WorldWideScience

Sample records for surfaces successfully identified

  1. Factors Identifying Successful Adolescent Career Awareness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Mary Liz

    Helping adolescents make successful career decisions has been the concern of the education system, with a variety of methods being tried over the years. A literature review indicated that there are a number of successful programs giving adolescents a good basis from which to make career choices. State and national levels contribute funding and…

  2. Identifying Sociological Factors for the Success of Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Tarter, D.; Coleman, A.

    Astrosociology factors relevant to success of future space exploration may best be identified through studies of sociological circumstances of past successful explorations, such as the Apollo-Lunar Missions. These studies benefit from access to primary records of the past programs. The Archives and Special Collections Division of the Salmon Library at the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) houses large collections of material from the early periods of the space age. The Huntsville campus of the University of Alabama System had its birth in the mid-1950s at the time when the von Braun rocket team was relocated from Texas to Huntsville. The University, the City of Huntsville and the US Government rocket organizations developed in parallel over subsequent years. As a result, the University has a significant space heritage and focus. This is true not only for the engineering and science disciplines, but also for the social sciences. The life of the University spans the period when Huntsville government and industrial organizations were responsible for producing the rocket vehicles to first take mankind to the Moon. That endeavor was surely as significant sociologically as technologically. In the 1980s, Donald E. Tarter, conducted a series of video interviews with some leading members of the original von Braun team. Although the interviews ranged over many engineering subjects, they also recorded personal features of people involved in the Apollo lunar exploration program and the interactions between these people. Such knowledge was of course an objective. These interviews are now in the collections of the UAH Library Archives, along with extensive documentation from the same period. Under sponsorship of the Archives and the NASA-Marshall Retiree Association, the interview series was restarted in 2006 to obtain comparable oral-history interviews with more than fifty US born members of the rocket team from the 1960s. Again these video interviews are rich with

  3. Utilizing Surface Sensors to Identify Wake Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengying; Hemati, Maziar S.

    2016-11-01

    Marine swimmers often exploit external flow structures to reduce locomotive effort. To achieve this advantage, these swimmers utilize mechanosensory organs on the surface of their bodies to detect hydrodynamic signals from the surrounding fluid, which can then be used to inform the control task. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing similar flow sensing systems to achieve enhanced propulsive efficiency and maneuverability in human-engineered underwater vehicles. In particular, much attention has been given to the problem of wake sensing; however, these investigations have concentrated on a restricted class of wakes-i.e., Kármán-type vortex streets-whereas more complicated wake structures can arise in practice. In this talk, we will explore the possibility of identifying wake regimes through the use of surface sensors. Potential flow theory is adopted to simulate the interactions of various wakes with a fish-like body. Wakes in different dynamical regimes impart distinct hydrodynamic signatures on the body, which permits these regimes to be distinguished from one another in an automated fashion. Our results can provide guidance for improving flow sensing capabilities in human-engineered systems and hint at how marine swimmers may sense their hydrodynamic surroundings.

  4. Characteristics Identified for Success by Restorative Dental Science Department Chairpersons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Alvin G; Weiss, Robert O; Wichman, Christopher S; Sukotjo, Cortino; Brundo, Gerald C

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the characteristics that current chairpersons in restorative dentistry, general dentistry, prosthodontics, and operative dentistry departments in U.S. dental schools feel are most relevant in contributing to their success. The secondary aim was to determine these individuals' rankings of the importance of a listed set of characteristics for them to be successful in their position. All 82 current chairs of the specified departments were invited to respond to an electronic survey. The survey first asked respondents to list the five most essential characteristics to serve as chair of a department and to rank those characteristics based on importance. Participants were next given a list of ten characteristics in the categories of management and leadership and, without being aware of the category of each individual item, asked to rank them in terms of importance for their success. A total of 39 chairpersons completed the survey (47.6% response rate; 83.3% male and 16.2% female). In section one, the respondents reported that leadership, vision, work ethic, integrity, communication, and organization were the most essential characteristics for their success. In section two, the respondents ranked the leadership characteristics as statistically more important than the management characteristics (p<0.0001) for being successful in their positions.

  5. Identifying and Articulating Library Connections to Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Lisa; Piotrowski, Pattie; Savage, Devin

    2016-01-01

    Engaging in ongoing assessment is key to libraries demonstrating their value to their institutions. This study is an initial step in a STEM library's long-term goal of measuring the library's connection to, and impact on, student academic success markers such as retention and persistence. Initial results showed that any library usage was always…

  6. Methods To Identify Aptamers against Cell Surface Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Ducongé

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid-based ligands identified through a process of molecular evolution named SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment. During the last 10-15 years, numerous aptamers have been developed specifically against targets present on or associated with the surface of human cells or infectious pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites. Several of the aptamers have been described as potent probes, rivalling antibodies, for use in flow cytometry or microscopy. Some have also been used as drugs by inhibiting or activating functions of their targets in a manner similar to neutralizing or agonistic antibodies. Additionally, it is straightforward to conjugate aptamers to other agents without losing their affinity and they have successfully been used in vitro and in vivo to deliver drugs, siRNA, nanoparticles or contrast agents to target cells. Hence, aptamers identified against cell surface biomarkers represent a promising class of ligands. This review presents the different strategies of SELEX that have been developed to identify aptamers for cell surface-associated proteins as well as some of the methods that are used to study their binding on living cells.

  7. Identify and Classify Critical Success Factor of Agile Software Development Methodology Using Mind Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Abd El Hameed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selecting the right method, right personnel and right practices, and applying them adequately, determine the success of software development. In this paper, a qualitative study is carried out among the critical factors of success from previous studies. The factors of success match with their relative principles to illustrate the most valuable factor for agile approach success, this paper also prove that the twelve principles poorly identified for few factors resulting from qualitative and quantitative past studies. Dimensions and Factors are presented using Critical success Dimensions and Factors Mind Map Model.

  8. Hard-bottom succession of subtidal epibenthic communities colonizing hidden and exposed surfaces off northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo S. Pacheco

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of hard-bottom substrata comprises species growing on exposed rock and in hidden microhabitats, such as cracks and crevices. This study examines the succession of epibenthic organisms colonizing an artificial substratum with one surface exposed and one surface hidden on a vertical wall off northern Chile. On each sampling date species coverage of three replicate panels on both surfaces was assessed. The hidden surface was dominated in terms of coverage by the bryozoans Membranipora isabelleana and Lagenicella variabilis, while algae were absent. In contrast, the exposed surface was dominated by encrusting red corallines and the red alga Rhodymenia corallina. At the end of the experimental period both surfaces were dominated by colonial suspension feeders, but showed a different community structure and successional pattern. On the exposed surface, competitive exclusion was identified as an important aspect of succession, whereas on the hidden surface this pattern was not observed. These findings have implications for overall biodiversity, because pioneer species that are not able to survive long periods on exposed surfaces become restricted to hidden surfaces, from where they spread laterally. Thus, hidden microhabitats provide refuges for certain species, and may play an important role in the overall succession on rock faces. We conclude that examination of hidden microhabitats is necessary in order to fully understand succession in hard-bottom habitats.

  9. Identifying Noncognitive Skills That Contribute to Dental Students' Success: Dental Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Pendergast, Laura; Tellez, Marisol; Waldron, Elizabeth; Ismail, Amid

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify noncognitive factors that dental faculty members perceived to contribute to dental students' success and to assess dental faculty members' ratings of the relative importance of these factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Out of 184 eligible faculty members at one U.S. dental school, 43 respondents (23.3%) completed a survey in 2015-16. The survey asked respondents to rank the importance of seven noncognitive factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the ratings on importance of each noncognitive factor. Two additional open-ended questions asked faculty members to 1) think of dental students who performed very well and list the noncognitive factors they believed contributed to those students' success and 2) identify the two most important of those factors that contributed to success. Qualitative analysis was conducted to identify themes in the open-ended responses. The respondents rated professionalism and preparedness highest in importance for overall success. Preparedness was rated highest in importance for academic performance, and communication was highest in importance for clinical performance. Six themes were identified in the open-ended responses: communication/interpersonal skills, approach to learning, personal characteristics, professionalism, diverse experiences, and technical abilities. On both open-ended items, the most frequently cited noncognitive skill was communication/interpersonal skills followed by approach to learning. In this study, dental faculty members perceived communication, preparedness, and professionalism as important skills contributing to dental students' success.

  10. Nest success of grassland sparrows on reclaimed surface mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, G.E.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Marshall, M.R.; Brauning, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Grasslands resulting from surface mine reclamation support grassland songbird populations in several midwestern and eastern states in the United States, especially where reclaimed mines are large (>1,000ha). However, most reclaimed surface mines in Pennsylvania are small (success is unknown. We evaluated nest success of grasshopper (Ammodramus savannarum), Henslow's (A. henslowii), and Savannah sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) on 4 reclaimed surface mines (50-180ha) in western Pennsylvania, USA from 2006 to 2007. Overall nest success based on mean covariate values was 0.435 (95% CI = 0.376-0.504) for grasshopper sparrows, 0.396 (95% CI = 0.295-0.533) for Henslow's sparrows, and 0.158 (95% CI = 0.063-0.392) for Savannah sparrows. These estimates of nest success are comparable to those on larger reclaimed mines and other habitats. Grasshopper and Henslow's sparrow nests that were well concealed were less likely to fail than highly visible nests (??visible = -0.028, CI = -0.051 to -0.005 for grasshopper sparrows; ??visible = -0.063, CI = -0.112 to -0.014 for Henslow's sparrows), and nests in areas with surrounding deep litter were more likely to fail than nests in areas with shallow litter (??litterD = -0.145, CI = -0.335 to 0.045 for grasshopper sparrows; ??litterD = -0.676, CI = -1.187 to -0.116 for Henslow's sparrows). Savannah sparrow nests in areas with high visual obstruction by vegetation were less likely to fail than nests in areas with sparse and short vegetation (??VisOb = 0.048, CI = 0.006-0.091). Daily probability of survival for grasshopper sparrow nests was greatest early and late in the breeding season, and Savannah sparrow nest survival followed a decreasing linear trend. Nest survival of Henslow's sparrows was greater on warm days (??temp = 0.197, CI = 0.014-0.379), whereas for Savannah sparrows nest survival decreased on warm days and on days with rain, but for Savannah sparrows confidence intervals of weather effects included zero (??temp = -0

  11. Taboo search by successive confinement: Surveying a potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F.

    2001-09-01

    A taboo search for minima on a potential energy surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.

  12. Transforming ocular surface stem cell research into successful clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender S Sangwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has only been a quarter of a century since the discovery of adult stem cells at the human corneo-scleral limbus. These limbal stem cells are responsible for generating a constant and unending supply of corneal epithelial cells throughout life, thus maintaining a stable and uniformly refractive corneal surface. Establishing this hitherto unknown association between ocular surface disease and limbal dysfunction helped usher in therapeutic approaches that successfully addressed blinding conditions such as ocular burns, which were previously considered incurable. Subsequent advances in ocular surface biology through basic science research have translated into innovations that have made the surgical technique of limbal stem cell transplantation simpler and more predictable. This review recapitulates the basic biology of the limbus and the rationale and principles of limbal stem cell transplantation in ocular surface disease. An evidence-based algorithm is presented, which is tailored to clinical considerations such as laterality of affliction, severity of limbal damage and concurrent need for other procedures. Additionally, novel findings in the form of factors influencing the survival and function of limbal stem cells after transplantation and the possibility of substituting limbal cells with epithelial stem cells of other lineages is also discussed. Finally this review focuses on the future directions in which both basic science and clinical research in this field is headed.

  13. Review of five successful microbial geochemical surface surveys in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munnecke, D.M. [Environmental BioTechnologies Inc., San Carlos, CA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The development of a new surface geochemical survey technology to detect hydrocarbon microseeps was discussed. Microbial Exploration Technology (MET) was developed by Environmental BioTechnologies Inc., of San Carlos, California. It is used to determine the near surface soil`s metabolic activity towards metabolism of gaseous hydrocarbons. After several years of testing, the technology was commercialized in Canada in 1996. Since then, more than 3 million acres of land in Canada have been surveyed using MET. Surveys are conducted by collecting soil samples in a quarter by quarter mile grid pattern. The samples are then sent to California for analysis. One of the unique characteristics of MET is that it provides a contour map indicating the percent probability of drilling success. This paper presented the following five MET surveys as examples of what types of results can be obtained from the surveys: (1) Flinton Survey (T11 R6 W2), (2) Elcott Survey (T1-2 R1-3 W2), (3) Silverton Survey (T3 R32 W1), (4) Swift Current Block (T13-15 R10-R13 W3), and (5) Border Block (T1-2 R12-14 W3). Each example demonstrates that MET can be very supportive for oil and gas exploration and exploitation activities. It was suggested that running MET surveys before seismic surveys helps in determining where seismic surveys should be conducted to reduce overall exploration costs by 30 to 60 per cent, while improving drilling success. 6 figs.

  14. The use of arithmetic average method in identifying critical success criteria for Homestay Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Shahidah Md; Ramli, Razamin; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Kayat, Kalsom; Razak, Rafidah Abd

    2015-12-01

    Malaysian Homestay is very unique. It is classified as Community Based Tourism (CBT). Homestay Programme which is a community events where a tourist stays together with a host family for a period of time and enjoying cultural exchange besides having new experiences. Homestay programme has booming the tourism industry since there is over 100 Homestay Programme currently being registered with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism Malaysia. However, only few Homestay Programme enjoying the benefits of success Homestay Programme. Hence, this article seeks to identify the critical success factors for a Homestay Programme in Malaysia. An Arithmetic Average method is utilized to further evaluate the identified success factors in a more meaningful way. The findings will help Homestay Programme function as a community development tool that manages tourism resources. Thus, help the community in improving local economy and creating job opportunities.

  15. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  16. Identifying the annual signal in laminated clastic sediments from a Late Pleistocene lake succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Samuel; Starnberger, Reinhard; Spötl, Christoph; Brauer, Achim; Dulski, Peter

    2014-05-01

    A thick (>250m) succession of laminated lacustrine sediments at the Baumkirchen site in the Inn Valley (Austria) indicates the presence of a lake or series of lake phases existing during Marine Isotope Stage 3. The laminations are highly complex, entirely clastic, and vary considerably in thickness and internal structure. Despite high sedimentation rates of 5-6 cm per year indicated by radiocarbon and pollen data, there is no systematic macroscopic annual pattern in the laminations which could be used to develop a high-resolution (varve) chronology. Microscopic investigations of thin sections revealed sub-mm to cm-scale silt layers punctuated by very thin (0.25-2 mm) clay-rich layers spaced semi-regularly between 2 and 8 cm where present. The spacing and small grain size of these thin layers suggests a possible annual process responsible for their formation: rain-out of the fine suspended sediment from the water column during winter, when fluvial discharge into the lake was negligible and its surface was frozen. These potentially annual layers are not reliably identifiable macroscopically, however, analysis of X-ray fluorescence core scan data revealed the layers to be enriched in several heavy metals: most strongly in Zn but also in Pb, Cu and Ni. Possible carrier minerals of these heavy metals are currently being investigated. The radiocarbon chronology (in the short upper section where it is available) and heavy metal peak counting agree within error suggesting the heavy metal enriched clay-rich layers are mostly annual. Available X-ray fluorescence data for 150 m of the section suggest no significant long-term changes in annual layer spacing (i.e. sedimentation rate) from the 5-6 cm average indicated by the radiocarbon data, although there is a high degree of small-scale variation. Preliminary optically stimulated luminescence dates point to the presence of several hiatuses in this succession suggesting a fragmented record containing several lake periods of

  17. Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; De Volpi, A.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.

  18. The Usefulness of Appreciative Inquiry As a Method to Identify Mass Sports Program Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadine VAN GRAMBERG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the relationship between good health and physical activity is well known. Despite the growth of public mass sports programs in many countries, few evaluate them to ensure they meet their targets. Measuring organizational effectiveness and program success in public sports organizations is difficult and cannot be done directly as it involves a number of complex dimensions involving both internal (organizational and external (customer factors. Recognizing this, the paper advances the Appreciative Inquiry approach as a culturally sensitive method to focus on the positives of human experience rather than finding faults or gaps and as a means of identifying the success factors of service delivery. The paper outlines the research strategy to investigate success in Malaysian mass sport programs.

  19. A Fuzzy DEMATEL Method to Identify Critical Success Factors of Knowledge Management Adoption in Supply Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin K. Patil; Kant, R.

    2013-01-01

    In globalisation of business, Knowledge Management (KM) plays an important role in Supply Chain (SC) to create, build and maintain competitive advantage through utilisation of knowledge and through collaborative practices. Literature review have suggested the performance of KM adoption in SC may be affected by various influencing factors but it is always difficult for the practitioners to improve all aspects at the same time. The aim of this study is to identify Critical Success Factors (CSFs...

  20. Individually Identifiable Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors, Tags and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Tucker, Dana Y. G. (Inventor); Hines, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A surface-launched acoustic wave sensor tag system for remotely sensing and/or providing identification information using sets of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor tag devices is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include coding and other diversity techniques to produce groups of sensors that interact minimally, reducing or alleviating code collision problems typical of prior art coded SAW sensors and tags, and specific device embodiments of said coded SAW sensor tags and systems. These sensor/tag devices operate in a system which consists of one or more uniquely identifiable sensor/tag devices and a wireless interrogator. The sensor device incorporates an antenna for receiving incident RF energy and re-radiating the tag identification information and the sensor measured parameter(s). Since there is no power source in or connected to the sensor, it is a passive sensor. The device is wirelessly interrogated by the interrogator.

  1. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Traboulsi, Elias I; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J; Milam, Ann H; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M; Bennett, Jean

    2005-04-26

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65(-/-) mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials.

  2. An extensible and successful method of identifying collaborators for National Library of Medicine informationist projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeff D; Rambo, Neil H

    2015-07-01

    The New York University (NYU) Health Sciences Library used a new method to arrange in-depth discussions with basic science researchers. The objective was to identify collaborators for a new National Library of Medicine administrative supplement. The research took place at the NYU Health Sciences Library. Using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) RePORTER, forty-four researchers were identified and later contacted through individualized emails. Nine researchers responded to the email followed by six in-person or phone discussions. At the conclusion of this process, two researchers submitted applications for supplemental funding, and both of these applications were successful. This method confirmed these users could benefit from the skills and knowledge of health sciences librarians, but they are largely unaware of this.

  3. Identifying and prioritizing different factors influencing the success of advertisement during the economic depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Rashidi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During the financial crisis of 2007, many businesses and banks faced unexpected circumstances and declared bankruptcy. Market mortgage crisis and the collapse of the economic system in United States created a substantial amount of damage in world economy. Within a few years, the economic downturn was transferred to developing countries such as Iran. The recession has created conditions for Iranian companies that have led them to focus more on the subject of advertising since this is the primary tool of communication and business customers business. Success and failure of many organizations and companies depend on their advertisement planning. In this study, the factors contributing to the success and effectiveness of advertising during the recession time are identified. This survey has been accomplished on investigating an Iranian dairy firm named “Kalle”. Using a questionnaire in Likert scale, the study determines the effects of various factors of advertisement on sales improvement in this firm using Pearson correlation ratio and rank them based on Freedman test. Cronbach alpha has been calculated as 0.93. According to the results, factors that contribute to the success of advertising during a recession include: Responsiveness to customers’ needs, advertising tools, content factors, the amount of money spent and availability.

  4. Identifying dispersive GPR signals and inverting for surface waveguide properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kruk, Jan; Jacob, Rob; Steelman, Colby; Endres, Tony; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    At locations where a thin surface layer overlies a substrate medium that has a lower permittivity, or a much larger permittivity/conductivity than the surface layer, pronounced dispersion of GPR waves can be observed and the surface layer acts as a waveguide. A low velocity waveguide is present when the substrate has a lower permittivity and total reflection occurs beyond the critical angle on the upper and lower interfaces. A leaky waveguide is present when the substrate medium has a much larger permittivity and/or conductivity. Although the lower interface is a strong reflector, some energy is still transmitted across the interface and total reflection only occurs at the upper waveguide-air interface. In both cases, electromagnetic waves are trapped within the waveguide and the radar energy is internally reflected, resulting in a series of interfering multiples that manifest themselves as shingling reflections that exhibit different phase and group velocities. Normalizing the data on the maximum amplitude for each trace shows that most of the energy is contained within the dispersive waves which propagate over large distances. Phase-velocity spectra calculated from these dispersed GPR data clearly indicate the presence of a frequency-dependent phase velocity that decreases with increasing frequency. The dispersion characteristics depend on the type of waveguide and the source-receiver antenna orientations. For low-velocity waveguides, the transverse electric (TE) modes propagate at lower frequencies compared to transverse magnetic (TM) modes, whereas only uneven TE and even TM modes can propagate through leaky waveguides. The waveguide properties can be obtained by picking dispersion curves from the maxima in the phase-velocity spectra and inverting for a single-layer waveguide model by adjusting the model parameters using a combined global and local minimization algorithm until the difference between the picked dispersion curve and the model-predicted dispersion

  5. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  6. A strategy for identifying locomotion modes using surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Kuiken, Todd A; Lipschutz, Robert D

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the use of surface electromyography (EMG) combined with pattern recognition (PR) to identify user locomotion modes. Due to the nonstationary characteristics of leg EMG signals during locomotion, a new phase-dependent EMG PR strategy was proposed for classifying the user's locomotion modes. The variables of the system were studied for accurate classification and timely system response. The developed PR system was tested on EMG data collected from eight able-bodied subjects and two subjects with long transfemoral (TF) amputations while they were walking on different terrains or paths. The results showed reliable classification for the seven tested modes. For eight able-bodied subjects, the average classification errors in the four defined phases using ten electrodes located over the muscles above the knee (simulating EMG from the residual limb of a TF amputee) were 12.4% +/- 5.0%, 6.0% +/- 4.7%, 7.5% +/- 5.1%, and 5.2% +/- 3.7%, respectively. Comparable results were also observed in our pilot study on the subjects with TF amputations. The outcome of this investigation could promote the future design of neural-controlled artificial legs.

  7. Identifying the Factors Leading to Success: How an Innovative Science Curriculum Cultivates Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2016-06-01

    PlantingScience is an award-winning program recognized for its innovation and use of computer-supported scientist mentoring. Science learners work on inquiry-based experiments in their classrooms and communicate asynchronously with practicing plant scientist-mentors about the projects. The purpose of this study was to identify specific factors contributing to the program's effectiveness in engaging students. Using multiple data sources, grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin in Basics of qualitative research. Sage, Newbury Park, 1990) was used to develop a conceptual model identifying the central phenomenon, causal conditions, intervening conditions, strategies, contexts, and student outcomes of the project. Student motivation was determined to be the central phenomenon explaining the success of the program, with student empowerment, online mentor interaction, and authenticity of the scientific experiences serving as causal conditions. Teachers contributed to student motivation by giving students more freedom, challenging students to take projects deeper, encouraging, and scaffolding. Scientists contributed to student motivation by providing explanations, asking questions, encouraging, and offering themselves as partners in the inquiry process. Several positive student outcomes of the program were uncovered and included increased positivity, greater willingness to take projects deeper, better understanding of scientific concepts, and greater commitments to collaboration. The findings of this study provide relevant information on how to develop curriculum, use technology, and train practitioners and mentors to utilize strategies and actions that improve learners' motivation to engage in authentic science in the classroom.

  8. [Levers in Primary Health Care - Identifying Strategic Success Factors for Improved Primary Care in Upper Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, J; Rebhandl, E; Reckwitz, N; Hockl, W

    2016-12-01

    Current and projected general practitioner (GP) and primary care in Austria shows structural and process inadequacies in the quality as well as assurance of healthcare supply. The aim is therefore to develop solution- and patient-oriented measures that take patient-related requirements and medical perspectives into account. Using an effect matrix, subjective expert and user priorities were ascertained, cause and effect relationships were examined, and an expanded circle of success for the optimization of GP and primary care in Upper Austria was developed. Through this, the relevant levers for target-oriented development and optimization of the complex system of GP and primary care in Upper Austria were identified; these are training to become general practitioners, entrepreneurs as well as management and coordination. It is necessary to further adapt the identified levers conceptually and operationally in a targeted approach. This is to be achieved by means of the primary health care (PHC) concept as well as management tools and information and communication technologies (ICT) associated with it. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Research citation analysis of nursing academics in Canada: identifying success indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2010-11-01

    This article is a report of a citation analysis of research publications by Canadian nursing academics. Citation analysis can yield objective criteria for assessing the value of published research and is becoming increasingly popular as an academic evaluation tool in universities around the world. Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of academic researchers and identifying leaders among them. The journal publication records of 737 nursing academics at 33 Canadian universities and schools of nursing were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: number of citations for each journal publication, summative citation count of all published papers and the Scopus h-index. Preliminary citation analysis was conducted from June to July 2009, with the final analysis performed on 2 October 2009 following e-mail verification of publication lists. The top 20 nursing academics for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of career citations for all publications, number of career citations for first-authored publications, most highly cited first-authored publications, the Scopus h-index for all publications and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. Citation analysis metrics are useful for evaluating the research performance of academic researchers in nursing. Institutions are encouraged to protect the research time of successful and promising nursing academics, and to dedicate funds to enhance the research programmes of underperforming academic nursing groups. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The struggling reader: Identifying and addressing reading problems successfully at an early stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Le Cordeur

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The standard of reading of learners in the intermediate phase is cause for considerable concern. In this article, the intermediate phase refers to grades 4, 5 and 6 (roughly ages 10 – 12. According to the 2008 Evaluation Assessment Tests for Reading, only 15% of learners in Grade 6 achieved the required literacy level. Clearly, reading achievement is a problem in South Africa. Although approximately 4% of any given population experience neurological reading problems, the focus of this article is on the significant number of learners in the intermediate phase who experience reading problems and the generic causes of reading problems for learners in general. The intent is to alert teachers and parents to the characteristics of a struggling reader so that the problem can be identified and addressed early. Firstly, ways in which learning problems are manifested are described. Secondly, a discussion of various types of reading problems, of which four, namely poor reading comprehension, inadequate reading fluency, a lack of vocabulary and a negative attitude towards reading, are discussed in depth. Strategies for struggling readers are presented and recommendations are made. The conclusion is that learners who experience reading problems can learn to read successfully when given the necessary support.

  11. Why some make it and others do not: Identifying psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to identify psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer. Post hoc, two groups were distinguished: (1) Male soccer players who Successfully progressed into professional adult soccer (n = 18) and (2) Male soccer players who did not

  12. Using Standardized Tests to Identify Prior Knowledge Necessary for Success in Algebra: A Predictive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if there is a relationship between students' scores on the eighth-grade Indiana State Test of Education Progress Plus (ISTEP+) exam and success on Indiana's Algebra End-of-Course Assessment (ECA). Additionally, it sought to determine if algebra success could be significantly predicted by the achievement in one or…

  13. Using Standardized Tests to Identify Prior Knowledge Necessary for Success in Algebra: A Predictive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if there is a relationship between students' scores on the eighth-grade Indiana State Test of Education Progress Plus (ISTEP+) exam and success on Indiana's Algebra End-of-Course Assessment (ECA). Additionally, it sought to determine if algebra success could be significantly predicted by the achievement in one or…

  14. A Method to Identify Flight Obstacles on Digital Surface Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Min; LIN Xinggang; SUN Shouyu; WANG Youzhi

    2005-01-01

    In modern low-altitude terrain-following guidance, a constructing method of the digital surface model (DSM) is presented in the paper to reduce the threat to flying vehicles of tall surface features for safe flight. The relationship between an isolated obstacle size and the intervals of vertical- and cross-section in the DSM model is established. The definition and classification of isolated obstacles are proposed, and a method for determining such isolated obstacles in the DSM model is given. The simulation of a typical urban district shows that when the vertical- and cross-section DSM intervals are between 3 m and 25 m, the threat to terrain-following flight at low-altitude is reduced greatly, and the amount of data required by the DSM model for monitoring in real time a flying vehicle is also smaller. Experiments show that the optimal results are for an interval of 12.5 m in the vertical- and cross-sections in the DSM model, with a 1:10 000 DSM scale grade.

  15. IDENTIFYING THE LOCAL SURFACE URBAN HEAT ISLAND THROUGH THE MORPHOLOGY OF THE LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current characterization of the Land Surface Temperature (LST at city scale insufficiently supports efficient mitigations and adaptations of the Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI at local scale. This research intends to delineate the LST variation at local scale where mitigations and adaptations are more feasible. At the local scale, the research helps to identify the local SUHI (LSUHI at different levels. The concept complies with the planning and design conventions that urban problems are treated with respect to hierarchies or priorities. Technically, the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite image products are used. The continuous and smooth latent LST is first recovered from the raw images. The Multi-Scale Shape Index (MSSI is then applied to the latent LST to extract morphological indicators. The local scale variation of the LST is quantified by the indicators such that the LSUHI can be identified morphologically. The results are promising. It can potentially be extended to investigate the temporal dynamics of the LST and LSUHI. This research serves to the application of remote sensing, pattern analysis, urban microclimate study, and urban planning at least at 2 levels: (1 it extends the understanding of the SUHI to the local scale, and (2 the characterization at local scale facilitates problem identification and support mitigations and adaptations more efficiently.

  16. Three principles to define the success of a diagnostic study could be identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Gerke, Oke; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2012-01-01

    and analyzing diagnostic studies, the criterion to define the success of the study should be clearly prespecified. The results of the statistical approach taken should be interpreted in accordance with this criterion. This ensures coherence of results and prevents unnecessarily large sample sizes. The liberal...

  17. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Kenchington

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores, and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here

  18. Identifying Critical Success Factors for TQM and Employee Performance in Malaysian Automotive Industry: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadia Dedy, Aimie; Zakuan, Norhayati; Zaidi Bahari, Ahamad; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Chin, Thoo Ai; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    TQM is a management philosophy embracing all activities through which the needs and expectations of the customer and the community and the goals of the companies are satisfied in the most efficient and cost effective way by maximizing the potential of all workers in a continuing drive for total quality improvement. TQM is very important to the company especially in automotive industry in order for them to survive in the competitive global market. The main objective of this study is to review a relationship between TQM and employee performance. Authors review updated literature on TQM study with two main targets: (a) evolution of TQM considering as a set of practice, (b) and its impacts to employee performance. Therefore, two research questions are proposed in order to review TQM constructs and employee performance measure: (a) Is the set of critical success factors associated with TQM valid as a whole? (b) What is the critical success factors should be considered to measure employee performance in automotive industry?

  19. Identifying the Factors Leading to Success: How an Innovative Science Curriculum Cultivates Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    "PlantingScience" is an award-winning program recognized for its innovation and use of computer-supported scientist mentoring. Science learners work on inquiry-based experiments in their classrooms and communicate asynchronously with practicing plant scientist-mentors about the projects. The purpose of this study was to identify specific…

  20. An empirical study on identifying critical success factors on chaos management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaos management is one of the most necessary efforts on managing business units. Many organizations fail to cope with undesirable circumstances, which may happen without any prior notice and as a result, they may face with significant financial losses. In this paper, we present an empirical study to determine critical success factors, which could help handle any possible chaos in organizations. The proposed study of this paper is implemented for a set of travel agencies located in Tehran, Iran. Chronbach alpha is calculated as 0.821, which is well above the minimum desirable level. In addition, we have also performed factor analysis, which yields a KMO value of 0.576 with the level of significance of 0.000. The results indicate that there are six important factors including effective management strategy, internal environmental factors, creative and innovative attitudes, external environmental factors and top level management thoughts.

  1. Systematically Identified Failure Is the Route to a Successful Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2015-01-01

    Although we have a systematic approach to innovation and evaluation (and scale-up) for treatments, medical technologies and diagnostic tests in healthcare, we have no equivalent for service delivery innovations. Service delivery innovation is common but frequently goes unevaluated, leading to less systematic decisions about which innovations are scaled up and which ones are not. The absence of a formal evaluation system for service delivery innovation means that there is no objective standard for evaluating an innovation's success or failure, and thus no way to decide whether it should be scaled up, adapted and retested, or not scaled up at all. This results in "bad failure" - the scale-up of innovations that are untested, and the failure to scale-up other innovations that might have been effective but no one measured their effectiveness in a systematic way.

  2. The use of social networking platforms for sexual health promotion: identifying key strategies for successful user engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Hilary J; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Weaver, Emma Rn; Pedrana, Alisa E; Stoové, Mark A; Hellard, Margaret E

    2015-02-06

    Online social networking platforms such as Facebook and Twitter have grown rapidly in popularity, with opportunities for interaction enhancing their health promotion potential. Such platforms are being used for sexual health promotion but with varying success in reaching and engaging users. We aimed to identify Facebook and Twitter profiles that were able to engage large numbers of users, and to identify strategies used to successfully attract and engage users in sexual health promotion on these platforms. We identified active Facebook (n = 60) and Twitter (n = 40) profiles undertaking sexual health promotion through a previous systematic review, and assessed profile activity over a one-month period. Quantitative measures of numbers of friends and followers (reach) and social media interactions were assessed, and composite scores used to give profiles an 'engagement success' ranking. Associations between host activity, reach and interaction metrics were explored. Content of the top ten ranked Facebook and Twitter profiles was analysed using a thematic framework and compared with five poorly performing profiles to identify strategies for successful user engagement. Profiles that were able to successfully engage large numbers of users were more active and had higher levels of interaction per user than lower-ranked profiles. Strategies used by the top ten ranked profiles included: making regular posts/tweets (median 46 posts or 124 tweets/month for top-ranked profiles versus six posts or six tweets for poorly-performing profiles); individualised interaction with users (85% of top-ranked profiles versus 0% for poorly-performing profiles); and encouraging interaction and conversation by posing questions (100% versus 40%). Uploading multimedia material (80% versus 30%) and highlighting celebrity involvement (70% versus 10%) were also key strategies. Successful online engagement on social networking platforms can be measured through quantitative (user numbers and

  3. The IGSN Experience: Successes and Challenges of Implementing Persistent Identifiers for Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Arko, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Physical samples collected and studied in the Earth sciences represent both a research resource and a research product in the Earth Sciences. As such they need to be properly managed, curated, documented, and cited to ensure re-usability and utility for future science, reproducibility of the data generated by their study, and credit for funding agencies and researchers who invested substantial resources and intellectual effort into their collection and curation. Use of persistent and unique identifiers and deposition of metadata in a persistent registry are therefore as important for physical samples as they are for digital data. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) is a persistent, globally unique identifier. Its adoption by individual investigators, repository curators, publishers, and data managers is rapidly growing world-wide. This presentation will provide an analysis of the development and implementation path of the IGSN and relevant insights and experiences gained along its way. Development of the IGSN started in 2004 as part of a US NSF-funded project to establish a registry for sample metadata, the System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR). The initial system provided a centralized solution for users to submit information about their samples and obtain IGSNs and bar codes. Challenges encountered during this initial phase related to defining the scope of the registry, granularity of registered objects, responsibilities of relevant actors, and workflows, and designing the registry's metadata schema, its user interfaces, and the identifier itself, including its syntax. The most challenging task though was to make the IGSN an integral part of personal and institutional sample management, digital management of sample-based data, and data publication on a global scale. Besides convincing individual researchers, curators, editors and publishers, as well as data managers in US and non-US academia, state and federal agencies, the PIs of the SESAR project

  4. Identifying keys to success in clinical learning: a study of two interprofessional learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksov, Klara Bolander; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Liljedahl, Matilda; Björck, Erik

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to study the intrinsic system behind interprofessional clinical learning environments. Two health care units were selected on the basis of having received a reward for best clinical learning organization. Interviews were carried out with health care staff/clinical supervisors from different professions. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to qualitative content analysis, and categories and themes were identified. Analysis revealed two different systems of clinical learning environments. In one, the interplay between the structural aspects dominated, and in the other, the interplay between the cultural aspects dominated. An important similarity between the environments was that a defined role for students in the organization and interprofessional teamwork around supervision across professional borders was emphasized.

  5. Identifying the trends in wound-healing patents for successful investment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jae Ha; Sohn, So Young

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the need for rapid wound-healing has significantly increased because of the increasing number of patients who are diagnosed with diabetes and obesity. These conditions have contributed to a surge in the number of patients with chronic wounds worldwide. Furthermore, many cost-effective wound-healing technologies have been developed in order to keep up with the increased demand. In this paper, we performed a quantitative study of the trends associated with wound-healing technologies using patent data. We analyzed the trends considering four different groups of patent applicants: firms, universities, research institutes, and individuals using a structural topic model. In addition, we analyzed the knowledge flow between patent applicants using citation analysis, and confirmed the role of applicants in the knowledge-flow network using k-means clustering. As a result, the primary wound-healing technology patents applied for by the four groups varied considerably, and we classified the roles of patent applicants were found in the knowledge-flow network. Our results showed the organizations that are leading each area of wound-healing technology. Furthermore, from the results, we identified specific institutions that are efficient for spreading knowledge related to wound-healing technology based on the patents. This information can contribute to the planning of investment strategies and technology policies related to wound-healing.

  6. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  7. Tales from the crypt and coral reef: the successes and challenges of identifying new herpesviruses using metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are ubiquitous double-stranded DNA viruses infecting many animals, with the capacity to cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Different herpesviruses have different cell tropisms, and have been detected in a diverse range of tissues and sample types.Metagenomics – encompassing viromics – analyses the nucleic acid of a tissue or other sample in an unbiased manner, making few or no prior assumptions about which viruses may be present in a sample. This approach has successfully discovered a number of novel herpesviruses. Furthermore, metagenomic analysis can identify herpesviruses with high degrees of sequence divergence from known herpesviruses and does not rely upon culturing large quantities of viral material.Metagenomics has had success in two areas of herpesvirus sequencing: firstly, the discovery of novel exogenous and endogenous herpesviruses in primates, bats and cnidarians; and secondly, in characterising large areas of the genomes of herpesviruses previously only known from small fragments, revealing unexpected diversity. This review will discuss the successes and challenges of using metagenomics to identify novel herpesviruses, and future directions within the field.

  8. Competency Skills Assessment: Successes and Areas for Improvement Identified During Collaboration Between Informaticists and a National Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn; Hunter, Kathy; McGonigle, Dee; Hebda, Toni; Hill, Taryn; Lamblin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) approached the Nursing Informatics Research Team (NIRT) with a request to collaborate and conduct a competency assessment for their organization. An online tool was developed to determine current technology in perioperative settings. This presentation shares the process used to conduct research that led to a method for assessing perioperative nurses' competencies skills in their practice as well as identified gaps in curricula that faculty could address. Both successes and areas for improvement are detailed. The outcome of the process demonstrated a need to understand what skills are being assessed as AORN did not know what technology existed or how existing equipment was being used.

  9. Identifying and prioritizing the factors influencing the success of science and technology foresight in the field of economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Raieninezhad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Promoting complex global environment, tremendous growth and increase of network communication technology in the world, strategic planning and foresight activities in science and technology have become very important. Gradually, organizations and businesses are realizing the importance of foresight; many organizations attempt to execute such activities. However, this concept is not still well known in our country and among our organizations. Therefore, recognizing the factors influencing the success of this concept is a kind of issues that the organizations and activists are faced. Thus, this research seeks to identify and to rank the factors, particularly in the areas of economy, and it has developed five hypotheses. In this paper, factors affecting the success of foresight are given in four groups of rational, structure, scope, and results. Data collection for this study is a questionnaire and the binomial tests, Pearson correlation and Friedman test have been used to prove the hypothesis. According to the analysis of data obtained from the questionnaire conducted by SPSS software, all research hypotheses were confirmed. It also became clear that the rational component had the greatest impact on the future success of science and technology in the field of economic.

  10. Microbial succession of Debaryomyces hansenii strains during the production of Danish surfaced-ripened cheeses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Mee; Westall, Signe; Jespersen, Lene

    2002-01-01

    Surface-ripened cheeses of the Danbo type were analyzed for the presence of yeasts with special emphasis on Debaryomyces hansenii. Samples were taken from pasteurized milk, brine, and inoculation slurries and from cheese surfaces during ripening at a Danish dairy. D. hansenii was found to be the ......Surface-ripened cheeses of the Danbo type were analyzed for the presence of yeasts with special emphasis on Debaryomyces hansenii. Samples were taken from pasteurized milk, brine, and inoculation slurries and from cheese surfaces during ripening at a Danish dairy. D. hansenii was found...... present from the onset of ripening. Thereafter, a microbial succession among the strains took place during the ripening. After 3 d of ripening, only one strain was found. This particular strain was found to be dominant in 16 additional batches of surface-ripened cheeses. We investigated the cause...... of the observed microbial succession by determining the variation in strains with regard to their ability to grow on lactate and at different pH and NaCl concentrations. The strains were shown to vary in their ability to grow on lactate. In a full factorial design at three levels with factor levels close...

  11. Automated microraft platform to identify and collect non-adherent cells successfully gene-edited with CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attayek, Peter J; Waugh, Jennifer P; Hunsucker, Sally A; Grayeski, Philip J; Sims, Christopher E; Armistead, Paul M; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2017-05-15

    Microraft arrays have been used to screen and then isolate adherent and non-adherent cells with very high efficiency and excellent viability; however, manual screening and isolation limits the throughput and utility of the technology. In this work, novel hardware and software were developed to automate the microraft array platform. The developed analysis software identified microrafts on the array with greater than 99% sensitivity and cells on the microrafts with 100% sensitivity. The software enabled time-lapse imaging and the use of temporally varying characteristics as sort criteria. The automated hardware released microrafts with 98% efficiency and collected released microrafts with 100% efficiency. The automated system was used to examine the temporal variation in EGFP expression in cells transfected with CRISPR-Cas9 components for gene editing. Of 11,499 microrafts possessing a single cell, 220 microrafts were identified as possessing temporally varying EGFP-expression. Candidate cells (n=172) were released and collected from the microraft array and screened for the targeted gene mutation. Two cell colonies were successfully gene edited demonstrating the desired mutation.

  12. Error determination of a successive correction type objective analysis scheme. [for surface meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. R.; Leslie, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    The Purdue Regional Objective Analysis of the Mesoscale (PROAM) is a successive correction type scheme for the analysis of surface meteorological data. The scheme is subjected to a series of experiments to evaluate its performance under a variety of analysis conditions. The tests include use of a known analytic temperature distribution to quantify error bounds for the scheme. Similar experiments were conducted using actual atmospheric data. Results indicate that the multiple pass technique increases the accuracy of the analysis. Furthermore, the tests suggest appropriate values for the analysis parameters in resolving disturbances for the data set used in this investigation.

  13. Massively parallel DNA sequencing successfully identifies new causative mutations in deafness genes in patients with cochlear implantation and EAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Miyagawa

    Full Text Available Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation.

  14. Stakeholders Perspectives on the Success Drivers in Ghana’s National Health Insurance Scheme – Identifying Policy Translation Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Fusheini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Ghana’s National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS, established by an Act of Parliament (Act 650, in 2003 and since replaced by Act 852 of 2012 remains, in African terms, unprecedented in terms of growth and coverage. As a result, the scheme has received praise for its associated legal reforms, clinical audit mechanisms and for serving as a hub for knowledge sharing and learning within the context of South-South cooperation. The scheme continues to shape national health insurance thinking in Africa. While the success, especially in coverage and financial access has been highlighted by many authors, insufficient attention has been paid to critical and context-specific factors. This paper seeks to fill that gap. Methods Based on an empirical qualitative case study of stakeholders’ views on challenges and success factors in four mutual schemes (district offices located in two regions of Ghana, the study uses the concept of policy translation to assess whether the Ghana scheme could provide useful lessons to other African and developing countries in their quest to implement social/NHISs. Results In the study, interviewees referred to both ‘hard and soft’ elements as driving the “success” of the Ghana scheme. The main ‘hard elements’ include bureaucratic and legal enforcement capacities; IT; financing; governance, administration and management; regulating membership of the scheme; and service provision and coverage capabilities. The ‘soft’ elements identified relate to: the background/context of the health insurance scheme; innovative ways of funding the NHIS, the hybrid nature of the Ghana scheme; political will, commitment by government, stakeholders and public cooperation; social structure of Ghana (solidarity; and ownership and participation. Conclusion Other developing countries can expect to translate rather than re-assemble a national health insurance programme in an incomplete and highly modified form over a period

  15. Possibilities of tribospectroscopy using two indenters for identifying defects in the surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Galina M.; Smolin, Alexey Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Currently, for the study of the topography of material surface with nanoscale roughness tribospectroscopy is used as a method based on the analysis of the forces acting between two loading indenters and the sample surface. Recently, it has been shown theoretically that it is possible to determine nanodefects in the surface layer based on the analysis of the frictional force during sliding of one indenter. In this article, based on computer simulation by the method of movable cellular automata, we investigated the possibility of the tribospectroscopic method to identify nanodefects in the surface layer using a system of two indenters. For this purpose, we compared Fourier spectra for the normal and tangential components of the forces of interaction of both indenters for the cases of a defect-free sample and a sample with nanoscale plane cracks perpendicular to the studied surface. The data obtained from the numerical simulation showed that the presence of the second indenter provides additional useful information about the state of the sample surface, which is reflected in the estimates of the spectral density of the time history of the corresponding forces.

  16. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Uezumi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases.

  17. Unique secreted–surface protein complex of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, identified by phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagic, Dragana; Wen, Wesley; Collett, Michael A; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the most diverse structures on bacterial surfaces; hence, they are candidates for species- and strain-specific interactions of bacteria with the host, environment, and other microorganisms. Genomics has decoded thousands of bacterial surface and secreted proteins, yet the function of most cannot be predicted because of the enormous variability and a lack of experimental data that would allow deduction of function through homology. Here, we used phage display to identify a pair of interacting extracellular proteins in the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. A secreted protein, SpcA, containing two bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains type 3 (Big-3) and a domain distantly related to plant pathogen response domain 1 (PR-1-like) was identified by screening of an L. rhamnosus HN001 library using HN001 cells as bait. The SpcA-“docking” protein, SpcB, was in turn detected by another phage display library screening, using purified SpcA as bait. SpcB is a 3275-residue cell-surface protein that contains general features of large glycosylated Serine-rich adhesins/fibrils from gram-positive bacteria, including the hallmark signal sequence motif KxYKxGKxW. Both proteins are encoded by genes within a L. rhamnosus-unique gene cluster that distinguishes this species from other lactobacilli. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a secreted-docking protein pair identified in lactobacilli. PMID:23233310

  18. An in vitro study to identify a ceramic polishing protocol effecting smoothness superior to glazed surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjuran, Noxy George; Sreelal, T

    2014-09-01

    Polishing is taken up as an alternative to reglazing after adjustments of glazed ceramic prosthesis. An in vitro study was carried out to evaluate three different ceramic polishing systems and their combinations to identify a method that would achieve surface smoothness superior to the glazed surface. 77 glazed feldspathic porcelain disc surfaces, of diameter 12.5 mm and thickness 2 mm were constituted into seven groups of 11 specimen surfaces each. The glazed surfaces in the first group served as control (C). They were not subjected to deglazing or polishing. The remaining 66 surfaces underwent deglazing. The deglazed surfaces in the second group (D) were retained as such and did not undergo polishing. The deglazed surfaces in the third group (Wh), were polished using a polishing wheel (CeraMaster). In the fourth group (K), an adjustment kit (Porcelain Adjustment kit) was used for polishing the deglazed surfaces. The fifth group (Wx) was polished with diamond particle-impregnated wax (Dura-Polish Dia). In all these three groups, polishing was done for 40 s. The deglazed surfaces of the sixth group (WhWx) were polished initially with polishing wheel for 40 s and then with diamond particle-impregnated wax for 40 s. In the seventh group (KWx), the deglazed surfaces were polished with an adjustment kit (Porcelain Adjustment kit) for 40 s followed by diamond particle-impregnated wax (Dura-Polish Dia) for 40 s. In the sixth and seventh groups, the total polishing time was 80 s each. From each group, one specimen was set aside for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining ten specimens in each group underwent colorimetry and profilometry. Colorimeter (Minolta CR-200b ChromaMeter; Minolta, Osaka, Japan) was used to measure parameters according to CIE L*a*b* colour system and colour difference (ΔE) between control and other groups were calculated. Profilometer (Talysurf CLI 2000) was used to measure the surface roughness (Ra). The data were statistically

  19. Identifying Surface Changes on HRSC Images of the Mars South Polar Residual CAP (sprc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004), including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007). The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004), spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003) and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004). Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015). HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and

  20. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  1. High throughput atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization for identifying protein-resistant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Minghao; Kilduff, James E; Belfort, Georges

    2012-02-01

    Three critical aspects of searching for and understanding how to find highly resistant surfaces to protein adhesion are addressed here with specific application to synthetic membrane filtration. They include the (i) discovery of a series of previously unreported monomers from a large library of monomers with high protein resistance and subsequent low fouling characteristics for membrane ultrafiltration of protein-containing fluids, (ii) development of a new approach to investigate protein-resistant mechanisms from structure-property relationships, and (iii) adaptation of a new surface modification method, called atmospheric pressure plasma-induced graft polymerization (APP), together with a high throughput platform (HTP), for low cost vacuum-free synthesis of anti-fouling membranes. Several new high-performing chemistries comprising two polyethylene glycol (PEG), two amines and one zwitterionic monomers were identified from a library (44 commercial monomers) of five different classes of monomers as strong protein-resistant monomers. Combining our analysis here, using the Hansen solubility parameters (HSP) approach, and data from the literature, we conclude that strong interactions with water (hydrogen bonding) and surface flexibility are necessary for producing the highest protein resistance. Superior protein-resistant surfaces and subsequent anti-fouling performance was obtained with the HTP-APP as compared with our earlier HTP-photo graft-induced polymerization (PGP).

  2. Carboxylator: incorporating solvent-accessible surface area for identifying protein carboxylation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Shu-An; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2011-10-01

    In proteins, glutamate (Glu) residues are transformed into γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues in a process called carboxylation. The process of protein carboxylation catalyzed by γ-glutamyl carboxylase is deemed to be important due to its involvement in biological processes such as blood clotting cascade and bone growth. There is an increasing interest within the scientific community to identify protein carboxylation sites. However, experimental identification of carboxylation sites via mass spectrometry-based methods is observed to be expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Thus, we were motivated to design a computational method for identifying protein carboxylation sites. This work aims to investigate the protein carboxylation by considering the composition of amino acids that surround modification sites. With the implication of a modified residue prefers to be accessible on the surface of a protein, the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA) around carboxylation sites is also investigated. Radial basis function network is then employed to build a predictive model using various features for identifying carboxylation sites. Based on a five-fold cross-validation evaluation, a predictive model trained using the combined features of amino acid sequence (AA20D), amino acid composition, and ASA, yields the highest accuracy at 0.874. Furthermore, an independent test done involving data not included in the cross-validation process indicates that in silico identification is a feasible means of preliminary analysis. Additionally, the predictive method presented in this work is implemented as Carboxylator (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/Carboxylator/), a web-based tool for identifying carboxylated proteins with modification sites in order to help users in investigating γ-glutamyl carboxylation.

  3. Identifying Key Issues and Potential Solutions for Integrated Arrival, Departure, Surface Operations by Surveying Stakeholder Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponso, Bimal; Coppenbarger, Richard A.; Jung, Yoon; Quon, Leighton; Lohr, Gary; O’Connor, Neil; Engelland, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) collaborates with the FAA and industry to provide concepts and technologies that enhance the transition to the next-generation air-traffic management system (NextGen). To facilitate this collaboration, ARMD has a series of Airspace Technology Demonstration (ATD) sub-projects that develop, demonstrate, and transitions NASA technologies and concepts for implementation in the National Airspace System (NAS). The second of these sub-projects, ATD-2, is focused on the potential benefits to NAS stakeholders of integrated arrival, departure, surface (IADS) operations. To determine the project objectives and assess the benefits of a potential solution, NASA surveyed NAS stakeholders to understand the existing issues in arrival, departure, and surface operations, and the perceived benefits of better integrating these operations. NASA surveyed a broad cross-section of stakeholders representing the airlines, airports, air-navigation service providers, and industry providers of NAS tools. The survey indicated that improving the predictability of flight times (schedules) could improve efficiency in arrival, departure, and surface operations. Stakeholders also mentioned the need for better strategic and tactical information on traffic constraints as well as better information sharing and a coupled collaborative planning process that allows stakeholders to coordinate IADS operations. To assess the impact of a potential solution, NASA sketched an initial departure scheduling concept and assessed its viability by surveying a select group of stakeholders for a second time. The objective of the departure scheduler was to enable flights to move continuously from gate to cruise with minimal interruption in a busy metroplex airspace environment using strategic and tactical scheduling enhanced by collaborative planning between airlines and service providers. The stakeholders agreed that this departure concept could improve schedule

  4. Identifying dominant controls on the water balance of partly sealed surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Schübl, Marleen; Siebert, Caroline; Weiler, Markus

    2017-04-01

    It is the challenge of modern urban development to obtain a near natural state for the urban water balance. For this purpose permeable alternatives to conventional surface sealing have been established during the last decades. A wealth of studies - under laboratory as well as field conditions - has emerged around the globe to examine the hydrological characteristics of different types of pavements. The main results of these studies - measured infiltration and evaporation rates, vary to a great extent between single studies and pavement types due to methodological approaches and local conditions. Within this study we analyze the controls of water balance components of partly sealed urban surfaces derived from an extensive literature review and a series of infiltration experiments conducted on historical and modern pavements within the city of Freiburg, Germany. Measured values published in 48 studies as well as the results of 30 double-ring infiltration experiments were compiled and sorted according to the measured parameter, the pavement type, pavement condition, age of the pavement, porosity of the pavement material and joint filling material as well as joint proportion of joint pavements. The main influencing factors on infiltration / hydraulic conductivity, evaporation rates and groundwater recharge of permeable pavements were identified and quantified using multiple linear regression methods. The analysis showed for both the literature study and our own infiltration experiments that condition and age of the pavement have the major influence on the pavement's infiltration capacity and that maintenance plays an important role for the long-term effectiveness of permeable pavements. For pavements with joints, the porosity of the pavement material seemed to have a stronger influence on infiltration capacity than the proportion of joint surface for which a clear influence could not be observed. Evaporation rates were compared for different surface categories as not

  5. Remembering the Children: Implementation and Success of a Robust Method for Identifying and Testing Children of HIV Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Darlow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Children of HIV patients are a historically neglected demographic by HIV services. It has been recommended by CHIVA that HIV services have a robust method of detecting and testing untested children. We note that no such method is either in widespread use or in the literature. Method. In December 2011, a one-page proforma to identify HIV untested children and a clear multidisciplinary pathway to test them were implemented. Twelve months later the uptake of the proforma and pathway, the numbers of patients and children identified for testing, and their outcomes were audited. Results. The proforma was completed in 192/203 (94.6% eligible patients. Twenty-five (21.5% of 118 identified offspring had not been tested. Ten (8.5% of these were <18 years old. All were reported to be clinically well. Ten children were referred for testing, seven were tested immediately, and three were tested within 18 months of identification. All children were tested HIV negative. Discussion. We have identified a method of identification that is easy and robust and provides a user-friendly safety net to empower healthcare providers to identify and test children at risk. We recommend the implementation of such strategies nationwide to prevent death due to undiagnosed HIV in children.

  6. Molecular dynamics study to identify the reactive sites of a liquid squalane surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sven P K; Reed, Stewart K; Westacott, Robin E; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2006-06-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid squalane, C30H62, were performed, focusing in particular on the liquid-vacuum interface. These theoretical studies were aimed at identifying potentially reactive sites on the surface, knowledge of which is important for a number of inelastic and reactive scattering experiments. A united atom force field (Martin, M. G.; Siepmann, J. I. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 4508-4517) was used, and the simulations were analyzed with respect to their interfacial properties. A modest but clearly identifiable preference for methyl groups to protrude into the vacuum has been found at lower temperatures. This effect decreases when going to higher temperatures. Additional simulations tracking the flight paths of projectiles directed at a number of randomly chosen surfaces extracted from the molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The geometrical parameters for these calculations were chosen to imitate a typical abstraction reaction, such as the reaction between ground-state oxygen atoms and hydrocarbons. Despite the preference for methyl groups to protrude further into the vacuum, Monte Carlo tracking simulations suggest, on geometric grounds, that primary and secondary hydrogen atoms are roughly equally likely to react with incoming gas-phase atoms. These geometric simulations also indicate that a substantial fraction of the scattered products is likely to undergo at least one secondary collision with hydrocarbon side chains. These results help to interpret the outcome of previous measurements of the internal and external energy distribution of the gas-phase OH products of the interfacial reaction between oxygen atoms and liquid squalane.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: a direct method to identify colorants in various artist media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Christa L; Rayner, Kari S; Casadio, Francesca; Grzywacz, Cecily M; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been developed as a direct, extractionless, nonhydrolysis tool to detect lake pigments and colorants of various classes used in a variety of artist materials. Presented first is the SERS analysis of the natural colorant turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), main component curcumin, as present in dry lake pigment grains, dyed textile yarns, and reference paint layers containing the lake pigment bound in animal glue painted on glass. This experiment demonstrated that it is possible to detect the chromophore in various matrixes of increasing complexity, allowing its unambiguous identification in a wide range of artists' materials, even at very low concentration and in the presence of binders such as glue. In addition, removal of the colorant from the complex with the inorganic substrate or mordanted yarn was not necessary for identification. This proof-of-concept study was then extended to include analysis of several pastel sticks from a historical pastel box and two samples from a pastel artwork, both attributed to American painter Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). This study represents the first extractionless, nonhydrolysis direct SERS study of multiple artist materials, including identification of natural and synthetic colorants and organic pigments contained in historic artists' pastels spanning a broad range of chemical classes: polyphenols, rhodamines, azo pigments, and anthraquinones. Successful identification is demonstrated on samples as small as a single grain of pigment.

  8. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN.

  9. Improving clinical practice using clinical decision support systems: a systematic review of trials to identify features critical to success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Houlihan, Caitlin A; Balas, E Andrew; Lobach, David F

    2005-01-01

    Objective To identify features of clinical decision support systems critical for improving clinical practice. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Literature searches via Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to 2003; and searches of reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews. Study selection Studies had to evaluate the ability of decision support systems to improve clinical practice. Data extraction Studies were assessed for statistically and clinically significant improvement in clinical practice and for the presence of 15 decision support system features whose importance had been repeatedly suggested in the literature. Results Seventy studies were included. Decision support systems significantly improved clinical practice in 68% of trials. Univariate analyses revealed that, for five of the system features, interventions possessing the feature were significantly more likely to improve clinical practice than interventions lacking the feature. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified four features as independent predictors of improved clinical practice: automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow (P < 0.00001), provision of recommendations rather than just assessments (P = 0.0187), provision of decision support at the time and location of decision making (P = 0.0263), and computer based decision support (P = 0.0294). Of 32 systems possessing all four features, 30 (94%) significantly improved clinical practice. Furthermore, direct experimental justification was found for providing periodic performance feedback, sharing recommendations with patients, and requesting documentation of reasons for not following recommendations. Conclusions Several features were closely correlated with decision support systems' ability to improve patient care significantly. Clinicians and other stakeholders should implement clinical decision support systems that incorporate these

  10. An Innovative Method to Identify Autoantigens Expressed on the Endothelial Cell Surface: Serological Identification System for Autoantigens Using a Retroviral Vector and Flow Cytometry (SARF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Shirai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies against integral membrane proteins are usually pathogenic. Although anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECAs are considered to be critical, especially for vascular lesions in collagen diseases, most molecules identified as autoantigens for AECAs are localized within the cell and not expressed on the cell surface. For identification of autoantigens, proteomics and expression library analyses have been performed for many years with some success. To specifically target cell-surface molecules in identification of autoantigens, we constructed a serological identification system for autoantigens using a retroviral vector and flow cytometry (SARF. Here, we present an overview of recent research in AECAs and their target molecules and discuss the principle and the application of SARF. Using SARF, we successfully identified three different membrane proteins: fibronectin leucine-rich transmembrane protein 2 (FLRT2 from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, and Pk (Gb3/CD77 from an SLE patient with hemolytic anemia, as targets for AECAs. SARF is useful for specific identification of autoantigens expressed on the cell surface, and identification of such interactions of the cell-surface autoantigens and pathogenic autoantibodies may enable the development of more specific intervention strategies in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Moving from capstones toward cornerstones: successes and challenges in applying systems biology to identify mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Nathan; Climer, Sharlee; Dougherty, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    The substantial progress in the last few years toward uncovering genetic causes and risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has opened new experimental avenues for identifying the underlying neurobiological mechanism of the condition. The bounty of genetic findings has led to a variety of data-driven exploratory analyses aimed at deriving new insights about the shared features of these genes. These approaches leverage data from a variety of different sources such as co-expression in transcriptomic studies, protein-protein interaction networks, gene ontologies (GOs) annotations, or multi-level combinations of all of these. Here, we review the recurrent themes emerging from these analyses and highlight some of the challenges going forward. Themes include findings that ASD associated genes discovered by a variety of methods have been shown to contain disproportionate amounts of neurite outgrowth/cytoskeletal, synaptic, and more recently Wnt-related and chromatin modifying genes. Expression studies have highlighted a disproportionate expression of ASD gene sets during mid fetal cortical development, particularly for rare variants, with multiple analyses highlighting the striatum and cortical projection and interneurons as well. While these explorations have highlighted potentially interesting relationships among these ASD-related genes, there are challenges in how to best transition these insights into empirically testable hypotheses. Nonetheless, defining shared molecular or cellular pathology downstream of the diverse genes associated with ASDs could provide the cornerstones needed to build toward broadly applicable therapeutic approaches.

  12. Moving from Capstones towards Cornerstones: Successes and challenges in applying systems biology to identify mechanisms of autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eKopp

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The substantial progress in the last few years towards uncovering genetic causes and risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASD has opened new experimental avenues for identifying the underlying neurobiological mechanism of the condition. The bounty of genetic findings has led to a variety of data-driven exploratory analyses aimed at deriving new insights about the shared features of these genes. These approaches leverage data from a variety of different sources such as co-expression in transcriptomic studies, protein-protein interaction networks, Gene Ontologies annotations, or multi-level combinations of all of these. Here, we review the recurrent themes emerging from these analyses and highlight some of the challenges going forward. Themes include findings that ASD associated genes discovered by a variety of methods have been shown to contain disproportionate amounts of neurite outgrowth/cytoskeletal, synaptic, and more recently Wnt-related and chromatin modifying genes. Expression studies have highlighted a disproportionate expression of ASD gene sets during mid fetal cortical development, particularly for rare-variants, with multiple analyses highlighting the striatum and cortical projection and interneurons as well. While these explorations have highlighted potentially interesting relationships among these ASD-related genes, there are challenges in how to best transition these insights into empirically testable hypotheses. Nonetheless, defining shared molecular or cellular pathology downstream of the diverse genes associated with autism spectrum disorders could provide the cornerstones needed to build towards broadly applicable therapeutic approaches.

  13. Successes and challenges of using whole exome sequencing to identify novel genes underlying an inherited predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Regalado, Ellen S; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Guo, Dong-chuan

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD) that can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Putative genes are validated by identifying additional families with a causative mutation in the genes. This approach has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD.

  14. Successful periodontal ligament regeneration by periodontal progenitor preseeding on natural tooth root surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangaria, Smit Jayant; Ito, Yoshihiro; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2011-10-01

    The regeneration of lost periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone is the purpose of periodontal tissue engineering. The goal of the present study was to assess the suitability of 3 odontogenic progenitor populations from dental pulp, PDL, and dental follicle for periodontal regeneration when exposed to natural and synthetic apatite surface topographies. We demonstrated that PDL progenitors featured higher levels of periostin and scleraxis expression, increased adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential, and pronounced elongated cell shapes on barren root chips when compared with dental pulp and dental follicle cells. When evaluating the effect of surface characteristics on PDL progenitors, natural root surfaces resulted in elongated PDL cell shapes, whereas PDL progenitors on synthetic apatite surfaces were rounded or polygonal. In addition, surface coatings affected PDL progenitor gene expression profiles: collagen I coatings enhanced alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression levels and laminin-1 coatings increased epidermal growth factor (EGF), nestin, cadherin 1, and keratin 8 expression. PDL progenitors seeded on natural tooth root surfaces in organ culture formed new periodontal fibers after 3 weeks of culture. Finally, replantation of PDL progenitor-seeded tooth roots into rat alveolar bone sockets resulted in the complete formation of a new PDL and stable reattachment of teeth over a 6-month period. Together, these findings indicate that periodontal progenitor cell type as well as mineral surface topography and molecular environment play crucial roles in the regeneration of true periodontal anchorage.

  15. Central sensitization does not identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are likely to achieve short-term success with physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify whether hyperexcitability of the central nervous system is a prognostic factor for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) likely to experience rapid and clinical self-reported improvement following a physical therapy program including soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic interventions. Women presenting with clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS were involved in a prospective single-arm trial. Participants underwent a standardized examination and then a physical therapy session. The physical therapy sessions included both soft tissue mobilization directed at the anatomical sites of potential median nerve entrapment and a passive nerve slider neurodynamic technique targeted to the median nerve. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the median, radial and ulnar nerves, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, carpal tunnel and tibialis anterior muscle were assessed bilaterally. Additionally, thermal detection and pain thresholds were measured over the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence bilaterally to evaluate central nervous system excitability. Subjects were classified as responders (having achieved a successful outcome) or non-responders based on self-perceived recovery. Variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate variables for determining prognosis. Data from 72 women were included in the analysis, of which 35 experienced a successful outcome (48.6%). Three variables including PPT over the C5-C6 joint affected side 66 points were identified. If 2 out of 3 variables were present (LR + 14.8), the likelihood of success increased from 48.6 to 93.3%. We identified 3 factors that may be associated with a rapid clinical response to both soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic techniques targeted to the median nerve in women presenting with CTS. Our results support that widespread central sensitization may not be present in women with CTS who

  16. Grasshopper sparrow reproductive success and habitat use on reclaimed surface mines varies by age of reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Petra; Ammer, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    We studied 3 mountaintop mining–valley fill (MTMVF) complexes in southern West Virginia, USA to examine grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum pratensis) demographic response to different age classes of mine land reclamation. For 71 nests monitored during the 2001–2002 breeding seasons, overall nest success (36%) was within the range of nest success rates previously reported for this species, but it was highest on more recently reclaimed sites (56%). Nest density and clutch size did not differ (P > 0.30) among reclamation age classes, whereas number of fledglings was greater (P = 0.01) on more recently reclaimed sites. We measured vegetation variables at 70 nest subplots and at 96 systematic subplots to compare nest vegetation with vegetation available on the plots. We found that nests occurred in areas with more bare ground near the nest, greater vegetation height–density surrounding the nest site, lower grass height, and fewer woody stems, similar to previous studies. As postreclamation age increased, vegetation height–density and maximum grass height increased, and sericea (Lespedeza cuneata) became more dominant. Nest success declined with increasing vegetation height–density at the nest. The grasslands available on these reclaimed mine complexes are of sufficient quality to support breeding populations of grasshopper sparrows, but nest success decreased on the older reclaimed areas. Without active management, grasslands on reclaimed MTMVF mines become less suitable for nesting grasshopper sparrows about 10 years after reclamation.

  17. A study of how to implement a successful CRM by identifying challenges using DEMATEL method: An empirical study on small to medium business units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Saeidipour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies and analyzes barriers of customer relationship management (CRM implementation in SMEs. Hence, based on a comprehensive review of the literature and gathering the viewpoint of experts, the influencing barriers are identified. In order to analyze the identified barriers, DEMATEL methodology is applied and a causal model of the relationships between barriers is developed. Furthermore, based on the DEMATEL results the barriers are also categorized into two groups of driver and dependent. The results of study show that inadequate budget, organization culture, obligation of major management to CRM and inadequate access to modern technical knowledge are among effective impediments and play important role in successful establishment of customer relationship management system.

  18. Hierarchically structured superhydrophobic coatings fabricated by successive Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of micro-/nano-sized particles and surface silanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ping-Szu; Yang, Yu-Min; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2007-11-21

    The present study demonstrates the creation of a stable, superhydrophobic surface by coupling of successive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) depositions of micro- and nano-sized (1.5 µm/50 nm, 1.0 µm/50 nm, and 0.5 µm/50 nm) silica particles on a glass substrate with the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of dodecyltrichlorosilane on the surface of the particulate film. Particulate films, in which one layer of 50 nm particles was deposited over one to five sublayers of larger micro-sized particles, with hierarchical surface roughness and superhydrophobicity, were successfully fabricated. Furthermore, the present 'two-scale' (micro- and nano-sized particles) approach is superior to the previous 'one-scale' (micro-sized particles) approach in that both higher advancing contact angle and lower contact angle hysteresis can be realized. Experimental results revealed that the superhydrophobicity exhibited by as-fabricated particulate films with different sublayer particle diameters increases in the order of 0.5 µm>1.0 µm>1.5 µm. However, no clear trend between sublayer number and surface superhydrophobicity could be discerned. An explanation of superhydrophobicity based on the surface roughness introduced by two-scale particles is also proposed.

  19. Hierarchically structured superhydrophobic coatings fabricated by successive Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of micro-/nano-sized particles and surface silanization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, P-S; Yang, Y-M; Lee, Y-L [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2007-11-21

    The present study demonstrates the creation of a stable, superhydrophobic surface by coupling of successive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) depositions of micro- and nano-sized (1.5 {mu}m/50 nm, 1.0 {mu}m/50 nm, and 0.5 {mu}m/50 nm) silica particles on a glass substrate with the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of dodecyltrichlorosilane on the surface of the particulate film. Particulate films, in which one layer of 50 nm particles was deposited over one to five sublayers of larger micro-sized particles, with hierarchical surface roughness and superhydrophobicity, were successfully fabricated. Furthermore, the present 'two-scale' (micro- and nano-sized particles) approach is superior to the previous 'one-scale' (micro-sized particles) approach in that both higher advancing contact angle and lower contact angle hysteresis can be realized. Experimental results revealed that the superhydrophobicity exhibited by as-fabricated particulate films with different sublayer particle diameters increases in the order of 0.5 {mu}m>1.0 {mu}m>1.5 {mu}m. However, no clear trend between sublayer number and surface superhydrophobicity could be discerned. An explanation of superhydrophobicity based on the surface roughness introduced by two-scale particles is also proposed.

  20. Supervision, support and mentoring interventions for health practitioners in rural and remote contexts: an integrative review and thematic synthesis of the literature to identify mechanisms for successful outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify mechanisms for the successful implementation of support strategies for health-care practitioners in rural and remote contexts. Design This is an integrative review and thematic synthesis of the empirical literature that examines support interventions for health-care practitioners in rural and remote contexts. Results This review includes 43 papers that evaluated support strategies for the rural and remote health workforce. Interventions were predominantly training and education programmes with limited evaluations of supervision and mentoring interventions. The mechanisms associated with successful outcomes included: access to appropriate and adequate training, skills and knowledge for the support intervention; accessible and adequate resources; active involvement of stakeholders in programme design, implementation and evaluation; a needs analysis prior to the intervention; external support, organisation, facilitation and/or coordination of the programme; marketing of the programme; organisational commitment; appropriate mode of delivery; leadership; and regular feedback and evaluation of the programme. Conclusion Through a synthesis of the literature, this research has identified a number of mechanisms that are associated with successful support interventions for health-care practitioners in rural and remote contexts. This research utilised a methodology developed for studying complex interventions in response to the perceived limitations of traditional systematic reviews. This synthesis of the evidence will provide decision-makers at all levels with a collection of mechanisms that can assist the development and implementation of support strategies for staff in rural and remote contexts. PMID:24521004

  1. Satellite remote sensing of surface energy balance: Success, failures, and unresolved issues in FIFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Goetz, Scott J.; Sellers, Piers J.; Nickeson, Jaime E.

    1992-11-01

    The FIFE staff science group, consisting of the authors, developed and evaluated process models relating surface energy and mass flux, that is, surface rates, to boundary layer and surface biophysical characteristics, that is, surface states. In addition, we developed and evaluated remote sensing algorithms for inferring surface state characteristics. In this paper we report the results of our efforts. We also look in detail at the sensor and satellite platform requirements (spatial resolution and orbital requirements) as driven by surface energy balance dynamics and spatial variability. We examine also the scale invariance of the process models and remote sensing algorithms, that is, to what degree do the remotely sensed parameters and energy balance relations translate from the patch level where they were developed to the mesoscale level where they are required? Finally, we examine the atmospheric correction and calibration issues involved in extending the remotely sensed observations within a season and between years. From these investigations we conclude that (1) existing formulations for the radiation balance and latent heat components of the surface energy balance equation are valid at the patch level. (2) Many of the surface physiological characteristics that parameterize these formulations can be estimated using satellite remote sensing at both local and regional scales; a few important ones cannot. (3) The mathematical structures relating radiation and surface energy flux to remote sensing parameters are, for the most part, scale invariant over the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) study area. The conditions for scale invariance are derived. (4) The precision of satellite remote sensing estimates of surface reflectance, calibrated and corrected for atmospheric effects, is no worse than about 1% absolute. The errors may actually be smaller, but an upper bound of 1% results from sampling variance

  2. Nesting success of grassland and savanna birds on reclaimed surface coal mines of the midwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galligan, E.W.; DeVault, T.L.; Lima, S.L. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Reclaimed surface coal mines in southwestern Indiana support many grassland and shrub/savanna bird species of conservation concern. We examined the nesting success of birds on these reclaimed mines to assess whether such 'unnatural' places represent productive breeding habitats for such species. We established eight study sites on two large, grassland-dominated mines in southwestern Indiana and classified them into three categories (open grassland, shrub/savanna, and a mixture of grassland and shrub/savanna) based on broad vegetation and landscape characteristics. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, we found and monitored 911 nests of 31 species. Daily nest survival for the most commonly monitored grassland species ranged from 0.903 (Dickcissel, Spiza americana) to 0.961 (Grasshopper Sparrow, Ammodramus savannarum). Daily survival estimates for the dominant shrub/savanna nesting species ranged from 0.932 (Brown Thrasher, Toxostoma rufum) to 0.982 (Willow Flycatcher, Empidonax traillii). Vegetation and landscape effects on nesting success were minimal, and only Eastern Meadowlarks (Sturnella magna) showed a clear time-of-season effect, with greater nesting success in the first half of the breeding season. Rates of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism were only 2.1% for grassland species and 12.0% for shrub/savanna species. The nesting success of birds on reclaimed mine sites was comparable to that in other habitats, indicating that reclaimed habitats on surface mines do not necessarily represent reproductive traps for birds.

  3. Characterizing the successful student in general chemistry and physical science classes in terms of Jung's personality types as identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Wayne David

    1998-11-01

    A student's success in a science class can depend upon previous experiences, motivation, and the level of interest in the subject. Since psychological type is intrinsic to a person's whole being, it can be influential upon the student's motivation and interests. Thus, a study of student psychological types versus the level of success in a class, as measured by a percentage, has potential to uncover certain personality characteristics which may be helpful to or which may hinder a student's learning environment. This study was initiated, using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, to evaluate any correlation between a student's personality type and his/her performance in a science class. A total of 1041 students from three classes: Chemistry 121/122, Chemistry 112, Physical Science 100, volunteered for the study. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the levels of significance among sixteen personality types' averages. The results reveal that for the Chemistry 1121/122 course, the average score of the INTJ personality type was 5.1 to 12.6 points higher than every other personality type. The ANOVA identifies 3 personality types with averages significantly below the INTJ at the p < 0.05 significance level. The ANOVA analysis for the Chemistry 112 course identified significances between student scores at p = 0.08. The significance level for the differences among scores for the Physical Science 100 course was determined at a level of p = 0.02. Significance levels for p < 0.05 and <0.01 were identified between several groups in this course. The data suggest, that although personality type may not predict a particular student's success in a science class, students with certain personality traits may be favored in a chemistry class due the structure of the instruction and the presentation of the subject matter.

  4. Cell surface domain specific postsynaptic currents evoked by identified GABAergic neurones in rat hippocampus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccaferri, G; Roberts, J D; Szucs, P; Cottingham, C A; Somogyi, P

    2000-04-01

    1. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked in CA1 pyramidal cells (n = 46) by identified interneurones (n = 43) located in str. oriens were recorded in order to compare their functional properties and to determine the effect of synapse location on the apparent IPSC kinetics as recorded using somatic voltage clamp at -70 mV and nearly symmetrical [Cl-]. 2. Five types of visualised presynaptic interneurone, oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LMC), basket (BC), axo-axonic (AAC), bistratified (BiC) and oriens-bistratified (O-BiC) cells, were distinguished by immunocytochemistry and/or synapse location using light and electron microscopy. 3. Somatostatin immunoreactive O-LMCs, innervating the most distal dendritic shafts and spines, evoked the smallest amplitude (26 +/- 10 pA, s.e.m., n = 8) and slowest IPSCs (10-90 % rise time, 6.2 +/- 0.6 ms; decay, 20.8 +/- 1.7 ms, n = 8), with no paired-pulse modulation of the second IPSC (93 +/- 4 %) at 100 ms interspike interval. In contrast, parvalbumin-positive AACs evoked larger amplitude (308 +/- 103 pA, n = 7) and kinetically faster (rise time, 0.8 +/- 0.1 ms; decay 11.2 +/- 0.9 ms, n = 7) IPSCs showing paired-pulse depression (to 68 +/- 5 %, n = 6). Parvalbumin- or CCK-positive BCs (n = 9) terminating on soma/dendrites, BiCs (n = 4) and O-BiCs (n = 7) innervating dendrites evoked IPSCs with intermediate kinetic parameters. The properties of IPSCs and sensitivity to bicuculline indicated that they were mediated by GABAA receptors. 4. In three cases, kinetically complex, multiphasic IPSCs, evoked by an action potential in the recorded basket cells, suggested that coupled interneurones, possibly through electrotonic junctions, converged on the same postsynaptic neurone. 5. The population of O-BiCs (4 of 4 somatostatin positive) characterised in this study had horizontal dendrites restricted to str. oriens/alveus and innervated stratum radiatum and oriens. Other BiCs had radial dendrites as described earlier. The parameters

  5. Optical coherence tomography identifies lower labial salivary gland surface density in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan K Nowak

    Full Text Available The labial minor salivary glands (LSGs are easily accessible mucus-secreting structures of the alimentary tract that may provide new information on the basis of gastrointestinal complications of cystic fibrosis (CF. It was shown that they are destructed in the course of cystic fibrosis. We employed wide-field, micrometer resolution in vivo optical coherence tomography to assess the surface density of LSGs in 18 patients with CF and 18 healthy subjects. The median LSGs' surface densities in CF patients, and in the control group were 4.32 glands/cm2 and 6.58 glands/cm2, respectively (p = 0.006; Mann-Whitney U test. A lower LSG surface density is a previously unrecognized CF-related pathology of the alimentary tract.

  6. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  7. Electromagnetic Induction Sensor Data to Identify Areas of Manure Accumulation on a Feedlot Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was initiated to test the validity of using electromagnetic induction (EMI) survey data, a prediction-based sampling strategy and ordinary linear regression modeling to predict spatially variable feedlot surface manure accumulation. A 30 m × 60 m feedlot pen with a central mound was selecte...

  8. The Complexity of Identifying Ryu-Takayanagi Surfaces in AdS3/CFT2

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We present a constructive algorithm for the determination of Ryu-Takayanagi surfaces in AdS3/CFT2 which exploits previously noted connections between holographic entanglement entropy and max-flow/min-cut. We then characterize its complexity as a polynomial time algorithm.

  9. The complexity of identifying Ryu-Takayanagi surfaces in AdS3/CFT2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, N.; Chatwin-Davies, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a constructive algorithm for the determination of Ryu-Takayanagi surfaces in AdS3/CFT2 which exploits previously noted connections between holographic entanglement entropy and max-flow/min-cut. We then characterize its complexity as a polynomial time algorithm.

  10. Identifying apple surface defects using principal components analysis and artifical neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial neural networks and principal components were used to detect surface defects on apples in near-infrared images. Neural networks were trained and tested on sets of principal components derived from columns of pixels from images of apples acquired at two wavelengths (740 nm and 950 nm). I...

  11. Loss and replacement of small particles on the contact surfaces of footwear during successive exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoney, David A; Bowen, Andrew M; Stoney, Paul L

    2016-12-01

    On the contact surfaces of footwear loosely, moderately and strongly held particle fractions were separated and analyzed in an effort to detect different particle signals. Three environmental exposure sites were chosen to have different, characteristic particle types (soil minerals). Shoes of two types (work boots and tennis shoes) were tested, accumulating particles by walking 250m in each environment. Some shoes were exposed to only one environment; others were exposed to all three, in one of six different sequences. Sampling methods were developed to separate particles from the contact surface of the shoe based on how tightly they were held to the sole. Loosely held particles were removed by walking on paper, moderately held particles were removed by electrostatic lifting, and the most tightly held particles were removed by moist swabbing. The resulting numbers and types of particles were determined using forensic microscopy. Particle profiles from the different fractions were compared to test the ability to objectively distinguish the order of exposure to the three environments. Without exception, the samples resulting from differential sampling are dominated by the third site in the sequential footwear exposures. No noticeable differences are seen among the differential samplings of the loosely, moderately and strongly held particles: the same overwhelming presence of the third site is seen. It is clear from these results (1) that the third (final) exposure results in the nearly complete removal of any particles from prior exposures, and (2) that under the experimental conditions loosely, moderately and strongly held particles are affected similarly, without any detectable enrichment of the earlier exposures among the more tightly held particles. These findings have significant implications for casework, demonstrating that particles on the contact surfaces of footwear are rapidly lost and replaced.

  12. Spectromicroscopy of C60 and azafullerene C59N: Identifying surface adsorbed water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbahar, Dogan; Susi, Toma; Rocquefelte, Xavier; Bittencourt, Carla; Scardamaglia, Mattia; Blaha, Peter; Guttmann, Peter; Rotas, Georgios; Tagmatarchis, Nikos; Zhu, Xiaohui; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Ewels, Chris P.

    2016-10-01

    C60 fullerene crystals may serve as important catalysts for interstellar organic chemistry. To explore this possibility, the electronic structures of free-standing powders of C60 and (C59N)2 azafullerenes are characterized using X-ray microscopy with near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, closely coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. This is supported with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and associated core-level shift DFT calculations. We compare the oxygen 1s spectra from oxygen impurities in C60 and C59N, and calculate a range of possible oxidized and hydroxylated structures and associated formation barriers. These results allow us to propose a model for the oxygen present in these samples, notably the importance of water surface adsorption and possible ice formation. Water adsorption on C60 crystal surfaces may prove important for astrobiological studies of interstellar amino acid formation.

  13. The influence of milling-burnishing successive and simultaneous processes on the surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoraş, C. C.; Brabie, G.; Chirita, B.

    2016-08-01

    The present techniques do not offer the possibility for milling and burnishing at the same time. The novelty of this study is the development of a new tool and tool holder that allows this processes to take place simultaneous. Magnesium alloys have a wide range of usages in industry; in the past years they seem to be a promising solution to classic implants. Improvements in fatigue and tensile strength need to be made. Heat treatments are difficult to implement, so the solution is a mechanical treatment. The burnishing process offers very good results, but it has difficulties in simultaneous machining with the milling process. Thereby a hydraulic roller burnishing tool and a special tool holder was manufactured to solve this issue. The combined process was carried out on a CNC milling machine. This study seeks to highlight the influence of the milling-burnishing process parameter on the surface roughness in the case of magnesium alloy AZ31B-F. Parameters like speed and feed of cut, burnishing pressure and depth where taken into consideration. It was noted that with the increase of the feed, speed, pressure and depth of burnishing the general percentage improvement of the surface roughness was higher.

  14. Groundwater surface water interactions and the role of phreatophytes in identifying recharge zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Ahring

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater and surface water interactions within riparian corridors impact the distribution of phreatophytes that tap into groundwater stores. The changes in canopy area of phreatophytes over time is related to changes in depth to groundwater, distance from a stream or river, and hydrologic soil group. Remote sensing was used to determine the location of trees with pre-development and post-development aerial photography over the Ogallala Aquifer in the central plains of the United States. It was found that once the depth to groundwater becomes greater than about 3 m, tree populations decrease as depth to water increases. This subsequently limited the extent of phreatophytes to within 700 m of the river. It was also found that phreatophytes have a higher likelihood of growing on hydrologic soil groups with higher saturated hydraulic conductivity. Phreatophytes exist along portions of the Arkansas River corridor where significant decreases in groundwater occurred as long as alluvium exists to create perched conditions where trees survive dry periods. Significant decreases (more that 50% in canopy cover exists along river segments where groundwater declined by more than 10 m, indicating areas with good hydraulic connectivity between surface water and groundwater. Thus, interpretation of changes in phreatophyte distribution using historical and recent aerial photography is important in delineating zones of enhanced recharge where aquifers might be effectively recharged through diversion of surface water runoff.

  15. Groundwater surface water interactions through streambeds and the role of phreatophytes in identifying important recharge zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Ahring

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater and surface water interactions within riparian corridors impact the distribution of phreatophytes that tap into groundwater stores. The changes in canopy area of phreatophytes over time is related to changes in depth to groundwater, distance from a stream or river, and hydrologic soil group. Remote sensing was used to determine the location of trees with predevelopment and post-development aerial photography over the Ogallala Aquifer in the central plains of the United States. It was found that once the depth to groundwater becomes greater than about 3 m, tree populations decrease as depth to water increases. This subsequently limited the extent of phreatophytes to within 700 m of the river. It was also found that phreatophytes have a higher likelihood of growing on hydrologic soil groups with higher saturated hydraulic conductivity. Phreatophytes exist along portions of the Arkansas River corridor where significant decreases in groundwater occurred as long as alluvium exists to create perched conditions where trees survive dry periods. Significant decreases (more that 50% in canopy cover exists along river segments where groundwater declined by more than 10 m, indicating areas with good hydraulic connectivity between surface water and groundwater. Thus, interpretation of changes in phreatophyte distribution using historical and recent aerial photophaphy is important in delineating zones of enhanced recharge where aquifers might be effectively recharged through diversion of surface water runoff.

  16. Comparative evaluation of surface changes in four Ni-Ti instruments with successive uses - An SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Subha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the surface alterations seen in four kinds of Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti instruments using a scanning electron microscope (SEM for five successive uses in preparing root canals of extracted human molars and also to determine whether the design of the instrument influenced the appearance of defects on the instrument surface. Materials and Methods: Four different types of instruments namely; ProFile, ProTaper Rotary, ProTaper Hand and K3 Endo were used in 300 mesio-buccal canals. The instruments were examined under the SEM, after every use, to assess the progress of changes on their surfaces for a maximum of five uses. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test. Results: The most prevalent defects observed were pitting, followed by metal strips. Signs of discontinuity, microfractures and disruption of cutting edge were also evident. Number of defects increased with successive uses. Conclusions: ProTaper Hand showed significantly more microfractures and metal strips than other instruments from third use onwards. ProTaper Rotary and K3 Endo also showed significant changes.

  17. Identifying woody vegetation on coal surface mines using phenological indicators with multitemporal Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, A. J.; Li, J.; Wynne, R. H.; Donovan, P. F.; Zipper, C. E.

    2014-11-01

    Surface mining for coal has disturbed large land areas in the Appalachian Mountains. Better information on mined lands' ecosystem recovery status is necessary for effective environmental management in mining-impacted regions. Because record quality varies between state mining agencies and much mining occurred prior to widespread use of geospatial technologies, accurate maps of mining extents, durations, and land cover effects are often not available. Landsat data are well suited to mapping and characterizing land cover and forest recovery on former coal surface mines. Past mine reclamation techniques have often failed to restore premining forest vegetation but natural processes may enable native forests to re-establish on mined areas with time. However, the invasive species autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellate) is proliferating widely on former coal surface mines, often inhibiting reestablishment of native forests. Autumn olive outcompetes native vegetation because it fixes atmospheric nitrogen and benefits from a longer growing season than native deciduous trees. This longer growing season, along with Landsat 8's high signal to noise ratio, has enabled species-level classification of autumn olive using multitemporal Landsat 8 data at accuracy levels usually only obtainable using higher spatial or spectral resolution sensors. We have used classification and regression tree (CART®) and support vector machine (SVM) to classify five counties in the coal mining region of Virginia for presence and absence of autumn olive. The best model found was a CART® model with 36 nodes which had an overall accuracy of 84% and kappa of 0.68. Autumn olive had conditional kappa of 0.65 and a producers and users accuracy of 86% and 83% respectively. The best SVM model used a second order polynomial kernel and had an overall accuracy of 77%, an overall kappa of 0.54 and a producers and users accuracy of 60% and 90% respectively.

  18. Nylon-3 copolymers that generate cell-adhesive surfaces identified by library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Ryul; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Masters, Kristyn S

    2009-11-25

    Polymers in the nylon-3 family contain subunits derived from beta-amino acids, which are linked to one another via amide bonds. Thus, the nylon-3 backbone is homologous to the alpha-amino acid-based backbone of proteins. This molecular-level homology suggests that nylon-3 materials might be intrinsically protein-mimetic. The experiments described here explore this prospect in the context of cell adhesion, with tissue engineering as a long-range goal. We have evaluated a small library of sequence-random nylon-3 copolymers for the ability to render surfaces attractive to NIH 3T3 fibroblast adhesion and spreading. Library screening was accomplished in a high-throughput, parallel mode via attachment of the copolymers in a two-dimensional array to a modified glass surface. Significant variations in fibroblast adhesion and spreading were observed as a function of nylon-3 subunit identity and proportion. Several of the nylon-3 copolymers supported cell adhesion and morphology that was comparable, or even superior, to that achieved on positive control substrates such as tissue culture polystyrene and collagen-coated glass. Moreover, studies conducted under serum-free conditions demonstrated that specific nylon-3 derivatives supported cell adhesion independently of serum protein adsorption. Although cell adhesion was diminished in the absence of serum, particular copolymers demonstrated an ability to support substantially greater cell adhesion than any of the other conditions, including the positive controls. The nylon-3 copolymers that were most effective at promoting adhesion to a modified glass surface proved also to be effective at promoting adhesion when attached to a PEG-based hydrogel, demonstrating the potential for these copolymers to be used in tissue engineering applications.

  19. Modelling evapotranspiration during precipitation deficits: identifying critical processes in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, Anna M.; Pitman, Andy J.; Decker, Mark; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Abramowitz, Gab; Kala, Jatin; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Surface fluxes from land surface models (LSMs) have traditionally been evaluated against monthly, seasonal or annual mean states. The limited ability of LSMs to reproduce observed evaporative fluxes under water-stressed conditions has been previously noted, but very few studies have systematically evaluated these models during rainfall deficits. We evaluated latent heat fluxes simulated by the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) LSM across 20 flux tower sites at sub-annual to inter-annual timescales, in particular focusing on model performance during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits. The importance of key model processes in capturing the latent heat flux was explored by employing alternative representations of hydrology, leaf area index, soil properties and stomatal conductance. We found that the representation of hydrological processes was critical for capturing observed declines in latent heat during rainfall deficits. By contrast, the effects of soil properties, LAI and stomatal conductance were highly site-specific. Whilst the standard model performs reasonably well at annual scales as measured by common metrics, it grossly underestimates latent heat during rainfall deficits. A new version of CABLE, with a more physically consistent representation of hydrology, captures the variation in the latent heat flux during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits better than earlier versions, but remaining biases point to future research needs. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating LSMs under water-stressed conditions and across multiple plant functional types and climate regimes.

  20. Results from an exploratory study to identify the factors that contribute to success for UK medical device small- and medium-sized enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, P C; Williams, D J

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports the results from an exploratory study that sets out to identify and compare the strategic approaches and patterns of business practice employed by 14 UK small- and medium-sized enterprises to achieve success in the medical device sector of the health-care industry. An interview-based survey was used to construct individual case studies of the medical device technology (MDT) companies. A cross-case analysis was performed to search for patterns and themes that cut across these individual cases. Exploratory results revealed the heterogeneity of MDT companies and the distinctive features of the MDT innovation process that emphasize the importance of a strategic approach for achieving milestones in the product development and exploitation process and for creating value for the company and its stakeholders. Recognizing the heterogeneity of MDT companies, these exploratory findings call for further investigation to understand better the influence of components of the MDT innovation process on the commercialization life cycle and value trajectory. This is required to assist start-up or spin-out MDT companies in the UK and worldwide to navigate the critical transitions that determine access to financial and consumer markets and enhance the potential to build a successful business. This will be important not only for bioscience-based companies but also for engineering-based companies aiming to convert their activities into medical devices and the health- and social-care market.

  1. Fabrication of hydrophobic surface of titanium dioxide films by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, A.M.; Gunjakar, J.L. [Thin Film Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004, Maharashtra (India); Lokhande, C.D., E-mail: l_chandrakant@yahoo.com [Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Oh Shim, E-mail: jocat@kist.re.kr [Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) films were fabricated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate using successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, optical absorption and contact angle measurement were applied to study the structural, surface morphological, optical and surface wettability properties of the as-deposited and annealed TiO{sub 2} films. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed both as-deposited and annealed TiO{sub 2} films are amorphous. Irregular shaped spherical grains of random size and well covered to the fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates were observed from SEM studies with some cracks after annealing. The optical band gap values of virgin TiO{sub 2,} annealed, methyl violet and rose bengal sensitized TiO{sub 2} were found to be 3.6, 3.5, 2.87 and 2.95 eV, respectively. Surface wettability studied in contact with liquid interface, showed hydrophobic nature as water contact angles were greater than 90 deg. The adsorption of dyes, as confirmed by the photographs, is one of the prime requirements for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC).

  2. Evaluation of land surface model simulations of evapotranspiration over a 12 year crop succession: impact of the soil hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Garrigues

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration has been recognized as one of the most uncertain term in the surface water balance simulated by land surface models. In this study, the SURFEX/ISBA-A-gs simulations of evapotranspiration are assessed at local scale over a 12 year Mediterranean crop succession. The model is evaluated in its standard implementation which relies on the use of the ISBA pedotransfer estimates of the soil properties. The originality of this work consists in explicitly representing the succession of crop cycles and inter-crop bare soil periods in the simulations and assessing its impact on the dynamic of simulated and measured evapotranspiration over a long period of time. The analysis focuses on key soil parameters which drive the simulation of evapotranspiration, namely the rooting depth, the soil moisture at saturation, the soil moisture at field capacity and the soil moisture at wilting point. The simulations achieved with the standard values of these parameters are compared to those achieved with the in situ values. The portability of the ISBA pedotransfer functions is evaluated over a typical Mediterranean crop site. Various in situ estimates of the soil parameters are considered and distinct parametrization strategies are tested to represent the evapotranspiration dynamic over the crop succession. This work shows that evapotranspiration mainly results from the soil evaporation when it is continuously simulated over a Mediterranean crop succession. The evapotranspiration simulated with the standard surface and soil parameters of the model is largely underestimated. The deficit in cumulative evapotranspiration amounts to 24% over 12 years. The bias in daily daytime evapotranspiration is −0.24 mm day−1. The ISBA pedotransfer estimates of the soil moisture at saturation and at wilting point are overestimated which explains most of the evapotranspiration underestimation. The overestimation of the soil moisture at wilting point causes the

  3. Evaluation of land surface model simulations of evapotranspiration over a 12 year crop succession: impact of the soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigues, S.; Olioso, A.; Calvet, J.-C.; Martin, E.; Lafont, S.; Moulin, S.; Chanzy, A.; Marloie, O.; Desfonds, V.; Bertrand, N.; Renard, D.

    2014-10-01

    Evapotranspiration has been recognized as one of the most uncertain term in the surface water balance simulated by land surface models. In this study, the SURFEX/ISBA-A-gs simulations of evapotranspiration are assessed at local scale over a 12 year Mediterranean crop succession. The model is evaluated in its standard implementation which relies on the use of the ISBA pedotransfer estimates of the soil properties. The originality of this work consists in explicitly representing the succession of crop cycles and inter-crop bare soil periods in the simulations and assessing its impact on the dynamic of simulated and measured evapotranspiration over a long period of time. The analysis focuses on key soil parameters which drive the simulation of evapotranspiration, namely the rooting depth, the soil moisture at saturation, the soil moisture at field capacity and the soil moisture at wilting point. The simulations achieved with the standard values of these parameters are compared to those achieved with the in situ values. The portability of the ISBA pedotransfer functions is evaluated over a typical Mediterranean crop site. Various in situ estimates of the soil parameters are considered and distinct parametrization strategies are tested to represent the evapotranspiration dynamic over the crop succession. This work shows that evapotranspiration mainly results from the soil evaporation when it is continuously simulated over a Mediterranean crop succession. The evapotranspiration simulated with the standard surface and soil parameters of the model is largely underestimated. The deficit in cumulative evapotranspiration amounts to 24% over 12 years. The bias in daily daytime evapotranspiration is -0.24 mm day-1. The ISBA pedotransfer estimates of the soil moisture at saturation and at wilting point are overestimated which explains most of the evapotranspiration underestimation. The overestimation of the soil moisture at wilting point causes the underestimation of

  4. Identifying and tracing potential energy surfaces of electronic excitations with specific character via their transition origins: application to oxirane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Hao; Zuehlsdorff, T J; Payne, M C; Hine, N D M

    2015-05-14

    We show that the transition origins of electronic excitations identified by quantified natural transition orbital (QNTO) analysis can be employed to connect potential energy surfaces (PESs) according to their character across a wide range of molecular geometries. This is achieved by locating the switching of transition origins of adiabatic potential surfaces as the geometry changes. The transition vectors for analysing transition origins are provided by linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations under the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We study the photochemical CO ring opening of oxirane as an example and show that the results corroborate the traditional Gomer-Noyes mechanism derived experimentally. The knowledge of specific states for the reaction also agrees well with that given by previous theoretical work using TDDFT surface-hopping dynamics that was validated by high-quality quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We also show that QNTO can be useful for considerably larger and more complex systems: by projecting the excitations to those of a reference oxirane molecule, the approach is able to identify and analyse specific excitations of a trans-2,3-diphenyloxirane molecule.

  5. Succession of the sea-surface microlayer in the Baltic Sea under natural and experimentally induced low-wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The sea-surface microlayer (SML is located within the boundary between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The high spatial and temporal variability of the SML's properties, however, have hindered a clear understanding of interactions between biotic and abiotic parameters at or across the air-water interface. Among the factors changing the physical and chemical environment of the SML, wind speed is an important one. In order to examine the temporal effects of minimized wind influence, SML samples were obtained from the southern Baltic Sea and from mesocosm experiments in a marina to study naturally and artificially calmed sea surfaces. Organic matter concentrations as well as abundance, 3H-thymidine incorporation, and the community composition of bacteria in the SML (bacterioneuston compared to the underlying bulk water (ULW were analyzed. In all SML samples, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen were only slightly enriched and showed low temporal variability, whereas particulate organic carbon and nitrogen were generally greatly enriched and highly variable. This was especially pronounced in a dense surface film (slick that developed during calm weather conditions as well as in the artificially calmed mesocosms. Overall, bacterioneuston abundance and productivity correlated with changing concentrations of particulate organic matter. Moreover, changes in the community composition in the field study were stronger in the particle-attached than in the non-attached bacterioneuston. This implies that decreasing wind enhances the importance of particle-attached assemblages and finally induces a succession of the bacterial community in the SML. Eventually, under very calm meteorological conditions, there is an uncoupling of the bacterioneuston from the ULW.

  6. A tyrosine-rich cell surface protein in the diatom Amphora coffeaeformis identified through transcriptome analysis and genetic transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias T Buhmann

    Full Text Available Diatoms are single-celled eukaryotic microalgae that are ubiquitously found in almost all aquatic ecosystems, and are characterized by their intricately structured SiO2 (silica-based cell walls. Diatoms with a benthic life style are capable of attaching to any natural or man-made submerged surface, thus contributing substantially to both microbial biofilm communities and economic losses through biofouling. Surface attachment of diatoms is mediated by a carbohydrate- and protein- based glue, yet no protein involved in diatom underwater adhesion has been identified so far. In the present work, we have generated a normalized transcriptome database from the model adhesion diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Using an unconventional bioinformatics analysis we have identified five proteins that exhibit unique amino acid sequences resembling the amino acid composition of the tyrosine-rich adhesion proteins from mussel footpads. Establishing the first method for the molecular genetic transformation of A. coffeaeformis has enabled investigations into the function of one of these proteins, AC3362, through expression as YFP fusion protein. Biochemical analysis and imaging by fluorescence microscopy revealed that AC3362 is not involved in adhesion, but rather plays a role in biosynthesis and/or structural stability of the cell wall. The methods established in the present study have paved the way for further molecular studies on the mechanisms of underwater adhesion and biological silica formation in the diatom A. coffeaeformis.

  7. Identifier-based adaptive neural dynamic surface control for uncertain DC-DC buck converter system with input constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Ren, Xuemei; Oliver, Jesus Angel

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, an identifier-based adaptive neural dynamic surface control (IANDSC) is proposed for the uncertain DC-DC buck converter system with input constraint. Based on the analysis of the effect of input constraint in the buck converter, the neural network compensator is employed to ensure the controller output within the permissible range. Subsequently, the constrained adaptive control scheme combined with the neural network compensator is developed for the buck converter with uncertain load current. In this scheme, a newly presented finite-time identifier is utilized to accelerate the parameter tuning process and to heighten the accuracy of parameter estimation. By utilizing the adaptive dynamic surface control (ADSC) technique, the problem of "explosion of complexity" inherently in the traditional adaptive backstepping design can be overcome. The proposed control law can guarantee the uniformly ultimate boundedness of all signals in the closed-loop system via Lyapunov synthesis. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  8. Variability of soil enzyme activities and vegetation succession following boreal forest surface soil transfer to an artificial hill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Niemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A landfill site in southern Finland was converted into urban green space by covering it with a layer of fresh forest humus transferred from nearby construction sites. The aim was to develop the 70 m high artificial hill into a recreational area with high biodiversity of flora and fauna. Forest humus was used as a source of organic matter, plant roots, seeds, soil fauna and microorganisms in order to enable rapid regeneration of diverse vegetation and soil biological functions. In this study we report the results of three years of monitoring of soil enzyme activity and plant species compositional patterns. Monthly soil samples were taken each year between June and September from four sites on the hill and from two standing reference forests using three replicate plots. Activities of 10 different enzymes, soil organic matter (SOM content, moisture, pH and temperature of the surface layer were monitored. Abundances of vascular plant species were surveyed on the same four hill sites between late May and early September, three times a season in 2004 and 2005. Although the addition of organic soil considerably increased soil enzyme activities (per dw, the activities at the covered hill sites were far lower than in the reference forests. Temporal changes and differences between sites were analysed in more detail per soil organic matter (SOM in order to reveal differences in the quality of SOM. All the sites had a characteristic enzyme activity pattern and two hill sites showed clear temporal changes. The enzyme activities in uncovered topsoil increased, whereas the activities at the covered Middle site decreased, when compared with other sites at the same time. The different trend between Middle and North sites in enzyme activities may reflect differences in humus material transferred to these sites, but difference in the succession of vegetation affects enzyme activities strongly. Middle yielded higher β-sitosterol content in 2004, as an indication

  9. Community voices: barriers and opportunities for programmes to successfully prevent vertical transmission of HIV identified through consultations among people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoforos Mallouris

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2010, two global networks of people living with HIV, the International Community of Women Living with HIV (ICW Global and the Global Network of People living with HIV (GNP +  were invited to review a draft strategic framework for the global scale up of prevention of vertical transmission (PVT through the primary prevention of HIV and the prevention of unintended pregnancies among women living with HIV. In order to ensure recommendations were based on expressed needs of people living with HIV, GNP+ and ICW Global undertook a consultation amongst people living with HIV which highlighted both facilitators and barriers to prevention services. This commentary summarizes the results of that consultation. Discussion: The consultation was comprised of an online consultation (moderated chat-forum with 36 participants from 16 countries, an anonymous online e-survey (601 respondents from 58 countries, and focus-group discussions with people living with HIV in Jamaica (27 participants. The consultation highlighted the discrepancies across regions with respect to access to essential packages of PVT services. However, the consultation participants also identified common barriers to access, including a lack of trustworthy sources of information, service providers’ attitudes, and gender-based violence. In addition, participant responses revealed common facilitators of access, including quality counselling on reproductive choices, male involvement, and decentralized services. Conclusions: The consultation provided some understanding and insight into the participants’ experiences with and recommendations for PVT strategies. Participants agreed that successful, comprehensive PVT programming require greater efforts to both prevent primary HIV infection among young women and girls and, in particular, targeted efforts to ensure that women living with HIV and their partners are supported to avoid unintended pregnancies and to have safe, healthy

  10. Detachment and successive re-attachment of multiple, reversibly-binding tethers result in irreversible bacterial adhesion to surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Jelmer; van der Mei, Henny C; Hall, Connie L; Peterson, Brandon W; de Vries, Joop; Song, Lei; Jong, Ed D de; Busscher, Henk J; Swartjes, Jan J T M

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to surfaces occurs ubiquitously and is initially reversible, though becoming more irreversible within minutes after first contact with a surface. We here demonstrate for eight bacterial strains comprising four species, that bacteria adhere irreversibly to surfaces through multiple

  11. A method of identifying and isolating a unique member of a multigene family: application to a trypanosome surface antigen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruef, B J; Hecht, J H; Manning, J E

    1991-04-25

    A chimeric oligonucleotide was constructed using DNA sequences from two distal regions of a cDNA which encodes a major surface antigen (TSA-1) of Trypanosoma cruzi. Conditions were found that allowed the chimeric oligonucleotide to hybridize only to a 5.4 kb EcoRI fragment in a Southern blot of total genomic DNA. The 5.4 kb EcoRI genomic DNA fragment has previously been shown to be located at a telomeric site, thus the studies described here directly demonstrate that the TSA-1 gene is telomeric in location. It is also shown that the chimeric oligonucleotide can be used to selectively identify recombinant lambda phage which harbor the TSA-1 gene using standard library screening procedures. Since these studies demonstrate that a chimeric oligonucleotide can be used to identify in both Southern blots and library screens a single member among the more than sixty members of the TSA-1 gene family, it seems likely that chimeric oligonucleotides may be of general use in studies involving repetitive DNA sequence families.

  12. Surface morphology and grain analysis of successively industrially grown amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); McJunkin, Thomas [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 43210 Columbus, Ohio (United States); Agnello, Simonpietro; Gelardi, Franco M. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Palermo, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Wehner, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Fischer, Christian B., E-mail: chrbfischer@uni-koblenz.de [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different a-C:H coatings in various thicknesses on Si (1 0 0) have been studied. • For both types no significant difference in surface morphology is detectable. • The grain number with respect to their height appears randomly distributed. • In average no grain higher than 14 nm and larger than 0.05 μm{sup 2} was observed. • A height to area correlation confines all detected grains to a limited region. - Abstract: Silicon (1 0 0) has been gradually covered by amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films via an industrial process. Two types of these diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, one more flexible (f-DLC) and one more robust (r-DLC), have been investigated. Both types have been grown by a radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique with acetylene plasma. Surface morphologies have been studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the DLC structure. Both types appeared to have very similar morphology and sp{sup 2} carbon arrangement. The average height and area for single grains have been analyzed for all depositions. A random distribution of grain heights was found for both types. The individual grain structures between the f- and r-type revealed differences: the shape for the f-DLC grains is steeper than for the r-DLC grains. By correlating the average grain heights to the average grain areas for all depositions a limited region is identified, suggesting a certain regularity during the DLC deposition mechanisms that confines both values. A growth of the sp{sup 2} carbon entities for high r-DLC depositions is revealed and connected to a structural rearrangement of carbon atom hybridizations and hydrogen content in the DLC structure.

  13. Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children with Specific Language Impairment: Identifying Adequate Progress and Successful Learning Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkel, Holly L.; Komesidou, Rouzana; Fleming, Kandace K.; Romine, Rebecca Swinburne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to provide guidance to clinicians on early benchmarks of successful word learning in an interactive book reading treatment and to examine how encoding and memory evolution during treatment contribute to word learning outcomes by kindergarten children with specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Twenty-seven…

  14. Short non-coding RNAs as bacteria species identifiers detected by surface plasmon resonance enhanced common path interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greef, Charles; Petropavlovskikh, Viatcheslav; Nilsen, Oyvind; Khattatov, Boris; Plam, Mikhail; Gardner, Patrick; Hall, John

    2008-04-01

    Small non-coding RNA sequences have recently been discovered as unique identifiers of certain bacterial species, raising the possibility that they can be used as highly specific Biowarfare Agent detection markers in automated field deployable integrated detection systems. Because they are present in high abundance they could allow genomic based bacterial species identification without the need for pre-assay amplification. Further, a direct detection method would obviate the need for chemical labeling, enabling a rapid, efficient, high sensitivity mechanism for bacterial detection. Surface Plasmon Resonance enhanced Common Path Interferometry (SPR-CPI) is a potentially market disruptive, high sensitivity dual technology that allows real-time direct multiplex measurement of biomolecule interactions, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and microbes. SPR-CPI measures differences in phase shift of reflected S and P polarized light under Total Internal Reflection (TIR) conditions at a surface, caused by changes in refractive index induced by biomolecular interactions within the evanescent field at the TIR interface. The measurement is performed on a microarray of discrete 2-dimensional areas functionalized with biomolecule capture reagents, allowing simultaneous measurement of up to 100 separate analytes. The optical beam encompasses the entire microarray, allowing a solid state detector system with no scanning requirement. Output consists of simultaneous voltage measurements proportional to the phase differences resulting from the refractive index changes from each microarray feature, and is automatically processed and displayed graphically or delivered to a decision making algorithm, enabling a fully automatic detection system capable of rapid detection and quantification of small nucleic acids at extremely sensitive levels. Proof-of-concept experiments on model systems and cell culture samples have demonstrated utility of the system, and efforts are in

  15. Surface electromyography studies in standing position confirm that ankle strategy remains disturbed even following successful treatment of patients with a history of sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Juliusz; Lisiński, Przemysław; Ciesielska, Jagoda; Kulczyk, Aleksandra; Lipiec, Joanna; Bandosz, Agata

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] It is hypothesized that ankle strategy can be changed in patients with a history of sciatica. The aim of this study was to detect residual disturbances following successful treatment. [Subjects and Methods] In patients with a history of sciatica (N=11) and pseudo-sciatica (N=9), differences in muscle activity were recorded with bilateral surface polyelectromyography and stability measurements (center of foot pressure sway and center of spectrum) in normal standing and tandem positions. Results were compared with recordings in healthy people (N=9) to identify abnormalities in electromyographic and postural studies. [Results] Increased amplitude of electromyographic recordings from the gastrocnemius and extensor digiti muscles on the affected side was detected more in patients with a history of sciatica than pseudo-sciatica syndromes in tandem position. Fewer amplitude fluctuations were observed in both positions preferably in patients following sciatica. Changes in center of foot pressure sway and center of spectrum during balance platform studies were detected in normal standing position in this group of patients. No similar abnormalities in electromyographic and postural studies were detected in healthy people. [Conclusion] Sciatica and pseudo-sciatica evoke persistent disturbances in activity of muscles responsible for ankle strategy. Electromyography differentiates the two groups of patients better than postural studies. PMID:27065544

  16. Reconstructing satellite images to quantify spatially explicit land surface change caused by fires and succession: A demonstration in the Yukon River Basin of interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengli; Jin, Suming; Dahal, Devendra; Chen, Xuexia; Young, Claudia; Liu, Heping; Liu, Shuguang

    2013-05-01

    Land surface change caused by fires and succession is confounded by many site-specific factors and requires further study. The objective of this study was to reveal the spatially explicit land surface change by minimizing the confounding factors of weather variability, seasonal offset, topography, land cover, and drainage. In a pilot study of the Yukon River Basin of interior Alaska, we retrieved Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), albedo, and land surface temperature (LST) from a postfire Landsat image acquired on August 5th, 2004. With a Landsat reference image acquired on June 26th, 1986, we reconstructed NDVI, albedo, and LST of 1987-2004 fire scars for August 5th, 2004, assuming that these fires had not occurred. The difference between actual postfire and assuming-no-fire scenarios depicted the fires and succession impact. Our results demonstrated the following: (1) NDVI showed an immediate decrease after burning but gradually recovered to prefire levels in the following years, in which burn severity might play an important role during this process; (2) Albedo showed an immediate decrease after burning but then recovered and became higher than prefire levels; and (3) Most fires caused surface warming, but cooler surfaces did exist; time-since-fire affected the prefire and postfire LST difference but no absolute trend could be found. Our approach provided spatially explicit land surface change rather than average condition, enabling a better understanding of fires and succession impact on ecological consequences at the pixel level.

  17. The Challenges for Persistence with Two-Year College Student Transfers and How One Survey Attempts to Identify Pathways of Success for Geoscience Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; Van Der Hoeven Kraft, K.; Wolfe, B.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid growth in enrollments at two-year colleges (2YCs), these institutions provide a rich talent pool for future science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) graduates at four-year universities, particularly students from underrepresented groups (American Geosciences Institute [AGI], 2014). This is particularly true for the geosciences because over 25% of recent geoscience graduates with a bachelor's degree attended a 2YC for at least one semester (AGI, 2013). However, it is difficult to successfully track 2YC transfers because many 2YC students do not complete an associate's degree and very few institutions offer a geoscience-specific associate's degree. In order to recruit future geoscientists from this pool of students, researchers need to better understand the barriers these students face when trying to transfer and how they are able to successfully navigate these barriers. During spring 2014 graduation, AGI surveyed students completing their bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees about their educational background, experiences and future plans after graduation. Those graduates who attended a 2YC for at least one semester provided insight into their enrollment decisions as they transferred into a four-year university. The sample from this survey represents 154 responses from a total of 596 responses. General demographics reveal an older population (average age: 30, median: 27), a higher percent of male students (54% male, 40% female) and Caucasians (76%, 10% non Caucasian) than a traditional 2YC student. Students attending 2YC nationally are on average 28 years old (median: 24), are 57% women, and are 51% Caucasian (AACC Fast Facts, 2014). In addition, responses indicated some of the factors that influenced their ability to successfully transfer into 4-year geoscience programs including personal motivation and successful transfer of credits.

  18. Successful identifying the fire disaster with deaths with electrical principles%利用电气原理成功认定一起亡人火灾事故

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张学楷

    2012-01-01

    Via introducing the investigation of the fire disaster with death, the article discusses the key points and experiences of the successful identification of the fire caused by battery bicycle's recharging wire electrical failure by locking the suspicion of wire electrical failure with electrical principles.%通过介绍一起亡人火灾事故调查,论述了利用电气原理锁定线路电气故障起火嫌疑,探讨了认定电瓶车充电线路短路起火的要点和体会.

  19. Novel algorithm for identifying T-wave current density alternans using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kenji; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Futagawa, Keisuke; Shoda, Morio; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Itoh, Manabu; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    The noninvasive evaluation of ventricular T-wave alternans (TWA) in patients with lethal ventricular arrhythmias is an important issue. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm to identify T-wave current density alternans (TWCA) using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping (187-ch SAVP-ECG). We recorded 10 min of 187-ch SAVP-ECG using a Mason-Likar lead system in the supine position. A recovery time (RT) dispersion map was obtained by averaging the 187-ch SAVP-ECG. The TWCA value was determined from the relative changes in the averaged current density in the T-wave zone (Tpeak ± 50 ms) for two T-wave types. We registered 20 ECG recordings from normal controls and 11 ECG recordings from nine subjects with long QT syndrome (LQT). We divided LQT syndrome subjects into two groups: group 1 provided 9 ECG recordings without visually apparent TWAs, and group 2 provided 2 ECG recordings with visually apparent TWAs. The QTc interval values in the LQT groups were higher than those in the control (515 ± 60 ms in LQT G-1, 600 ± 27 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 415 ± 19 ms in control, P < 0.001). The RTendc dispersion values among the LQT subjects were higher than those of the control subjects (48 ± 19 ms in LQT G-1, 65 ± 30 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 24 ± 10 ms in control, P < 0.01). The mean TWCA value was significantly higher in the LQT G-2 group with visually apparent TWCAs (0.5 ± 0.2% in control, 2.1 ± 1.2% in LQT G-1, and 32.3 ± 6.9% in LQT G-2). Interestingly, the two-dimensional distribution of TWCA in LQT was inhomogeneous and correlated with the distribution of increased RT dispersion. We conclude that a novel algorithm using 187-ch SAVP-ECG might provide new insights into body surface TWCA.

  20. Variation in Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase I DNA Can Successfully Identify Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi (Diptera: Culicidae) and Culex (Melanoconion) ribeirensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, A S; Maia, D A; Gil-Santana, H R; de Mello, C F; Martins, A de J; Alencar, J

    2016-12-22

    Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi Sirivanakarn & Belkin 1980 and Culex (Melanoconion) ribeirensis Forattini & Sallum 1985 are two morphologically very similar species of the Pedroi subgroup of mosquitoes in the Spissipes section of the subgenus Melanoconion of the genus Culex L. 1758. We carried out an analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) DNA variation between these two species. The recent observation of sympatric coexistence in a forested area of Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil) triggered the need to validate these two species previously identified based on morphology. We concluded that the COI is a useful tool for identification of Cx. pedroi and Cx. ribeirensis.

  1. Identifying second language speech tasks and ability levels for successful nurse oral interaction with patients in a linguistic minority setting: an instrument development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Talia; Laurier, Michel D; Turner, Carolyn E; Segalowitz, Norman

    2011-09-01

    One of the most demanding situations for members of linguistic minorities is a conversation between a health professional and a patient, a situation that frequently arises for linguistic minority groups in North America, Europe, and elsewhere. The present study reports on the construction of an oral interaction scale for nurses serving linguistic minorities in their second language (L2). A mixed methods approach was used to identify and validate a set of speech activities relating to nurse interactions with patients and to derive the L2 ability required to carry out those tasks. The research included an extensive literature review, the development of an initial list of speech tasks, and validation of this list with a nurse focus group. The retained speech tasks were then developed into a questionnaire and administered to 133 Quebec nurses who assessed each speech task for difficulty in an L2 context. Results were submitted to Rasch analysis and calibrated with reference to the Canadian Language Benchmarks, and the constructs underlying the speech tasks were identified through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results showed that speech tasks dealing with emotional aspects of caregiving and conveying health-specific information were reported as being the most demanding in terms of L2 ability, and the most strongly associated with L2 ability required for nurse-patient interactions. Implications are discussed with respect to the development and use of assessment instruments to facilitate L2 workplace training for health care professionals.

  2. Successful implementation of the stepwise layer-by-layer growth of MOF thin films on confined surfaces: Mesoporous silica foam as a first case study

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the successful growth of highly crystalline homogeneous MOF thin films of HKUST-1 and ZIF-8 on mesoporous silica foam, by employing a layer-by-layer (LBL) method. The ability to control and direct the growth of MOF thin films on confined surfaces, using the stepwise LBL method, paves the way for new prospective applications of such hybrid systems. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Surface electromyography studies in standing position confirm that ankle strategy remains disturbed even following successful treatment of patients with a history of sciatica

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Juliusz; Lisiński, Przemysław; Ciesielska, Jagoda; Kulczyk, Aleksandra; Lipiec, Joanna; Bandosz, Agata

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] It is hypothesized that ankle strategy can be changed in patients with a history of sciatica. The aim of this study was to detect residual disturbances following successful treatment. [Subjects and Methods] In patients with a history of sciatica (N=11) and pseudo-sciatica (N=9), differences in muscle activity were recorded with bilateral surface polyelectromyography and stability measurements (center of foot pressure sway and center of spectrum) in normal standing and tandem positio...

  4. Bathymetry Surface Layer used to identify, delineate and classify moderate-depth benthic habitats around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 2x2 meter resolution bathymetry surface of the moderate-depth portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, south of St....

  5. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing.

  6. Developing an easy-to-apply model for identifying relevant pathogen pathways into surface waters used for recreational purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondera, Katharina; Klaer, Kassandra; Roder, Silke; Brueckner, Ira; Strathmann, Martin; Kistemann, Thomas; Schreiber, Christiane; Pinnekamp, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Swimming in inner-city surface waters is popular in the warm season, but can have negative consequences such as gastro-intestinal, ear and skin infections. The pathogens causing these infections commonly enter surface waters via several point source discharges such as the effluents from wastewater treatment plants and sewer overflows, as well as through diffuse non-point sources such as surface runoff. Nonetheless, the recreational use of surface waters is attractive for residents. In order to save financial and organizational resources, local authorities need to estimate the most relevant pathways of pathogens into surface waters. In particular, when detailed data on a local scale are missing, this is quite difficult to achieve. For this reason, we have developed an easy-to-apply model using the example of Escherichia coli and intestinal enterococci as a first approach to the local situation, where missing data can be replaced by data from literature. The model was developed based on a case study of a river arm monitored in western Germany and will be generalized for future applications. Although the limits of the EU Bathing Water Directive are already fulfilled during dry weather days, we showed that the effluent of wastewater treatment plants and overland flow had the most relevant impact on the microbial surface water quality. On rainy weather days, combined sewer overflows are responsible for the highest microbial pollution loads. The results obtained in this study can help decision makers to focus on reducing the relevant pathogen sources within a catchment area.

  7. Paving the Way to Successful Implementation: Identifying Key Barriers to Use of Technology-Based Therapeutic Tools for Behavioral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex; Lord, Sarah; Torrey, John; Marsch, Lisa; Lardiere, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers to use of technology for behavioral health care from the perspective of care decision makers at community behavioral health organizations. As part of a larger survey of technology readiness, 260 care decision makers completed an open-ended question about perceived barriers to use of technology. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), qualitative analyses yielded barrier themes related to characteristics of technology (e.g., cost and privacy), potential end users (e.g., technology literacy and attitudes about technology), organization structure and climate (e.g., budget and infrastructure), and factors external to organizations (e.g., broadband accessibility and reimbursement policies). Number of reported barriers was higher among respondents representing agencies with lower annual budgets and smaller client bases relative to higher budget, larger clientele organizations. Individual barriers were differentially associated with budget, size of client base, and geographic location. Results are discussed in light of implementation science frameworks and proactive strategies to address perceived obstacles to adoption and use of technology-based behavioral health tools.

  8. Multi-Axis Identifiability Using Single-Surface Parameter Estimation Maneuvers on the X-48B Blended Wing Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.; Koshimoto, Ed T.; Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of parameter estimation on hybrid-wing-body type aircraft is complicated by the fact that many design candidates for such aircraft involve a large number of aero- dynamic control effectors that act in coplanar motion. This fact adds to the complexity already present in the parameter estimation problem for any aircraft with a closed-loop control system. Decorrelation of system inputs must be performed in order to ascertain individual surface derivatives with any sort of mathematical confidence. Non-standard control surface configurations, such as clamshell surfaces and drag-rudder modes, further complicate the modeling task. In this paper, asymmetric, single-surface maneuvers are used to excite multiple axes of aircraft motion simultaneously. Time history reconstructions of the moment coefficients computed by the solved regression models are then compared to each other in order to assess relative model accuracy. The reduced flight-test time required for inner surface parameter estimation using multi-axis methods was found to come at the cost of slightly reduced accuracy and statistical confidence for linear regression methods. Since the multi-axis maneuvers captured parameter estimates similar to both longitudinal and lateral-directional maneuvers combined, the number of test points required for the inner, aileron-like surfaces could in theory have been reduced by 50%. While trends were similar, however, individual parameters as estimated by a multi-axis model were typically different by an average absolute difference of roughly 15-20%, with decreased statistical significance, than those estimated by a single-axis model. The multi-axis model exhibited an increase in overall fit error of roughly 1-5% for the linear regression estimates with respect to the single-axis model, when applied to flight data designed for each, respectively.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for identifying traces of adenine in different mineral and rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, B.; Navarro, R.; Sansano, A.; Rull, F.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the potentials of SERS as a technique for in-situ identification of life traces in Mars surface explorations using the Raman instrument (RLS), payload of the ESA Mars mission Exomars. This preliminary study focused on detection of adenine on a variety of rocks soils samples using macro-SERS detection.

  10. Floristic composition and plant succession on near-surface radioactive-waste-disposal facilities in the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, G.D.; Foxx, T.S.

    1982-03-01

    Since 1946, low-level radioactive waste has been buried in shallow landfills within the confines of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Five of these sites were studied for plant composition and successional patterns by reconnaissance and vegetation mapping. The data show a slow rate of recovery for all sites, regardless of age, in both the pinon-juniper and ponderosa pine communities. The sites are not comparable in succession or composition because of location and previous land use. The two oldest sites have the highest species diversity and the only mature trees. All sites allowed to revegetate naturally tend to be colonized by the same species that originally surrounded the sites. Sites on historic fields are colonized by the old field flora, whereas those in areas disturbed only by grazing are revegetated by the local native flora.

  11. Swift residue-screening identifies key N-glycosylated asparagines sufficient for surface expression of neuroglycoprotein Lingo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaotian; Pocas, Jennifer; Liu, Yan; Wu, Paul W; Mosyak, Lidia; Somers, Will; Kriz, Ron

    2009-03-18

    Advances in genomics and proteomics have generated the needs for the efficient identification of key residues for structure and function of target proteins. Here we report the utilization of a new residue-screening approach, which combines a mammalian high-throughput transient expression system with a PCR-based expression cassette, for the study of the post-translational modification. Applying this approach results in a quick identification of essential N-glycosylation sites of a heavily glycosylated neuroglycoprotein Lingo-1, which are sufficient for the support of its surface expression. These key N-glycosylated sites uniquely locate on the concave surface of the elongated arc-shape structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain. The swift residue-screening approach may provide a new strategy for structural and functional analysis.

  12. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela Costinela

    2012-01-01

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen...... and that its overpotential is highly dependent on the stabilization of intermediates through hydrogen bonds with water molecules. We also determine that OER occurs through direct recombination mechanism and that its major source of overpotential is the scaling relationship between HOO* and HO* surface...... intermediates. Using a previously developed Sabatier model we show that the theoretical predictions of catalytic activities match the experimentally determined onset potentials for the ORR and the OER, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Consequently, the combination of first-principles theoretical analysis...

  13. A method of identifying and isolating a unique member of a multigene family: application to a trypanosome surface antigen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A chimeric oligonucleotide was constructed using DNA sequences from two distal regions of a cDNA which encodes a major surface antigen (TSA-1) of Trypanosoma cruzi. Conditions were found that allowed the chimeric oligonucleotide to hybridize only to a 5.4 kb EcoRI fragment in a Southern blot of total genomic DNA. The 5.4 kb EcoRI genomic DNA fragment has previously been shown to be located at a telomeric site, thus the studies described here directly demonstrate that the TSA-1 gene is telomer...

  14. Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Identifiability of the Land Surface Model JULES at the point scale in permeable catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, C.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; McIntyre, N. R.

    2012-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are recognised as important components of Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Simulating exchanges of the moisture, carbon and energy between land surface and atmosphere in a consistent manner requires physics-based LSMs of high complexity, fine vertical resolution and a large number of parameters that need to be estimated. The "physics" that is incorporated in such models is generally based on our knowledge of point (or very small) scale hydrological processes. Therefore, while larger GCM grid-scale performance may be the ultimate goal, the ability of the model to simulate the point-scale processes is, intuitively, a pre-requisite for its reliable use at larger scales. Critical evaluation of model performance and parameter uncertainty at point scales is therefore a rational starting point for critical evaluation of LSMs; and identification of optimal parameter sets at the point scale is a significant stage of the model evaluation at larger scales. The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is a complex LSM, which is used to represent surface exchanges in the UK Met Office's forecast and climate change models. This complexity necessitates a large number of model parameters (in total 108) some of which are incapable of being measured directly at large (i.e. kilometer) scales. For this reason, a parameter sensitivity analysis is a vital confidence building process within the framework of every LSM, and as a part of the calibration strategy. The problem of JULES parameter estimation and uncertainty at the point scale with a view to assessing the accuracy and the uncertainty in the default parameter values is addressed. The sensitivity of the JULES output of soil moisture is examined using parameter response surface analysis. The implemented technique is based on the Regional Sensitivity Analysis method (RSA), which evaluates the model response surface over a region of parameter space using Monte Carlo sampling. The modified version of RSA

  15. Identifying hydrological pathways in the north basin of Lake Kivu using stable isotope ratios of meteoric recharge and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagizi, Charles M.; Kasereka, Marcellin M.; Terzerand, Stefan; Cuoco, Emilio; Liotta, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    A rain-gauge network of 12 stations was installed at different altitudes at Nyiragongo volcano (DR Congo) and surroundings and sampled on monthly basis between December 2013 and June 2015 to evaluate the isotopic signature of the meteoric recharge. Additional samples were collected on monthly basis from 5 rivers, 7 springs, 3 profiles in Kabuno bay and 2 others in the Main Basin of Lake Kivu to determine their water isotope compositions (δ18O and δ2H). The precipitation, surface and groundwater δ18O and δ2H values were thereafter used to estimate the groundwater recharge area, surface and groundwater inflow level to Lake Kivu, and for modeling water circulation in the north basin of Lake Kivu. The monthly precipitation isotope composition varied in a large range, whereas mean precipitation-weighed values ranged between -12.39‰ and 6.52‰ for δ2H, and from -4.02‰ to -0.91‰ for δ18O. Monthly values allowed to define a Local Meteoric Water Line of equation δ2H=7.96δ18O + 16.96. Our dataset, the first time series in the Virunga, implies that the δ18O and δ2H of precipitation are predominantly determined by the recycled moisture source area, while their clearly defined seasonality is driven by wind direction and precipitation amount changes. The δ18O, δ2H and deuterium-excess values revealed a convergence zone around Nyiragongo where the N-NE and S-SW trade winds come together. Moisture from the Nile River basin brought by the N-NE originating winds yielded depleted precipitation at local highlands, while that from the Congo River basin brought by the S-SW wind yielded enriched precipitation at lowlands. Rivers and springs monthly are included in the range of monthly precipitation values, and are thus indicative of lack of significant evaporation during aquifer recharge. The mean rivers and springs δ2H and δ18O, and the mean precipitation-weighed values revealed the presence of shallow groundwater recharged between 2100 and 2700m a.s.l., and deep

  16. Computation and Evaluation of Features of Surface Electromyogram to Identify the Force of Muscle Contraction and Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar P. Arjunan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between force of muscle contraction and muscle fatigue with six different features of surface electromyogram (sEMG was determined by conducting experiments on thirty-five volunteers. The participants performed isometric contractions at 50%, 75%, and 100% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Six features were considered in this study: normalised spectral index (NSM5, median frequency, root mean square, waveform length, normalised root mean square (NRMS, and increase in synchronization (IIS index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression analysis were performed to determine the significance of the feature with respect to the three factors: muscle force, muscle fatigue, and subject. The results show that IIS index of sEMG had the highest correlation with muscle fatigue and the relationship was statistically significant (P0.05.

  17. Successful transplantation of in vitro expanded human corneal endothelial precursors to corneal endothelial surface using a nanocomposite sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikumar P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though the transplantation of in vitro expanded human corneal endothelial precursors in animal models of endothelial damage by injecting into the anterior chamber has been reported, the practical difficulties of accomplishing such procedure in human patients have been a hurdle to clinical translation. Here we report the successful transplantation of in vitro expanded human corneal precursor cells to an animal eye using a transparent Nano-composite sheet and their engraftment.Materials and Methods: Human Corneal endothelial cells (HCEC were isolated from human cadaver eyes with informed consent and expanded in the lab using a sphere forming assay in a novel Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP for 26 days. HCEC obtained by sphere forming assay were seeded in a novel Nano-composite sheet, which was made of PNIPA-NC gels by in-situ, free-radical polymerization of NIPA monomer in the presence of exfoliated clay (synthetic hectorite “Laponite XLG” uniformly dispersed in aqueous media. After a further seven days in vitro culture of HCEC in the Nano-composite sheet, cells were harvested and transplanted on cadaver-bovine eyes (n=3. The cells were injected between the corneal endothelial layer and the Nano-composite sheet that had been placed prior to the injection in close proximity to the endothelial layer. After three hours, the transplanted Nano-composite sheets were removed from the bovine eyes and subjected to microscopic examination. The corneas were subjected to Histo-pathological studies along with controls. Results: HCEC formed sphere like colonies in TGP which expressed relevant markers as confirmed by RT-PCR. Microscopic studies of the Nanosheets and histopathological studies of the cornea of the Bull’s eye revealed that the HCEC got engrafted to the corneal endothelial layer of the bovine eyes with no remnant cells in the Nanosheet. Conclusion: Transplantation of in vitro expanded donor human corneal endothelial cells

  18. Enhanced super-hydrophobic and switching behavior of ZnO nanostructured surfaces prepared by simple solution--immersion successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, P; Sundaramurthy, J; Mangalaraj, D; Nataraj, D; Rajarathnam, D; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-11-01

    A simple and cost-effective successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method was adopted to fabricate hydrophobic ZnO nanostructured surfaces on transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO), glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. ZnO films deposited on different substrates show hierarchical structures like spindle, flower and spherical shape with diameters ranging from 30 to 300 nm. The photo-induced switching behaviors of ZnO film surfaces between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states were examined by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. ZnO nanostructured films had contact angles of ~140° and 160°±2 on glass and PET substrates, respectively, exhibiting hydrophobic behavior without any surface modification or treatment. Upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the films showed hydrophilic behavior (contact angle: 15°±2), which upon low thermal stimuli revert back to its original hydrophobic nature. Such reversible and repeatable switching behaviors were observed upon cyclical exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These biomimetic ZnO surfaces exhibit good anti-reflective properties with lower reflectance of 9% for PET substrates. Thus, the present work is significant in terms of its potential application in switching devices, solar coatings and self-cleaning smart windows.

  19. USAR recruiting success factors

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, George W.; Kocher, Kathryn M.; Gandolfo, Robin Ragsdale

    1987-01-01

    This study attempts to identify attributes associated with successful recruiters, to evaluate existing data on recruiter performance and characteristics, and to develop a model to aid in the selection of personnel who are likely to become successful recruiters. Conventional multivariate statistical techniques have not proved adequate in identifying successful recruiters, largely because of the absence of reliable and valid measures of recruiter success. This study applies a relatively new met...

  20. Hemiuroid trematode sporocysts are undetected by hemocytes of their intermediate host, the ark cockle Anadara trapezia: potential role of surface carbohydrates in successful parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Minami; Delamare-Deboutteville, Jerome; Dang, Cecile; Barnes, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    In order to establish a successful relationship with their hosts, parasites must subvert or evade immune defences. Cockle Anadara trapezia and Sydney Rock oyster (SRO) Saccostrea glomerata live in the same location but only ark cockles are infected by sporocysts of hemiuroid trematode. This provides an opportunity to explore differing interactions between the parasite and the immune system of susceptible and refractive hosts. Rapid migration and encapsulation of sporocysts was observed by SRO hemocytes but not by cockle hemocytes. This migration/encapsulation was inhibited by N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine but not by the other sugars, implicating specific surface carbohydrates in immune detection. Effector responses of hemocytes were investigated in vitro in terms of production of reactive oxygen production (ROS). Hemocytes of both species strongly reacted to Zymosan, but only SRO hemocytes responded to live sporocysts. Neither species' hemocytes produced ROS in the presence of dead/fixed sporocysts, and there was no suppression of Zymosan-induced respiratory burst by sporocysts. This suggests that immune escape is mediated by avoiding encapsulation, perhaps through molecular mimicry. Membrane-shaving with proteases indicated that sporocyst surface proteins are not a key factors in hemocytic detection. Surface carbohydrates of SRO and cockle hemocytes and of sporocysts were profiled with a panel of biotinylated lectins. This revealed substantial differences between cockle and SRO hemocytes, but greater similarity between cockle hemocytes and sporocysts. Results suggest that surface carbohydrates play an integral role in hemocyte immunorecognition and that surface carbohydrate molecular mimicry is a potential strategy for immune evasion in cockles by hemiuroid trematode sporocysts.

  1. An integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring method for identifying seasonal changes and spatial changes in surface water quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoor Viswanathan, Vidhya; Jiang, Yongjun; Berg, Michael; Hunkeler, Daniel; Schirmer, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Integrated catchment-scale management approaches in large catchments are often hindered due to the poor understanding of the spatially and seasonally variable pathways of pollutants. High-frequency monitoring of water quality at random locations in a catchment is resource intensive and challenging. A simplified catchment-scale monitoring approach is developed in this study, for the preliminary identification of water quality changes - Integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring (ISSM). This multi-parameter monitoring approach is applied using the isotopes of water (δ18O-H2O and δD) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) together with the fluxes of nitrate and other solutes, which are used as chemical markers. This method involves selection of few sampling stations, which are identified as the hotspots of water quality changes within the catchment. The study was conducted in the peri-alpine Thur catchment in Switzerland, with two snap-shot campaigns (representative of two widely varying hydrological conditions), in summer 2012 (low flow) and spring 2013 (high flow). Significant spatial (varying with elevation) and seasonal changes in the sources of water were observed between the two seasons. A spatial variation of the sources of nitrate and the solute loads was observed, in tandem with the land use changes in the Thur catchment. There is a seasonal shift in the sources of nitrate, it varies from a strong treated waste water signature during the low flow season to a mixture of other sources (like soil nitrogen derived from agriculture), in the high flow season. This demonstrates the influence of other sources that override the influence of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) during high flow in the Thur River and its tributaries. This method is expected to be a cost-effective alternative, providing snap-shots, that can help in the preliminary identification of the pathways of solutes and their seasonal/spatial changes in catchments.

  2. Evaluation of land surface model simulations of evapotranspiration over a 12-year crop succession: impact of soil hydraulic and vegetation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigues, S.; Olioso, A.; Calvet, J. C.; Martin, E.; Lafont, S.; Moulin, S.; Chanzy, A.; Marloie, O.; Buis, S.; Desfonds, V.; Bertrand, N.; Renard, D.

    2015-07-01

    Evapotranspiration has been recognized as one of the most uncertain terms in the surface water balance simulated by land surface models. In this study, the SURFEX/ISBA-A-gs (Interaction Sol-Biosphere-Atmosphere) simulations of evapotranspiration are assessed at the field scale over a 12-year Mediterranean crop succession. The model is evaluated in its standard implementation which relies on the use of the ISBA pedotransfer estimates of the soil properties. The originality of this work consists in explicitly representing the succession of crop cycles and inter-crop bare soil periods in the simulations and assessing its impact on the dynamics of simulated and measured evapotranspiration over a long period of time. The analysis focuses on key parameters which drive the simulation of ET, namely the rooting depth, the soil moisture at saturation, the soil moisture at field capacity and the soil moisture at wilting point. A sensitivity analysis is first conducted to quantify the relative contribution of each parameter on ET simulation over 12 years. The impact of the estimation method used to retrieve the soil parameters (pedotransfer function, laboratory and field methods) on ET is then analysed. The benefit of representing the variations in time of the rooting depth and wilting point is evaluated. Finally, the propagation of uncertainties in the soil parameters on ET simulations is quantified through a Monte Carlo analysis and compared with the uncertainties triggered by the mesophyll conductance which is a key above-ground driver of the stomatal conductance. This work shows that evapotranspiration mainly results from the soil evaporation when it is continuously simulated over a Mediterranean crop succession. This results in a high sensitivity of simulated evapotranspiration to uncertainties in the soil moisture at field capacity and the soil moisture at saturation, both of which drive the simulation of soil evaporation. Field capacity was proved to be the most

  3. Process optimization of deposition conditions of PbS thin films grown by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using response surface methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Ersin; Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse

    2015-07-01

    In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) thin films were synthesized by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method with different pH, dipping time and dipping cycles. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were successfully used to optimize the PbS films deposition parameters and understand the significance and interaction of the factors affecting the film quality. 5-level-3-factor central composite design was employed to evaluate the effects of the deposition parameters (pH, dipping time and dipping cycles) on the response (the optical band gap of the films). Data obtained from RSM were subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The optimal conditions for the PbS films deposition have been found to be: pH of 9.1, dipping time of 10 s and dipping cycles of 10 cycles. The predicted band gap of PbS film was 2.13 eV under the optimal conditions. Verification experiment (2.24 eV) confirmed the validity of the predicted model. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  4. Identifying sources of B and As contamination in surface water and groundwater downstream of the Larderello geothermal - industrial area (Tuscany-Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Sergio; Amadori, Michele; Pennisi, Maddalena; Cortecci, Gianni

    2014-02-01

    A study on the upper reaches of the Cecina River (Tuscany-Central Italy) and the associated unconfined aquifer was carried out from September 2007 to August 2008. The study aimed to identify the sources of B and As contamination in stream water and groundwater, and record contamination levels. The study area, which comprises a northern sector of the Larderello geothermal field, has in time been contaminated by both surface geothermal manifestations (now thought to have ceased) and anthropogenic activity. The latter refers to the disposal of spent geothermal fluids and borogypsum sludge, by-product of colemanite treatment with sulphuric acid, which until the late '70s were discharged in the Larderello area into the Possera Creek, a southern tributary of the Cecina River. A network of 22 stream sections and 9 observation wells was defined. Stream discharge (16 sites), well water levels and chemical concentrations (mainly B, As and anions) in water were measured monthly. Together, discharge and chemical concentrations were used to define the source of contamination by calculating the contaminant load in successive sections of the river network. Due to the stream's intermittent flow, only 50% of the performed monthly surveys could be used in comparing the contaminant load at different sections. Both contaminant loads (referring to median to high flow conditions) and chemical concentrations suggest that B mainly derives from the leakage of a concentrated Na-SO4 water rich in B, SO4, NO3 likely from a small aquitard located in the Larderello area. The B load from this area is about 2 kg/h and increases to approximately 2.7 kg/h in the final section of the study area, likely due to contribution of groundwater. As mainly derives from dissolution and adsorption-desorption processes involving water and As-rich stream bed sediments. Of the total 15 g/h As load measured at the end section, only about 3 g/h derive from the Larderello area. Further to stream bed, As

  5. Numerical Investigation of the Flow Dynamics and Evaporative Cooling of Water Droplets Impinging onto Heated Surfaces: An Effective Approach To Identify Spray Cooling Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Rui-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Pei-Xue

    2016-09-13

    Numerical investigations of the dynamics and evaporative cooling of water droplets impinging onto heated surfaces can be used to identify spray cooling mechanisms. Droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation are simulated using the presented numerical model. Volume-of-fluid method is used in the model to track the free surface. The contact line dynamics was predicted from a dynamic contact angle model with the evaporation rate predicted by a kinetic theory model. A species transport equation was solved in the gas phase to describe the vapor convection and diffusion. The numerical model was validated by experimental data. The physical effects including the contact angle hysteresis and the thermocapillary effect are analyzed to offer guidance for future numerical models of droplet impingement cooling. The effects of various parameters including surface wettability, surface temperature, droplet velocity, droplet size, and droplet temperature were numerically studied from the standpoint of spray cooling. The numerical simulations offer profound analysis and deep insight into the spray cooling heat transfer mechanisms.

  6. Facile Fabrication of a Silver Nanoparticle Immersed, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imposed Paper Platform through Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction for On-Site Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wansun; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2015-12-23

    We introduce a novel, facile, rapid, low-cost, highly reproducible, and power-free synthesizable fabrication method of paper-based silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immersed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform, known as the successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The rough and porous properties of the paper led to direct synthesis of AgNPs on the surface as well as in the paper due to capillary effects, resulting in improved plasmon coupling with interparticles and interlayers. The proposed SERS platform showed an enhancement factor of 1.1 × 10(9), high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 4.2%), and 10(-12) M rhodamine B highly sensitive detection limit by optimizing the SILAR conditions including the concentration of the reactive solution (20/20 mM/mM AgNO3/NaBH4) and the number of SILAR cycles (six). The applicability of the SERS platform was evaluated using two samples including human cervical fluid for clinical diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, associated with cervical cancer, and a malachite green (MG) solution for fungicide and parasiticide in aquaculture, associated with human carcinogenesis. The AgNP-immersed SERS-functionalized platform using the SILAR technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of HPV infection and detection of MG-activated human carcinogenesis.

  7. Controlling successive ionic layer absorption and reaction cycles to optimize silver nanoparticle-induced localized surface plasmon resonance effects on the paper strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Wansun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates why a silver nanoparticle (SNP)-induced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) paper chip fabricated at low successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles leads to a high SERS enhancement factor (7 × 108) with an inferior nanostructure and without generating a hot spot effect. The multi-layered structure of SNPs on cellulose fibers, verified by magnified scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed by a computational simulation method, was hypothesized as the reason. The pattern of simulated local electric field distribution with respect to the number of SILAR cycles showed good agreement with the experimental Raman intensity, regardless of the wavelength of the excitation laser sources. The simulated enhancement factor at the 785-nm excitation laser source (2.8 × 109) was 2.5 times greater than the experimental enhancement factor (1.1 × 109). A 532-nm excitation laser source exhibited the highest maximum local electric field intensity (1.9 × 1011), particularly at the interparticle gap called a hot spot. The short wavelength led to a strong electric field intensity caused by strong electromagnetic coupling arising from the SNP-induced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects through high excitation energy. These findings suggest that our paper-based SILAR-fabricated SNP-induced LSPR model is valid for understanding SNP-induced LSPR effects.

  8. Succession of the sea-surface microlayer in the coastal Baltic Sea under natural and experimentally induced low-wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The sea-surface microlayer (SML is located within the boundary between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The high spatial and temporal variability of the SML's properties, however, have hindered a clear understanding of interactions between biotic and abiotic parameters at or across the air-water interface. Among the factors changing the physical and chemical environment of the SML, wind speed is an important one. In order to examine the temporal effects of minimized wind influence, SML samples were obtained from the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea and from mesocosm experiments in a marina to study naturally and artificially calmed sea surfaces. Organic matter concentrations as well as abundance, 3H-thymidine incorporation, and the community composition of bacteria in the SML (bacterioneuston compared to the underlying bulk water (ULW were analyzed. In all SML samples, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen were only slightly enriched and showed low temporal variability, whereas particulate organic carbon and nitrogen were generally greatly enriched and highly variable. This was especially pronounced in a dense surface film (slick that developed during calm weather conditions as well as in the artificially calmed mesocosms. Overall, bacterioneuston abundance and productivity correlated with changing concentrations of particulate organic matter. Moreover, changes in the community composition in the field study were stronger in the particle-attached than in the non-attached bacterioneuston. This implies that decreasing wind enhances the importance of particle-attached assemblages and finally induces a succession of the bacterial community in the SML. Eventually, under very calm meteorological conditions, there is an uncoupling of the bacterioneuston from the ULW.

  9. Soil Shear Properties Assessment, Resistance, Thermal, and Triboelectric Analysis (SPARTTA) Tool: A New Multitool Instrument for Identifying the Physical Properties of In-situ Soils on Planetary Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Peters, G. H.; Beegle, L. W.; Zhou, Y. M.; Van Stryk, N.; Carey, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    SPARTTA is a low cost, low mass (robotic surface mission. A key innovation of SPARTTA is its state-of-the-art miniature packaging approach which enables in-situ comprehensive analyses of the physical properties of soils on any planetary body (e.g. asteroids, comets, etc.) with a single compact instrument. SPARTTA will specifically address several high-priority science goals identified in the Decadal Study regarding the physical properties of planetary soils, liquid water/water-ice detection, and electrostatics for bodies as diverse as comets, Trojan asteroids, Mars and the Moon [Planetary Science Decadal Study, 2013]. Additionally, it will provide valuable data to assist engineers in designing landing, drilling, coring, and sample acquisition systems for future Discovery, New Frontiers missions, or flagship landed missions.

  10. A new methodology to identify surface water bodies at risk by using pesticide monitoring data: The glyphosate case study in Lombardy Region (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guardo, Andrea; Finizio, Antonio

    2017-08-14

    In the last decades, several monitoring programs were established as an effect of EU Directives addressing the quality of water resources (drinking water, groundwater and surface water). Plant Protection Products (PPPs) are an obvious target of monitoring activities, since they are directly released into the environment. One of the challenges in managing the risk of pesticides at the territorial scale is identifying the locations in water bodies needing implementation of risk mitigation measures. In this, the national pesticides monitoring plans could be very helpful. However, monitoring of pesticides is a challenging task because of the high number of registered pesticides, cost of analyses, and the periodicity of sampling related to pesticide application and use. Extensive high-quality data-sets are consequently often missing. More in general, the information that can be obtained from monitoring studies are frequently undervalued by risk managers. In this study, we propose a new methodology providing indications about the need to implement mitigation measures in stretches of surface water bodies on a territory by combining historical series of monitoring data and GIS. The methodology is articulated in two distinct phases: a) acquisition of monitoring data and setting-up of informative layers of georeferenced data (phase 1) and b) statistical and expert analysis for the identification of areas where implementation of limitation or mitigation measures are suggested (phase 2). Our methodology identifies potentially vulnerable water bodies, considering temporal contamination trends and relative risk levels at selected monitoring stations. A case study is presented considering glyphosate monitoring data in Lombardy Region (Northern of Italy) for the 2008-2014 period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of techniques to identify coal-mine and power-generation effects on surface-water quality, San Juan River basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C.L.; Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Thomas, E.V.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous analytical techniques were applied to determine water quality changes in the San Juan River basin upstream of Shiprock , New Mexico. Eight techniques were used to analyze hydrologic data such as: precipitation, water quality, and streamflow. The eight methods used are: (1) Piper diagram, (2) time-series plot, (3) frequency distribution, (4) box-and-whisker plot, (5) seasonal Kendall test, (6) Wilcoxon rank-sum test, (7) SEASRS procedure, and (8) analysis of flow adjusted, specific conductance data and smoothing. Post-1963 changes in dissolved solids concentration, dissolved potassium concentration, specific conductance, suspended sediment concentration, or suspended sediment load in the San Juan River downstream from the surface coal mines were examined to determine if coal mining was having an effect on the quality of surface water. None of the analytical methods used to analyzed the data showed any increase in dissolved solids concentration, dissolved potassium concentration, or specific conductance in the river downstream from the mines; some of the analytical methods used showed a decrease in dissolved solids concentration and specific conductance. Chaco River, an ephemeral stream tributary to the San Juan River, undergoes changes in water quality due to effluent from a power generation facility. The discharge in the Chaco River contributes about 1.9% of the average annual discharge at the downstream station, San Juan River at Shiprock, NM. The changes in water quality detected at the Chaco River station were not detected at the downstream Shiprock station. It was not possible, with the available data, to identify any effects of the surface coal mines on water quality that were separable from those of urbanization, agriculture, and other cultural and natural changes. In order to determine the specific causes of changes in water quality, it would be necessary to collect additional data at strategically located stations. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Surface proteome analysis identifies platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha as a critical mediator of transforming growth factor-beta-induced collagen secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Noskovičová, Nina; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Lindner, Michael; Hatz, Rudolf; Hauck, Stefanie M; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblasts are extracellular matrix-producing cells in the lung. Fibroblast activation by transforming growth factor-beta leads to myofibroblast-differentiation and increased extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of pulmonary fibrosis. While fibroblast function with respect to migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix deposition has been well-explored, little is known about the surface proteome of lung fibroblasts in general and its specific response to fibrogenic growth factors, in particular transforming growth factor-beta. We thus performed a cell-surface proteome analysis of primary human lung fibroblasts in presence/absence of transforming growth factor-beta, followed by characterization of our findings using FACS analysis, Western blot, and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. We identified 213 surface proteins significantly regulated by transforming growth factor-beta, platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha being one of the top down-regulated proteins. Transforming growth factor beta-induced downregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha induced upregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta expression and phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream target of platelet derived growth factor signaling. Importantly, collagen type V expression and secretion was strongly increased after forced knockdown of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha, an effect that was potentiated by transforming growth factor-beta. We therefore show previously underappreciated cross-talk of transforming growth factor-beta and platelet derived growth factor signaling in human lung fibroblasts, resulting in increased extracellular matrix deposition in a platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha dependent manner. These findings are of particular importance for the treatment of lung fibrosis patients with high pulmonary transforming growth factor-beta activity.

  13. Predicting Classroom Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald P.

    A study was conducted at Rancho Santiago College (RSC) to identify personal and academic factors that are predictive of students' success in their courses. The study examined the following possible predictors of success: language and math test scores; background characteristics; length of time out of high school; high school background; college…

  14. Proteome analysis identifies the Dpr protein of Streptococcus mutans as an important factor in the presence of early streptococcal colonizers of tooth surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yoshida

    Full Text Available Oral streptococci are primary colonizers of tooth surfaces and Streptococcus mutans is the principal causative agent of dental caries in humans. A number of proteins are involved in the formation of monospecies biofilms by S. mutans. This study analyzed the protein expression profiles of S. mutans biofilms formed in the presence or absence of S. gordonii, a pioneer colonizer of the tooth surface, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE. After identifying S. mutans proteins by Mass spectrometric analysis, their expression in the presence of S. gordonii was analyzed. S. mutans was inoculated with or without S. gordonii DL1. The two species were compartmentalized using 0.2-μl Anopore membranes. The biofilms on polystyrene plates were harvested, and the solubilized proteins were separated by 2-DE. When S. mutans biofilms were formed in the presence of S. gordonii, the peroxide resistance protein Dpr of the former showed 4.3-fold increased expression compared to biofilms that developed in the absence of the pioneer colonizer. In addition, we performed a competition assay using S. mutans antioxidant protein mutants together with S. gordonii and other initial colonizers. Growth of the dpr-knockout S. mutans mutant was significantly inhibited by S. gordonii, as well as by S. sanguinis. Furthermore, a cell viability assay revealed that the viability of the dpr-defective mutant was significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type strain when co-cultured with S. gordonii. Therefore, these results suggest that Dpr might be one of the essential proteins for S. mutans survival on teeth in the presence of early colonizing oral streptococci.

  15. Prediction of conformational changes by single mutation in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg identified in HBsAg-negative blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Martono

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV by host immunity has been suggested to give rise to variants with amino acid substitutions at or around the 'a' determinant of the surface antigen (HBsAg, the main target of antibody neutralization and diagnostic assays. However, there have never been successful attempts to provide evidence for this hypothesis, partly because the 3 D structure of HBsAg molecules has not been determined. Tertiary structure prediction of HBsAg solely from its primary amino acid sequence may reveal the molecular energetic of the mutated proteins. We carried out this preliminary study to analyze the predicted HBsAg conformation changes of HBV variants isolated from Indonesian blood donors undetectable by HBsAg assays and its significance, compared to other previously-reported variants that were associated with diagnostic failure. Results Three HBV variants (T123A, M133L and T143M and a wild type sequence were analyzed together with frequently emerged variants T123N, M133I, M133T, M133V, and T143L. Based on the Jameson-Wolf algorithm for calculating antigenic index, the first two amino acid substitutions resulted in slight changes in the antigenicity of the 'a' determinant, while all four of the comparative variants showed relatively more significant changes. In the pattern T143M, changes in antigenic index were more significant, both in its coverage and magnitude, even when compared to variant T143L. These data were also partially supported by the tertiary structure prediction, in which the pattern T143M showed larger shift in the HBsAg second loop structure compared to the others. Conclusions Single amino acid substitutions within or near the 'a' determinant of HBsAg may alter antigenicity properties of variant HBsAg, which can be shown by both its antigenic index and predicted 3 D conformation. Findings in this study emphasize the significance of variant T143M, the prevalent isolate with highest degree of

  16. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....

  17. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....

  18. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history....... Consistent with our expectations, we find that full professors, authors appointed at economics and history departments, and authors working in Anglo-Saxon and German countries are more likely to receive citations than other scholars. Long and co-authored articles are also a factor for citation success. We...... find similar patterns when assessing the same authors' citation success in economics journals. As a novel feature, we demonstrate that the diffusion of research — publication of working papers, as well as conference and workshop presentations — has a first-order positive impact on the citation rate....

  19. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    affects citations. In regard to author-specific characteristics, male authors, full professors and authors working economics or history departments, and authors employed in Anglo-Saxon countries, are more likely to get cited than others. As a ‘shortcut' to citation success, we find that research diffusion......This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardly...

  20. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardl...

  1. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history. Co...

  2. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Derks, Marloes G. M.; Tellier, Siri;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: We performed a novel, hypothesis-free and quantitative analysis of citation networks exploring the literature on successful ageing that exists in the Web of Science Core Collection Database using the CitNetExplorer software. Outcomes were visualized using timeline-based citation patterns...

  3. [(≡SiO)TaV (=CH2)Cl2], the first tantalum methylidene species prepared and identified on the silica surface

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2013-11-01

    A novel surface tantalum methylidene [(≡SiO)TaV (=CH 2)Cl2] was obtained via thermal decomposition of the well-defined surface species [(≡SiO)TaVCl2Me 2]. This first surface tantalum methylidene ever synthesized has been fully characterized and the kinetics of the a-hydrogen abstraction reaction has also been investigated in the heterogeneous system. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Successful systems sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

    2007-01-01

    Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change.

  5. Software Maintenance Success Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Reifer, Donald J

    2011-01-01

    Dispelling much of the folklore surrounding software maintenance, Software Maintenance Success Recipes identifies actionable formulas for success based on in-depth analysis of more than 200 real-world maintenance projects. It details the set of factors that are usually present when effective software maintenance teams do their work and instructs on the methods required to achieve success. Donald J. Reifer--an award winner for his contributions to the field of software engineering and whose experience includes managing the DoD Software Initiatives Office--provides step-by-step guidance on how t

  6. "Success"ful Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    The Success in Reading and Writing Program at a K-2 school in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, teaches children of varied races and abilities to read and write using newspapers, dictionaries, library books, magazines, and telephone directories. These materials help students develop language skills in a failure-free atmosphere. Includes two…

  7. Verbal Behavior and Courtroom Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Michael G.

    1981-01-01

    Identifies characteristics of successful courtroom speech for prosecuting attorneys, defense attorneys, and accuseds using computer-based content analysis and rater judgments of verbal behaviors. Demonstrates that verbal aggression is an important factor for successful prosecutors, equivocation is important to success for defense attorneys, and…

  8. A 'NanoSuit' surface shield successfully protects organisms in high vacuum: observations on living organisms in an FE-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Isao; Tsutsui, Takami; Matsumoto, Haruko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2015-03-01

    Although extremely useful for a wide range of investigations, the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) has not allowed researchers to observe living organisms. However, we have recently reported that a simple surface modification consisting of a thin extra layer, termed 'NanoSuit', can keep organisms alive in the high vacuum (10(-5) to 10(-7) Pa) of the SEM. This paper further explores the protective properties of the NanoSuit surface-shield. We found that a NanoSuit formed with the optimum concentration of Tween 20 faithfully preserves the integrity of an organism's surface without interfering with SEM imaging. We also found that electrostatic charging was absent as long as the organisms were alive, even if they had not been coated with electrically conducting materials. This result suggests that living organisms possess their own electrical conductors and/or rely on certain properties of the surface to inhibit charging. The NanoSuit seems to prolong the charge-free condition and increase survival time under vacuum. These findings should encourage the development of more sophisticated observation methods for studying living organisms in an FE-SEM.

  9. Immunoglobulin G isotype responses to variant surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum in healthy Gabonese adults and children during and after successive malaria attacks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, G.; Yone, C.L.; Tebo, A.E.; Aaken, J. van; Lell, B.; Kremsner, P.G.; Luty, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed immunoglobulin G (IgG) isotype responses with specificity for the variant surface antigens (VSA) of heterologous Plasmodium falciparum isolates by using flow cytometry and plasma from healthy Gabonese adults and from children during and after two consecutive malaria episodes. The individ

  10. Succeeding with succession planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, C R

    1996-12-01

    Succession planning is the process of identifying people who could presently move into key positions or could do so after specifically targeted development occurs. The process identifies the better people in the organization and takes a consistent approach to assembling, analyzing, and retaining information about potential leaders and planning for their further development. At its simplest level, it is the development of a backup and potential successor to each manager; at is most formal, it is a documented plan for management succession at all levels in the organization. Strongly supportive of a policy of development and promotion from within the organization, succession planning also represents a proactive posture in respect to inevitable management turnover. In these days of rapid change in health care, no modern organization that expects to keep up with increasing competition can afford to drift--or even to let a single department drift--while replacements are recruited for managers who resign, retire, or otherwise leave.

  11. International Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    This article, with a focus on North American postsecondary education, identifies international students as a strategic enrollment management institutional priority; presents themes in the international student retention, satisfaction, and success research literature; and describes related best practices. It also presents the findings from an…

  12. Human Resource Outsourcing Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasliza Abdul-Halim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature on partnership seems to take the relationship between partnership quality and outsourcing success for granted. Therefore, this article aims at examining the role of service quality in strengthening the relationship between partnership quality and human resource (HR outsourcing success. The samples were obtained from 96 manufacturing organizations in Penang, Malaysia. The results showed that partnership quality variables such as trust, business understanding, and communication have significant positive impact on HR outsourcing success, whereas in general, service quality was found to partially moderate these relationships. Therefore, comprehending the HR outsourcing relationship in the context of service quality may assist the organizations to accomplish HR outsourcing success by identifying areas of expected benefits and improvements.

  13. Feasibility study: using δ18O-PO4 to identify phosphate sources in Dutch surface waters: peat, manure, sewage treatment plant or natural, nutrient-rich groundwater?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, M.R.A.; Tamburini, F.; Griffioen, J.J.; Chardon, W.

    2012-01-01

    High nutrient concentrations are in the Netherlands and most other European nations the biggest challenge to comply with the European water quality guidelines. The continuous application of manure and fertilizers by farmers has a strong impact on the phosphate concentrations in surface water systems

  14. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  15. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  16. Feasibility study: using δ18O-PO4 to identify phosphate sources in Dutch surface waters: peat, manure, sewage treatment plant or natural, nutrient-rich groundwater?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, M.R.A.; Tamburini, F.; Griffioen, J.J.; Chardon, W.

    2012-01-01

    High nutrient concentrations are in the Netherlands and most other European nations the biggest challenge to comply with the European water quality guidelines. The continuous application of manure and fertilizers by farmers has a strong impact on the phosphate concentrations in surface water systems

  17. Successful Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiqurrahman Nasihun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging concept of successful aging is based on evidence that in healthy individual when they get aged, there are  considerable variations in physiological functions alteration. Some people exhibiting greater, but others very few or no age related alteration. The first is called poor aging and the later is called successful pattern of aging (Lambert SW, 2008. Thus, in the simple words the successful aging concept is define as an opportunity of old people to stay  active and productive condition despite they get aged chronologically. Aging itself might be defined as the progressive accumulation of changes with time associated with or responsible for the ever-increasing susceptibility to disease and death which accompanies advancing age (Harman D, 1981. The time needed to accumulate changes is attributable to aging process. The marked emerging questions are how does aging happen and where does aging start? To answer these questions and because of the complexity of aging process, there are more than 300 aging theories have been proposed to explain how and where aging occured and started respectively. There are too many to enumerate theories and classification of aging process. In summary, all of these aging theories can be grouped into three clusters: 1. Genetics program theory, this theory suggests that aging is resulted from program directed by the genes; 2. Epigenetic theory, in these theory aging is resulted from environmental random events not determined by the genes; 3. Evolutionary theory, which propose that aging is a medium for disposal mortal soma in order to avoid competition between organism and their progeny for food and space, did not try to explain how aging occur, but possibly answer why aging occur (De la Fuente. 2009. Among the three groups of aging theories, the epigenetic theory is useful to explain and try to solve the enigma of aging which is prominently caused by internal and external environmental influences

  18. Facial recognition software success rates for the identification of 3D surface reconstructed facial images: implications for patient privacy and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazura, Jan C; Juluru, Krishna; Chen, Joseph J; Morgan, Tara A; John, Majnu; Siegel, Eliot L

    2012-06-01

    Image de-identification has focused on the removal of textual protected health information (PHI). Surface reconstructions of the face have the potential to reveal a subject's identity even when textual PHI is absent. This study assessed the ability of a computer application to match research subjects' 3D facial reconstructions with conventional photographs of their face. In a prospective study, 29 subjects underwent CT scans of the head and had frontal digital photographs of their face taken. Facial reconstructions of each CT dataset were generated on a 3D workstation. In phase 1, photographs of the 29 subjects undergoing CT scans were added to a digital directory and tested for recognition using facial recognition software. In phases 2-4, additional photographs were added in groups of 50 to increase the pool of possible matches and the test for recognition was repeated. As an internal control, photographs of all subjects were tested for recognition against an identical photograph. Of 3D reconstructions, 27.5% were matched correctly to corresponding photographs (95% upper CL, 40.1%). All study subject photographs were matched correctly to identical photographs (95% lower CL, 88.6%). Of 3D reconstructions, 96.6% were recognized simply as a face by the software (95% lower CL, 83.5%). Facial recognition software has the potential to recognize features on 3D CT surface reconstructions and match these with photographs, with implications for PHI.

  19. Research into Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomir Novak

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available As competition is becoming ever more fierce, research into the prerequisites for success is gaining ground. By most people, success is perceived as an external phenomenon, but it is in fact the consequence of a person's readiness to perform in the world (of business. In the paper, Novak distinguishes between internal, external and group success. The essence of interna!success, which is the condition for the other two types of success, is assuming responsibility for, and exercising self-control over one's psychic phenomena. This in fact means that one needs to "reprogramme" the old patterns of behaviour and substitute them for the new, which leads to personality changes based on the understanding and acceptance of the self and others as they are. In realizing personal abilities, motives and goals, mental guiding laws must also be taken into account. Nowadays, the overall success of an organization is an important indicator of the quality of gro up work. The working patterns of individuals comply with the patterns used by his or her colleagues. When we do something for ourselves, we do it for others. In certain organizations, through accepted ways of communication all people become successful, and no body needs to be paid off. Employees wholly identify themselves with their organization, and vice versa. This three-part paradigm (I-Others-Community is the basis for various models of practical training for success, which are often idealized, but are primarily aimed at abolishing passivity and flaws in the system and its wider environment.

  20. Application of multivariate statistical approach to identify trace elements sources in surface waters: a case study of Kowalskie and Stare Miasto reservoirs, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepak, Marcin; Sojka, Mariusz

    2017-08-01

    The paper reports the results of measurements of trace elements concentrations in surface water samples collected at the lowland retention reservoirs of Stare Miasto and Kowalskie (Poland). The samples were collected once a month from October 2011 to November 2012. Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were determined in water samples using the inductively coupled plasma with mass detection (ICP-QQQ). To assess the chemical composition of surface water, multivariate statistical methods of data analysis were used, viz. cluster analysis (CA), principal components analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis (DA). They made it possible to observe similarities and differences in the chemical composition of water in the points of water samples collection, to uncover hidden factors accounting for the structure of the data, and to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic sources on the content of trace elements in the water of retention reservoirs. The conducted statistical analyses made it possible to distinguish groups of trace elements allowing for the analysis of time and spatial variation of water in the studied reservoirs.

  1. Identifying Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  2. Identifying the hotspots of non-renewable water use using HiGW-MAT: A new land surface model coupled with human interventions and ground water reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, T.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Yeh, P. J.; Koirala, S.; Kanae, S.; Hanasaki, N.

    2011-12-01

    The real hydrological cycles on the Earth are not natural anymore. Global hydrological model simulations of the water cycle and available water resources should have an ability to consider the effects of human interventions on hydrological cycles. Anthropogenic activity modules (Hanasaki et al., 2008), such as reservoir operation, crop growth and water demand in crop lands, and environmental flows, were incorporated into a land surface model called MATSIRO (Takata et al., 2003), to form a new model, MAT-HI (Pokhrel et al., 2011). Total terrestrial water storages (TWS) in large river basins were estimated using the new model by off-line simulation, and compared with the TWS observed by GRACE for 2002-2007. The results showed MAT-HI has an advantage estimating TWS particularly in arid river basins compared with H08 (Hanasaki et al., 2008). MAT-HI was further coupled with a module representing the ground water level fluctuations (Yeh et al., 2005), and consists a new land surface scheme HiGW-MAT (Human Intervention and Ground Water coupled MATSIRO). HiGW-MAT is also associated with a scheme tracing the origin and flow path with the consideration on the sources of water withdrawal from stream flow, medium-size reservoirs and nonrenewable groundwater in addition to precipitation to croplands enabled the assessment of the origin of water producing major crops as Hanasaki et al. (2010). Areas highly dependent on nonrenewable groundwater are detected in the Pakistan, Bangladesh, western part of India, north and western parts of China, some regions in the Arabian Peninsula and the western part of the United States through Mexico. Cumulative nonrenewable groundwater withdrawals estimated by the model are corresponding fairly well with the country statistics of total groundwater withdrawals. Ground water table depletions in large aquifers in US estimated by HiGW-MAT were compared with in-situ observational data, and the correspondences are very good. Mean global exploitation

  3. The use of GIS and multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) to identify agricultural land management practices which cause surface water pollution in drinking water supply catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Richard; Kay, Paul; Foulger, Miles

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse pollution poses a threat to water quality and results in the need for treatment for potable water supplies which can prove costly. Within the Yorkshire region, UK, nitrates, pesticides and water colour present particular treatment problems. Catchment management techniques offer an alternative to 'end of pipe' solutions and allow resources to be targeted to the most polluting areas. This project has attempted to identify such areas using GIS based modelling approaches in catchments where water quality data were available. As no model exists to predict water colour a model was created using an MCE method which is capable of predicting colour concentrations at the catchment scale. CatchIS was used to predict pesticide and nitrate N concentrations and was found to be generally capable of reliably predicting nitrate N loads at the catchment scale. The pesticides results did not match the historic data possibly due to problems with the historic pesticide data and temporal and spatially variability in pesticide usage. The use of these models can be extended to predict water quality problems in catchments where water quality data are unavailable and highlight areas of concern. IWA Publishing 2008.

  4. Success Analysis for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Elihu

    The success analysis approach consists of individual and group exercises through which participants, in sharing meaning-centered experiences, identify their strengths and needs and clarify values operative in both past and expected successes. This approach constitutes a rational and practical perspective whereby students, teachers, staff, and…

  5. Success Analysis for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Elihu

    The success analysis approach consists of individual and group exercises through which participants, in sharing meaning-centered experiences, identify their strengths and needs and clarify values operative in both past and expected successes. This approach constitutes a rational and practical perspective whereby students, teachers, staff, and…

  6. Development of a bioanalytical test battery for water quality monitoring: Fingerprinting identified micropollutants and their contribution to effects in surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Altenburger, Rolf; Aït-Aïssa, Selim; Brion, François; Busch, Wibke; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Denison, Michael S; Du Pasquier, David; Hilscherová, Klára; Hollert, Henner; Morales, Daniel A; Novák, Jiří; Schlichting, Rita; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Serra, Helene; Shao, Ying; Tindall, Andrew J; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Williams, Timothy D; Escher, Beate I

    2017-10-15

    Surface waters can contain a diverse range of organic pollutants, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and industrial compounds. While bioassays have been used for water quality monitoring, there is limited knowledge regarding the effects of individual micropollutants and their relationship to the overall mixture effect in water samples. In this study, a battery of in vitro bioassays based on human and fish cell lines and whole organism assays using bacteria, algae, daphnids and fish embryos was assembled for use in water quality monitoring. The selection of bioassays was guided by the principles of adverse outcome pathways in order to cover relevant steps in toxicity pathways known to be triggered by environmental water samples. The effects of 34 water pollutants, which were selected based on hazard quotients, available environmental quality standards and mode of action information, were fingerprinted in the bioassay test battery. There was a relatively good agreement between the experimental results and available literature effect data. The majority of the chemicals were active in the assays indicative of apical effects, while fewer chemicals had a response in the specific reporter gene assays, but these effects were typically triggered at lower concentrations. The single chemical effect data were used to improve published mixture toxicity modeling of water samples from the Danube River. While there was a slight increase in the fraction of the bioanalytical equivalents explained for the Danube River samples, for some endpoints less than 1% of the observed effect could be explained by the studied chemicals. The new mixture models essentially confirmed previous findings from many studies monitoring water quality using both chemical analysis and bioanalytical tools. In short, our results indicate that many more chemicals contribute to the biological effect than those that are typically quantified by chemical monitoring programs or those regulated by environmental

  7. Ensuring a successful family business management succession

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Succession is the biggest long-term challenge that most family businesses face. Indeed, leaders ‘disposition to plan for their succession is frequently the key factor defining whether their family business subsists or stops. The research seeks to find out how to manage successfully the business management succession over main principles. This work project aims at researching the key points relevant to almost all family firms, to have a viable succession transition and positioni...

  8. High-Impact Succession Management. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Kim; Campbell, Michael; Smith, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Most companies have an opportunity to improve their succession management programs. The number one challenge for succession management (as identified by both HR leaders and executives) is developing a succession planning strategy. This comprehensive industry study sets out to determine how succession management (when done well) helps improve…

  9. Hospital-physician joint ventures: a strategic approach for both dimensions of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J D; Slaton, C R; Savage, G T

    1990-01-01

    Joint ventures between hospitals and the physicians on their medical staffs have produced successes and failures. Each joint venture has two very different dimensions of success--financial and collaborative. The most successful ventures are able to accomplish both of these often conflicting goals. To enhance hospital executives' success in joint ventures with physicians, a strategic approach with a series of six steps and their corresponding models or maps is proposed. The steps in this strategic approach are: (1) identify key stakeholders and linkages among them; (2) surface stakeholder conflict using problem-oriented maps; (3) diagnose the venture on both dimensions of success; (4) classify the venture using both dimensions of success; (5) select a strategy to optimize the venture's current potential for success; and (6) select an approach to transform the venture with limited potential for success.

  10. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  11. Paleo-surfaces of glacio-eustatically forced aggradational successions in the coastal area of Rome: Assessing interplay between tectonics and sea-level during the last ten interglacials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Fabrizio; Florindo, Fabio; Anzidei, Marco; Sepe, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    Recently acquired geochronological and stratigraphic data provide new information on the sedimentary successions deposited by the Paleo-Tiber River in the coastal and near-coastal area of Rome in consequence of the glacio-eustatic changes, allowing to better define their inner geometry and palaeogeographic spatial distribution. In the present work we use this revised sedimentary dataset to provide a geochronologically constrained and tectonically adjusted record of paleo sea-level indicators. Aimed at this scope, we review literature data acquired in the last 35 years and using the new geochronological constraints we pinpoint the coastal-to-fluvial terraces of MIS 5 and MIS 7, mapping their relic surfaces in an area of 30 km along the coast north and south of the Tiber River mouth, and 20 km inland of the fluvial valleys of Tiber and Aniene rivers. The geometry of these paleo-surfaces provides constraints on the relative elevation of the sea-level during the last interglacials and on the uplift rates in this region during the last 200 ka. In particular, we recognize the previously undetected terraces of MIS 5.3 and MIS 5.1 interstadials, and we assess their spatial relationship with respect to MIS 5.5, providing important information on sea-level oscillations during this time span. Comparison with sea-level indicators provided by previous aggradational successions deposited during past interglacials spanning MIS 9 through MIS 21 in the coastal area of Rome, also allows us to reconstruct the tectonic history and investigate its relationships with the Middle-Pleistocene volcanic activity of the Roman Comagmatic Region along the Tyrrhenian Sea margin of Italy in the last 900 ka.

  12. Extraction of pure spectral signatures and corresponding chemical maps from EPR imaging data sets: identifying defects on a CaF2 surface due to a laser beam exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Fadel, Maya; Zhang, Xin; de Juan, Anna; Tauler, Roma; Vezin, Hervé; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-04-07

    A calcium fluoride (CaF2) plate was exposed to pulsed laser irradiations inducing surface morphological and ionization changes on its surface. More precisely surface damages mainly correspond to intrinsic defects. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) hyperspectral imaging is a powerful technique able to characterize the defects formed on the CaF2 surface. Indeed, EPR hyperspectral images provide spatial and spectral information about the sample studied. In fact, these images possess a great potential to obtain accurate and reliable knowledge about the chemical composition and the distribution of the component due to the presence of the spatial aspect. However, the complexity of such hyperspectral data sets imposes the use of advanced chemometric tools to extract valuable information on the considered physicochemical system. Therefore, Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) is proposed to identify and locate the different constituents in the images. The originality of this work is that it reports on the application of MCR-ALS, for the first time, on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging data sets that will furnish the distribution maps and the spectral signatures of all components present in the sample. The results show the identification of different intrinsic defects on a CaF2 sample from the sole information in the raw image measurements and, therefore, confirm the potential of this methodology and the important role of spatial information contained in the image.

  13. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  14. Planning farm succession: how to be successful

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Planning farm succession is really good farm planning in its broadest aspect. Unfortunately very few farmers and their families have devoted sufficient time to working out how the farm business will be transferred. After demonstrating the importance of the farm succession issue, this article goes on to explaining a method of successfully tackling the process.

  15. Italian Succession Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    De Tullio, Giandomenico

    2012-01-01

    Italian inheritance law based on the Roman law of succession including legitimate succession and testamentary succession. The importance of drafting an Italian will and the legal requirements according to Italian Law.

  16. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardin, D.E.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  17. The ability to identify the intraparotid facial nerve for locating parotid gland lesions in comparison to other indirect landmark methods: evaluation by 3.0 T MR imaging with surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Mana; Fujii, Shinya; Nishihara, Keisuke; Matsusue, Eiji; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori (Japan); Kawamoto, Katsuyuki [Tottori University, Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    It is important to know whether a parotid gland lesion is in the superficial or deep lobe for preoperative planning. We aimed to investigate the ability of 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with surface coils to identify the intraparotid facial nerve and locate parotid gland lesions, in comparison to other indirect landmark methods. We retrospectively evaluated 50 consecutive patients with primary parotid gland lesions. The position of the facial nerve was determined by tracing the nerve in the stylomastoid foramen and then following it on sequential MR sections through the parotid gland. The retromandibular vein and the facial nerve line (FN line) were also identified. For each radiologist and each method, we determined the diagnostic ability for deep lobe lesions and superficial lobe lesions, as well as accuracy. These abilities were compared among the three methods using the Chi-square test with Yates' correction. Mean diagnostic ability for deep lobe lesions, the diagnostic ability for superficial lobe lesions, and accuracy were 92%, 86%, 87%, respectively, for the direct identification method; 67%, 89%, 86%, respectively, for the retromandibular vein method; and 25%, 99%, 90%, respectively, for the FN line method. The direct identification method had significantly higher diagnostic ability for deep lesions than the FN line method (P < 0.01), but significantly lower diagnostic ability for superficial lobe lesions than the FN line method (P < 0.01). Direct identification of the intraparotid facial nerve enables parotid gland lesions to be correctly located, particularly those in the deep lobes. (orig.)

  18. Components of Successful Magnet Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Faye B.

    This paper identifies and discusses components of successful magnet programs. It is based on a review of existing research literature and information gathered directly from school districts. First, the paper discusses separately the following elements, which are considered "core components": (1) leadership; (2) organizational structure; (3)…

  19. Identifying nitrate sources and transformations in surface water by combining dual isotopes of nitrate and stable isotope mixing model in a watershed with different land uses and multi-tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Lu, Baohong

    2017-04-01

    Nitrate is essential for the growth and survival of plants, animals and humans. However, excess nitrate in drinking water is regarded as a health hazard as it is linked to infant methemoglobinemia and esophageal cancer. Revealing nitrate characteristics and identifying its sources are fundamental for making effective water management strategies, but nitrate sources in multi-tributaries and mixed land covered watersheds remain unclear. It is difficult to determine the predominant NO3- sources using conventional water quality monitoring techniques. In our study, based on 20 surface water sampling sites for more than two years' monitoring from April 2012 to December 2014, water chemical and dual isotopic approaches (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) were integrated for the first time to evaluate nitrate characteristics and sources in the Huashan watershed, Jianghuai hilly region, East China. The results demonstrated that nitrate content in surface water was relatively low in the downstream (<10 mg/L), but spatial heterogeneities were remarkable among different sub-watersheds. Extremely high nitrate was observed at the source of the river in one of the sub-watersheds, which exhibited an exponential decline along the stream due to dilution, absorption by aquatic plants, and high forest cover. Although dramatically decline of nitrate occurred along the stream, denitrification was not found in surface water by analyzing δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3- relationship. Proportional contributions of five potential nitrate sources (i.e., precipitation; manure and sewage; soil nitrogen; nitrate fertilizer; nitrate derived from ammonia fertilizer and rainfall) were estimated using a Bayesian isotope mixing model. Model results indicated nitrate sources varied significantly among different rainfall conditions, land use types, as well as anthropologic activities. In summary, coupling dual isotopes of nitrate (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-, simultaneously) with a Bayesian isotope mixing model offers

  20. Assessing call centers’ success:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham A. Baraka

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a model to evaluate the performance of call centers based on the Delone and McLean Information Systems success model. A number of indicators are identified to track the call center’s performance. Mapping of the proposed indicators to the six dimensions of the D&M model is presented. A Weighted Call Center Performance Index is proposed to assess the call center performance; the index is used to analyze the effect of the identified indicators. Policy-Weighted approach was used to assume the weights with an analysis of different weights for each dimension. The analysis of the different weights cases gave priority to the User satisfaction and net Benefits dimension as the two outcomes from the system. For the input dimensions, higher priority was given to the system quality and the service quality dimension. Call centers decision makers can use the tool to tune the different weights in order to reach the objectives set by the organization. Multiple linear regression analysis was used in order to provide a linear formula for the User Satisfaction dimension and the Net Benefits dimension in order to be able to forecast the values for these two dimensions as function of the other dimensions

  1. Biosphere reserves: Attributes for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cuong, Chu; Dart, Peter; Hockings, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Biosphere reserves established under the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Program aim to harmonise biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. Concerns over the extent to which the reserve network was living up to this ideal led to the development of a new strategy in 1995 (the Seville Strategy) to enhance the operation of the network of reserves. An evaluation of effectiveness of management of the biosphere reserve network was called for as part of this strategy. Expert opinion was assembled through a Delphi Process to identify successful and less successful reserves and investigate common factors influencing success or failure. Ninety biosphere reserves including sixty successful and thirty less successful reserves in 42 countries across all five Man and the Biosphere Program regions were identified. Most successful sites are the post-Seville generation while the majority of unsuccessful sites are pre-Seville that are managed as national parks and have not been amended to conform to the characteristics that are meant to define a biosphere reserve. Stakeholder participation and collaboration, governance, finance and resources, management, and awareness and communication are the most influential factors in the success or failure of the biosphere reserves. For success, the biosphere reserve concept needs to be clearly understood and applied through landscape zoning. Designated reserves then need a management system with inclusive good governance, strong participation and collaboration, adequate finance and human resource allocation and stable and responsible management and implementation. All rather obvious but it is difficult to achieve without commitment to the biosphere reserve concept by the governance authorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are ...

  3. Success in Science, Success in Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    This is a series of four different scientific problems which were resolved through collaborations. They are: "Better flow cytometry through novel focusing technology", "Take Off®: Helping the Agriculture Industry Improve the Viability of Sustainable, Large-Production Crops", "The National Institutes of Health's Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS)", and "Expanding the capabilities of SOLVE/RESOLVE through the PHENIX Consortium." For each one, the problem is listed, the solution, advantages, bottom line, then information about the collaboration including: developing the technology, initial success, and continued success.

  4. Successful restrained eating and trait impulsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koningsbruggen, Guido M; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Restrained eaters with high scores on the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS) are more successful than low scorers in regulating their food intake. According to the theory of temptation-elicited goal activation (Fishbach, Friedman, & Kruglanski, 2003), they have become successful because, due to earlier repeated instances of successful self-control, they formed an associative link between temptations and thoughts of dieting. It is unclear, however, why they should have been more successful in earlier attempts at self-control than their unsuccessful counterparts. We examined whether trait impulsiveness plays a role by investigating the associations between dietary restraint, trait impulsiveness, and PSRS. Results showed that the interaction between dietary restraint and impulsiveness predicted dieting success: A lower level of impulsiveness was associated with greater dieting success among restrained eaters. These results suggest that restrained eaters who are less impulsive are more likely to become successful restrained eaters as identified with the PSRS.

  5. Critical success factors in ERP implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blerta Abazi Chaushi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study conducts state of the art literature review of critical success factors for enterprise resource planning systems implementation success. Since research on critical success factors for ERP implementation success is very rare and fragmented, this study provides a more comprehensive list of ten factors that companies that have adopted and struggle with the implementation, as well as companies who are in the process of considering implementation of ERP system can easily adopt and follow. The main contribution of this paper is that these ten new critical success factors are identifi ed through a thorough analysis of 22 selected research papers and is more comprehensive and straightforwardly employable for use.

  6. Characterization of a surface membrane molecule expressed by natural killer cells in most inbred mouse strains: monoclonal antibody C9.1 identifies an allelic form of the 2B4 antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, K; Katoh, H; Muguruma, K; Koyama, K

    1999-01-01

    A newly generated monoclonal antibody (mAb C9.1) described in this study identifies a surface membrane molecule that is involved in the lytic programme of activated natural killer (NK) cells. This conclusion is based on the facts that, first, this antigen was expressed on the vast majority of surface immunoglobulin (sIg)− CD3− CD4− CD8− spleen lymphocytes, albeit it was also present on minor subsets of sIg+ B (≈7%) and CD3+ T (≈2%) lymphocytes; second, that all splenic NK activity was contained within the C9.1+ cell population, and was almost totally abolished by treatment of spleen cells with mAb C9.1 and complement; third, that mAb C9.1 was capable of increasing interleukin-2-cultured and in vivo polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid-activated, NK cell-mediated, antibody-redirected lysis, but not freshly isolated NK cell-mediated killing. Furthermore, the strain distribution of the C9.1 antigen was shown to be antithetical to that of the 2B4 antigen already described as a molecule associated with major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted killing mediated by activated NK cells. The gene encoding C9.1 antigen was linked to the Akp1 isozyme locus on chromosome 1 close to the 2B4 gene. Although C9.1 and 2B4 were monomeric glycoproteins of 78 000 MW and 66 000 MW, respectively, removal of N-linked sugars from both antigens by endoglycosidase F yielded identical protein backbones of 38 000 MW. Thus, all of these results suggest that mAb C9.1 recognizes an allelic form of the 2B4 antigen. However, the detection of mAb C9.1-reactive antigen on a minor subset of B cells may suggest a possible reactivity of mAb C9.1 with some product of other members of the 2B4 family genes. PMID:10233732

  7. Ability of Slovakian Pupils to Identify Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Rodak, Rastislav

    2009-01-01

    A pupil's ability to identify common organisms is necessary for acquiring further knowledge of biology. We investigated how pupils were able to identify 25 bird species following their song, growth habits, or both features presented simultaneously. Just about 19% of birds were successfully identified by song, about 39% by growth habit, and 45% of…

  8. What makes a successful volume crime investigator?

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study sought to understand the role of volume crime investigators in the modern era. It attempted to gain officers` perceptions on the attributes required to be a successful at the role. In addition, the research sought to understand how modern investigators thought success should be defined and measured in relation to individual investigator performance. Chapter One explored previous research relating to police investigators and success, and identified the main research que...

  9. Exploring Cultural Predictors of Military Intervention Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    AU/ACSC/Wade, E/AY15 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY EXPLORING CULTURAL PREDICTORS OF MILITARY INTERVENTION SUCCESS by Dr...post facto exploration of predictors of military intervention success . As such, the research examined pre- and post-intervention political conditions as...qualitative analysis to identify cultural factors that might predict intervention success . The study concluded that Central American former Spanish

  10. `Superman` savours Sangu success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.

    1997-05-01

    The president of Halliburton Energy Development, Norman Chambers, has been instrumental in defining and implementing his company`s ``Contract to Produce`` (CTP) strategy. Based on yet greater integration of operator and contractor effort, he has claimed that this concept could help unburden oil companies and transform marginal field economics. Contrary opinion is that field operators will be reluctant to see their risk-reward territory being shared by contractors wanting to extend their field of interest. An interview with Norman Chambers is reported in which he recalled a strategic review in 1993 which revealed that among oil companies there is a widespread wish to concentrate on their core competencies of finding and selling and that the production function was one capability with which some companies were less than happy. Halliburton can offer engineering, construction and project management capabilities and sub-surface experience and is prepared to share in the reservoir and other risks. The CTP concept is particularly attractive to smaller companies. Halliburton`s first significant venture is in the small but strategically important Sangu gasfield offshore Bangladesh with the independent United Kingdom Cairn Energy. Many of the other business opportunities identified for the company to-date are also with small companies. (UK)

  11. The phylogenetics of succession can guide restoration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shooner, Stephanie; Chisholm, Chelsea Lee; Davies, T. Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic tools have increasingly been used in community ecology to describe the evolutionary relationships among co-occurring species. In studies of succession, such tools may allow us to identify the evolutionary lineages most suited for particular stages of succession and habitat rehabilita...

  12. A framework for successful hotel developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris E Cloete

    2013-04-01

    Various critical success factors for hotel development are identified in this article, and incorporated into a hotel property development framework, establishing a practical ‘road map’ for successful hotel developments. The validity of the proposed hotel property development framework has been assessed by intensive direct interviews with hotel development professionals.

  13. Ingredients for successful partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFor the development of new cross-sector partnerships it is required to know what the essence of successful partnership projects is. Which factors influence success or failure of partnerships is highly related to the specific context where partnerships operate. The literature on critical

  14. Successful grant writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Gerard H.; Holloway, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining research funding is central to the research process. However many (clinician-) scientists receive little, or no, training in the process of writing a successful grant application. In an era of reductions in research budgets and application success rates, the ability to construct a well pre

  15. Three Tiers to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Rhonda; Stepanek, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a three-tiered, differentiated curriculum in a response to intervention (RTI) framework that has successfully raised achievement at all levels, but is particularly successful with ninth-grade students. Walla Walla (Washington) School District implemented the three-tiered intervention program as a series of differentiated…

  16. What is Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Lifang

    2015-01-01

    <正>Success is actually a feeling.Like confidence and satisfaction,it is a positive feeling which appears after individuals reach their own ideal dreams,fulfill their tasks.But everyone havetheir own opinions so that there are various thoughts on the theme what is success.

  17. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  18. Exploring MBA Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Amanda; Hodgkinson, Myra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the meaning of career success in relation to the attainment of an MBA degree, for a group of experienced managers. In so doing, the paper aims to consider the adequacy of MBA career success, defined solely in terms of external criteria. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 36 in-depth interviews…

  19. Successful Aging: Multiple Trajectories and Population Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Fengyan Tang

    2014-01-01

    Following Rowe and Kahn¡¯s successful aging model, this study identified successful aging as a distinctive aging trajectory and examined gender differences in the aging process. Using the Health and Retirement Study data (2000-2008), this study applied group-based trajectory analysis to identify multiple aging trajectories in a sample of older Americans aged 65 and over (N=9,226). Six dimensions were analyzed in the multi-trajectory model: chronic disease, physical functional limitation, disa...

  20. Writing successful UX proposals

    CERN Document Server

    Hass, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Bringing new project funding and business opportunities to your organization is a vital part of UX professionals' growth and success. Writing Successful UX Proposals teaches the proven techniques for assessing proposal requests, writing successful commercial and government funding proposals, and enhancing your business development skills. This book will teach UX practitioners how to succeed in UX business development by mastering the following goals: * Understand how to assess a request for proposals* Understand the "anatomy" of a proposal response * Speak the business language of those who will be evaluating the proposed approach* Recognize the successes of others and build upon their advice Complete with case studies, tricks and tips, and real-world examples throughout, this is a must-have resource for UX professionals interested in honing their proposal writing skills and setting themselves up for success. * Provides unique sales and proposal writing insights tailored to the UX arena (including both resear...

  1. Exploring mobile learning success factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Cochrane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a comparative account and analysis of three mobile Web 2.0 projects instigated within a tertiary learning environment during 2008. Following the successful instigation of a mobile Web 2.0 project in the third year of a Bachelor of Product Design course during semester one, similar projects were initiated in semester two within the first-year and second-year Bachelor of Product Design courses. A common methodology for supporting and facilitating mobile Web 2.0 projects was used for all three projects. The projects were designed to explore the potential of mobile Web 2.0 tools to enhance both the formal and informal teaching and learning environments with a focus upon mobile blogging (moblogging. A comparison of student and teaching staff feedback from each of the three projects provided a basis for identifying and illustrating critical success factors within similar m-learning scenarios. Critical success factors identified include: the importance of the pedagogical integration of the technology into the course assessment, lecturer modelling of the pedagogical use of the tools, the need for regular formative feedback from lecturers to students, and the appropriate choice of mobile devices and software to support the pedagogical model underlying the course.

  2. Successful grant writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, Gerard H; Holloway, John W

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining research funding is central to the research process. However many (clinician-) scientists receive little, or no, training in the process of writing a successful grant application. In an era of reductions in research budgets and application success rates, the ability to construct a well presented, clear, articulate proposal is becoming more important than ever. Obtaining grants is a method to achieve your long term research goals. If you are able to formulate these long term goals, it is relevant to explore the market and investigate all potential grant opportunities. Finally, we will provide an outline of key elements of successful research grants.

  3. It Takes a Department! A Study of the Culture of Proficiency in Three Successful Foreign Language Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Frank B.; Darhower, Mark Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contexts and practices of three undergraduate foreign language teacher education programs identified by ACTFL/Language Testing International and reported by Glisan, Swender, and Surface (2013) as having a high success rate in propelling their graduates into the Advanced proficiency level on the ACTFL…

  4. Success Factors of E-Learning Projects: A Technical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhomod, Sami; Shafi, Mohd Mudasir

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the success factors of e learning programs in King Saud University from an engineer and technician's point of view. An extensive study of existing literature was done to determine the 11 success factors of e learning program. The factors identified as success factors are: Sufficient Users Training,…

  5. Successful project management

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Trevor L

    2016-01-01

    Successful Project Management, 5th edition, is an essential guide for anyone who wants to improve the success rate of their projects. It will help managers to maintain a balance between the demands of the customer, the project, the team and the organization. Covering the more technical aspects of a project from start to completion it contains practised and tested techniques, covering project conception and start-up, how to manage stake holders, effective risk management, project planning and launch and execution. Also including a brand new glossary of key terms, it provides help with evaluating your project as well as practical checklists and templates to ensure success for any ambitious project manager. With over one million copies sold, the hugely popular Creating Success series covers a wide variety of topic, with the latest editions including new chapters such as Tough Conversations and Treating People Right. This indispensable business skills collection is suited to a variety of roles, from someone look...

  6. Tribes Communities Success Stories

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data describes successful EPA projects and partnerships which are restoring local communities and watersheds within the San Francisco Bay Delta Watershed.

  7. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  8. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  9. Erp Systems Critical Success Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam K. Sowan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Enterprise Resources Planning (ERP systems are one of the highly complex systems in the information systems field; the implementations of this type of systems need a long time, high cost, and a lot of resources. Many factors affect the successful implementation of ERP system. The critical success factors (CSFs can be categorized as general, ICT related and software engineering or system life cycle (SLC related. This paper is a survey paper that identifies ERP systems CSFs in general and software engineering CSFs in specific. Also an agile methodology for ERP systems' implementations will be presented. Many existing ERP systems were surveyed and presented from ICT / software engineering point of view.

  10. Principles of successful cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A

    1999-10-01

    Screening for cancer is the application of various tests to apparently healthy individuals in order to identify who among them has occult disease, which may be either invasive disease or a precursor lesion. For any given cancer site, the potential of screening to reduce morbidity and mortality is based on well-defined criteria for the evaluation of screening effectiveness and on acceptable performance to be realized in the average community setting. Screening programs are most successful when they are organized into a system that leads to high rates of participation, high quality, and constant surveillance and evaluation. If the elements that contribute to a successful screening program are not well organized and integrated, then the fullest potential of screening will not be realized.

  11. The composition of international success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus; Lai, Signe Sophus

    ) in well-travelled series, whereas the less-travelled series have a higher proportion of scenes set in private homes or suburban exterior locations. We conclude the analysis by linking the traits of the well-travelled series to notions of cultural proximity and cross-cultural recognisability, and note......Danish television series have in recent years enjoyed an unprecedented level of international success, with series such as Borgen (2010-13) and The Killing (2007-12) travelling to multiple countries in Europe and beyond. Several explanations for the success have been put forward – ranging from...... or more European markets) compared to the series that do not. Typically, content analysis of television series is focused on identifying bias, for example in the portrayal of women or minority groups (Gerding and Signorielli, 2014). In this analysis, we extent the coding frame to include aesthetic...

  12. Writing a successful business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, A B

    1997-01-01

    1. In creating and building a business, the entrepreneur assumes all the responsibilities for its development and management, as well as the risks and risks and rewards. Many businesses do not survive because business owners fail to develop an effective plan. 2. The business plan focuses on major areas of concern and their contribution to the success of a new business. The finished product communicates the product/service to others and provides the basis for the financial proposal. 3. Planning helps identify customers, market area, pricing strategy, and competitive conditions. It aids in decision making and is an essential guide for operating a business successfully and measuring progress. 4. The business plan not only serves as a mechanism for obtaining any needed financial resources, but also indicates the future direction of the company.

  13. Telehealth success: evaluation framework development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, M

    2001-01-01

    appropriate alternative), identifying the beneficiaries of telehealth (i.e. ensuring randomly selected participants take part) and what is measured (i.e. including benefits, drawbacks and side effects of telehealth). Evaluation efforts and frameworks have identified "success" factors such as technical acceptability of the system, cost/benefit/effectiveness, organizational support, satisfaction, recruitment and retention, client outcomes such as quality of life, acceptance by consumers and providers. Less is known about the relationship among these variables and whether the findings around one variable are generalizable to other settings or applications. For example, organizational support may be essential for successful provider-patient interactions via videoconference, which result in higher quality of life. A conceptual framework would assist in accumulating this type of evidence and supporting more advanced research efforts.

  14. Healthcare succession planning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian K; Muise, Melanie; Cummings, Greta; Newburn-Cook, Chris

    2009-12-01

    Succession planning is a business strategy that has recently gained attention in the healthcare literature, primarily because of nursing shortage concerns and the demand for retaining knowledgeable personnel to meet organizational needs. Little research has been conducted in healthcare settings that clearly defines best practices for succession planning frameworks. To effectively carry out such organizational strategies during these challenging times, an integrative review of succession planning in healthcare was performed to identify consistencies in theoretical approaches and strategies for chief nursing officers and healthcare managers to initiate. Selected articles were compared with business succession planning to determine whether healthcare strategies were similar to best practices already established in business contexts. The results of this integrative review will aid leaders and managers to use succession planning as a tool in their recruitment, retention, mentoring, and administration activities and also provide insights for future development of healthcare succession planning frameworks.

  15. Urban freight transportation : Challenges, failure, and successes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, Goos; Quak, H.; Peeters, Rene; Woensel van, T.; Zijm, H.; Klumpp, M.; Clausen, U.; Ten Hompel, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the challenges, failures and successes on urban freight transportation. We first identify the various involved stakeholders with their interests. Then we evaluate a large number of urban freight transport initiatives and identify lessons learned, which are distinguished in

  16. Urban freight transportation: challenges, failures and successes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, G.; Quak, H.J.; Peeters, R.; Woensel, T. van

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the challenges, failures and successes on urban freight transportation. We first identify the various involved stakeholders with their interests. Then we evaluate a large number of urban freight transport initiatives and identify lessons learned, which are distinguished in

  17. Successful ageing for psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisah, Carmelle

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to explore the concept and determinants of successful ageing as they apply to psychiatrists as a group, and as they can be applied specifically to individuals. Successful ageing is a heterogeneous, inclusive concept that is subjectively defined. No longer constrained by the notion of "super-ageing", successful ageing can still be achieved in the face of physical and/or mental illness. Accordingly, it remains within the reach of most of us. It can, and should be, person-specific and individually defined, specific to one's bio-psycho-social and occupational circumstances, and importantly, reserves. Successful professional ageing is predicated upon insight into signature strengths, with selection of realistic goal setting and substitution of new goals, given the dynamic nature of these constructs as we age. Other essential elements are generativity and self-care. Given that insight is key, taking a regular stock or inventory of our reserves across bio-psycho-social domains might be helpful. Importantly, for successful ageing, this needs to be suitably matched to the professional task and load. This lends itself to a renewable personal ageing plan, which should be systemically adopted with routine expectations of self-care and professional responsibility. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  18. Untangling Performance from Success

    CERN Document Server

    Yucesoy, Burcu

    2015-01-01

    Fame, popularity and celebrity status, frequently used tokens of success, are often loosely related to, or even divorced from professional performance. This dichotomy is partly rooted in the difficulty to distinguish performance, an individual measure that captures the actions of a performer, from success, a collective measure that captures a community's reactions to these actions. Yet, finding the relationship between the two measures is essential for all areas that aim to objectively reward excellence, from science to business. Here we quantify the relationship between performance and success by focusing on tennis, an individual sport where the two quantities can be independently measured. We show that a predictive model, relying only on a tennis player's performance in tournaments, can accurately predict an athlete's popularity, both during a player's active years and after retirement. Hence the model establishes a direct link between performance and momentary popularity. The agreement between the performa...

  19. Determining Success Criteria and Success Factors for International Construction Projects for Malaysian Contractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammed Alashwal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of international construction projects is fraught with various challenges such as competitiveness, lack of resources, versatile global economy, and specific conditions in the host country. Malaysian contractors have been venturing into global construction market since early 1980s. However, their venturing was not successful all the time. The number of international projects awarded to Malaysian contractors has reduced drastically during the past decade. Taking advantage of this experience, this paper aims to identify the success criteria and success factors of international construction projects. The data was collected from 120 respondents using a questionnaire survey and analysed using principal component analysis and regression analysis. The results revealed three principal criteria of project success namely, Management Success, Functional Success, and Organisation Success. The main components of success factors include Team Power and Skills, Resource Availability, External Environment, Organisation Capability, Project Support, and Project Organisation. Further analysis emphasized the importance of strong financing capacity of contractors, project social environment, and competence of the project manager in achieving project success. The results of this paper can serve as a guideline for contractors and project managers to achieve success in this context. Future studies may provide in-depth analysis of success criteria and success factors specific for construction project type and host-country location.

  20. Success factors of agricultural company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Chládková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on developing a proposal to eliminate weaknesses in medium-sized farm and thus improving its market position. To determine the position of company’s products due to the competition, a BCG Matrix (Boston Consulting Group Matrix was used. Financial Ratio Analysis was used to identify company’s financial situation. With the help of the situational analysis of the company’s internal environment, success factors, strengths and weaknesses were defined. Further the proposals were designed to remove the selected weaknesses. In the farm was identified the following strengths: quality of managers, long-term and stable customer-supplier relationships, selling commodities at optimum moisture content and purity, the use of subsidies and high milk yield cows. A weakness was mainly breeding pigs, missing website, company profitability and obsolete buildings. Amongst others was suggested to create website for the farm.

  1. ORCID @ CMU: Successes and Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Troll Covey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Setting and Objectives: Carnegie Mellon University (CMU recently planned and implemented a project to help CMU researchers get an Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier (ORCID and to enable administrators to integrate the ORCIDs into university systems. This article describes and assesses the planning, performance, and outcome of this initiative, branded ORCID @ CMU. Design and Methods: The article chronicles why and how ORCID was integrated at CMU, including the rationale for changes in strategic plans. It assesses researcher participation in the project using transaction log and content analyses, and the performance of the ORCID project team using recommendations in the Jisc ORCID project report, frankly reporting the team’s successes and failures. The article concludes with lessons learned that should inform ORCID integration projects and expectations at other institutions. Results: The ORCID @ CMU web application was a great success. However, the project team did not allow enough time to prepare or devote enough attention to advocacy. The marketing message was not sufficiently persuasive and the marketing channels were not particularly effective. The overall participation rate in ORCID @ CMU was far below the target of 40%, though participation in many demographics exceeded the goal. Conclusions: Strategic planning does not guarantee success. Secure more than lip service from senior administrators. Recruit champions from across the institution. Develop a message that resonates with researchers. Allow sufficient time to prepare. Empower the project manager. Start with the low hanging fruit. Develop special outreach to doctoral students and postdocs.

  2. Successful aging at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    The expression successful aging at work and related terms such as active, healthy, and productive aging at work are frequently used by organizational researchers and practitioners. However, there are no concrete definitions or theoretical frameworks that explain their meaning, assumptions, and

  3. Successful School Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Rhea Dawn

    2001-01-01

    School composting programs that have met the challenges inherent in long-term composting have several traits in common: a supportive educational program, schoolwide participation, and a consistent maintenance program. Examines the elements of success, offers examples of incorporating composting into the curriculum, and describes three methods of…

  4. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  5. Success in Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jens; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    What makes a successful entrepreneur? Using Danish register data, we find strong support for the hypothesis that theoretical skills from schooling and practical skills acquired through wage-work are complementary inputs in the human capital earnings function of entrepreneurs. In fact, we find tha...

  6. Pathways to School Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development began implementing a multi-year school readiness project in several area schools. Evidence from both research and the field point to several key elements that foster school readiness and create pathways to school success for all children. This paper presents components of a…

  7. Models of Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Wu Renbao made national celebrity for his commitment to achieving common prosperity among his co-villagers in Huaxi Village, Jiangsu Province.Wu's recipe for success was to take advantage of collective strength by encouraging mutual assistance between villages and households.

  8. Mindfulness and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness has long been practiced in Eastern spiritual traditions for personal improvement, and educators and educational institutions have recently begun to explore its usefulness in schools. Mindfulness training can be valuable for helping students be more successful learners and more connected members of an educational community. To determine…

  9. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  10. Success in Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jens; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    What makes a successful entrepreneur? Using Danish register data, we find strong support for the hypothesis that theoretical skills from schooling and practical skills acquired through wage-work are complementary inputs in the human capital earnings function of entrepreneurs. In fact, we find...

  11. Ramada, A Successful Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>After entry into the WTO, China’s hotels are being challenged by the global economy and overseas counterparts. They should seek creation and development to fight against the fierce competition. Ramada Pudong Hotel, managed by the Shanghai Airport Group Civil Aviation Property Company Ltd, has become a successful example in creative management.

  12. Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of characteristics of 12 average and 12 superior small business people in three developing nations (India, Malawi, and Ecuador) found proactive qualities such as initiative and assertiveness, achievement orientation, and commitment to others characteristic of successful entrepreneurs. Other expected qualities (self-confidence,…

  13. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  14. Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of characteristics of 12 average and 12 superior small business people in three developing nations (India, Malawi, and Ecuador) found proactive qualities such as initiative and assertiveness, achievement orientation, and commitment to others characteristic of successful entrepreneurs. Other expected qualities (self-confidence,…

  15. Successful Bilingual Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecel, Maria Robledo; Cortez, Josie

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a research project carried out by the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA). IDRA's primary research question for this study was, "What contributed to the success of a bilingual education classroom as evidenced by LEP student academic achievement?" In addition to the student data, qualitative and contextual…

  16. Non-destructive photoacoustic imaging of metal surface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seungwan; Kim, Jeesu; Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-11-01

    The detection of metal surface defects is important in achieving the goals of product quality enhancement and manufacturing cost reduction. Identifying the defects with visual inspection is difficult, inaccurate, and time-consuming. Thus, several inspection methods using line cameras, magnetic field, and ultrasound have been proposed. However, identifying small defects on metal surfaces remains a challenge. To deal with this problem, we propose the use of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) as a new non-destructive imaging tool to detect metal surface defects. We successfully visualized two types of cracks (i.e., unclassified and seam cracks) in metal plate samples using PAI. In addition, we successfully extracted cracked edges from height-encoded photoacoustic maximum amplitude projection images using the Laplacian of Gaussian filtering method, and then, quantified the detected edges for a statistical analysis. We concluded that PAI can be useful in detecting metal surface defects reducing the defect rate and manufacturing cost during metal production.

  17. Identifying patient risks during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Ferreira Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risks reported at a public institution andto know the main patient risks from the nursing staff point of view.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive and exploratory study. Thesurvey was developed at a hospital in the city of Taboão da Serra, SãoPaulo, Brazil. The study included all nurses working in care areas whoagreed to participate in the study. At the same time, sentinel eventsoccurring in the period from July 2006 to July 2007 were identified.Results: There were 440 sentinel events reported, and the main risksincluded patient falls, medication errors and pressure ulcers. Sixty-fivenurses were interviewed. They also reported patient falls, medicationerrors and pressure ulcers as the main risks. Conclusions: Riskassessment and implementation of effective preventive actions arenecessary to ensure patient’s safety. Involvement of a multidisciplinaryteam is one of the steps for a successful process.

  18. MODEL OF TRAINING OF SUCCESS IN LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Александровна Лежнева

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the importance of the development of motive to succeed in adolescence. It is determined the value of the motive to achieve success in the further development of the teenager: a motive to achieve effective internal forces mobilized for the implementation of successful operation ensures the active involvement of teenagers in social and interpersonal relationships. As the primary means of motive development success is considered training. The author provides a definition of "training for success in life," creates a model of training for success in life, and describes its units (targeted, informative, technological, productive, reveals the successful development of the technology life strategy used during the training (self-presentation, targets, incentives, subject-orientation. The author pays attention to the need for a future psychologist to develop teenagers’ motive to achieve success through the mastery of competence in constructing a model of training for success in life, and its implementation in the course of professional activities. The main means of training students of psychology to the use of training success in life identified the additional educational programs and psychological section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-77

  19. Economic Floating Waste Detectionfor Surface Cleaning Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumroengrit Jakkrit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Removing waste out of water surface is a routine task and can be operated by using autonomous surface cleaning robots. This paper presents amethodoflaser-based floating waste detection for surface robot guidance when waste positions are unknown beforehand. Basing on concept of refraction and reflection of laser ray, the proposed laser-based technique is proven to be applicable on floating waste detection. The economic waste detector is constructed and mounted on the robot. Five DOF equations of motion are formulated for calculation of waste position incorporating distance measured by the laser and also the robot motion caused by external wind force as well as water surface tension. Experiments were conducted on a pond with calm water and results show that the presented economic waste detection successfully identify and locate position of plastic bottles floating on water surface within the range of 5 meters.

  20. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  1. Health promotion: challenges revealed in successful practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kênia Lara; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Belga, Stephanie Marques Moura Franco; Silva, Paloma Morais; Rodrigues, Andreza Trevenzoli

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine successful practices of health promotion in health, education, culture, welfare and sport, leisure, identifying the elements of success and challenges in the field. METHODS A qualitative study with data obtained from in-depth analysis that included participant observation, interviews with managers, coordinators, professionals and participants from 29 practices reported as successful for promoting health in six municipalities of the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, MG, Southeastern Brazil, in 2011. The variables of the study were concept, dimension, dissemination and ease of access, identified in practices guided by content analysis. RESULTS The results indicate a conceptual and methodological uncertainty about health promotion as evidenced by conflicting objects and contradictory purposes. The practices differ in size, coverage and ease of access, determined by inter-sector coordination and political and financial investment. CONCLUSIONS We identified challenges to health promotion focusing on vulnerable populations, limits to financing and intersectoral partnerships. PMID:24789640

  2. Small(pox) success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  3. Small(pox success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn

    Full Text Available The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  4. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    of business excellence points to a clear agenda for success. Setting clear strategic goals and the ability to take a long-term view of an organization's direction, combined with other leadership attributes such as creativity, teambuilding and learning, are principal keys to creating an excellent organization......Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...... lower value on the teambuilding and strategic competencies than is required for business excellence. By contrast, their "ideal" leader is heavily characterized by being a creative, inspiring, and active problem-solver....

  5. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...... of business excellence points to a clear agenda for success. Setting clear strategic goals and the ability to take a long-term view of an organization's direction, combined with other leadership attributes such as creativity, teambuilding and learning, are principal keys to creating an excellent organization....... Leaders seeking to achive business excellence must view the high-level attainment of these sets of leadership competencies as their paramount objective. In striving for business excellence, European leaders may encounter resistance among their employees. Crucially, European employees place a markedly...

  6. Analysing Java Identifier Names

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Identifier names are the principal means of recording and communicating ideas in source code and are a significant source of information for software developers and maintainers, and the tools that support their work. This research aims to increase understanding of identifier name content types - words, abbreviations, etc. - and phrasal structures - noun phrases, verb phrases, etc. - by improving techniques for the analysis of identifier names. The techniques and knowledge acquired can be appl...

  7. Identifiability in stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The problem of identifiability is basic to all statistical methods and data analysis, occurring in such diverse areas as Reliability Theory, Survival Analysis, and Econometrics, where stochastic modeling is widely used. Mathematics dealing with identifiability per se is closely related to the so-called branch of ""characterization problems"" in Probability Theory. This book brings together relevant material on identifiability as it occurs in these diverse fields.

  8. Profile of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1998-01-01

    What management skills must Europe's business leaders improve to achieve business excellence? Which country's leaders are best placed for success? Does the next generation have what it takes to compete? In the second half of their study of the leadership styles that drive business excellence, Jens...... Dahlgaard, Anders Nørgaard and Søren Jakobsen describe an excellent leadership profile that provides the answers....

  9. Successful time management

    CERN Document Server

    Forsyth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Packed with tips and techniques, Successful Time Management serves as a guide to reviewing and assessing new work practices to improve time management. It includes great time-saving ideas, practical solutions, checklists, and advice on controlling paperwork, delegating and working with others, prioritizing to focus on key issues, and getting and staying organized. This new third edition contains new practical tips on using email in a time effective manner and dealing with other internet-based tools and apps to help productivity.

  10. Principles of successful partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Kara; Denke, Nancy J; Gorombei, Deb; Ostroski, Tammy L; Root, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers must understand and value the unique contributions of all interdisciplinary professionals, with the goal of optimizing the wellness or illness needs of each patient. Work cannot be done in silos, and the ability to develop and sustain effective professional partnerships is essential. Health care teams must work within a complex environment that depends on the shared efforts of multiple professionals to successfully provide care in a fragmented, highly stressed system. Implementing partnerships that foster relationships through shared interests, vision, and values can aid in the coordination of resources to provide a more positive patient experience and outcome. The development of partnerships requires time and acceptance of shared risks and responsibilities. In return, involved parties will be able to build trust, share rewards, and expand the possibilities of what can be accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe results-oriented partnerships, which include the attributes of collaboration, coordination, and communication. Essential concepts and practical tools for success are reviewed to offer new and existing partnerships a lens through which to view interdisciplinary interactions that can contribute to organizational success and longevity. Potential pitfalls that may impact patient services and organizational health are also discussed.

  11. Successful Succession in Family Businesses : Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleem, Majid; Islam, Md. Shariful

    2009-01-01

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities...

  12. A Successful Automated Search for Crouching Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanela, J. E.; Dickey, J. M.

    2000-12-01

    Much effort has been expended during the last two decades on the search for Low Surface Brightness galaxies (LSBs), the galaxies Disney called ``Crouching Giants,'' which may be a dominant mass repository in the universe. The difficulty in gathering information on a significant population of LSBs lies in the time-consuming nature of identifying LSB candidates. To date, all survey-based searches for LSBs have involved manual inspections of plate-based material or optical CCD observations. We have conducted the first successful automated search for HI-rich galaxies (including LSBs) using the Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner (APS) Catalog of the POSS I. We identified HI-rich candidates by selecting galaxies located on the ``blue edge'' of an O-E vs. E color-magnitude diagram from the APS Catalog. Subsequent 21-cm observations on the upgraded Arecibo 305m dish showed that over 50% of our observed candidates were HI-rich with M{H{ I}}/LB ranging from 0.1 to 4.8 (in solar units). These M{H{ I}}/LB values are comparable to those of LSB candidates selected by manual means. Comparison of our candidate galaxies with known LSB galaxies shows that they have similar bivariate brightness distributions as well as other optical properties. Furthermore, examination of existing LSB catalogs shows that over 65% of LSBs are located on the ``blue edge,'' whereas only 10% of the general APS galaxy population has O-E values this low. Known LSB galaxies on the O-E ``blue edge'' include several LSBs with red B-V colors from O'Neil, Bothun, and Schombert (2000), indicating our bandpasses are critical in the segregation of these LSB candidates from the general population. We have determined the physical basis for the success of these simple search criteria, which is tied to the low current star formation rate of LSBs. The details of the search algorithm and guidelines of how to apply it to other existing surveys, such as the SDSS, will be provided.

  13. Surface oxidation under ambient air--not only a fast and economical method to identify double bond positions in unsaturated lipids but also a reminder of proper lipid processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Park, Hyejung; Kim, Philseok; Jiang, Yan; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-06-17

    A simple, fast approach elucidated carbon-carbon double bond positions in unsaturated lipids. Lipids were deposited onto various surfaces and the products from their oxidation in ambient air were observed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS). The most common oxidative products, aldehydes, were detected as transformations at the cleaved double bond positions. Ozonides and carboxylic acids were generated in certain lipids. Investigations of the conditions controlling the appearance of these products indicated that the surface oxidation depends on light and ambient air. Since the lipid oxidation was slower in a high concentration of ozone, singlet oxygen appeared to be a parallel oxidant for unsaturated lipids. The 3-hydroxyl group in the sphingoid base of sulfatides offered some protection from oxidation for the Δ4,5-double bond, slowing its oxidation rate relative to that of the isolated double bond in the N-linked fatty acyl chain. Direct sampling by thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-ESI-MS provides a powerful approach to elucidate detailed structural information on biological samples. Co-localization of the starting lipids and their oxidation products after TLC separation allowed assignment of the native unsaturation sites. Phosphatidylserine and N,N-dimethyl phosphatidylethanolamine isomers in a bovine brain total lipid extract were distinguished on the basis of their oxidation products. Meanwhile, the findings reported herein reveal a potential pitfall in the assignment of structures to lipids extracted from TLC plates because of artifactual oxidation after the plate development.

  14. Surface boxplots

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2014-01-22

    In this paper, we introduce a surface boxplot as a tool for visualization and exploratory analysis of samples of images. First, we use the notion of volume depth to order the images viewed as surfaces. In particular, we define the median image. We use an exact and fast algorithm for the ranking of the images. This allows us to detect potential outlying images that often contain interesting features not present in most of the images. Second, we build a graphical tool to visualize the surface boxplot and its various characteristics. A graph and histogram of the volume depth values allow us to identify images of interest. The code is available in the supporting information of this paper. We apply our surface boxplot to a sample of brain images and to a sample of climate model outputs.

  15. Negotiating Successfully in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Benoliel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural negotiations are complex, challenging, and difficult to navigate because much of the Asian culture is unstated, implicit, and internalized in subtle behavioral patterns. It is like an iceberg; more is invisible and less is visible. To understand how the Asian negotiation values and practices are different from those in the West, I describe briefly the Asian cultural roots, highlight the major dimensions that differentiate cultures, explore the factors that influence the Asian negotiation processes and outcomes, and provide a list of practical suggestions for negotiating successful deals with Asian negotiators.

  16. Successful product realization strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, John; Boulton, William R.

    1995-02-01

    Product realization is the process of defining, designing, developing, and delivering products to the market. While the main thrust of this JTEC panel was to conduct a complete investigation of the state of Japanese low-cost electronic packaging technologies, it is very difficult to totally separate the development of technology and products from the product realization process. Japan's electronics firms adhere to a product realization strategy based on a strong customer focus, a consistent commitment to excellence in design, and a cost-effective approach to technology commercialization. The Japanese product-pull strategy has been a successful driver and influencing factor in every aspect of the product development cycle.

  17. Successful innovation by motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Koudelková

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Innovation is one of the most important factors for business growth. Human capital plays a significant role in the successful process of innovation. This article deals with employee motivation in the innovation process and the main scientific aim of this study is to present results of research that was undertaken in the Czech Republic at the beginning of 2013. Questionnaires were used for the survey and statistical analyses such as Chi square test or Hierarchical cluster analysis were used for data processing. This study also provides a theoretical and practical overview of business innovation in the Czech Republic.

  18. Implant success!!!.....simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthra Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment. By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  19. SUCCESS OUTSIDE THE CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Coming as a much-needed boon for the countryside,this year's No.1 Document,jointly released by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the State Council,pledges a series of concrete measures to propel improvements in the rural economy and the livelihood of farmers.Nevertheless,rural prosperity in line with the success of urban areas will prove to be a challenge.The foundation of the agriculture sector remains fluid,and farmers lack a stable source of income and a reliable social safety net.

  20. Relationships and project marketing success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki; Lindblom, Jarno

    2002-01-01

    Project operations are a dominating mode of international business. Managing relationships and networks is crucial to project marketing success both at the level of the individual project and at the level of multiple projects. This article first defines key characteristics of project business......, identifies potentially relevant actors in the project marketing milieu, and emphasizes the importance of constantly nurturing project business relationships, also in "sleeping relationship" periods where concrete projects are not expected. Thereafter the points made are illustrated with a Finnish......-Chinese turnkey project case at the level of the individual project and a Danish-German professional service project case at the level of multiple projects. It is concluded that project managers and marketers should focus their attention on the management of project relationships before, during, and after...

  1. Elementary Schoolchildren's Self- and Social Perceptions of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Elina; Mykkänen, Arttu; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate children's self- and social perceptions of success to identify how success could be promoted in a classroom context. Using a participatory approach, this study explored children's subjective experiences with success in 41 learning situations selected by researchers (Phase 1: self-perceptions) and 48…

  2. LEIR commissioning successfully completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    An important milestone has been passed in the preparation of the injector complex to supply ions to the LHC experiments. The LEIR lead-ion beam, seen on one of the control screens just before the PS injection region. The Low-Energy Ion Ring - LEIR for short - has passed its first tests with flying colours. On 12 May, the ring that will accumulate lead ions for the LHC was shut down after seven months of tests (see Bulletin 44/2005). 'The commissioning phase was a resounding success,' enthuses a satisfied Michel Chanel, head of the LEIR construction project. After several months of fine-tuning, the LEIR team has achieved its aim of producing the kind of beam required for first lead-ion collisions in the LHC in 2008. This involved creating bunches containing 230 million ions, in line with the specifications for those first beams. This success can be put down to the machine's outstanding design and components. 'It's a great achivement by all the teams involved in the machine's construction,' underlines Christian...

  3. Distributed Persistent Identifiers System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Golodoniuc

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The need to identify both digital and physical objects is ubiquitous in our society. Past and present persistent identifier (PID systems, of which there is a great variety in terms of technical and social implementation, have evolved with the advent of the Internet, which has allowed for globally unique and globally resolvable identifiers. PID systems have, by in large, catered for identifier uniqueness, integrity, and persistence, regardless of the identifier’s application domain. Trustworthiness of these systems has been measured by the criteria first defined by Bütikofer (2009 and further elaborated by Golodoniuc 'et al'. (2016 and Car 'et al'. (2017. Since many PID systems have been largely conceived and developed by a single organisation they faced challenges for widespread adoption and, most importantly, the ability to survive change of technology. We believe that a cause of PID systems that were once successful fading away is the centralisation of support infrastructure – both organisational and computing and data storage systems. In this paper, we propose a PID system design that implements the pillars of a trustworthy system – ensuring identifiers’ independence of any particular technology or organisation, implementation of core PID system functions, separation from data delivery, and enabling the system to adapt for future change. We propose decentralisation at all levels — persistent identifiers and information objects registration, resolution, and data delivery — using Distributed Hash Tables and traditional peer-to-peer networks with information replication and caching mechanisms, thus eliminating the need for a central PID data store. This will increase overall system fault tolerance thus ensuring its trustworthiness. We also discuss important aspects of the distributed system’s governance, such as the notion of the authoritative source and data integrity

  4. spatially identifying vulnerable areas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System (SMDSS) to identify factors that make forest and game reserves vulnerable .... involve the creation of a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Slope Settlement and ... Feature). Spatial. Analyst Tool. (Slope). Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool. Buffer Tool.

  5. Triangulation of NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for triangulation of NURBS surfaces. This technique is built upon an advancing front technique combined with grid point projection. This combined approach has been successfully implemented for structured and unstructured grids.

  6. Triangulation of NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for triangulation of NURBS surfaces. This technique is built upon an advancing front technique combined with grid point projection. This combined approach has been successfully implemented for structured and unstructured grids.

  7. Factors Affecting Successful Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David Vittle

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of education practitioners towards the process of reintegrating pupils (many of whom display social, emotional and behavioural difficulties), from a pupil referral unit (PRU) to mainstream educational provision in a rural bilingual Welsh authority, and examines the barriers and facilitators they identified as…

  8. Death by success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurses, Kerem; Giones, Ferran; Mehta, Kandarpkumar

    We use international diffusion, deinstitutionalization, and power theory to explain the diffusion and ban of the third-party ownership (TPO) practice in the soccer industry. We use an inductive case study combining archival and interview data to identify the mechanisms that lead to the diffusion,...

  9. Factors Affecting Successful Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David Vittle

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the perspectives of education practitioners towards the process of reintegrating pupils (many of whom display social, emotional and behavioural difficulties), from a pupil referral unit (PRU) to mainstream educational provision in a rural bilingual Welsh authority, and examines the barriers and facilitators they identified as…

  10. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  11. Iridium: failures & successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  12. SUCCESS OUTSIDE THE CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Coming as a much-needed boon for the countryside, this year’s No.1 Document, jointly released by the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the State Council, pledges a series of concrete measures to propel improvements in the rural economy and the livelihood of farmers. Nevertheless, rural prosperity in line with the success of urban areas will prove to be a challenge. The foundation of the agriculture sector remains fluid, and farmers lack a stable source of income and a reliable social safety net. So how can China promote the sustained development of its agriculture sector and social improvements to the countryside? Experts and economists provide suggestions to achieving these goals.

  13. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  14. A metric for success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Gary P.

    1994-05-01

    The federal agencies are working with industry to ease adoption of the metric system. The goal is to help U.S. industry compete more successfully in the global marketplace, increase exports, and create new jobs. The strategy is to use federal procurement, financial assistance, and other business-related activities to encourage voluntary conversion. Based upon the positive experiences of firms and industries that have converted, federal agencies have concluded that metric use will yield long-term benefits that are beyond any one-time costs or inconveniences. It may be time for additional steps to move the Nation out of its dual-system comfort zone and continue to progress toward metrication. This report includes 'Metric Highlights in U.S. History'.

  15. Identity management key to successful mergers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Giessner (Steffen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlienated employees who feel a loss of identity could place financial and strategic objectives of a merger at risk through lack of drive, reduced performance, and even sabotage. Identifying and managing these issues from the start could therefore be critical to the success of such undert

  16. Learning and Training: Enhancing Small Business Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Crowley, Suzanne

    Owners or managers of 181 Australian businesses employing fewer than 20 people in the construction, manufacturing, property and business services, and retail industries in 3 metropolitan and 3 nonmetropolitan locations were interviewed by telephone to identify how they used training to enhance their small business's success. Of those surveyed,…

  17. Academic Success Factors: An IT Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aimao; Aasheim, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified causal factors for academic success. Factors vary from personal factors, such as cognitive style (McKenzie & Schweitzer, 2001), to social factors, such as culture differences (Aysan, Tanriogen, & Tanriogen, 1996). However, in these studies it is re-searchers who theorized the causal dimensions and…

  18. Successful Pedagogies for an Australian Multicultural Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch-Dummett, Carlene

    2006-01-01

    A study undertaken in two primary schools and a pre-school in a multicultural urban area of NSW identified five pedagogical topics that incorporated successful teaching practices and processes that accord with the Delors Report recommendations. The report recommended that education for the future should be organised around the four pillars of…

  19. Identifying Knowledge and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Coutinho Lourenço de Lima

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I discuss how the principle of identifying knowledge which Strawson advances in ‘Singular Terms and Predication’ (1961, and in ‘Identifying Reference and Truth-Values’ (1964 turns out to constrain communication. The principle states that a speaker’s use of a referring expression should invoke identifying knowledge on the part of the hearer, if the hearer is to understand what the speaker is saying, and also that, in so referring, speakers are attentive to hearers’ epistemic states. In contrasting it with Russell’s Principle (Evans 1982, as well as with the principle of identifying descriptions (Donnellan 1970, I try to show that the principle of identifying knowledge, ultimately a condition for understanding, makes sense only in a situation of conversation. This allows me to conclude that the cooperative feature of communication (Grice 1975 and reference (Clark andWilkes-Gibbs 1986 holds also at the understanding level. Finally, I discuss where Strawson’s views seem to be unsatisfactory, and suggest how they might be improved.

  20. The success of complex networks at criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Urbina, Victor; Herrmann, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    In spiking neural networks an action potential could in principle trigger subsequent spikes in the neighbourhood of the initial neuron. A successful spike is that which trigger subsequent spikes giving rise to cascading behaviour within the system. In this study we introduce a metric to assess the success of spikes emitted by integrate-and-fire neurons arranged in complex topologies and whose collective behaviour is undergoing a phase transition that is identified by neuronal avalanches that become clusters of activation whose distribution of sizes can be approximated by a power-law. In numerical simulations we report that scale-free networks with the small-world property is the structure in which neurons possess more successful spikes. As well, we conclude both analytically and in numerical simulations that fully-connected networks are structures in which neurons perform worse. Additionally, we study how the small-world property affects spiking behaviour and its success in scale-free networks.

  1. Linking Success Factors to Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivasamy Mothilal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Based on a literature survey, an attempt has been made in this study to develop a framework for identifying the success factors. In addition, a list of key success factors is presented. The emphasis is on success factors dealing with breadth of services, internationalization of operations, industry focus, customer focus, 3PL experience, relationship with 3PLs, investment in quality assets, investment in information systems, availability of skilled professionals and supply chain integration. In developing the factors an effort has been made to align and relate them to financial performance. Conclusion/Recommendations: We found success factors relationship with 3PLs and skilled logistics professionals would substantially improves financial performance metric profit growth. Our findings also contribute to managerial practice by offering a benchmarking tool that can be used by managers in the 3PL service provider industry in India.

  2. Identifying barriers to charge-carriers in the bulk and surface regions of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystal films by x-ray absorption fine structures (XAFSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Matthew J.; Vaccarello, Daniel; Yiu, Yun Mui; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Ding, Zhifeng

    2016-11-01

    Solar cell performance is most affected by the quality of the light absorber layer. For thin-film devices, this becomes a two-fold problem of maintaining a low-cost design with well-ordered nanocrystal (NC) structure. The use of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) NCs as the light absorber films forms an ideal low-cost design, but the quaternary structure makes it difficult to maintain a well-ordered layer without the use of high-temperature treatments. There is little understanding of how CZTS NC structures affect the photoconversion efficiency, the charge-carriers, and therefore the performance of the device manufactured from it. To examine these relationships, the measured photoresponse from the photo-generation of charge-carrier electron-hole pairs was compared against the crystal structure, as short-range and long-range crystal orders for the films. The photoresponse simplifies the electronic properties into three basic steps that can be associated with changes in energy levels within the band structure. These changes result in the formation of barriers to charge-carrier flow. The extent of these barriers was determined using synchrotron-based X-ray absorbance fine structure to probe the individual metal centers in the film, and comparing these to molecular simulations of the ideal extended x-ray absorbance fine structure scattering. This allowed for the quantification of bond lengths, and thus an interpretation of the distortions in the crystal lattice. The various characteristics of the photoresponse were then correlated to the crystallographic order and used to gain physical insight into barriers to charge-carriers in the bulk and surface regions of CZTS films.

  3. Overcome barriers to career success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raudsepp, E.

    1983-04-01

    A test is given to determine if an engineer suffers from one of the three barriers to technical success: fear of success, fear of failure, or perfectionism. As in most such tests, the middle way is best. Successful engineers know that perfection cannot be attained, that they don't have time to worry about failure or success, and that by aiming and perservering in doing things well, success can be achieved.

  4. Artificial Intelligence Applied to Project Success: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Magaña Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project control and monitoring tools are based on expert judgement and parametric tools. Projects are the means by which companies implement their strategies. However project success rates are still very low. This is a worrying situation that has a great economic impact so alternative tools for project success prediction must be proposed in order to estimate project success or identify critical factors of success. Some of these tools are based on Artificial Intelligence. In this paper we will carry out a literature review of those papers that use Artificial Intelligence as a tool for project success estimation or critical success factor identification.

  5. Global Microbial Identifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielinga, Peter; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    microbial identifier (GMI) initiative, aims to build a database of whole microbial genome sequencing data linked to relevant metadata, which can be used to identify microorganisms, their communities and the diseases they cause. It would be a platform for storing whole genome sequencing (WGS) data......) will likely also enable a much better understanding of the pathogenesis of the infection and the molecular basis of the host response to infection. But the full potential of these advances will only transpire if the data in this area become transferable and thereby comparable, preferably in open......-source systems. There is therefore an obvious need to develop a global system of whole microbial genome databases to aggregate, share, mine and use microbiological genomic data, to address global public health and clinical challenges, and most importantly to identify and diagnose infectious diseases. The global...

  6. Identifying learning styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Grace

    2016-12-14

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article explored different learning styles and outlined some of the models that can be used to identify them. It discussed the limitations of these models, indicating that although they can be helpful in identifying a student's preferred learning style, this is not 'fixed' and might change over time. Learning is also influenced by other factors, such as culture and age.

  7. Identifying and Managing Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Janice M.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the college or university chief financial officer in institutional risk management is (1) to identify risk (physical, casualty, fiscal, business, reputational, workplace safety, legal liability, employment practices, general liability), (2) to develop a campus plan to reduce and control risk, (3) to transfer risk, and (4) to track and…

  8. Identifying Nursing's Future Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Carolyn S.; Hawken, Patty L.

    1990-01-01

    A study determined that encouraging and supporting students in professional activities while they were still in school would lead those students to participate in professional nursing organizations after they graduated. Organized nursing needs to identify the factors that influence nurses to join organizations and concentrate on these factors to…

  9. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  10. Success and adaptation

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Yesterday morning, the last colliding proton beams of 2013 were extracted from the LHC, heralding the start of the machine’s first long shutdown (LS1) and crowning its first three glorious years of running. I hardly need to tell the CERN community what a fabulous performance all the people running the machine, the experiments, the computing and all supporting infrastructures put in. Those people are you, and you all know very well what a great job everyone did.   Nevertheless, I would like to express my thanks to all the people who made this first LHC run such a success. Re-measuring the whole Standard Model in such a short period, and then completing it with the discovery of what looks increasingly like the Higgs boson, is no mean feat. What I’d like to focus on today is another aspect of our field: its remarkable ability to adapt. When I started out in research, experiments involved a handful of people and lasted a few years at most. The timescale for the development of ...

  11. Enhancement of surface properties on commercial polymer packaging films using various surface treatment processes (fluorination and plasma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyroux, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.peyroux@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, F-63171 Aubière (France); Dubois, Marc, E-mail: marc.dubois@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, F-63171 Aubière (France); Tomasella, Eric, E-mail: eric.tomasella@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, F-63171 Aubière (France); Petit, Elodie, E-mail: elodie.petit@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, F-63171 Aubière (France); Flahaut, Delphine, E-mail: delphine.flahaut@univ-pau.fr [Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, IPREM/ECP (UMR 5254), Hélioparc, 2 av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau cedex 9 (France)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different surface treatment processes were investigated in this work. • Both processes drastically change the composition induced on the surfaces. • Direct fluorination is identified as an efficient way to adjust surface properties. • Plasma processes result in a specific enhancement of the surface properties. • The pristine polymer surface has been successfully improved. - Abstract: Before considering their combination on commercial packaging films, two surface treatments processes were investigated. Indeed, direct fluorination and plasma processes are currently recognized as effective processes to improve polymer surface properties. The aim of this first work is to elucidate mechanisms that occur on the treated surface. The modifications of the surface layer were characterized using various complementary spectroscopy techniques such as Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, high resolution solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) with {sup 19}F nucleus which are suitable to determine the nature of bonding and specific groups formed during the process. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was also achieved to extract the surface chemical compositions. In addition, surface properties of the treated films were studied by specific measurements of surface energy in order to reveal surface parameters such as rugosity and chemical composition which could be adjusted. All these results underline that the layer induced regardless of the two processes plays a key role in the enhancement of the surface properties.

  12. Succession planning: valuable process or pointless exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2006-01-01

    Succession planning is the process of identifying people who could presently move into key positions or could do so after specifically targeted development occurs. The process identifies the better people in the organization and takes a consistent approach to assembling, analyzing, and retaining information about potential leaders and planning for their further development. At its simplest level, it is the development of a backup and potential successor to each manager; at its most formal, it is a documented plan for management succession at all levels in the organization. Strongly supportive of a policy of development and promotion from within the organization, succession planning also represents a proactive posture in respect to inevitable management turnover. In these days of rapid change in health care, no modern organization that expects to keep up with increasing competition can afford to drift-or even let a single department drift-although replacements are recruited for managers who resign, retire, or otherwise leave. On numerous occasions, however, all of the effort expended in succession planning seems wasted when potential successors either leave the organization or fail to live up to expectations, prompting one to wonder whether succession planning is little more than a pointless exercise.

  13. Predictors of successful transition to registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Craig; Esterman, Adrian; Smith, Colleen; Kenny, Amanda

    2013-06-01

    To identify predictors of successful transition from undergraduate student to registered nurse and to identify whether any particular pre-registration paid employment choice impacted on transition. Nursing students in Australia and internationally, engage in a variety of paid employment whilst completing their university studies. However, there is little empirical evidence about the different types of employment chosen by students and any relationship to graduate nurse transition. A descriptive questionnaire survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted with newly graduated nurses throughout Australia. The survey data were collected over 4 months in 2011, with 392 registered nurses completing a questionnaire. Respondents were categorized into four groups, according to their chosen work type (hospitality/retail, enrolled nurse, other healthcare worker, and non-worker) and transition scores were identified. Transition scores were significantly higher for undergraduates who were employed compared with non-workers. Postregistration institutional work factors appeared to be stronger predictors of successful transition than pre-registration employment factors. Assistance in dealing with complex patients, orientation to a new environment, and respect from colleagues were the best predictors for successful transition. Engaging in some form of paid employment in the final year of undergraduate university study is beneficial. However, it is not pre-registration employment choice per se that is the best predictor of successful transition, but the influence of work factors which new graduates experience in their first year of practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Determinants of successful deanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaw, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    With the significant changes taking place in health and education as well as the rising demands and expectations, deans of medical faculties must exhibit strong and effective leadership skills. Deans need to focus on the broad scope and to translate their dreams into applied institutional operations and functions. It is thus necessary that the deans must identify the institution's core ideology, lead strategic planning, create a common vision and offer direction to the collective membership of the institution. Some personal qualities that appear to be critical for effective deanship include being visionary, fair, trustworthy and exemplary. Prospective deans should receive training in leadership. New deans must be properly informed on the strategic plan of the faculty before they are appointed.

  15. Parental Influences on Hmong University Students' Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports findings from a series of focus groups conducted on Hmong American university students. The purpose of the focus groups was to understand how, from the perspective of Hmong American students themselves, acculturative stress and parents influencedacademic success. Findings of a thematic analysis centered on general themes across focus group respondents that related to parental socialization, gendered socialization, and ethnic identification. Each identified themes is discussed in reference to gendered patterns of experiences in Hmong American families and in reference to academic success.

  16. Top 10 Steps to Business Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Gianna

    2013-03-01

    What does it really take to build a successful technology based company? This fast paced and interactive discussion will highlite potential missteps as well as actions that increase the likelihood of success. Topics under consideration will include: how to begin, creating an organizational structure, creating a plan, selecting a name, financing, allocating resources as efficiently as possible, building a team, protecting intangible assets, strategic alliances, obtaining revenue and transitioning from startup to growth. The primary goal of this presentation is to help you identify value-creating practices as well as wasteful practices, while providing the general nuts and bolts required to move forward.

  17. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  18. Anodized dental implant surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. Materials and Methods: A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. Results: The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. Conclusions: The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  19. Anodized dental implant surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  20. Determinants of construction project success in India

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, Kumar Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    This study presents exploratory work and seeks to identify and evaluate the success and failure factors that could form a guideline for further study and to some extent help professionals to understand some critical aspects that impact project performance concerning construction in India. A total of 55 attributes affecting the performance of construction projects are analysed in terms of their level of influence on four key performance criteria – schedule, cost, quality, and no disputes – using a two-stage questionnaire survey. These attributes are then further analysed, interpreted and evaluated.   Based on the critical success factors obtained from the study, a neural network model-based predictive model for project performance has been developed. The performance prediction models have been derived for all four project performance criteria. Further, a hypothesis that ‘project success’ is influenced by ‘success traits’ has also been formulated. The hypothesized positive inter-relationships betwe...

  1. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...... in a successful ecological niche of doctoral education, and the ways in which the microclimate support the doctoral students’ learning. The methods we applied in the case study were based on short-term ethnographic fieldwork. The results reveal four key features of the emotional atmosphere in the microclimate...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...

  2. Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Mary N. Hill

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal

  3. Predicting parameters of degradation succession processes of Tibetan Kobresia grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Li, Y. K.; Xu, X. L.; Zhang, F. W.; Du, Y. G.; Liu, S. L.; Guo, X. W.; Cao, G. M.

    2015-11-01

    In the past two decades, increasing human activity (i.e., overgrazing) in the Tibetan Plateau has strongly influenced plant succession processes, resulting in the degradation of alpine grasslands. Therefore, it is necessary to diagnose the degree of degradation to enable implementation of appropriate management for sustainable exploitation and protection of alpine grasslands. Here, we investigated environmental factors and plant functional group (PFG) quantity factors during the alpine grassland succession processes. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify the parameters indicative of degradation. We divided the entire degradation process into six stages. PFG types shifted from rhizome bunchgrasses to rhizome plexus and dense-plexus grasses during the degradation process. Leguminosae and Gramineae plants were replaced by sedges during the advanced stages of degradation. The PFGs were classified into two reaction groups: the grazing-sensitive group, containing Kobresia humilis Mey, and Gramineae and Leguminosae plants, and the grazing-insensitive group, containing Kobresia pygmaea Clarke. The first group was correlated with live root biomass in the surface soil (0-10 cm), whereas the second group was strongly correlated with mattic epipedon thickness and K. pygmaea characteristics. The degree of degradation of alpine meadows may be delineated by development of mattic epipedon and PFG composition. Thus, meadows could be easily graded and their use adjusted based on our scaling system, which would help prevent irreversible degradation of important grasslands. Because relatively few environmental factors are investigated, this approach can save time and labor to formulate a conservation management plan for degraded alpine meadows.

  4. Building Successful Information Systems – a Key for Successful Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doina ROSCA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Building Successful Information Systems – a Key for Successful OrganizationAbstract: An Information System (IS can have a major impact on corporate strategy and organizational success. The involvement of managers and decision makers in all aspects of information systems is a major factor for organizational success, including higher profits and lower costs. Some of the benefits business organization seek to achieve through information systems include: better safety, competitive advantage, fewer errors, greater accuracy, higher quality products, improved communications, increased efficiency and productivity, more efficient administration, superior financial and managerial decision making.

  5. Critical Success Factors for Risk Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yaraghi, Niam

    2009-01-01

    Despite the existence of extensive literature regarding risk management, there still seems to be lack of knowledge in identification of Critical Success Factors (CSFs) in this area. In this research Grounded Theory is implemented to identify CSFs in Risk Management Systems (RMS). Factor analysis and one-sample t-test are then used to refine and rank the CSFs based on the results of a survey which has been performed among Risk Management practitioners in various types of Swedish corporations. ...

  6. Strategies for successful esthetic dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Stephen R

    2007-07-01

    The foundational principles of esthetic smiles reveal the direct influence of individual tooth alignment on dentofacial relationships. The use of clinical photography is an essential means to identify esthetic problems. Smile design provides an opportunity for effective communication to discuss treatment alternatives with the patient in the consultation process. The scope of treatment can be determined, and treatment limitations can be explained. Smile design findings influence preparation design, material selection, and laboratory communication for enhanced predictability and improved treatment success.

  7. Critical success factors in information technology projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the critical success factors (CSF of IT projects in Pa-kistan. The identified factors cannot only be functional to exact type IT projects but also to all types of IT projects, their success directly affects the achievement of whole organization. The proposed study of this paper has determined 15 factors influencing the most on the success of IT projects through multiple regression analysis. The survey has disclosed that many CSFs were found related to IT projects but these 15 factors are also the backbone of IT projects. The re-search results obtained clearly indicated that the Leadership Qualities played a significant role in obtaining Top Management support in order to access to resources however, the Leadership Qualities did not play any role on the trained and capable Project Team Members. Besides, it is undoubtedly defined effective communication of the project was established to be influential on the conclusion and contributing factor towards the Success of IT projects in Pakistan. Top Man-agement Support as a whole was not found to play a key role in the IT Project Success.

  8. Defining and Measuring Academic Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis T. York

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite, and perhaps because of its amorphous nature, the term - academic success' is one of the most widely used constructs in educational research and assessment within higher education. This paper conducts an analytic literature review to examine the use and operationalization of the term in multiple academic fields. Dominant definitions of the term are conceptually evaluated using Astin's I-E-O model resulting in the proposition of a revised definition and new conceptual model of academic success. Measurements of academic success found throughout the literature are presented in accordance with the presented model of academic success. These measurements are provided with details in a user-friendly table (Appendix B. Results also indicate that grades and GPA are the most commonly used measure of academic success. Finally, recommendations are given for future research and practice to increase effective assessment of academic success.

  9. Successful cognitive and emotional aging

    OpenAIRE

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Depp, Colin A.; Vahia, Ipsit V.

    2010-01-01

    We review the definitions, determinants, and ways of enhancing successful cognitive and emotional aging. Objective definitions of successful aging based on physical health emphasize outcomes including freedom from disability and disease, whereas subjective definitions center on well-being, social connectedness, and adaptation. Most older people do not meet objective criteria for successful aging, while a majority meet the subjective criteria. Older people with severe mental ...

  10. Succession planning and individual development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudreau, Kelly A; Hardy, Jacalyn

    2006-06-01

    The authors present a framework for a succession planning and individual development initiative implemented in a Veterans Health Administration facility. Foundational strategic goals and a conceptual framework in the Veterans Affairs system provide the structure for the 3 facility-level succession planning and individual development programs. Outcomes of the programs are promising with 2 of 3 programs demonstrating clear succession planning outcomes and the other one showing positive preliminary results.

  11. SUCCESS@Seneca: Facilitating Student and Staff Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Steve; Decandia, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    SUCCESS@Seneca has teamed up with the General Arts and Science programs at Seneca's Newnham campus. The design of an integrated service delivery model addresses numerous student success and retention related activities by providing the essential connection between academics and college resources. The program focuses on the promotion and support of…

  12. Evolution, Appearance, and Occupational Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Little, Anthony C; Roberts, S. Craig

    2012-01-01

    .... In this article, we review evidence linking physical appearance to occupational success and evaluate the hypothesis that appearance based biases are consistent with predictions based on evolutionary...

  13. Paperless medical records: measuring success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobey, Mary Ellen

    2004-01-01

    North Shore Magnetic Imaging Center (NSMIC) underwent a major transformation of the patient process through an 18-month "Reinvention Project." The project began in October 2002, with an assessment of systems in place. A complete review of each stage of the patient process--scheduling, registration, insurance verification, screening, scanning, transcription, and billing--resulted in the discovery that the paperwork for a single patient examination could go though as many as 20 sets of hands. The project was supported by the formation of an internal team comprised of staff members from all departments (support, patient accounts, and technical), radiologists, and members of the center's senior management team. The team had 2 goals: increase the level of patient care, and create a paperless environment. External teams were formed to address specific areas targeted to support the process. The transformation for all involved--patients, staff, radiologists, and referring physicians--has proved to be very positive. The work, however, was not finished. Upon the project's completion, NSMIC recognized the importance of identifying successes and areas for improvement. These included ongoing reviews of the project's impact on all stakeholders and looking for new technologies and programs to enhance the new systems in place. There are plans for a project "sequel." Strategies are being developed for "Reinvention, Phase II." Elements of these strategies include enhancement of the scheduling programs to create more checks and balances for the staff and investigating an online scheduling option for the center's referring physicians. The purchase and implementation of a voice recognition system--tabled during Phase I--is scheduled for the first quarter of 2005.

  14. Population and breeding success of Red-headed Vulture Sarcogyps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Campbell Murn

    Periodic monitoring of each identified nest was done to determine breeding success ... Historical reports indicate Red- headed Vultures .... 24. 217. 241. Table 2: Age composition of Red-headed and Egyptian Vultures based on highest count.

  15. Preservice Music Teachers' Descriptions of Successful and Unsuccessful Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sean R.; Parker, Elizabeth Cassidy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how undergraduate music education students identify, through a reflective writing exercise, the major characteristics of successful and unsuccessful teachers. We asked two research questions: (1) How did preservice music teachers describe successful and unsuccessful teachers (2) How did perceptions differ…

  16. Training employees as a management attribute of successful companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumalo, R

    2001-12-01

    This paper discusses training as an important attribute of successful companies and identified as characteristic of excellent Zimbabwean companies. Although confident this attribute contributes to successful performance by companies in which it is applied, it is possible that contributions could be more effective were all characteristics implemented collectively. However, the research suggests that training alone can offer significant improvement in employees' performance.

  17. Success in Seattle; Creative Reuse and Community Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narver, Betty Jane

    1983-01-01

    Examines issues and influences surrounding massive school closure in Seattle, Washington, and identifies factors that led to the success of a program to rescue school space for other purposes. Attributes the success of the reuse program to planning policies and management processes, city government cooperation, and citizen involvement. (MJL)

  18. An assessment of bank merger success in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    German banks have experienced a merger wave since the early 1990s. However, the success or bank mergers remains a continuous matter or debate. This paper suggests a taxonomy to evaluate post-merger performance on the basis of cost and profit efficiency (CE and PE). I identify successful mergers as t

  19. Creating a professional presentation. A template of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garity, J

    1999-01-01

    Successful individuals speak and write effectively. Effective speakers know their subject, convey a message, and understand their audience. Guidelines to enhance speaking skills, identify adult learner/learning style strategies, and use audiovisual aids more successfully in presentations are presented. The professional career benefits of presentations are discussed.

  20. Five Strategies of Successful Part-Time Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Vivien; Lawrence, Thomas B.; Frost, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies commonalities in the approaches of successful part-time professionals. Discusses five strategies for success: (1) communicating work-life priorities and schedules to the organization; (2) making the business case for part-time arrangements; (3) establishing time management routines; (4) cultivating advocates in senior management; and…

  1. Five Strategies of Successful Part-Time Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Vivien; Lawrence, Thomas B.; Frost, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies commonalities in the approaches of successful part-time professionals. Discusses five strategies for success: (1) communicating work-life priorities and schedules to the organization; (2) making the business case for part-time arrangements; (3) establishing time management routines; (4) cultivating advocates in senior management; and…

  2. Impact of Leadership Styles on Project Success – The Case of a Multinational Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Blaskovics

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Literature on project success mainly focused on identifying and analyzing success criteria and critical success factors. Success criteria are used for evaluating the success of a project and critical success factors are those factors which increase the potential for achieving project success. However, the interrelationships among them were rarely analyzed, although researchers highlighted the importance of these interrelationships. The aim of the paper is to identify a leadership style, of which project managers can maximize the potential for achieving project success. Project success is analyzed from the point of view of success criteria. This approach manages the shortcoming mentioned above, the lack of analyzing interrelationships among critical success factors and success criteria. This outcome is drawn from qualitative field research at a subsidiary of a Scandinavian-based multinational company.

  3. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  4. RE 05: engineering successful products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atlee, Joanne M.; Wieringa, Roel J.

    2006-01-01

    At the Requirements Engineering conference series, researchers and practitioners exchange experiences, discuss problems, and propose solutions. The theme of RE 05--Engineering Successful Products--reflects the understanding that high-quality requirements are at the heart of successful products. To b

  5. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  6. Succession planning: securing the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Julia; Roy, Wendy

    2004-12-01

    Succession planning is an essential business strategy for healthcare organizations, given the impending retirement of the huge Baby Boomer cohort of experienced nurses. It ensures that there will be qualified candidates when key vacancies occur. The authors describe the critical elements of a succession plan and suggest ways to implement them. The model can be applied to leadership and clinical positions.

  7. Success and Women's Career Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joyce E. A.; Burgess, Jennifer R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Women still face barriers to career success and satisfaction: stereotypes, assumptions, organizational culture, human resource practices, and lack of opportunities. Despite individual and organizational strategies, many women leave to become entrepreneurs. There is a need to investigate how women define career success. (SK)

  8. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  9. SUCCESSION MANAGEMENT: UPAYA HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING MENUJU SUCCESS CORPORATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rini Kuswati

    2010-06-01

    create a more flexible and dynamic approach for preparing future executive and have the leadership necessary ready to meet the business challenges of the remainder of the decade and beyond. Succession management allows the corporate leadership to instill a more dynamic process became easier to integrate with the firm’s strategic initiatives. It better aligns organizational thinking with the external environment where the discontinuities make it possible to anticipate the full spectrum of change that a corporation will confront. It is the leadership and succession philosophy that focuses on developing the creativity and flexibility that allows for a more rapid response to change. So succession management as one way to became the success corporate.

  10. Pairing and reproductive success in two sympatric species of Hyalella (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Dogielinotidae) from southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Castiglioni, Daniela; Bond-Buckup, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at characterizing pairing and reproductive success in relation to male and female sizes of the sympatric freshwater gammarideans Hyalella pleoacuta and H. castroi from southern Brazil. These amphipods exhibit precopulatory mate guarding, in which a male will carry a potential mate beneath its ventral surface, guarding the female for several days until it molts and lays its eggs. The specimens were collected monthly with nets, from November 2003 to July 2004 in two trout aquaculture ponds at Sítio Vale das Trutas locality, São José dos Ausentes County, southern Brazil. The precopulatory pairs and ovigerous females were identified and separated in the field. In the laboratory, they were measured (cephalothorax length in mm), using a micrometer eyepiece in a stereoscopic microscope. Pairing success was estimated from the proportion of mating males and females related to their respective non-pairing individuals by size classes. Reproductive success was estimated from egg production. The mean cephalothorax length of paired males was larger than that of the unpaired males. For females, however, body size not affect pairing success for either species, because mean cephalothorax length of paired females did not differ significantly from unpaired females. Paired and unpaired males of both species of Hyalella were larger than the females. Positive assortative mating by size was observed in both species; i.e., larger males tended to pair with larger females. Male pairing success increased sharply with size. In both species, reproductive success in males increased with body size; however, the females of intermediate size classes showed greater reproductive success. This result supports the hypothesis that loading constraints play a part in structuring size-assortative pairing in these species.

  11. Succession Planning in Australian Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hicks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this paper is that succession planning in Australian farming is under-developed.It may be linked to economic and social change which suggests that farmers need to adapt togenerational change but this is being resisted or ignored. The implications of this are the slowdecline of family farming, a poor transfer of skills and knowledge to subsequent generationsof farmers in some parts of the agricultural sector and the potential for an extension of thefinancial services industry to develop a more effective raft of succession planning measuresto mitigate the effects of a traditional approach to succession in agriculture.

  12. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are cultural achievements that reflect our humanity, power our economy, and constitute fundamental aspects of our lives as citizens, consumers, parents, and members of the workforce. Providing all students with access to quality education in the STEM disciplines is important to our nation's…

  13. Towards Informed Maintenance Decision Making: Identifying and Mapping Successful Diagnostic and Prognostic Routes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiddens, W.W.; Braaksma, A.J.J.; Tinga, T.; Grubbström, R.W.; Hinterhuber, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced maintenance techniques (AMTs) are practices that can support informed maintenance decision making by taking the current, but preferably also the future state of physical assets into account. These techniques can be worthwhile to companies when they are well applied. However, only few compan

  14. Identifying Success Factors of ICT in Developing a Learning Community: Case Study Charles Sturt University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew; Uys, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: A learning community has been developing in a distributed environment amongst the members of the Centre for Enhancing of Learning and Teaching (CELT) located in the Bathurst, Goulburn and Orange campuses of Charles Sturt University. This group is known by the acronym of GDMOB, with the purpose of the community to facilitate the…

  15. Towards Informed Maintenance Decision Making: Identifying and Mapping Successful Diagnostic and Prognostic Routes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiddens, Wieger Willem; Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Tinga, Tiedo; Grubbström, R.W.; Hinterhuber, H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced maintenance techniques (AMTs) are practices that can support informed maintenance decision making by taking the current, but preferably also the future state of physical assets into account. These techniques can be worthwhile to companies when they are well applied. However, only few

  16. Identifying the Criteria for Planning the Selection and Succession of a CIO: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Many challenges face CIOs in their management of IT systems; yet, very little research is available regarding the issues and constraints associated with their role. CIO leadership is still a subject of inquiry for those with aspirations to pursue such a position. The specific problem of the current qualitative phenomenological study concerned the…

  17. The Dissertation Examination: Identifying Critical Factors in the Success of Indigenous Australian Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil; Trudgett, Michelle; Page, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous Australians represent 2.2% of the working age population, yet account for only 1.4% of all university enrolments. In relation to higher degree research students, Indigenous Australians account for 1.1% of enrolments, but only 0.8% of all higher degree research completions. This paper reports on findings that emerged from an Australian…

  18. The Development and Field Test of an Employment Interview System to Identify Successful School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Angelique L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the employment interview system for Principals (ICIS-Principal). This instrument attempts to predict the effectiveness of principal applicants as building leaders, determined through a set of employment interview questions aligned with the primary themes found within the…

  19. Identifying Usability and Productivity Dimensions for Measuring the Success of Mobile Business Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiju Vuolle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews existing measures used for evaluating the usability of information systems and those used for evaluating the level of the productivity of a company. We discuss the usefulness of the existing measures in the mobile business context, where both mobility and work-context pose specific demands for the mobile business services. The review showed that the existing measures rarely consider the great contextual variation caused by the mobility of the services and the demands this poses on usability; which, in turn, affects productivity. To build a measurement tool that better meets the requirements of mobile business services, we completed case studies on two mobile business services, one used in passenger transport and the other in construction sites. Based on the understanding gained from the case studies, we propose a list of dimensions and items addressing both usability and productivity aspects that work as the basis for a multidisciplinary measurement tool.

  20. Identifying U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Characteristics That Correspond to Success in Specific Occupational Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Combat Camera 04 Logistics 48 Recruiting and Retention Specialist 05 MAGTF Plans 55 Music 06 Comm 57 CBRN 08 Arty 58 MP 11 Utilities 59 Electronics Maint...regression a type of shrinkage estimator. For 1a = the penalty uses only the absolute values of the coefficients and is the same as the penalty used...and Retention Specialist 138 11 05 MAGTF Plans 174 15 55 Music 353 46 06 Comm 8,577 932 57 CBRN 495 60 08 Arty 3,019 347 58 MP 2,462 278 11 Utilities

  1. [Success factors in public healthy eating campaigns: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschemann-Witzel, J; Pérez-Cueto, F J A; Strand, M; Verbeke, W; Bech-Larsen, T

    2012-01-01

    Public campaigns and interventions are rarely fully evaluated regarding their effectiveness. The analysis of past, successful activities can contribute to the future development of public campaigns and interventions for healthier eating. The study of public campaigns and interventions for healthier eating aimed at identifying the underlying success factors and describing their relation. Interviews were conducted with representatives of 11 cases that had been identified as especially successful in an earlier research step. The interviews were analysed with regard to possible success factors and the latter used to develop a model of success factor interrelation. It was found that success of the cases was first, attributed to characteristics of the macro environment or to public private partnerships in the initiation of campaigns, second, to the engagement of social communities, elements of empowerment of the target group and the implementation of social marketing measures, and thirdly, in citizens adoption of the campaign and in accompanying structural changes. The model and identified success factors underline that success can stem from three crucial phases: the set up of a campaign, the conduction and finally, the interrelation with the citizen. The model can serve as a guide in the future development of campaigns.

  2. Turkey knockdown in successive flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R D; Edson, R K; Watkins, K L; Robertson, J L; Meldrum, J B; Novilla, M N

    2000-01-01

    Turkey knockdown was diagnosed in three of five flocks of hen turkeys on a single farm within a 12-mo period. The age of birds in the flocks affected ranged from 6 wk 2 days to 7 wk 4 days. The attack rate ranged from 0.02% to 0.30% with a case fatality rate in affected birds ranging from 0 to 74%. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical signs and histopathologic lesions associated with knockdown. The feed in all flocks contained bacitracin methylene disalicylate and monensin (Coban). Affected birds were recumbent, demonstrated paresis, and were unable to vocalize. Postmortem examination revealed few significant lesions although pallor of the adductor muscles and petechiation in adductor and gastrocnemius muscles were noted. Birds that had been recumbent for extended periods were severely dehydrated. Consistent microscopic lesions included degeneration, necrosis, and regeneration of adductor, gastrocnemius, and abdominal muscles. No lesion in cardiac tissue was noted. Results of our investigation indicated that changes in water consumption, vitamin E status, and brooder to finisher movement correlated with the occurrence of knockdown. Turkey knockdown was defined in 1993 as any condition identified in a turkey flock that has affected the neuromuscular system to a degree that a turkey is unable to walk or stand. This definition was later modified to...neuromuscular or skeletal systems to a degree that a turkey is unable to walk or stand properly. Knockdown may be associated with numerous feed, management, or disease factors alone or in combination. Dosage of monensin, feed restriction/gorging, water restriction, heat stress, copper, mycotoxins, sodium chloride in feed, and sulfa drugs have all been suggested as contributing factors; however, laboratory studies to duplicate this have not been successful. This report presents observations from a single farm at which three of five hen flocks in a single year experienced knockdown. When a flock was reported as

  3. Predicting Success in Elementary Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogull, R. G.; Rosengarten, W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a device for predicting student success in a high school Elementary Algebra course. It was intended to assist guidance counselors in advising students in selecting the most appropriate mathematics course. (Editor)

  4. Leadership for Successful School Desegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the literature and questionnaire responses shows that superintendents who successfully meet the challenge of school desegregation assess the situation of each school, provide for communication, focus on potential student benefits, and demonstrate personal commitment. (Author/MLF)

  5. Human capital and career success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    Denmark’s registry data provide accurate and complete career history data along with detailed personal characteristics (e.g., education, gender, work experience, tenure and others) for the population of Danish workers longitudinally. By using such data from 1992 to 2002, we provide rigorous...... evidence for the first time for the population of workers in an entire economy (as opposed to case study evidence) on the effects of the nature and scope of human capital on career success (measured by appointments to top management). First, we confirm the beneficial effect of acquiring general human...... capital formally through schooling for career success, as well as the gender gap in career success rates. Second, broadening the scope of human capital by experiencing various occupations (becoming a generalist) is found to be advantageous for career success. Third, initial human capital earned through...

  6. Success Factors of PLM Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭月梅; 李莉敏; 胡庆夕; 方明伦

    2004-01-01

    Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) is a business strategy beginning to gain wide acceptance. Concerning the implementation of PLM projects, six success factors are presented and analyzed in details in this paper.

  7. The neurobiology of successful abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, H; Brennan, K L; Hester, R; Whelan, R

    2013-08-01

    This review focuses on the neurobiological processes involved in achieving successful abstinence from drugs of abuse. While there is clinical and public health value in knowing if the deficits associated with drug use correct with abstinence, studying the neurobiology that underlies successful abstinence can also illuminate the processes that enable drug-dependent individuals to successfully quit. Here, we review studies on human addicts that assess the neurobiological changes that arise with abstinence and the neurobiological predictors of successfully avoiding relapse. The literature, while modest in size, suggests that abstinence is associated with improvement in prefrontal structure and function, which may underscore the importance of prefrontally mediated cognitive control processes in avoiding relapse. Given the implication that the prefrontal cortex may be an important target for therapeutic interventions, we also review evidence indicating the efficacy of cognitive control training for abstinence.

  8. Success Teaching Spelling with Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mariellen

    1983-01-01

    A spelling approach which incorporates music on a cassette with spelling, pronunciation, and definition of specific words was successful in improving junior high learning disabled students' spelling performance, self-esteem, and sequential memories. (CL)

  9. The characteristics of successful entrepreneurs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pokrajcic, Dragana

    2004-01-01

    .... The psychological characteristic theory of entrepreneur argues that successful entrepreneurs possess certain personality traits that mark them out as special, and tries to determine and to evaluate these special traits...

  10. Success Teaching Spelling with Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mariellen

    1983-01-01

    A spelling approach which incorporates music on a cassette with spelling, pronunciation, and definition of specific words was successful in improving junior high learning disabled students' spelling performance, self-esteem, and sequential memories. (CL)

  11. Organizational Climate for Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Hannes; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Research on successful aging at work has neglected contextual resources such as organizational climate, which refers to employees' shared perceptions of their work environment. We introduce the construct of organizational climate for successful aging (OCSA) and examine it as a buffer of the negative relationship between employee age and focus on opportunities (i.e., beliefs about future goals and possibilities at work). Moreover, we expected that focus on opportunities, in turn, positively predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and motivation to continue working after official retirement age. Data came from 649 employees working in 120 companies (M age = 44 years, SD = 13). We controlled for organizational tenure, psychological climate for successful aging (i.e., individuals' perceptions), and psychological and organizational age discrimination climate. Results of multilevel analyses supported our hypotheses. Overall, our findings suggest that OCSA is an important contextual resource for successful aging at work.

  12. Building a Successful Technology Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silicon Valley is the iconic cluster—a dense regional network of companies, universities, research institutions, and other stakeholders involved in a single industry. Many regions have sought to replicate the success of Silicon Valley, which has produced technological innov...

  13. Potential success factors in brand development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Grunert, Klaus G.; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    2005-01-01

    Branding is important to both retailers and manufacturers in the fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry, as both parties attempt to develop strong brands in order to improve their position vis-à-vis each other and direct competitors. But what is required to develop a strong brand...... to the marketing of the brand." The branding literature mentions many important aspects, factors, issues, brand requirements, steps, building blocks or guidelines for building strong brands. However, these are all quite general and abstract. Given the substantial body of literature on branding, surprisingly few...... of this paper is to identify potential success factors in developing strong brands and to test whether these factors can be used to discriminate between strong and weak brands. It does so through a review of the literature for potential success factors. Furthermore, to ensure that important factors have...

  14. VIEWS ON SUCCESS IN LIFE BASED GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Magdalena IORGA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the characteristics of success in life we must consider the social construction of genders (male and female manifested in the interaction between the sexes. Social interpretation of biological sex leads to the identification of a set of behaviors particular to each sex, both in society and subsequently in private life as well as in the public eye. The research aims to identify the opinions and beliefs on the matter of students from the Veterinary Medicine University of Bucharest, their views on success in life, in the work place, in their study environment and in society as a whole, the characteristics of each gender, equality between women and men. The research findings reveal a specific social pattern determined by gender and residential environment.

  15. Successful e-marketplaces: An institutional perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T R Madanmohan

    2005-04-01

    Since their inception, e-marketplaces have witnessed a major shakeout and have undergone tremendous change with regard to their business models and products/service offerings. Only a few marketplaces survive, tend to grow and consolidate in this turbulent environment. This development represents an interesting challenge to prevailing institutional theory, which views the performance of organizations as strongly influenced by the orientation and characteristics of a number of key institutional frameworks. Our research, based on a case survey methodology, attempts to identify the characteristics underlying successful e-marketplaces. Results indicate the success of a marketplace strongly influenced by number of key institutional frameworks and firm-level strategies. Ownership and bias, service focus, value impact, market opaqueness, rapidity of response, complementary assets and appropriability, and industry regulations emerge as key variables.

  16. Method of identifying defective particle coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark E.; Whiting, Carlton D.

    1986-01-01

    A method for identifying coated particles having defective coatings desig to retain therewithin a build-up of gaseous materials including: (a) Pulling a vacuum on the particles; (b) Backfilling the particles at atmospheric pressure with a liquid capable of wetting the exterior surface of the coated particles, said liquid being a compound which includes an element having an atomic number higher than the highest atomic number of any element in the composition which forms the exterior surface of the particle coating; (c) Drying the particles; and (d) Radiographing the particles. By television monitoring, examination of the radiographs is substantially enhanced.

  17. Enterprise architecture for business success

    CERN Document Server

    Wijegunaratne, Inji; Evans-Greenwood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Enterprise Architecture (EA) has evolved to become a prominent presence in today's information systems and technology landscape. The EA discipline is rich in frameworks, methodologies, and the like. However, the question of 'value' for business ;professionals remains largely unanswered - that is, how best can Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Architects deliver value to the enterprise? Enterprise Architecture for Business Success answers this question. Enterprise Architecture for Business Success is primarily intended for IT professionals working in the area of Enterprise Architectu

  18. Geometry success in 20 mins

    CERN Document Server

    Editors, LearningExpress

    2010-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, this completely revised and updated third edition of Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day is an invaluable resource for both students and adults.

  19. The characteristics of successful entrepreneurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokrajčić Dragana M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the economic, psychological and social-behavioral theories of the entrepreneur in order to determine the characteristics of a successful entrepreneur. The major contribution of economic theories of the entrepreneur is better understanding of the entrepreneur and his/her role in economic development. The psychological characteristic theory of entrepreneur argues that successful entrepreneurs possess certain personality traits that mark them out as special, and tries to determine and to evaluate these special traits. The social-behavioral theories stress the influence of experience, knowledge, social environment and ability to learn on the entrepreneur’s success as well as his/her personality traits. Neither of the examined theories of entrepreneur gives a satisfactory explanation of the entrepreneur’s success, but taken as a whole, they can explain key factors of entrepreneur’s success. The entrepreneur’s success comes about as a result of his/her personality traits, ability to learn from experience and ability to adjust to his/her environment.

  20. Statistical properties of successive ocean wave parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wist, Hanne Therese

    2004-07-01

    For random waves the free surface elevation can be described by a number of individual wave parameters. The main object of this work has been to study the statistical properties of individual parameters in successive waves; the wave crest height, the wave height and the wave period. In severe sea states the wave crest heights exhibit a nonlinear behavior, which must be reflected in the models. An existing marginal distribution that uses second order Stokes-type nonlinearity is transformed to a two-dimensional distribution by use of the two-dimensional Rayleigh distribution. This model only includes sum frequency effects. A two-dimensional distribution is also established by transforming a second order model including both sum and difference frequency effects. Both models are based on the narrow-band assumption, and the effect of finite water depth is included. A parametric wave crest height distribution proposed by Forristall (2000) has been extended to two dimensions by transformation of the two-dimensional Weibull distribution. Two successive wave heights are modeled by a Gaussian copula, which is referred to as the Nataf model. Results with two initial distributions for the transformation are presented, the Naess (1985) model and a two-parameter Weibull distribution, where the latter is in best agreement with data. The results are compared with existing models. The Nataf model has also been used for modeling three successive wave heights. Results show that the Nataf transformation of three successive wave heights can be approximated by a first order autoregressive model. This means that the distribution of the wave height given the previous wave height is independent of the wave heights prior to the previous wave height. The simulation of successive wave heights can be done directly without simulating the time series of the complete surface elevation. Successive wave periods are modeled with the Nataf transformation by using a two-parameter Weibull distribution

  1. Mechanisms of Surface-Mediated DNA Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was employed in conjunction with resonance energy transfer (RET) to observe the dynamic behavior of donor-labeled ssDNA at the interface between aqueous solution and a solid surface decorated with complementary acceptor-labeled ssDNA. At least 100 000 molecular trajectories were determined for both complementary strands and negative control ssDNA. RET was used to identify trajectory segments corresponding to the hybridized state. The vast majority of molecules from solution adsorbed nonspecifically to the surface, where a brief two-dimensional search was performed with a 7% chance of hybridization. Successful hybridization events occurred with a characteristic search time of ∼0.1 s, and unsuccessful searches resulted in desorption from the surface, ultimately repeating the adsorption and search process. Hybridization was reversible, and two distinct modes of melting (i.e., dehybridization) were observed, corresponding to long-lived (∼15 s) and short-lived (∼1.4 s) hybridized time intervals. A strand that melted back onto the surface could rehybridize after a brief search or desorb from the interface. These mechanistic observations provide guidance for technologies that involve DNA interactions in the near-surface region, suggesting a need to design surfaces that both enhance the complex multidimensional search process and stabilize the hybridized state. PMID:24708278

  2. Establishing predictors for successfully planned endotracheal extubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chin-Ming; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Liu, Wei-Lun; Weng, Shih-Feng; Sung, Mei-I; Hsing, Shu-Chen; Cheng, Kuo-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish predictors for successfully planned extubation, which can be followed by medical personnel. The patients who were admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital and met the following criteria between January 2005 and December 2014 were collected retrospectively: intubation > 48 hours; and candidate for extubation. The patient characteristics, including disease severity, rapid shallow breath index (RSBI), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), cuff leak test (CLT) before extubation, and outcome, were recorded. The CLT was classified as 2+ with audible flow without a stethoscope, 1+ with audible flow using a stethoscope, and negative (N) with no audible flow, even with a stethoscope. Failure to extubate was defined as reintubation within 48 hours. In total, 6583 patients were enrolled and 403 patients (6.1%) had extubation failures. Male patients dominated the patient cohort (4261 [64.7%]). The mean age was 64.5±16.3 years. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 11.3%. The extubation failure rate for females was greater than males (7.7% vs 5.3%, P predictors for successful extubation.This study identified 3 independent risk factors for successful extubation after a successful breathing trial, including a CLT of 2+, a MEP ≥ 55 cmH2O, and a RSBI < 68 breath/min/ml. Furthermore, a nomogram integrating these 3 parameters, which represented the combined consideration of the upper airway patentency, cough strength, and respiratory capacity, was developed to better predict extubation success.

  3. Successful Implementation of Clinical Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, V.; Bruner, K.; Maciaz, G.; Saucedo, L.; Catzoela, L.; Ramirez, R.; Jacobs, W.J.; Nguyen, P.; Patel, L.; Webster, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To identify and describe the most critical strategic and operational contributors to the successful implementation of clinical information technologies, as deployed within a moderate sized system of U.S. community hospitals. Background and Setting CHRISTUS Health is a multi-state system comprised of more than 350 services and 60 hospitals with over 9 000 physicians. The Santa Rosa region of CHRISTUS Health, located in greater San Antonio, Texas is comprised of three adult community hospital facilities and one Children’s hospital each with bed capacities of 142–180. Computerized Patient Order Entry (CPOE) was first implemented in 2012 within a complex market environment. The Santa Rosa region has 2 417 credentialed physicians and 263 mid-level allied health professionals. Methods This report focuses on the seven most valuable strategies deployed by the Health Informatics team in a large four hospital CHRISTUS region to achieve strong CPOE adoption and critical success lessons learned. The findings are placed within the context of the literature describing best practices in health information technology implementation. Results While the elements described involved discrete de novo process generation to support implementation and operations, collectively they represent the creation of a new customer-centric service culture in our Health Informatics team, which has served as a foundation for ensuring strong clinical information technology adoption beyond CPOE. Conclusion The seven success factors described are not limited in their value to and impact on CPOE adoption, but generalize to – and can advance success in – varied other clinical information technology implementations across diverse hospitals. A number of these factors are supported by reports in the literature of other institutions’ successful implementations of CPOE and other clinical information technologies, and while not prescriptive to other settings, may be adapted to yield

  4. Ballroom Dance: Linking Serious Leisure to Successful Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Ratchford, Regena G

    2016-09-01

    This study explored ballroom dance as serious leisure and successful aging in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Qualitative procedures were used to explore stories of ballroom dance and successful aging. Participants described positive successful aging and active leisure engagement. Three themes emerged from thematic analyses: (a) Ballroom Dance as Serious Leisure: Its Dimensions; (b) Ballroom Dance: Its Link to Successful Aging; (c) The Affinity: We Love to Dance!. The participants' ballroom dance revealed serious leisure characteristics in conjunction with their successful aging. They loved to dance, self-identified as ballroom dancers, and orchestrated their dance activities within its social world. Future research should examine the relation of successful aging to the social world of ballroom dance. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. NCLEX-RN Performance: Predicting Success on the Computerized Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Julie Keith; Beeman, Pamela Butler

    2001-01-01

    Discriminant analysis was used to identify variables predictive of success in the computerized National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses with data from 289 nursing graduates. Using seven significant predictors, 94% of passes and 92% of failures were correctly identified. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  6. Digital Identifier Systems: Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Khedmatgozar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifier is one of the main elements in identifying an object in digital environment. Digital identifier systems were developed followed by a lot of problems such as violation of persistency and uniqueness of physical identifiers and URL in digital environment. These identifiers try to guarantee uniqueness and persistency of hostnames by using indirect names for Domain Name System (DNS. The main objective of this research is to identify qualified digital identifier system among other systems. To achieve the research objective, researchers have considered two major steps: first, identifying main criteria for distinguishing digital identifier based on literature review and focus group interview; and second, performing a comparative evaluation on common identifier systems in the world. Findings of first step demonstrated seven main criteria in three domains for distinguishing digital identifier systems: identifier uniqueness and persistency in the identifier features domain, digital identification, digital uniqueness, digital persistency and digital actionability in the digital coverage domain, and globality in the comprehensiveness of scope domain. In the second step, results of the comparative evaluation on common identifier systems indicated that six identifier systems, included, DOI, Handle, UCI, URN, ARK and PURL, are appropriate choices for using as a digital identifier system. Also, according to these results, three identification systems Including NBN, MARIAM and ISNI were identified as suitable choices for digital identification in certain specialized fields. According to many benefits of using these identifiers in important applied fields, such as, digital content chains and networks integration, digital right management, cross referencing, digital libraries and citation analysis, results of this study can help digital environment experts to diagnose digital identifier and their effective use in applied fields.

  7. Successive Boronizing and Austempering for GGG-40 Grade Ductile Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murat Baydogan; Seckin Izzet Akray

    2009-01-01

    Boronizing and austempering were successively applied to a GGG-40 grade ductile iron in order to combine the advantages of both process in a single treatment. This new procedure formed a 30 μm thick boride layer on the surface with subsurface matrix structure consisted of acicular ferrite and retained austenite. Reciprocating wear tests showed that successive boronizing and austempering exhibited considerably higher wear resistance than conventional boronizing having a subsurface matrix structure consisting of ferrite and pearlite.

  8. [Brain Mechanism for Successful Memory Retrieval].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    Previous neuropsychological studies that investigated patients with brain injury have revealed the presense of multiple memory systems and the related brain regions. Recent functional imaging studies have identified a neuronal network including the temporal cortex and hippocampus that is responsible for the retrieval of semantic memory. This memory network was further investigated by electrophysiology using a simultaneous recording technique. This new technique revealed that a coupling of inter-area top-down signal within the temporal cortex with translaminar signal processing is required for successful memory retrieval of visual objects.

  9. Succession planning: a call to action for nurse executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Sylvain; Crenshaw, Jeannette T

    2013-10-01

    To discuss the organisational benefits of strategic succession planning in acute care hospital settings as a responsibility of chief nurse executives. A formal succession planning process is crucial to the financial and operational viability and sustainability of acute care hospitals. A succession plan is an essential business strategy that promotes effective leadership transition and continuity while maintaining productivity. Nursing and business literature were reviewed; reports contrasting institutions with and without succession plans were examined; and, operational implications were considered. It is imperative that chief nurse executives respond to the business benefits of an effective succession planning programme, identify common barriers and solutions, and implement best practices for a successful strategic succession planning programme. A strategic succession planning programme may offer many benefits to an acute care hospital, including improved retention rates, increased staff engagement and enhanced financial performance. Considering the ageing nursing workforce and the potential increase in demand for nursing services in the near future, nurse executives and other nurse leaders must actively engage in a formal succession planning process. A formal succession planning programme will help to provide strategic leadership continuity, operational effectiveness and improved quality of care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Leadership Succession and Successful Leadership: The Case of Laura Martinez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Encarnacion, Jr.; Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Merchant, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This case study follows the work of principal Laura Martinez as moving from leading Stevens Elementary for 9 years, and now opening a new P-8th grade academy in the same south Texas urban, inner-city district. The purpose of this case study was to observe successful leadership and the principal's strategies both in her previous and present school,…

  11. The International Successful School Principalship Project: Success Sustained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Lejf; Johansson, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the findings of the follow-up studies of successful school principals in six countries: Australia, Denmark, England, Norway, Sweden, and the USA. Design/methodology/approach: Data were categorized according to stakeholder expectations, the concept and practice of leadership, and the…

  12. Leadership Succession and Successful Leadership: The Case of Laura Martinez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Encarnacion, Jr.; Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Merchant, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This case study follows the work of principal Laura Martinez as moving from leading Stevens Elementary for 9 years, and now opening a new P-8th grade academy in the same south Texas urban, inner-city district. The purpose of this case study was to observe successful leadership and the principal's strategies both in her previous and present school,…

  13. Succession planning. A strategy for taking charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, F L

    2000-01-01

    This article on succession planning includes a definition of succession planning, the reasons for and components of succession planning, and why succession planning is important to the leadership of an organization, unit, division or department. Each component of succession planning, that is, vision, networking, and mentorship, is described, with examples that are intended to guide the reader to initiate and evaluate succession planning.

  14. Drilling successful from ROV Ventana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakes, Debra S.; McFarlane, James A. R.; Holloway, G. Leon; Greene, H. Gary

    Cores of granite and deformed sediment from the walls of Monterey Canyon were successfully recovered from December 30 to 31, 1992, by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Ventana using a small-diameter, double-barrel drill with a diamond bit. This HSTR (Holloway-Stakes-Tengdin-Rajcula) drill was developed to drill cores horizontally from sulfide/sulfate walls of active black smokers. The drill was first successfully used by the submersible Alvin in October 1991 to drill into massive sulfide chimneys, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (Eos, June 30, 1992, p. 273), and it was subsequently used with equal success on the chalcopyrite-rich chimneys from 21°N and 9°N on the East Pacific Rise. The recent December dives, however, marked the first time that drilling has ever been attempted from the smaller ROV and the first time coring into the harder igneous rock substrate has been attempted.

  15. Success factors in technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Universities in the U.S. have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This paper describes goals and philosophy of the Technology Licensing Office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This paper also relates the critical factors for susscessful technology transfer, particularly relating to new business formation. These critical factors include the quality of the technology, the quality of the management, the quality of the investor, the passion for success, and the image of the company. Descriptions of three different levels of investment are also given and the most successful level of investment for starting a new company is reviewed. Licensing to large companies is also briefly reviewed, as this type of licensing requires some different strategies than that of licensing to start-up companies. High quality critical factors and intelligent investment create rewards for the parties and successful ventures.

  16. Mission Success for Combustion Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes how mission success for combustion experiments has been obtained in previous spaceflight experiments and how it will be obtained for future International Space Station (ISS) experiments. The fluids and combustion facility is a payload planned for the ISS. It is composed of two racks: the fluids Integrated rack and the Combustion INtegrated Rack (CIR). Requirements for the CIR were obtained from a set of combustion basis experiments that served as surrogates for later experiments. The process for experiments that fly on the ISS includes proposal selection, requirements and success criteria definition, science and engineering reviews, mission operations, and postflight operations. By following this process, the microgravity combustion science program has attained success in 41 out of 42 experiments.

  17. Fast Success and Slow Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mors, Louise; Waguespack, David

    Full Abstract: Do the benefits of cross boundary collaborations outweigh the costs? We seek to answer this question by examining 5079 collaborations in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Our findings suggest that crossing formal boundaries is positively related to success and efficiency...... of the collaboration. Yet there are high costs associated with cross boundary collaborations for unsuccessful projects, as these take longer to fail, and therefore hold up resources that could be reallocated to other projects. We find that even with a boost in success, the costs are higher than the likelihood...... of success, suggesting that firms are better off investing in nondiverse projects. This finding has important implications for how we think about the benefits of seeking novelty....

  18. Nurse manager succession planning: synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titzer, Jennifer; Phillips, Tracy; Tooley, Stephanie; Hall, Norma; Shirey, Maria

    2013-10-01

    The literature supporting nurse manager succession planning is reviewed and synthesised to discover best practice for identifying and developing future nurse managers. Healthcare succession planning practices are lacking. Nurse managers are historically selected based on clinical skills and lack formal leadership preparation. A systematic literature search appraises and summarises the current literature supporting nurse manager succession planning. Multiple reviewers were used to increase the reliability and validity of article selection and analysis. New nurse managers require months to adapt to their positions. Deliberate nurse manager succession planning should be integrated in the organisation's strategic plan and provide a proactive method for identifying and developing potential leaders. Organisations that identify and develop internal human capital can improve role transition, reduce nurse manager turnover rates and decrease replacement costs. Despite the clear benefits of succession planning, studies show that resource allocation for proactive, deliberate development of current and future nurse leaders is lacking. Additionally, systematic evaluation of succession planning is limited. Deliberate succession planning efforts and appropriate resource allocation require strategic planning and evaluation methods. Detailed evaluation methods demonstrating a positive return on investment utilising a cost-benefit analysis and empirical outcomes are necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Priority setting: what constitutes success? A conceptual framework for successful priority setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibbald Shannon L

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sustainability of healthcare systems worldwide is threatened by a growing demand for services and expensive innovative technologies. Decision makers struggle in this environment to set priorities appropriately, particularly because they lack consensus about which values should guide their decisions. One way to approach this problem is to determine what all relevant stakeholders understand successful priority setting to mean. The goal of this research was to develop a conceptual framework for successful priority setting. Methods Three separate empirical studies were completed using qualitative data collection methods (one-on-one interviews with healthcare decision makers from across Canada; focus groups with representation of patients, caregivers and policy makers; and Delphi study including scholars and decision makers from five countries. Results This paper synthesizes the findings from three studies into a framework of ten separate but interconnected elements germane to successful priority setting: stakeholder understanding, shifted priorities/reallocation of resources, decision making quality, stakeholder acceptance and satisfaction, positive externalities, stakeholder engagement, use of explicit process, information management, consideration of values and context, and revision or appeals mechanism. Conclusion The ten elements specify both quantitative and qualitative dimensions of priority setting and relate to both process and outcome components. To our knowledge, this is the first framework that describes successful priority setting. The ten elements identified in this research provide guidance for decision makers and a common language to discuss priority setting success and work toward improving priority setting efforts.

  20. Developing a Successful HIV Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome integration indicates that persistent sterilizing immunity will be needed for a successful vaccine candidate. This suggests a need for broad antibodies targeting the Env protein. Immunogens targeting gp120 have been developed that block infection in monkeys and mimic the modest success of the RV144 clinical trial in that protection is short-lived following a decline in antibody-depending cell-mediated cytotoxicity-like antibodies. Attempts to induce antibody persistence have been complicated by a loss of efficacy, presumably by increasing the number of HIV-target cells. The key seems to be achieving an immune balance.

  1. Successive quadratic programming multiuser detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Xuewen; Zhang Yaling; Liu Sanyang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the semidefinite programming relaxation of the CDMA maximum likelihood multiuser detection problem,a detection strategy by the successive quadratic programming algorithm is presented. Coupled with the randomized cut generation scheme, the suboptimal solution of the multiuser detection problem in obtained. Compared to the interior point methods previously reported based on semidefinite programming, simulations demonstrate that the successive quadratic programming algorithm often yields the similar BER performances of the multiuser detection problem. But the average CPU time of this approach is significantly reduced.

  2. The Keys to Success in Doctoral Studies: A Preimmersion Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Deborah; Albuja, Laura Dean; Azaiza, Khitam

    2016-01-01

    This article will review an innovative on-line preimmersion course for a hybrid doctor of nursing practice (DNP) program and a traditional face-to-face doctor of philosophy nursing program. The doctoral candidates include both postbaccalaureate and postmaster's students. The authors of the preimmersion course developed and initiated the course in order to address various issues that have surfaced in discussions between students and faculty. Examples of common themes identified include writing skills, statistics, life-work-school balance, and navigating instructional technology. Doctoral studies may pose challenges to students studying nursing, in regard to academic rigor and experiencing on-line education for the first time, especially for students who have been out of school for an extended amount of time or are not accustomed to a nontraditional classroom; thus, having a preimmersion course established may facilitate a smooth transition to rigorous academic studies in a hybrid program. The course, which was developed and delivered through Blackboard, a learning management system, includes the following 9 preimmersion modules: academic strategies (learning styles, creating an effective PowerPoint presentation), library support (introduction to the university library, literature review tutorial, and citation styles), mindfulness, wellness, statistics essentials, writing express, DNP capstone, netiquette, and DNP/doctor of philosophy mentorship. Each module consists of various tools that may promote student success in specific courses and the programs in general. The purpose of designing the preimmersion course is to decrease attrition rates and increase success of the students. While the majority of students have succeeded in their coursework and been graduated from the program, the authors of this article found that many students struggled with the work, life, and school balance. Future work will include the evaluation of results from graduate students enrolled in

  3. Leadership Succession: Future-proofing Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Saul; Youngs, Howard

    2017-09-12

    The challenges in deaf education illustrate the requirement and importance of leadership in this specialized field. The significant and impending talent depletion unfolding as baby-boomers retire, positions leadership succession planning as a strategic issue. This mixed methods study is the first of its kind in New Zealand. The aim is to understand leadership demographics and assumptions to determine the need for strategic succession planning to identify and address leaky pipelines. The findings from 82% of the deaf education workforce through a questionnaire and interviews with seven senior leaders reveal that senior leaders do not appear aware of four key areas that dissuade and shrink the pool of potential leadership aspirants. The four areas are prioritizing family; safeguarding health; concerns about bureaucracy, paperwork, and workload; and, a reluctance to move away from teaching. Aspirant identification appears informal, as there is no formal succession plan in place, which suggests a leadership crisis is imminent in New Zealand deaf education provision. Recommendations are provided that may help address this situation in New Zealand and other first-world nations if sufficient leaders are in place to deal with the challenges facing deaf education today and in the future. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Institutionalization and Organizational Long-term Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise L. Fleck

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalization processes have an ambivalent effect on organizational long-term success. Even though they foster organizational stability and permanence, they also bring about rigidity and resistance to change. As a result, successful organizations are likely to lose their competitive advantage over time. The paper addresses this issue through the investigation of the institutionalization processes of two long-lived companies: General Electric, a firm that has been a long-term success and its rival, Westinghouse, which was broken up after eleven decades of existence. The longitudinal, multilevel analysis of firms and industry has identified two different modes of organizational institutionalization. The reactive mode gives rise to rigidity and change resistance, much like institutional theory predicts; the proactive mode, on the other hand, neutralizes those negative effects of institutionalization processes. In the reactive mode, structure predominates. In the proactive mode, agency plays a major role in organizational institutionalization, and in managing the organization’s relations with the environment, clearly contributing to environmental institutionalization.

  5. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-positive pathogen, the adaptation to Gram-negative UPEC resulted in cytoplasmic protein contamination. In a more direct approach, whole-cell bacteria were labeled with a biotin tag to indicate surface-exposed peptides and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2-DLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins isolated from the outer membrane. This method discovered 25 predicted outer membrane proteins expressed by UPEC while growing in human urine. Nine of the 25 predicted outer membrane proteins were part of iron transport systems or putative iron-regulated virulence proteins, indicating the importance of iron acquisition during growth in urine. One of the iron transport proteins identified, Hma, appears to be a promising vaccine candidate is being further investigated. The method described here presents a system to rapidly identify the outer membrane proteome of bacteria, which may prove valuable in vaccine development. PMID:19426766

  6. Maternal Cohabitation and Educational Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raley, R. Kelly; Frisco, Michelle L.; Wildsmith, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in children's experiences in cohabiting families, little is known about how living in such families affects children's academic success. Extrapolating from two theoretical frameworks that have been commonly used to explain the association between parental divorce and educational outcomes, the authors constructed…

  7. Academic Success at Selective Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    Examined success factors of eight under-prepared students at Colorado State University. Four major themes emerged from the data: pre-college experiences, struggles, positive campus experiences and support, and student growth. Findings were conceptualized within a student resiliency framework. (EV)

  8. Lobomycosis Successfully Treated with Posaconazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Beatriz; Seas, Carlos; Salomon, Martín; Bravo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Lobomycosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis for which no standard treatment is available to date. We describe a patient in Peru with lobomycosis on the left earlobe that was successfully treated with posaconazole for 27 months. No evidence of recurrence was observed after five years of follow-up. PMID:23546805

  9. Parents, School Success, and Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-08-03

    In this podcast, Dr. William Jeynes, CDC Parenting Speaker Series guest, discusses the importance of parental involvement in children's academic success and lifelong health.  Created: 8/3/2009 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 8/3/2009.

  10. Trusted advisers build business success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M. Strike (Vanessa)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe role of the trusted and most loyal adviser has been a crucial one to family concerns throughout the ages. During the Korean Joseon Dynasty, Kim Cheo-Seon, a eunuch, advised successive kings wisely. Sir Francis Walsingham, Principal Secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England, is rememb

  11. Successful I.D. Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Margaret J.

    Instructional Development (I.D.) encounters are dependent for success on such variables as power, politics, promotion, and organizational placement. I.D. consultants must be aware of power bases or orientation of other personnel and clients, e.g., these four "power personalities" which affect their efforts in managing I.D. encounters: the gate…

  12. Emotional Intelligence and Successful Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulding, Wanda S.

    Cognitive intelligence is often equated with eventual success in many areas. However, there are many instances where people of high IQ flounder whereas those of modest IQ do surprisingly well. Author and renowned psychologist Daniel Goleman believes that the explanation for this fact lies in abilities called "emotional intelligence,"…

  13. Measuring Success: Evaluating Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Yael

    2010-01-01

    This paper reveals a new evaluation model, which enables educational program and project managers to evaluate their programs with a simple and easy to understand approach. The "index of success model" is comprised of five parameters that enable to focus on and evaluate both the implementation and results of an educational program. The integration…

  14. of the Intestate Succession Act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    substitution in terms of the Intestate Succession Act 81 of 1987. See the ... the Court explained the reasons for the difference between its .... (b) Each surviving spouse should inherit a child's share of the intestate estate or so ... the Black Administration Act 38 of 1927 and the Births and Deaths Registration Act 51 of 1992. 36.

  15. Practices of Successful School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolph, Dave; Grant, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Leadership is a discipline that has been studied to improve organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Owing to the attention and emphasis that education has been subject to in recent decades, the study of successful school leadership presents an area worth examining (Smith & Piele, 1997). Therefore, the research underpinning this article…

  16. The Passion of Successful Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports multiperspective research on 10 successful, experienced headteachers working in a range of urban and suburban schools of different sizes (with different school populations and free school meals indices of between 20% and 62%). All had raised the levels of measurable pupil attainments in their schools and all were highly regarded…

  17. Archery: Success through Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Ralph W.

    1982-01-01

    For maximum early success in mastering the sport of archery, the first few days of instruction should be taken in the classroom. Two positions, the grip and the anchor, which can be taught and rehearsed in the classroom, are described. (JN)

  18. Emotion regulation and successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Gaurav; Gross, James J

    2012-08-01

    Despite normative declines in old age, healthy elderly typically report surprisingly high levels of well-being. It is not clear why this is so. A study by Brassen and colleagues suggests that one factor may be reduced responsiveness to regret. These findings highlight the role of emotion regulation in successful aging.

  19. Trusted advisers build business success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M. Strike (Vanessa)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe role of the trusted and most loyal adviser has been a crucial one to family concerns throughout the ages. During the Korean Joseon Dynasty, Kim Cheo-Seon, a eunuch, advised successive kings wisely. Sir Francis Walsingham, Principal Secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England, is rememb

  20. Defining and Measuring Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Travis T.; Gibson, Charles; Rankin, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Despite, and perhaps because of its amorphous nature, the term "academic success" is one of the most widely used constructs in educational research and assessment within higher education. This paper conducts an analytic literature review to examine the use and operationalization of the term in multiple academic fields. Dominant…

  1. Successful Teachers Practice Perpetual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Marisa

    2007-01-01

    Successful teaching involves continuous learning, stimulation, motivation, and networking with other art educators. To help art teachers improve themselves, SchoolArts magazine recently organized the Folk Art Traditions and Beyond Seminar at Ghost Ranch in Santa Fe. In this article, the author describes the highlights of the Folk Art Traditions…

  2. What Is Needed for Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖婧

    2007-01-01

    <正>Every one of us expects success in our daily life and work. However, we can’t avoid various kinds of failures. Some people will persist in their effort and finally get suc- cess, while others will lose their hearts easily for not having achieved what they have aimed at.

  3. Trusted advisers build business success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M. Strike (Vanessa)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe role of the trusted and most loyal adviser has been a crucial one to family concerns throughout the ages. During the Korean Joseon Dynasty, Kim Cheo-Seon, a eunuch, advised successive kings wisely. Sir Francis Walsingham, Principal Secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England, is

  4. Successful Components of Interdisciplinary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Katherine; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This article presents 10 ideas for developing successful interdisciplinary curricula as suggested in the allied health literature. Implementation of the ideas is illustrated by examples from a clinical geriatric course involving physical therapy, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, and medical students. (Author/CT)

  5. Successful intelligence and giftedness: an empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ferrando

    Full Text Available The aim of our research is to look into the diversity within gifted and talented students. This is important to better understand their complexity and thus offer a more appropriate educational programs. There are rather few empirical works which attempt to identify high abilities profiles (giftedness and talent that actually exist beyond the theoretical level. The present work intends to single out the different patterns or profiles resulting from the combination of the successful intelligence abilities (analytical, synthetic and practical, as defined by Stenberg. A total of 431 students from the Region of Murcia participated in this study. These students performed the Aurora Battery tasks (Chart, Grigorenko, & Sternberg, 2008, designed to measure the analytical, practical and creative intelligence. Analytically gifted students (n=27, practically gifted (n=33 and creatively gifted (n= 34 were identified, taking as criteria scores equal to or higher than 120 IQ on each intelligence. Different Q-factor analyses were carried out for the three groups of students, in such a way that students were grouped according to their similarities. A total of 10 profiles showing how successful intelligence abilities are combined were obtained, something that has made possible to support the theory put forward by Sternberg (2000: the analytical, practical and creative talent profiles, as well as the resulting combinations, the analytical-practical, analytical-creative, practical-creative profiles, along with the consummate balance talent (high performance in the three types of intelligence.

  6. PSC: protein surface classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  7. Experiences of successful undergraduate students in online science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Carolyn A.

    This qualitative phenomenological study explored successful undergraduate experiences in online science courses to determine factors that contributed the necessary support for their success. The research questions were: (1) What personal factors contributed to student success in an online science course? (2) What university supports and interventions were available that contributed to student success? (3) What challenges or barriers to success were encountered? and (4) What advice or suggestions can be offered to enable future students to be successful? Thirteen undergraduate students were interviewed. After the interviews were transcribed and coded, the researcher analyzed the data to establish commonalities among student experiences. Finally, interpretations of the themes were applied to the research questions. The findings in the study indicated there was no one characteristic or single factor that contributed to the successful experiences of all online students, but a myriad of characteristics and factors that combined to play a role in student success in an online science course. Identifying and understanding the characteristics and factors presented may enable the university to create better support systems to promote future student success and retention.

  8. Identification of Dimeric Methylalumina Surface Species during Atomic Layer Deposition Using Operando Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ryan A; McAnally, Michael O; Schatz, George C; Stair, Peter C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2017-02-15

    Operando surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to successfully identify hitherto unknown dimeric methylalumina surface species during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a silver surface. Vibrational modes associated with the bridging moieties of both trimethylaluminum (TMA) and dimethylaluminum chloride (DMACl) surface species were found during ALD. The appropriate monomer vibrational modes were found to be absent as a result of the selective nature of SERS. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed to locate and identify the expected vibrational modes. An operando localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrometer was utilized to account for changes in SER signal as a function of the number of ALD cycles. DMACl surface species were unable to be measured after multiple ALD cycles as a result of a loss in SERS enhancement and shift in LSPR. This work highlights how operando optical spectroscopy by SERS and LSPR scattering are useful for probing the identity and structure of the surface species involved in ALD and, ultimately, catalytic reactions on these support materials.

  9. An Exploratory Study of E-Business Success Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jingting; HUANG Jinghua

    2004-01-01

    E-business success factors are important for traditional enterprises to implement e-business. This topic is attracting more and more researchers to study. This paper makes an exploratory study on the factors influencing e-business success. Firstly, based on the literature review, 52 factors are suggested. Secondly, two rounds of survey with Delphi method are conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analysis are used to identify 57factors. This is the foundation of empirical study.

  10. A model of succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Sally; Procter, Nicholas; Deuter, Kate

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews current literature on succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners (NPs) and discusses a model of succession planning that is underpinned by principals of leadership development, workforce participation and client engagement. The paper identifies succession planning as a means of managing a present and future workforce, while simultaneously addressing individual and organizational learning and practice development needs. A discussion of the processes attendant upon sustainable succession planning - collegial support, career planning and development, information exchange, capacity building, and mentoring is framed within the potential interrelationships between existing NP, developing NP and service directors and/or team managers. Done effectively and in partnership with wider clinical services, succession planning has the potential to build NP leadership development and leadership transition more broadly within mental health services.

  11. [Effect of stock abundance and environmental factors on the recruitment success of small yellow croaker in the East China Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zun-lei; Yuan, Xing-wei; Yang, Lin-lin; Yan, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Jia-hua

    2015-02-01

    Multiple hypotheses are available to explain recruitment rate. Model selection methods can be used to identify the best model that supports a particular hypothesis. However, using a single model for estimating recruitment success is often inadequate for overexploited population because of high model uncertainty. In this study, stock-recruitment data of small yellow croaker in the East China Sea collected from fishery dependent and independent surveys between 1992 and 2012 were used to examine density-dependent effects on recruitment success. Model selection methods based on frequentist (AIC, maximum adjusted R2 and P-values) and Bayesian (Bayesian model averaging, BMA) methods were applied to identify the relationship between recruitment and environment conditions. Interannual variability of the East China Sea environment was indicated by sea surface temperature ( SST) , meridional wind stress (MWS), zonal wind stress (ZWS), sea surface pressure (SPP) and runoff of Changjiang River ( RCR). Mean absolute error, mean squared predictive error and continuous ranked probability score were calculated to evaluate the predictive performance of recruitment success. The results showed that models structures were not consistent based on three kinds of model selection methods, predictive variables of models were spawning abundance and MWS by AIC, spawning abundance by P-values, spawning abundance, MWS and RCR by maximum adjusted R2. The recruitment success decreased linearly with stock abundance (P runoff of Changjiang River showed a marginally negative effect (P = 0.07). Based on mean absolute error and continuous ranked probability score, predictive error associated with models obtained from BMA was the smallest amongst different approaches, while that from models selected based on the P-value of the independent variables was the highest. However, mean squared predictive error from models selected based on the maximum adjusted R2 was highest. We found that BMA method could

  12. Coevolutionary success-driven multigames

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Wealthy individuals may be less tempted to defect than those with comparatively low payoffs. To take this into consideration, we introduce coevolutionary success-driven multigames in structured populations. While the core game is always the weak prisoner's dilemma, players whose payoffs from the previous round exceed a threshold adopt only a minimally low temptation to defect in the next round. Along with the strategies, the perceived strength of the social dilemma thus coevolves with the success of each individual player. We show that the lower the threshold for using the small temptation to defect, the more the evolution of cooperation is promoted. Importantly, the promotion of cooperation is not simply due to a lower average temptation to defect, but rather due to a dynamically reversed direction of invasion along the interfaces that separate cooperators and defectors on regular networks. Conversely, on irregular networks, in the absence of clear invasion fronts, the promotion of cooperation is due to inte...

  13. Key to Language Learning Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktavian Mantiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the important elements of language learning and teaching i.e. the role of teachers as well as the attitude and motivation of learners. Teachers undoubtedly play crucial roles in students’ language learning outcome which could ignite or diminish students’ motivation. Positive attitudes and motivation – instrumental or integrative and intrinsic or extrinsic – are key to successful learning. Therefore it is paramount for language teachers as well as learners to know these roles and nurture the best possible ways where language teaching and learning will thrive. This paper also suggested that both stake-holders should be open to holistic approach of language learning and that other factors such as the environment could play an important part in language teaching and learning success.

  14. Successful renal transplantation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hold, Phoebe M; Wong, Christopher F; Dhanda, Raman K; Walkinshaw, Steve A; Bakran, Ali

    2005-09-01

    Little is known about the implications of performing a renal transplant on a patient who is already pregnant. This case study reports a successful outcome of pregnancy, diagnosed coincidentally following renal transplantation at 13 weeks gestation. The recipient was a 23-year-old woman with chronic kidney disease who received a live-related renal transplant from her father. Pregnancy was discovered at routine ultrasound scanning of the renal allograft at 5 days posttransplant and estimated at 13 weeks gestation. She received ciclosporin monotherapy as immunosuppression throughout the pregnancy, and was given valacyclovir as prophylaxis against cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Renal function remained stable throughout the pregnancy, which progressed normally, resulting in the vaginal delivery of a healthy, liveborn male infant at 37 weeks gestation. This case study demonstrates that transplantation during pregnancy can have a successful outcome.

  15. Institutional Influences on Succession Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Fietze, Simon

    International research shows that entrepreneurial intentions (EI) largely depend on the institutional context. Family business research indicates that succession intentions (SI) similarly vary among countries but explanations up to now are mainly based on cultural differences. Especially in Nordic...... welfare countries entrepreneurial but also succession intention are lower than in countries with other welfare models. Therefore we investigate how SI differs in 17 countries with regards to the institutional context by combining the Global University Entrepreneurial Spirit Students’ Survey (GUESSS......) and the Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED). With this study we fill a research gap by analyzing the influence of social policy measured by the total generosity index on SI of students. The regression results show that SI among other variables depends on the welfare model in certain institutional contexts...

  16. Challenges for Success in Startups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Richard

    2000-03-01

    The basic challenges to a startup company such as IME have stemmed from the need to balance the business world's goal of fast entry into the market place with the necessity for a solid foundation in technology. Our technology base is broad - indeed it has the makings of a new industry - and the lure of quick commercial success in a specific application could easily make IME vulnerable to the R&D might of giant international companies. The essential challenges for success play out in business/technology decision tradeoffs: (i) preserving equity and viability while keeping R&D momentum and establishing intellectual property, (ii) attracting investors while maintaining focus on long-range goals, and (iii) developing a complete team while protecting capital resources. This balancing act keeps the company agile and resilient, qualities that large corporations could emulate with profit.

  17. The Successive Mean Quantization Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Mikael; Dahl, Mattias; Claesson, Ingvar

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the Successive Mean Quantization Transform (SMQT). The transform reveals the organization or structure of the data and removes properties such as gain and bias. The transform is described and applied in speech processing and image processing. The SMQT is considered as an extra processing step for the mel frequency cepstral coefficients commonly used in speech recognition. In image processing the transform is applied in automatic image enhancement and dynamic range compress...

  18. Fumigation success for California facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Robert

    2010-02-01

    As Robert Hacker, at the time director of facilities management at the St John's Regional Medical Center in Oxnard, California, explains, the hospital, one of the area's largest, recently successfully utilised a new technology to eliminate mould, selecting a cost and time-saving fumigation process in place of the traditional "rip and tear" method. Although hospital managers knew the technology had been used extremely effectively in other US buildings, this was reportedly among the first ever healthcare applications.

  19. Key to Language Learning Success

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at the important elements of language learning and teaching i.e. the role of teachers as well as the attitude and motivation of learners. Teachers undoubtedly play crucial roles in students’ language learning outcome which could ignite or diminish students’ motivation. Positive attitudes and motivation – instrumental or integrative and intrinsic or extrinsic – are key to successful learning. Therefore it is paramount for language teachers as well as learners to know these rol...

  20. The Successive Mean Quantization Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Mikael; Dahl, Mattias; Claesson, Ingvar

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the Successive Mean Quantization Transform (SMQT). The transform reveals the organization or structure of the data and removes properties such as gain and bias. The transform is described and applied in speech processing and image processing. The SMQT is considered as an extra processing step for the mel frequency cepstral coefficients commonly used in speech recognition. In image processing the transform is applied in automatic image enhancement and dynamic range compress...

  1. What influences crowdfunding campaign success.

    OpenAIRE

    Drabløs, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Crowdfunding is a recently emerged market for entrepreneurs; it represents a new and growing source of potential capital. The potential crowdfunding is starting to reach it potential, and has beginning to go mainstream. There is a gap in the research on crowdfunding and within the field of what separates a successful campaign from a failed one. To explore the variables influencing crowdfunding campaign this paper looks into academic articles, the crowdfunding platforms, general...

  2. Emerging Prospects for Repository Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T

    2006-01-12

    Recent events are again raising some old issues and creating new opportunities regarding the future disposition of the used, or spent, fuel from nuclear power plants. Handling these challenges well will not only help set the stage for a robust nuclear energy future, but will reflect the growing linkages among nuclear power, nuclear waste management, international security, and public and political acceptance. The emerging global nuclear regime may make spent fuel management not only more important, but improve chances of success.

  3. Delivering success in Milton Keynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The national roll out of the new procurement route, for publicly funded health schemes over 1 million Pound, has recently been implemented and NHS Trusts are quite naturally looking to the pilot regions for a demonstration of what can be achieved. One such example is the successful delivery of the new Treatment Centre for Milton Keynes General Hospital NHS Trust by Norwest Hoist Construction and its supply chain.

  4. Weight Maintenance: Determinants of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-15

    submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF DIETETIC ADMINISTRATION In Nutrition and Food Sciences Approved: Tamara...Determinants Of Success by Cynthia Mitchell, Master of Dietetic Administration Utah State University, 2005 Major Professor: Tamara Vitale Department...a concern. Current data suggest that these foods are often higher in energy, fat and sodium, but deficient in fiber , vitamins A and C and folate

  5. Innovation, Key to Lasting Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Oerlikon Textile will be exhibiting at ITMA ASIA 2010 in Shanghai on its 750- -plus stand C 51/C 52 in hall W2 from 22 to 26 June 2010. Highlights of the five brands under the umbrella of the textile machinery manufacturer include the new Autoconer X5 winding machine, a new FDY technology and the Era embroidery machine. Their technological innovations illustrate the slogan under which Oerlikon Textile is appearing at the show: Innovation remains the key to success.

  6. Communication: essential strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary

    2013-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advance organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tool, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author discusses strategies for communication for change processes, whether large or small. Intentional planning and development of a communication strategy alongside, not as an afterthought, to change initiatives are essential.

  7. Financial tips for PPS success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The National Association for Home Care asked several home care financial experts to set out their recommendations for success under prospective payment system (PPS) based upon first-year experiences. Many of the recommendations provided are consistent among all the experts in such areas as cash flow, revenue recognition, timely and accurate billing, and information technology. These recommendations can help guide home health agencies into the second year of the Medicare home health PPS.

  8. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  9. Distributed design approach in persistent identifiers systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golodoniuc, Pavel; Car, Nicholas; Klump, Jens

    2017-04-01

    The need to identify both digital and physical objects is ubiquitous in our society. Past and present persistent identifier (PID) systems, of which there is a great variety in terms of technical and social implementations, have evolved with the advent of the Internet, which has allowed for globally unique and globally resolvable identifiers. PID systems have catered for identifier uniqueness, integrity, persistence, and trustworthiness, regardless of the identifier's application domain, the scope of which has expanded significantly in the past two decades. Since many PID systems have been largely conceived and developed by small communities, or even a single organisation, they have faced challenges in gaining widespread adoption and, most importantly, the ability to survive change of technology. This has left a legacy of identifiers that still exist and are being used but which have lost their resolution service. We believe that one of the causes of once successful PID systems fading is their reliance on a centralised technical infrastructure or a governing authority. Golodoniuc et al. (2016) proposed an approach to the development of PID systems that combines the use of (a) the Handle system, as a distributed system for the registration and first-degree resolution of persistent identifiers, and (b) the PID Service (Golodoniuc et al., 2015), to enable fine-grained resolution to different information object representations. The proposed approach solved the problem of guaranteed first-degree resolution of identifiers, but left fine-grained resolution and information delivery under the control of a single authoritative source, posing risk to the long-term availability of information resources. Herein, we develop these approaches further and explore the potential of large-scale decentralisation at all levels: (i) persistent identifiers and information resources registration; (ii) identifier resolution; and (iii) data delivery. To achieve large-scale decentralisation

  10. Successful Climate Science Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, P.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decade, efforts to communicate the facts of global change have not successfully moved political leaders and the general public to action. In response, a number of collaborative efforts between scientists and professional communicators, writers, journalists, bloggers, filmmakers, artists and others have arisen seeking to bridge that gap. As a result, a new cadre of science-literate communicators, and media-savvy scientists have made themselves visible across diverse mainstream, traditional, and social media outlets. Because of these collaborations, in recent years, misinformation, and disinformation have been successfully met with accurate and credible rebuttals within a single news cycle.Examples of these efforts is the Dark Snow Project, a science/communication collaboration focusing initially on accelerated arctic melt and sea level rise, and the Climate Science Rapid Response team, which matches professional journalists with appropriate science experts in order to respond within a single news cycle to misinformation or misunderstandings about climate science.The session will discuss successful examples and suggest creative approaches for the future.

  11. Success in Transdisciplinary Sustainability Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Luthe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of sustainable development and societal transitions require both analytical understandings of how coupled human-environment systems function and transdisciplinary science-to-practice approaches. The academic discourse has advanced in developing a framework for defining success in transdisciplinary research (TDR. Further empirical evidence is needed to validate the proposed concepts with TDR case studies. This paper applies a widely used TDR framework to test and critically evaluate its design principles and criteria of success with five TDR case studies the author is intimately familiar with. Overall, the design principles of the framework are validated for the five cases. Additional design principles are derived from the case analysis and proposed to complement the applied framework: (1 A project origin from society as opposed to with and for society; (2 Quickly available initiation funding; (3 Flexibility in time, objectives and methods throughout the research process; (4 Acceptance of process vs. project results; (5 Inclusion of public science communication; and (6 A demand-driven transition to a prolonged or new project partnership. The complementing principles are proposed for integration in the applied framework and are subject to further empirical testing. The reflexive empirical approach I have taken in this paper offers a key step towards removing institutional barriers for successful TDR, demonstrating how conceptual frameworks can be applied.

  12. PLANT SUCCESSION ON SICILIAN TERRACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. RUHL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available 189 phytosociological relevés have been made in five areas of Sicily, three on volcanic substrates and two on limestones, to study plant community succession trends within abandoned terraced vineyards and cereal fields. Disturbance status and abandonment age was recorded for each sample plot. DCA of these relevés suggests that four are the most important factors driving succession, i.e. geological substrate, bioclimate, age of abandonment and disturbance. In most cases - if there are some dispersal centres near the old fields - undisturbed and less disturbed terraces evolve quite rapidly towards the local potential “climax” community. Different trends have been recorded on the areas which underwent and still undergo frequent and severe disturbance: succession is biased or even blocked in a steady state, so that grassland, garrigue, mantle or herb-dominated communities prevail. The species composition of the plant communities subject to disturbance seems to be strongly connected with the time gap between abandonment and first disturbance occurrence. The “mixed” ecological-structural-phytosociological approach here adopted to describe plant communities was quite effective to interpret abandoned terraces communities and their dynamism.

  13. PLANT SUCCESSION ON SICILIAN TERRACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. RUHL

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available 189 phytosociological relevés have been made in five areas of Sicily, three on volcanic substrates and two on limestones, to study plant community succession trends within abandoned terraced vineyards and cereal fields. Disturbance status and abandonment age was recorded for each sample plot. DCA of these relevés suggests that four are the most important factors driving succession, i.e. geological substrate, bioclimate, age of abandonment and disturbance. In most cases - if there are some dispersal centres near the old fields - undisturbed and less disturbed terraces evolve quite rapidly towards the local potential “climax” community. Different trends have been recorded on the areas which underwent and still undergo frequent and severe disturbance: succession is biased or even blocked in a steady state, so that grassland, garrigue, mantle or herb-dominated communities prevail. The species composition of the plant communities subject to disturbance seems to be strongly connected with the time gap between abandonment and first disturbance occurrence. The “mixed” ecological-structural-phytosociological approach here adopted to describe plant communities was quite effective to interpret abandoned terraces communities and their dynamism.

  14. Lung cancer screening: identifying the high risk cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Michael W.; Raji, Olaide Y; John K. Field

    2015-01-01

    Low dose computed tomography (LDCT) is a viable screening tool for early lung cancer detection and mortality reduction. In practice, the success of any lung cancer screening programme will depend on successful identification of individuals at high risk in order to maximise the benefit-harm ratio. Risk prediction models incorporating multiple risk factors have been recognised as a method of identifying individuals at high risk of developing lung cancer. Identification of individuals at high ri...

  15. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  16. New criteria to identify spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Arne; Krishna, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self-adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest....

  17. New Criteria to Identify Spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Jensen; M Krishna

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we give some new criteria for identifying the components of a probability measure, in its Lebesgue decomposition. This enables us to give new criteria to identify spectral types of self-adjoint operators on Hilbert spaces, especially those of interest.

  18. A novel and simple method for identifying the lung intersegmental plane using thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kei; Kanzaki, Masato; Mitsuboshi, Shota; Maeda, Hideyuki; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Murasugi, Masahide; Onuki, Takamasa

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the intersegmental plane is very important for successful lung segmentectomy. Although several methods are available, they require specialized skills and pose a potential risk of losing sight of the correct intersegmental planes. Therefore, easier and more reliable methods are required. In this study, we hypothesized that surface temperatures of resecting segments or lobes decrease because of blood flow suppression after the ligation of target arteries and veins, and intersegmental planes can be visualized using a thermography. To test this hypothesis, we performed six lung resections (two lobectomies and four segmentectomies) on three pigs and, using a handheld thermography, we monitored the lung surface temperatures to identify intersegmental planes. We demonstrated that thermal imaging sharply demarcated intersegmental planes soon after the ligation of vessels in all procedures. Compared with other methods, thermography requires no special technical skills, drug injection and lung inflation. Therefore, we believe that the thermographic method described in this study will be a powerful option to identify intersegmental planes during anatomical lung segmentectomy.

  19. Supporting Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; McDaris, J. R.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The geoscience student population in the United States today does not reflect the diversity of the US population. Not only does this challenge our ability to educate sufficient numbers of students in the geosciences, it also challenges our ability to address issues of environmental justice, to bring geoscience expertise to diverse communities, and to pursue a research agenda reflecting the needs and interests of our nation as a whole. Programs that are successful in supporting students from underrepresented groups attend to the whole student (Jolly et al, 2004) as they develop not only knowledge and skills, but a sense of belonging and a drive to succeed in geoscience. The whole student approach provides a framework for supporting the success of all students, be they members of underrepresented groups or not. Important aspects of support include mentoring and advising, academic support, an inclusive learning community, and opportunities to learn about the profession and to develop geoscience and professional skills. To successfully provide support for the full range of students, it is critical to consider not only what opportunities are available but the barriers different types of students face in accessing these opportunities. Barriers may arise from gaps in academic experiences, crossing into a new and unfamiliar culture, lack of confidence, stereotype threat, implicit bias and other sources. Isolation of geoscience learning from its application and social context may preferentially discourage some groups. Action can be taken to increase support for all students within an individual course, a department or an institution. The InTeGrate STEP Center for the Geosciences, the Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education at Two-Year Colleges program and the On the Cutting Edge Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty program all provide resources for individuals and departments including on line information, program descriptions, and workshop opportunities.

  20. Microbiota fingerprints lose individually identifying features over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, David; Leung, Marcus H Y; Lee, Patrick K H

    2017-01-09

    Humans host individually unique skin microbiota, suggesting that microbiota traces transferred from skin to surfaces could serve as forensic markers analogous to fingerprints. While it is known that individuals leave identifiable microbiota traces on surfaces, it is not clear for how long these traces persist. Moreover, as skin and surface microbiota change with time, even persistent traces may lose their forensic potential as they would cease to resemble the microbiota of the person who left them. We followed skin and surface microbiota within households for four seasons to determine whether accurate microbiota-based matching of individuals to their households could be achieved across long time delays. While household surface microbiota traces could be matched to the correct occupant or occupants with 67% accuracy, accuracy decreased substantially when skin and surface samples were collected in different seasons, and particularly when surface samples were collected long after skin samples. Most OTUs persisted on skin or surfaces for less than one season, indicating that OTU loss was the major cause of decreased matching accuracy. OTUs that were more useful for individual identification persisted for less time and were less likely to be deposited from skin to surface, suggesting a trade-off between the longevity and identifying value of microbiota traces. While microbiota traces have potential forensic value, unlike fingerprints they are not static and may degrade in a way that preferentially erases features useful in identifying individuals.

  1. Ikea success in chinese furniture

    OpenAIRE

    Yihong, Li

    2007-01-01

    This thesis will focus on the market exploiting and development of IKEA in China, analysis the characteristics of Chinese market and the supply-demand of the IKEA products in China. It also analyze the main Chinese consumers’ behaviour and evaluating the furniture retail market in China. IKEA is a successful case to open the china market recent years. The main goal is to acquire this information in order to provide the overseas retailers with a good starting point for creating an effective bu...

  2. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  3. Fast Success and Slow Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mors, Louise; Waguespack, David

    Collaborating across formal boundaries is beneficial for performance outcomes like innovation. Yet it also costly as it requires actors to overcome spatial distance and enter new knowledge domains. The question then arises as to whether the benefits outweigh costs? We seek to answer this question...... by examining 5079 collaborations in the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Our findings suggest that crossing formal boundaries is positively related to success of the collaboration, as well as efficiency of the project. Yet there are high costs associated with cross boundary collaborations...

  4. Author Identifiers in Scholarly Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Simeon

    2010-01-01

    Bibliometric and usage-based analyses and tools highlight the value of information about scholarship contained within the network of authors, articles and usage data. Less progress has been made on populating and using the author side of this network than the article side, in part because of the difficulty of unambiguously identifying authors. I briefly review a sample of author identifier schemes, and consider use in scholarly repositories. I then describe preliminary work at arXiv to implement public author identifiers, services based on them, and plans to make this information useful beyond the boundaries of arXiv.

  5. Preoperative factors influencing success in pterygium surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Gimeno Ana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify preoperative, perioperative and postoperative risk factors that influence the success of pterygium surgery. Methods This is a prospective study of thirty-six patients with primary or recurrent pterygia. A detailed anamnesis and an ophthalmological examination were performed looking for the following factors: age, race, latitude and altitude of the main place of residence, hours of exposure to the sun, use of protective measures against UV-radiation, classification of pterygium, width of the pterygium at limbus, surgical technique (conjunctival autograft plus suturing versus tissue glue, graft alterations (misapposition, granuloma, haemorrhage, oedema, retraction or necrosis, and postoperative symptoms (foreign-body sensation, pain. The examinations were performed 2 and 7 days and 2, 6 and 12 months after surgery. In addition, recurrence was defined as any growth of conjunctiva into the cornea. Results A logistic regression and a survival analysis have been used to perform data analysis. A total number of 36 patients completed a one year follow-up. A total of 13 patients were born and lived in Spain, and 26 came from other countries, mostly Latin America. A total number of 8 males (no women presented a recurrence, mainly between 2 and 6 months. The hours of sun exposure through their life was independently related to surgical success. Pterygia of less than 5 mm of base width showed a weak positive correlation with recurrence. None of the other factors considered were significantly related to recurrence. Conclusions Male gender and high sun exposure are strongly and independently related to surgical success after the removal of pterygia.

  6. Evolving roles of highly successful mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    This article was written groom mentors, old and new, by identifying the evolving roles that highly successful mentors in order to share wisdom with their protégés. First aspiring mentors need to become subject matter experts in their profession by achieving the relevant benchmarks of mastery in their career fields. Next, they must win the coveted role of respected leader by being trustworthy and putting the development of others first. The mastery of knowledge and earning of respect must also be balanced by genuine humility if the mentor is to be effective in sharing what he or she knows. Highly successful mentors are teachers, plain and simple, and they are most effective in this role when they have a deep passion for teaching. By properly using reflection, adroit mentors look back upon their many adventures and carefully select critical stories to share with their protégés. While outstanding mentors have a lot to say, they need to spend most of their time listening to those they mentor to ensure that they understand their protégés' individualized needs and goals. To help protégés through the setbacks and disappointments that can accompany an Army career, high-speed mentors need to don the role of optimistic cheerleaders, encouraging those they mentor and restoring hope. Once a striving mentor has finally reached the summit of mentoring and is a trusted counselor, he or she must continue to nurture and protect this fragile, but most influential role. Lastly, great mentors need to be consummate students of both their profession and mentoring so that they remain vital and responsive to those they mentor. In closing, it is hoped that by considering and embracing these evolving roles, dedicated students of mentoring will derive a deeper satisfaction and have greater success in this critically important leadership responsibility.

  7. Superamphiphobic Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalli, A.; Mugele, F.; Brutin, David

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent trends in the development, fabrication, and characterization of superamphiphobic surfaces. An amphiphobic surface repels both polar liquids, such as water, and nonpolar (oily) liquids, and has therefore useful technological application in microfluidics devices, protecti

  8. Rumble surfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    National Institute for Transport and Road

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumble surfaces are intermittent short lengths of coarse-textured road surfacings on which vehicle tyres produce a rumbling sound. used in conjunction with appropriate roadsigns and markings, they can reduce accidents on rural roads by alerting...

  9. Surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, T

    2006-10-01

    Surface analysis techniques are important tools to use in the verification of surface cleanliness and medical device functionality. How these techniques can be employed and some example applications are described.

  10. Successful nesting behavior of Puerto Rican parrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K.A.; Field, R.; Wilson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed nesting behavior of five pairs of the endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (Amazona vittata) during eight successful nesting attempts. Each stage of the nesting cycle (egg laying, incubation, early chick rearing, and late chick rearing) was characterized by distinct trends or levels of behavior. During egg laying, female attentiveness to tile nest increased, and male attentiveness decreased. Throughout incubation and the first several days of early chick rearing, females were highly attentive to their nests, whereas males rarely entered the nest cavities. Female attentiveness then began to decline. Male attentiveness to the nest was sporadic until chicks were 10-12 days old. when all males began to enter their nests at least once each day. During late chick rearing, both male and female attentiveness were erratic and highly variable. Biologists may be able to use these results to identify nest problems and the need for management intervention when patterns of nest attentiveness deviate from the limits described in this study..

  11. Financial modeling: Rx for financial success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D

    2001-01-01

    In an era of managed care, cost cutting and finding ways to increase revenue are key goals in the survival of group practices. Many practices find that they have to boost their revenue by a certain amount (for example, 20-30% within the next three years) to maintain viability in the health care marketplace. Understanding how to generate that revenue and influence short-term and long-term financial outcomes is a far trickier process. This article details how practice administrators can influence a practice's bottom line through a three-step process: (1) identify the components of the practice's financial performance and drivers of performance results, (2) diagnose the practice's current financial situation, and (3) pinpoint benchmarks and targets for success.

  12. MARKET SUCCESS FACTORS OF SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Fleith de Medeiros

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates dimensions and factors that according to the perception of business managers drive the market success of environmentally sustainable products. Initially, publications related to new products introduced to the market (with or without environmental focus were evaluated. Four complementary dimensions were identified as responsible for proper performance: (i Market Knowledge, (ii Interfunctional Collaboration, (iii Knowledge Integration Mechanisms, and (iv Generative Learning. Considering the above, an exploratory study following a qualitative approach was conducted with managers that work in the Brazilian market. For the choice of the respondents, some characteristics were considered, such as growth in the sector of activity where the organization works, and the area that they manage. Results lead to the validation and ranking of the factors and dimensions mentioned in the literature. They also allowed the identification of new factors as: technological domain, competitive price, quality, company's brand, and payback. Moreover, considering the variables described and the relationships established among them, it was inferred that technological domain can be considered as a dimension. This suggestion is based on the respondents' perception concerning "technological domain", such as: specialized people, research budget, and also budget for facilities and equipment. The study also shows deeper difference among practice areas than among sectors. Based on the list of factors that was generated, new studies are recommended to measure the impact of the factors and dimensions on the success of green products.

  13. Interdisciplinary research has consistently lower funding success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromham, Lindell; Dinnage, Russell; Hua, Xia

    2016-06-30

    Interdisciplinary research is widely considered a hothouse for innovation, and the only plausible approach to complex problems such as climate change. One barrier to interdisciplinary research is the widespread perception that interdisciplinary projects are less likely to be funded than those with a narrower focus. However, this commonly held belief has been difficult to evaluate objectively, partly because of lack of a comparable, quantitative measure of degree of interdisciplinarity that can be applied to funding application data. Here we compare the degree to which research proposals span disparate fields by using a biodiversity metric that captures the relative representation of different fields (balance) and their degree of difference (disparity). The Australian Research Council's Discovery Programme provides an ideal test case, because a single annual nationwide competitive grants scheme covers fundamental research in all disciplines, including arts, humanities and sciences. Using data on all 18,476 proposals submitted to the scheme over 5 consecutive years, including successful and unsuccessful applications, we show that the greater the degree of interdisciplinarity, the lower the probability of being funded. The negative impact of interdisciplinarity is significant even when number of collaborators, primary research field and type of institution are taken into account. This is the first broad-scale quantitative assessment of success rates of interdisciplinary research proposals. The interdisciplinary distance metric allows efficient evaluation of trends in research funding, and could be used to identify proposals that require assessment strategies appropriate to interdisciplinary research.

  14. An E-Services Success Measurement Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Nasser H. Zaied

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of e-service solutions within the public sector has primarily been concerned with moving away from traditional information monopolies and hierarchies. E-service aims at increasing the convenience and accessibility of government services and information to citizens. Providing services to the public through the Web may lead to faster and more convenient access to government services with fewer errors. It also means that governmental units may realize increased efficiencies, cost reductions, and potentially better customer service. The main objectives of this work are to study and identify the success criteria of e-service delivery and to propose a comprehensive, multidimensional framework of e-services success. To examine the validity of the proposed framework, a sample of 200 e-service users were asked to assess their perspectives towards e-service delivery in some Egyptian organizations. The results showed that the proposed framework is applicable and implementable in the e-services evaluation; it also shows that the proposed framework may assist decision makers and e-service system designers to consider different criteria and measures before committing to a particular choice of e-service or to evaluate any existing e-service system.

  15. Persistent Identifiers, Discoverability and Open Science (Communication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Fiona; Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Early in 2016, the American Geophysical Union announced it was incorporating ORCIDs into its submission workflows. This was accompanied by a strong statement supporting the use of other persistent identifiers - such as IGSNs, and the CrossRef open registry 'funding data'. This was partly in response to funders' desire to track and manage their outputs. However the more compelling argument, and the reason why the AGU has also signed up to the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines (http://cos.io/top), is that ultimately science and scientists will be the richer for these initiatives due to increased opportunities for interoperability, reproduceability and accreditation. The AGU has appealed to the wider community to engage with these initiatives, recognising that - unlike the introduction of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for articles by CrossRef - full, enriched use of persistent identifiers throughout the scientific process requires buy-in from a range of scholarly communications stakeholders. At the same time, across the general research landscape, initiatives such as Project CRediT (contributor roles taxonomy), Publons (reviewer acknowledgements) and the forthcoming CrossRef DOI Event Tracker are contributing to our understanding and accreditation of contributions and impact. More specifically for earth science and scientists, the cross-functional Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (COPDESS) was formed in October 2014 and is working to 'provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals'. Clearly, the judicious integration of standards, registries and persistent identifiers such as ORCIDs and International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) to the research and research output processes is key to the success of this venture

  16. Identifiability, exchangeability and confounding revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Greenland, Sander; Robins, James Matthew

    2009-01-01

    In 1986 the International Journal of Epidemiology published "Identifiability, Exchangeability and Epidemiological Confounding". We review the article from the perspective of a quarter century after it was first drafted and relate it to subsequent developments on confounding, ignorability, and collapsibility.

  17. Identifying discharge practice training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, L; Emmerson, K

    A training needs analysis tool was developed to identify nurses' discharge training needs and to improve discharge practice. The tool includes 49 elements of discharge practice subdivided into four areas: corporate, operational, clinical and nurse-led discharge. The tool was disseminated to 15 wards on two hospital sites with assistance from the practice development team. Analysis of discharge training is important to assess discharge training needs and to identify staff who may assist with training.

  18. Political Economy: Success or Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. Frey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Political Economy and Public Choice approaches have promoted the study of interactions between the economy and the polity for over 60 years now. The present paper endeavours to provide a critical discussion of this literature and its achievements. In particular, it begins with the different approaches based on empirically tested or politometric models and it then proceeds to discuss different studies of the effects that particular rules of the game have on politico-economic outcomes. The third section of the paper will address studies that take institutions to be endogenous and aims to explain why particular institutions emerge. Finally, the question of whether Political Economy has been a success or a failure will be tackled. While the success in terms of the position it has gained in economic research and teaching is undeniable, a look at one of the most thriving recent areas of economics, happiness research, will reveal that some of its fundamental lessons are all too often disregarded.

  19. Success in tutoring electronic troubleshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ellen M.

    1990-01-01

    Two years ago Dr. Sherrie Gott of the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory described an avionics troubleshooting tutor being developed under the Basic Job Skills Research Program. The tutor, known as Sherlock, is directed at teaching the diagnostic procedures necessary to investigate complex test equipment used to maintain F-15 fighter aircraft. Since Dr. Gott's presentation in 1987, the tutor has undergone field testing at two Air Force F-15 flying wings. The results of the field test showed that after an average of 20 hours on the tutor, the 16 airmen in the experimental group (who average 28 months of experience) showed significant performance gains when compared to a control group (having a mean experience level of 37 months) who continued participating in the existing on-the-job training program. Troubleshooting performance of the tutored group approached the level of proficiency of highly experienced airmen (averaging approximately 114 months of experience), and these performance gains were confirmed in delayed testing six months following the intervention. The tutor is currently undergoing a hardware and software conversion form a Xerox Lisp environment to a PC-based environment using an object-oriented programming language. Summarized here are the results of the successful field test. The focus is on: (1) the instructional features that contributed to Sherlock's success; and (2) the implementation of these features in the PC-based version of the avionics troubleshooting tutor.

  20. LS1 Report: Successful tests

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    At the PS Booster, the new beam dump and the associated shielding blocks surrounding it have been successfully installed and the installation of the beam transfer lines are now under way. The BI.SMH septum magnet has been successfully repaired following a confirmed vacuum leak.   At the PS, the consolidation of the seven main PS magnets has started, and the replacement of the old cooling and ventilation system continues to progress well. At the SPS, the replacement of the irradiated cables in Long Straight Section 1 (LSS1) of the SPS is now well under way and proceeding well. At the LHC, the Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation (SMACC) project remains ongoing. The closure of internal sleeves has begun in sector 7-8, and the shunt installations, a major consolidation activity, are progressing well in sector 8-1. The equivalent of more than one sector's outer sleeves (W) have been closed, and leak tests are in progress in several sub-sector...

  1. Towards Successful Cloud Ordering Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yan-Kwang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rise of cloud services has led to a drastic growth of e-commerce and a greater investment in development of new cloud services systems by related industries. For SaaS developers, it is important to understand customer needs and make use of available resources at as early as the system design and development stage. Objectives: This study integrates E-commerce Systems (ECS Success model and Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA into empirical research of the critical factors for cloud ordering system success. Methods/Approach: A survey research is conducted to collect data on customer perceptions of the importance and performance of each attribute of the particular cloud ordering service. The sample is further divided according to the degree of use of online shopping into high-usage users and low-usage users in order to explore their views regarding the system and generate adequate coping strategies. Results: Developers of online ordering systems can refer to the important factors obtained in this study when planning strategies of product/service improvement. Conclusions: The approach proposed in this study can also be applied to evaluation of other kinds of cloud services systems.

  2. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-01

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  3. Covalent Surface Modifications of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavia Sanders, Adriana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    A report meant to document the chemistries investigated by the author for covalent surface modification of CNTs. Oxidation, cycloaddition, and radical reactions were explored to determine their success at covalently altering the CNT surface. Characterization through infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermo gravimetric analysis was performed in order to determine the success of the chemistries employed. This report is not exhaustive and was performed for CNT surface modification exploration as it pertains to the "Next Gen" project.

  4. Some Media Relations Success Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperbeck, John M.

    1997-01-01

    A panel of 29 extension faculty/staff members who work well with the media were interviewed to identify ways to improve their media relations. Reasons for working with the media, ways to develop relationships with media representatives, and suggestions for creating a more favorable climate for media relations in universities were noted. (JOW)

  5. School Plus Home = Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Nancy; Santos, Ricardo Sotelo

    This handbook was developed to serve as a point of reference in identifying potential dropout problems. Included are several crucial recommendations for establishing an effective partnership between home and school that will help children succeed in school. Recommendations focus on preventive action in the classroom and at home. Artwork and…

  6. Hemocompatibility of polymeric nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S; Popat, Ketul C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin (ALB) adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen (FIB) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG) adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces.

  7. Surface reconstructions

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2009-01-01

    It is well-known, even at the most elementary level of scientific knowledge, that free surfaces have properties which make them differ from the underlying bulk material. In the case of liquids, it is common knowledge - even among laymen - that the liquid surface acts as though it were a distinct skin-like material. At a slightly more advanced level, it is known that the liquid surface will seek to minimize its total surface energy by minimizing its surface area; thereby affecting its local vapor-pressure and adsorption behavior. In the case of solids too, it has long been known that different

  8. Surface chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, KR

    2008-01-01

    The surface Chemistry of a material as a whole is crucially dependent upon the Nature and type of surfaces exposed on crystallites. It is therefore vitally important to independently Study different, well - defined surfaces through surface analytical techniques. In addition to composition and structure of surface, the subject also provides information on dynamic light scattering, micro emulsions, colloid Stability control and nanostructures. The present book endeavour to bring before the reader that the understanding and exploitation of Solid state phenomena depended largely on the ability to

  9. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology.

  10. English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing student success: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mary Angela

    2012-01-01

    Many English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) nursing students struggle in nursing school for a multitude of reasons. The purpose of this critical review of the literature is to identify barriers and discover bridges to ESL nursing student success. Twenty-five articles were identified for the review. Language barriers were identified as the single most significant obstacle facing the ESL nursing student. Bridges to ESL nursing student success include enhancing language development and acculturation into the American mainstream culture. A broad range of strategies to promote student success are outlined and the role of the nurse educator in ESL nursing student success is also addressed.

  11. 5 CFR 412.201 - Management succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., MANAGEMENT, AND EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT Succession Planning § 412.201 Management succession. The head of each agency, in consultation with OPM, must develop a comprehensive management succession program, based on... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management succession. 412.201...

  12. What Research Says about the Effect of Academic Enrichment on the Success Rate of Baccalaureate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearing, Arleen

    In the nursing literature, many variables have been used in research to identify students at risk, predict program success, and to indicate the best time to identify at-risk students and how to predict success on the Nursing Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). In general, American College Testing Program (ACT) scores predicted…

  13. Genetic adaptation of Streptococcus mutans during biofilm formation on different types of surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharoni Reuven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adhesion and successful colonization of bacteria onto solid surfaces play a key role in biofilm formation. The initial adhesion and the colonization of bacteria may differ between the various types of surfaces found in oral cavity. Therefore, it is conceivable that diverse biofilms are developed on those various surfaces. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular modifications occurring during in vitro biofilm development of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on several different dental surfaces. Results Growth analysis of the immobilized bacterial populations generated on the different surfaces shows that the bacteria constructed a more confluent and thick biofilms on a hydroxyapatite surface compared to the other tested surfaces. Using DNA-microarray technology we identified the differentially expressed genes of S. mutans, reflecting the physiological state of biofilms formed on the different biomaterials tested. Eight selected genes were further analyzed by real time RT-PCR. To further determine the impact of the tested material surfaces on the physiology of the bacteria, we tested the secretion of AI-2 signal by S. mutans embedded on those biofilms. Comparative transcriptome analyses indicated on changes in the S. mutans genome in biofilms formed onto different types of surfaces and enabled us to identify genes most differentially expressed on those surfaces. In addition, the levels of autoinducer-2 in biofilms from the various tested surfaces were different. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that gene expression of S. mutans differs in biofilms formed on tested surfaces, which manifest the physiological state of bacteria influenced by the type of surface material they accumulate onto. Moreover, the stressful circumstances of adjustment to the surface may persist in the bacteria enhancing intercellular signaling and surface dependent biofilm formation.

  14. How do people live life successfully with Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Young; Ellis-Hill, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how people live life successfully with Parkinson's disease and what contributed to the level of success. To examine the level of success as defined by people with Parkinson's disease. To find what contributed to the level of success. Self-care support has gained importance for supporting people with their chronic diseases including Parkinson's disease. Although self-care and life adjustments can improve patients' general well-being, it is unclear which approaches best facilitate positive adjustments to illness. Semi-structured interviews with participants with Parkinson's disease. Eight participants living with Parkinson's disease for 2-16 years were recruited from a Parkinson's disease voluntary group in the UK. Interviews covered their perceived level of success and the factors which they perceived led to that success. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Participants rated a high level of success in living with Parkinson's disease with an average personal rating 75/100 despite facing difficulties. Successful living was perceived to have taken place when people were either (1) able to return to their usual state of health or (2) considered themselves to be stable within a new/readjusted state of health. Aspects which were perceived to support positive psychosocial adjustment included a positive mindset, determination, acceptance of new challenges and family support. Maintaining usual life and physical ability is the major concern among the people with Parkinson's disease. It would be helpful for health care professionals to identify what constitutes a 'usual' life for that person and to support them to develop a positive mindset and acceptance of new challenges, drawing on the determination of the person as well as any available family support. In supporting self-care, it is helpful to gain information about the subjective experience of living with Parkinson's disease including their perceived level of success at

  15. Proactive Assessment for Collaboration Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Ju

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a government–academia–industry joint training project that produces Vietnamese midlevel technical managers. To ensure collaboration success, a proactive assessment methodology was developed as a supplement to the conventional project management practices. In the postproject feedback, the funding agencies acknowledged that the project fulfilled its contractual obligations and achieved its objectives. The implementing university was pleased as it broke ground in this type of collaboration in Taiwan. The industrial partners, however, were not so sure about the effectiveness of this collaborative training endeavor because there were many skirmishes between company supervisors and Vietnamese interns caused by the interns’ self-interested perception and expectation. Consequently, a theoretical framework for predicting internship acceptance and preventing unfavorable perceptions was proposed to strengthen the proactive assessment methodology. Collaboration research, funding agencies, academia, and industry could all benefit from this study.

  16. Persistence, Perseverance, and Success (PPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Madhlangobe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe motivational factors that increased open distance learning (ODL students’ capacity to successfully graduate with master’s and doctoral credentials. Study background revealed that Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU persistently experiences increased levels of student dropout and competition from conventional universities that introduce ODL through “block-release” programs. We used a descriptive qualitative research approach to collect and analyze data—hence, data collection through audio-recorded open-ended semi-structured interviews helped to maintain accurate accounts of data. We presented data through themed reporting enhanced by direct quotes from participants. Our research broadly concluded that once participants registered to study, perceived attention from various social angles created immense motivational factors ranging from institution motivators, personal factors, and social-generated motivators such as fear of what society would think of them all motivated them to persist and graduate with proposed credentials.

  17. Psychose passionnelle in successive generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J; Haden, P

    1980-12-01

    This paper describes two women. The first was admitted to hospital having suddenly, and without adequate reason, developed the idea that a senior married colleague at her workplace had fallen deeply in love with her. The second woman is her mother, who had been admitted to the same hospital twenty-two years earlier with a well systematized delusion that her husband was unfaithful. Both syndromes have been described by de Clérambault as two of the three forms of psychose passionnelle. The present report is intended to clarify the concepts of psychose passionelle and demonstrate the similarities between jealousy and erotomania. We believe these case histories describe the first reported instance of psychose passionnelle in successive generations of one family.

  18. Success for All in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Tracey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the third-year findings of a longitudinal evaluation in England of Success for All (SFA, a comprehensive literacy program. Eighteen SFA schools across England and 18 control schools, matched on prior achievement and demographics, were included in this quasi-experimental study. The results of hierarchical linear modeling analysis reveal a statistically significant positive school-level effect for SFA schools compared with control schools on standardized reading measures of word-level and decoding skills, and there were directionally positive but nonsignificant school-level effects on measures of comprehension and fluency. Practical and policy implications of these findings are discussed, particularly as they relate to recent English government policies encouraging schools to implement research-proven approaches.

  19. How to measure reproductive success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassmann, Beverly I; Gillespie, Brenda

    2003-01-01

    To date there have been few empirical comparisons between alternative methods for measuring reproductive success (RS). We consider the pros and cons of alternative measures of RS to provide guidance for the design of field studies in human behavioral ecology. We compare cross-sectional measures that count offspring alive at the time of the interview and retrospective measures that require data on offspring age at death or censoring. We consider analyses that include adult women (yielding age-specific estimates of RS) as well as analyses restricted to postreproductive women (yielding data on lifetime RS). These methods are applied to reproductive data for the Dogon of Mali, West Africa. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Nurse executives' perspectives on succession planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Marjorie

    2006-06-01

    Six nurse executives from 5 settings were interviewed to learn more about how succession planning is being applied in today's practice. Their experiences, presented in this article, provide a snapshot of ways succession planning can be applied in different organizations. Interviewees share their personal philosophy, concepts, and approaches to succession planning. Although these nurse executives approach succession planning differently, they share a belief that succession planning is embedded in the nurse executive role and that succession planning is key to sustaining quality nursing practice. Insights and recommendations for further study of succession planning are summarized.