 TAB in stabilizing graphene aqueous suspensions. Moreover, we investigated the effect of graphene sheet size and Gemini surfactant spacer length on the structure of surfactant assemblies on graphene. The present study results can expand our comprehension of dispersion mechanism of graphene nanosheets by Gemini surfactants.

  10. New theoretical framework for designing nonionic surfactant mixtures that exhibit a desired adsorption kinetics behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorkanikkara, Srinivas Nageswaran; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2010-12-21

    How does one design a surfactant mixture using a set of available surfactants such that it exhibits a desired adsorption kinetics behavior? The traditional approach used to address this design problem involves conducting trial-and-error experiments with specific surfactant mixtures. This approach is typically time-consuming and resource-intensive and becomes increasingly challenging when the number of surfactants that can be mixed increases. In this article, we propose a new theoretical framework to identify a surfactant mixture that most closely meets a desired adsorption kinetics behavior. Specifically, the new theoretical framework involves (a) formulating the surfactant mixture design problem as an optimization problem using an adsorption kinetics model and (b) solving the optimization problem using a commercial optimization package. The proposed framework aims to identify the surfactant mixture that most closely satisfies the desired adsorption kinetics behavior subject to the predictive capabilities of the chosen adsorption kinetics model. Experiments can then be conducted at the identified surfactant mixture condition to validate the predictions. We demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of the proposed theoretical framework through a realistic case study by identifying a nonionic surfactant mixture consisting of up to four alkyl poly(ethylene oxide) surfactants (C(10)E(4), C(12)E(5), C(12)E(6), and C(10)E(8)) such that it most closely exhibits a desired dynamic surface tension (DST) profile. Specifically, we use the Mulqueen-Stebe-Blankschtein (MSB) adsorption kinetics model (Mulqueen, M.; Stebe, K. J.; Blankschtein, D. Langmuir 2001, 17, 5196-5207) to formulate the optimization problem as well as the SNOPT commercial optimization solver to identify a surfactant mixture consisting of these four surfactants that most closely exhibits the desired DST profile. Finally, we compare the experimental DST profile measured at the surfactant mixture condition

  11. Acute toxicity of anionic and non-ionic surfactants to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, M; Fernández-Serrano, M; Jurado, E; Núñez-Olea, J; Ríos, F

    2016-03-01

    The environmental risk of surfactants requires toxicity measurements. As different test organisms have different sensitivity to the toxics, it is necessary to establish the most appropriate organism to classify the surfactant as very toxic, toxic, harmful or safe, in order to establish the maximum permissible concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. We have determined the toxicity values of various anionic surfactants ether carboxylic derivatives using four test organisms: the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna, the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum (freshwater algae) and Phaeodactylum tricornutum (seawater algae). In addition, in order to compare and classify the different families of surfactants, we have included a compilation of toxicity data of surfactants collected from literature. The results indicated that V. fischeri was more sensitive to the toxic effects of the surfactants than was D. magna or the microalgae, which was the least sensitive. This result shows that the most suitable toxicity assay for surfactants may be the one using V. fischeri. The toxicity data revealed considerable variation in toxicity responses with the structure of the surfactants regardless of the species tested. The toxicity data have been related to the structure of the surfactants, giving a mathematical relationship that helps to predict the toxic potential of a surfactant from its structure. Model-predicted toxicity agreed well with toxicity values reported in the literature for several surfactants previously studied. Predictive models of toxicity is a handy tool for providing a risk assessment that can be useful to establish the toxicity range for each surfactant and the different test organisms in order to select efficient surfactants with a lower impact on the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Traces of surfactants can severely limit the drag reduction of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peaudecerf, François J; Landel, Julien R; Goldstein, Raymond E; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2017-07-11

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have the potential to achieve large drag reduction for internal and external flow applications. However, experiments have shown inconsistent results, with many studies reporting significantly reduced performance. Recently, it has been proposed that surfactants, ubiquitous in flow applications, could be responsible by creating adverse Marangoni stresses. However, testing this hypothesis is challenging. Careful experiments with purified water already show large interfacial stresses and, paradoxically, adding surfactants yields barely measurable drag increases. To test the surfactant hypothesis while controlling surfactant concentrations with precision higher than can be achieved experimentally, we perform simulations inclusive of surfactant kinetics. These reveal that surfactant-induced stresses are significant at extremely low concentrations, potentially yielding a no-slip boundary condition on the air-water interface (the "plastron") for surfactant concentrations below typical environmental values. These stresses decrease as the stream-wise distance between plastron stagnation points increases. We perform microchannel experiments with SHSs consisting of stream-wise parallel gratings, which confirm this numerical prediction, while showing near-plastron velocities significantly slower than standard surfactant-free predictions. In addition, we introduce an unsteady test of surfactant effects. When we rapidly remove the driving pressure following a loading phase, a backflow develops at the plastron, which can only be explained by surfactant gradients formed in the loading phase. This demonstrates the significance of surfactants in deteriorating drag reduction and thus the importance of including surfactant stresses in SHS models. Our time-dependent protocol can assess the impact of surfactants in SHS testing and guide future mitigating designs.

  13. Removal of cesium ions from clays by cationic surfactant intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Yang, Hee-Man; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach to remediate cesium-contaminated clays based on intercalation of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) into clay interlayers. Intercalation of DTAB was found to occur very rapidly and involved exchanging interlayer cations. The reaction yielded efficient cesium desorption (∼97%), including of a large amount of otherwise non-desorbable cesium ions by cation exchange with ammonium ions. In addition, the intercalation of DTAB afforded an expansion of the interlayers, and an enhanced desorption of Cs by cation exchange with ammonium ions even at low concentrations of DTAB. Finally, the residual intercalated surfactants were easily removed by a decomposition reaction with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Cu 2+ /Fe 2+ catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Green Cosmetic Surfactant from Rice: Characterization and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hanno

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, microwave irradiation has been extensively used for performing green organic synthesis. The aim of this study was to synthesize, through a microwave-assisted irradiation process, a natural surfactant with O/W emulsifying properties. Our attention was focused on polyglycerol esters of fatty acids that are biocompatible and biodegradable non-ionic surfactants widely used in food and cosmetic products. The emulsifier was obtained using vegetable raw material from renewable sources: polyglycerol derived from vegetable glycerol and rice bran oil fatty acids. The natural emulsifier obtained was then characterized and evaluated for its emulsifying properties using different doses, oil phases, rheological additives, waxes, etc. The potential application in solar products, in comparison with other natural emulsifiers, was also evaluated.

  15. Surfactant assisted surface morphology and thermal properties of polythiophene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijeth, H.; Niranjana, M.; Yesappa, L.; Chapi, Sharanappa; Raghu, S.; Ashokkumar, S. P.; Devendrappa, H.

    2017-06-01

    Conducting polythiophene (PTH)/aluminium oxide (Al2O3) composites was prepared with camphor sulphonic acid (CSA) as s anionic surfactant by means of in situ chemical oxidation polymerization. The morphology and material phase of PTH/Al2O3 (PTHA) composites were investigated by Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The FESEM image shows alter the size of grain and EDX results consistent with the presence of Al2O3 and CSA chemical composition. Thermal stability of composites was characterized using TGA/DSC, the results indicate that the PTP/Al2O3 composites have higher thermal stability than that of PTP and decompose at higher temperatures due to addition of anionic surfactant.

  16. Synthesis of mesoporous zirconia using an amphoteric surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.Y.; Bruinsma, P.J.; Chen, Y.L.; Liu, J.

    1996-01-01

    An amphoteric surfactant, cocamidopropyl betaine, was used for the synthesis of mesoporous zirconia. The carboxylate functionality of the surfactant permitted strong bonding with soluble zirconium species, while the quaternary ammonium group ensured large headgroup area and high solubility under acidic conditions. An amphoteric co-template [betaine, or (carboxymethyl)trimethylammonium hydroxide] improved uniformity of the hexagonal mesophase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the as-synthesized zirconium sulfate mesophase indicated hexagonal mesostructure, and low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed a 41 angstrom primary d-spacing and two higher order reflections of a hexagonal lattice. High surface area zirconia was produced by controlled base treatment of the hexagonal mesophase with sodium hydroxide, followed by calcination. TEM and XRD indicated that the mesostructure was stable to 350 C

  17. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.W.; Park, J.Y.; Lee, H.H.; Cho, H.J. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    Removal of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) using electrokinetic method was studied in a model system. Kaolinite and phenanthrene were selected as the model clay soil and representative HOC. Three different types of surfactants, APG (alkyl polyglucoside), Brij30 (polyoxyethylene 4 lauryl ether), and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate), were used to enhance the solubility of HOCs. Electrokinetic (EK) column experiments were performed using water, surfactant solution, and acetate buffer solution under a constant current condition. Voltage and flow through the soil system were interpreted with time. Electrolyte pH at the anode and cathode compartments was observed for operation time. Removal efficiency of phenanthrene was examined after the end of EK operation during 2, 4, and 6 weeks. (orig.)

  18. Fluorescence enhancement of mazindol in the presence of anionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Guardia, Miguel; Galdú, Manuel V.

    Experimental conditions for the determination of mazindol {[ 3H] imidazo(2,1-a)isoindol-5-ol-5(4 chlorophenyl-2,5 dihydro)} by u.v. spectroscopy and by spectrofluorimetry have been studied. We have found that the addition of anionic surfactants provides a four-fold increase in the sensitivity of the fluorimetric determination of mazindol at 325 nm. Sensitization parameters of each of the moieties of the anionic surfactant structures have been obtained and it has been found that the triethanolamine lauryl sulphate is the most adequate structure to produce an enhancement of the mazindol fluorescence. A new method for the fluorimetric determination of mazindol that involves prior u.v. irradiation of the samples is proposed which allows a sensitivity increase of 17,500% and a detection limit of 3.6 ng ml -1.

  19. Surfactant Distribution Measurements Downstream of a Reynolds Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. S.; Korenowski, G. M.; Vogel, M. J.; Hirsa, A. H.

    1999-11-01

    Minuscule amounts of surface-active agents, of the order of 1 mg/m^2, are sufficient to change the characteristics of flow at an air/water interface. Specifically, the intrinsic viscoelastic interfacial properties, which are a strong function of the concentration of the surfactant, appear in essential terms of the boundary conditions of the flow equations. The noninvasive laser-based technique of second harmonic generation (SHG) is used to determine the surfactant concentration profile downstream of a contamination front in real time. In this experiment, a Reynolds ridge marks the leading edge of a contaminated region upstream of a surface barrier. The SHG technique allows for the nonintrusive characterization of the top molecular layer over the subsurface flow. Results include the concentration gradient and surface tension profiles downstream of the Reynolds ridge. The SHG results, along with simultaneous DPIV measurements, will be related to the interfacial viscosities.

  20. Comparison of several ethanol productions using xylanase, inorganic salts, surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Lu, Jie; Yang, Rui-feng; Song, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-ming; Wang, Hai-song; Zhou, Jing-hui

    2017-03-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment is an effective and environmentally friendly method to produce bioethanol with lignocellulosic materials. Corn stover was pretreated with liquid hot water (LHW) and then subjected to semi-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (S-SSF) to obtain high ethanol concentration and yield. The present study aimed to confirm the effect of several additives on the fermentation digestibility of unwashed WIS of corn stover pretreated with LHW. So we also investigated the process, such as enzyme addition, inorganic salts, surfactant and different loading Triton. Results show that high ethanol concentration is necessary to add xylanase in the stage of saccharification. The ethanol concentration increased mainly with magnesium ion on fermentation. Comparing with Tween 80, Span 80 and Polyethylene glycol, Triton is the best surfactant. In contrast to using xylanase and Triton respectively, optimization can make up the lack of stamina and improve effect of single inorganic salts.

  1. Surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C and their precursors in bronchoalveolar lavages from children with acute and chronic inflammatory airway disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winter Tobias

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surfactant proteins B (SP-B and C (SP-C are important for the stability and function of the alveolar surfactant film. Their involvement and down-regulation in inflammatory processes has recently been proposed, but their level during neutrophilic human airway diseases are not yet known. Methods We used 1D-electrophoresis and Western blotting to determine the concentrations and molecular forms of SP-B and SP-C in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid of children with different inflammatory airway diseases. 21 children with cystic fibrosis, 15 with chronic bronchitis and 14 with pneumonia were included and compared to 14 healthy control children. Results SP-B was detected in BAL of all 64 patients, whereas SP-C was found in BAL of all but 3 children; those three BAL fluids had more than 80% neutrophils, and in two patients, who were re-lavaged later, SP-C was then present and the neutrophil count was lower. SP-B was mainly present as a dimer, SP-C as a monomer. For both qualitative and quantitative measures of SP-C and SP-B, no significant differences were observed between the four evaluated patient groups. Conclusion Concentration or molecular form of SP-B and SP-C is not altered in BAL of children with different acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We conclude that there is no down-regulation of SP-B and SP-C at the protein level in inflammatory processes of neutrophilic airway disease.

  2. Surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C and their precursors in bronchoalveolar lavages from children with acute and chronic inflammatory airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafel, Oliver; Latzin, Philipp; Paul, Karl; Winter, Tobias; Woischnik, Markus; Griese, Matthias

    2008-04-11

    The surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) are important for the stability and function of the alveolar surfactant film. Their involvement and down-regulation in inflammatory processes has recently been proposed, but their level during neutrophilic human airway diseases are not yet known. We used 1D-electrophoresis and Western blotting to determine the concentrations and molecular forms of SP-B and SP-C in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of children with different inflammatory airway diseases. 21 children with cystic fibrosis, 15 with chronic bronchitis and 14 with pneumonia were included and compared to 14 healthy control children. SP-B was detected in BAL of all 64 patients, whereas SP-C was found in BAL of all but 3 children; those three BAL fluids had more than 80% neutrophils, and in two patients, who were re-lavaged later, SP-C was then present and the neutrophil count was lower. SP-B was mainly present as a dimer, SP-C as a monomer. For both qualitative and quantitative measures of SP-C and SP-B, no significant differences were observed between the four evaluated patient groups. Concentration or molecular form of SP-B and SP-C is not altered in BAL of children with different acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We conclude that there is no down-regulation of SP-B and SP-C at the protein level in inflammatory processes of neutrophilic airway disease.

  3. Spontaneous vesicle phase formation by pseudogemini surfactants in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nan; Shi, Lijuan; Lu, Fei; Xie, Shuting; Zheng, Liqiang

    2014-08-14

    The phase behavior of a kind of pseudogemini surfactant in aqueous solutions, formed by the mixture of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) and butane-1,4-bis (methylimidazolium bromide) ([mim-C4-mim]Br2) or butane-1,4-bis(methylpyrrolidinium bromide) ([mpy-C4-mpy]Br2) in a molar ratio of 2 : 1, is reported in the present work. When [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 is mixed with SDBS in aqueous solutions, one cationic [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 molecule "bridges" two SDBS molecules by noncovalent interactions (e.g. electrostatic, π-π stacking, and σ-π interactions), behaving like a pseudogemini surfactant. Vesicles can be formed by this kind of pseudogemini surfactant, determined by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) or cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The mixed system of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with [mim-C4-mim]Br2 or [mpy-C4-mpy]Br2 was also constructed, and only micelles were observed. We infer that a pseudogemini surfactant is formed under the synergic effect of electrostatic, π-π stacking, and σ-π interactions in the SDBS/[mim-C4-mim]Br2/H2O system, while electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic interactions may provide the directional force for vesicle formation in the SDBS/[mpy-C4-mpy]Br2/H2O system.

  4. Surfactant-free exfoliation of graphite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Karen B; Sendecki, Anne; Liu, Haitao

    2014-03-14

    We report an ultrasound exfoliation of graphite in a weakly basic solution to produce multi-layer graphene dispersion. A unique feature of this process is that no surfactant was added to stabilize the exfoliated graphene in water. The concentration of the graphene dispersion prepared by this approach can be up to 0.02 mg mL(-1) and it was stable at room temperature for several months.

  5. Synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadesh Mandal

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium. Proton irradiated stable 197 Au and radioactive 198 Au were simultaneously used for production of radioactive gold nanoparticle. Face centered cubic gold nanoparticles with size of 4-50 nm were found in proton irradiated gold foil. However, the size of nanoparticle varies with pH using both stable and radioactive gold. (author)

  6. Interleukin-2 induces beta2-integrin-dependent signal transduction involving the focal adhesion kinase-related protein B (fakB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockdorff, J; Kanner, S B; Nielsen, M

    1998-01-01

    beta2 integrin molecules are involved in a multitude of cellular events, including adhesion, migration, and cellular activation. Here, we studied the influence of beta2 integrins on interleukin-2 (IL-2)-mediated signal transduction in human CD4(+) T cell lines obtained from healthy donors...... and a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient. We show that IL-2 induces tyrosine phosphorylation of a 125-kDa protein and homotypic adhesion in beta2 integrin (CD18)-positive but not in beta2-integrin-negative T cells. EDTA, an inhibitor of integrin adhesion, blocks IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation...... experiments indicate that the IL-2-induced 125-kDa phosphotyrosine protein is the focal adhesion kinase-related protein B (fakB). Thus, IL-2 induces strong tyrosine phosphorylation of fakB in beta2-integrin-positive but not in beta2-integrin-negative T cells, and CD18 mAb selectively blocks IL-2-induced fak...

  7. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsieh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB, a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human tropoelastin (HTE, the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N. Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  8. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B transgenic mice develop TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 pathology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tudor, E L

    2010-05-19

    Cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive inclusions containing TAR-DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) within motor neurons are the hallmark pathology of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 is a nuclear protein and the mechanisms by which it becomes mislocalized and aggregated in ALS are not properly understood. A mutation in the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein-B (VAPB) involving a proline to serine substitution at position 56 (VAPBP56S) is the cause of familial ALS type-8. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which VAPBP56S induces disease, we created transgenic mice that express either wild-type VAPB (VAPBwt) or VAPBP56S in the nervous system. Analyses of both sets of mice revealed no overt motor phenotype nor alterations in survival. However, VAPBP56S but not VAPBwt transgenic mice develop cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulations within spinal cord motor neurons that were first detected at 18 months of age. Our results suggest a link between abnormal VAPBP56S function and TDP-43 mislocalization.

  9. Assembly studies of six intestinal intermediate filament (IF) proteins B2, C1, C2, D1, D2, and E1 in the nematode C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabinos, Anton; Schünemann, Jürgen; Parry, David A D

    2017-03-01

    The dimerisation properties of six intestine-expressed intermediate filament (IF) proteins (B2, C1, C2, D1, D2, E1) were analysed in blot overlay assay on membranes containing all of the eleven recombinant C. elegans IF proteins (A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, B2, C1, C2, D1, D2, and E1). The interactions detected in the blot assays exclusively comprise intestine-expressed IF proteins and the protein A4, which is found in the dauer larva intestine. About 86% of these interactions are heterotypic, while the remaining interactions relate to C1, C2, and D2 homodimers. These multiple modes of interaction were also supported by calculations of the numbers of possible interchain ionic interactions derived from the individual rod sequences. The results predict that the six B2, C1, C2, D1, D2, and E1 IF proteins are able to form as many as eleven different heteropolymeric and three homopolymeric IFs in the C. elegans intestine. This simple model of the intestinal IF meshwork enables us to speculate that our previously reported triple RNAi worms arrested or decreased their growth because of feeding reduction due to morphological defects of the mechanically compromised intestine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Leptospira Immunoglobulin-Like Protein B Interacts with the 20th Exon of Human Tropoelastin Contributing to Leptospiral Adhesion to Human Lung Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Tseng, Andrew; He, Hongxuan; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Wang, Xuannian; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Leptospira immunoglobulin-like protein B (LigB), a surface adhesin, is capable of mediating the attachment of pathogenic leptospira to the host through interaction with various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human tropoelastin (HTE), the building block of elastin, confers resilience and elasticity to lung, and other tissues. Previously identified Ig-like domains of LigB, including LigB4 and LigB12, bind to HTE, which is likely to promote Leptospira adhesion to lung tissue. However, the molecular mechanism that mediates the LigB-HTE interaction is unclear. In this study, the LigB-binding site on HTE was further pinpointed to a N-terminal region of the 20th exon of HTE (HTE20N). Alanine mutants of basic and aromatic residues on HTE20N significantly reduced binding to the LigB. Additionally, HTE-binding site was narrowed down to the first β-sheet of LigB12. On this binding surface, residues F1054, D1061, A1065, and D1066 were critical for the association with HTE. Most importantly, the recombinant HTE truncates could diminish the binding of LigB to human lung fibroblasts (WI-38) by 68%, and could block the association of LigA-expressing L. biflexa to lung cells by 61%. These findings should expand our understanding of leptospiral pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis.

  11. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI's particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system

  12. Surfactant protein-D and pulmonary host defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouch Erika C

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surfactant protein-D (SP-D participates in the innate response to inhaled microorganisms and organic antigens, and contributes to immune and inflammatory regulation within the lung. SP-D is synthesized and secreted by alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, but is also expressed by epithelial cells lining various exocrine ducts and the mucosa of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. SP-D, a collagenous calcium-dependent lectin (or collectin, binds to surface glycoconjugates expressed by a wide variety of microorganisms, and to oligosaccharides associated with the surface of various complex organic antigens. SP-D also specifically interacts with glycoconjugates and other molecules expressed on the surface of macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. In addition, SP-D binds to specific surfactant-associated lipids and can influence the organization of lipid mixtures containing phosphatidylinositol in vitro. Consistent with these diverse in vitro activities is the observation that SP-D-deficient transgenic mice show abnormal accumulations of surfactant lipids, and respond abnormally to challenge with respiratory viruses and bacterial lipopolysaccharides. The phenotype of macrophages isolated from the lungs of SP-D-deficient mice is altered, and there is circumstantial evidence that abnormal oxidant metabolism and/or increased metalloproteinase expression contributes to the development of emphysema. The expression of SP-D is increased in response to many forms of lung injury, and deficient accumulation of appropriately oligomerized SP-D might contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of human lung diseases.

  13. Flavonoid-surfactant interactions: A detailed physicochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Onkar; Kaur, Rajwinder; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the interactions between flavonoids and surfactants with attention of finding the probable location of flavonoids in micellar media that can be used for controlling their antioxidant behavior. In present study, the micellar and interfacial behavior of twin tailed anionic surfactants viz. sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate (NaDEHP) in the presence of two flavonoids, namely quercetin (QUE) and kaempferol (KFL) have been studied by surface tension measurements. UV-visible, fluorescence and differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) measurements have been employed to predict the probable location of flavonoids (QUE/KFL) within surfactant (AOT/NaDEHP) aggregates. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements further confirmed the solubilization of QUE/KFL in AOT/NaDEHP aggregates deduced from increased hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) of aggregates in the presence of flavonoids. Both radical scavenging activity (RSA) and degradation rate constant (k) of flavonoids are found to be higher in NaDEHP micelles as compared to AOT micelles.

  14. Microbiological Production of Surfactant from Agricultural Residuals for IOR Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Greg Alan; Bruhn, Debby Fox; Fox, Sandra Lynn; Noah, Karl Scott; Thompson, David Neal

    2002-04-01

    Utilization of surfactants for improved oil recovery (IOR) is an accepted technique with high potential. However, technology application is frequently limited by cost. Biosurfactants (surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms) are not widely utilized in the petroleum industry due to high production costs associated with use of expensive substrates and inefficient product recovery methods. The economics of biosurfactant production could be significantly impacted through use of media optimization and application of inexpensive carbon substrates such as agricultural process residuals. Utilization of biosurfactants produced from agricultural residuals may 1) result in an economic advantage for surfactant production and technology application, and 2) convert a substantial agricultural waste stream to a value-added product for IOR. A biosurfactant with high potential for use is surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis. Reported here is the production and potential IOR utilization of surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis (American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 21332) from starch-based media. Production of surfactants from microbiological growth media based on simple sugars, chemically pure starch medium, simulated liquid and solid potato-process effluent media, a commercially prepared potato starch in mineral salts, and process effluent from a potato processor is discussed. Additionally, the effect of chemical and physical pretreatments on starchy feedstocks is discussed.

  15. Surfactant mediated slurry formulations for Ge CMP applications

    KAUST Repository

    Basim, G. Bahar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, slurry formulations in the presence of self-assembled surfactant structures were investigated for Ge/SiO2 CMP applications in the absence and presence of oxidizers. Both anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate-SDS) and cationic (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide-C12TAB) micelles were used in the slurry formulations as a function of pH and oxidizer concentration. CMP performances of Ge and SiO2 wafers were evaluated in terms of material removal rates, selectivity and surface quality. The material removal rate responses were also assessed through AFM wear rate tests to obtain a faster response for preliminary analyses. The surfactant adsorption characteristics were studied through surface wettability responses of the Ge and SiO2 wafers through contact angle measurements. It was observed that the self-assembled surfactant structures can help obtain selectivity on the silica/germanium system at low concentrations of the oxidizer in the slurry. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  16. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  17. NATURAL SURFACTANTS AND THEIR USE IN FOOD INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Kreps

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms produce wide range of surfactants, generally called biosurfactants. These compounds are mainly divided according to their molecular weight, physico - chemical properties and mode of action. Saponins, plant surfactants, have properties of  soap and they are high foaming and therefore are used in cosmetic (shampoos, liquid soaps et cetera and food industry (sweeteners, food additives into the effervescents et cetera. Most of them are spread in plants of agriculture importance and some of them are basic segments in human food. They often occur in plants (in more then 100 species. Saponins can be find in vegetables as a soya, a bean, a lentil, a spinach, a tomato, a potato, a garlic, a onion. Today biosurfactants are mainly used in bioremediation but they can be utilized in many sectors of food industry. We have paid attention to some microbial and plant surfactants and their prospects of exploitation in this industry.doi:10.5219/170 

  18. Nanoparticle size controls aggregation in lamellar nonionic surfactant mesophase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Edakkal; Aswal, Vinod K; Kumaraswamy, Guruswamy

    2013-08-06

    We show that the size of silica nanoparticles influences the nature of their aggregation in an aqueous solution of a relatively hydrophobic nonionic surfactant, C12E4. We present results for dispersions of silica nanoparticles with sizes varying from 8 to 26 nm, in a 75: 25 C12E4/water system, that forms a lamellar phase, Lα, at room temperature. Addition of silica particles does not affect the formation of the Lα phase. Nanoparticles smaller than about 11 nm aggregate irreversibly in the C12E4/water system. However, nanoparticles larger than about 15 nm aggregate in the Lα phase, but are dispersed at temperatures above the Lα order-disorder temperature. Thus, in contrast to the smaller particles, aggregation of silica nanoparticles larger than about 15 nm is reversible with temperature. We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to demonstrate that these results can be explained by the size-dependent wrapping of nanoparticles by surfactant bilayers. Larger particles, above 15 nm in size, are sterically stabilized by the formation of an adsorbed surfactant bilayer. The cost of bilayer bending inhibits adsorption onto the highly curved surfaces of smaller particles, and these "bare" particles aggregate irreversibly.

  19. Micellization Behavior of Long-Chain Substituted Alkylguanidinium Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Bouchal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface activity and micelle formation of alkylguanidinium chlorides containing 10, 12, 14 and 16 carbon atoms in the hydrophobic tail were studied by combining conductivity and surface tension measurements with isothermal titration calorimetry. The purity of the resulting surfactants, their temperatures of Cr→LC and LC→I transitions, as well as their propensity of forming birefringent phases, were assessed based on the results of 1H and 13C NMR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and polarizing microscopy studies. Whenever possible, the resulting values of Krafft temperature (TK, critical micelle concentration (CMC, minimum surface tension above the CMC, chloride counter-ion binding to the micelle, and the standard enthalpy of micelle formation per mole of surfactant (ΔmicH° were compared to those characterizing alkyltrimethylammonium chlorides or bromides with the same tail lengths. The value of TK ranged between 292 and 314 K and increased strongly with the increase in the chain length of the hydrophobic tail. Micellization was described as both entropy and enthalpy-driven. Based on the direct calorimetry measurements, the general trends in the CMC with the temperature, hydrophobic tail length, and NaCl addition were found to be similar to those of other types of cationic surfactants. The particularly exothermic character of micellization was ascribed to the hydrogen-binding capacity of the guanidinium head-group.

  20. Biocompatible Amphiphilic Hydrogel-Solid Dimer Particles as Colloidal Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Amstad, Esther; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Cai, Liheng; Fan, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Hai, Mingtan; Koehler, Stephan; Zhang, Huidan; Liang, Fuxin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Weitz, David A

    2017-12-26

    Emulsions of two immiscible liquids can slowly coalesce over time when stabilized by surfactant molecules. Pickering emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles can be much more stable. Here, we fabricate biocompatible amphiphilic dimer particles using a hydrogel, a strongly hydrophilic material, and achieve large contrast in the wetting properties of the two bulbs, resulting in enhanced stabilization of emulsions. We generate monodisperse single emulsions of alginate and shellac solution in oil using a flow-focusing microfluidics device. Shellac precipitates from water and forms a solid bulb at the periphery of the droplet when the emulsion is exposed to acid. Molecular interactions result in amphiphilic dimer particles that consist of two joined bulbs: one hydrogel bulb of alginate in water and the other hydrophobic bulb of shellac. Alginate in the hydrogel compartment can be cross-linked using calcium cations to obtain stable particles. Analogous to surfactant molecules at the interface, the resultant amphiphilic particles stand at the water/oil interface with the hydrogel bulb submerged in water and the hydrophobic bulb in oil and are thus able to stabilize both water-in-oil and oil-in-water emulsions, making these amphiphilic hydrogel-solid particles ideal colloidal surfactants for various applications.