WorldWideScience

Sample records for surfaces second-harmonic probing

  1. Fluorescent DNA probes at liquid/liquid interfaces studied by surface second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Giuseppe; Brevet, Pierre-François; Vauthey, Eric

    2016-01-28

    The properties of a series of oxazole yellow dyes, including the dicationic YOPRO-1 and its homodimeric parent YOYO-1 and two monocationic dyes (YOSAC-1 and YOSAC-3), have been investigated at the dodecane/water interface using stationary and time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (SSHG) combined with quantum chemical calculations. Whereas YOYO-1 exists predominantly as a H-dimer in aqueous solution, the stationary SSHG spectra reveal that such dimers are not formed at the interface. No significant H-aggregation was observed with YOPRO-1, neither in solution nor at the interface. In the case of the monocationic YOSAC dyes, a distinct SSHG band due to H-aggregates was measured at the interface, whereas only weak aggregation was found in solution. These distinct aggregation behaviors can be explained by the different orientations of the dyes at the interface, as revealed from the analysis of polarization-resolved experiments, the doubly-charged dyes lying more flat on the interface than the singly charged ones. Although YOYO-1 and YOPRO-1 do not form H-dimer/aggregates at the interface, time-resolved SSHG measurements point to the occurrence of intra- and intermolecular interactions, respectively, which inhibit the ultrafast non-radiative decay of the excited dyes via large amplitude motion, and lead to a nanosecond excited-state lifetime. The distinct behavior evidenced here for YOYO-1 and YOSAC dyes points to their potential use as fluorescent or SHG interfacial probes.

  2. Fluorescent DNA probes at liquid/liquid interfaces studied by surface second harmonic generation

    OpenAIRE

    Licari, Giuseppe Léonardo; Brevet, Pierre-François; Vauthey, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The properties of a series of oxazole yellow dyes, including the dicationic YOPRO-1 and its homodimeric parent YOYO-1 and two monocationic dyes (YOSAC-1 and YOSAC-3), have been investigated at the dodecane/water interface using stationary and time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (SSHG) combined with quantum chemical calculations. Whereas YOYO-1 exists predominantly as a H-dimer in aqueous solution, the stationary SSHG spectra reveal that such dimers are not formed at the interface...

  3. Probing energetics with second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konek, Christopher; Mason, Brian; Stoltz, Chad; Gump, Jared; Wilkinson, John

    2009-06-01

    We focus on the insensitive high explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6- trinitrobenzene (TATB) with the goal of obtaining structural information as a function of pressure and temperature. Prior experiments from Los Alamos (Son et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 1999, 103 (26) 5434) demonstrated that in high temperature environments (approaching 300^o C) TATB increases in efficiency as a nonlinear optical medium, possibly undergoing structural changes which alter the crystal symmetry. We use the nonlinear optical technique second harmonic generation (SHG) to probe TATB in a diamond anvil cell experimental setup to perform measurements at high pressure. Additionally, by exploiting the electronic absorption features of TATB to perform resonantly enhanced second harmonic generation (RE-SHG) experiments, we probe the electronic transitions in the visible range as a function of pressure and temperature, to observe electronic changes that would occur. Polarization resolved SHG experiments allow further insight into changes in crystal structure. These static measurements may have implications for shocked TATB.

  4. Studies of surfaces using optical second-harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom, H.W.K.

    1984-04-01

    The experiments reported in this thesis demonstrate the use of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) in reflection from surfaces to study various surface properties. The experiments firmly establish SHG as a viable new surface probe that complements existing surface probes in ultrahigh vacuum environments and is in many ways unique for studying interfaces between dense media. Surface structural symmetry can be revealed through the anisotropy in the SH signal from the surface as the sample is rotated about its normal. The form of this anisotropy is derived in theory and verified with an experiment on the Si(100) and (111) surfaces. The SHG and SFG signals from molecules adsorbed on noninteracting substrates have a direct relationship to the number, average orientation, and spectroscopic properties of the molecules. The SH intensity was used to measure the isotherm for adsorption of p-nitrobenzoic acid from ethanolic solution to fused silica. Experiments performed on a strongly-interacting well-characterized Rh(111) surface in ultrahigh vacuum establish the sensitivity of the SH probe in corroboration with other surface probes. For the first time, the SH coverage-dependence was fit by theory in a quantitative way for the case of O-atom adsorption. The sensitivity of SH to adsorption at different sites was established for CO on top- and bridge-sites. SHG was shown to be surface specific in that the SHG from alkali metal surfaces originates from the first two monolayers. SH sensitivity to the adsorption of catalytically-important hydrocarbons and to chemical processes such as benzene dehydrogenation was also demonstrated. 122 references, 27 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, John Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-11-24

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of {approx} 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm-1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach.

  6. Soft X-Ray Second Harmonic Generation as an Interfacial Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R. K.; Raj, S. L.; Pascal, T. A.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Foglia, L.; Simoncig, A.; Fabris, N.; Miotti, P.; Hull, C. J.; Rizzuto, A. M.; Smith, J. W.; Mincigrucci, R.; Masciovecchio, C.; Gessini, A.; Allaria, E.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Roussel, E.; Spampinati, S.; Penco, G.; Di Mitri, S.; Trovò, M.; Danailov, M.; Christensen, S. T.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Coreno, M.; Poletto, L.; Drisdell, W. S.; Prendergast, D.; Giannessi, L.; Principi, E.; Nordlund, D.; Saykally, R. J.; Schwartz, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes at soft x-ray wavelengths have remained largely unexplored due to the lack of available light sources with the requisite intensity and coherence. Here we report the observation of soft x-ray second harmonic generation near the carbon K edge (˜284 eV ) in graphite thin films generated by high intensity, coherent soft x-ray pulses at the FERMI free electron laser. Our experimental results and accompanying first-principles theoretical analysis highlight the effect of resonant enhancement above the carbon K edge and show the technique to be interfacially sensitive in a centrosymmetric sample with second harmonic intensity arising primarily from the first atomic layer at the open surface. This technique and the associated theoretical framework demonstrate the ability to selectively probe interfaces, including those that are buried, with elemental specificity, providing a new tool for a range of scientific problems.

  7. Soft X-Ray Second Harmonic Generation as an Interfacial Probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, R. K.; Raj, S. L.; Pascal, T. A.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Foglia, L.; Simoncig, A.; Fabris, N.; Miotti, P.; Hull, C. J.; Rizzuto, A. M.; Smith, J. W.; Mincigrucci, R.; Masciovecchio, C.; Gessini, A.; Allaria, E.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Roussel, E.; Spampinati, S.; Penco, G.; Di Mitri, S.; Trovò, M.; Danailov, M.; Christensen, S. T.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T. -C.; Coreno, M.; Poletto, L.; Drisdell, W. S.; Prendergast, D.; Giannessi, L.; Principi, E.; Nordlund, D.; Saykally, R. J.; Schwartz, C. P.

    2018-01-01

    Nonlinear optical processes at soft x-ray wavelengths have remained largely unexplored due to the lack of available light sources with the requisite intensity and coherence. Here we report the observation of soft x-ray second harmonic generation near the carbon K edge (~284 eV) in graphite thin films generated by high intensity, coherent soft x-ray pulses at the FERMI free electron laser. Our experimental results and accompanying first-principles theoretical analysis highlight the effect of resonant enhancement above the carbon K edge and show the technique to be interfacially sensitive in a centrosymmetric sample with second harmonic intensity arising primarily from the first atomic layer at the open surface. This technique and the associated theoretical framework demonstrate the ability to selectively probe interfaces, including those that are buried, with elemental specificity, providing a new tool for a range of scientific problems.

  8. Probing the Near-Field of Second-Harmonic Light around Plasmonic Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Bernd; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-08

    We introduce a new concept that enables subwavelength polarization-resolved probing of the second-harmonic near-field distribution of plasmonic nanostructures. As a local sensor, this method utilizes aluminum nanoantennas, which are resonant to the second-harmonic wavelength and which allow to efficiently scatter the local second-harmonic light to the far-field. We place these sensors into the second-harmonic near-field generated by plasmonic nanostructures and carefully vary their position and orientation. Observing the second-harmonic light resonantly scattered by the aluminum nanoantennas provides polarization-resolved information about the local second-harmonic near-field distribution. We then investigate the polarization-resolved second-harmonic near-field of inversion symmetric gold dipole nanoantennas. Interestingly, we find strong evidence that the second-harmonic dipole is predominantly oriented perpendicular to the gold nanoantenna long axis, although the excitation laser is polarized parallel to the nanoantennas. We believe that our investigations will help to disentangle the highly debated origin of the second-harmonic response of inversion symmetric plasmonic structures. Furthermore, we believe that our new method, which enables the measurement of local nonlinear electric fields, will find widespread implementation and applications in nonlinear near-field optical microscopy.

  9. Surface plasmon-enhanced transverse magnetic second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Hanbicki, Aubrey T; Jonker, Berry T; Lüpke, Gunter

    2013-11-18

    We present experimental studies on surface plasmon (SP) enhanced transverse magnetic second-harmonic generation (T-MSHG) in single-crystal iron films grown by molecular beam epitaxy at room temperature on MgO (001) substrates. We show that it is possible to achieve both strongly enhanced T-MSHG intensity and high magnetic contrast ratio under attenuated total reflection configuration without using complex heterostructures because MSHG is generated directly at the iron surface where SPs are present. The T-MSHG has a much larger contrast ratio than transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (T-MOKE) and shows great potential for a new generation of bio-chemical sensors due to its very high surface sensitivity. In addition, by analyzing the experimental results and the simulations based on SP field-enhancement theory, we demonstrate that the second-order susceptibility of MSHG shows great anisotropy and the tensor χ(xzz)(odd) is dominant in our sample.

  10. Surface structure enhanced second harmonic generation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana

    Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography......-defined regular arrays of gold square nanostructures. These nanostructure arrays induce local field enhancement, which significantly lowers the threshold for second harmonic generation in the nanofibers....

  11. Theory of surface second-harmonic generation in silica nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    -based nanowires is critically discussed, based on simulations of second-harmonic generation in nanowires with a fluctuating phase-matching wavelength. It is concluded that efficient wavelength conversion will require strong improvements in the nanowire uniformity, peak powers well in excess of 10 KW, increase...

  12. Second-Harmonic Generation by Electromagnetic Waves at the Surface of a Semi-Infinite Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Second-Harmonic Generation by Electromagnetic Waves at the Surface of a Semi-Infinite Metal Frank Crowne and Christian Fazi Sensors and...DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Second-Harmonic Generation by Electromagnetic Waves at the Surface of a Semi

  13. Second-Harmonic Generation Scanning Microscopy on Domains in Al Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning optical second-harmonic generation microscopy has been used to investigate domains in the surface of polycrystaline Al. Strong contrast among the crystalline grains is obtained due to variations in their crystallographic orientations and thus also nonlinear response. The origin of the co...

  14. Surface plasmon polariton excitation by second harmonic generation in single organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simesen, Paw; Søndergaard, Thomas; Skovsen, Esben

    2015-01-01

    Coherent local excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by second-harmonic generation (SHG) in individual aligned crystalline organic functionalized para-phenylene nanofibers deposited on a thin silver film is demonstrated. The SH-SPP generation is considered theoretically and investigated...

  15. Second Harmonic Correlation Spectroscopy: Theory and Principles for Determining Surface Binding Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sly, Krystal L; Conboy, John C

    2017-06-01

    A novel application of second harmonic correlation spectroscopy (SHCS) for the direct determination of molecular adsorption and desorption kinetics to a surface is discussed in detail. The surface-specific nature of second harmonic generation (SHG) provides an efficient means to determine the kinetic rates of adsorption and desorption of molecular species to an interface without interference from bulk diffusion, which is a significant limitation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The underlying principles of SHCS for the determination of surface binding kinetics are presented, including the role of optical coherence and optical heterodyne mixing. These properties of SHCS are extremely advantageous and lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise (S/N) of the correlation data, increasing the sensitivity of the technique. The influence of experimental parameters, including the uniformity of the TEM00 laser beam, the overall photon flux, and collection time are also discussed, and are shown to significantly affect the S/N of the correlation data. Second harmonic correlation spectroscopy is a powerful, surface-specific, and label-free alternative to other correlation spectroscopic methods for examining surface binding kinetics.

  16. Local excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by second-harmonic generation in crystalline organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Søndergaard, Thomas; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Coherent local excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by second-harmonic generation (SHG) in aligned crystalline organic functionalized para-phenylene nanofibers deposited on a thin silver film is demonstrated. The excited SPPs are characterized using angle-resolved leakage radiation....... This is explained both as a consequence of approaching the peak of the fibers nonlinear response at the wavelength 772 nm, and as a consequence of better coupling to SPPs due to their stronger confinement. © 2012 Optical Society...

  17. Femtosecond pump-probe second-harmonic generation from silicon nanogratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yong; Green, Avery; Diebold, Alain

    Silicon nanogratings with fin-like nanogroove arrays have been used in nanoelectronics to build field effect transistors (FinFETs), which have attracted enormous attention due to their superior electronic properties. They can also be used in photonic systems to achieve desired linear and nonlinear optical functionalities. Here we perform second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses on a set of 28, 42, and 65 nm-pitch Si nanogratings to study rotational anisotropy and ultrafast dynamics of SHG. We observe that in pump-probe SHG experiments, the SHG signal from a Si nanograting can be instantaneously enhanced 32% by an autocorrelated pump pulse. The enhancement is caused by pump-induced transient polarization of photoexcited charge in the nanogratings. We also find that charge photoinjection magnifies the quadrupole SHG component significantly more than the dipole SHG component. These results provide insight into the SHG response at the nanoscale, dynamic behaviors of SHG upon photoexcitation, and ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited carriers in Si nanogratings. Furthermore, SHG results from nanogratings of different pitches provide guidance for using the SHG technique to characterize feature dimensions in Si nanogratings.

  18. Van Allen Probes Observations of Second Harmonic Poloidal Standing Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Oimatsu, Satoshi; Nosé, Masahito; Min, Kyungguk; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Chan, Anthony; Wygant, John; Kim, Hyomin

    2018-01-01

    Long-lasting second-harmonic poloidal standing Alfvén waves (P2 waves) were observed by the twin Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP) spacecraft in the noon sector of the plasmasphere, when the spacecraft were close to the magnetic equator and had a small azimuthal separation. Oscillations of proton fluxes at the wave frequency (˜10 mHz) were also observed in the energy (W) range 50-300 keV. Using the unique RBSP orbital configuration, we determined the phase delay of magnetic field perturbations between the spacecraft with a 2nπ ambiguity. We then used finite gyroradius effects seen in the proton flux oscillations to remove the ambiguity and found that the waves were propagating westward with an azimuthal wave number (m) of ˜-200. The phase of the proton flux oscillations relative to the radial component of the wave magnetic field progresses with W, crossing 0 (northward moving protons) or 180° (southward moving protons) at W ˜ 120 keV. This feature is explained by drift-bounce resonance (mωd ˜ ωb) of ˜120 keV protons with the waves, where ωd and ωb are the proton drift and bounce frequencies. At lower energies, the proton phase space density (FH+) exhibits a bump-on-tail structure with ∂FH+/∂W>0 occurring in the 1-10 keV energy range. This FH+ is unstable and can excite P2 waves through bounce resonance (ω ˜ ωb), where ω is the wave frequency.

  19. Second-Harmonic Scattering as a Probe of Structural Correlations in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M; Roke, Sylvie; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Second-harmonic scattering experiments of water and other bulk molecular liquids have long been assumed to be insensitive to interactions between the molecules. The measured intensity is generally thought to arise from incoherent scattering due to individual molecules. We introduce a method to compute the second-harmonic scattering pattern of molecular liquids directly from atomistic computer simulations, which takes into account the coherent terms. We apply this approach to large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water, where we show that nanosecond second-harmonic scattering experiments contain a coherent contribution arising from radial and angular correlations on a length scale of < 1 nm, much shorter than had been recently hypothesized (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141). By combining structural correlations from simulations with experimental data (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141), we can also extract an effective molecular hyperpolarizability in the liquid phase. This work ...

  20. Probing and modeling of carrier motion in organic devices by electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Manaka, Takaaki; Taguchi, Dai

    2014-10-01

    By probing dielectric polarization originating from dipoles and electrons in materials, we can study dynamical carrier behaviors in materials and also in devices. Maxwell displacement current (MDC) measurement allows us to directly probe orientational dipolar motion in monolayers, while electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement allows dynamical electron and hole transport in solids to be probed directly. By probing nonlinear polarization induced in solids by coupling with incident electromagnetic waves of laser beam and dc electric field that originate from moving carriers, long-range carrier motion is visualized. Experiments using a time-resolved EFISHG technique reveal carrier transfer in organic devices such as organic field-effect transistors, organic light-emitting diodes, organic memory devices, and organic solar cells, and thus enable us to model the carrier transport mechanism. We anticipate that this novel technique using EFISHG can be a powerful tool for studying carrier behaviors in organic devices as well as in organic materials.

  1. Inspecting the surface of implanted Si(111) during annealing by reflective second harmonic generation: The influence of chamber pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chung-Wei; Chang, Shoou-Jinn [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chun-Chu [Department of Electrophysics, National Chia Yi University, Chia Yi 600, Taiwan (China); Lo, Kuang-Yao, E-mail: kuanglo@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chia Yi University, Chia Yi 600, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    The present study used the reflective second harmonic generation (RSHG) method to analyze the quality of the surface layer of implanted Si(111) and to discuss the influence of chamber pressure during rapid thermal annealing. Under a lower chamber pressure, the recrystallization is better, and the defects are eliminated for a higher implanted dose because dopant phosphorus (P) atoms on the surface region more easily out-diffuse at lower chamber pressures. Thus, the occurrence of less out-diffusion makes more P atoms remain on the surface layer and causes larger defects, especially for higher implanted doses. Defects on the surface region are influenced by chamber pressure. In the current work, the RSHG results showed more detailed information by linking secondary ion mass spectrometry and sheet resistance measurement. - Highlights: ► Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) with different chamber pressures was performed. ► The quality of implanted Si was analyzed by reflective second harmonic generation. ► High-dose implanted Si is obviously influenced by the pressure in the RTA chamber. ► Pressure in the RTA chamber affects the generation of defects. ► Defect suppression is obvious at relatively low chamber pressure.

  2. Second harmonic generation in NLO polymers excited by Surface Plasmon enhanced electric field induced by femtosecond optical pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawata Y.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We will report second harmonic generation (SHG in nonlinear optical (NLO polymers excited by surface plasmon enhanced optical fields. The surface plasmon (SP polariton was excited in an attenuated total reflection geometry having the Kretchmann configuration. The NLO polymers, consisting of Disperse Red1 as guest chromophores and poly (methyl methacrylate as host materials, were coated upon the Ag layers. Our experimental results indicated that the SHG signal intensity from the polymer coated Ag films was more than 10 times higher than that from the non-coated Ag films. The SHG autocorrelation traces excited by SP-enhanced fields were also studied and the correlation time was shorter than 150 fs, the temporal resolutions of the present spectrometer.

  3. Probing the longitudinal electric field of Bessel beams using second-harmonic generation from nano-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turquet, Léo; Kakko, Joona-Pekko; Karvonen, Lasse; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko; Lipsanen, Harri; Kauranen, Martti; Bautista, Godofredo

    2017-08-01

    Non-diffractive Bessel beams are receiving significant interest in optical microscopy due to their remarkably large depth of field. For example, studies have shown the superiority of Bessel beams over Gaussian beams for volumetric imaging of three-dimensionally thick or extended samples. However, the vectorial aspects of the focal fields of Bessel beams are generally obscured when traditional methods are used to characterize their three-dimensional point-spread function in space, which contains contributions from all optical field components. Here, we show experimentally the three-dimensional spatial distribution and enhanced depth of field of the longitudinal electric field components of a focused linearly-polarized Bessel beam. This is done through second-harmonic generation from well-defined vertically-aligned gallium-arsenide nanowires, whose second-order response is primarily driven by the longitudinal fields at the beam focus.

  4. Second harmonic generation imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has shown great promise for imaging live cells and tissues, with applications in basic science, medical research, and tissue engineering. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging offers a complete guide to this optical modality, from basic principles, instrumentation, methods, and image analysis to biomedical applications. The book features contributions by experts in second-harmonic imaging, including many pioneering researchers in the field. Written for researchers at all levels, it takes an in-depth look at the current state of the art and possibilities of SHG microscopy. Organized into three sections, the book: Provides an introduction to the physics of the process, step-by-step instructions on how to build an SHG microscope, and comparisons with related imaging techniques Gives an overview of the capabilities of SHG microscopy for imaging tissues and cells—including cell membranes, muscle, collagen in tissues, and microtubules in live cells—by summarizing experi...

  5. Surface and interface states of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films investigated by optical second-harmonic generation and terahertz emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamh, S. Y.; Park, S.-H.; Lee, J. S., E-mail: jsl@gist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Photon Science, School of Physics and Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, S.-K.; Jeon, J. H.; Chun, S. H. [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, J. H.; Kahng, S. J. [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, K.; Choi, E. J. [Department of Physics, University or Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.; Choi, S.-H. [Department of Applied Physics, College of Applied Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bansal, N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rutgers, The state University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Oh, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The state University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Park, Joonbum; Kho, Byung-Woo; Kim, Jun Sung [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the surface and interface states of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films by using the second-harmonic generation technique. Distinct from the surface of bulk crystals, the film surface and interface show the isotropic azimuth dependence of second-harmonic intensity, which is attributed to the formation of randomly oriented domains on the in-plane. Based on the nonlinear susceptibility deduced from the model fitting, we determine that the surface band bending induced in a space charge region occurs more strongly at the film interface facing the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate or capping layer compared with the interface facing the air. We demonstrate that distinct behavior of the terahertz electric field emitted from the samples can provide further information about the surface electronic state of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}.

  6. Three-dimensional structural imaging of starch granules by second-harmonic generation circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, G-Y; Lee, H; Hsu, K-J; Huttunen, M J; Kauranen, M; Lin, Y-Y; Chu, S-W

    2014-03-01

    Chirality is one of the most fundamental and essential structural properties of biological molecules. Many important biological molecules including amino acids and polysaccharides are intrinsically chiral. Conventionally, chiral species can be distinguished by interaction with circularly polarized light, and circular dichroism is one of the best-known approaches for chirality detection. As a linear optical process, circular dichroism suffers from very low signal contrast and lack of spatial resolution in the axial direction. It has been demonstrated that by incorporating nonlinear interaction with circularly polarized excitation, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism can provide much higher signal contrast. However, previous circular dichroism and second-harmonic generation circular dichroism studies are mostly limited to probe chiralities at surfaces and interfaces. It is known that second-harmonic generation, as a second-order nonlinear optical effect, provides excellent optical sectioning capability when combined with a laser-scanning microscope. In this work, we combine the axial resolving power of second-harmonic generation and chiral sensitivity of second-harmonic generation circular dichroism to realize three-dimensional chiral detection in biological tissues. Within the point spread function of a tight focus, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism could arise from the macroscopic supramolecular packing as well as the microscopic intramolecular chirality, so our aim is to clarify the origins of second-harmonic generation circular dichroism response in complicated three-dimensional biological systems. The sample we use is starch granules whose second-harmonic generation-active molecules are amylopectin with both microscopic chirality due to its helical structure and macroscopic chirality due to its crystallized packing. We found that in a starch granule, the second-harmonic generation for right-handed circularly polarized excitation is

  7. Simulation of Second Harmonic Ultrasound Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    , and the fundamental pressure is calculated by Field II. The second harmonic pressure in k-space along the propagating direction is calculated as an auto-convolution of the fundamental pressure multiplied by an exponential propagating coefficient. In this case, the second harmonic pressure can be calculated using ASA...... for any plane parallel to the initial plane. In the focal plane (elevation-lateral) at 60 mm from the transducer surface, calculated by ASA, the RMS errors for the fundamental component are 2.66% referred to Field II and 4.28% referred to Abersim. For the second harmonic component, the RMS error is 0...

  8. Two-photon photoluminescence and second-harmonic generation from unintentionally doped and semi-insulating GaN crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiksen, R. H.; Aunsborg, T. S.; Kristensen, P. K.; Pedersen, K.

    2017-11-01

    Unintentionally doped and semi-insulating Fe-doped GaN crystals grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated with two-photon photoluminescence and second-harmonic generation spectroscopy to reveal doping effects on the nonlinear optical properties and thus indirectly on crystal properties. Like for linear luminescence, it is found that Fe doping strongly reduces nonlinear luminescence. Recording of second-harmonic generation spectra in transmission probing bulk properties shows no significant difference between doped and un-doped crystals. Reflected second-harmonic generation probing 50-100 nm at the surface, on the other hand, shows significantly lower signal from the doped sample. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy shows that the Fe concentration is higher at the surface than in the bulk of the doped crystal. It is suggested that this causes higher defect density and degraded order in the surface region, thus reducing the second-harmonic signal.

  9. Resonant plasmonic nanoparticles for multicolor second harmonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accanto, Nicolò; Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hancu, Ion M.; Renger, Jan; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles capable of efficiently generating nonlinear optical signals, like second harmonic generation, are attracting a lot of attention as potential background-free and stable nano-probes for biological imaging. However, second harmonic nanoparticles of different species do not produce readily distinguishable optical signals, as the excitation laser mainly defines their second harmonic spectrum. This is in marked contrast to other fluorescent nano-probes like quantum dots that emit light at different colors depending on their sizes and materials. Here, we present the use of resonant plasmonic nanoparticles, combined with broadband phase-controlled laser pulses, as tunable sources of multicolor second harmonic generation. The resonant plasmonic nanoparticles strongly interact with the electromagnetic field of the incident light, enhancing the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. Because the plasmon resonance in these structures is spectrally narrower than the laser bandwidth, the plasmonic nanoparticles imprint their fingerprints on the second harmonic spectrum. We show how nanoparticles of different sizes produce different colors in the second harmonic spectra even when excited with the same laser pulse. Using these resonant plasmonic nanoparticles as nano-probes is promising for multicolor second harmonic imaging while keeping all the advantages of nonlinear optical microscopy.

  10. Deep-ultraviolet second-harmonic generation by combined degenerate four-wave mixing and surface nonlinearity polarization in photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Feng; Zhou, Guiyao; Zhang, Xianting; Mei, Chao; Sang, Xinzhu; Wu, Qiang; Yan, Binbin; Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Kangping; Wang, Kuiru; Yu, Chongxiu; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa Yaw; Wai, P K A

    2017-08-23

    Deep-ultraviolet (UV) second-harmonics (SHs) have important applications in basic physics and applied sciences. However, it still remains challenging to generate deep-UV SHs especially in optical fibers. Here, for the first time, we experimentally demonstrate the deep-UV SH generations (SHGs) by combined degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and surface nonlinearity polarization in an in-house designed and fabricated air-silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF). When femtosecond pump pulses with average input power P av of 650 mW and center wavelength λ p of 810, 820, 830, and 840 nm are coupled into the normal dispersion region close to the zero-dispersion wavelength of the fundamental mode of the PCF, the anti-Stokes waves induced by degenerate FWM process are tunable from 669 to 612 nm. Then, they serve as the secondary pump, and deep-UV SHs are generated within the wavelength range of 334.5 to 306 nm as a result of surface nonlinearity polarization at the core-cladding interface of the PCF. The physical mechanism of the SHGs is confirmed by studying the dependences of the output power P SH of the SHs on the PCF length and time. Finally, we also establish a theoretical model to analyze the SHGs.

  11. Second harmonic spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Yu, Ping; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    in highly anisotropic linear polarization properties, as studied recently in pyramide-shaped self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots, but also in second harmonic generation (SHG), which can be greatly enhanced allowing for detailed studies of such structures. SHG has contributed considerably as a technique...... to investigate solid state systems where the local inversion symmetry is broken by e.g. a surface or an interface, defect states or simply by structures so small that the bulk symmetry properties no longer are valid. Our idea is to use SHG in the configurations, where the bulk and surface contributions...

  12. The application of the symmetry properties of optical second harmonic generation to studies of interfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, Marla Beth [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Optical second harmonic generation has proven to be a powerful tool for studying interfaces. The symmetry properties of the process allow for surface sensitivity not available with other optical methods. In this thesis, we take advantage of these symmetry properties SHG to study a variety of interesting systems not previously studied with this technique. We show that optical second harmonic generation is an effective surface probe with a submonolayer sensitivity for media without inversion symmetry. We demonstrate the technique at a gallium arsenide surface, exploiting the different symmetry properties of the bulk and surface of the crystal to isolate the surface contribution. We also demonstrate that optical second harmonic generation can be used to determine the anisotropic orientational distribution of a surface monolayer of molecules. We apply the technique to study homogeneously aligned liquid crystal cells. To further explore the LC-polymer interface, we used SHG to study the surface memory effect. The surface memory effect is the rendering of an isotropic interface anisotropic by putting it in contact with an anisotropic bulk. Last, we describe some preliminary measurements of a time-resolved spectroscopic study of the phenomenon of second harmonic generation in a gas. The construction of a 500 microjoule pulsed, tunable laser source is described.

  13. Strong Enhancement of Second Harmonic Emission by Plasmonic Resonances at the Second Harmonic Wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Bernd; Gui, Lili; Fuchs, Jaco; Floess, Dominik; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald

    2015-06-10

    We perform second harmonic spectroscopy of aluminum nanoantenna arrays that exhibit plasmonic resonances at the second harmonic wavelength between 450 and 570 nm by focusing sub-30 fs laser pulses tunable from 900 to 1140 nm onto the nanoantenna arrays. We find that a plasmonic resonance at the second harmonic wavelength boosts the overall nonlinear process by more than an order of magnitude. In particular, in the measurement the resonant second harmonic polarization component is a factor of about 70 stronger when compared to the perpendicular off-resonant second harmonic polarization. Furthermore, the maximum of the second harmonic conversion efficiency is found to be slightly blue-shifted with respect to the peak of the linear optical far-field spectrum. This fact can be understood from a simple model that accounts for the almost off-resonant absorption at the fundamental wavelength and the resonant emission process at the second harmonic.

  14. Theory of second-harmonic generation in silica nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of second-harmonic generation based on surface dipole and bulk multipole nonlinearities in silica nanowires is investigated numerically. Both circular and microstructured nanowires are considered. Phase matching is provided by propagating the pump field in the fundamental mode......, while generating the second harmonic in one of the modes of the LP11 multiplet. This is shown to work in both circular and microstructured nanowires, although only one of the LP11 modes can be phase-matched in the microstructure. The prospect of obtaining large conversion efficiencies in silica......-based nanowires is critically discussed, based on simulations of second-harmonic generation in nanowires with a fluctuating phase-matching wavelength. It is concluded that efficient wavelength conversion will either require strong improvements in the nanowire uniformity, or an increase of the second...

  15. Improved Efficiency Type II Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Walsh, Brian M.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Second harmonic efficiency is limited by lateral and temporal separation of the ordinary and extraordinary components of the fundamental. A mode locked dual beam laser demonstrated these effects and a novel method to minimize them.

  16. Second-harmonic generation microscopy of collagen-bearing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbel, Maarten K.; Callewaert, Tom; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    helices, resulting in the formation of the superhelical structure tropocollagen. Subsequently tropocollagen will align in a linear direction forming the fibers composing collagen-tissue. Due to the superhelical nature of collagen, this structure is ideal to be probed by second-harmonic generation.

  17. Optical second harmonic generation from Wannier excitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2007-01-01

    , a simplified three-band Wannier exciton model of cubic semiconductors is applied and a closed form expression for the complex second harmonic response function including broadening is derived. Our calculated spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with the measured response near the band edge...

  18. Spatial mode discrimination using second harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaubert, Vincent; Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Pulford, David

    2007-01-01

    -Kleinmann analysis, taking into account the full description of the multi-mode field inside the nonlinear crystal in a type I phase-maching condition. The good agreement between experiments and theory shows that the effect is well understood and that we have reliable models required for the design of novel photonics......Second harmonic generation can be used as a technique for controlling the spatial mode structure of optical beams. We demonstrate experimentally the generation of higher order spatial modes, and that it is possible to use nonlinear phase matching as a predictable and robust technique...... for the conversion of transverse electric modes of the second harmonic output. For a given TEMn0 pump mode the output mode can be altered continuously by adjusting the laser wavelength, the focusing of the pump or the temperature of the nonlinear medium. We make quantitative comparisons with a generalized Boyd...

  19. Optical second harmonic generation studies of the nature of the oxide-covered and clean c(4 × 4) and (2 × 4) reconstructed GaAs(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S. R.; Hoare, R. D.; Pemble, M. E.; Povey, I. M.; Stafford, A.; Taylor, A. G.; Joyce, B. A.; Neave, J. H.; Zhang, J.

    1993-07-01

    We report the application of the "epioptic" technique of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) to the study of surface chemical processes occurring at the technologically important (001) surfaces of the non-centrosymmetric compound semiconductor GaAs. SHG has been used to monitor the thermal removal of surface contamination from an GaAs(001) substrate mounted in a conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) chamber. Rotational anisotropy plots of the reflected SH signal recorded at near-normal incidence indicate that the oxide layer is not fully disordered and possesses some structural anisotropy, i.e. some preferred net surface orientation. In addition the rotational anisotropy plots were observed to change in both intensity and apparent phase between the oxide-covered surface and the clean reconstructed surfaces. Following heating to 850 K under the background As 2 flux present in the chamber, the SH signal from the clean, reconstructed surface was approximately 5 × weaker than that observed for the contaminated surface and was subsequently found to be insensitive to the reconstruction change between the (2 × 4) and c(4 × 4) surfaces, in agreement with theoretical predictions for surfaces having 2mm and 4mm symmetry, respectively. These data are discussed in terms of the difficulties encountered when attempting to observe a surface SH response from a non-centrosymmetric substrate. The sensitivity of the technique towards the thin oxide overlayer suggests that for overlayers which are likely to possess net oriented in-plane dipoles due to the structural mismatch with the substrate, an SH response may be observed in preference to a bulk response when a normal incidence geometry is employed.

  20. Promoting Spontaneous Second Harmonic Generation through Organogelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, A Belén; Aparicio, Fátima; Faour, Lara; Iliopoulos, Konstantinos; Morille, Yohann; Allain, Magali; Franco, Santiago; Andreu, Raquel; Sahraoui, Bouchta; Gindre, Denis; Canevet, David; Sallé, Marc

    2016-07-27

    An organogelator based on the Disperse Red nonlinear optical chromophore was synthesized according to a simple and efficient three-step procedure. The supramolecular gel organization leads to xerogels which display a spontaneous second harmonic generation (SHG) response without any need for preprocessing, and this SHG activity appears to be stable over several months. These findings, based on an intrinsic structural approach, are supported by favorable intermolecular supramolecular interactions, which promote a locally non-centrosymmetric NLO-active organization. This is in sharp contrast with most materials designed for SHG purposes, which generally require the use of expensive or heavy-to-handle external techniques for managing the dipoles' alignment.

  1. Glass devices for efficient second harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Pedersen, Jacob; Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We show here that quasi-phase matched (QPM) planar nonlinear devices of high quality can be fabricated by means of periodic poling of the glass. The devices, used for second-harmonic generation (SHG), have accurately-controlled centre wavelengths, and the normalised conversion efficiencies...... are approximately one order of magnitude higher than what has previously been reported for periodically poled glass. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that high-quality nonlinear QPM devices can be fabricated in glass-on-silicon. The technology is easily adaptable to any desired wavelength (e.g. 1550 nm) and can...

  2. Second harmonic generation in resonant optical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichenfield, Matt; Moore, Jeremy; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Olsson, Roy H.; Wiwi, Michael; Padilla, Camille; Douglas, James Kenneth; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel

    2018-01-09

    An optical second-harmonic generator (or spontaneous parametric down-converter) includes a microresonator formed of a nonlinear optical medium. The microresonator supports at least two modes that can be phase matched at different frequencies so that light can be converted between them: A first resonant mode having substantially radial polarization and a second resonant mode having substantially vertical polarization. The first and second modes have the same radial order. The thickness of the nonlinear medium is less than one-half the pump wavelength within the medium.

  3. Optical second harmonic generation from Pt nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, N.; Aratake, K.; Okushio, R.; Iwai, T. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Sugawara, A. [Hitachi Advanced Research Laboratory, Akanuma 2520, Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan); Sano, H. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Mizutani, G. [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)], E-mail: mizutani@jaist.ac.jp

    2007-09-15

    We have measured optical second harmonic intensity from arrays of Pt nanowires of 20 nm and 9 nm average widths, as a function of the incident and output light polarizations, the azimuthal angle, and the excitation photon energy. The nanowires were fabricated through shadow deposition on self-organized NaCl(1 1 0) faceted templates. The anisotropy of the SH intensity from the Pt nanowires was found to be stronger than that from the Au nanowires reported previously. The effective nonlinear susceptibility element {chi}{sub 222}{sup (2)}, with the suffix 2 indicating the direction [11-bar0], was observed for Pt nanowires, although it was not observed for Au nanowires. This difference is suggested to be due to the weaker suppression of the incident fundamental fields by the depolarization field in the Pt nanowires and the larger anisotropy in the nonlinearity of Pt nanowires due to the thinner widths.

  4. Second Harmonic Generation of Unpolarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changqin; Ulcickas, James R. W.; Deng, Fengyuan; Simpson, Garth J.

    2017-11-01

    A Mueller tensor mathematical framework was applied for predicting and interpreting the second harmonic generation (SHG) produced with an unpolarized fundamental beam. In deep tissue imaging through SHG and multiphoton fluorescence, partial or complete depolarization of the incident light complicates polarization analysis. The proposed framework has the distinct advantage of seamlessly merging the purely polarized theory based on the Jones or Cartesian susceptibility tensors with a more general Mueller tensor framework capable of handling partial depolarized fundamental and/or SHG produced. The predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of z -cut quartz and mouse tail tendon obtained with polarized and depolarized incident light. The polarization-dependent SHG produced with unpolarized fundamental allowed determination of collagen fiber orientation in agreement with orthogonal methods based on image analysis. This method has the distinct advantage of being immune to birefringence or depolarization of the fundamental beam for structural analysis of tissues.

  5. Second harmonic generation from the `centrosymmetric' crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatram Nalla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Second harmonic generation (SHG is a well known non-linear optical phenomena which can be observed only in non-centrosymmetric crystals due to non-zero hyperpolarizability. In the current work we observed SHG from a Zn(II complex which was originally thought to have crystallized in the centrosymmetric space group C2/c. This has been attributed to the unequal antiparallel packing of the metal complexes in the non-symmetric space group Cc or residual non-centrosymmetry in C2/c giving rise to polarizability leading to strong SHG. The enhancement of SHG by UV light has been attributed to the increase in non-centrosymmetry and hence polarity of packing due to strain induced in the crystals. The SHG signals measured from these crystals were as large as potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals, KH2PO4 (KDP, and showed temperature dependence. The highest SHG efficiency was observed at 50 K. The SHG phenomenon was observed at broad wavelengths ranging from visible to below-red in these crystals.

  6. Second-harmonic generation in noncentrosymmetric phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Qiong; Wang, Ying; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Su, Haibin; Tohyama, Takami; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the discovery of more and more phosphates with relatively strong nonlinear optic effect, we studied the mechanism of the second-harmonic generation (SHG) effect in several phosphates by band model and first-principles calculations. When the energy of an incident photon is much smaller than the band gap of material, the SHG is almost frequency independent and determined by the combination of Berry connection and a symmetric tensor. The SHG effect in phosphates can be enhanced by the enhancement of orbital hybridization or the reduction of charge-transfer energy, which results in widened bandwidth of occupied state and reduced band gap in the electronic structure, respectively. By the first-principles calculation on the electronic structures of several phosphates—BPO4, LiCs2PO4 , β -Li3VO4 , and β -Li3PO4 —we interpreted the relatively strong SHG effect in LiCs2PO4 and β -Li3VO4 as the consequence of the reduced charge-transfer energy compared to their parent β -Li3PO4 , while the enhanced SHG in BPO4 is resulting from enhanced orbital hybridization.

  7. OPTICAL SECOND-HARMONIC GENERATION IN CRYSTALLINE AMINO ACIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIECKHOFF, K E; PETICOLAS, W L

    1965-02-05

    Optically active amino acids contain many highly efficient optical second-harmonic generators. When light from a ruby laser at 6943 A falls on the crystalline amino acids with sufficient intensity, the second harmonic of the light at 3471 A can be observed. Although the symmetry requirements for optical second-harmonic generation are always met by isomerically pure optically active substances, there is considerable variation in efficiency for the generation of the second harmonic, ranging from almost zero to greater than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, the most efficient known.

  8. Characterization of the second-harmonic response of a silver-air interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, K A [Division de FIsica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, Baja California, 22800 (Mexico); Torre, R [Dipartimento di Fisica and European Laboratory for Non-linear Spectroscopy (LENS), Polo Scientifico, Universita di Firenze, Via Carrara n.1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 (Italy); INFM CRS-SOFT, Universita La Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    We present an experimental study of second-harmonic generation in the light reflected from a flat silver surface. It is discussed that the harmonic generation from such a surface may be expressed in terms of the three unique elements of its effective surface susceptibility tensor. A method is proposed to determine the susceptibilities by measuring the second-harmonic power with different polarization conditions. By employing a picosecond light source and photon-counting techniques, we determine the susceptibilities and compare our results with previous work.

  9. Second-harmonic imaging of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2000-01-01

    . In addition, the second-harmonic spectrum exhibits another smaller but well-pronounced peak at 765 nm not found in the linear experiments. We attribute this peak to the generation of second-harmonic radiation in the AlGaAs spacer layer enhanced by the local symmetry at the quantum-dot interface. We further...

  10. Second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen in ancient bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Second-harmonic generation imaging (SHG captures triple helical collagen molecules near tissue surfaces. Biomedical research routinely utilizes various imaging software packages to quantify SHG signals for collagen content and distribution estimates in modern tissue samples including bone. For the first time using SHG, samples of modern, medieval, and ice age bones were imaged to test the applicability of SHG to ancient bone from a variety of ages, settings, and taxa. Four independent techniques including Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, radiocarbon dating protocols, and mass spectrometry-based protein sequencing, confirm the presence of protein, consistent with the hypothesis that SHG imaging detects ancient bone collagen. These results suggest that future studies have the potential to use SHG imaging to provide new insights into the composition of ancient bone, to characterize ancient bone disorders, to investigate collagen preservation within and between various taxa, and to monitor collagen decay regimes in different depositional environments.

  11. Silencing and enhancement of second-harmonic generation in optical gap antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Johann; Bachelier, Guillaume; Song, Mingxia; Rai, Padmnabh; Colas des Francs, Gérard; Dereux, Alain; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2012-05-07

    Amplifying local electromagnetic fields by engineering optical interactions between individual constituents of an optical antenna is considered fundamental for efficient nonlinear wavelength conversion in nanometer-scale devices. In contrast to this general statement we show that high field enhancement does not necessarily lead to an optimized nonlinear activity. In particular, we demonstrate that second-harmonic responses generated at strongly interacting optical gap antennas can be significantly suppressed. Numerical simulations are confirming silencing of second-harmonic in these coupled systems despite the existence of local field amplification. We then propose a simple approach to restore and amplify the second-harmonic signal by changing the manner in which electrically-connected optical antennas are interacting in the charge-transfer plasmon regime. Our observations provide critical design rules for realizing optimal structures that are essential for a broad variety of nonlinear surface-enhanced characterizations and for realizing the next generation of electrically-driven optical antennas.

  12. Second harmonic generation imaging in tissue engineering and cartilage pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilledahl, Magnus; Olderøy, Magnus; Finnøy, Andreas; Olstad, Kristin; Brinchman, Jan E.

    2015-03-01

    The second harmonic generation from collagen is highly sensitive to what extent collagen molecules are ordered into fibrils as the SHG signal is approximately proportional to the square of the fibril thickness. This can be problematic when interpreting SHG images as thick fibers are much brighter than thinner fibers such that quantification of the amount of collagen present is difficult. On the other hand SHG is therefore also a very sensitive probe to determine whether collagen have assembled into fibrils or are still dissolved as individual collagen molecules. This information is not available from standard histology or immunohistochemical techniques. The degree for fibrillation is an essential component for proper tissue function. We will present the usefulness of SHG imaging in tissue engineering of cartilage as well as cartilage related pathologies. When engineering cartilage it is essential to have the appropriate culturing conditions which cause the collagen molecules to assemble into fibrils. By employing SHG imaging we have studied how cell seeding densities affect the fibrillation of collagen molecules. Furthermore we have used SHG to study pathologies in developing cartilage in a porcine model. In both cases SHG reveals information which is not visible in conventional histology or immunohistochemistry

  13. Second Harmonic Generation in Subdiffractive Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nistor, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    The PhD thesis is devoted to the study of second harmonic generation of narrow beams in photonic crystals. The basic idea is that if both frequencies, the fundamental and second harmonics are in the region of self-collimation, then the second harmonics of narrow beams can be very efficient. The beams do not spread diffractively during propagation and interaction. The phase matching is ensured for all components of the interacting beams. This allows to enhance the nonlinear interaction efficiency several times. The thesis rewises the theory of self-collimation of narrow beams in photonic crystals, and presents the theory of second harmonics in photonic crystals. Calculations in photonic crystals of different configurations are presented, and the recommendations to experimental realisations are given.

  14. Large second-harmonic generation in thermally poled silica waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Jesper; Kristensen, Martin; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the observation of very large second-harmonic signals from thermally poled silica waveguide samples. Secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements show that significant amounts of silver ions are injected from the top electrode during poling.......We report the observation of very large second-harmonic signals from thermally poled silica waveguide samples. Secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements show that significant amounts of silver ions are injected from the top electrode during poling....

  15. Second harmonic generation in Te crystal using free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, T; Minehara, E J

    2002-01-01

    The second harmonic generation signal converted from the fundamental wavelength of 22 mu m of a free electron laser was observed for the first time using a birefringent Te crystal. The experimental conversion efficiency of Te crystal for second harmonic generation is 0.53%, which is equivalent to the theoretical value within a factor of 2. The Te crystal has been incorporated into an autocorrelator system to measure the micro-pulse width of infrared free electron laser successfully. (author)

  16. Second-Harmonic Generation and Shielding Effects on Alkali Clusters on Ultrathin Organic Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the nonlinear optical activity of large Na and K clusters, grown on Au metal film-supported alkane thiol monolayers of different chain lengths. Both the total optical second-harmonic signal intensity as well as its dependence on the angle of incidence depend on the surface coverage...

  17. Optical second-harmonic generation and photoemission from Al quantum wells on Si(1 1 1) 7x7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, K.; Kristensen, P.K.; Rafaelsen, J.; Skivesen, N.; Pedersen, T.G.; Morgen, P.; Li, Z.; Hoffmann, S.V

    2003-10-22

    Thin Al films on Si(1 1 1) have been investigated by optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in combination with synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. Valence band spectra show quantization of the Al sp-band in the energy range from the Fermi level down to the surface state at a binding energy of 4.6 eV. Quantization effects in SHG are observed as oscillations in the signal as a function of film thickness with an oscillation period that depends on the pump frequency of the laser light. The relation between film thickness and photon energy of SHG resonances for Al films indicates different types of resonances involving both quantum well and substrate states. It is shown that the structural order at the Al/Si interface can be probed through the rotationally anisotropic contribution to SHG. By exposing the film to oxygen and thus modifying the free surface, surface and interface contributions to the isotropic SH signal are identified.

  18. Hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in rat and human corneas: the potential of second harmonic generation microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaël Latour; Laura Kowalczuk; Michèle Savoldelli; Jean-Louis Bourges; Karsten Plamann; Francine Behar-Cohen; Marie-Claire Schanne-Klein

    2012-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic...

  19. Second Harmonic Detection of Spin-Dependent Transport in Magnetic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai-Ming; Granville, S.; Yu, Da-Peng; J-ph., Ansermet

    2010-02-01

    Detection of the second harmonic response of magnetic nanostructures to an ac current is shown to be a very sensitive probe of the magnetization reversal process. A temperature oscillation is obtained by Joule heating instead of using a laser as the heat source, as in thermo-galvanic voltage measurements (TGV). Joule heating is used to produce a large local temperature gradient in asymmetric Co/Cu/Co spin valves. Evidence is found for an effect of a heat current on magnetization.

  20. Double resonant excitation of the second harmonic of terahertz raditation in dielectric-graphene layered metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yu; Grimalsky, V.; Lavrinenko, A. V.; Boardman, A.

    2017-09-01

    Excitation of the second harmonic of THz radiation is investigated theoretically in the planar multilayered structure dielectric-graphene-dielectric-graphene-…. It is studied the case of the oblique incidence of the s-polarized fundamental wave, where the electric field is parallel to the interfaces, and generation of the p-type second harmonic wave occurs. The original concept is proposed to employ the double resonance arrangement for the effective generation of the second harmonic. The double resonant case can be realized when a high-permittivity dielectric is at the input of the structure and the vacuum is at the output. The high efficiency is demonstrated; the second harmonic reflectance coefficient is ≥0.01 under realistic values of the collision frequency in graphene >1012 s-1. Such a great efficiency, which is four-five orders of magnitude higher than reported for the graphene-dielectric structures previously, is proposed for the first time. To compute the nonlinear surface currents, two approaches were used, the kinetic and the hydrodynamic. A qualitative agreement between two approaches, proven in the present modeling, ensures an applicability of the results.

  1. Second harmonic generation imaging microscopy of cellular structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Andrew C.; Jin, Lei; Loew, Leslie M.

    2005-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy is an important emerging technique for biological research, with many advantages over existing one- or two-photon fluorescence techniques. A non-linear phenomenon employing mode-locked Ti:sapphire or fiber-based lasers, SHG results in intrinsic optical sectioning without the need for a confocal aperture. Furthermore, as a second-order process SHG is confined to loci lacking a center of symmetry. Many important structural proteins such as collagen and cellulose show intrinsic SHG, thus providing access to sub-resolution information on symmetry. However, we are particularly interested here in "resonance-enhanced" SHG from styryl dyes. In general SHG is a combination of a true second-order process and a third-order process dependent on a static electric field, such that SHG from membrane-bound dyes depends on a cell's trans-membrane potential. With simultaneous patch-clamping and non-linear imaging of cells, we have found that SHG is a sensitive probe of trans-membrane potential with sensitivities that are up to four times better than those obtained under optimal conditions using one-photon fluorescence imaging. With the sensitivity of SHG to local electric fields from other sources such as the membrane dipole potential as well as the quadratic dependence of SHG on concentration, we have found that SHG imaging of styryl dyes is also a powerful technique for the investigation of lipid phases and rafts and for the visualization of the dynamics of membrane-vesicle fusion following fertilization of an ovum.

  2. Time and Temperature Dependent Microrheology of Dye-Doped Polymers Using Second Harmonic Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremichael, Fassil

    The goal of this work is to build an understanding of the microscopic viscoelastic properties of a polymer. We used electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) measurements of organic molecular probes to study such microrheological properties. Polymers of high optical quality are doped with dye molecules and spin coated into 2-3 mu m thick films. When one of these films is irradiated with laser light at a particular wavelength, in the presence of a static field, second harmonic light (at half the incident wavelength) is generated owing to the dyes' nonlinearities. Note that the host polymer's function is to provide a rigid matrix to hold the guest molecule in place. Such materials are often called molecular materials because the bulk response can be explained directly in terms of a linear sum of the molecular properties. As such, the second harmonic signal is a function of the degree of net orientation of the dye molecules because second harmonic generation is disallowed in bulk centrosymmetric materials. Second harmonic generation is thus a powerful tool in the study of molecular orientation order. The polymer's temperature dependent microscopic environment, elastic strength, and free volume can be determined from second harmonic probed motion of the dye molecules when subjected to external forces such as electric fields. Such studies can be used to help understand the relationship between the microscopic and macroscopic mechanical and optical properties of the dye-polymer system. In this work, the application of a unique electric field temporal profile on the films doped with disperse red 1 (DR1) dye helped us to determine the microscopic elasticities and viscosities and the nature of the distribution of sites of poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA polymer. With this determination, we were able to better model a dye -polymer system. Our model is shown to be consistent with the experimental results. Our electric field profile has also led to a time

  3. Solitons and second harmonic radiation in type III bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Freund, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The emission at the second harmonic of the plasma frequency from self-consistent Langmuir solitons is calculated. The theory predicts, in a natural way, the observed transition from the region where the intensity is linearly proportional to the electron flux to the region where the radio intensity is proportional to the square of the electron flux. A detailed comparison of the radiation observed at the second harmonic for the burst of 18:10 UT March 31, 1976, with the one expected on the assumption of radiation from solitons, using the correlated in situ measurements of the electric fields at the second harmonic, and their spatial structure, provides strong evidence that, for the first time, Langmuir solitons have been observed in space.

  4. Confocal Imaging of Biological Tissues Using Second Harmonic Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B-M.; Stoller, P.; Reiser, K.; Eichler, J.; Yan, M.; Rubenchik, A.; Da Silva, L.

    2000-03-06

    A confocal microscopy imaging system was devised to selectively detect Second harmonic signals generated by biological tissues. Several types of biological tissues were examined using this imaging system, including human teeth, bovine blood vessels, and chicken skin. All these tissues generated strong second harmonic signals. There is considerable evidence that the source of these signals in tissue is collagen. Collagen, the predominant component of most tissues, is known to have second order nonlinear susceptibility. This technique may have diagnostic usefulness in pathophysiological conditions characterized by changes in collagen structure including malignant transformation of nevi, progression of diabetic complications, and abnormalities in wound healing.

  5. Noninvasive probing of the ocean surface using laser-based nonlinear optical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenowski, G.M.; Frysinger, G.S.; Asher, W.E. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-06-01

    The laser-based nonlinear optical methods of second-harmonic generation and sum-frequency generation have been developed to study the chemical composition and concentration of natural surfactant materials present as slicks on the ocean surface. These noninvasive second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation methods produce signals which originate from only the top few molecular layers of the ocean surface, thereby producing an accurate picture of the ocean surface condition without interference from the bulk ocean chemistry. Chemical specificity of the methods is achieved by tuning the incident laser frequency to coincide with optical absorptions in the surface absorbed materials. We show that laser-based second-order nonlinear optical processes of SHG and SFG provide highly surface selective, noninvasive, in situ probes of the ocean surface. Although only preliminary experiments are reported in this paper, the probes provide important information about the nature of surfactants at the ocean surface and their behavior in response to dynamic forces at the sea/air interface. The future of the probes lies in their further development and use as in situ interfacial spectroscopic techniques.

  6. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek

    Organic CNHP4 nanofibers showing a strong second-harmonic (SH) response have been successfully implemented as active components in a metal-organic hybrid system. Using nondestructive roll-on transfer technique nanofibers were transferred from the growing mica substrates onto electron...

  7. Second harmonic generation from photonic structured GaN nanowalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soya, Takahiro; Inose, Yuta; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Kouji; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kishino, Katsumi, E-mail: t-soya@sophia.ac.j [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Sophia University 7-1, Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We observed large enhancement of reflected second harmonic generation (SHG) using the one-dimensional photonic effect in regularly arranged InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well nanowalls. Using the effect when both fundamental and SH resonate with the photonic mode, we obtained enhancement of about 40 times compared with conditions far from resonance.

  8. Multi-order nonlinear diffraction in second harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, S. M.; Neshev, D.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    We analyze the emission patterns in the process of second harmonic (SH) generation in χ(2) nonlinear gratings and identify for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the evidence of Raman-Nath type nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes....

  9. Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-01-10

    We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

  10. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at high field side. Direct electron heating experiment on the Aditya tokamak using fast waves (FW) in the IC frequency range has already been carried out in [3] and ... 1Spec (solid line) shows the power deposition profile of ions due to ... The vertical line indicates the second-harmonic resonance layer for hydrogen ions. 716.

  11. Optical Cherenkov radiation in ultrafast cascaded second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Zhou, Binbin

    2010-01-01

    We show through theory and numerics that when few-cycle femtosecond solitons are generated through cascaded (phase-mismatched) second-harmonic generation, these broadband solitons can emit optical Cherenkov radiation in the form of linear dispersive waves located in the red part of the spectrum. ...

  12. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 4. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of Aditya tokamak plasma. Asim Kumar Chattopadhyay S V Kulkarni R Srinivasan Aditya Team. Volume 85 Issue 4 October 2015 pp 713-721 ...

  13. Second harmonic generation from corona-poled polymer thin films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-09

    Feb 9, 2014 ... Abstract. We characterize thermal stability of second harmonic generation (SHG) properties of four different Y-type polymers poled using corona poling method. These polymers are based on donor–acceptor–donor-type repeating unit with different aromatic moieties acting as donors and dicyanomethylene ...

  14. Characterization of GaN layers by second harmonic generation and photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juodkazis, Saulius; Galeckas, Augustinas; Vaitkus, Juozas V.; Sakai, Shiro; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2001-03-01

    We have observed an apparent rotational anisotropy of the second harmonic generation (SHG) at signal at (lambda) = 405 nm back-reflected from the surface (0001) of 3 micrometers -thick GaN grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The focusing depth of 2 micrometers was aimed to probe the 10-15 nm-thick buffer layer where both cubic and hexagonal phases of GaN are coexisting. Typical angular dependency clearly indicated the presence of both isotropic and six-fold contributions. The isotropic I(2(omega ))(qq) component has a minor one-fold modulation due to a ca. 2 degree(s) disorientation of the top surface with respect to the hexagonal planes. We attribute the substantial isotropic component to the SHG yield from the bulk of GaN. The occurrence of six-fold I(2(omega )) (qq) anisotropy, however, indicates a complementary nonlinearities, most likely due to hexagonal phase, which is coexisting with the hexagonal one in the buffer layer region. In general, both surface and bulk nonlinearities are contributing to the reflected SH yield. The symmetry of surface can differ from that in the bulk, exhibiting a corresponding angular dependence of harmonic generation. SHG mapping of GaN (ooo1) surface was measured from the ablated pattern. Space-Time-Spectra resolved photoluminescence (PL) was used to characterize the InGaN layers and GaN/InGaN MQW laser structures. Two-photon absorption (TPA) excited mapping of the dislocation network in GaN layers is demonstrated.

  15. Noise Analysis of Second-Harmonic Generation in Undoped and MgO-Doped Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Wang; Jorge Fonseca-Campos; Wan-guo Liang; Chang-Qing Xu; Ignacio Vargas-Baca

    2008-01-01

    Noise characteristics of second-harmonic generation (SHG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) using the quasiphase matching (QPM) technique are analyzed experimentally. In the experiment, a0.78 μm second-harmonic (SH) wave was generated when a 1.56 μm fundamental wave passed through a PPLN crystal (bulk or waveguide). The time-domain and frequency-domain noise characteristics of the fundamental and SH waves were analyzed. By using the pump-probe method, the noise characteristics of S...

  16. Electric-Field Switchable Second-Harmonic Generation in Bilayer MoS2 by Inversion Symmetry Breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J; Wierzbowski, J; Steinhoff, A; Florian, M; Rösner, M; Heimbach, F; Müller, K; Jahnke, F; Wehling, T O; Finley, J J; Kaniber, M

    2017-01-11

    We demonstrate pronounced electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation in naturally inversion symmetric 2H stacked bilayer MoS2 embedded into microcapacitor devices. By applying strong external electric field perturbations (|F| = ±2.6 MV cm-1) perpendicular to the basal plane of the crystal, we control the inversion symmetry breaking and, hereby, tune the nonlinear conversion efficiency. Strong tunability of the nonlinear response is observed throughout the energy range (Eω ∼ 1.25-1.47 eV) probed by measuring the second-harmonic response at E2ω, spectrally detuned from both the A- and B-exciton resonances. A 60-fold enhancement of the second-order nonlinear signal is obtained for emission at E2ω = 2.49 eV, energetically detuned by ΔE = E2ω - EC = -0.26 eV from the C-resonance (EC = 2.75 eV). The pronounced spectral dependence of the electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation signal reflects the bandstructure and wave function admixture and exhibits particularly strong tunability below the C-resonance, in good agreement with density functional theory calculations. Moreover, we show that the field-induced second-harmonic generation relies on the interlayer coupling in the bilayer. Our findings strongly suggest that the strong tunability of the electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation signal in bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides may find applications in miniaturized electrically switchable nonlinear devices.

  17. Characterization of muscle contraction with second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prent, Nicole

    Muscle cells have the ability to change length and generate force due to orchestrated action of myosin nanomotors that cause sliding of actin filaments along myosin filaments in the sarcomeres, the fundamental contractile units, of myocytes. The correlated action of hundreds of sarcomeres is needed to produce the myocyte contractions. This study probes the molecular structure of the myofilaments and investigates the movement correlations between sarcomeres during contraction. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is employed for imaging striated myocytes. Myosin filaments in striated myocytes inherently have a nonzero second-order susceptibility, [special characters omitted] and therefore generate efficient SHG. Employing polarization-in polarization-out (PIPO) SHG microscopy allows for the accurate determination of the characteristic ratio, [special characters omitted] in birefringent myocytes, which describes the structure of the myosin filament. Analysis shows that the b value at the centre of the myosin filament, where the nonlinear dipoles are better aligned, is slightly lower than the value at the edges of the filament, where there is more disorder in orientation of the nonlinear dipoles from the myosin heads. Forced stretching of myocytes resulted in an SHG intensity increase with the elongation of the sarcomere. SHG microscopy captured individual sarcomeres during contraction, allowing for the measurement of sarcomere length (SL) and SHG intensity (SI) fluctuations. The fluctuations also revealed higher SHG intensity in elongated sarcomeres. The sarcomere synchronization model (SSM) for contracting and quiescent myocytes was developed, and experimentally verified for three cases (isolated cardiomyocyte, embryonic chicken cardiomyocyte, and larva myocyte). During contraction, the action of SLs and SIs between neighbouring sarcomeres partially correlated, whereas in quiescent myocytes the SLs show an anti-correlation and the SIs have no

  18. Second harmonic generation study of the air/liquid interface of different solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Li, Dechun; Cao, Lihua; Li, Ying; Song, Xinwang; Li, Chunxiu; Li, Yaping; Cao, Xulong

    2013-09-01

    As an intrinsically surface-specific technique, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) is widely used in the study of interface in recent years. The SHG signals from the air/liquid interface of Rhodamine B and Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonate (SDBS) aqueous solutions were obtained and analyzed, which demonstrate that the SHG signal intensity of Rhodamine B is stronger than that of SDBS. Compared with one single solution, the SHG signal intensity of the mixed aqueous solution of Rhodamine B and SDBS decreases. From the UV-VIS absorption spectrum of the two aqueous solutions, it can be seen that Rhodamine B has an absorption peak closer to the second harmonic frequency. Therefore the resonance of the second harmonic frequency with the frequency of the dipole transitions of the chromophore considerably enhances the signal intensity. Furthermore, the hyperpolarizabilities of the molecules of Rhodamine B and SDBS are calculated from first-principles, which reveal that the hyperpolarizability of Rhodamine B molecule is greater than that of SDBS molecule. When they are mixed, molecules of Rhodamine B and SDBS gather together because Rhadamine B molecule carries positive surface charge and SDBS is anionic surfactant, causing the decrease of the SHG intensity of the mixed solution.

  19. Second-harmonic patterned polarization-analyzed reflection confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Chukwuemeka; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce the second-harmonic patterned polarization-analyzed reflection confocal (SPPARC) microscope-a multimodal imaging platform that integrates Mueller matrix polarimetry with reflection confocal and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. SPPARC microscopy provides label-free three-dimensional (3-D), SHG-patterned confocal images that lend themselves to spatially dependent, linear polarimetric analysis for extraction of rich polarization information based on the Mueller calculus. To demonstrate its capabilities, we use SPPARC microscopy to analyze both porcine tendon and ligament samples and find differences in both circular degree-of-polarization and depolarization parameters. Moreover, using the collagen-generated SHG signal as an endogenous counterstain, we show that the technique can be used to provide 3-D polarimetric information of the surrounding extrafibrillar matrix plus cells or EFMC region. The unique characteristics of SPPARC microscopy holds strong potential for it to more accurately and quantitatively describe microstructural changes in collagen-rich samples in three spatial dimensions.

  20. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  1. Monolithic AlGaAs second-harmonic nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    Gili, V F; Locatelli, A; Rocco, D; Finazzi, M; Ghirardini, L; Favero, I; Gomez, C; Lemaître, A; Celebrano, M; De Angelis, C; Leo, G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate monolithic aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) optical anoantennas. Using a selective oxidation technique, we fabricate such epitaxial semiconductor nanoparticles on an aluminum oxide substrate. Second harmonic generation from an AlGaAs nanocylinder of height h=400 nm and varying radius pumped with femtosecond pulses delivered at 1554-nm wavelength has been measured, revealing a peak conversion efficiency exceeding 10-5 for nanocylinders with an otpimized geometry.

  2. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  3. Characteristics of pulse width for an enhanced second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Hyodo, Masaharu; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chuangtian; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Temporal characteristics of a cavity enhancement second harmonic (SH) generation for picosecond laser pulse are investigated. We experimentally measured pulse width changes that were indued by group velocity mismatching (GVM), SH process, and enhancement cavity. It indicates that the generated pulse width is a combined effect of the GVM and SH process. Meanwhile, the effect of the enhancement cavity can be avoided by controlling its free spectrum range. A interferometric autocorrelator with a KBBF-PCD as nonlinear crystal is also composed and this extends the measurement light wavelength below 410 nm.

  4. Second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, B.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.; Pedersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Second-harmonic (SH) optical imaging of self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate has been accomplished at room temperature by use of respectively a scanning far-field optical microscope in reflection mode and a scanning near-field optical microscope...... in transmission mode. In both cases the SH signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm in correspondence to the maximum in the photoluminescence spectrum of the QD sample. SH near-field optical images exhibit spatial signal variations on a subwavelength scale that depend on the pump wavelength. We...

  5. Plasmonic enhancement of second harmonic generation from nonlinear RbTiOPO4 crystals by aggregates of silver nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-García, Laura; Tserkezis, Christos; Ramírez, Mariola O

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a 60–fold enhancement of the second harmonic generation (SHG) response at the nanoscale in a hybrid metal-dielectric system. By using complex silver nanostructures photochemically deposited on the polar surface of a ferroelectric crystal, we tune the plasmonic resonances from the v...

  6. Analysis of magnetic nanoparticles using second harmonic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2017-10-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging technology with a number of potential applications. It is based on utilizing the non-linear magnetization response for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We have proposed a method to improve the detection sensitivity for the magnetization of MNPs, and their imaging technique, based on the detection of a second harmonic of the response using a high Tc SQUID. The advantage of using the second harmonic is that the response can be measured even with small amplitudes. In this paper, superparamagnetic MNPs with different diameters and different compositions of materials were analyzed by this method. In the MNPs, Resovist was found to be almost one order of magnitude larger than that of the other MNPs tested. The magnetic moments of the MNPs were estimated by fitting with the Langevin function to obtain the magnetic moments m of Resovist of 3.62×10-18 [J/T]. The magnetic moment m of Resovist was 7.4 times larger than the other MNPs.

  7. Characterization of Second Harmonic Afterburner Radiation at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2010-09-14

    During commissioning of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory it was shown that saturation lengths much shorter than the installed length of the undulator line can routinely be achieved. This frees undulator segments that can be used to provide enhanced spectral properties and at the same time, test the concept of FEL Afterburners. In December 2009 a project was initiated to convert undulator segments at the down-beam end of the undulator line into Second Harmonic Afterburners (SHAB) to enhance LCLS radiation levels in the 10-20 keV energy range. This is being accomplished by replacement of gap-shims increasing the fixed gaps from 6.8 mm to 9.9 mm, which reduces their K values from 3.50 to 2.25 and makes the segments resonant at the second harmonic of the upstream unmodified undulators. This paper reports experimental results of the commissioning of the SHAB extension to LCLS.

  8. Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy in Collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, P C

    2002-09-30

    Collagen is a key structural protein in the body; several pathological conditions lead to changes in collagen. Among imaging modalities that can be used in vivo, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has a key advantage: it provides {approx}1 {micro}m resolution information about collagen structure as a function of depth. A new technique--polarization-modulated SHG--is presented: it permits simultaneous measurement of collagen orientation, of a lower bound on the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility tensor, and of the ratio of the two independent elements in this tensor. It is applied to characterizing SHG in collagen and to determining effects of biologically relevant changes in collagen structure. The magnitude of the second harmonic signal in two dimensional images varies with position even in structurally homogeneous tissue; this phenomenon is due to interference between second harmonic light generated by neighboring fibrils, which are randomly oriented parallel or anti-parallel to each other. Studies in which focal spot size was varied indicated that regions where fibrils are co-oriented are less than {approx}1.5 {micro}m in diameter. A quartz reference was used to determine the spot size as well as a lower limit (d{sub xxx} > 0.3 pm/V) for the magnitude of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The ratio of the two independent tensor elements ranged between d{sub XYY}/d{sub XXX} = 0.60 and 0.75. SHG magnitude alone was not useful for identifying structural anomalies in collagenous tissue. Instead, changes in the polarization dependence of SHG were used to analyze biologically relevant perturbations in collagen structure. Changes in polarization dependence were observed in dehydrated samples, but not in highly crosslinked samples, despite significant alterations in packing structure. Complete thermal denaturation and collagenase digestion produced samples with no detectable SHG signal. Collagen orientation was measured in thin

  9. Revisiting the boundary conditions for second-harmonic generation at metal-dielectric interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nireekshan Reddy, K.; Chen, Parry Y.; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I.; Sivan, Yonatan

    2017-09-01

    We study second-harmonic generation (SHG) arising from surface nonlinearity at a metal-dielectric interface using a spectral decomposition method. Since our method avoids the need to consider the generalized boundary condition across the metal-dielectric interface in the presence of a perpendicular surface source, we retrieve the known discontinuity of the tangential component of the electric field ($E_{\\parallel}^ {2\\omega}$) for a general geometry, based on a purely mathematical argument. Further, we reaffirm the standard convention of the implementation of this condition, namely, that the surface dipole source radiates as if placed outside the metal surface for arbitrary geometries. We also study and explain the spectral dependence of the discontinuity of the tangential component of the electric field at second harmonic. Finally, we note that the default settings of the commercial numerical package COMSOL Multiphysics fail to account for the $E_{\\parallel}^ {2\\omega}$-discontinuity. We provide a simple recipe that corrects the boundary condition within these existing settings.

  10. Second-harmonic imaging of ferroelectric domain walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Pedersen, Kjeld

    1998-01-01

    Domain walls in periodically poled ferroelectric KTiOPO4 and LiNbO3 crystals are observed by making use of second-harmonic (SH) generation enhancement in the transition regions between neighboring domains. SH images of domain walls obtained with various samples for different polarization...... configurations are presented. The SH generation enhancement is found especially pronounced for the polarization of the SH radiation being perpendicular to the domain walls. The origin and selection rules for the contrast in SH images of domain walls are discussed. The results obtained suggest that the domain...... walls produce a deteriorating effect on SH generation by quasiphase matching. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics. [S0003-6951(98)02039-7]....

  11. Nonlinear wave chaos: statistics of second harmonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2017-10-01

    Concepts from the field of wave chaos have been shown to successfully predict the statistical properties of linear electromagnetic fields in electrically large enclosures. The Random Coupling Model (RCM) describes these properties by incorporating both universal features described by Random Matrix Theory and the system-specific features of particular system realizations. In an effort to extend this approach to the nonlinear domain, we add an active nonlinear frequency-doubling circuit to an otherwise linear wave chaotic system, and we measure the statistical properties of the resulting second harmonic fields. We develop an RCM-based model of this system as two linear chaotic cavities coupled by means of a nonlinear transfer function. The harmonic field strengths are predicted to be the product of two statistical quantities and the nonlinearity characteristics. Statistical results from measurement-based calculation, RCM-based simulation, and direct experimental measurements are compared and show good agreement over many decades of power.

  12. Second harmonic chalcone crystal: Synthesis, growth and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Silva, E.D., E-mail: deepak.dsilva@gmail.co [Department of studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri, Mangalore 574199 (India); Narayan Rao, D. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Philip, Reji [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Butcher, Ray J. [Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, DC 20059 (United States); Rajnikant [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu Tawi 180006 (India); Dharmaprakash, S.M. [Department of studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri, Mangalore 574199 (India)

    2011-05-15

    The novel nonlinear optical chalcone derivative (2E)-3-[4-(methylsulfanyl)phenyl]-1-(3-bromophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (3Br4MSP) crystals have been grown by slow evaporation technique at ambient temperature. The crystal was subjected to different types of characterization method in order to study its possible application in nonlinear optics. The structure determination of the grown crystal was done by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. The morphology of the crystal is studied. The crystal was subjected to thermal analysis to find its thermal stability. The grown crystals were characterized for their optical transmission and mechanical hardness. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the crystal is obtained by classical powdered technique. The laser damage threshold for 3Br4MSP crystal was determined using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

  13. Second harmonic plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for second harmonic plasma emission by the weak turbulence (or random phase) processes L + L + or - S to T, proceeding in two three-wave steps, L + or - S to L prime and L + L prime to T, where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and electromagnetic waves, respectively, is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes, and constraints on the characteristics of the source plasma, are derived. Limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation and the levels of the L prime and S waves are determined. Expressions for the growth rates and path-integrated wave temperatures are derived for simple models of the wave spectra and source plasma.

  14. Rotational second harmonic generation endoscopy with 1μm fiber laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gangjun; Xie, Tuqiang; Yu, Lingfeng; Su, Jianping; Tomov, Ivan V.; Wang, Qiang; Rao, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    2009-02-01

    We present a kind of rotational two photon mciroendoscopy for 1μm fiber femtosecond laser. The fiber laser provide ultrashort femto-second pulses with center wavelength at 1.034μm and repetition rate of 50MH. The rotational probe is based on double cladding photonic crystal fiber (CD PCF) fiber, Grin lens, microprism and rotational MEMS motor. The MEMS motor has diameter of 2.2mm and can provide 360 degree full view rotation. We experimentally show that the DC PCF fiber works for 1μm fiber laser two photon system. Second harmonic generation (SHG) singnal line profile of rat tail tendon and fish scale was taken with the endoscopy system.

  15. Nanotwin Detection and Domain Polarity Determination via Optical Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ming-Liang; Agarwal, Rahul; Nukala, Pavan; Liu, Wenjing; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-07-13

    We demonstrate that optical second harmonic generation (SHG) can be utilized to determine the exact nature of nanotwins in noncentrosymmetric crystals, which is challenging to resolve via conventional transmission electron or scanned probe microscopies. Using single-crystalline nanotwinned CdTe nanobelts and nanowires as a model system, we show that SHG polarimetry can distinguish between upright (Cd-Te bonds) and inverted (Cd-Cd or Te-Te bonds) twin boundaries in the system. Inverted twin boundaries are generally not reported in nanowires due to the lack of techniques and complexity associated with the study of the nature of such defects. Precise characterization of the nature of defects in nanocrystals is required for deeper understanding of their growth and physical properties to enable their application in future devices.

  16. Second-harmonic generation from a thin spherical layer and No-generation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapshai, V. N.; Shamyna, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye approximation, we solve the problem of second-harmonic generation by an elliptically polarized electromagnetic wave incident on the surface of a spherical particle that is coated by an optically nonlinear layer and is placed in a dielectric. The formulas obtained characterize the spatial distribution of the electric field of the second harmonic in the far-field zone. The most general form of the second-order dielectric susceptibility tensor is considered, which contains four independent components, with three of them being nonchiral and one, chiral. Consistency and inconsistencies between the obtained solution and formulas from works of other authors are found. We analyze the directivity patterns that characterize the spatial distribution of the generated radiation for the nonchiral layer and their dependences on the anisotropy and ellipticity coefficients of the incident wave. It is found that, with increasing radius of the nonlinear layer, the generated radiation becomes more directional. Combinations of parameters for which no radiation is generated are revealed. Based on this, we propose methods for experimental determination of the anisotropy coefficients.

  17. Efficient second harmonic generation in low-loss planar GaN waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromovyi, Maksym; Brault, Julien; Courville, Aimeric; Rennesson, Stéphanie; Semond, Fabrice; Feuillet, Guy; Baldi, Pascal; Boucaud, Philippe; Duboz, Jean-Yves; De Micheli, Marc P

    2017-09-18

    We demonstrate low-loss GaN/AlGaN planar waveguides grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire substrates. By using a proper AlGaN cladding layer and reducing surface roughness we reach modal phase matching between a TM0 pump at 1260nm and a TM2 second harmonic at 630nm. A maximal power conversion of 2% is realized with an efficiency of 0.15%·W(-1)cm(-2). We provide a modelling that demonstrates broadband features of GaN/AlGaN platform by showing second harmonic wavelengths tunability from the visible up to the near-infrared spectral region. We discuss drawbacks of modal phase matching and propose a novel solution which allows a drastic improvement of modal overlaps with the help of a planar polarity inversion. This new approach is compatible with low propagation losses and may allow as high as 100%·W(-1)cm(-2) conversion efficiencies in the future.

  18. Angularly resolved RABBITT using a second harmonic pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriot, Vincent; Marciniak, Alexandre; Karras, Gabriel; Schindler, Baptiste; Renois-Predelus, Gina; Compagnon, Isabelle; Concina, Bruno; Brédy, Richard; Celep, Gulabi; Bordas, Christian; Constant, Eric; Lépine, Franck

    2017-11-01

    Processes in atoms or molecules on the attosecond timescale have been measured using XUV attosecond and IR femtosecond pulses overlapping in time and controlled with attosecond accuracy. Within this general framework, many strategies have been developed using the harmonics of the fundamental pulse. In this paper, we focus on a specific configuration where the attosecond pulse train is composed by odd harmonics and is dressed by the second harmonic of the fundamental light. Measuring the angularly resolved photoelectron spectrum as a function of the delay between the pulses, a clear oscillation of the anisotropy parameters appears revealing attosecond controlled interferences. This process, is assigned to interferences between two quantum paths involving one XUV photon, on one path, and a XUV+UV photons on the other path. The XUV-UV delay dependent up–down asymmetry can be interpreted following the usual RABBITT formalism, where the dressing photon energy corresponds to the energy separation between the XUV photons of the attosecond pulse train. This approach allows an intuitive analysis of the interference and provides a well suited method for the study of complex valence band systems thanks to the limited congestion of the resulting spectrum.

  19. Efficient Forward Second-Harmonic Generation from Planar Archimedean Nanospirals

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, Roderick B; Vargas, Guillermo; Avanesyan, Sergey M; Haglund, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    The enhanced electric field at plasmonic resonances in nanoscale antennas can lead to efficient harmonic generation, especially when the plasmonic geometry is asymmetric on either inter-particle or intra-particle levels. The planar Archimedean nanospiral offers a unique geometrical asymmetry for second-harmonic generation (SHG) because the SHG results neither from arranging centrosymmetric nanoparticles in asymmetric groupings, nor from non-centrosymmetric nanoparticles that retain a local axis of symmetry. Here we report forward SHG from planar arrays of Archimedean nanospirals using 15 fs pulse from a Ti:sapphire oscillator tuned to 800 nm wavelength. The measured harmonic-generation efficiencies are 2.6*10-9, 8*10-9 and 1.3*10-8 for left-handed circular, linear, and right-handed circular polarizations, respectively. The uncoated nanospirals are stable under average power loading of as much as 300 uW per nanoparticle. The nanospirals also exhibit a selective conversion between polarization states. These exp...

  20. Research of second harmonic generation images based on texture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Li, Yan; Gong, Haiming; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan

    2014-09-01

    Texture analysis plays a crucial role in identifying objects or regions of interest in an image. It has been applied to a variety of medical image processing, ranging from the detection of disease and the segmentation of specific anatomical structures, to differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy as a potential noninvasive tool for imaging biological tissues has been widely used in medicine, with reduced phototoxicity and photobleaching. In this paper, we clarified the principles of texture analysis including statistical, transform, structural and model-based methods and gave examples of its applications, reviewing studies of the technique. Moreover, we tried to apply texture analysis to the SHG images for the differentiation of human skin scar tissues. Texture analysis method based on local binary pattern (LBP) and wavelet transform was used to extract texture features of SHG images from collagen in normal and abnormal scars, and then the scar SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal ones. Compared with other texture analysis methods with respect to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, LBP combined with wavelet transform was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy. It can provide a new way for clinical diagnosis of scar types. At last, future development of texture analysis in SHG images were discussed.

  1. Second harmonic generation reveals matrix alterations during breast tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen; Tang, Ping; Brown, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Alteration of the extracellular matrix in tumor stroma influences efficiency of cell locomotion away from the primary tumor into surrounding tissues and vasculature, thereby affecting metastatic potential. We study matrix changes in breast cancer through the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen in order to improve the current understanding of breast tumor stromal development. Specifically, we utilize a quantitative analysis of the ratio of forward to backward propagating SHG signal (F/B ratio) to monitor collagen throughout ductal and lobular carcinoma development. After detection of a significant decrease in the F/B ratio of invasive but not in situ ductal carcinoma compared with healthy tissue, the collagen F/B ratio is investigated to determine the evolution of fibrillar collagen changes throughout tumor progression. Results are compared with the progression of lobular carcinoma, whose F/B signature also underwent significant evolution during progression, albeit in a different manner, which offers insight into varying methods of tissue penetration and collagen manipulation between the carcinomas. This research provides insights into trends of stromal reorganization throughout breast tumor development.

  2. Metrology of Multiphoton Microscopes Using Second Harmonic Generation Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahou, Pierre; Malkinson, Guy; Chaudan, Élodie; Gacoin, Thierry; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Supatto, Willy

    2017-11-01

    In multiphoton microscopy, the ongoing trend toward the use of excitation wavelengths spanning the entire near-infrared range calls for new standards in order to quantify and compare the performances of microscopes. This article describes a new method for characterizing the imaging properties of multiphoton microscopes over a broad range of excitation wavelengths in a straightforward and efficient manner. It demonstrates how second harmonic generation (SHG) nanoprobes can be used to map the spatial resolution, field curvature, and chromatic aberrations across the microscope field of view with a precision below the diffraction limit and with unique advantages over methods based on fluorescence. KTiOPO4 nanocrystals are used as SHG nanoprobes to measure and compare the performances over the 850-1100 nm wavelength range of several microscope objectives designed for multiphoton microscopy. Finally, this approach is extended to the post-acquisition correction of chromatic aberrations in multicolor multiphoton imaging. Overall, the use of SHG nanoprobes appears as a uniquely suited method to standardize the metrology of multiphoton microscopes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Efficient forward second-harmonic generation from planar archimedean nanospirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson II Roderick B.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The enhanced electric field at plasmonic resonances in nanoscale antennas can lead to efficient harmonic generation, especially when the plasmonic geometry is asymmetric on either inter-particle or intra-particle levels. The planar Archimedean nanospiral offers a unique geometrical asymmetry for second-harmonic generation (SHG because the SHG results neither from arranging centrosymmetric nanoparticles in asymmetric groupings, nor from non-centrosymmetric nanoparticles that retain a local axis of symmetry. Here, we report forward SHG from planar arrays of Archimedean nanospirals using 15 fs pulses from a Ti:sapphire oscillator tuned to 800 nm wavelength. The measured harmonic-generation efficiencies are 2.6·10−9, 8·10−9 and 1.3·10−8 for left-handed circular, linear, and right-handed circular polarizations, respectively. The uncoated nanospirals are stable under average power loading of as much as 300 μWper nanoparticle. The nanospirals also exhibit selective conversion between polarization states. These experiments show that the intrinsic asymmetry of the nanospirals results in a highly efficient, two-dimensional harmonic generator that can be incorporated into metasurface optics.

  4. Far- and near-field second harmonic imaging of ferroelectric domain walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld; Skettrup, Torben

    1998-01-01

    Domain walls in periodically poled ferroelectric LiNbO3 crystals are observed with both far- and near-field imaging techniques that make use of second harmonic generation in the transition regions between neighbouring domains. Second harmonic images of domain walls represent bright lines of about 0.......5 micrometers in width (as measured with the near-field microscope) for the polarization of the second harmonic radiation perpendicular to the domain walls. Origin and selection rules for the constrast in second harmonic images of domain walls are discussed....

  5. Resonant second harmonic generation of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a collisional magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhdeep; Sharma, A. K.; Salih, Hyder A.

    2009-04-01

    Second harmonic generation of a right circularly polarized Gaussian electromagnetic beam in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The beam causes Ohmic heating of electrons and subsequent redistribution of the plasma, leading to self-defocusing. The radial density gradient, in conjunction with the oscillatory electron velocity, produces density oscillation at the wave frequency. The density oscillation beats with the oscillatory velocity to produce second harmonic current density, giving rise to resonant second harmonic radiation when the wave frequency is one-third of electron cyclotron frequency. The second harmonic field has azimuthal dependence as exp(iθ). The self-defocusing causes a reduction in the efficiency of harmonic generation.

  6. Tunable Room Temperature Second Harmonic Generation in Glasses Doped with CuCI Nanocrystalline Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon; Schley, Robert Scott; B. L. Justus

    2003-05-01

    Two-photon excited emission centered at 379-426 nm in photodarkening borosilicate glass doped with CuCl nanocrystalline quantum dots at room temperature has been observed. The emission is detected in the direction of the fundamental near-infrared beam. Time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature and 77 K indicate that the emission is largely coherent light characteristic of second harmonic generation (SHG). An average conversion efficiency of ~10-10 is obtained for a 2 mm thick sample. The observed SHG can originate in the individual noncentrosymmetric nanocrystals, leading to a bulk-like contribution, and at the nanocrystal-glass interface, leading to a surface contribution. The bulk-like conversion efficiency is estimated using previously reported values of coherence length (5m) and bulk nonlinear susceptibility. This bulk-like conversion efficiency estimate is found to be smaller than the measured value, suggesting a more prominent surface contribution.

  7. Crystallographic Mapping of Guided Nanowires by Second Harmonic Generation Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeman, Lior; Ben-Zvi, Regev; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Oron, Dan; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-02-08

    The growth of horizontal nanowires (NWs) guided by epitaxial and graphoepitaxial relations with the substrate is becoming increasingly attractive owing to the possibility of controlling their position, direction, and crystallographic orientation. In guided NWs, as opposed to the extensively characterized vertically grown NWs, there is an increasing need for understanding the relation between structure and properties, specifically the role of the epitaxial relation with the substrate. Furthermore, the uniformity of crystallographic orientation along guided NWs and over the substrate has yet to be checked. Here we perform highly sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry of polar and nonpolar guided ZnO NWs grown on R-plane and M-plane sapphire. We optically map large areas on the substrate in a nondestructive way and find that the crystallographic orientations of the guided NWs are highly selective and specific for each growth direction with respect to the substrate lattice. In addition, we perform SHG polarimetry along individual NWs and find that the crystallographic orientation is preserved along the NW in both polar and nonpolar NWs. While polar NWs show highly uniform SHG along their axis, nonpolar NWs show a significant change in the local nonlinear susceptibility along a few micrometers, reflected in a reduction of 40% in the ratio of the SHG along different crystal axes. We suggest that these differences may be related to strain accumulation along the nonpolar wires. We find SHG polarimetry to be a powerful tool to study both selectivity and uniformity of crystallographic orientations of guided NWs with different epitaxial relations.

  8. Multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for imaging keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the possible application of multiphoton fluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for imaging the structural features of keratoconus cornea and to evaluate its potential as being a clinical in vivo monitoring technique. Using the near-infrared excitation source from a titanium-sapphire laser pumped by a diode-pumped, solid state (DPSS) laser system, we can induce and simultaneously acquire multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG signals from the cornea specimens with keratoconus. A home-modified commercial microscope system with specified optical components is used for optimal signal detection. Keratoconus cornea button from patient with typical clinical presentation of keratoconus was obtained at the time of penetrating keratoplasty. The specimen was also sent for the histological examination as comparison. In all samples of keratoconus, destruction of lamellar structure with altered collagen fiber orientation was observed within whole layer of the diseased stromal area. In addition, the orientation of the altered collagen fibers within the cone area shows a trend directing toward the apex of the cone, which might implicate the biomechanical response of the keratoconus stroma to the intraocular pressure. Moreover, increased autofluorescent cells were also found in the cone area, with increased density as one approaches the apical area. In conclusion, multiphoton autofluorescence and SHG microscopy non-invasively demonstrated the morphological features of keratoconus cornea, especially the structural alternations of the stromal lamellae. We believe that in the future the multiphoton microscopy can be applied in vivo as an effective, non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring technique for keratoconus.

  9. Optimization of second-harmonic's quantization precision for intensity modulation noise suppressing in a digital RFOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diqing; Ye, Kebin; Wang, Zeyu; Mao, Jianmin; Jin, Zhonghe

    2017-12-01

    Aiming at the demodulation signal compensation technique for intensity modulation noise suppressing in a digital RFOG, which is based on the detection of closed loop's second-harmonic, the quantization precision for second-harmonic is discussed and optimized. By analyzing second-harmonic's fluctuation under the intensity modulation noise equal to shot noise limited sensitivity, the expression for the required minimum quantization bits of second-harmonic signal is obtained. Based on this expression, numerical simulations are carried out to optimize the quantization bits in a digital RFOG in detail. Based on over-sampling technique, the stability of gyro output signal with different quantization bits and rotation rates is tested to verify the theoretically analyzed results. It is concluded that the minimum quantization bits of second-harmonic is related to the rotation rate and the ratio of second-harmonic's maximum to minimum, and it gets larger as these two parameters are increased. Especially, the required minimum quantization bits for second-harmonic would generally exceed that supported only by hardware circuits, which leads to the adoption of over-sampling technique. And it is proven that the quantization precision improvement for second-harmonic, realized by the over-sampling technique, does work in improving the effect of intensity modulation noise suppressing.

  10. Second harmonic generation at fatigue cracks by low-frequency Lamb waves: Experimental and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Ng, Ching-Tai; Kotousov, Andrei; Sohn, Hoon; Lim, Hyung Jin

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and theoretical analyses of the second harmonic generation due to non-linear interaction of Lamb waves with a fatigue crack. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) simulations and experimental studies are carried out to provide physical insight into the mechanism of second harmonic generation. The results demonstrate that the 3D FE simulations can provide a reasonable prediction on the second harmonic generated due to the contact nonlinearity at the fatigue crack. The effect of the wave modes on the second harmonic generation is also investigated in detail. It is found that the magnitude of the second harmonic induced by the interaction of the fundamental symmetric mode (S0) of Lamb wave with the fatigue crack is much higher than that by the fundamental anti-symmetric mode (A0) of Lamb wave. In addition, a series of parametric studies using 3D FE simulations are conducted to investigate the effect of the fatigue crack length to incident wave wavelength ratio, and the influence of the excitation frequency on the second harmonic generation. The outcomes show that the magnitude and directivity pattern of the generated second harmonic depend on the fatigue crack length to incident wave wavelength ratio as well as the ratio of S0 to A0 incident Lamb wave amplitude. In summary, the findings of this study can further advance the use of second harmonic generation in damage detection.

  11. Experimental observation of second-harmonic generation and diffusion inside random media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faez, Sanli; Johnson, P. M.; Mazurenko, D. A.; Lagendijk, Ad

    We have experimentally measured the distribution of the second-harmonic intensity that is generated inside a highly scattering slab of porous gallium phosphide. Two complementary techniques for determining the distribution are used. First, the spatial distribution of second-harmonic light intensity

  12. Acoustically induced optical second harmonic generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    CERN Document Server

    Ebothe, J; Cabarrocas, P R I; Godet, C; Equer, B

    2003-01-01

    Acoustically induced second harmonic generation (AISHG) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films of different morphology has been observed. We have found that with increasing acoustical power, the optical SHG of Gd : YAB laser light (lambda = 2.03 mu m) increases and reaches its maximum value at an acoustical power density of about 2.10 W cm sup - sup 2. With decreasing temperature, the AISHG signal strongly increases below 48 K and correlates well with the temperature behaviour of differential scanning calorimetry indicating near-surface temperature phase transition. The AISHG maxima were observed at acoustical frequencies of 10-11, 14-16, 20-22 and 23-26 kHz. The independently performed measurements of the acoustically induced IR spectra have shown that the origin of the observed phenomenon is the acoustically induced electron-phonon anharmonicity in samples of different morphology.

  13. The Binding of Roxarsone at the Silica/Water Interface Studied with Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konek, Christopher; Ostrowski, David; Geiger, Franz

    2005-03-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogen that can also cause chronic poisoning when ingested via drinking water in quantities as low as 10 micrograms/L. In the US, organic arsenicals such as Roxarsone are commonly used as feed additives in the poultry industry. The use of poultry litter as fertilizer results in environmental arsenic deposition rates of up to 50 metric tons per year; the subsequent environmental fate of Roxarsone is unknown. We use second harmonic generation (SHG) to study the thermodynamics and kinetics of Roxarsone binding to environmentally relevant mineral oxide/water interfaces. Roxarsone binding to water/SiO2 interfaces is fully reversible, consistent with high Roxarsone mobility. Results from Langmuir isotherm measurements and surface SHG spectra are presented as well.

  14. Achromatic phase matching for tunable second-harmonic generation by use of a grism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, B A; Bisson, S E; Trebino, R; Mitchell, M G; Sidick, E; Jacobson, A

    1997-08-15

    Achromatic phase matching (APM) involves dispersing the light entering a nonlinear-optical crystal so that a wide range of wavelengths is simultaneously phase matched. Using an APM arrangement consisting of a grism (a grating on the surface of a prism) and three prisms, optimized to match a second-harmonic crystal phase-matching angle versus wavelength to high order, we efficiently doubled tunable fundamental light near 650nm with a bandwidth of >95 nm by use of a 4-mm type I beta-barium borate crystal. APM uses no moving parts, and unlike previous APM designs, ours avoids lenses and hence is easy to align and insensitive to translational misalignment of the beam.

  15. Nonlinear Raman-Nath second harmonic generation of hybrid structured fundamental wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huaqing; Liu, Haigang; Sang, Minghuang; Li, Jun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-02-20

    We numerically and experimentally investigated the nonlinear Raman-Nath second harmonic generation of hybrid structured fundamental wave whose phase modulation combined periodic and random structure. The second harmonic generation of both one- and two-dimensional hybrid structured fundamental wave were investigated in this paper. The results show that more diffraction spots can be obtained in these hybrid structures than the pure periodic modulation cases. Besides, the total intensity of the second harmonic not only can be dramatically enhanced without altering the diffraction angles, but also is increasing with the degree of randomness of the structure. This study enriches the family of second harmonic generation of structured fundamental wave and has potential application in dynamically controlling second harmonic wave in arbitrary directions.

  16. Theory of optical second-harmonic generation from a sphere of centrosymmetric material: small-particle limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadap, Jerry I.; Shan, Jie; Heinz, Tony F.

    2004-07-01

    The electromagnetic theory of optical second-harmonic generation from small spherical particles comprised of centrosymmetric material is presented. The interfacial region where the inversion symmetry is broken provides a source of the nonlinearity. This response is described by a general surface nonlinear susceptibility tensor for an isotropic interface. In addition, the appropriate weak bulk terms for an isotropic centrosymmetric medium are introduced. The linear optical response of the sphere and the surrounding region is assumed to be isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary. The analysis is carried out to leading order in the ratio of (a/λ), the particle radius to the wavelength of the incident light, and can be considered as the Rayleigh limit for second-harmonic generation from a sphere. Emission from the sphere arises from both induced electric dipole and electric quadrupole moments at the second-harmonic frequency. The former requires a nonlocal excitation mechanism in which the phase variation of the pump beam across the sphere is considered, while the latter is present for a local-excitation mechanism. The locally excited electric dipole term, analogous to the source for linear Rayleigh scattering, is absent for the nonlinear case because of the overall inversion symmetry of the problem. The second-harmonic field is found to scale as (a/λ)3 and to be completely determined by two effective nonlinear susceptibility coefficients formed as a prescribed combination of the surface and bulk nonlinearities. Characteristic angular and polarization selection rules resulting from the mechanism of the radiation process are presented. Various experimental aspects of the problem are examined, including the expected signal strengths and methods of determining the nonlinear susceptibilities. The spectral characteristics associated with the geometry of a small sphere are also discussed, and distinctive localized plasmon resonances are identified.

  17. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank; Asger Mortensen, N; Pertsch, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maximally achievable efficiency reached for finite values of the group index at the point of phase-matching. Furthermore, we identify situations for which slow light, surprisingly, does not enhance the second-harmonic generation efficiency. Our results are corroborated by rigorous nonlinear simulations of second-harmonic generation in periodic nanobeam waveguides with loss.

  18. Pattern formation in singly resonant second-harmonic generation with competing parametric oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, P.; Saffman, M.

    1999-01-01

    fundamental field, and its coupling to a pair of nondegenerate parametric fields. The parametric fields are driven by the nonresonant second-harmonic field. Analysis indicates the existence of transverse instability of the pump field alone, as well as the possibility of simultaneous instability of the pump......We theoretically investigate the generation of spatial patterns in intracavity second-harmonic generation. We consider a cavity with planar mirrors that is resonant at the fundamental frequency, but not at the second-harmonic frequency. A mean-field model is derived that describes the resonant...

  19. Optical second-harmonic generation measurements of porous low-k dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Joanna; Shaw, Thomas; Laibowitz, Robert; Heinz, Tony

    2009-03-01

    Low-k dielectric materials based on porous carbon-doped oxides, with relative dielectric constants as low as 2.1, are widely used as thin insulating films in the microelectronics industry. Knowledge of these materials' basic electronic properties, such as energy gaps, barrier heights, and trap states, is essential for modeling their electrical leakage and stability characteristics. We use femtosecond laser pulses to probe the dynamics of charge-carrier transfer processes across Si/LKD interfacial barriers by optical second harmonic generation (SHG). Larger electric fields from multiphoton injection can be developed in Si/LKD systems compared to Si/SiO2, indicating a significantly higher density of traps in the LKD. This is consistent with previously reported measurements of trap density by photoinjection techniques^*. We will also discuss results on the dynamics of discharging and on the dependence of charging phenomena on layer thickness. ^*J. M. Atkin, D. Song, T. M. Shaw, E. Cartier, R. B. Laibowitz, and T. F. Heinz, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 094104 (2008).

  20. Low-temperature anomalies of photoinduced second harmonic generation in skutterudites

    CERN Document Server

    Viennois, R; Terki, F; Charar, S; Muntzer, A; Kasperczyk, J; Ravot, D; Tedenac, J C

    2003-01-01

    Photoinduced second harmonic generation (PISHG) was found in skutterudite compounds of CeFe sub 4 Sb sub 1 sub 2 and Ce sub 0 sub . sub 7 Fe sub 3 sub . sub 5 Ni sub 0 sub . sub 5 Sb sub 1 sub 2. Measurements versus temperature, pump-probe delaying time and external magnetic field were performed. The studied compounds belong to moderate heavy fermion compounds (HFC) in the ground state. The PISHG signals appear at 6.8 and 4.9 K for CeFe sub 4 Sb sub 1 sub 2 and Ce sub 0 sub . sub 7 Fe sub 3 sub . sub 5 Ni sub 0 sub . sub 5 Sb sub 1 sub 2 , respectively. We suspect that these signals are due to anharmonic electron-phonon interactions creating a charge density non-centrosymmetry. The observed effects are caused either by a possible phase transition or by drastic changes in the electron structure of the HFC with decreasing temperature.

  1. Improved identification of viable myocardium using second harmonic imaging during dobutamine stress echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Sozzi (Fabiola); D. Poldermans (Don); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); A. Elhendy (Abdou); E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni); R. Valkema (Roelf); J. de Sutter; A.F.L. Schinkel (Arend); A. Borghetti; J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine whether, compared with fundamental imaging, second harmonic imaging can improve the accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography for identifying viable myocardium, using nuclear imaging as a reference. PATIENTS: 30 patients with chronic left

  2. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging Analysis of Collagen Arrangement in Human Cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Choul Yong; Lee, Jimmy K.; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we imaged human cornea using a second harmonic generation imaging technique. The horizontal collagen bundle arrangement of corneal stroma as a function of depth and location was analyzed.

  3. Synchronous pumping of picosecond dye laser using high efficiency second harmonic generation from optical fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Bernardin, J. P.; Macdonald, R. L.; Demouchy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The stable operation of a mode-locked dye laser synchronously pumped by the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser produced in an Nd codoped germanosilicate optical fiber is reported. The optical fiber preparation technique, which results in a second harmonic conversion efficiency of 2 percent, is described. This optical fiber SHG conversion efficiency is the highest reported to date using a continuous-wave mode-locked laser.

  4. Improved identification of viable myocardium using second harmonic imaging during dobutamine stress echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Sozzi, Fabiola; Poldermans, Don; Bax, Jeroen; Elhendy, Abdou; Vourvouri, Eleni; Valkema, Roelf; Sutter, J.; Schinkel, Arend; Borghetti, A; Roelandt, Jos

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether, compared with fundamental imaging, second harmonic imaging can improve the accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography for identifying viable myocardium, using nuclear imaging as a reference.
PATIENTS—30 patients with chronic left ventricular dysfunction (mean (SD) age, 60 (8) years; 22 men).
METHODS—Dobutamine stress echocardiography was carried out in all patients using both fundamental and second harmonic imaging. All patients underwent dual isotope simul...

  5. Absolute-magnetic-field measurement using nanogranular in-gap magnetic sensor with second-harmonic and liquid-nitrogen-temperature operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Yasugi, Takuya; Majima, Yatsuse; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko

    2017-05-01

    To detect the absolute magnetic field, such as the earth's magnetic field, a linear magnetic response, a zero point, and thermal stability are required. We thus propose an operating method and sensor probe consisting of a nanogranular in-gap magnetic sensor (GIGS), an operational amplifier integrated circuit, and a modulation coil. The sensor probe was operated in second-harmonic mode at a liquid-nitrogen (Liq. N2) temperature. When an AC magnetic field was applied to GIGS, the second-harmonic signal was generated and modulated by the outer magnetic field to be measured. After lock-in detection, the modulated output signal showed good linearity and a zero point. Moreover, higher sensitivity and low noise with low thermal fluctuation was obtained by the cooling at Liq. N2 temperature.

  6. Absolute-magnetic-field measurement using nanogranular in-gap magnetic sensor with second-harmonic and liquid-nitrogen-temperature operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Tsukada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To detect the absolute magnetic field, such as the earth’s magnetic field, a linear magnetic response, a zero point, and thermal stability are required. We thus propose an operating method and sensor probe consisting of a nanogranular in-gap magnetic sensor (GIGS, an operational amplifier integrated circuit, and a modulation coil. The sensor probe was operated in second-harmonic mode at a liquid-nitrogen (Liq. N2 temperature. When an AC magnetic field was applied to GIGS, the second-harmonic signal was generated and modulated by the outer magnetic field to be measured. After lock-in detection, the modulated output signal showed good linearity and a zero point. Moreover, higher sensitivity and low noise with low thermal fluctuation was obtained by the cooling at Liq. N2 temperature.

  7. Selectively Plasmon-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation from Monolayer Tungsten Diselenide on Flexible Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhuo

    2018-01-04

    Monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDCs) exhibit promising characteristics in miniaturized nonlinear optical frequency converters, due to their inversion asymmetry and large second-order nonlinear susceptibility. However, these materials usually have a very short light interaction lengths with the pump laser because they are atomically thin, such that second-harmonic generation (SHG) is generally inefficient. In this paper, we fabricate a judiciously structured 150-nm-thick planar surface consisting of monolayer tungsten diselenide and sub-20-nm-wide gold trenches on flexible substrates, reporting ~7000-fold SHG enhancement without peak broadening or background in the spectra as compared to WSe2 on as-grown sapphire substrates. Our proof-of-concept experiment yields effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility of 2.1 × 104 pm/V. Three orders of magnitude enhancement is maintained with pump wavelength ranging from 800 nm to 900 nm, breaking the limitation of narrow pump wavelength range for cavity-enhanced SHG. In addition, SHG amplitude can be dynamically controlled via selective excitation of the lateral gap plasmon by rotating the laser polarization. Such fully open, flat and ultrathin profile enables a great variety of functional samples with high SHG from one patterned silicon substrate, favoring scalable production of nonlinear converters. The surface accessibility also enables integration with other optical components for information processing in an ultrathin and flexible form.

  8. Noise Analysis of Second-Harmonic Generation in Undoped and MgO-Doped Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise characteristics of second-harmonic generation (SHG in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN using the quasiphase matching (QPM technique are analyzed experimentally. In the experiment, a0.78 μm second-harmonic (SH wave was generated when a 1.56 μm fundamental wave passed through a PPLN crystal (bulk or waveguide. The time-domain and frequency-domain noise characteristics of the fundamental and SH waves were analyzed. By using the pump-probe method, the noise characteristics of SHG were further analyzed when a visible light (532 nm and an infrared light (1090 nm copropagated with the fundamental light, respectively. The noise characterizations were also investigated at different temperatures. It is found that for the bulk and waveguide PPLN crystals, the SH wave has a higher relative noise level than the corresponding fundamental wave. For the same fundamental wave, the SH wave has lower noise in a bulk crystal than in a waveguide, and in MgO-doped PPLN than in undoped PPLN. The 532 nm irradiation can lead to higher noise in PPLN than the 1090 nm irradiation. In addition, increasing temperature of device can alleviate the problem of noise in conjunction with the photorefractive effect incurred by the irradiation light. This is more significant in undoped PPLN than in MgO-doped one.

  9. Spontaneous Polarization in Bio-organic Materials Studied by Scanning Pyroelectric Microscopy (SPEM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M.; van der Veen, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Bio-organic materials such as bones, teeth, and tendon generally show nonlinear optical (Masters and So in Handbook of Biomedical Nonlinear Optical Microscopy, 2008), pyro- and piezoelectric (Fukada and Yasuda in J Phys Soc Jpn 12:1158, 1957) properties, implying a permanent polarization, the presence of which can be rationalized by describing the growth of the sample and the creation of a polar axis according to Markov's theory of stochastic processes (Hulliger in Biophys J 84:3501, 2003; Batagiannis et al. in Curr Opin Solid State Mater Sci 17:107, 2010). Two proven, versatile techniques for probing spontaneous polarization distributions in solids are scanning pyroelectric microscopy (SPEM) and second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM). The combination of pyroelectric scanning with SHG-microscopy in a single experimental setup leading to complementary pyroelectric and nonlinear optical data is demonstrated, providing us with a more complete image of the polarization in organic materials. Crystals consisting of a known polar and hyperpolarizable material, CNS (4-chloro-4-nitrostilbene) are used as a reference sample, to verify the functionality of the setup, with both SPEM and SHGM images revealing the same polarization domain information. In contrast, feline and human nails exhibit a pyroelectric response, but a second harmonic response is absent for both keratin containing materials, implying that there may be symmetry-allowed SHG, but with very inefficient second harmonophores. This new approach to polarity detection provides additional information on the polar and hyperpolar nature in a variety of (bio) materials.

  10. Surface charge measurement using an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1998-01-01

    During the 1960s, the first measurements of charge on dielectric surfaces using simple electrostatic probes were reported. However it is only within the last 10 years that a proper understanding of the probe response has been developed. This situation arose as a consequence of the earlier studies...

  11. Precise characterization of self-catalyzed III-V nanowire heterostructures via optical second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Wei, Yu-Ming; Zhou, Zhang-Kai; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Wang, Xue-Hua; Yu, Si-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the utility of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) polarimetry to perform structural characterization of self-assembled zinc-blende/wurtzite III-V nanowire heterostructures. By analyzing four anisotropic SHG polarimetric patterns, we distinguish between wurtzite (WZ), zinc-blende (ZB) and ZB/WZ mixing III-V semiconducting crystal structures in nanowire systems. By neglecting the surface contributions and treating the bulk crystal within the quasi-static approximation, we can well explain the optical SHG polarimetry from the NWs with diameter from 200-600 nm. We show that the optical in-coupling and out-coupling coefficients arising from depolarization field can determine the polarization of the SHG. We also demonstrate micro-photoluminescence of GaAs quantum dots in related ZB and ZB/WZ mixing sections of core-shell NW structure, in agreement with the SHG polarimetry results. The ability to perform in situ SHG-based crystallographic study of semiconducting single and multi-crystalline nanowire heterostructures will be useful in displaying structure-property relationships of nanodevices.

  12. Crystal growth and second harmonic generation efficiency of a chalcone derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenatchi, V.; Muthu, K.; Rajasekar, M.; Meenakshisundaram, SP., E-mail: aumats2009@gmail.com

    2013-06-15

    Single crystals of (2E,6E)-2-(4-fluorobenzylidine)-6-(4-methoxybenzylidine)cyclohexanone (FBMBC) have been grown by a slow evaporation solution growth technique from ethanol at room temperature. The single crystal X-ray diffraction study reveals that the FBMBC belongs to triclinic system and the cell parameters are a=9.790(6) Å, b=12.08(7) Å, c=14.09(9) Å and V=1577 Å{sup 3}. The structure and the crystallinity of the material were further confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The various functional groups present in the molecule are confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The scanning electron microscopy study reveals the surface morphology of the as-grown crystal. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis studies reveal the purity of the material and the crystals are transparent in the visible region having a low optical cut-off at ∼475 nm. The second harmonic generation efficiency of FBMBC is estimated by the Kurtz and Perry technique. Theoretical calculations were performed using the Hartree–Fock method with 6-31 G(d,p) as the basis set to derive the optimized geometry and the first-order molecular hyperpolarizability (β) values.

  13. Second harmonic generation on self-assembled GaAs/Au nanowires with thickness gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardini, A.; Leahu, G.; Centini, M.; Li Voti, R.; Fazio, E.; Sibilia, C.; Repetto, D.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.

    2017-05-01

    Here we investigated the SH generation at the wavelength of 400 nm (pump laser at 800 nm, 120 fs pulses) of a "metasurface" composed by an alternation of GaAs nano-grooves and Au nanowires capping portions of flat GaAs. The nano-grooves depth and the Au nanowires thickness gradually vary across the sample. The samples are obtained by ion bombardment at glancing angle on a 150 nm Au mask evaporated on a GaAs plane wafer. The irradiation process erodes anisotropically the surface, creating Au nanowires and, at high ion dose, grooves in the underlying GaAs substrate (pattern transfer). The SHG measurements are performed for different pump linear polarization angle at different positions on the "metasurface" in order to explore the regions with optimal conditions for SHG efficiency. The pump polarization angle is scanned by rotating a half-wave retarder plate. While the output SH signal in reflection is analyzed by setting the polarizer in `s' or `p' configuration in front of the detector. The best polarization condition for SHG is obtained in the configuration where the pump and second harmonic fields are both `p' polarized, and the experiments show a SH polarization dependence of the same symmetry of bulk GaAs. Thus, the presence of gold contributes only as field localization effect, but do not contributes directly as SH generator.

  14. Optical characterisation of plasmonic nanostructures on planar substrates using second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persechini, Lina; Verre, Ruggero; Smith, Christopher M; Fleischer, Karsten; Shvets, Igor V; Ranjan, Mukesh; Facsko, Stefan; McGilp, John F

    2015-10-05

    Off-normal, polarization dependent second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements were performed ex situ on plasmonic nanostructures grown by self-assembly on nanopatterned templates. These exploratory studies of Ag nanoparticle (NP) arrays show that the sensitivity of SHG to the local fields, which are modified by the NP size, shape and distribution, makes it a promising fixed wavelength characterization technique that avoids the complexity of spectroscopic SHG. The off-normal geometry provides access to the out-of-plane SH response, which is typically an order-of-magnitude larger than the in-surface-plane response measured using normal incidence, for example in SHG microscopy. By choosing the plane of incidence orthogonal to the NP array direction, it was shown that the p-polarized SH response, as a function of input polarization, is very sensitive to NP morphology, with a change of 20% in the aspect ratio of the NPs producing a variation of a factor of 30 in the easily measureable ratio of the p-polarized SH field strength for s- and p-polarized input. The results show that such a fixed geometry could be used for the in situ characterization of anisotropic nanostructure morphology during growth by self-assembly, which could be particularly useful in situations where rotating the sample may be neither desirable nor easily accomplished.

  15. Effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sungho; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-02-01

    Waves propagating in anisotropic media are subject to skewing effects due to the media having directional wave speed dependence, which is characterized by slowness curves. Likewise, the generation of second harmonics is sensitive to micro-scale damage that is generally not detectable from linear features of ultrasonic waves. Here, the effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in a transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate are numerically studied. The strain energy density function for a nonlinear transversely isotropic material is formulated in terms of the Green-Lagrange strain invariants. The guided wave mode pairs for cumulative second harmonic generation in the plate are selected in accordance with the internal resonance criteria - i.e., phase matching and non-zero power flux. Moreover, the skew angle dispersion curves for the mode pairs are obtained from the semi-analytical finite element method using the derivative of the slowness curve. The skew angles of the primary and secondary wave modes are calculated and wave propagation simulations are carried out using COMSOL. Numerical simulations revealed that the effect of skew angle mismatch can be significant for second harmonic generation in anisotropic media. The importance of skew angle matching on cumulative second harmonic generation is emphasized and the accompanying issue of the selection of internally resonant mode pairs for both a unidirectional transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate is demonstrated.

  16. Improved identification of viable myocardium using second harmonic imaging during dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, F B; Poldermans, D; Bax, J J; Elhendy, A; Vourvouri, E C; Valkema, R; De Sutter, J; Schinkel, A F; Borghetti, A; Roelandt, J R

    2001-12-01

    To determine whether, compared with fundamental imaging, second harmonic imaging can improve the accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography for identifying viable myocardium, using nuclear imaging as a reference. 30 patients with chronic left ventricular dysfunction (mean (SD) age, 60 (8) years; 22 men). Dobutamine stress echocardiography was carried out in all patients using both fundamental and second harmonic imaging. All patients underwent dual isotope simultaneous acquisition single photon emission computed tomography (DISA-SPECT) with (99m)technetium-tetrofosmin/(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose on a separate day. Myocardial viability was considered present by dobutamine stress echocardiography when segments with severe dysfunction showed a biphasic sustained improvement or an ischaemic response. Viability criteria on DISA-SPECT were normal or mildly reduced perfusion and metabolism, or perfusion/metabolism mismatch. Using fundamental imaging, 330 segments showed severe dysfunction at baseline; 144 (44%) were considered viable. The agreement between dobutamine stress echocardiography by fundamental imaging and DISA-SPECT was 78%, kappa = 0.56. Using second harmonic imaging, 288 segments showed severe dysfunction; 138 (48%) were viable. The agreement between dobutamine stress echocardiography and DISA-SPECT was significantly better when second harmonic imaging was used (89%, kappa = 0.77, p = 0.001 v fundamental imaging). Second harmonic imaging applied during dobutamine stress echocardiography increases the agreement with DISA-SPECT for detecting myocardial viability.

  17. Hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in rat and human corneas: the potential of second harmonic generation microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaël Latour

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Second Harmonic Generation (SHG microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet's membrane, in the posterior cornea. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet's membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily

  18. Three-dimensional tooth imaging using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Huey; Chen, Wei-Liang; Sun, Yen; Fwu, Peter Tramyeon; Lin, Ming-Gu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2007-02-01

    Detailed morphological and cellular information relating to the human tooth have traditionally been obtained through histological studies that required decalcification, staining, and fixation. With the recent invention of multiphoton microscopy, it has become possible to acquire high resolution images without histological procedures. Using an epiilluminated multiphoton microscope, we obtained two-photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) images of ex vivo human tooth. By combining these two imaging modalities we obtained submicron resolution images of the enamel, dentin, and the periodontal ligaments. The enamel emits endogenous two-photon autofluorescence. The structure of the dentin is visible from both the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation signals. The periodontal ligament composed mostly of collagen can be visualized by SHG imaging. We also constructed three dimensional images of the enamel, dentin, and periodontal ligament. The effectiveness of using multiphoton and second harmonic generation microscopy to obtain structural information of teeth suggest its potential use in dental diagnostics.

  19. Double resonant excitation of the second harmonic of terahertz raditation in dielectricgraphene layered metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapoport, Yu; Grimalsky, V.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Excitation of the second harmonic of THz radiation is investigated theoretically in the planar multilayered structure dielectric-graphene-dielectric-graphene–.... It is studied the case of the oblique incidence of the s-polarized fundamental wave, where the electric field is parallel to the inter......Excitation of the second harmonic of THz radiation is investigated theoretically in the planar multilayered structure dielectric-graphene-dielectric-graphene–.... It is studied the case of the oblique incidence of the s-polarized fundamental wave, where the electric field is parallel...... and the vacuum is at the output. The high efficiency is demonstrated; the second harmonic reflectance coefficient is ≥0.01 under realistic values of the collision frequency in graphene >1012 s−1. Such a great efficiency, which is four–five orders of magnitude higher than reported for the graphene...

  20. Terahertz-field-induced second harmonic generation through Pockels effect in zinc telluride crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Marion; Degert, Jérôme; Abraham, Emmanuel; Freysz, Eric

    2014-10-15

    We report on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a near-infrared pulse in a zinc telluride crystal through the Pockels effect induced by an intense terahertz pulse. The temporal and angular behaviors of the SHG have been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions. This phenomenon, so far overlooked, makes it possible to generate second harmonic through cascading of two second-order nonlinear phenomena in the near-infrared and terahertz ranges. We also show how this cascading process can be used to sample terahertz pulses.

  1. Green bright squeezed light from a cw periodically poled KTP second harmonic generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Buchhave, Preben

    2002-01-01

    We present the experimental observation of bright amplitude squeezed light from a singly resonant second harmonic generator (SHG) based on a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. Contrary to conventional SHG, the interacting waves in this device couple efficiently using...... quasi phase matching (QPM) and more importantly QPM allows access to higher valued elements of the nonlinear tensor than is possible under the constraint of birefringence phase matching. We observe a noise reduction of 13% below the shot noise limit in the generated second harmonic field. This noise...

  2. Ultrashort pulse chirp measurement via transverse second-harmonic generation in strontium barium niobate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trull, J.; Wang, B.; Parra, A.; Vilaseca, R.; Cojocaru, C. [Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica Catalunya, Terrassa 08222 (Spain); Sola, I. [Grupo de Investigación en Óptica Extrema (GIOE), Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Krolikowski, W. [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Science Program, Texas A and M University at Qatar, Doha (Qatar); Sheng, Y. [Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Pulse compression in dispersive strontium barium niobate crystal with a random size and distribution of the anti-parallel orientated nonlinear domains is observed via transverse second harmonic generation. The dependence of the transverse width of the second harmonic trace along the propagation direction allows for the determination of the initial chirp and duration of pulses in the femtosecond regime. This technique permits a real-time analysis of the pulse evolution and facilitates fast in-situ correction of pulse chirp acquired in the propagation through an optical system.

  3. Phase-matched second harmonic generation with on-chip GaN-on-Si microdisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, I.; Gromovyi, M.; Zeng, Y.; El Kurdi, M.; Sauvage, S.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Gayral, B.; Semond, F.; Duboz, J. Y.; de Micheli, M.; Checoury, X.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate phase-matched second harmonic generation in gallium nitride on silicon microdisks. The microdisks are integrated with side-coupling bus waveguides in a two-dimensional photonic circuit. The second harmonic generation is excited with a continuous wave laser in the telecom band. By fabricating a series of microdisks with diameters varying by steps of 8 nm, we obtain a tuning of the whispering gallery mode resonances for the fundamental and harmonic waves. Phase matching is obtained when both resonances are matched with modes satisfying the conservation of orbital momentum, which leads to a pronounced enhancement of frequency conversion. PMID:27687007

  4. Efficient second harmonic generation in χ(2) profile reconfigured lithium niobate thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lutong; Wang, Yiwen; Hu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    Second harmonic wave was efficiently generated in proton exchanged lithium niobate thin film channel waveguides. Modal dispersion phase matching was achieved between two guided modes at pump and second-harmonic wavelengths with the same polarization, enabling using the largest second-order nonlinear component d33. The χ(2) profile in the lithium niobate thin film was reconfigured by proton exchange, leading to significantly enhanced modal overlap integral between the interacting modes. Normalized conversion efficiency up to 48% W-1 cm-2 was achieved in experiments.

  5. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure.

  6. Determination of Collagen Fiber Orientation in Human Tissue by Use of Polarization Measurement of Molecular Second-Harmonic-Generation Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2004-05-01

    Based on the reflection-type polarization measurement of second-harmonic-generation (SHG) light induced by collagen molecules, we are able to determine the collagen fiber orientation in human tissues taken from a cadaver. The resulting SHG radar graph shows the direction of the absolute orientation and the degree of organization of collagen fibers. To evaluate the probing sensitivity to the collagen orientation, we compared the proposed method with other polarimetric methods. Use of the proposed method revealed characteristic orientation differences among collagen fibers and demonstrated significant inhomogeneity with respect to the distribution of collagen orientation in human dentin. The proposed method provides a powerful research and diagnostic tool for examining the collagen orientation in human tissues.

  7. Fringe resolved autocorrelator for characterization of ultrashort laser pulses using second harmonics of ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rudrashish; Das, Susanta Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Use of second harmonics (SH) of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods for ultrashort pulse characterization is reported here. The used ZnO nanorods are grown by chemical bath deposition method. The pulse characterization is done by the autocorrelator technique. From this, the pulse duration is estimated to be 14 femtosecond (fs). The spectral bandwidth of the pulse under probe is ∼ 85 nm with central wavelength at 820 nm. Theoretically, Fourier transformation limited pulse width corresponding to this spectral bandwidth is 12 fs. So experimentally measured pulse width closely matches with the theoretical prediction. The reported characterization system is cost effective and can be used for characterization of fs laser of broad wavelength range.

  8. Analysis of the second harmonic generation signal from a liquid/air and liquid/liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thanh Tung; Jonchère, Alban; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Brevet, Pierre-François; Diat, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Three different liquid interfaces, water/air, thiophene/air, and water/thiophene, were probed using the second harmonic generation (SHG) technique. Thiophene and water have been chosen because the hyperpolarizability of these molecules has already been measured or calculated and the different values can be found in literature. We have studied the microscopic structure of these interfaces by comparing the components of the second order susceptibility tensor determined from the SHG polarization curve analysis with those determined via a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of these interfaces. We have indeed computed the structure and orientation of water and thiophene molecules at the liquid/air and liquid/liquid (L/L) interfaces as a function of the distance from the interface. The integrated susceptibility values calculated by MD simulations agree well with SHG results and validate the choice of force fields that should permit to quantify more complex L/L interfaces.

  9. High-resolution second-harmonic microscopy of poled silica waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2003-01-01

    A second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy (SHSOM) apparatus operating in reflection is used for high-resolution imaging of second-order optical non-linearities (SONs) in electric-field poled silica-based waveguides. SHSOM of domain walls in a periodically poled KTiOPO_4 crystal is performed...

  10. High-resolution second-harmonic microscopy of poled silica waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2003-01-01

    A second-harmonic scanning optical microscopy (SHSOM) apparatus operating in reflection is used for high-resolution imaging of second-order optical non-linearities (SONs) in electric-field poled silica-based waveguides. SHSOM of domain walls in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal is performed...

  11. Second harmonic generation of spectrally broadened femtosecond ytterbium laser radiation in a gas-filled capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-09-30

    A 300-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser with a wavelength of 1030 nm and energy of 150 {mu}J were converted to a 15-fs pulse with a wavelength of 515 nm by broadening the emission spectrum in a capillary filled with xenon and by generating the second harmonic in a KDP crystal. The energy efficiency of the conversion was 30 %.

  12. Cerenkov second-harmonic generation in the strong conversion limit: New effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Stegeman, George I.; Torruellas, William

    1996-01-01

    Using beam propagation method calculations, we show that new effects occur for second-harmonic generation in the Čerenkov regime when it is optimized for efficient coupling to leaky modes. The fundamental throughput becomes independent of the input power over a few decades; i.e., optical power

  13. Resonant-optical-second-harmonic generation from thin C60 films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Bert; Anema, Anton; Jonkman, Harry T.; Sawatzky, George A.; Woude, Folkert van der

    1993-01-01

    We studied the optical-second-harmonic generation from thin C60 films, using a combination of frequency-, rotational-, angular-, and film-thickness-dependent measurements. We present a method to resolve the phase of χ(2) by exploiting the interference between the C60 overlayer contribution and the

  14. Interference Effects in the Optical Second Harmonic Generation from Ultrathin Alkali Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2000-01-01

    Interference effects are shown to strongly modulate the transmission second harmonic signal (fundamental wavelength 1067 nm) from rough alkali island films grown on insulating substrates if one varies the angle of incidence. Depending on growth conditions and substrate thickness, the measured...... accurate values of the ratios of the relevant nonlinear optical coefficients....

  15. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers deposited on encapsulated plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Leißner, Till; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    on lithographically defined regular arrays of gold nanostructures, which subsequently have been coated with thin films of diamond-like carbon with 25, 55 and 100 nm thickness. Femtosecond laser scanning microscopy enables us to identify enhancement of the second harmonic response of the fibers. This is facilitated...

  16. Observation of self-pulsing in singly resonant optical second-harmonic generation with competing nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Lodahl, Peter; Mamaev, Alexander V.

    2002-01-01

    We predict and experimentally observe temporal self-pulsing in singly resonant intracavity second-harmonic generation under conditions of simultaneous parametric oscillation. The threshold for self-pulsing as a function of cavity tuning and phase mismatch are found from analysis of a three-compon...

  17. Two-pass-internal second-harmonic generation using a prism coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D. G.; Nieh, S. T. K.; Steier, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A dispersive quartz prism is used to couple the total second harmonic generated in both directions by an internal cavity frequency doubler. The study shows that the dispersion of air and mirror reflection phase shifts can be compensated for by a slight nonphase match condition in the doubler.

  18. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maxima...

  19. Misconceptions regarding Second Harmonic Generation in X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, G; Schneidmiller, E; Yurkov, M V

    2005-01-01

    Nonlinear generation of coherent harmonic radiation is an important option in the operation of a X-ray FEL facility since it broadens the spectral range of the facility itself, thus allowing for a wider scope of experimental applications. We found that up-to-date theoretical understanding of second harmonic generation is incorrect. Derivation of correct radiation characteristics will follow our criticism.

  20. Cancellation of photodiode-induced second harmonic distortion using single side band modulation from a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devgan, Preetpaul S; Hastings, Alexander S; Urick, Vincent J; Williams, Keith J

    2012-11-19

    We have theoretically and experimentally investigated using a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DP-MZM) in an RF photonic link to cancel the second harmonic distortion due to the photodiode. Biasing the DP-MZM for single sideband modulation, the second harmonic generated by the DP-MZM can be set out of phase with the second harmonic generated at the photodiode. We measure the output intercept point of the second harmonic distortion of the link to be 55.3 dBm, which is an improvement of over 32 dB as compared to only the photodiode.

  1. Detection of subepithelial fibrosis associated with corneal stromal edema by second harmonic generation imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Yamada, Naoyuki; Teranishi, Shinichiro; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Nishida, Teruo; Takahara, Atsushi

    2009-07-01

    Human corneas with or without stromal edema were examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to characterize stromal collagen organization. Tissue buttons from 31 corneas with stromal edema and 8 normal corneas were fixed, and 3-mm(2) blocks were cut and stained with phalloidin, to visualize the cytoskeleton. The blocks were examined by SHG imaging with a laser confocal microscope and a mode-locked titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser. Samples were scanned to a depth of 150 microm from the surface of Bowman's layer, and SHG forward- and backscatter signals were collected. Phalloidin staining was detected by conventional laser confocal microscopy. The three-dimensional structure of the anterior segment of the cornea was reconstructed from stacked SHG images. Three-dimensional reconstruction of SHG signals showed adherence of interwoven collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma to Bowman's layer in both normal and edematous corneas. Abnormal SHG signals at the level of Bowman's layer were observed in edematous corneas; three-dimensional images revealed that these signals were actually localized above Bowman's layer and were indicative of subepithelial fibrosis. Phalloidin staining showed transdifferentiation of stromal cells into fibroblastic cells in edematous corneas. The incidence of subepithelial fibrosis or of fibroblastic cells increased beginning 12 months after the onset of clinical stromal edema. SHG imaging of the anterior segment of edematous corneas revealed a normal appearance of interwoven collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma. The development of subepithelial fibrosis beginning 12 months after the onset of edema suggests that stromal edema may be a progressive disease.

  2. Evaluation of Flat Surface Temperature Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beges, G.; Rudman, M.; Drnovsek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is elaboration of elements related to metrological analysis in the field of surface temperature measurement. Surface temperature measurements are applicable in many fields. As examples, safety testing of electrical appliances and a pharmaceutical production line represent case studies for surface temperature measurements. In both cases correctness of the result of the surface temperature has an influence on final product safety and quality and thus conformity with specifications. This paper deals with the differences of flat surface temperature probes in measuring the surface temperature. For the purpose of safety testing of electrical appliances, surface temperature measurements are very important for safety of the user. General requirements are presented in European standards, which support requirements in European directives, e.g., European Low Voltage Directive 2006/95/EC and pharmaceutical requirements, which are introduced in official state legislation. This paper introduces a comparison of temperature measurements of an attached thermocouple on the measured surface and measurement with flat surface temperature probes. As a heat generator, a so called temperature artifact is used. It consists of an aluminum plate with an incorporated electrical heating element with very good temperature stability in the central part. The probes and thermocouple were applied with different forces to the surface in horizontal and vertical positions. The reference temperature was measured by a J-type fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple. Two probes were homemade according to requirements in the European standard EN 60335-2-9/A12, one with a fine-wire (0.2 mm) thermocouple and one with 0.5mm of thermocouple wire diameter. Additional commercially available probes were compared. Differences between probes due to thermal conditions caused by application of the probe were found. Therefore, it can happen that measurements are performed with improper equipment or

  3. Second harmonic generation spectroscopy in the Reststrahl band of SiC using an infrared free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.paarmann@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Razdolski, Ilya; Melnikov, Alexey; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Wolf, Martin [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-08-24

    The Reststrahl spectral region of silicon carbide has recently attracted much attention owing to its potential for mid-infrared nanophotonic applications based on surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). Studies of optical phonon resonances responsible for surface polariton formation, however, have so far been limited to linear optics. In this Letter, we report the first nonlinear optical investigation of the Reststrahl region of SiC, employing an infrared free-electron laser to perform second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy. We observe two distinct resonance features in the SHG spectra, one attributed to resonant enhancement of the nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (2)} and the other due to a resonance in the Fresnel transmission. Our work clearly demonstrates high sensitivity of mid-infrared SHG to phonon-driven phenomena and opens a route to studying nonlinear effects in nanophotonic structures based on SPhPs.

  4. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  5. Stromal alterations in ovarian cancers via wavelength dependent Second Harmonic Generation microscopy and optical scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Karissa B; Campbell, Kirby R; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Salih, Sana M; Patankar, Manish; Campagnola, Paul J

    2017-02-06

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate; however, the specific rates are highly dependent on the stage of the disease upon diagnosis. Current screening and imaging tools are insufficient to detect early lesions and are not capable of differentiating the subtypes of ovarian cancer that may benefit from specific treatments. As an alternative to current screening and imaging tools, we utilized wavelength dependent collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe the structural differences in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size scale and encode structural information. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found a strong wavelength dependence of these metrics that are related to significant structural differences in the collagen organization and are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. Moreover, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy (>90%) between high-grade serous tumors from the other tissue types. High-grade serous tumors account for ~70% of ovarian cancers, and this delineation has potential clinical applications in terms of supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool. SHG and optical scattering measurements provide sub

  6. Second-Harmonic Coherent Driving of a Spin Qubit in a Si/SiGe Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarlino, P.; Kawakami, E.; Ward, D.R.; Savage, D.E.; Lagally, M.G.; Friesen, M.; Coppersmith, S.N.; Eriksson, M.A.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate coherent driving of a single electron spin using second-harmonic excitation in a Si/SiGe quantum dot. Our estimates suggest that the anharmonic dot confining potential combined with a gradient in the transverse magnetic field dominates the second-harmonic response. As expected, the

  7. Second harmonic generation and two-photon luminescence upconversion in glasses doped with ZnSe nanocrystalline quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thantu, Napoleon [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)]. E-mail: Napoleon.Thantu@ngc.com

    2005-01-01

    We report two-photon excited emission in borosilicate glasses doped with ZnSe nanocrystalline quantum dots. The emission, predominantly near the two-photon energy and detected in the direction of the excitation beam, is in the visible, and the fundamental excitation is the near-infrared output of a tunable femtosecond laser. Depending on the two-photon energy, time- and frequency-resolved measurements at room temperature reveal that the emission largely consists of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon luminescence upconversion, and a much smaller luminescence from redshifted, low-lying trap states and other trap levels residing near the semiconductor band edge. We discuss the SHG origin in terms of bulk-like and surface contributions from the nanocrystals and the two-photon resonant enhancement near the excitonic absorption.

  8. Squeezing and entanglement in doubly resonant, type II, second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Buchhave, Preben

    2003-01-01

    We investigate, theoretically, the generation of bright and vacuum-squeezed light as well as entanglement in intracavity, type II, phase-matched second-harmonic generation. The cavity in which the crystal is embedded is resonant at the fundamental frequency but not at the second-harmonic frequency....... A simple model for the process using semiclassical theory is derived, and quadrature-squeezing spectra of the involved fundamental fields are deduced. The analysis shows that vacuum squeezing reminiscent of subthreshold optical parametric oscillator squeezing is present and, in the ideal case, perfect....... Under slight modifications of the operational conditions, the system is shown to produce efficient bright, squeezed light. Furthermore, we investigate the degree of polarization squeezing and find that three Stokes parameters can be squeezed simultaneously. Finally, we gauge the process for possible...

  9. Concept for power scaling second harmonic generation using a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2015-01-01

    Within the field of high-power second harmonic generation (SHG), power scaling is often hindered by adverse crystal effects such as thermal dephasing arising from the second harmonic (SH) light, which imposes limits on the power that can be generated in many crystals. Here we demonstrate a concept...... for efficient power scaling of single-pass SHG beyond such limits using a cascade of nonlinear crystals, in which the first crystal is chosen for high nonlinear efficiency and the subsequent crystal(s) are chosen for power handling ability. Using this highly efficient singlepass concept, we generate 3.7 W...... of continuous-wave diffraction-limited 2 ( 1.25) M = light at 532 nm from 9.5 W of non-diffraction-limited 2 ( 7.7) M = light from a tapered laser diode, while avoiding significant thermal effects. Besides constituting the highest SH power yet achieved using a laser diode, this demonstrates that the concept...

  10. The prevalence of second harmonic radiation in type III bursts observed at kilometric wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, F. T.; Alvarez, H.

    1973-01-01

    We present the analysis of 64 type III solar bursts that drifted from 3.5 MHz down to the range 350-50 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970. Bursts arrival times were predicted by a simple model and then compared with observations. The results show that, as the bursts drift, the fundamental often disappears below a certain frequency range while the second harmonic remains. Below about 1 MHz, the second harmonic occurrence predominates. Recognizing this fact we deduce a mean velocity of 0.32c plus or minus 0.02c for the exciter particles, where the uncertainty is the standard error and c the velocity of light in vacuum; the electron density model used is comparable to a solar wind model.

  11. High throughput second harmonic imaging for label-free biological applications

    KAUST Repository

    Macias Romero, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is inherently sensitive to the absence of spatial centrosymmetry, which can render it intrinsically sensitive to interfacial processes, chemical changes and electrochemical responses. Here, we seek to improve the imaging throughput of SHG microscopy by using a wide-field imaging scheme in combination with a medium-range repetition rate amplified near infrared femtosecond laser source and gated detection. The imaging throughput of this configuration is tested by measuring the optical image contrast for different image acquisition times of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in two different wide-field setups and one commercial point-scanning configuration. We find that the second harmonic imaging throughput is improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to point-scan imaging. Capitalizing on this result, we perform low fluence imaging of (parts of) living mammalian neurons in culture.

  12. Investigating starch gelatinization through Stokes vector resolved second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Xiang, Lu Yun; Qiu, Jianjun; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2017-04-01

    The changes of the morphology during heating and the degree of crystallinity of dry and hydrated starch granules are investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) based Stokes polarimetry. A spatial distribution of various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), and the degree of circular polarization (DOCP) are extracted and compared with the two dimensional second harmonic (SH) Stokes images of starch granules. The SH signal from hydrated and dry starch on heating differed significantly in DOLP and DOCP values, indicating that hydrated starch has a greater degree of ultrastructural amylopectin disorder. The detail of denaturation and the phase transition of hydrated starch demonstrate the significant influence of thermal processing.

  13. Nanostructure induced changes in lifetime and enhanced second-harmonic response of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leißner, Till [NanoSYD, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, 6400 Sønderborg (Denmark); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense (Denmark); Kostiučenko, Oksana; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Fiutowski, Jacek, E-mail: fiutowski@mci.sdu.dk [NanoSYD, Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Alsion 2, 6400 Sønderborg (Denmark); Brewer, Jonathan R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense (Denmark)

    2015-12-21

    In this letter we show that the optical response of organic nanofibers, grown from functionalized para-quaterphenylene molecules, can be controlled by forming organic-plasmonic hybrid systems. The interaction between nanofibers and supporting regular arrays of nanostructures leads to a strongly enhanced second harmonic response. At the same time, the fluorescence lifetime of the nanofibers is reduced from 0.32 ns for unstructured gold films to 0.22 ns for gold nanosquare arrays, demonstrating efficient organic–plasmonic interaction. To study the origin of these effects, we applied two-photon laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. These findings provide an effective approach for plasmon-enhanced second-harmonic generation at the nanoscale, which is attractive for nanophotonic circuitry.

  14. Resonant second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Roland, I.; Checoury, X.; Han, Z.; El Kurdi, M.; Sauvage, S.; Boucaud, P., E-mail: philippe.boucaud@ief.u-psud.fr [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS - Univ. Paris Sud 11, Bâtiment 220, F-91405 Orsay (France); Gayral, B. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, CEA-CNRS group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, CEA-CNRS group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Brimont, C.; Guillet, T. [Université Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34905 Montpellier (France); Mexis, M.; Semond, F. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Grégory, F-06560 Valbonne (France)

    2015-02-23

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride photonic crystal cavity embedded in a two-dimensional free-standing photonic crystal platform on silicon. The photonic crystal nanocavity is optically pumped with a continuous-wave laser at telecom wavelengths in the transparency window of the nitride material. The harmonic generation is evidenced by the spectral range of the emitted signal, the quadratic power dependence vs. input power, and the spectral dependence of second harmonic signal. The harmonic emission pattern is correlated to the harmonic polarization generated by the second-order nonlinear susceptibilities χ{sub zxx}{sup (2)}, χ{sub zyy}{sup (2)} and the electric fields of the fundamental cavity mode.

  15. Effect of composition and temperature on the second harmonic generation in silver phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidakis, I.; Psilodimitrakopoulos, S.; Kosma, K.; Lemonis, A.; Stratakis, E.

    2018-01-01

    We herein employ nonlinear laser imaging microscopy to explicitly study the dynamics of second harmonic generation (SHG) in silver iodide phosphate glasses. While glasses of this family have gained extensive scientific attention over the years due to their superior conducting properties, considerably less attention has been paid to their unique nonlinear optical characteristics. In the present study, firstly, it is demonstrated that SHG signal intensity is enhanced upon increasing silver content due to the random formation of silver microstructures within the glass network. Secondly, the SHG temperature dynamics were explored near the glass transition temperature (Tg) regime, where significant glass relaxation phenomena occur. It is found that heating towards the Tg improves the SHG efficiency, whereas above Tg, the capacity of glasses to generate second harmonic radiation is drastically suppressed. The novel findings of this work are considered important in terms of the potential employment of these glasses for the realization of advanced photonic applications like optical-switches and wavelength conversion devices.

  16. Nonlinear Optical Magnetism Revealed by Second-Harmonic Generation in Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Sergey S; Camacho-Morales, Rocio; Xu, Lei; Rahmani, Mohsen; Smirnova, Daria A; Wang, Lei; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2017-06-14

    Nonlinear effects at the nanoscale are usually associated with the enhancement of electric fields in plasmonic structures. Recently emerged new platform for nanophotonics based on high-index dielectric nanoparticles utilizes optically induced magnetic response via multipolar Mie resonances and provides novel opportunities for nanoscale nonlinear optics. Here, we observe strong second-harmonic generation from AlGaAs nanoantennas driven by both electric and magnetic resonances. We distinguish experimentally the contribution of electric and magnetic nonlinear response by analyzing the structure of polarization states of vector beams in the second-harmonic radiation. We control continuously the transition between electric and magnetic nonlinearities by tuning polarization of the optical pump. Our results provide a direct observation of nonlinear optical magnetism through selective excitation of multipolar nonlinear modes in nanoantennas.

  17. A 0.4-THz Second Harmonic Gyrotron with Quasi-Optical Confocal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaotong; Fu, Wenjie; Yan, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Mode density is very relevant for harmonic gyrotron cavity. Theoretical investigations suggest that quasi-optical confocal waveguide performs low mode density and good mode-selective character. By selecting the appropriate mode and optimizing the cavity parameters, the quasi-optical confocal cavity is suitable for high-harmonic terahertz gyrotron without mode competition. In order to verify the theoretical analysis, a 0.4-THz second harmonic gyrotron has been designed and experimented. Driven by a 40-kV, 4.75-A electron beam and 7.51-T magnetic field, the gyrotron prototype could generate 6.44 kW of output power at 395.35 GHz, which corresponds to an electron efficiency of 3.4%. There is no mode competition between the second harmonic and fundamental observed in the experiments.

  18. Second harmonic generation in 3-d uniform arrangement of type I collagen on nonlinear optics microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Z F; Zhu, M F; Guo, Z Y; Liu, S H

    2013-01-01

    Second harmonic microscopic imaging and spectroscopy technology has become a powerful tool for biomedical studies, especially in fibrosis-related diseases research. And type I collagen is the major risk factors for fibrotic diseases. In this study, model for three-dimensional (3-D) uniform arrangement type I collagen is set up for researching the second harmonic generation (SHG) on nonlinear optics microscopy. Based on this model, we discuss the influence of different length and size collagen in 3-D arrangement type I collagen. Results can guide us to neatly judge the size, length, and molecules density effect on SHG. For practical application, this theoretical approach can lead us to analyze different severity of collagen diseases. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Detection of collagen by second harmonic microscopy as a diagnostic tool for liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Maruth; Kable, Eleanor P. W.; Braet, Filip; Wang, X. M.; Gorrell, M. D.; Cox, Guy

    2006-02-01

    Liver fibrosis has many causes, including hepatitis C, alcohol abuse, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is characterized by abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The deposition of these proteins results in impaired liver function caused by distortion of the hepatic architecture by fibrous scar tissue. The unique triple helix structure of collagen and high level of crystallinity make it very efficient for generating second harmonic signals. In this study we have set out to see if second harmonic imaging of collagen can be used as a non-biased quantitative tool for classification of fibrosis levels in liver biopsies and if it can detect early fibrosis formation not detected by current methods.

  20. Optical second harmonic generation phase measurement at interfaces of some organic layers with indium tin oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Ngah Demon, Siti Zulaikha; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Matsushima, Toshinori; Murata, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    We observed phase shift in optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from interfaces of indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and ITO/pentacene. Phase correction due to Fresnel factors of the sample was taken into account. The phase of SHG electric field at the ITO/pentacene interface, ϕ_ with respect to the phase of SHG of bare substrate ITO was 160°, while the interface of ITO/CuPc had a phase of 140°.

  1. Optical second harmonic generation phase measurement at interfaces of some organic layers with indium tin oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngah Demon, Siti Zulaikha; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro; Mizutani, Goro; Matsushima, Toshinori; Murata, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We observed phase shift in optical second harmonic generation (SHG) from interfaces of indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and ITO/pentacene. Phase correction due to Fresnel factors of the sample was taken into account. The phase of SHG electric field at the ITO/pentacene interface, ϕinterface with respect to the phase of SHG of bare substrate ITO was 160°, while the interface of ITO/CuPc had a phase of 140°.

  2. Atomically Phase-Matched Second-Harmonic Generation in a 2D Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    OPEN ORIGINAL ARTICLE Atomically phase-matched second-harmonic generation in a 2D crystal Mervin Zhao1,2,*, Ziliang Ye1,2,*, Ryuji Suzuki3,4,*, Yu...arising from a single atomic layer, where the SH light elucidated important information such as the grain boundaries and electronic structure in these ultra...intensity on layer number as a result of atomically phase-matched nonlinear dipoles in layers of the 3R crystal that constructively interfere. By

  3. Power characteristics of CW second harmonic generation in periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bong Hoon; Rhee, Bum Ku [Dept. of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Myoung Sik [Research Center for Dielectric and Advanced Matter Physics. Busan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Power characteristics of CW second harmonic generation (SHG) in 0.5-mm-thick periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3} (PPLN) witha 6.5 μm domain period were investigated as a function of crystal length, and confocal parameter which was varied by using a lens of different focal length. We found there is the optimum condition of confocal parameter for SHG for a given intensity.

  4. Second-harmonic generation in AlGaAs microdisks in the telecom range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, S; Andronico, A; Lemaître, A; Favero, I; Ducci, S; Leo, G

    2014-05-15

    We report on second-harmonic generation in whispering-gallery-mode AlGaAs microcavities suspended on a GaAs pedestal. Frequency doubling of a 1.58 μm pump is observed with 7×10(-4)   W(-1) conversion efficiency. This device can be integrated in a monolithic photonic chip for classical and quantum applications in the telecom band.

  5. Resonant second-harmonic-generation circular-dichroism microscopy reveals molecular chirality in native biological tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Mei-Yu; Kan, Che-Wei; Lin, Yen-Yin; Ye, Cin-Wei; Wu, Meng-Jer; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Conventional linear optical activity effects are widely used for studying chiral materials. However, poor contrast and artifacts due to sample anisotropy limit the applicability of these methods. Here we demonstrate that nonlinear second-harmonic-generation circular dichroism spectral microscopy can overcome these limits. In intact collagenous tissues, clear spectral resonance is observed with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. By performing gradual protein denaturation studies, we show that the resonant responses are dominantly due to the molecular chirality.

  6. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Kyle S., E-mail: sprattkyle@gmail.com; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F. [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P. O. Box 8029, Austin, Texas 78713–8029, US (United States)

    2015-10-28

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic.

  7. Broad-band second-harmonic generation in holey optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Monro, T.M.; Pruneri, V.; Broderick, N.G.R.; Faccio, D.; Kazansky, P. G.; Richardson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Holey fibers are shown to have an ideal geometry for efficient parametric processes due to their tailorable modal properties. These fibers can have the additional advantage of single-mode operation at all the interacting wavelengths. We demonstrate theoretically that by appropriate choice of holey fiber geometry, these fibers can be up to four orders of magnitude more efficient for second harmonic generation than conventional poled fibers

  8. Improved quantification of collagen anisotropy with polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Stanciu, George A

    2017-09-01

    Imaging tissue samples by polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy provides both qualitative and quantitative insights into collagen organization in a label-free manner. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy goes beyond simple intensity-based imaging by adding the laser beam polarization component and applying different quantitative metrics such as the anisotropy factor. It thus provides valuable information on collagen arrangement not available with intensity measurements alone. Current established approaches are limited to calculating the anisotropy factor for only a particular laser beam polarization and no general guidelines on how to select the best laser beam polarization have yet been defined. Here, we introduce a novel methodology for selecting the optimal laser beam polarization for characterizing tissues using the anisotropy in the purpose of identifying cancer signatures. We show that the anisotropy factor exhibits a similar laser beam polarization dependence to the second harmonic intensity and we combine it with the collagen orientation index computed by Fast Fourier Transform analysis of the recorded images to establish a framework for choosing the laser beam polarization that is optimal for an accurate interpretation of polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy images and anisotropy maps, and hence a better differentiation between healthy and dysplastic areas. SHG image of skin tissue (a) and a selected area of interest for which we compute the SHG intensity (b) and anisotropy factor (c) dependence on the laser beam polarization and also the FFT spectrum (d) to evaluate the collagen orientation index. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The origin of second harmonic generation hotspots in chiral optical metamaterials [Invited

    OpenAIRE

    Valev, V.K.; Zheng, X.; Biris, C. G.; Silhanek, A. V.; Volskiy, V.; De Clercq, Ben; Aktsipetrov, Oleg A.; Ameloot, Marcel; Panoiu, N C; Vandenbosch, G. A. E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    Novel ways to detect the handedness in chiral optical metamaterials by means of the second harmonic generation (SHG) process have recently been proposed. However, the precise origin of the SHG emission has yet to be unambiguously established. In this paper, we present computational simulations of both the electric currents and the electromagnetic fields in chiral planar metamaterials, at the fundamental frequency (FF), and discuss the implications of our results on the characteristics of expe...

  10. Grain size effect of monolayer MoS2 transistors characterized by second harmonic generation mapping

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Chih-Pin

    2015-08-27

    We investigated different CVD-synthesized MoS2 films, aiming to correlate the device characteristics with the grain size. The grain size of MoS2 can be precisely characterized through nondestructive second harmonic generation mapping based on the degree of inversion symmetry. The devices with larger grains at the channel region show improved on/off current ratio, which can be explained by the less carrier scattering caused by the grain boundaries.

  11. Noninvasive corneal stromal collagen imaging using two-photon-generated second-harmonic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Petroll, W Matthew; Nishida, Teruo; Kenney, M Cristina; Jester, James V

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using femtosecond-pulse lasers to produce second-harmonic generated (SHG) signals to noninvasively assess corneal stromal collagen organization. The Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, California, USA. Mouse, rabbit, and human corneas were examined by two-photon confocal microscopy using a variable-wavelength femtosecond lasers to produce SHG signals. Two types were detected: forward scattered and backward scattered. Wavelength dependence of the SHG signal was confirmed by spectral separation using the 510 Meta (Zeiss). To verify the spatial relation between SHG signals and corneal cells, staining of cytoskeletons and nuclei was performed. Second-harmonic-generated signal intensity was strongest with an excitation wavelength of 800 nm for all 3 species. Second-harmonic-generated forward signals showed a distinct fibrillar pattern organized into bands suggesting lamellae, while backscattered SHG signals appeared more diffuse and indistinct. Reconstruction of SHG signals showed two patterns of lamellar organization: highly interwoven in the anterior stroma and orthogonally arranged in the posterior stroma. Unique to the human cornea was the presence of transverse, sutural lamellae that inserted into Bowman's layer, suggesting an anchoring function. Using two-photon confocal microscopy to generate SHG signals from the corneal collagen provides a powerful new approach to noninvasively study corneal structure. Human corneas had a unique organizational pattern with sutural lamellae to provide important biomechanical support that was not present in mouse or rabbit corneas.

  12. Eddy Current Probe for Surface and Sub-Surface Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An eddy current probe includes an excitation coil for coupling to a low-frequency alternating current (AC) source. A magneto-resistive sensor is centrally disposed within and at one end of the excitation coil to thereby define a sensing end of the probe. A tubular flux-focusing lens is disposed between the excitation coil and the magneto-resistive sensor. An excitation wire is spaced apart from the magneto-resistive sensor in a plane that is perpendicular to the sensor's axis of sensitivity and such that, when the sensing end of the eddy current probe is positioned adjacent to the surface of a structure, the excitation wire is disposed between the magneto-resistive sensor and the surface of the structure. The excitation wire is coupled to a high-frequency AC source. The excitation coil and flux-focusing lens can be omitted when only surface inspection is required.

  13. Multi-line transmission in medical imaging using the second-harmonic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Dénarié, Bastien; Austeng, Andreas; Torp, Hans

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of three-dimensional imaging in the field of medical ultrasound imaging has greatly increased the number of transmissions needed to insonify a whole volume. With a large number of transmissions comes a low image frame rate. When using classical transmission techniques, as in two-dimensional imaging, the frame rate becomes unacceptably low, prompting the use of alternative transmission patterns that require less time. One alternative is to use a multi-line transmission (MLT) technique which consists of transmitting several pulses simultaneously in different directions. Perturbations appear when acquiring and beamforming the signal in the direction of one pulse because of the pulses sent in other directions. The edge waves from the pulses transmitted in a different direction add to the signal transmitted in the direction of interest, resulting in artifacts in the final image. Taking advantage of the nonlinear propagation of sound in tissue, the second-harmonic signal can be used with the MLT technique. The image obtained using the second-harmonic signal, compared with an image obtained using the fundamental signal, should have reduced artifacts coming from other pulses transmitted simultaneously. Simulations, backed up by experiments imaging a wire target and an in vivo left ventricle, confirm that the hypothesis is valid. In the studied case, the perturbations appear as an increase in the signal level around the main echo of a point scatterer. When using the fundamental signal, the measured amplitude level of the perturbations was approximately -40 dB compared with the maximum signal amplitude (-27 dB in vivo), whereas it was around -60 dB (-45 dB in vivo) for the second-harmonic signal. The MLT technique encounters limitations in the very near field where the pulses overlap and the perturbation level also increases for images with strong speckle and low contrast.

  14. Design of a 50 MW, 34 GHz second harmonic coaxial gyroklystron for advanced accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjona, M.R.; Lawson, W.

    1999-07-01

    At the University of Maryland, the authors have been investigating the feasibility of using gyroklystrons and gyroklystrons as drivers for linear colliders and advanced accelerators for a number of years. The most recent experimental tube achieved a peak power of about 80 MW at 8.57 GHz with 32% efficiency and over 30 dB gain with a three-cavity first harmonic circuit. The current experimental effort is devoted to producing about 100 MW of peak power at 17.14 GHz with a second-harmonic three-cavity tube. Some schemes for advanced linear colliders with center-of-mass energies of 5 TeV or more expect to require higher frequency sources, perhaps near 35 GHz or 91 GHz. A design study at 95 GHz indicated that peak powers near 7 MW were possible. In this design study, they present the simulated operating characteristics of a four cavity 34 GHz second-harmonic gyroklystron tube which is capable of producing about 60 MW of peak power with an efficiency of about 40% and a gain above 50 dB. The electron gun is a single-anode magnetron injection gun. The input cavity is a TE{sub 011} cavity which is driven at 17 GHz. The remainder of the cavities are TE{sub 021} cavities which interact near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The gain cavity and the output cavities are at twice the drive frequency, but the penultimate cavity is detuned to enhance efficiency. All cavities are abrupt-transition cavities. Both systems are derived from scaled versions of the 17 GHz tube. In this paper, they present detailed designs and performance predictions for both the electron gun and the microwave circuit.

  15. A Second Harmonic Self-Oscillating Mixer Incorporating Resonant Cell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A downconverting second harmonic self-oscillating mixer (SOM is developed for low-cost wireless communications applications. Incorporating resonant cell in the SOM, we can provide suitable oscillation for generating LO and terminations to all major unwanted mixing products, leading to high conversion gain design. The proposed SOM was measured with 8.5 dB downconversion gain at the RF frequency of 8.2 GHz RF, LO frequency of 4.0 GHz, and IF frequency of 0.2 GHz. The proposed design achieves higher conversion gain than that of the SOM without resonant cell.

  16. Quantifying external and internal collagen organization from Stokes-vector-based second harmonic generation imaging polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila, Francisco J.; del Barco, Oscar; Bueno, Juan M.

    2017-10-01

    Collagen organization has been analyzed at both external and internal scales by combining Stokes-vector polarimetry and second harmonic generation microscopy. A significant linear relationship between the diattenuation and the external collagen organization was found. The dominant orientation of the collagen fibers was found to run parallel to the axis of diattenuation. Information on the collagen chirality was obtained from the circular dichroism, which showed also a strong dependence with the internal collagen organization. The results show that certain polarimetric parameters might be useful to extract quantitative information and characterize collagen arrangement.

  17. Quantum properties of transverse pattern formation in second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Scotto, P.; Zambrini, R.

    2002-01-01

    these equations through extensive numerical simulations and analytically in the linearized limit. Our study, made below and above the threshold of pattern formation, is guided by a microscopic scheme of photon interaction underlying pattern formation in second-harmonic generation. Close to the threshold...... transverse wave number, which are not identified in a linearized analysis, are also described. The intensity differences between opposite points of the far fields are shown to exhibit sub-Poissonian statistics, revealing the quantum nature of the correlations. We observe twin beam correlations in both...

  18. 2D Arrays of Hexagonal Plasmonic Necklaces for Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Tornero, Alejandro; Tserkezis, Christos; Mateos, Luis; Bausá, Luisa E; Ramírez, Mariola O

    2017-04-01

    Hexagonal plasmonic necklaces of silver nanoparticles organized in 2D superlattices on functional ferroelectric templates are fabricated in large-scale spatial regions by using a surfactant-free photo-deposition process. The plasmonic necklaces support broad radiative plasmonic resonances allowing the enhancement of second harmonic generation (SHG) at the ferroelectric domain boundaries. A 400-fold SHG enhancement is achieved at the near-UV spectral region with subsequent interest for technological applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Controllable nonlocal behaviour by cascaded second-harmonic generation of fs pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) of ultra-short pulses can act as a prototypical nonlocal nonlinear model, since the strength and nature of the temporal nonlocality can be controlled through the phase-mismatch parameter. The presence of a group-velocity mismatch namely implies that when the phase...... compression to few-cycle pulses in the cascaded quadratic soliton compressor, the spectral content of the full coupled SHG model is predicted by the nonlocal model even when few-cycle pulses are interacting....

  20. Deep modulation of second-harmonic light by wavelength detuning of a laser diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mathias; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Power modulated visible lasers are interesting for a number of applications within areas such as laser displays and medical laser treatments. In this paper, we present a system for modulating the second-harmonic light generated by single-pass frequency doubling of a distributed feedback (DFB....... The bandwidth of the modulation is limited by the electronics. This method has the potential to decrease the size as well as cost of modulated visible lasers. The achievable optical powers will increase as DFB MOPAs are further developed. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America...

  1. Second-harmonic interference imaging of ferroelectric domains through a scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyang; Wei, Dunzhao; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Yunzhi; Zhang, Yong; Hu, X. P.; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2017-12-01

    We report a second-harmonic (SH) interference imaging technique to observe the ferroelectric domains of a periodically poled LiTaO3 crystal through a scanning microscope. By interfering with the reference SH field, which is produced in an un-poled LiTaO3 crystal, the SH imaging of the positive and negative domains can be easily distinguished. The image quality can be tuned by rotating the reference crystal or moving the focal plane. Our SH interference configuration is compatible with commercial scanning microscopy and has potential applications in fast examination of the ferroelectric structures in waveguide, film, and integrated devices.

  2. Second-harmonic-generation measurements on ZnSe under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Jin Ming Xing; Mukhtar, E; Ding Da Jun

    2002-01-01

    Second-harmonic-generation (SHG) measurements on ZnSe at high pressure, up to 7 GPa, have been reported. The zinc-blende-rock-salt transition pressure has been determined at room temperature from the SHG in ZnSe using a femtosecond laser. The pressure required to induce transformation from a zinc-blende to a rock-salt structure decreases from 11.5 to 1.07 GPa in a femtosecond laser field. SHG can be used to monitor structural changes under pressure of some materials with nonlinear optical properties.

  3. Investigation of Heavily Doped Congruent Lithium Tantalite for Single-pass Second Harmonic Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Farsi, Mohammad Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Treball final de màster oficial fet en col·laboració amb Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Universitat de Barcelona (UB) i Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (ICFO) [ANGLÈS] We report a compact , practical, green sources based on single-pass second harmonic generation(SHG) of a picosecond Yb-fiber laser in 10-mm-long, heavily MgO doped congruent lithium tantalite (MgO:cPPLT). The fundamental pump source is 20 ps Yb-fiber laser operating at a repetition rate of 80 MHz. The green source ...

  4. Second harmonic generation in nano-structured thin-film lithium niobate waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Xiong, Xiao; Andrade, Nicolas; Venkataraman, Vivek; Ren, Xi-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Lončar, Marko

    2017-03-20

    Integrated thin-film lithium niobate platform has recently emerged as a promising candidate for next-generation, high-efficiency wavelength conversion systems that allow dense packaging and mass-production. Here we demonstrate efficient, phase-matched second harmonic generation in lithographically-defined thin-film lithium niobate waveguides with sub-micron dimensions. Both modal phase matching in fixed-width waveguides and quasi-phase matching in periodically grooved waveguides are theoretically proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Our low-loss (~3.0 dB/cm) nanowaveguides possess normalized conversion efficiencies as high as 41% W-1cm-2.

  5. Graphics processing unit-based quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Jonayat, A S M; Patel, Sanjay; Toussaint, Kimani C

    2014-09-01

    We adapt a graphics processing unit (GPU) to dynamic quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging. We demonstrate the temporal advantage of the GPU-based approach by computing the number of frames analyzed per second from SHG image videos showing varying fiber orientations. In comparison to our previously reported CPU-based approach, our GPU-based image analysis results in ∼10× improvement in computational time. This work can be adapted to other quantitative, nonlinear imaging techniques and provides a significant step toward obtaining quantitative information from fast in vivo biological processes.

  6. Orbital-angular-momentum mixing in type-II second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leonardo J.; Buono, Wagner T.; Tasca, Daniel S.; Dechoum, Kaled; Khoury, Antonio Z.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear mixing of orbital angular momentum in type-II second-harmonic generation with arbitrary topological charges imprinted on two orthogonally polarized beams. Starting from the basic nonlinear equations for the interacting fields, we derive the selection rules determining the set of paraxial modes taking part in the interaction. Conservation of orbital angular momentum naturally appears as the topological charge selection rule. However, a less intuitive rule applies to the radial orders when modes carrying opposite helicities are combined in the nonlinear crystal, an intriguing feature confirmed by experimental measurements.

  7. Second-Harmonic Coherent Driving of a Spin Qubit in a Si/SiGe Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlino, P; Kawakami, E; Ward, D R; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, M A; Vandersypen, L M K

    2015-09-04

    We demonstrate coherent driving of a single electron spin using second-harmonic excitation in a Si/SiGe quantum dot. Our estimates suggest that the anharmonic dot confining potential combined with a gradient in the transverse magnetic field dominates the second-harmonic response. As expected, the Rabi frequency depends quadratically on the driving amplitude, and the periodicity with respect to the phase of the drive is twice that of the fundamental harmonic. The maximum Rabi frequency observed for the second harmonic is just a factor of 2 lower than that achieved for the first harmonic when driving at the same power. Combined with the lower demands on microwave circuitry when operating at half the qubit frequency, these observations indicate that second-harmonic driving can be a useful technique for future quantum computation architectures.

  8. Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Fe(II) Interactions with Hematite (α-Fe2O3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David S.; Hull, Christopher J.; Troiano, Julianne M.; Riha, Shannon C.; Martinson, Alex B.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2013-02-28

    Iron oxides are a ubiquitous class of compounds that are involved in many biological, geological, and technological processes, and the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple is a fundamental transformation pathway; however, the study of iron oxide surfaces in aqueous solution by powerful spectroscopic techniques has been limited due to "strong absorber problem". In this work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) thin films of polycrystalline alpha-Fe2O3 were analyzed using the Eisenthal chi((3)) technique, a variant of second harmonic generation that reports on interfacial potentials. By determining the surface charge densities at multiple pH values, the point of zero charge was found to be 5.5 +/- 0.3. The interaction of aqueous Fe(II) at pH 4 and in 1 mM NaCl with ALD-prepared hematite was found to be fully reversible and to lead to about 4 times more ferrous iron ions adsorbed per square centimeter than on fused-silica surfaces under the same conditions. The data are consistent with a recently proposed conceptual model for net Fe(II) uptake or release that is underlain by a dynamic equilibrium between Fe(II) adsorbed onto hematite, electron transfer into favorable surface sites with attendant Fe(III) deposition, and electron conduction to favorable remote sites that release and replenish aqueous Fe(II).

  9. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  10. Effective nonlinearities and multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation in modulated quasi-phase-matching gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ole; Graversen, T. W.; Clausen, Carl A. Balslev

    2000-01-01

    Quasi-phase-matching gratings induces Kerr effects in quadratic nonlinear materials. We show analytically and confirm numerically how modulating the grating changes the effective quadratic and cubic nonlinearities and allows for multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation.......Quasi-phase-matching gratings induces Kerr effects in quadratic nonlinear materials. We show analytically and confirm numerically how modulating the grating changes the effective quadratic and cubic nonlinearities and allows for multi-wavelength second-harmonic generation....

  11. Influence of the pump depletion on the anomalous absorption of the extraordinary wave in the second harmonic ECRH experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu

    2018-02-01

    The saturation analysis for the two-upper-hybrid-plasmon low-threshold parametric decay instability of the extraordinary wave is carried out for the conditions of the second harmonic ECRH experiments with due account of the daughter wave secondary decay and of the pump depletion. The anomalous absorption rate in the range of 10% is demonstrated for the parameters of the TEXTOR tokamak second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiment at a single-mode primary decay.

  12. Quadratic solitons for negative effective second-harmonic diffraction as nonlocal solitons with periodic nonlocal response function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbensen, B.K.; Bache, Morten; Krolikowski, W.

    2012-01-01

    We employ the formal analogy between quadratic and nonlocal solitons to investigate analytically the properties of solitons and soliton bound states in second-harmonic generation in the regime of negative diffraction or dispersion of the second harmonic. We show that in the nonlocal description...... this regime corresponds to a periodic nonlocal response function. We then use the strongly nonlocal approximation to find analytical solutions of the families of single bright solitons and their bound states in terms of Mathieu functions....

  13. Simultaneous Second Harmonic Generation of Multiple Wavelength Laser Outputs for Medical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Seok Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple wavelength light sources in the medical spectral window region are useful for various medical sensing applications in tissue by distinguishing the absorption and scattering coefficients optically. We propose a simultaneous second harmonic generation of multiple wavelength fiber laser output using parallel channels of periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN waveguides. High intensity dual wavelength lasing output is experimentally realized with two tunable fiber Bragg gratings of 1,547.20 nm and 1,554.48 nm for the efficient conversion to the half wavelengths, 773.60 nm and 777.24 nm, by using two parallel PPLN channels. Compared with a conventional dual second harmonic generation (SHG configuration based on two different input wavelengths from each independent light source, this method has a relatively higher efficiency to align the input light beam into the adjacent parallel PPLN channels simultaneously. The use of fiber lasers offers several advantages since they are relatively inexpensive, provide high power in excess of tens of watts, are widely tunable, and can produce pulses from milliseconds to femtoseconds.

  14. Simultaneous Second Harmonic Generation of Multiple Wavelength Laser Outputs for Medical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung Nam; Song, Jae-Jin; Kang, Jin U.; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Multiple wavelength light sources in the medical spectral window region are useful for various medical sensing applications in tissue by distinguishing the absorption and scattering coefficients optically. We propose a simultaneous second harmonic generation of multiple wavelength fiber laser output using parallel channels of periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguides. High intensity dual wavelength lasing output is experimentally realized with two tunable fiber Bragg gratings of 1,547.20 nm and 1,554.48 nm for the efficient conversion to the half wavelengths, 773.60 nm and 777.24 nm, by using two parallel PPLN channels. Compared with a conventional dual second harmonic generation (SHG) configuration based on two different input wavelengths from each independent light source, this method has a relatively higher efficiency to align the input light beam into the adjacent parallel PPLN channels simultaneously. The use of fiber lasers offers several advantages since they are relatively inexpensive, provide high power in excess of tens of watts, are widely tunable, and can produce pulses from milliseconds to femtoseconds. PMID:22163945

  15. Three-Dimensional Geometry of Collagenous Tissues by Second Harmonic Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Karen; Stoller, Patrick; Knoesen, André

    2017-06-01

    Collagen is a biological macromolecule capable of second harmonic generation, allowing label-free detection in tissues; in addition, molecular orientation can be determined from the polarization dependence of the second harmonic signal. Previously we reported that in-plane orientation of collagen fibrils could be determined by modulating the polarization angle of the laser during scanning. We have now extended this method so that out-of-plane orientation angles can be determined at the same time, allowing visualization of the 3-dimensional structure of collagenous tissues. This approach offers advantages compared with other methods for determining out-of-plane orientation. First, the orientation angles are directly calculated from the polarimetry data obtained in a single scan, while other reported methods require data from multiple scans, use of iterative optimization methods, application of fitting algorithms, or extensive post-optical processing. Second, our method does not require highly specialized instrumentation, and thus can be adapted for use in almost any nonlinear optical microscopy setup. It is suitable for both basic and clinical applications. We present three-dimensional images of structurally complex collagenous tissues that illustrate the power of such 3-dimensional analyses to reveal the architecture of biological structures.

  16. Double resonant plasmonic nanoantennas for efficient second harmonic generation in zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nils; Protte, Maximilian; Walter, Felicitas; Georgi, Philip; Zentgraf, Thomas; Meier, Cedrik

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of second harmonic light in zinc oxide (ZnO) by utilizing double resonant plasmonic nanoantenna arrays. The antenna design is based on two gold dipole rods with plasmonic resonances at ω and 2 ω , enabling strong localization of light at the fundamental frequency ω within the ZnO, as well as improved reemission of the second harmonic generation (SHG) at 2 ω into the far field. Wavelength-dependent SHG measurements show that the intensity of the far-field signal strongly depends on the properties of the ZnO substrate: While a bulk-ZnO substrate causes the SHG signal emitted from the nanoantennas to decrease, a thin-film ZnO substrate provides a strongly enhanced signal from the double resonant antennas. Comparing the wavelength-dependent results from the double resonant antennas with single dipole rods, the enhancement of the SHG intensity is more than twofold. Our experimental results confirm theoretical calculations of the SHG obtained from the double resonant antenna arrays.

  17. Second harmonic generation in nanoscale films of transition metal dichalcogenide: Accounting for multipath interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kudryavtsev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The transfer matrix method has been widely used to calculate wave propagation through the layered structures consisting entirely of either linear or nonlinear optical materials. In the present work, we develop the transfer matrix method for structures consisting of alternating layers of linear and nonlinear optical materials. The result is presented in a form that allows one to directly substitute the values of material constants, refractive index and absorption coefficient, into the expressions describing the second harmonic generation (SHG field. The model is applied to the calculation of second harmonic (SH field generated in nano-thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides exfoliated on top of silicon oxide/silicon Fabry-Perot cavity. These structures are intensively studied both in view of their unique properties and perspective applications. A good agreement between experimental and numerical results can be achieved by small modification of optical constants, which may arise in an experiment due to a strong electric field of an incident focused pump laser beam. By considering the SHG effect, this paper completes the series of works describing the role of Fabry-Perot cavity in different optical effects (optical reflection, photoluminescence and Raman scattering in 2D semiconductors that is extremely important for characterization of these unique materials.

  18. Near- and far-field second-harmonic imaging of quasi-phase-matching crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohnsen, B; Bozhevolnyi, S I

    2001-04-01

    Second-harmonic scanning near- and far-field optical microscopy of an electric-field poled KTiOPO4 quasi-phase-matching crystal has been accomplished. This has been done in order to reveal the walls that form the intersections between inverted and non-inverted crystal domains. The domain walls are seen clearly only in images recorded by means of second-harmonic generation because of a large nonlinear contrast, and they appear as bright stripes when studied in a reflection geometry but they are dark when studied in transmission. The images show that the duty cycle of the quasi-phase-matching crystal differs from the ideal and that the walls are not completely smooth. These effects, in combination with the observed scattering from the domain walls, are expected to lower the output of the crystal when used for frequency doubling. We conclude that the wall thickness is no more than approximately 100 nm, which makes it a suitable test object for the resolution capabilities of scanning near-field optical microscopes that are used for nonlinear imaging.

  19. Quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging to detect osteogenesis imperfecta in human skin samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Ferreira, A. E.; D'Souza-Li, L.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that leads to bone fractures due to mutations in the Col1A1 or Col1A2 genes that affect the primary structure of the collagen I chain with the ultimate outcome in collagen I fibrils that are either reduced in quantity or abnormally organized in the whole body. A quick test screening of the patients would largely reduce the sample number to be studied by the time consuming molecular genetics techniques. For this reason an assessment of the human skin collagen structure by Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) can be used as a screening technique to speed up the correlation of genetics/phenotype/OI types understanding. In the present work we have used quantitative second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to investigate the collagen matrix organization of the OI human skin samples comparing with normal control patients. By comparing fibril collagen distribution and spatial organization, we calculated the anisotropy and texture patterns of this structural protein. The analysis of the anisotropy was performed by means of the two-dimensional Discrete Fourier Transform and image pattern analysis with Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). From these results, we show that statistically different results are obtained for the normal and disease states of OI.

  20. Discrimination of radiation quality through second harmonic out-of-phase cw-ESR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Brai, Maria; Barbon, Antonio; Brustolon, Marina

    2014-02-01

    The ability to discriminate the quality of ionizing radiation is important because the biological effects produced in tissue strongly depends on both absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) of ionizing particles. Here we present an experimental electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis aimed at discriminating the effective LETs of various radiation beams (e.g., 19.3 MeV protons, (60)Co photons and thermal neutrons). The measurement of the intensities of the continuous wave spectrometer signal channel first harmonic in-phase and the second harmonic out-of-phase components are used to distinguish the radiation quality. A computational analysis, was carried out to evaluate the dependence of the first harmonic in-phase and second harmonic out-of-phase components on microwave power, modulation amplitude and relaxation times, and highlights that these components could be used to point out differences in the relaxation times. On the basis of this numerical analysis the experimental results are discussed. The methodology described in this study has the potential to provide information on radiation quality.

  1. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  2. Tunable second harmonic generation of monolayer MoS2 by Se doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, C. T.; Clark, D. J.; Senthilkumar, V.; Jang, J. I.; Cho, H.-Y.; Kim, Y. S.; Binghamton University Collaboration

    As a transition metal dichalcogenides whose bandgap becomes direct with inversion symmetry breaking in the monolayer limit, MoS2 has been getting ample attention as next-generation nonlinear optic material for its strong optical nonlinear properties. In this study, we demonstrate the wavelength second harmonic generation tunability of monolayer Mo(S, Se)2. Employing the two-zone furnaces system, we selenized as-grown monolayer MoS2at different temperature. X-ray photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to confirm the chemical composition of selenized film. Photoluminescence spectra shows the red shift in optical bandgap from 1.83 to 1.53 eV as a function of concentration Se replacing S. Second harmonic generation characteristics were measured in reflection geometry using ps pulse from Nd:YAG laser. Applying the previous bulk model, we calculated that the maximum value of χ (2)varied from ~40 pm/V for pure MoS2 to ~100 pm/V for pure MoSe2.We believe that our findings along with the ability to stack different 2D materials will create stacked 2D heterostructure with high χ (2)over a wide range of wavelength from visible to NIR. This research was supported by Priority Research Centers Program (2009-0093818), the Basic Science Research Program (2015-019609), and Basic Research Lab Program (2014-071686) through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), funded by the Korean g.

  3. Significance of accurate diffraction corrections for the second harmonic wave in determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyunjo, E-mail: hjjeong@wku.ac.kr [Division of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Wonkwang University, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing [School of Traffic and Transportation Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410075 (China); Barnard, Dan [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The accurate measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter β for fluids or solids generally requires making corrections for diffraction effects due to finite size geometry of transmitter and receiver. These effects are well known in linear acoustics, while those for second harmonic waves have not been well addressed and therefore not properly considered in previous studies. In this work, we explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction corrections using the multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which were developed from the quasilinear solutions of the KZK equation. The effects of making these corrections are examined through the simulation of β determination in water. Diffraction corrections are found to have more significant effects than attenuation corrections, and the β values of water can be estimated experimentally with less than 5% errors when the exact second harmonic diffraction corrections are used together with the negligible attenuation correction effects on the basis of linear frequency dependence between attenuation coefficients, α{sub 2} ≃ 2α{sub 1}.

  4. Genetic algorithm applied to the optimization of quantum cascade lasers with second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajić, A. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Telekom Srbija, a.d., Takovska 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radovanović, J., E-mail: radovanovic@etf.bg.ac.rs; Milanović, V. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Indjin, D.; Ikonić, Z. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-07

    A computational model for the optimization of the second order optical nonlinearities in GaInAs/AlInAs quantum cascade laser structures is presented. The set of structure parameters that lead to improved device performance was obtained through the implementation of the Genetic Algorithm. In the following step, the linear and second harmonic generation power were calculated by self-consistently solving the system of rate equations for carriers and photons. This rate equation system included both stimulated and simultaneous double photon absorption processes that occur between the levels relevant for second harmonic generation, and material-dependent effective mass, as well as band nonparabolicity, were taken into account. The developed method is general, in the sense that it can be applied to any higher order effect, which requires the photon density equation to be included. Specifically, we have addressed the optimization of the active region of a double quantum well In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/Al{sub 0.48}In{sub 0.52}As structure and presented its output characteristics.

  5. Theory of anomalous backscattering in second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu. [Ioffe Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya st., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    A quantitative model explaining generation of the anomalous backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) experiments at TEXTOR tokamak as a secondary nonlinear process which accompanies a primary low-threshold parametric decay instability (PDI) leading to excitation of two—upper hybrid (UH)—plasmons trapped in plasma is developed. The primary absolute PDI enhancing the UH wave fluctuations from the thermal noise level is supposed to be saturated due to a cascade of secondary low-threshold decays of the daughter UH wave leading to excitation of the secondary UH waves down-shifted in frequency and the ion Bernstein wave. A set of equations describing the cascade is derived and solved numerically. The results of numerical modelling are shown to be in agreement with the analytical estimations of the growth rate of the initial and secondary parametric decays and the saturation level. The generation of backscattering signal is explained by coupling of the daughter UH waves. The fine details of the frequency spectrum of the anomalously reflected extraordinary wave and the absolute value of the observed backscattering signal in the second harmonic X-mode ECRH experiments at TEXTOR are reproduced.

  6. Second harmonic reflection and transmission from primary S0 mode Lamb wave interacting with a localized microscale damage in a plate: A numerical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Tse, Peter W; Chen, Jingming; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Second harmonic generation has been widely used in characterizing microstructural changes which are evenly distributed in a whole structure. However, few attention has been paid to evaluating localized micro-scale damages. In this paper, second harmonic reflection and transmission from the primary S0 mode Lamb wave interacting with a localized microstructural damage is numerically discussed. Schematic diagram for deriving fundamental temporal waveform and reconstructing the second harmonic temporal waveform based on Morlet wavelet transform is presented. Second harmonic reflection and transmission from an interface between the zones of linear elastic and nonlinear materials is firstly studied to verify the existence of interfacial nonlinearity. Compositions contributing to second harmonic components in the reflected and transmitted waves are analyzed. Amplitudes of the reflected and transmitted second harmonic components generated at an interface due to the interfacial nonlinearity are quantitatively evaluated. Then, second harmonic reflection and transmission from a localized microscale damage is investigated. The effects of the length and width of a microscale damage on WCPA (wavelet coefficient profile area) of the reflected and transmitted second harmonic components are studied respectively. It is found that the second harmonic component in the reflected waves mainly reflects the interfacial nonlinearity while second harmonic in the transmitted waves reflects the material nonlinearity. These findings provide some basis on using second harmonic generation for characterization and detection of localized microstructural changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Contactless Characterization of Carrier Injection and Recombination Processes at Semiconductor Interfaces Using Second-Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, R.; Shirokaya, Y. V.; Marka, Z.; Miller, J. K.; Rashkeev, S. N.; Pantelides, S. T.; Tolk, N. H.; Choi, B. K.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.

    2003-03-01

    Leakage currents can be significantly enhanced in MOS devices by exposure to ionizing radiation. We have demonstrated that second-harmonic generation (SHG) is a useful technique for the characterization of carrier transport in X-ray damaged ultra-thin oxides. Our results show also that this technique is more sensitive to the detection of damage in thin oxide films than conventional electrical measurement approaches. Using this technique which we have designated Laser Interrogated Leakage Current (LILC), we have performed time-dependent measurements, which provide dynamical information about injection, trapping, detrapping, transport and recombination processes in thin layers of SiO2 on Si. In addition, we have shown for the first time that optical SHG measurements can be performed effectively on an oxide sample with a gradually varying thickness (from 1 nm to 6.5 nm) which cannot be studied by conventional electronic measurements.

  8. Second-harmonic generation of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagating in an inhomogeneous and nonlinear medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Ding, Chunling; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    A general description of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagating in nonlinear and inhomogeneous media is given by deducing cylindrical coupled-wave equations. Based on the cylindrical coupled-wave equations, we analyze second-harmonic generation (SHG) of some special cases of inhomogeneity, and find that the inhomogeneity of the first- and second-order polarization can influence the amplitude of the SHG. From a different point of view, exact solutions of cylindrical electromagnetic waves propagating in a nonlinear medium with a special case of inhomogeneity have been obtained previously. We show that cylindrical SHG in an inhomogeneous and nonlinear medium can also be deduced from exact solutions. As verification, we compare the results obtained from the two different methods and find that descriptions of SHG by the coupled-wave equations are in good agreement with the exact solutions.

  9. Broadband second-harmonic generation in APPLN with group-velocity matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian; Zhang, Jiandong; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Xuan; Zhang, Zuxing

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we present a method to increase the acceptance bandwidth of second harmonic generation (SHG) with 5 mol% MgO-doped aperiodically poled lithium niobate (APPLN) when the conditions of quasi-phase-matching and group-velocity matching are satisfied simultaneously. The APPLN, with a length of 10 mm, has 3333 uniform domains, with the polarization directions of each domain optimized by a genetic algorithm, to obtain the profile of nonlinear coefficients in the communication band. By adjusting the positions and quantities of the fundamental wavelengths appropriately, the evolution of bandwidths is investigated theoretically. The simulation results show that the acceptance bandwidth of SHG is approximately 243.3 nm for type-I (o + o → e) interaction around the wavelength of zero-group-velocity dispersion in crystal, which is enhanced by 4.5 times that of periodic structures.

  10. Silicon photonic crystal cavity enhanced second-harmonic generation from monolayer WSe2

    CERN Document Server

    Fryett, Taylor K; Zheng, Jiajiu; Liu, Chang-Hua; Xu, Xiaodong; Majumdar, Arka

    2016-01-01

    Nano-resonator integrated with two-dimensional materials (e.g. transition metal dichalcogenides) have recently emerged as a promising nano-optoelectronic platform. Here we demonstrate resonatorenhanced second-harmonic generation (SHG) in tungsten diselenide using a silicon photonic crystal cavity. By pumping the device with the ultrafast laser pulses near the cavity mode at the telecommunication wavelength, we observe a near visible SHG with a narrow linewidth and near unity linear polarization, originated from the coupling of the pump photon to the cavity mode. The observed SHG is enhanced by factor of ~200 compared to a bare monolayer on silicon. Our results imply the efficacy of cavity integrated monolayer materials for nonlinear optics and the potential of building a silicon-compatible second-order nonlinear integrated photonic platform.

  11. Plasmon-enhanced second harmonic generation in semiconductor quantum dots close to metal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Bragas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the enhancement of the optical second harmonic signal in non-centrosymmetric semiconductor CdS quantum dots, when they are placed in close contact with isolated silver nanoparticles. The intensity enhancement is about 1000. We also show that the enhancement increases when the incoming laser frequency $omega$ is tuned toward the spectral position of the silver plasmon at $2omega$, proving that the silver nanoparticle modifies the nonlinear emission.Received: 8 March 2011, Accepted: 30 May 2011; Edited by: L. Viña; Reviewed by: R. Gordon, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; DOI: 10.4279/PIP.030002Cite as: P. M. Jais, C. von Bilderling, A. V. Bragas, Papers in Physics 3, 030002 (2011

  12. High sensitive translational temperature measurement using characteristic curve of second harmonic signal in wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamada, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    A high sensitive measurement system of translational temperature of plasma was developed. In this system, which is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy, a peak value of second harmonic signal was measured as a function of modulation depth. The translational temperature was estimated by fitting the theoretically calculated curve to the measured characteristic curve. The performance of this system was examined using microwave discharge plasma. As a result of comparison with conventional laser absorption spectroscopy, both results show good agreement in the measurable region of the laser absorption spectroscopy. Next, the measurable limit of this system was investigated by decreasing the target number density. The detectable fractional absorption was as low as 3.7 × 10-5 in which condition the signal to noise ratio was the order of single digit at the averaging number of 40. This value is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the laser absorption spectroscopy.

  13. Second harmonic generation studies in L-alanine single crystals grown from solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomadevi, Shanmugam, E-mail: sboomi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Periyar Maniammai University, Thanjavur-613 403, Tamil Nadu (India); Pandiyan, Krishnamoorthy [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, SASTRA University, Thanjavur-613 401, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of L-alanine of dimensions 2×1.1×0.5 cm{sup 3} were grown by evaporation method using deionised water as a solvent. The morphology of the grown crystals had (1 2 0) and (0 1 1) as their prominent faces. UV–vis-near IR spectrum shows the transparency range of L-alanine crystal available for frequency doubling from 250 to 1400 nm. Phase-matched second harmonic generation was observed in L-alanine sample by using 7 ns Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with OPO set up. In the present work, phase matching was achieved by angle and wavelength tuning. The angular and spectral phase-matching bandwidths were determined experimentally for a 1.5 mm thick L-alanine crystal and the results have been compared with their theoretical results. Further the possible reasons for the broadening of SHG spectrum have been discussed.

  14. Imaging the noncentrosymmetric structural organisation of tissue with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, Maxime; Laliberte, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Martin, Francois; Pepin, Henri; Pfeffer, Christian P; Brown, Cameron; Rammuno, Lora; Legare, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We report the imaging of tendon, a connective tissue rich in collagen type I proteins, with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation (I-SHG) microscopy. We observed that the noncentrosymmetric structural organization can be maintained along the fibrillar axis over more than 150 {\\mu}m, while in the transverse direction it is ~1-15 {\\mu}m. Those results are explained by modeling tendon as a heterogeneous distribution of noncentrosymmetric nanocylinders (collagen fibrils) oriented along the fibrillar axis. The preservation of the noncentrosymmetric structural organization over multiple tens of microns reveals that tendon is made of domains in which the fraction occupied by fibrils oriented in one direction is larger than in the other.

  15. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging Analysis of Collagen Arrangement in Human Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Lee, Jimmy K; Chuck, Roy S

    2015-08-01

    To describe the horizontal arrangement of human corneal collagen bundles by using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Human corneas were imaged with an inverted two photon excitation fluorescence microscope. The excitation laser (Ti:Sapphire) was tuned to 850 nm. Backscatter signals of SHG were collected through a 425/30-nm bandpass emission filter. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping image stacks (z-stacks) were acquired to generate three dimensional data sets. ImageJ software was used to analyze the arrangement pattern (irregularity) of collagen bundles at each image plane. Collagen bundles in the corneal lamellae demonstrated a complex layout merging and splitting within a single lamellar plane. The patterns were significantly different in the superficial and limbal cornea when compared with deep and central regions. Collagen bundles were smaller in the superficial layer and larger in deep lamellae. By using SHG imaging, the horizontal arrangement of corneal collagen bundles was elucidated at different depths and focal regions of the human cornea.

  16. Dynamical centrosymmetry breaking — A novel mechanism for second harmonic generation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, David N. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Marini, Andrea [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Biancalana, Fabio, E-mail: f.biancalana@hw.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    We discover an unusual phenomenon that occurs when a graphene monolayer is illuminated by a short and intense pulse at normal incidence. Due to the pulse-induced oscillations of the Dirac cones, a dynamical breaking of the layer’s centrosymmetry takes place, leading to the generation of second harmonic waves. We prove that this result can only be found by using the full Dirac equation and show that the widely used semiconductor Bloch equations fail to reproduce this and some other important physics of graphene. Our results open new windows in the understanding of nonlinear light-matter interactions in a wide variety of new 2D materials with a gapped or ungapped Dirac-like dispersion.

  17. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis of Second-Harmonic Generation Images: A Semiautomatic Collagen Fibers Quantification Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel A Zeitoune

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast number of human pathologic conditions are directly or indirectly related to tissular collagen structure remodeling. The nonlinear optical microscopy second-harmonic generation has become a powerful tool for imaging biological tissues with anisotropic hyperpolarized structures, such as collagen. During the past years, several quantification methods to analyze and evaluate these images have been developed. However, automated or semiautomated solutions are necessary to ensure objectivity and reproducibility of such analysis. This work describes automation and improvement methods for calculating the anisotropy (using fast Fourier transform analysis and the gray-level co-occurrence matrix. These were applied to analyze biopsy samples of human ovarian epithelial cancer at different stages of malignancy (mucinous, serous, mixed, and endometrial subtypes. The semiautomation procedure enabled us to design a diagnostic protocol that recognizes between healthy and pathologic tissues, as well as between different tumor types.

  18. Optically induced second-harmonic generation in CdI sub 2 -Cu layered nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Voolless, F; Hydaradjan, W

    2003-01-01

    A large enhancement (up to 0.40 pm V sup - sup 1) of the second-order optical susceptibility was observed in CdI sub 2 -Cu single-layered nanocrystals for the Nd:YAG fundamental laser beam lambda = 1.06 mu m. The Cu impurity content and nanolayer thickness of the cleaved layers (about several nanometres) play a crucial role in the observed effect. The temperature dependence of the optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) together with its correlation with Raman spectra of low-frequency modes indicate a key role for the UV-induced anharmonic electron-phonon interactions in the observed effect. The maximal output UV-induced SHG was achieved for a Cu content of about 0.5% and at liquid helium temperatures.

  19. Random laser action with coherent feedback via second-harmonic generation

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Yanqi; Cai, Zengyan; Chen, Xianfeng

    2016-01-01

    The random laser action with coherent feedback by second-harmonic generation (SHG) was experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Compared with the conventional random laser action based on photoluminescence effect, which needs strong photoresponse in the active medium and has a fixed response waveband due to the inherent energy level structure of the material, this random SHG laser action indicates a possible confinement of the nonlinear signal with ring cavities and widens the response waveband due to the flexible frequency conversion in nonlinear process. The combination of coherent random laser and nonlinear optics will provide us another possible way to break phase-matching limitations, with fiber or feedback-based wavefront shaping method to transmit the emission signal directionally. This work suggests potential applications in band-tunable random laser, phase-matching-free nonlinear optics and even brings in new consideration about random nonlinear optics (RNO).

  20. Application of quantitative second-harmonic generation microscopy to posterior cruciate ligament for crimp analysis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woowon; Rahman, Hafizur; Kersh, Mariana E.; Toussaint, Kimani C.

    2017-04-01

    We use second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to quantitatively characterize collagen fiber crimping in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The obtained SHG images are utilized to define three distinct categories of crimp organization in the PCL. Using our previously published spatial-frequency analysis, we develop a simple algorithm to quantitatively distinguish the various crimp patterns. In addition, SHG microscopy reveals both the three-dimensional structural variation in some PCL crimp patterns as well as an underlying helicity in these patterns that have mainly been observed using electron microscopy. Our work highlights how SHG microscopy could potentially be used to link the fibrous structural information in the PCL to its mechanical properties.

  1. Resonantly enhanced second-harmonic generation using III-V semiconductor all-dielectric metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Sheng; Keeler, Gordon A; Sinclair, Michael B; Yang, Yuanmu; Reno, John; Pertsch, Thomas; Brener, Igal

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena in nanostructured materials have been challenging our perceptions of nonlinear optical processes that have been explored since the invention of lasers. For example, the ability to control optical field confinement, enhancement, and scattering almost independently, allows nonlinear frequency conversion efficiencies to be enhanced by many orders of magnitude compared to bulk materials. Also, the subwavelength length scales render phase matching issues irrelevant. Compared with plasmonic nanostructures, dielectric resonator metamaterials show great promise for enhanced nonlinear optical processes due to their larger mode volumes. Here, we present, for the first time, resonantly enhanced second-harmonic generation (SHG) using Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based dielectric metasurfaces. Using arrays of cylindrical resonators we observe SHG enhancement factors as large as 104 relative to unpatterned GaAs. At the magnetic dipole resonance we measure an absolute nonlinear conversion efficiency o...

  2. Second Harmonic Generation Guided Raman Spectroscopy for Sensitive Detection of Polymorph Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Azhad U.; Ye, Dong Hye; Song, Zhengtian; Zhang, Shijie; Hedderich, Hartmut G.; Mallick, Babita; Thirunahari, Satyanarayana; Ramakrishnan, Srividya; Sengupta, Atanu; Gualtieri, Ellen J.; Bouman, Charles A.; Simpson, Garth J. (Purdue); (IPDO)

    2017-05-08

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) was integrated with Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of pharmaceutical materials. Particulate formulations of clopidogrel bisulfate were prepared in two crystal forms (Form I and Form II). Image analysis approaches enable automated identification of particles by bright field imaging, followed by classification by SHG. Quantitative SHG microscopy enabled discrimination of crystal form on a per particle basis with 99.95% confidence in a total measurement time of ~10 ms per particle. Complementary measurements by Raman and synchrotron XRD are in excellent agreement with the classifications made by SHG, with measurement times of ~1 min and several seconds per particle, respectively. Coupling these capabilities with at-line monitoring may enable real-time feedback for reaction monitoring during pharmaceutical production to favor the more bioavailable but metastable Form I with limits of detection in the ppm regime.

  3. Second harmonic generation analysis of early Achilles tendinosis in response to in vivo mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Tenocytes have been implicated in the development of tendinosis, a chronic condition commonly seen in musculoskeletal overuse syndromes. However, the relation between abnormal tenocyte morphology and early changes in the fibrillar collagen matrix has not been closely examined in vivo. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a recently developed technique which allows examination of fibrillar collagen structures with a high degree of specificity and resolution. The goal of this study was to examine the potential utility of SHG and multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) microscopy in understanding the relation between tenocytes and their surrounding collagenous matrix in early tendon overuse lesions. Methods Histological preparations of tendon were prepared from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to an Achilles tendon loading protocol for 12 weeks (Rat-A-PED), or from sedentary age-matched cage controls. Second harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence were performed simultaneously on these tissue sections in at least three different areas. Results SHG microscopy revealed an association between abnormal tenocyte morphology and morphological changes in the fibrillar collagen matrix of mechanically loaded Achilles tendons. Collagen density and organization was significantly reduced in focal micro-regions of mechanically loaded tendons. These pathological changes occurred specifically in association with altered tenocyte morphology. Normal tendons displayed a regular distribution of fibre bundles, and the average size of these bundles as determined by Gaussian analysis was 0.47 μm ± 0.02. In comparison, fibre bundle measures from tendon regions in the vicinity of abnormal tenocytes could not be quantified due to a reduction in their regularity of distribution and orientation. Conclusions SHG microscopy allowed high resolution detection of focal tendon abnormalities affecting the fibrillar collagen matrix. With ongoing

  4. Second harmonic generation analysis of early Achilles tendinosis in response to in vivo mechanical loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tenocytes have been implicated in the development of tendinosis, a chronic condition commonly seen in musculoskeletal overuse syndromes. However, the relation between abnormal tenocyte morphology and early changes in the fibrillar collagen matrix has not been closely examined in vivo. Second harmonic generation (SHG microscopy is a recently developed technique which allows examination of fibrillar collagen structures with a high degree of specificity and resolution. The goal of this study was to examine the potential utility of SHG and multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF microscopy in understanding the relation between tenocytes and their surrounding collagenous matrix in early tendon overuse lesions. Methods Histological preparations of tendon were prepared from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to an Achilles tendon loading protocol for 12 weeks (Rat-A-PED, or from sedentary age-matched cage controls. Second harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence were performed simultaneously on these tissue sections in at least three different areas. Results SHG microscopy revealed an association between abnormal tenocyte morphology and morphological changes in the fibrillar collagen matrix of mechanically loaded Achilles tendons. Collagen density and organization was significantly reduced in focal micro-regions of mechanically loaded tendons. These pathological changes occurred specifically in association with altered tenocyte morphology. Normal tendons displayed a regular distribution of fibre bundles, and the average size of these bundles as determined by Gaussian analysis was 0.47 μm ± 0.02. In comparison, fibre bundle measures from tendon regions in the vicinity of abnormal tenocytes could not be quantified due to a reduction in their regularity of distribution and orientation. Conclusions SHG microscopy allowed high resolution detection of focal tendon abnormalities affecting the fibrillar collagen

  5. Direct measurement of effective indices of guided modes in LiNbO(3) waveguides using the Cerenkov second harmonic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, N A; Robinson, W C

    1987-06-01

    Second-harmonic generation in the form of Cerenkov radiation has been used to make direct, contact-free measurements of the effective indices of guided modes in LiNbO(3) channel waveguides. X-cut substrates were used, and channels oriented along the y axis were formed by either proton exchange or titanium indiffusion. For end-fire TE excitation, the Cerenkov harmonic radiates forward at a shallow angle into the substrate, leaves the output facet of the substrate, and appears as bright bands in the far field. These bands are seen to form a one-to-one correspondence with the m lines that are due to guided modes when a prism coupler is simultaneously clamped to the sample surface. The effective indices of the guided modes can be obtained by a simple calculation that involves only the substrate index and the angle at which the Cerenkov harmonic is radiated into the substrate. This technique permits effective index measurements of cladded waveguides where prism coupler measurements cannot be made. Examples of the technique in which index oil is used as a guide overlayer are given.

  6. Study of all-polymer-based waveguide resonant gratings and their applications for optimization of second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Luong, Mai; Thanh Ngan Nguyen, Thi; Thanh Nguyen, Chi; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Diep Lai, Ngoc

    2015-09-01

    We investigated theoretically and experimentally the optical properties of all-polymer-based one-dimensional waveguide resonant gratings (WRGs) and their important applications for the optimization of second-harmonic generation (SHG). We first studied the basic theory of the resonant modes of a simple grating-coupled waveguide realized on a material possessing a low refractive index contrast. The optical properties of any WRG were numerically simulated by using the finite-difference time domain method, performed by commercial Lumerical software. The polymer-based surface relief gratings were fabricated on azopolymer Disperse Red 1-Poly-Methyl-Methacrylate (DR1-PMMA) thin films by using the two-beam interference method and mass transport effect. Their experimental reflection spectra measured as a function of incident light wavelength are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. We then demonstrated a first application of such a polymer-based WRG for nonlinear optics. Thanks to the strong local electrical field in the WRG, due to a guided-mode resonance condition, the SHG signal of an infrared light beam was strongly enhanced by a factor of 25 as compared to the result obtained in a sample without a grating.

  7. Characterization of quasi-phase-matching gratings in quadratic media through double-pass second-harmonic power measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Baldi, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    A new scheme for nondestructive characterization of quasi-phase-matching grating structures and temperature gradients through inverse Fourier theory using second-harmonic-generation experiments is proposed. By inserting a mirror to reflect the signals back through the sample, we show how it is po......A new scheme for nondestructive characterization of quasi-phase-matching grating structures and temperature gradients through inverse Fourier theory using second-harmonic-generation experiments is proposed. By inserting a mirror to reflect the signals back through the sample, we show how...... it is possible to retrieve the relevant information by measuring only the generated second-harmonic power, avoiding more complicated phase measurements. The potential of the scheme is emphasized through theoretical and numerical investigations in the case of periodically poled lithium niobate bulk crystals....

  8. Effect of Precipitation Morphology on the Second Harmonic Generation of Ultrasonic Wave During Tempering in P92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Minati Kumari; Swaminathan, J.; Bandyopadhyay, Nil Ratan; Sagar, Sarmistha Palit

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the generation of second harmonic of ultrasound wave and the variation of its amplitude with the precipitation morphology in P92 steel. P92 steel samples were normalized at 1075 °C and tempered in a range of 715-835 °C at a step of 30 °C to study the effect of nucleation and growth of precipitates on the amplitude of second harmonic of ultrasound wave. It has been observed that the non linear ultrasonic (NLU) parameter which is defined as the ratio of the amplitude of second harmonic to the square of the amplitude of the transmitted signal frequency increases with the nucleation and growth of precipitates. Whereas when the growth of precipitate is restricted and fine secondary precipitates start to nucleate, it decreases. The maximum of NLU parameter corresponds to the optimum tempering temperature for the studied material.

  9. Three-dimensional mapping of single gold nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous transparent matrix using optical second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butet, Jérémy; Bachelier, Guillaume; Duboisset, Julien; Bertorelle, Franck; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Jonin, Christian; Benichou, Emmanuel; Brevet, Pierre-François

    2010-10-11

    We report the three-dimensional mapping of 150 nm gold metallic nanoparticles dispersed in a homogeneous transparent polyacrylamide matrix using second-harmonic generation. We demonstrate that the position of single nanoparticles can be well defined using only one incident fundamental beam and the harmonic photon detection performed at right angle. The fundamental laser beam properties are determined using its spatial autocorrelation function and used to prove that single nanoparticles are observed. Polarization resolved measurements are also performed allowing for a clear separation of the second-harmonic response of the single gold metallic nanoparticles from that of aggregates of such nanoparticles.

  10. Efficient second-harmonic generation and modal dispersion effects in orientation-patterned GaAs waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oron, M B; Pearl, S; Blau, P; Shusterman, S

    2010-08-15

    Efficient second-harmonic conversion of 4 microm radiation was demonstrated in orientation-patterned GaAs (OPGaAs) waveguides (WGs). An experimentally corrected phase-matching curve for second harmonic generation (SHG) in OPGaAs WGs is presented. Influence of WG modes on the SHG process was studied. Two distinct types of SHG in the waveguides were identified and related to the TE and TM modes. Each type has its own dependence on pump polarization. The 21% W(-1) normalized conversion efficiency is within a factor of 0.75 from the predicted value for an ideal WG.

  11. Internalization of fluorescent dextrans in the submandibular salivary glands of live animals: a study combining intravital two-photon microscopy and second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    Here we show that a combination of two-photon microscopy and second harmonic generation can be successfully used to study endocytosis in the submandibular salivary glands of live animals. First, we have characterized the threedimensional structure of the acini and the ducts forming the parenchyma of the excised glands by exciting various endogenous molecules, which highlight the shape of the cells and various components of the extracellular matrix. Next, by time-lapse imaging we show the dynamic distribution of fluorescent probes injected systemically. This was achieved by using a custom-made holder aimed to reduce the motion artifacts associated with the heartbeat and the respiration in the live animals. Finally, we show that fluorescent dextrans are internalized primarily by the supporting cells in the salivary glands, a characteristic shared by other secretory organs such as the pancreas.

  12. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  13. Investigation of Non-linear Chirp Coding for Improved Second Harmonic Pulse Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Ali, Muhammad Asim; Shaikh, Muhammad Mujtaba; Freear, Steven

    2017-08-01

    Non-linear frequency-modulated (NLFM) chirp coding was investigated to improve the pulse compression of the second harmonic chirp signal by reducing the range side lobe level. The problem of spectral overlap between the fundamental component and second harmonic component (SHC) was also investigated. Therefore, two methods were proposed: method I for the non-overlap condition and method II with the pulse inversion technique for the overlap harmonic condition. In both methods, the performance of the NLFM chirp was compared with that of the reference LFM chirp signals. Experiments were performed using a 2.25 MHz transducer mounted coaxially at a distance of 5 cm with a 1 mm hydrophone in a water tank, and the peak negative pressure of 300 kPa was set at the receiver. Both simulations and experimental results revealed that the peak side lobe level (PSL) of the compressed SHC of the NLFM chirp was improved by at least 13 dB in method I and 5 dB in method II when compared with the PSL of LFM chirps. Similarly, the integrated side lobe level (ISL) of the compressed SHC of the NLFM chirp was improved by at least 8 dB when compared with the ISL of LFM chirps. In both methods, the axial main lobe width of the compressed NLFM chirp was comparable to that of the LFM signals. The signal-to-noise ratio of the SHC of NLFM was improved by as much as 0.8 dB, when compared with the SHC of the LFM signal having the same energy level. The results also revealed the robustness of the NLFM chirp under a frequency-dependent attenuation of 0.5 dB/cm·MHz up to a penetration depth of 5 cm and a Doppler shift up to 12 kHz. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement in the structure quality of ZnO nanorods by diluted Co dopants: Analyses via optical second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chung-Wei; Hsiao, Chih-Hung [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shoou-Jinn [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Brahma, Sanjaya; Chang, Feng Ming [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Wang, Peng Han [Department of Photonics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lo, Kuang-Yao, E-mail: kuanglo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-28

    We report a systematic study about the effect of cobalt concentration in the growth solution over the crystallization, growth, and optical properties of hydrothermally synthesized Zn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O [0 ≤ x ≤ 0.40, x is the weight (wt.) % of Co in the growth solution] nanorods. Dilute Co concentration of 1 wt. % in the growth solution enhances the bulk crystal quality of ZnO nanorods, and high wt. % leads to distortion in the ZnO lattice that depresses the crystallization, growth as well as the surface structure quality of ZnO. Although, Co concentration in the growth solution varies from 1 to 40 wt. %, the real doping concentration is limited to 0.28 at. % that is due to the low growth temperature of 80 °C. The enhancement in the crystal quality of ZnO nanorods at dilute Co concentration in the solution is due to the strain relaxation that is significantly higher for ZnO nanorods prepared without, and with high wt. % of Co in the growth solution. Second harmonic generation is used to investigate the net dipole distribution from these coatings, which provides detailed information about bulk and surface structure quality of ZnO nanorods at the same time. High quality ZnO nanorods are fabricated by a low-temperature (80 °C) hydrothermal synthesis method, and no post synthesis treatment is needed for further crystallization. Therefore, this method is advantageous for the growth of high quality ZnO coatings on plastic substrates that may lead toward its application in flexible electronics.

  15. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging and Fourier Transform Spectral Analysis Reveal Damage in Fatigue-Loaded Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, David T.; Sereysky, Jedd B.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Laudier, Damien M.; Huq, Rumana; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional histologic methods provide valuable information regarding the physical nature of damage in fatigue-loaded tendons, limited to thin, two-dimensional sections. We introduce an imaging method that characterizes tendon microstructure three-dimensionally and develop quantitative, spatial measures of damage formation within tendons. Rat patellar tendons were fatigue loaded in vivo to low, moderate, and high damage levels. Tendon microstructure was characterized using multiphoton microscopy by capturing second harmonic generation signals. Image stacks were analyzed using Fourier transform-derived computations to assess frequency-based properties of damage. Results showed 3D microstructure with progressively increased density and variety of damage patterns, characterized by kinked deformations at low, fiber dissociation at moderate, and fiber thinning and out-of-plane discontinuities at high damage levels. Image analysis generated radial distributions of power spectral gradients, establishing a “fingerprint” of tendon damage. Additionally, matrix damage was mapped using local, discretized orientation vectors. The frequency distribution of vector angles, a measure of damage content, differed from one damage level to the next. This study established an objective 3D imaging and analysis method for tendon microstructure, which characterizes directionality and anisotropy of the tendon microstructure and quantitative measures of damage that will advance investigations of the microstructural basis of degradation that precedes overuse injuries. PMID:20232150

  16. Second harmonic generation property of monolayer TMDCs and its potential application in producing terahertz radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Wei, Dongshan; Huang, Xuri

    2017-12-28

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) properties in two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have aroused great interest. However, until now SHG for TMDC monolayer alloys is seldom investigated. Meanwhile, there is considerable controversy over the static SHG coefficients of monolayer MoS2. The feasibility to produce terahertz (THz) radiation via SHG in pure and alloyed TMDCs has never been reported. We first calculate the SHG coefficients of monolayer MoS2, MoSe2, and MoS2(1-x)Se2x using the independent particle approximation plus scissors correction. We then simulate their THz absorption by applying density function perturbation theory plus the Lorentzian line and try to calculate their zero-frequency THz refractive index and birefringence. The physical property of MoS2(1-x)Se2x alloys is simulated by considering various combinations. Results indicate that monolayer MoS2, MoSe2, and MoS2(1-x)Se2x possess large static SHG coefficients and THz birefringence and display low absorption over broadband THz frequencies. Therefore, they have applications in producing THz radiation via SHG. This study demonstrates that THz radiation can be attained in a large number of monolayers and few-layers and will extend applications of 2D materials. Moreover, it is possible to identify the magnitude of static coefficients of single-layer MoS2 by measuring THz intensities.

  17. Second harmonic generation microscopy differentiates collagen type I and type III in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kayra, Damian; Elliott, W. Mark; Hogg, James C.; Abraham, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The structural remodeling of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral lung region is an important feature in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiphoton microscopy is capable of inducing specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal from non-centrosymmetric structural proteins such as fibrillar collagens. In this study, SHG microscopy was used to examine structural remodeling of the fibrillar collagens in human lungs undergoing emphysematous destruction (n=2). The SHG signals originating from these diseased lung thin sections from base to apex (n=16) were captured simultaneously in both forward and backward directions. We found that the SHG images detected in the forward direction showed well-developed and well-structured thick collagen fibers while the SHG images detected in the backward direction showed striking different morphological features which included the diffused pattern of forward detected structures plus other forms of collagen structures. Comparison of these images with the wellestablished immunohistochemical staining indicated that the structures detected in the forward direction are primarily the thick collagen type I fibers and the structures identified in the backward direction are diffusive structures of forward detected collagen type I plus collagen type III. In conclusion, we here demonstrate the feasibility of SHG microscopy in differentiating fibrillar collagen subtypes and understanding their remodeling in diseased lung tissues.

  18. Diffusion voltage in polymer light emitting diodes measured with electric field induced second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, P.K.; Rafaelsen, J.; Pedersen, T.G.; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstraede 103, 9220 Aalborg East (Denmark)

    2005-12-01

    We apply electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) and demonstrate the ability to determine the diffusion voltage in PLED devices. The EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field, which is the sum of the diffusion voltage and the applied voltage. By minimizing the EFISH-signal as a function of the applied voltage, the diffusion voltage is determined by measuring the applied voltage that cancels out the diffusion voltage. The PLEDs are fabricated with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the hole injecting contact and two different electron injecting contacts, namely aluminum and calcium. The diffusion voltage originates from the rearranged charges caused by the difference in Fermi levels in the materials in the PLEDs. Different contacts will thus cause different diffusion voltages. We demonstrate here that the EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field in both reverse and forward bias, and discuss the dependence on contact materials. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Automated biphasic morphological assessment of hepatitis B-related liver fibrosis using second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong-Hong; Chen, Tse-Ching; Teng, Xiao; Liang, Kung-Hao; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2015-08-01

    Liver fibrosis assessment by biopsy and conventional staining scores is based on histopathological criteria. Variations in sample preparation and the use of semi-quantitative histopathological methods commonly result in discrepancies between medical centers. Thus, minor changes in liver fibrosis might be overlooked in multi-center clinical trials, leading to statistically non-significant data. Here, we developed a computer-assisted, fully automated, staining-free method for hepatitis B-related liver fibrosis assessment. In total, 175 liver biopsies were divided into training (n = 105) and verification (n = 70) cohorts. Collagen was observed using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy without prior staining, and hepatocyte morphology was recorded using two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy. The training cohort was utilized to establish a quantification algorithm. Eleven of 19 computer-recognizable SHG/TPEF microscopic morphological features were significantly correlated with the ISHAK fibrosis stages (P 0.82 for liver cirrhosis detection. Since no subjective gradings are needed, interobserver discrepancies could be avoided using this fully automated method.

  20. Infrared-based least-invasive third and second harmonic generation imaging of ocular tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Yu; Yu, Han-Chieh; Wang, I.-Jong; Sun, Chi-kuang

    2009-02-01

    Cornea functions as an outermost lens and plays an important role in vision. For cornea diagnosis and treatment, a microscopic imaging system with cellular resolution and high eye safety is strongly desired. Recently, the cell morphology of corneal epithelium and endothelium can be revealed by confocal or two-photon fluorescence microscopy, while the collagen fibers in the corneal stroma can be shown by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. However, in most of the developed imaging tools, visible to near-infrared light sources were used. To increase the eye safety, a light source with longer wavelength would be needed. In this presentation, a study using an infrared laser based nonlinear microscopy to investigate the ocular tissues of a mouse eye will be demonstrated. Since most of autofluorescence was suppressed under infrared excitation, third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy was used to reveal the cellular morphology and ~700μm penetrability could be achieved. Combining SHG with THG, in an intact mouse eye, not only the cornea but also the upper half of the lens could be observed with cellular resolution. Our study indicated that infrared-based SHG and THG microscopy could provide a useful in vivo investigating tool for ophthalmology.

  1. Second Harmonic Generation Reveals Subtle Fibrosis Differences in Adult and Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhao, Jing-Min; Rao, Hui-Ying; Yu, Wei-Miao; Zhang, Wei; Theise, Neil D; Wee, Aileen; Wei, Lai

    2017-11-20

    Investigate subtle fibrosis similarities and differences in adult and pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) using second harmonic generation (SHG). SHG/two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging quantified 100 collagen parameters and determined qFibrosis values by using the nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network (CRN) scoring system in 62 adult and 36 pediatric NAFLD liver specimens. Six distinct parameters identified differences among the NASH CRN stages with high accuracy (area under the curve, 0835-0.982 vs 0.885-0.981, adult and pediatric). All portal region parameters showed similar changes across early stages 0, 1C, and 2, in both groups. Parameter values decreased in adults with progression from stage 1A/B to 2 in the central vein region. In children, aggregated collagen parameters decreased, but nearly all distributed collagen parameters increased from stage 1A/B to 2. SHG analysis accurately reproduces NASH CRN staging in NAFLD, as well as reveals differences and similarities between adult and pediatric collagen deposition not captured by currently available quantitative methods.

  2. Imaging corneal crosslinking by autofluorescence 2-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Philipp; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Hüttmann, Gereon; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the use of 2-photon microscopy (TPM), which excites tissue autofluorescence, in detecting and calculating the grade of collagen corneal crosslinks, which are not visible through the slitlamp and in vivo confocal microscopy. Departments of Ophthalmology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, and University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany. Experimental study. Corneas of rabbits were treated with different crosslinking (CXL) protocols. Two weeks after treatment, the corneas were evaluated in vivo by confocal microscopy. Eyes were enucleated and TPM was performed at 710 nm and 826 nm excitation wavelengths to detect tissue autofluorescence, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime measurements (FLIM). Eyes were then fixed and analyzed by histology. Crosslinking following the standard protocol generated a strong autofluorescence signal in the stroma that was detected by TPM. This signal was weakly present in the control specimens, and a sharp transition zone between the peripheral zone and the CXL zone was seen. On FLIM, an increase in corneal crosslinks was measured when the standard protocol was used. Two-photon microscopy, a noninvasive method, was able to detect the effects of therapeutic CXL and measure the grade of CXL. In addition to postoperative treatment control, the technique has possibilities for use in online dosimetry during 2-photon triggered CXL. Copyright © 2010 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Second-harmonic generation scattering directionality predicts tumor cell motility in collagen gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Van Hove, Amy; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Perry, Seth W.; Brown, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) allows for the analysis of tumor collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. SHG directionality, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward-propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by collagen fibril diameter, spacing, and disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors progress, these parameters evolve, producing concurrent changes in F/B. It has been recently shown that the F/B of highly metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tumors is significantly different from less metastatic tumors. This suggests a possible relationship between the microstructure of collagen, as measured by the F/B, and the ability of tumor cells to locomote through that collagen. Utilizing in vitro collagen gels of different F/B ratios, we explored the relationship between collagen microstructure and motility of tumor cells in a “clean” environment, free of the myriad cells, and signals found in in vivo. We found a significant relationship between F/B and the total distance traveled by the tumor cell, as well as both the average and maximum velocities of the cells. Consequently, one possible mechanism underlying the observed relationship between tumor F/B and metastatic output in IDC patient samples is a direct influence of collagen structure on tumor cell motility. PMID:25625899

  4. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  5. Synchronous-digitization for Video Rate Polarization Modulated Beam Scanning Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shane Z; DeWalt, Emma L; Schmitt, Paul D; Muir, Ryan M; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-03-09

    Fast beam-scanning non-linear optical microscopy, coupled with fast (8 MHz) polarization modulation and analytical modeling have enabled simultaneous nonlinear optical Stokes ellipsometry (NOSE) and linear Stokes ellipsometry imaging at video rate (15 Hz). NOSE enables recovery of the complex-valued Jones tensor that describes the polarization-dependent observables, in contrast to polarimetry, in which the polarization stated of the exciting beam is recorded. Each data acquisition consists of 30 images (10 for each detector, with three detectors operating in parallel), each of which corresponds to polarization-dependent results. Processing of this image set by linear fitting contracts down each set of 10 images to a set of 5 parameters for each detector in second harmonic generation (SHG) and three parameters for the transmittance of the fundamental laser beam. Using these parameters, it is possible to recover the Jones tensor elements of the sample at video rate. Video rate imaging is enabled by performing synchronous digitization (SD), in which a PCIe digital oscilloscope card is synchronized to the laser (the laser is the master clock.) Fast polarization modulation was achieved by modulating an electro-optic modulator synchronously with the laser and digitizer, with a simple sine-wave at 1/10th the period of the laser, producing a repeating pattern of 10 polarization states. This approach was validated using Z-cut quartz, and NOSE microscopy was performed for micro-crystals of naproxen.

  6. Second harmonic generation for collagen I characterization in rectal cancer patients with and without preoperative radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockhuys, Stéphanie; Agarwal, Nisha Rani; Hildesjö, Camilla; Jarlsfelt, Ingvar; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2017-10-01

    Rectal cancer is treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) to downstage the tumor, reduce local recurrence, and improve patient survival. Still, the treatment outcome varies significantly and new biomarkers are desired. Collagen I (Col-I) is a potential biomarker, which can be visualized label-free by second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, we used SHG to identify Col-I changes induced by RT in surgical tissue, with the aim to evaluate the clinical significance of RT-induced Col-I changes. First, we established a procedure for quantitative evaluation of Col-I by SHG in CDX2-stained tissue sections. Next, we evaluated Col-I properties in material from 31 non-RT and 29 RT rectal cancer patients. We discovered that the Col-I intensity and anisotropy were higher in the tumor invasive margin than in the inner tumor and normal mucosa, and RT increased and decreased the intensity in inner tumor and normal mucosa, respectively. Furthermore, higher Col-I intensity in the inner tumor was related to increased distant recurrence in the non-RT group but to longer survival in the RT group. In conclusion, we present a new application of SHG for quantitative analysis of Col-I in surgical material, and the first data suggest Col-I intensity as a putative prognostic biomarker in rectal cancer.

  7. Imaging Collagen in Scar Tissue: Developments in Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaço-Guidolin, Leila; Rosin, Nicole L; Hackett, Tillie-Louise

    2017-08-15

    The ability to respond to injury with tissue repair is a fundamental property of all multicellular organisms. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of fibrillar collagens as well as a number of other components is dis-regulated during repair in many organs. In many tissues, scaring results when the balance is lost between ECM synthesis and degradation. Investigating what disrupts this balance and what effect this can have on tissue function remains an active area of research. Recent advances in the imaging of fibrillar collagen using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging have proven useful in enhancing our understanding of the supramolecular changes that occur during scar formation and disease progression. Here, we review the physical properties of SHG, and the current nonlinear optical microscopy imaging (NLOM) systems that are used for SHG imaging. We provide an extensive review of studies that have used SHG in skin, lung, cardiovascular, tendon and ligaments, and eye tissue to understand alterations in fibrillar collagens in scar tissue. Lastly, we review the current methods of image analysis that are used to extract important information about the role of fibrillar collagens in scar formation.

  8. Nonlinear Metasurface for Simultaneous Control of Spin and Orbital Angular Momentum in Second Harmonic Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guixin; Wu, Lin; Li, King F; Chen, Shumei; Schlickriede, Christian; Xu, Zhengji; Huang, Siya; Li, Wendi; Liu, Yanjun; Pun, Edwin Y B; Zentgraf, Thomas; Cheah, Kok W; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Shuang

    2017-12-13

    The spin and orbital angular momentum (SAM and OAM) of light is providing a new gateway toward high capacity and robust optical communications. While the generation of light with angular momentum is well studied in linear optics, its further integration into nonlinear optical devices will open new avenues for increasing the capacity of optical communications through additional information channels at new frequencies. However, it has been challenging to manipulate the both SAM and OAM of nonlinear signals in harmonic generation processes with conventional nonlinear materials. Here, we report the generation of spin-controlled OAM of light in harmonic generations by using ultrathin photonic metasurfaces. The spin manipulation of OAM mode of harmonic waves is experimentally verified by using second harmonic generation (SHG) from gold meta-atom with 3-fold rotational symmetry. By introducing nonlinear phase singularity into the metasurface devices, we successfully generate and measure the topological charges of spin-controlled OAM mode of SHG through an on-chip metasurface interferometer. The nonlinear photonic metasurface proposed in this work not only opens new avenues for manipulating the OAM of nonlinear optical signals but also benefits the understanding of the nonlinear spin-orbit interaction of light in nanoscale devices.

  9. Second-harmonic generation scattering directionality predicts tumor cell motility in collagen gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Van Hove, Amy; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Perry, Seth W.; Brown, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) allows for the analysis of tumor collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. SHG directionality, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward-propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by collagen fibril diameter, spacing, and disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors progress, these parameters evolve, producing concurrent changes in F/B. It has been recently shown that the F/B of highly metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tumors is significantly different from less metastatic tumors. This suggests a possible relationship between the microstructure of collagen, as measured by the F/B, and the ability of tumor cells to locomote through that collagen. Utilizing in vitro collagen gels of different F/B ratios, we explored the relationship between collagen microstructure and motility of tumor cells in a "clean" environment, free of the myriad cells, and signals found in in vivo. We found a significant relationship between F/B and the total distance traveled by the tumor cell, as well as both the average and maximum velocities of the cells. Consequently, one possible mechanism underlying the observed relationship between tumor F/B and metastatic output in IDC patient samples is a direct influence of collagen structure on tumor cell motility.

  10. Fully automated muscle quality assessment by Gabor filtering of second harmonic generation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesen, Rik; Smolders, Sophie; Vega, José Manolo de Hoyos; Eijnde, Bert O.; Hansen, Dominique; Ameloot, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Although structural changes on the sarcomere level of skeletal muscle are known to occur due to various pathologies, rigorous studies of the reduced sarcomere quality remain scarce. This can possibly be explained by the lack of an objective tool for analyzing and comparing sarcomere images across biological conditions. Recent developments in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy and increasing insight into the interpretation of sarcomere SHG intensity profiles have made SHG microscopy a valuable tool to study microstructural properties of sarcomeres. Typically, sarcomere integrity is analyzed by fitting a set of manually selected, one-dimensional SHG intensity profiles with a supramolecular SHG model. To circumvent this tedious manual selection step, we developed a fully automated image analysis procedure to map the sarcomere disorder for the entire image at once. The algorithm relies on a single-frequency wavelet-based Gabor approach and includes a newly developed normalization procedure allowing for unambiguous data interpretation. The method was validated by showing the correlation between the sarcomere disorder, quantified by the M-band size obtained from manually selected profiles, and the normalized Gabor value ranging from 0 to 1 for decreasing disorder. Finally, to elucidate the applicability of our newly developed protocol, Gabor analysis was used to study the effect of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis on the sarcomere regularity. We believe that the technique developed in this work holds great promise for high-throughput, unbiased, and automated image analysis to study sarcomere integrity by SHG microscopy.

  11. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p wound repair following cartilage injury.

  12. Detection of the Second Harmonic of Decay-less Kink Oscillations in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckenfield, T.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2018-02-01

    EUV observations of a multi-thermal coronal loop, taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, which exhibits decay-less kink oscillations are presented. The data cube of the quiet-Sun coronal loop was passed through a motion magnification algorithm to accentuate transverse oscillations. Time–distance maps are made from multiple slits evenly spaced along the loop axis and oriented orthogonal to the loop axis. Displacements of the intensity peak are tracked to generate time series of the loop displacement. Fourier analysis on the time series shows the presence of two periods within the loop: {P}1={10.3}-1.7+1.5 minutes and {P}2={7.4}-1.3+1.1 minutes. The longer period component is greatest in amplitude at the apex and remains in phase throughout the loop length. The shorter period component is strongest further down from the apex on both legs and displays an anti-phase behavior between the two loop legs. We interpret these results as the coexistence of the fundamental and second harmonics of the standing kink mode within the loop in the decay-less oscillation regime. An illustration of seismological application using the ratio P 1/2P 2 ∼ 0.7 to estimate the density scale height is presented. The existence of multiple harmonics has implications for understanding the driving and damping mechanisms for decay-less oscillations and adds credence to their interpretation as standing kink mode oscillations.

  13. Characterization of wavefront errors in mouse cranial bone using second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Kner, Peter; Mortensen, Luke J.

    2017-03-01

    Optical aberrations significantly affect the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of deep tissue microscopy. As multiphoton microscopy is applied deeper into tissue, the loss of resolution and signal due to propagation of light in a medium with heterogeneous refractive index becomes more serious. Efforts in imaging through the intact skull of mice cannot typically reach past the bone marrow (˜150 μm of depth) and have limited resolution and penetration depth. Mechanical bone thinning or optical ablation of bone enables deeper imaging, but these methods are highly invasive and may impact tissue biology. Adaptive optics is a promising noninvasive alternative for restoring optical resolution. We characterize the aberrations present in bone using second-harmonic generation imaging of collagen. We simulate light propagation through highly scattering bone and evaluate the effect of aberrations on the point spread function. We then calculate the wavefront and expand it in Zernike orthogonal polynomials to determine the strength of different optical aberrations. We further compare the corrected wavefront and the residual wavefront error, and suggest a correction element with high number of elements or multiconjugate wavefront correction for this highly scattering environment.

  14. Synchronous-digitization for video rate polarization modulated beam scanning second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Schmitt, Paul D.; Muir, Ryan D.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Fast beam-scanning non-linear optical microscopy, coupled with fast (8 MHz) polarization modulation and analytical modeling have enabled simultaneous nonlinear optical Stokes ellipsometry (NOSE) and linear Stokes ellipsometry imaging at video rate (15 Hz). NOSE enables recovery of the complex-valued Jones tensor that describes the polarization-dependent observables, in contrast to polarimetry, in which the polarization stated of the exciting beam is recorded. Each data acquisition consists of 30 images (10 for each detector, with three detectors operating in parallel), each of which corresponds to polarization-dependent results. Processing of this image set by linear fitting contracts down each set of 10 images to a set of 5 parameters for each detector in second harmonic generation (SHG) and three parameters for the transmittance of the fundamental laser beam. Using these parameters, it is possible to recover the Jones tensor elements of the sample at video rate. Video rate imaging is enabled by performing synchronous digitization (SD), in which a PCIe digital oscilloscope card is synchronized to the laser (the laser is the master clock.) Fast polarization modulation was achieved by modulating an electro-optic modulator synchronously with the laser and digitizer, with a simple sine-wave at 1/10th the period of the laser, producing a repeating pattern of 10 polarization states. This approach was validated using Z-cut quartz, and NOSE microscopy was performed for micro-crystals of naproxen.

  15. 2D-MPI System using second harmonic with HTS-SQUID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Sanada, Y.; Ariyoshi, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is an imaging technique, with high sensitivity and high speed imaging, utilizing non-linear magnetization response for the detection of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP). MPI measures the magnetization change in the MNP under the AC magnetic field. Since the signal of the magnetization change is much smaller than the signal generated by the AC magnetic field, the signal response at the fundamental frequency cannot be used. Accordingly, it is the third harmonic of the response that is generally measured. However this method has disadvantages that the power of the AC magnetic field is large and as a result the system increased in size. In this study, we investigated the 2D imaging using a second harmonic, which can be theoretically obtained with a greater signal than in the case of the third harmonic. Moreover, an HTS-SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) magnetometer was employed in the study to enhance the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). A 2D-MPI system, which enables an imaging by scanning a DC magnetic field under a gradient magnetic field, was constructed. As a result, PSNR was increased by 1.5 times using SQUID with a Flux Transformer.

  16. The Interplay of Symmetry and Scattering Phase in Second Harmonic Generation from Gold Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Rahmani, Mohsen; Giannini, Vincenzo; Aouani, Heykel; Sidiropoulos, Themistoklis P H; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-08-10

    Nonlinear phenomena are central to modern photonics but, being inherently weak, typically require gradual accumulation over several millimeters. For example, second harmonic generation (SHG) is typically achieved in thick transparent nonlinear crystals by phase-matching energy exchange between light at initial, ω, and final, 2ω, frequencies. Recently, metamaterials imbued with artificial nonlinearity from their constituent nanoantennas have generated excitement by opening the possibility of wavelength-scale nonlinear optics. However, the selection rules of SHG typically prevent dipole emission from simple nanoantennas, which has led to much discussion concerning the best geometries, for example, those breaking centro-symmetry or incorporating resonances at multiple harmonics. In this work, we explore the use of both nanoantenna symmetry and multiple harmonics to control the strength, polarization and radiation pattern of SHG from a variety of antenna configurations incorporating simple resonant elements tuned to light at both ω and 2ω. We use a microscopic description of the scattering strength and phases of these constituent particles, determined by their relative positions, to accurately predict the SHG radiation observed in our experiments. We find that the 2ω particles radiate dipolar SHG by near-field coupling to the ω particle, which radiates SHG as a quadrupole. Consequently, strong linearly polarized dipolar SHG is only possible for noncentro-symmetric antennas that also minimize interference between their dipolar and quadrupolar responses. Metamaterials with such intra-antenna phase and polarization control could enable compact nonlinear photonic nanotechnologies.

  17. Studying the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to enhance healing of femur fractures using polarimetric second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golaraei, Ahmad; Raja, Vaishnavi; Akens, Margarete K.; Wilson, Brian C.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2017-07-01

    Linear polarization-in, polarization-out second-harmonic generation microscopy was used to study the effect of Photodynamic therapy treatment on enhancing the healing of femur fracture by investigating the ultrastructure of collagen as a major component of bone matrix.

  18. [Structural analysis of normal corneas and diseased corneas by applying second harmonic generation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    We have established a second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy system for imaging of the human cornea with a mode-locked femtosecond laser and a laser confocal microscope. This SHG microscopy system has allowed us to scan corneal tissue noninvasively ex vivo and to obtain three-dimensional images of corneal collagen lamellae. Such three-dimensional imaging of the normal anterior cornea revealed that collagen lamellae at the anterior stroma are inter-woven and adhere to Bowman membrane with these adherent lamellae being designated "sutural lamellae." Sutural lamellae adhere to Bowman membrane at an angle of approximately 19 degrees, whereas the angle of lamellae in the mid-stroma relative to Bowman membrane is smaller. We hypothesize that the structural unit consisting of both Bowman membrane and the sutural lamellae contributes to the rigidity and anterior curvature of the cornea. SHG imaging of keratoconic corneas revealed an either abnormal or a total lack of structure of the sutural lamellae, suggesting that this abnormality might be related to that of the corneal anterior curvature in such corneas. Furthermore, SHG imaging of corneas affected by stromal edema showed that the structure of the sutural lamellae was maintained, although abnormal collagen signals both above and below Bowman membrane were detected in corneas affected by clinical stromal edema for more than 12 months. SHG imaging of the structure of collagen lamellae in normal and diseased corneas thus has the potential to provide insight both into the mechanism for maintenance of corneal curvature as well as into the pathophysiology of corneal diseases.

  19. Abnormalities of stromal structure in the bullous keratopathy cornea identified by second harmonic generation imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Yamada, Norihiro; Zhang, Xu; Morita, Yukiko; Yamada, Naoyuki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Takahara, Atsushi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2012-07-27

    To identify structural alterations in collagen lamellae and the transdifferentiation of keratocytes into myofibroblasts in the corneal stroma of bullous keratopathy (BK) patients and to examine the relation of such changes to the duration of stromal edema or the underlying cause of BK. Six normal human corneas and 16 BK corneas were subjected to second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to allow three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of collagen lamellae. Expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) was examined by immunofluorescence analysis and conventional laser confocal microscopy. Collagen lamellae were interwoven at the anterior stroma and uniformly aligned at the posterior stroma, whereas αSMA was not detected throughout the entire stroma of the normal cornea. Nine (56%) and 7 (44%) of the 16 BK corneas showed abnormal collagen structure at the anterior and posterior stroma, respectively. Expression of αSMA was detected in the anterior or posterior stroma of 7 (44%) and 6 (38%) of the 16 BK corneas, respectively. Disorganization of collagen lamellae and myofibroblastic transdifferentiation were detected only in corneas with a duration of stromal edema of at least 12 months. Corneas with BK as a result of birth injury showed abnormal collagen structure at the posterior stroma, whereas those with BK resulting from laser iridotomy did not. Changes in the structure of the entire stroma were detected in BK corneas with a duration of stromal edema of at least 12 months, suggesting that such changes may be progressive. In addition, the underlying cause of BK may influence structural changes at the posterior stroma.

  20. Second-harmonic generation reveals a relationship between metastatic potential and collagen fiber structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Perry, Seth; Brown, Edward

    2014-02-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of collagen signals allows for the analysis of collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. The directionality of coherent SHG signals, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by fibril diameter, spacing, and order versus disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors interact with their microenvironment and metastasize, it causes changes in these parameters, and concurrent changes in the F/B ratio. Specifically, the F/B ratio of breast tumors that are highly metastatic to the lymph nodes is significantly higher than those in tumors with restricted lymph node involvement. We utilized in vitro analysis of tumor cell motility through collagen gels of different microstructures, and hence different F/B ratios, to explore the relationship between collagen microstructures and metastatic capabilities of the tumor. By manipulating environmental factors of fibrillogenesis and biochemical factors of fiber composition we created methods of varying the average F/B ratio of the gel, with significant changes in fiber structure occurring as a result of alterations in incubation temperature and increasing type III collagen presence. A migration assay was performed using simultaneous SHG and fluorescent imaging to measure average penetration depth of human tumor cells into the gels of significantly different F/B ratios, with preliminary data demonstrating that cells penetrate deeper into gels of higher F/B ratio caused by lower type III collagen concentration. Determining the role of collagen structure in tumor cell motility will aid in the future prediction metastatic capabilities of a primary tumor.

  1. Polarization Second Harmonic Generation Discriminates Between Fresh and Aged Starch-Based Adhesives Used in Cultural Heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psilodimitrakopoulos, Sotiris; Gavgiotaki, Evaggelia; Melessanaki, Kristallia; Tsafas, Vassilis; Filippidis, George

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we report that polarization second harmonic generation (PSHG) microscopy, commonly used in biomedical imaging, can quantitatively discriminate naturally aged from fresh starch-based glues used for conservation or restoration of paintings, works of art on paper, and books. Several samples of fresh and aged (7 years) flour and starch pastes were investigated by use of PSHG. In these types of adhesives, widely used in cultural heritage conservation, second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast originates primarily from the starch granules. It was found that in aged glues, the starch SHG effective orientation (SHG angle, θ) shifts to significantly higher values in comparison to the fresh granules. This shift is attributed to the different degree of granule hydration between fresh and aged adhesives. Thus noninvasive high-resolution nonlinear scattering can be employed to detect and quantify the degree of deterioration of restoration adhesives and to provide guidance toward future conservation treatments.

  2. Solar tidal variations of coefficients of second harmonic of gravitational potential of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandiz, Jose; Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    Variations of coefficients of the second harmonic of Mercury potential caused by the solar tides have been studied. In the paper we use analytical expressions for tidal variations of Stoks coefficients obtained for model of the elastic celestial body with concentric distributions of masses and elastic parameters (Love numbers) and their reduced form with using fundamental elastic parameter k2 of the Mercury. Taking into account the resonant properties of the Mercury motion variations of the Mercury potential coefficients we present in the form of Fourier series on the multiple of corresponding arguments of the Mercury orbital theory. Evaluations of the amplitudes and periods of observed variations of Mercury potential have been tabulated for base elastic model of the Mercury characterized by hypothetic elastic parameter (Love number) k2=0.37 (Dehant et al., 2005). Tidal variations of polar moment of inertia of the Mercury (due to tidal deformations) lead to remarkable variations of the Mercury rotation. Tidal variations of the Mercury axial rotation also have been determined and tabulated. From our results it follows that the tide periodic variations of gravitational coefficients of the Mercury in a few orders bigger then corresponding tidal variations of Earth's geopotential coefficients (Ferrandiz, Getino, 1993). Variations coefficients of the second harmonic of Mercury potential. These variations are determined by the known formulae for variations of coefficients of the second harmonic of geopotential (Ferrandiz, Getino, 1993). Here we present these formulae in some special form as applied to the considered problem about the Mercury tidal deformations: ( ) δJ2 = - 3Tα23-2, δC22 = T α21 - α22 -4, δS22 = T α1α2-2, δC21 = Tα1α3, δS21 = T α2α3. Here T = k2(M R3 -ma3 ) = 1.667 × 10-7 is a estimation of some conditional coefficient of tidal deformation of Mercury. m and Rare the mass and the mean radius of Mercury. Here we have used standard values of

  3. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37-42 GHz) and V/W-band (71- 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  4. Semiconductor Surface Characterization by Scanning Probe Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    potentiometry (STP)8 and ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM)9 which allow mapping of lateral surface potential and local subsurface Schottky...A.P.Fein. "Tunneling Spectroscopy of the Si(1 1 1)2xl Surface", Surf.Sci. 181, 295- 306, 1987. 8. P.Muralt, D.W.Pohl, "Scanning tunneling potentiometry

  5. In-situ second harmonic generation by cancer cell targeting ZnO nanocrystals to effect photodynamic action in subcellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bobo; Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Baev, Alexander; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Damasco, Jossana A; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shuangchun; Prasad, Paras N

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces the concept of in-situ upconversion of deep penetrating near infrared light via second harmonic generation from ZnO nanocrystals delivered into cells to effect photo activated therapies, such as photodynamic therapy, which usually require activation by visible light with limited penetration through biological tissues. We demonstrated this concept by subcellular activation of a photodynamic therapy drug, Chlorin e6, excited within its strong absorption Soret band by the second harmonic (SH) light, generated at 409 nm by ZnO nanocrystals, which were targeted to cancer cells and internalized through the folate-receptor mediated endocytosis. By a combination of theoretical modeling and experimental measurements, we show that SH light, generated in-situ by ZnO nanocrystals significantly contributes to activation of photosensitizer, leading to cell death through both apoptotic and necrotic pathways initiated in the cytoplasm. This targeted photodynamic action was studied using label-free Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering imaging of the treated cells to monitor changes in the distribution of native cellular proteins and lipids. We found that initiation of photodynamic therapy with upconverted light led to global reduction in the intracellular concentration of macromolecules, likely due to suppression of proteins and lipids synthesis, which could be considered as a real-time indicator of cellular damage from photodynamic treatment. In prospective applications this in-situ photon upconversion could be further extended using ZnO nanocrystals surface functionalized with a specific organelle targeting group, provided a powerful approach to identify and consequently maximize a cellular response to phototherapy, selectively initiated in a specific cellular organelle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface Plasmon Polaritons Probed with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Sierant, Aleksandra; Panas, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We report on an optical mirror for cold rubidium atoms based on a repulsive dipole potential created by means of a modified recordable digital versatile disc. Using the mirror, we have determined the absolute value of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) intensity, reaching 90 times the intensity...

  7. LLISSE: A Long Duration Venus Surface Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, T.; Hunter, G.; Rock, J.

    2017-11-01

    The Long Lived In-situ Solar System Explorer (LLISSE) project is developing prototypes of small Venus landers that are designed to transmit important science data from the Venus surface for > 60 days. The briefing provides a summary of the project .

  8. Elimination of Second-Harmonics in CMUTs using Square Pulse Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Hansen, Sebastian Molbech

    2016-01-01

    The harmonic imaging mode is today a fundamental part of ultrasound imaging; it is not only used for suppressing the grating lobe artifact, but also to reduce many other acoustical artifacts in the ultrasound image. A vital performance parameter for accepting CMUT probes as a clinical usable tran...

  9. Evaluation of Therapeutic Tissue Crosslinking (TXL) for Myopia Using Second Harmonic Generation Signal Microscopy in Rabbit Sclera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyablitskaya, Mariya; Takaoka, Anna; Munteanu, Emilia L.; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Second harmonic generation signals (SHG) are emitted preferentially from collagenous tissue structures and have been used to evaluate photochemically-induced (CXL) crosslinking changes in the cornea. Since therapeutic tissue crosslinking (TXL) using sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG) of the sclera is a potential treatment for high myopia, we explored the use of SHG microscopy to evaluate the effects. Methods Single sub-Tenon's (sT) injections (400 μL) using SMG (40–400 mM) were made at the equatorial 12 o'clock position of the right eye of cadaveric rabbit heads (n = 16 pairs). After 3.5 hours, confocal microscopy (CM) was performed using 860 nm two-photon excitation and 400 to 450 nm emission. Pixel density and fiber bundle “waviness” analyses were performed on the images. Crosslinking effects were confirmed using thermal denaturation (Tm) temperature. Comparison experiments with riboflavin photochemical crosslinking were done. Results Therapeutic tissue crosslinking localization studies indicated that crosslinking changes occurred at the site of injection and in adjacent sectors. Second harmonic generation signals revealed large fibrous collagenous bundled structures that displayed various degrees of waviness. Histogram analysis showed a nearly 6-fold signal increase in 400 mM SMG over 40 mM. This corresponded to a ΔTm = 13°C for 400 mM versus ΔTm = 4°C for 40 mM. Waviness analysis indicated increased fiber straightening as a result of SMG CXL. Conclusions Second harmonic generation signal intensity and fiber bundle waviness is altered by scleral tissue crosslinking using SMG. These changes provide insights into the macromolecular changes that are induced by therapeutic crosslinking technology and may provide a method to evaluate connective tissue protein changes induced by scleral crosslinking therapies. PMID:28055099

  10. Efficient second harmonic generation in beta-barium borate by a diffraction-limited copper vapor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R; Salimbeni, R; Toci, G; Vannini, M

    1992-05-20

    The diffraction-limited beam of a copper vapor laser employing a self-filtering unstable resonator was used to induce second harmonic generation in a nonlinear crystal of beta-barium borate. Despite the moderate emission characteristics of our small-scale laser device (1.5-W average power, 25-kW peak power at 511 nm), we obtained average and peak power conversion efficiencies of approximately 20 and 30%, respectively, which improved on the previously reported results by a factor of 2.

  11. High-power green light generation by second harmonic generation of single-frequency tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    laser emits in excess of 9 W single-frequency output power with a good beam quality. The output from the tapered diode laser is frequency doubled using periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. We investigate the modulation potential of the green light and improve the modulation depth from 1:4 to 1:50.......We demonstrate the generation of high power (>1.5W) and single-frequency green light by single-pass second harmonic generation of a high power tapered diode laser. The tapered diode laser consists of a DBR grating for wavelength selectivity, a ridge section and a tapered section. The DBR tapered...

  12. Probing Surface Chemistry at the Nanoscale Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene-Boisneuf, Laetitia

    Studies various nanostructured materials have gained considerable interest within the past several decades. This novel class of materials has opened up a new realm of possibilities, both for the fundamental comprehension of matter, but also for innovative applications. The size-dependent effect observed for these systems often lies in their interaction with the surrounding environment and understanding such interactions is the pivotal point for the investigations undertaken in this thesis. Three families of nanoparticles are analyzed: semiconductor quantum dots, metallic silver nanoparticles and rare-earth oxide nanomaterials. The radical scavenging ability of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2) is quite controversial since they have been labeled as both oxidizing and antioxidant species for biological systems. Here, both aqueous and organic stabilized nanoparticles are examined in straightforward systems containing only one reactive oxygen species to ensure a controlled release. The apparent absence of their direct radical scavenging ability is demonstrated despite the ease at which CeO2 nanoparticles generate stable surface Ce 3+ clusters, which is used to explain the redox activity of these nanomaterials. On the contrary, CeO2 nanoparticles are shown to have an indirect scavenging effect in Fenton reactions by annihilating the reactivity of Fe 2+ salts. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QD) constitute another highly appealing family of nanocolloids in part due to their tunable, size-dependent luminescence across the visible spectrum. The effect of elemental sulfur treatment is investigated to overcome one of the main drawbacks of CdSe QD: low fluorescence quantum yield. Herein, we report a constant and reproducible quantum yield of 15%. The effect of sulfur surface treatment is also assessed following the growth of a silica shell, as well as the response towards a solution quencher (4-amino-TEMPO). The sulfur treated QD is also tested for interaction with

  13. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  14. Mode pair selection of circumferential guided waves for cumulative second-harmonic generation in a circular tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingliang; Deng, Mingxi; Gao, Guangjian; Xiang, Yanxun

    2018-01-01

    The appropriate mode pairs of primary and double-frequency circumferential guided waves (CGWs) have been investigated and selected for generation of the cumulative second harmonics, which are applicable for quantitative assessment of damage/degradation in a circular tube. The selection criteria follow the requirements: the higher efficiency of cumulative second-harmonic generation (SHG) of primary CGW propagation, and the larger response sensitivity of cumulative SHG to material damage/degradation [characterized by variation in the third-order elastic (TOE) constants]. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter β of CGW propagation and the change rate of normalized β versus the TOE constants of tube material are, respectively, used to describe the efficiency of SHG and its response sensitivity to damage/degradation. Based on the selection criteria proposed, all the possible mode pairs of primary and double-frequency CGWs satisfying the phase velocity matching have been numerically examined. It has been found that there are indeed some mode pairs of CGW propagation with the larger values both of β and the change rate of normalized β versus the TOE constants. The CGW mode pairs found in this paper are of practical significance for quantitative assessment of damage/degradation in the circular tube. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Second-harmonic generation of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of solids in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Mendoza, Israel; Camacho-López, Santiago; Luna-Palacios, Yryx Y.; Esqueda-Barrón, Yasmín; Camacho-López, Miguel A.; Camacho-López, Marco; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2018-02-01

    We report the synthesis of small zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) based colloidal suspensions and the study of second-harmonic generation from aggregated ZnO NPs deposited on glass substrates. The colloidal suspensions were obtained using the laser ablation of solids in liquids technique, ablating a Zn solid target immersed in acetone as the liquid medium, with ns-laser pulses (1064 nm) of a Nd-YAG laser. The per pulse laser fluence, the laser repetition rate frequency and the ablation time were kept constant. The absorption evolution of the obtained suspensions was optically characterized through absorption spectroscopy until stabilization. Raman spectroscopy, SEM and HRTEM were used to provide evidence of the ZnO NPs structure. HRTEM results showed that 5-8 nm spheroids ZnO NPs were obtained. Strong second-harmonic signal is obtained from random ZnO monocrystalline NPs and from aggregated ZnO NPs, suggesting that the high efficiency of the nonlinear process may not depend on the NPs size or aggregation state.

  16. Second harmonic generation in gallium phosphide microdisks on silicon: from strict \\bar{4} to random quasi-phase matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemé, P.; Dumeige, Y.; Stodolna, J.; Vallet, M.; Rohel, T.; Létoublon, A.; Cornet, C.; Ponchet, A.; Durand, O.; Léger, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The convergence of nonlinear optical devices and silicon photonics is a key milestone for the practical development of photonic integrated circuits. The associated technological issues often stem from material incompatibility. This is the case of second order nonlinear processes in monolithically integrated III-V semiconductor devices on silicon, where structural defects called antiphase domains strongly impact the optical properties of the material. We theoretically investigate the influence of antiphase domains on second harmonic generation in III-V whispering gallery mode microresonators on silicon and focus on the effects of the antiphase domains’ mean size (i.e. the correlation length of the distribution). We demonstrate that the domain distributions can have opposite effects depending on the nonlinear process under consideration: while antiphase domains negatively impact second harmonic generation under \\bar{4} quasi-phase matching conditions (independent of the correlation length), large conversion efficiencies can arise far from \\bar{4}-quasi-phase matching provided that the APD correlation length remains within an appropriate range, and is still compatible with the spontaneous emergence of such defects in the usual III-V on Si epilayers. Such a build-up can be explained by the occurrence of random quasi-phase matching in the system.

  17. Effect of laser beam conditioning on fabrication of clean micro-channel on stainless steel 316L using second harmonic of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanasam Sunderlal; Baruah, Prahlad Kr; Khare, Alika; Joshi, Shrikrishna N.

    2018-02-01

    Laser micromachining of metals for fabrication of micro-channels generate ridge formation along the edges accompanied by ripples along the channel bed. The ridge formation is due to the formation of interference pattern formed by back reflections from the beam splitter and other optical components involved before focusing on the work piece. This problem can be curtailed by using a suitable aperture or Iris diaphragm so as to cut the unwanted portion of the laser beam before illuminating the sample. This paper reports an experimental investigation on minimizing this problem by conditioning the laser beam using an Iris diaphragm and using optimum process parameters. In this work, systematic experiments have been carried out using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to fabricate micro-channels. Initial experiments revealed that formation of ridges along the sides of micro-channel can easily be minimized with the help of Iris diaphragm. Further it is noted that a clean micro-channel of depth 43.39 μm, width up to 64.49 μm and of good surface quality with average surface roughness (Ra) value of 370 nm can be machined on stainless steel (SS) 316L by employing optimum process condition: laser beam energy of 30 mJ/pulse, 11 number of laser scans and scan speed of 169.54 μm/s with an opening of 4 mm diameter of Iris diaphragm in the path of the laser beam.

  18. Using Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy to Study the Three-Dimensional Structure of Collagen and its Degradation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Yair

    Collagen is one of the most abundant proteins found in the human body. Its crystalline structure possesses no centrosymmetry, allowing it to emit second-harmonic waves. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy utilizes the latter quality to produce high-resolution images of collagen rich tissues and therefore become a key research tool in the biomedical field. We developed a new model, intended to be used together with second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, to thoroughly investigate collagen-based tissues. We use our SHG model to reveal information in real time from enzymatic biochemical processes. We also present a novel method used to measure quantitatively the direction of the fibers within the tissue, from SHG images. Using this method, we were able to reconstruct an angular map of the orientation of collagen fibers from multiple sections across the entire area of a human cornea. The structure we obtained demonstrates the criss-crossing structure of the human cornea, previously suggested in the literature. In addition, we also report work on a unique step-wise three-photon fluorescence excitation discovered in melanin. This unique fluorescence mechanism was exploited to discriminate melanin on a small-size, low-cost and low laser power setup which was used as a prototype for a handheld device. The latter study is a part of a larger on-going effort in our group to explore new diagnosis methods to be used for early skin cancer screening. Finally, this work demonstrates a spectroscopy-based method to correct for blood vessel thickness effect. The method analyzes spectral shift from a molecular imaging agent and correlate the shifts to the length of the optical path in blood. The correction method described in this work is intended to be implemented on a guided catheter near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) intra-vascular imaging system. In this imaging system, this study's results will used to correct for the radial distance between the imaging tip of the

  19. Molecular Tension Probes for Imaging Forces at the Cell Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Galior, Kornelia; Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Salaita, Khalid

    2017-11-21

    Mechanical forces are essential for a variety of biological processes ranging from transcription and translation to cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation. Through the activation of mechanosensitive signaling pathways, cells sense and respond to physical stimuli from the surrounding environment, a process widely known as mechanotransduction. At the cell membrane, many signaling receptors, such as integrins, cadherins and T- or B-cell receptors, bind to their ligands on the surface of adjacent cells or the extracellular matrix (ECM) to mediate mechanotransduction. Upon ligation, these receptor-ligand bonds transmit piconewton (pN) mechanical forces that are generated, in part, by the cytoskeleton. Importantly, these forces expose cryptic sites within mechanosensitive proteins and modulate the binding kinetics (on/off rate) of receptor-ligand complexes to further fine-tune mechanotransduction and the corresponding cell behavior. Over the past three decades, two categories of methods have been developed to measure cell receptor forces. The first class is traction force microscopy (TFM) and micropost array detectors (mPADs). In these methods, cells are cultured on elastic polymers or microstructures that deform under mechanical forces. The second category of techniques is single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) including atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical or magnetic tweezers, and biomembrane force probe (BFP). In SMFS, the experimenter applies external forces to probe the mechanics of individual cells or single receptor-ligand complexes, serially, one bond at a time. Although these techniques are powerful, the limited throughput of SMFS and the nN force sensitivity of TFM have hindered further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction. In this Account, we introduce the recent advent of molecular tension fluorescence microscopy (MTFM) as an emerging tool for molecular imaging of receptor mechanics in living cells. MTFM probes are

  20. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  1. In vivo visualization of dermal collagen fiber in skin burn by collagen-sensitive second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Sasaki, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2013-06-01

    Optical assessment of skin burns is possible with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy due to its high sensitivity to thermal denaturation of collagen molecules. In contrast to previous studies that were performed using excised tissue specimens ex vivo, in vivo observation of dermal collagen fibers in living rat burn models with SHG microscopy is demonstrated. Changes in signal vanishing patterns in the SHG images are confirmed to be dependent on the burn degree. Comparison of the SHG images with Masson's trichrome-stained images indicated that the observed patterns were caused by the coexistence of molten and fibrous structures of dermal collagen fibers. Furthermore, a quantitative parameter for burn assessment based on the depth profile of the mean SHG intensity across the entire SHG image is proposed. These results and discussions imply a potential of SHG microscopy as a minimally invasive, highly quantitative tool for skin burn assessment.

  2. Efficiency of different methods of extra-cavity second harmonic generation of continuous wave single-frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Radnatarov, Daba

    2016-01-20

    This work presents for the first time to the best of our knowledge a comparative efficiency analysis among various techniques of extra-cavity second harmonic generation (SHG) of continuous-wave single-frequency radiation in nonperiodically poled nonlinear crystals within a broad range of power levels. Efficiency of nonlinear radiation transformation at powers from 1 W to 10 kW was studied in three different configurations: with an external power-enhancement cavity and without the cavity in the case of single and double radiation pass through a nonlinear crystal. It is demonstrated that at power levels exceeding 1 kW, the efficiencies of methods with and without external power-enhancement cavities become comparable, whereas at even higher powers, SHG by a single or double pass through a nonlinear crystal becomes preferable because of the relatively high efficiency of nonlinear transformation and fairly simple implementation.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of second harmonic direct detection scheme for low-dose range in alanine/EPR dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Felipe [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad de Panama (Panama); Departamento de Salud Radiologica, Caja de Seguro Social (Panama); Graeff, Carlos F.O.; Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: baffa@ffclrp.usp.br

    2002-04-21

    The usefulness of a direct detection scheme of the second harmonic (2h) overmodulated signal from irradiated alanine in EPR dosimetry was studied. For this purpose, a group of DL-alanine/paraffin cylindrical pellets was produced. The dosimeters were irradiated with a {sup 60}Co radiotherapy gamma source with doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Gy. The EPR measurements were carried out in a VARIAN-E4 spectrometer operating in X-band with optimized parameters to obtain highest amplitude signals of both harmonics. The 2h signal was detected directly at twice the modulation frequency. In preliminary results, the 2h showed some advantages over the 1h such as better resolution for doses below 1 Gy, better repeatability results and better linear behaviour in the dose range indicated. (author)

  4. Laterally azo-bridged h-shaped ferroelectric dimesogens for second-order nonlinear optics: ferroelectricity and second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Martinez-Perdiguero, Josu; Baumeister, Ute; Walker, Christopher; Etxebarria, Jesus; Prehm, Marko; Ortega, Josu; Tschierske, Carsten; O'Callaghan, Michael J; Harant, Adam; Handschy, Mark

    2009-12-30

    Two classes of laterally azo-bridged H-shaped ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs), incorporating azobenzene and disperse red 1 (DR-1) chromophores along the FLC polar axes, were synthesized and characterized by polarized light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, 2D X-ray diffraction analysis, and electro-optical investigations. They represent the first H-shaped FLC materials exhibiting the ground-state, thermodynamically stable enantiotropic SmC* phase, i.e., ground-state ferroelectricity. Second harmonic generation measurements of one compound incorporating a DR-1 chromophore at the incident wavelength of 1064 nm give a nonlinear coefficient of d(22) = 17 pm/V, the largest nonlinear optics coefficient reported to date for calamitic FLCs. This value enables viable applications of FLCs in nonlinear optics.

  5. Enhanced optical second-harmonic generation from the current-biased graphene/SiO2/Si(001) structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yong Q; Nelson, Florence; Lee, Ji Ung; Diebold, Alain C

    2013-05-08

    We find that optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) in reflection from a chemical-vapor-deposition graphene monolayer transferred onto a SiO2/Si(001) substrate is enhanced about 3 times by the flow of direct current electric current in graphene. Measurements of rotational-anisotropy SHG revealed that the current-induced SHG from the current-biased graphene/SiO2/Si(001) structure undergoes a phase inversion as the measurement location on graphene is shifted laterally along the current flow direction. The enhancement is due to current-associated charge trapping at the graphene/SiO2 interface, which introduces a vertical electric field across the SiO2/Si interface that produces electric field-induced SHG. The phase inversion is due to the positive-to-negative polarity switch in the current direction of the trapped charges at the current-biased graphene/SiO2 interface.

  6. Precise, motion-free polarization control in Second Harmonic Generation microscopy using a liquid crystal modulator in the infinity space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Tilbury, Karissa; Chen, Shean-Jen; Campagnola, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy coupled with polarization analysis has great potential for use in tissue characterization, as molecular and supramolecular structural details can be extracted. Such measurements are difficult to perform quickly and accurately. Here we present a new method that uses a liquid crystal modulator (LCM) located in the infinity space of a SHG laser scanning microscope that allows the generation of any desired linear or circular polarization state. As the device contains no moving parts, polarization can be rotated accurately and faster than by manual or motorized control. The performance in terms of polarization purity was validated using Stokes vector polarimetry, and found to have minimal residual polarization ellipticity. SHG polarization imaging characteristics were validated against well-characterized specimens having cylindrical and/or linear symmetries. The LCM has a small footprint and can be implemented easily in any standard microscope and is cost effective relative to other technologies.

  7. Efficient Second Harmonic Generation in 3D Nonlinear Optical-Lattice-Like Cladding Waveguide Splitters by Femtosecond Laser Inscription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Weijie; Jia, Yuechen; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Chen, Feng

    2016-02-29

    Integrated photonic devices with beam splitting function are intriguing for a broad range of photonic applications. Through optical-lattice-like cladding waveguide structures fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing, the light propagation can be engineered via the track-confined refractive index profiles, achieving tailored output beam distributions. In this work, we report on the fabrication of 3D laser-written optical-lattice-like structures in a nonlinear KTP crystal to implement 1 × 4 beam splitting. Second harmonic generation (SHG) of green light through these nonlinear waveguide beam splitter structures provides the capability for the compact visible laser emitting devices. With Type II phase matching of the fundamental wavelength (@ 1064 nm) to second harmonic waves (@ 532 nm), the frequency doubling has been achieved through this three-dimensional beam splitter. Under 1064-nm continuous-wave fundamental-wavelength pump beam, guided-wave SHG at 532 nm are measured with the maximum power of 0.65 mW and 0.48 mW for waveguide splitters (0.67 mW and 0.51 mW for corresponding straight channel waveguides), corresponding to a SH conversion efficiency of approximately ~14.3%/W and 13.9%/W (11.2%/W, 11.3%/W for corresponding straight channel waveguides), respectively. This work paves a way to fabricate compact integrated nonlinear photonic devices in a single chip with beam dividing functions.

  8. Chiral crystal of a C2v-symmetric 1,3-diazaaulene derivative showing efficient optical second harmonic generation

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xiaohua

    2011-03-01

    Achiral nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophores 1,3-diazaazulene derivatives, 2-(4â€-aminophenyl)-6-nitro-1,3-diazaazulene (APNA) and 2-(4â€-N,N-diphenylaminophenyl)-6-nitro-1,3-diazaazulene (DPAPNA), were synthesized with high yield. Despite the moderate static first hyperpolarizabilities (β0) for both APNA [(136 ± 5) à - 10-30 esu] and DPAPNA [(263 ± 20) à - 10-30 esu], only APNA crystal shows a powder efficiency of second harmonic generation (SHG) of 23 times that of urea. It is shown that the APNA crystallization driven cooperatively by the strong H-bonding network and the dipolar electrostatic interactions falls into the noncentrosymmetric P2 12121 space group, and that the helical supramolecular assembly is solely responsible for the efficient SHG response. To the contrary, the DPAPNA crystal with centrosymmetric P-1 space group is packed with antiparalleling dimmers, and is therefore completely SHG-inactive. 1,3-Diazaazulene derivatives are suggested to be potent building blocks for SHG-active chiral crystals, which are advantageous in high thermal stability, excellent near-infrared transparency and high degree of designing flexibility. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys, 2011 Optical crystals based on 1,3-diazaazulene derivatives are reported as the first example of organic nonlinear optical crystal whose second harmonic generation activity is found to originate solely from the chirality of their helical supramolecular orientation. The strong H-bond network forming between adjacent choromophores is found to act cooperatively with dipolar electrostatic interactions in driving the chiral crystallization of this material. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Remarkable effect of Ni{sup 2+}doping on structural, second harmonic generation, optical, mechanical and dielectric properties of KDP single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, V. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia); Shkir, Mohd, E-mail: shkirphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia); AlFaify, S.; Algarni, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia); Abutalib, M.M. [Faculty of Science-AL Faisaliah, Campus, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80200, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Yahia, I.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia); Nano-Science & Semiconductor Labs., Thin Film Lab., Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The nonlinear optical single crystals of pure and Ni{sup 2+} doped potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) were successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The effects of the addition of Ni{sup 2+} with different molar concentration have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-Raman, second harmonic generation, microscopic and dielectric studies. Its crystallinity was assessed by the FT-Raman technique and its surface, structural imperfections were recorded using high resolution microscope, which clearly reveals that the doping is showing considerable effect on the samples. The SHG measurements also carried out on pure and doped samples, which reveal the relative SHG efficiency has been enhanced due to doping. The optical activities were studied by UV–vis-NIR technique and reveals high optical transparency in doped samples. The remarkable enhancement in mechanical strength was observed due to doping. The enhanced dielectric constant and low dielectric loss confirms that the grown crystals with doping are superior to pure crystals and may be used in optoelectronic devices.

  10. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  11. Label-free imaging of brain and brain tumor specimens with combined two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Wu, Zanyi; Du, Huiping; Wang, Shu; Li, Lianhuang; Fang, Na; Lin, Peihua; Chen, Jianxin; Kang, Dezhi; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2017-10-01

    Label-free imaging techniques are gaining acceptance within the medical imaging field, including brain imaging, because they have the potential to be applied to intraoperative in situ identifications of pathological conditions. In this paper, we describe the use of two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in combination for the label-free detection of brain and brain tumor specimens; gliomas. Two independently detecting channels were chosen to subsequently collect TPEF/SHG signals from the specimen to increase TPEF/SHG image contrasts. Our results indicate that the combined TPEF/SHG microscopic techniques can provide similar rat brain structural information and produce a similar resolution like conventional H&E staining in neuropathology; including meninges, cerebral cortex, white-matter structure corpus callosum, choroid plexus, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellar cortex. It can simultaneously detect infiltrating human brain tumor cells, the extracellular matrix collagen fiber of connective stroma within brain vessels and collagen depostion in tumor microenvironments. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio and collagen content can be extracted as quantitative indicators for differentiating brain gliomas from healthy brain tissues. With the development of two-photon fiberscopes and microendoscope probes and their clinical applications, the combined TPEF and SHG microcopy may become an important multimodal, nonlinear optical imaging approach for real-time intraoperative histological diagnostics of residual brain tumors. These occur in various brain regions during ongoing surgeries through the method of simultaneously identifying tumor cells, and the change of tumor microenvironments, without the need for the removal biopsies and without the need for tissue labelling or fluorescent markers.

  12. Extraction of second harmonic from the In0.53Ga0.47As planar Gunn diode using radial stub resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricar, Mohamed Ismaeel; Khalid, A.; Glover, J.; Evans, G. A.; Vasileious, P.; Li, Chong; Cumming, D.; Oxley, C. H.

    2014-09-01

    Planar Indium Gallium Arsenide (InGaAs) Gunn diodes with on chip matching circuits have been fabricated on a semi-insulating Indium Phosphide (InP) substrate to enable the extraction of the second harmonic in millimeter-wave and terahertz frequencies. The planar Gunn diodes were designed in coplanar waveguide (CPW) format with an active channel length of 4 μm and width 120 μm integrated to CPW matching circuit and radial stub resonator to suppress the fundamental and to extract the second harmonic. The initial experimental measurements have given a second harmonic signal at 118 GHz with an output power of -20 dBm and the fundamental signal at 59 GHz was suppressed to the noise level of the experimental set-up.

  13. Nonlinear plasmonics in eutectic composites: Second harmonic generation and two-photon luminescence in a volumetric Bi2O3-Ag metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deska, R.; Sadecka, K.; Olesiak-Bańska, J.; Matczyszyn, K.; Pawlak, D. A.; Samoć, M.

    2017-01-01

    The nonlinear optical effect of second harmonic generation can be very strong when originating from nanoplasmonic structures, due to enhancement of the surrounding material's intrinsic non-linear optical properties or due to its occurrence as a result of the plasmonic structure. However, manufacturing of large-scale three dimensional nanoplasmonic structures is still a challenge. Here, we demonstrate the two-photon luminescence and second-harmonic generation in a Bi2O3-Ag eutectic-based metamaterial exhibiting a hierarchic structure of nano- and micro-sized silver precipitates. The investigations employed a microscope system combined with polarimetric analysis. It appears that the second-harmonic-generation arises from the silver plasmonic structure rather than from the nonlinear effects of the bismuth oxide matrix. Both quadrupolar and dipolar modes of polarization are observed.

  14. Analysis of second harmonic guided waves in pipes using a large-radius asymptotic approximation for axis-symmetric longitudinal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Lissenden, Cliff J

    2013-04-01

    Theoretical formulation for the problem of second harmonic guided waves in pipes is presented from the principles of continuum mechanics. The formulation is carried out in the reference configuration of the pipe with an emphasis on the correct use of the "Divergence" operator in the reference configuration. Second harmonic guided wave generation from axis-symmetric longitudinal guided wave modes is studied. A large radius asymptotic approximation for the wave structures in pipe is studied and an error estimate for the same is obtained. Comparison with the corresponding modes in a plate and the analogy to second harmonic guided wave generation in plates is presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. UHV-compatible spectroscopic scanning Kelvin probe for surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikie, I.; Petermann, U.; Lägel, B.

    1999-08-01

    We have developed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) to measure local work function ( φ) differences between a conducting sample and a reference metal tip to less than 1 meV. The work function is an extremely sensitive indicator of surface condition and is affected by adsorption, evaporation, surface topography, etc. For example, the increase of φ due to oxidation of Si(111) and polycrystalline rhenium is 1.4 and 1.9 eV, respectively. We have performed SKP work function topographies of metal and semiconductor samples during various UHV cleaning processes to determine if changes in surface work function (Δ φ) can be attributed to chemical contamination, e.g., carbon, or surface structural changes due to thermal processing or ion sputtering. We can, for instance, see major changes in oxidation kinetics due to the type of cleaning mechanism, flash anneal or sputter-anneal, or through as little as 0.6% carbon contamination. The UHV SKP control loop utilises a novel tracking system to maintain constant tip-to-sample spacing during scanning. Combined with the in-house 'Off-Null' detection method we have developed this allows a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio than alternative detection methods including the lock-in amplifier. Using this system we have performed in situ surface photovoltage spectroscopy during the oxidation of Si(111), illustrating the capability of this technique to probe the local density of states, and surface barrier height spectroscopy during surface processing.

  16. First and second harmonic ECRH experience at gyrotron frequencies at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallard, B.

    1987-11-01

    Plasma heating of electrons in both mirror machines and tokamaks, using mm wave gyrotron sources, have been carried out in many experiments in recent years. The technology for both sources and mode-preserving waveguide transmission systems is well developed at power levels of 200 kW. At LLNL electron heating at 28 GHz in the TMX-U tandem mirror has been used to create hot electrons required for a thermal barrier (potential well). TMX-U, and other devices operating at lower frequency and power (10 GHz, few kW), routinely generates electron populations with mean energies of 100 to 500 keV and densities in the low to mid 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ range. Radial pressure profiles vary from peaked-on-axis to hollow and are dependent on the mod-B resonance surfaces. Experiments on the axisymmetric mirror SM-1 have shown improved heating efficiency using multiple frequencies with narrow frequency separation. The importance of rf diffusion in determining electron confinement has been shown in CONSTANCE B. Fokker-Planck and particle orbit models have been useful for understanding the importance of cavity heating for creating runaway electrons, the sensitivity of hot electron production to cold plasma, the reduction of electron lifetime by rf diffusion, and the effect of multiple frequencies on heating stochasticity. Potential wells generated in plasmas with large fractions of mirror-trapped electrons have been measured in TMX-U. These offer prospects for enhanced confinement of highly stripped ions. 11 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Second Harmonic 110 GHz ECH-assisted Start-up in KSTAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han S. H.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In KSTAR device, a 110 GHz ECH system has been a useful heating device for a stable plasma start-up because a pure ohmic discharge scenario with a limited loop voltage of about 4 V was sometimes not successful for burn-through and plasma current ramp-up due to inconsistent wall conditioning and density control. Even though a pure ohmic discharge also was successful, the application of X2-mode ECH could reduce the flux consumption of poloidal field coils, leading to long pulse discharges. The ECH power was injected at the time of the field null formation after the onset of the toroidal electric field in which the electron temperature significantly increased up to 100 eV so that burn-through is overcome. The ECH heating enabled the formation of close flux surfaces earlier, leading to the reliable plasma current ramp-up, but, it caused outward plasma movement and failure of the plasma control, resulting in loss of the discharge. Moreover, impurities from the plasma facing components caused by not fully absorbed ECH power had a detrimental effect on the H-mode transition. In ECH-assisted start-up in the ramp-up phase, ECH power was mainly used for central electron heating, leading to reduction of the flux consumption of the central coils by increasing the electron temperature along with a density increase in the ramp-up phase. When X2-mode ECH power of 350 kW was injected at the mid-plane with a toroidal angle of 10 degree for 1 sec after the onset of the loop voltage, the flux consumption was reduced by about 30% in comparison with the pure ohmic discharges.

  18. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  19. Second harmonic generation microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Risbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -temperature endotherm peak observable in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms. DSC analysis of epimysium, the connective tissue layer that enfold skeletal muscles, produces one large endotherm starting at 57 °C and peaking at 59.5 °C. SHG microscopy of collagen fibers reveals a variability of thermal...

  20. Imaging the grain boundaries in polycrystalline MoS2 monolayer by non-invasive second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jinxin; Jiang, Tao; Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yanfeng; Gong, Xingao; Liu, Wei-Tao; Wu, Shiwei

    2015-03-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers have showed intriguing physical properties for high performance quantum electronics. In order to utilize them in technological applications at industrial scale, mass production of this two dimensional materials via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is demanded and urged. Despite the success of growing large-scale monolayer, limited grain size and emergence of grain boundary remain as the major hurdle being single crystalline sheets. To resolve this issue, it is necessary to image the grain and grain boundary, and further understand their formation with statistical significance. Here we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, a noninvasive coherent imaging technique, to image the grain and grain boundary in CVD grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide. The destructive interference between neighboring grains enabled us to pinpoint the location of grain boundary; the anisotropic polarization pattern permitted us to determine the type of grain boundary. Furthermore, this high-throughput characterization technique allows statistical analysis of hundreds of grain and grain boundary, unambiguously revealing that the CVD growth mechanism of monolayer MoS2.

  1. Cooperative Enhancement of Second-Harmonic Generation from a Single CdS Nanobelt-Hybrid Plasmonic Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Zhang, Qing; Chong, Wee Kiang; Yip, Jing Ngei; Wen, Xinglin; Li, Zhenpeng; Wei, Fengxia; Yu, Guannan; Xiong, Qihua; Sum, Tze Chien

    2015-05-26

    Semiconductor nanostructures (e.g., nanowires and nanobelts) hold great promise as subwavelength coherent light sources, nonlinear optical frequency converters, and all-optical signal processors for optoelectronic applications. However, at such small scales, optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) is generally inefficient. Herein, we report on a straightforward strategy using a thin Au layer to enhance the SHG from a single CdS nanobelt by 3 orders of magnitude. Through detailed experimental and theoretical analysis, we validate that the augmented SHG originates from the mutual intensification of the local fields induced by the plasmonic nanocavity and by the reflections within the CdS Fabry-Pérot resonant cavity in this hybrid semiconductor-metal system. Polarization-dependent SHG measurements can be employed to determine and distinguish the contributions of SH signals from the CdS nanobelt and gold film, respectively. When the thickness of gold film becomes comparable to the skin depth, SHG from the gold film can be clearly observed. Our work demonstrates a facile approach for tuning the nonlinear optical properties of mesoscopic, nanostructured, and layered semiconductor materials.

  2. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA.

  3. Crack processing in a resin material using nano-pulsed second harmonic Nd:YAG laser for personal identification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Daisaku; Ishii, Yoshio; Kubota, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2007-05-01

    A new personal identification method has been investigated which promises to be a useful technique for protecting society against the recent increase in card counterfeiting crimes. Micro cracks that is created into transparent acrylic material using second harmonic Nd:YAG (wavelength: 532nm, pulse width: 8ns, pulse energy: 0.5mJ) are used for writing ID information. Identical person is identified by image matching of speckle pattern from created crack. In this study, identification is attempted for constructing the new personal identification method. Various ID patterns are created with changing shapes, the arrangement of spot. In result of crack observation by optical microscope, cracks are created around the spot and the shapes are different respectively. Speckle patterns are successfully identified by image template matching with normalized correlation coefficient. In a case of identification on template and target image obtained from same object, strong correlation was obtained. In this result, processed objects were identified by discerning speckle pattern. For these reason, the feasibility of new personal identification system using the laser processing and the speckle pattern is implied.

  4. Second-harmonic generation using 4-quasi-phasematching in a GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Paulina S; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Solomon, Glenn S

    2014-01-01

    The 4 crystal symmetry in materials such as GaAs can enable quasi-phasematching for efficient optical frequency conversion without poling, twinning or other engineered domain inversions. 4 symmetry means that a 90° rotation is equivalent to a crystallographic inversion. Therefore, when light circulates about the 4 axis, as in GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microdisks, it encounters effective domain inversions that can produce quasi-phasematching. Microdisk resonators also offer resonant field enhancement, resulting in highly efficient frequency conversion in micrometre-scale volumes. These devices can be integrated in photonic circuits as compact frequency convertors, sources of radiation or entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental observation of second-harmonic generation in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity utilizing -quasi-phasematching. We use a tapered fibre to couple into the 5-μm diameter microdisk resonator, resulting in a normalized conversion efficiency η≈5 × 10(-5)mW(-1). Simulations indicate that when accounting for fibre-cavity scattering, the normalized conversion efficiency is η≈3 × 10(-3)mW(-1).

  5. Second-harmonic generation using -quasi-phasematching in a GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Paulina S.; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Solomon, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal symmetry in materials such as GaAs can enable quasi-phasematching for efficient optical frequency conversion without poling, twinning or other engineered domain inversions. symmetry means that a 90° rotation is equivalent to a crystallographic inversion. Therefore, when light circulates about the axis, as in GaAs whispering-gallery-mode microdisks, it encounters effective domain inversions that can produce quasi-phasematching. Microdisk resonators also offer resonant field enhancement, resulting in highly efficient frequency conversion in micrometre-scale volumes. These devices can be integrated in photonic circuits as compact frequency convertors, sources of radiation or entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental observation of second-harmonic generation in a whispering-gallery-mode microcavity utilizing -quasi-phasematching. We use a tapered fibre to couple into the 5-μm diameter microdisk resonator, resulting in a normalized conversion efficiency η≈5 × 10−5 mW−1. Simulations indicate that when accounting for fibre-cavity scattering, the normalized conversion efficiency is η≈3 × 10−3 mW−1. PMID:24434576

  6. Tunable plasmon resonance and enhanced second harmonic generation and upconverted fluorescence of hemispheric-like silver core/shell islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Si-Jing; Nan, Fan; Yang, Da-Jie; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-10-14

    We investigate tunable plasmon resonance and enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) and up-converted fluorescence (UCF) of the hemispheric-like silver core/shell islands. The Ag, Ag/Ag2O, and Ag/Ag2O/Ag island films are prepared by using a sputtering technique. The SHG and UCF of the Ag/Ag2O/Ag core/shell islands near the percolating regime is enhanced 2.34 and 3.94 times compared to the sum of two individual counterparts of Ag/Ag2O core/shell and Ag shell islands. The ratio of SHG intensity induced by p- and s-polarization is 0.86 for the initial Ag islands and increase to 1.61 for the Ag/Ag2O/Ag core/shell samples. The tunable intensity ratio of SHG to UCF of the Ag islands treated by thermal and laser annealing processes is also observed. The physical mechanism of the enhanced SHG and UCF in the Ag/Ag2O/Ag core/shell islands is discussed. Our observations provide a new approach to fabricate plasmon-enhanced optical nonlinear nanodevices with tunable SHG and UCF.

  7. Label-free imaging immune cells and collagen in atherosclerosis with two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis has been recognized as a chronic inflammation disease, in which many types of cells participate in this process, including lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs, mast cells, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs. Developments in imaging technology provide the capability to observe cellular and tissue components and their interactions. The knowledge of the functions of immune cells and their interactions with other cell and tissue components will facilitate our discovery of biomarkers in atherosclerosis and prediction of the risk factor of rupture-prone plaques. Nonlinear optical microscopy based on two-photon excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG were developed to image mast cells, SMCs and collagen in plaque ex vivo using endogenous optical signals. Mast cells were imaged with two-photon tryptophan autofluorescence, SMCs were imaged with two-photon NADH autofluorescence, and collagen were imaged with SHG. This development paves the way for further study of mast cell degranulation, and the effects of mast cell derived mediators such as induced synthesis and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs which participate in the degradation of collagen.

  8. Antimicrobial activity and second harmonic studies on organic non-centrosymmetric pure and doped ninhydrin single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Haris, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of pure, Cu2+ ions and Cd2+ ions doped on ninhydrin single crystals by slow solvent evaporation technique. The presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+ ions in the specimen of ninhydrin single crystal has been determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis was done to calculate the lattice parameters of the pure and doped crystals. The percentage of transmittance of the crystal was recorded using the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. Thermal behaviors of the grown crystals have been examined by the thermal gravimetric/differential thermal analysis. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show the minor variation in the hardness value for the pure and doped ninhydrin samples. The value of the work hardening coefficient n was found to be 2.0, 1.0 and 1.06 for pure, copper and cadmium doped ninhydrin crystals respectively. The second harmonic generation efficiency of Cd2+ and Cu2+ doped ninhydrin is 8.3 and 6.3 times greater than well known nonlinear crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate respectively. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by disk diffusion method against the standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillis niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  9. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandi, F., E-mail: fernando.brandi@ino.it [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Giammanco, F.; Conti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., via Matteucci n.38/D, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Sylla, F. [SourceLAB SAS, 86 Rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Lambert, G. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} range well suited for LWFA.

  10. Modelling of optical aberrations caused by light propagation in mouse cranial bone using second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Kayvan; Kner, Peter; Mortensen, Luke J.

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging through the bone to image into the bone marrow or the brain is an emerging need in the scientific community. Due to the highly scattering nature of bone, bone thinning or removal is typically required to enhance the resolution and signal intensity at the imaging plane. The optical aberrations and scattering in the bone significantly affect the resolution and signal to noise ratio of deep tissue microscopy. Multiphoton microscopy uses long wavelength (nearinfrared and infrared) excitation light to reduce the effects of scattering. However, it is still susceptible to optical aberrations and scattering since the light propagates through several layers of media with inhomogeneous indices of refraction. Mechanical removal of bone is highly invasive, laborious, and cannot be applied in experiments where imaging inside of the bone is desired. Adaptive optics technology can compensate for these optical aberrations and potentially restore the diffraction limited point spread function of the system even in deep tissue. To design an adaptive optics system, a priori knowledge of the sample structure assists selection of the proper correction element and sensing methods. In this work we present the characterization of optical aberrations caused by mouse cranial bone, using second harmonic generation imaging of bone collagen. We simulate light propagation through the bone, calculate aberrations and determine the correction that can be achieved using a deformable mirror.

  11. Octupolar molecules for nonlinear optics: from molecular design to crystals and films with large second-harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-Yun; Cho, Bong Rae

    2015-02-01

    We summarize the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of octupolar molecules, crystals, and films developed in our laboratory. We present the design strategy, structure-property relationship, and second-order NLO properties of 1,3,5-trinitro- and 1,3,5-tricyano-2,4,6-tris(p-diethylaminostyryl)benzene (TTB) derivatives, TTB crystals, and films prepared by free-casting TTB in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The first hyperpolarizability of TTB was fivefold larger than that of the dipolar analogue. Moreover, the TTB crystal showed unprecedentedly large second-harmonic generation (SHG). While TTB crystal films (20 wt% TTB/PMMA) on various substrates showed appreciable SHG values, the cylinder film exhibited much larger SHG values and large electro-optic (EO) coefficients. The large SHG values and EO coefficients, as well as the high thermal stability of the cylinder film, will make it a potential candidate for NLO device applications. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Europium doping induced symmetry deviation and its impact on the second harmonic generation of doped ZnO nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Soumen; Imakita, Kenji; Mizuhata, Minoru; Fujii, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of europium doping on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of ZnO nanowires (NWs). A non-monotonic enhancement in the SHG is observed with the increase of the europium concentration. Maximum SHG is observed from the 1 at.% europium doped ZnO NWs with an enhancement factor of 4.5. To understand the underlying mechanism, the effective second order non-linear coefficient (deff) is calculated from the theoretical fitting with consideration of the absorption effect. Microstructural characterization reveals the structural deformation of the ZnO NWs caused by europium doping. We estimated the deviation in the crystal site symmetry around the Eu3+ ions (defined as the asymmetric factor) from photoluminescence measurement and it is found to be strongly correlated with the calculated deff value. A strong linear dependence between the magnitudes of deff and the asymmetric factor suggests that deviation in the local site symmetry of the ZnO crystal by europium doping could be the most probable origin of the observed large second order non-linearity.

  13. Influence of the intracavity second harmonic generation on the mode competition in a double-mode diode-pumped Nd : YAG laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yermachenko, VM; Karle, RA; Petrovskiy, VN; Protsenko, ED

    The influence of intracavity second harmonic generation on the mode competition in a double-mode diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser is studied theoretically and experimentally. Various configurations of the optical cavity with II-type phase-matching frequency-doubling crystals are considered. The conditions

  14. Second Harmonic Generation, Electrooptical Pockels Effect, and Static First-Order Hyperpolarizabilities of 2,2′-Bithiophene Conformers: An HF, MP2, and DFT Theoretical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alparone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The static and dynamic electronic (hyperpolarizabilities of the equilibrium conformations of 2,2′-bithiophene (anti-gauche and syn-gauche were computed in the gas phase. The calculations were carried out using Hartree-Fock (HF, Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2, and density functional theory methods. The properties were evaluated for the second harmonic generation (SHG, and electrooptical Pockels effect (EOPE nonlinear optical processes at the typical λ=1064 nm of the Nd:YAG laser. The anti-gauche form characterized by the S–C2–C2′–S dihedral angle of 137° (MP2/6-311G** is the global minimum on the potential energy surface, whereas the syn-gauche rotamer (S–C2–C2′–S = 48°, MP2/6-311G** lies ca. 0.5 kcal/mol above the anti-gauche form. The structural properties of the gauche structures are rather similar to each other. The MP2 electron correlation effects are dramatic for the first-order hyperpolarizabilities of the 2,2′-bithiophenes, decreasing the HF values by ca. a factor of three. When passing from the anti-gauche to the syn-gauche conformer, the static and frequency-dependent first-order hyperpolarizabilities increase by ca. a factor of two. Differently, the electronic polarizabilities and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of these rotamers are rather close to each other. The syn-gauche structure could be discriminated from the anti-gauche one through its much more intense SHG and EOPE signals.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma of the human cornea visualized by second harmonic generation imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Takagi, Yuki; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Takahara, Atsushi; Nishida, Teruo

    2011-02-16

    The structure of collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma of the human cornea is thought to be an important determinant of corneal rigidity. The three-dimensional structure of such collagen lamellae in normal human corneas was examined. The anterior portion of 27 normal human corneas was obtained from donor tissue for Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) surgery, and blocks (∼3-mm square) of the central cornea were examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy. Each cornea was scanned from the surface of Bowman's layer to a depth of 150 μm, and SHG forward signals were collected. The angles of collagen lamellae immediately below to a depth of 30 μm below Bowman's layer (sutural lamellae) as well as of those at a depth of 50 or 100 μm were measured. The density and width of sutural lamellae were also evaluated. Collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma were evenly distributed and randomly oriented. The angle of sutural lamellae relative to Bowman's layer was 19.19 ± 4.34° (mean ± SD). The angles of collagen lamellae at depths of 50 or 100 μm were 8.91 ± 2.91 and 6.91 ± 2.11°, respectively. The density of sutural lamellae was 910.0 ± 480.4/mm(2), and their width was 13.14 ± 5.03 and 7.11 ± 3.00 μm in the region immediately beneath and 30 μm below Bowman's layer, respectively. Collagen lamellae in the anterior stroma of the normal human cornea are interwoven in three dimensions and adhere densely to Bowman's layer. This structure may contribute to the rigidity and curvature of the anterior portion of the cornea.

  16. [Interaction of surface active fluorescence probes and bovine serum albumin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong-kuan; Li, Na; Shen, Xing-hai; Gao, Hong-cheng

    2005-09-01

    The binding between two surface-active substituted 3H-indole fluorescence probes, i. e., iodo-dihexadecyl methyl-2-(p-dodecyl amino phenyl)-3, 3-dimethyl-5-carboethoxy-3H-indole ammonium and iodo-dimethyloctadecyl-2-(p-dodecyl amino phenyl)-3,3-dimethyl-5-carboethoxy-3H-indole ammonium, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution was studied using fluorescence. The binding constant and binding site number of molecule 1 and molecule 2 with BSA were obtained. It was confirmed that electrostatic interaction is the primary driving force for the combination of BSA with molecule 1 or molecule 2. According to the Förster resonance energy transfer theory, the distances between molecule 1, molecule 2 and tryptophan of BSA were calculated to be 2.90 nm and 4.02 nm, respectively.

  17. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  18. Quantitative analysis of collagen lamellae in the normal and keratoconic human cornea by second harmonic generation imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Naoyuki; Shin-Gyou-Uchi, Ryutaro; Azumi, Haruya; Ohta, Hiroaki; Morita, Yukiko; Yamada, Naoyuki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Takahara, Atsushi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2014-11-25

    To characterize the structural properties of collagen lamellae in the normal and keratoconic human corneal stroma, we measured their width and angle relative to Bowman's layer (BL). Thirteen normal and four keratoconic corneas were examined. Collagen lamellae in tissue blocks from the central cornea were visualized by second harmonic generation imaging microscopy. Images obtained in 1-μm steps from BL to Descemet's membrane (DM) were subjected to three-dimensional reconstruction. The reconstructed data sets were divided into 10 layers of equal depth (L1-L10) for analysis. The width of lamellae adherent to BL (L0) was also determined. For the normal cornea, the width (mean ± SD) of collagen lamellae was 6.5 ± 1.7 μm at L0, decreased to 4.3 ± 1.3 μm at L1, and then increased gradually with progression toward DM to 122.2 ± 34.5 μm at L10, whereas the angle of lamellae was 20.9° ± 5.4° at L1 and decreased initially to 10.6° ± 3.2° at L2 before declining gradually to 2.7° ± 2.2° at L10. The width and angle of collagen lamellae in the keratoconic cornea were significantly larger and smaller, respectively, relative to those in the normal cornea. In the normal human cornea, collagen lamellae adjacent to BL are narrow and form a steep angle with BL, whereas they increase in width and their angle relative to BL flattens with progression toward DM. These properties of collagen lamellae are altered in keratoconus and are likely related to abnormalities of corneal shape. © ARVO.

  19. Quantification of collagen fiber organization in biological tissues at cellular and molecular scales using second-harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar Ramachandra Rao, Raghu

    Collagen is the most abundant structural protein found in the human body, and is responsible for providing structure and function to tissues. Collagen molecules organize naturally into structures called fibers on the scale of the wavelength of light and lack inversion symmetry, thus allowing for the process of second harmonic generation (SHG) when exposed to intense incident light. We have developed two quantitative techniques: Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) imaging and generalized chi2 second-harmonic generation (chi2-SHG) imaging. In order to show that FT-SHG imaging can be used as a valuable diagnostic tool for real-world biological problems, we first investigate collagenase-induced injury in horse tendons. Clear differences in collagen fiber organization between normal and injured tendon are quantified. In particular, we observe that the regularly oriented organization of collagen fibers in normal tendons is disrupted in injured tendons leading to a more random organization. We also observe that FT-SHG microscopy is more sensitive in assessing tendon injury compared to the conventional polarized light microscopy. The second study includes quantifying collagen fibers in cortical bone using FT-SHG imaging and comparing it with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further, as an example study, we show how FT-SHG imaging could be used to quantify changes in bone structure as a function of age. Some initial work and future directions for extending FT-SHG to 3D are also discussed. The second technique, chi2-SHG imaging, takes advantage of the coherent nature of SHG and utilizes polarization to extract the second-order susceptibility (d elements) which provides information on molecular organization, i.e., it provides access to sub-diffractional changes "optically". We use chi2-SHG in combination with FT-SHG imaging to investigate a couple of biological problems. First, we quantify differences in collagen fiber organization between cornea and

  20. Surface temperature of deposit probe; Overfladetemperatur af belaegningsprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, S. [Risoe National Lab., Optics and Plasma Research Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Holst Soerensen, L. [Rea Tech, Roskilde (Denmark); Hu, G.; Arendt Jensen, P. [Depart. of Chemical Engineering, (KT), Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Simonsen, P.; Berg, M. [Energi E2, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    Belaegningsdannelser ved fyring med biomasse kan give anledning til driftforstyrrelser og problemer saesom taering af hedeflader, forringede varmeoverfoeringsforhold i kedlen samt aflejringer som skaber forringede flowforhold i kedlen. Belaegningsdannelse kan soeges undersoegt pae laboratorieskala i en fastbraendselsreaktor af flowreaktor typen, hvor isaer temperaturforholdene i reaktoren og pae belaegningsproben tilstraebes, at vaere sae realistiske og velbestemte som mulige. Som en del af biostoevfyringsprojektet undersoeges overfladetemperaturforhold af faststofreaktorens belaegningsprobe som funktion af tid og belaegningsudvikling vha. et infraroed kamera. Desuden er belaegningstemperaturer maelt med samme udstyr pae overhedere pae Avedoere biokedlen under halm-forbraending til sammenligning af temperaturforhold. Pae Avedoere biokedel maeles belaegningstemperaturerne pae overhederne til 850 grader C - 1000 grader C. Dette er vaesentligt hoejere end i faststofreaktorforsoegene, hvor belaegningsoverfladetemperaturerne maeles til 550 grader C - 710 grader C. Ved paebraending af partikler pae probe og overheder ses lokalt overfladetemperaturer som er 90 grader C - 150 grader C hoejere end temperaturniveauet af belaegningen. Deposits formation in biomass combustion may cause operational irregularities and problems like corrosion of heating surfaces, decreased heat transfer conditions in the boiler. Deposits formation may be sought investigated in a laboratory scale in a solid fuel reactor of the flow reactor type, where in particular the temperature conditions in the reactor and on the deposits probe is targeted to be as realistic and well determined as possible. As a part of the biomass firing project the surface temperature relations of the solid fuel reactor is investigated as a function of time and deposits evolution using an infrared camera. Additionally for comparison Avedoere biofuel boiler (ABB) deposits temperatures at the super heaters are monitored using

  1. Electrical conduction through surface superstructures measured by microscopic four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanabe, F.

    2003-01-01

    (STM) are used for measurements of four-point probe conductivity. The probe spacing can be changed from 500 nm to 1 mm. The other method involves monolithic micro-four-point probes, fabricated on silicon chips, whose probe spacing is fixed around several mum. These probes are installed in scanning......For in-situ measurements of the local electrical conductivity of well-defined crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum, we have developed two kinds of microscopic four-point probe methods. One involves a "four-tip STM prober," in which four independently driven tips of a scanning tunneling microscope......-electron-microscopy/electron-diffraction chambers, in which the structures of sample surfaces and probe positions are observed in situ. The probes can be positioned precisely on aimed areas on the sample with the aid of piezoactuators. By the use of these machines, the surface sensitivity in conductivity measurements has been greatly enhanced...

  2. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Optical diagnostics of laser-produced plasma requires a coherent, polarized probe beam synchronized with the pump beam. The probe beam should have energy above the background emission of plasma. Though the second harmonic probe beam satisfies most of the requirements, the plasma emission is larger ...

  3. Development of Raman-shifted probe laser beam for plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical diagnostics of laser-produced plasma requires a coherent, polarized probe beam synchronized with the pump beam. The probe beam should have energy above the background emission of plasma. Though the second harmonic probe beam satisfies most of the requirements, the plasma emission is larger at the ...

  4. Carbon Nanotube Tip Probes: Stability and Lateral Resolution in Scanning Probe Microscopy and Application to Surface Science to Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Chao, Kuo-Jen; Stevens, Ramsey M. D.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present results on the stability and lateral resolution capability of carbon nanotube (CNT) scanning probes as applied to atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surface topography images of ultra-thin films (2-5 nm thickness) obtained with AFM are used to illustrate the lateral resolution capability of single-walled carbon nanotube probes. Images of metal films prepared by ion beam sputtering exhibit grain sizes ranging from greater than 10 nm to as small as approximately 2 nm for gold and iridium respectively. In addition, imaging stability and lifetime of multi-walled carbon nanotube scanning probes are studied on a relatively hard surface of silicon nitride (Si3N4). AFM images Of Si3N4 surface collected after more than 15 hrs of continuous scanning show no detectable degradation in lateral resolution. These results indicate the general feasibility of CNT tips and scanning probe microscopy for examining nanometer-scale surface features of deposited metals as well as non-conductive thin films. AFM coupled with CNT tips offers a simple and nondestructive technique for probing a variety of surfaces, and has immense potential as a surface characterization tool in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  5. Direct measurement of surface-state conductance by microscopic four-point probe method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanikawa, T.

    2002-01-01

    For in situ measurements of local electrical conductivity of well defined crystal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum, we have developed microscopic four-point probes with a probe spacing of several micrometres, installed in a scanning-electron - microscope/electron-diffraction chamber. The probe...

  6. Microfour-point probe for studying electronic transport through surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Grey, Francois; Shiraki, I.

    2000-01-01

    Microfour-point probes integrated on silicon chips have been fabricated with probe spacings in the range 4-60 mum. They provide a simple robust device for electrical transport measurements at surfaces, bridging the gap between conventional macroscopic four-point probes and scanning tunneling...

  7. Revealing the second harmonic generation in a femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma by analyzing shapes of Ar XVII spectral lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Eugene; Dalimier, Elisabeth; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana; Fukuda, Yuji; Andreev, Alexander; Koga, James; Sakaki, Hironao; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander; Hayashi, Yukio; Skobelev, Igor; Pikuz, Sergei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-12-14

    We present experiments dealing with a femtosecond laser-driven cluster-based plasma, where by analyzing the nonlinear phenomenon of satellites of spectral lines of Ar XVII, we revealed the nonlinear phenomenon of the generation of the second harmonic of the laser frequency. For performing this analysis we developed new results in the theory of satellites of spectral lines. From such lineshape analysis we found, in particular, that the efficiency of converting the short (40 fs) intense (3x10¹⁸ W/cm²) incident laser light into the second harmonic was 2%. This result is in the excellent agreement with the 2-Dimensional Particle-In-Cell (2D PIC) simulation that we also performed. There is also an order of magnitude agreement between the thresholds for the SHG found from the line shape analysis and from the 2D PIC simulations.

  8. First and second harmonic generation of the XAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} (X=Zn,Cd,Hg) defect chalcopyrite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouahrani, Tarik, E-mail: tarik_ouahrani@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Tlemcen, B.P.230,13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Ecole Preparatoire en Sciences et Techniques, Depertement de Physique EPST-T, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique (LPQ3M), Universite de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria); Lasri, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Tlemcen, B.P.230,13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Universite Dr Tahar Moulay de Saida, B.P. 138, Cite el Nasr, Saida 20000 (Algeria); Reshak, Ali H. [School of Complex systems, FFPW- South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Bouhemadou, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Bin-Omran, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-09-15

    The chemical bonding of the ZnAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, CdAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and HgAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} defect chalcopyrites has been studied in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The GW quasi-particle approximation is used to correct the DFT-underestimation of energy gap, and as a consequence the linear and nonlinear optical properties are significantly enhanced. The second harmonic generation (SHG) displays certain dependence with the ionicity degree decrease through the dependency of the SHG on the band gap. The occurrence of the AIM saddle point is characterized and some clarifying features in relationship with the density topology are exposed, which enable to understand the relation with the second harmonic generation effect.

  9. Energy exchange properties during second-harmonic generation in finite one-dimensional photonic band-gap structures with deep gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Giuseppe; Centini, Marco; Scalora, Michael; Sibilia, Concita; Bertolotti, Mario; Bloemer, Mark J.; Bowden, Charles M.

    2003-01-01

    We study second-harmonic generation in finite, one-dimensional, photonic band-gap structures with large index contrast in the regime of pump depletion and global phase-matching conditions. We report a number of surprising results: above a certain input intensity, field dynamics resemble a multiwave mixing process, where backward and forward components compete for the available energy; the pump field is mostly reflected, revealing a type of optical limiting behavior; and second-harmonic generation becomes balanced in both directions, showing unusual saturation effects with increasing pump intensity. This dynamics was unexpected, and it is bound to influence the way one goes about thinking and designing nonlinear frequency conversion devices in a practical way.

  10. Myosin helical pitch angle as a quantitative imaging biomarker for characterization of cardiac programming in fetal growth restriction measured by polarization second harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Roldan, I.; Psilodimitrakopoulos, S.,; Eixarch, E.,; Torre, I.; Wotjas, B.; Crispi, F.; Figueras, F.; Artigas, D.,; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Gratacos, E.,

    2009-07-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) has recently shown a strong association with cardiac programming which predisposes to cardiovascular mortality in adulthood. Polarization Second Harmonic Microscopy can quantify molecular architecture changes with high sensitivity in cardiac myofibrils. In this work, we use myosin helical pitch angle as an example to quantify such alterations related to this high risk population. Importantly, this shows a potential use of the technique as an early diagnostic tool and an alternative method to understand pathophysiological processes.

  11. AFM fluid delivery/liquid extraction surface sampling/electrostatic spray cantilever probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-23

    An electrospray system comprises a liquid extraction surface sampling probe. The probe comprises a probe body having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, and having a liquid extraction tip. A solvent delivery conduit is provided for receiving solvent liquid from the liquid inlet and delivering the solvent liquid to the liquid extraction tip. An open liquid extraction channel extends across an exterior surface of the probe body from the liquid extraction tip to the liquid outlet. An electrospray emitter tip is in liquid communication with the liquid outlet of the liquid extraction surface sampling probe. A system for analyzing samples, a liquid junction surface sampling system, and a method of analyzing samples are also disclosed.

  12. Theoretical investigation for Li{sub 2}CuSb as multifunctional materials: Electrode for high capacity rechargeable batteries and novel materials for second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, Ali Hussain, E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [Institute of Physical Biology-South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kamarudin, H. [School of Materials Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis (UniMAP), P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2011-07-28

    Highlights: > We predict that Li{sub 2}CuSb should be good electrode materials for high capacity rechargeable batteries and novel materials for SHG. > We found that intercalation of lithium leads to phase transitions, which agrees well with the experiment. > Intercalation of Li leads to increase the conductivity and break the symmetry along optical axis make the material useful for SHG application. > The microscopic second order hyperpolarizability, the vector component along the dipole moment direction is about 31.01x10{sup -30} esu. - Abstract: Based on the first-principles electronic structure calculations, we predict that Li{sub 2}CuSb should be good electrode materials for high capacity rechargeable batteries and novel materials for second harmonic generation. This prediction is based on the experimental measurements of Fransson et al. , and as step forward to do deep investigation on these materials we addressed ourselves for performing theoretical calculation. We found that intercalation of lithium leads to phase transitions, which agrees well with the experiment, increasing the conductivity of the material, and break the symmetry along the optical axis making the material useful for second harmonic generation (SHG) applications. We should emphasize that lithiated compound show very high second order optical susceptibility. We present the total charge densities in the (1 1 0) and (1 0 0) planes for the parent and lithiated phases and it was found that the parent compound shows a considerable anisotropy between the two planes in consistence with our calculated optical properties. We found that Li{sub 2}CuSb possesses high second harmonic generation and its second order optical susceptibility of the total absolute value at zero frequency is equal to 142 pm/V. Based on the value of the second order optical susceptibility the microscopic second order hyperpolarizability, {beta}{sub ijk}, the vector component along the dipole moment direction is about 31.01 x 10

  13. 1.5 W green light generation by single-pass second harmonic generation of a single-frequency tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    More than 1.5 W of green light at 531 nm is generated by singlepass second harmonic generation in periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. The pump laser is a high power tapered laser with a distributed Bragg reflector etched in the ridge section of the laser to provide wavelength selectivity. The output...... power of the single-frequency tapered laser is 9.3 W in continuous wave operation. A conversion efficiency of 18.5 % was achieved in the experiments....

  14. Study of carrier blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate thin layer by electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Anderson, Liam J.; Jacob, Mohan V.

    2014-02-01

    By using electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement, we studied the carrier-blocking property of poly-linalyl acetate (PLA) thin layers sandwiched in indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)/PLA/C60/Al double-layer diodes. Results showed that the PLA layer totally blocks electrons crossing the C60 layer, and also blocks holes entering from the IZO layer. The EFISHG measurement effectively substantiates the hole-blocking electron-blocking property of the PLA layer sandwiched in double layer diodes.

  15. Effect of three pluronic polymers on the transport of an organic cation across a POPG bilayer studied by Second Harmonic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintali, S. R.; Varshney, G. K.; Das, K.

    2017-09-01

    Pluronic polymer induced transport of an organic cation across a negatively charged POPG membrane bilayer were studied using interfacial selective Second Harmonic (SH) spectroscopic technique. The length of either hydrophilic (poly-ethylene oxide) or hydrophobic (poly-propylene oxide) unit in the polymer was varied to investigate their effect on membrane transport. Membrane transport was observed to depend critically on the length of the hydrophobic segment present in the polymer. Membrane transport studies using polymers which were either 'incorporated' or 'incubated' with the lipid bilayer suggested that bilayer packing plays a critical role in the insertion of polymers having a long hydrophilic chain.

  16. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  17. Integrated Optoelectronic Probe Including a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser for Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, A.N.; Nieland, J.; Oosterbaan, S.; Steenbergen, W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mul, F.F.M. de; Kranenburg, H. van

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a

  18. Integrated optoelectronic probe including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser for laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, Alexander; Nieland, Janharm; Nieland, J.; Oosterbaan, Sjoerd; de Mul, F.F.M.; van Kranenburg, H.; Bekman, Herman H.P.Th.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a

  19. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin

    2013-01-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached...... measurements with an equidistant four-point probe for a wide range of contact spacings. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between bulk-like and surface-like conduction. The paper describes the design of the instrument and the approach to data and error analysis. Application examples are given...

  20. Nonlinear Effects in Three-minute Oscillations of the Solar Chromosphere. I. An Analytical Nonlinear Solution and Detection of the Second Harmonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jongchul; Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    2017-08-01

    The vertical propagation of nonlinear acoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere is considered. A new analytical solution that describes a finite-amplitude wave of an arbitrary wavelength is obtained. Although the short- and long-wavelength limits were previously considered separately, the new solution describes both limiting cases within a common framework and provides a straightforward way of interpolating between the two limits. Physical features of the nonlinear waves in the chromosphere are described, including the dispersive nature of low-frequency waves, the steepening of the wave profile, and the influence of the gravitational field on wavefront breaking and shock formation. The analytical results suggest that observations of three-minute oscillations in the solar chromosphere may reveal the basic nonlinear effect of oscillations with combination frequencies, superposed on the normal oscillations of the system. Explicit expressions for a second-harmonic signal and the ratio of its amplitude to the fundamental harmonic amplitude are derived. Observational evidence of the second harmonic, obtained with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph, installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Observatory, is presented. The presented data are based on the time variations of velocity determined from the Na i D2 and Hα lines.

  1. Nonlinear Effects in Three-minute Oscillations of the Solar Chromosphere. I. An Analytical Nonlinear Solution and Detection of the Second Harmonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jongchul [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Litvinenko, Yuri E. [Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, P. B. 3105, Hamilton 3240 (New Zealand)

    2017-08-01

    The vertical propagation of nonlinear acoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere is considered. A new analytical solution that describes a finite-amplitude wave of an arbitrary wavelength is obtained. Although the short- and long-wavelength limits were previously considered separately, the new solution describes both limiting cases within a common framework and provides a straightforward way of interpolating between the two limits. Physical features of the nonlinear waves in the chromosphere are described, including the dispersive nature of low-frequency waves, the steepening of the wave profile, and the influence of the gravitational field on wavefront breaking and shock formation. The analytical results suggest that observations of three-minute oscillations in the solar chromosphere may reveal the basic nonlinear effect of oscillations with combination frequencies, superposed on the normal oscillations of the system. Explicit expressions for a second-harmonic signal and the ratio of its amplitude to the fundamental harmonic amplitude are derived. Observational evidence of the second harmonic, obtained with the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph, installed at the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Observatory, is presented. The presented data are based on the time variations of velocity determined from the Na i D{sub 2} and H α lines.

  2. Tuning Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Thiago L; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Oliveira, Bruno S; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Ribeiro, Douglas S; Rabelo, Cassiano; Rodrigues, Wagner N; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-06-23

    A reproducible route for tuning localized surface plasmon resonance in scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes is presented. The method is based on the production of a focused-ion-beam milled single groove near the apex of electrochemically etched gold tips. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are employed to obtain highly spatially and spectroscopically resolved maps of the milled probes, revealing localized surface plasmon resonance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. By changing the distance L between the groove and the probe apex, the localized surface plasmon resonance energy can be fine-tuned at a desired absorption channel. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is applied as a test platform, and the results prove the reliability of the method to produce efficient scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes.

  3. Dispersion of the second harmonic generation from CdGa{sub 2}X{sub 4} (X = S, Se) defect chalcopyrite: DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Saleem Ayaz, E-mail: sayaz_usb@yahoo.com [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Nonlinear optical properties of CdGa{sub 2}X{sub 4} (X = S, Se) were investigated. • The compounds have large uniaxial anisotropy and large negative birefringence. • The second order susceptibility and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated. • CdGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} posses huge second harmonic generation. - Abstract: All electron full potential linear augmented plane wave method was used for calculating the nonlinear optical susceptibilities of CdGa{sub 2}X{sub 4} (X = S, Se) within the framework of density functional theory. The exchange correlation potential was solved by recently developed modified Becke and Johnson (mBJ) approximation. The crystal structure of CdGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4} reveals a large uniaxial dielectric anisotropy ensuing the birefringence of −0.036 and −0.066 which make it suitable for second harmonic generation. The second order susceptibility |χ{sub ijk}{sup (2)}(ω)| and microscopic first hyperpolarizability β{sub ijk}(ω) were calculated. The calculated |χ{sub 123}{sup (2)}(ω)| and |χ{sub 312}{sup (2)}(ω)| static values for the dominant components found to be 18.36 pm/V and 22.23 pm/V for CdGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4}. Both values shifted to be 60.12 pm/V and 108.86 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm. The calculated values of β{sub 123}(ω) is 6.47 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 12.42 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm for CdGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}, whereas it is 8.82 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 20.51 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm for CdGa{sub 2}Se{sub 4}. The evaluation of second order susceptibilities and first hyperpolarizabilties suggest that CdGa{sub 2}X{sub 4} possess huge second harmonic generation.

  4. Probing the surface of colloidal nanomaterials with potentiometry in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedin, Igor; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2014-08-13

    Colloidal nanomaterials represent an important branch of modern chemistry. However, we have very little understanding of molecular processes that occur at the nanocrystal (NC) surface during synthesis and post-synthetic modifications. Here we show that potentiometry can be used to study the surface of colloidal NCs under realistic reaction conditions. Potentiometric titrations of CdSe and InP nanostructures provide information on the active surface area, the affinity of ligands to the NC surface, and the surface reaction kinetics. These studies can be carried out at different temperatures in polar and nonpolar media for NCs of different sizes and shapes. In situ potentiometry can provide real-time feedback during synthesis of core-shell nanostructures.

  5. Art By Don Davis Artist's concept of one of the probes on the hot surface of Venus. Although the

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Art By Don Davis Artist's concept of one of the probes on the hot surface of Venus. Although the probes were not designed to withstand impact, there was a chance that one might survive and transmit some data from the surface. A small probe did survive and transmitted data for 67 minutes.

  6. Plasmon Enhanced Optical Near-field Probing of Metal Nanoaperture Surface Emitting Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Jiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2004-12-13

    We demonstrate a metal nano-aperture GaAs vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) for sub-wavelength optical near-filed probing, which exhibits the strong plasmon enhancement of both optical near-fields and voltage signals with forming a metal nano-particle in the nano-aperture. The threshold current is as low as 300microA, which shows a potential of nano-probing with low power consumption. We achieved the first demonstration of a plasmon enhanced VCSEL near-field probe. The spatial resolutions of the VCSEL probe with 400 nm and 200 nm apertures are 240nm and 130 nm, respectively. The enhancement factors of the optical near-field and voltage signal with a Au particle are 1.8 and 2, respectively. Our FDTD simulation shows that localized plasmon with a Au particle is very helpful for increasing optical near-field intensity and signal voltage in the VCSEL nano-probing.

  7. Nonlinear spectral imaging of human normal skin, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, S. Y.; Yang, J. G.; Zhuang, J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we use nonlinear spectral imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for analyzing the morphology of collagen and elastin and their biochemical variations in basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and normal skin tissue. It was found in this work that there existed apparent differences among BCC, SCC and normal skin in terms of their thickness of the keratin and epithelial layers, their size of elastic fibers, as well as their distribution and spectral characteristics of collagen. These differences can potentially be used to distinguish BCC and SCC from normal skin, and to discriminate between BCC and SCC, as well as to evaluate treatment responses.

  8. Second Harmonic Generation Using an All-Fiber Q-Switched Yb-Doped Fiber Laser and MgO:c-PPLN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Gan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have experimentally demonstrated an efficient all-fiber passively Q-switched Yb-doped fiber laser with Samarium doped fiber as a saturable absorber. Average output power of 3.4 W at a repetition rate of 250 kHz and a pulse width of 1.1 microseconds was obtained at a pump power of 9.0 W. By using this fiber laser system and an MgO-doped congruent periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:c-PPLN, second harmonic generation (SHG output at 532 nm was achieved at room temperature. The conversion efficiency is around 4.2% which agrees well with the theoretical simulation.

  9. CW blue-green light emission from GaN and SiC by sum-frequency generation and second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, L. C.; Steckl, A. J.

    2000-09-01

    Continuous wave (CW) back-scattered sum-frequency generation (SFG) and second harmonic generation (SHG) have been obtained from GaN and SiC. GaN samples were obtained from GaN films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), metalorganic chemical-vapor deposition and hydride vapor-phase epitaxy. The SiC samples were obtained from 3C SiC/Si grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), 4H and 6H single crystal SiC substrates. The samples were optically excited with two CW lasers at the red (840 nm) and the infrared (1.0 µm). SHG at 420 nm and 500 nm and SFG at 455 nm were observed. SFG and SHG were verified by measuring their relative intensities against the pumping laser power. The SHG signals from GaN and SiC samples are compared with that from KH2PO4 (KDP).

  10. Conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin layers on hydrophobic surface as studied by biomolecular probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Madsen, Jan Busk; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-01

    non-linear responses with increasing surface concentration. The results from this study support the conventional amphiphilic, triblock model of BSM in the adsorption onto hydrophobic surface from aqueous solution.The biomolecular probe-based approaches employed in this study, however, provided further...

  11. Results of experimental tests and calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, W.T.; Bussell, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The surface neutron moisture probe has been tested both to demonstrate that is is able to operate in the expected in-tank temperature and gamma-ray fields and to provide detector responses to known moisture concentration materials. The probe will properly function in a simultaneous high temperature (80 degrees C) and high gamma radiation field (210 rad/hr)environment. Comparisons between computer model predicted and experimentally measured detector responses to changes in moisture provide a basis for the probe calibration to in-tank moisture concentrations.

  12. Probing surface structures of Shewanella spp. by microelectrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dague, E.; Duval, J.F.L.; Jorand, R.; Thomas, F.; Gaboriaud, F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-range electrostatic forces substantially influence bacterial interactions and bacterial adhesion during the preliminary steps of biofilm formation. The strength of these forces depends strongly on the structure of the bacterium surfaces investigated. The latter may be addressed from appropriate

  13. Probing surface quantum flows in deformed pygmy dipole modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Kortelainen, M.; Pei, J. C.

    2017-09-01

    To explore the nature of collective modes in weakly bound nuclei, we have investigated deformation effects and surface flow patterns of isovector dipole modes in a shape-coexisting nucleus, 40Mg. The calculations were done in a fully self-consistent continuum finite-amplitude quasiparticle random phase approximation in a large deformed spatial mesh. An unexpected result of pygmy and giant dipole modes having disproportionate deformation splittings in strength functions was obtained. Furthermore, the transition current densities demonstrate that the long-sought core-halo oscillation in pygmy resonances is collective and compressional, corresponding to the lowest excitation energy and the simplest quantum flow topology. Our calculations show that surface flow patterns become more complicated as excitation energies increase.

  14. Micro reflectance difference techniques: Optical probes for surface exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, L.F.; Del Pozo-Zamudio, O.; Herrera-Jasso, R.; Ulloa-Castillo, N.A.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, 78000 San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    Micro reflectance difference spectroscopy ({mu}-RDS) is a promising tool for the in-situ and ex-situ characterization of semiconductors surfaces and interfaces. We discuss and compare two different approaches used to measure {mu}-RD spectra. One is based on a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, while the other uses a laser and a XY translation stage. To show the performance of these systems, we have measured surface optical anisotropies of GaSb(001) sample on which anisotropic strains have been generated by preferential mechanical polishing along [110] and [1 anti 10] directions. The spectrometers are complementary and the selection of one of them depends on the sample to be investigated and on experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. ANALYSIS OF SURFACE DEFECTS OF ALUMINUM AND ITS ALLOYS WITH A SCANNING KELVIN PROBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tyavlovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the use of probe electrometry in non-destructive testing is constrained by the complexity of measurement results interpretation. An output signal of electrometric probe depends on a number of physical and chemical parameters of surface including chemical composition variations, stresses, dislocations, crystallographic orientation of a surface, etc. The study aims to the use of probe electrometry methods for nondestructive testing and analysis of precision metal surfaces’ defects after different treatment or processing.Control of surface defects of aluminum and its alloys was performed with a scanning Kelvin probe technique. The results of scanning were plotted in a form of contact potential difference (CPD distribution map. Additionally, a histogram of CPD values distribution and statistical characteristics including the expectation of CPD mean value and histogram half-width were calculated either for the whole distribution or for each individual mode in a case of multimodal distribution.The spatial CPD distribution of A99 aluminum and AMG-2 alloy surfaces after electrochemical polishing and diamond finishing was studied. An additional study was held for AMG-2 surface after the formation of 30 microns thick specific nanostructured alumina oxide surface layer. Higher quality surfaces have characterized as more homogeneous distribution of the physical properties (at half-width distribution histogram. Surfaces with higher mechanical strength and overall better mechanical properties found to have lower CPD values that correspond to higher electron work function and surface energy. The presence of the second mode in the CPD distribution histogram indicates the significant proportion of defect areas on the sample surface.Analysis of visualized CPD distribution maps using defined criteria allows detecting and characterizing such defects as residual stress areas, areas with reduced microhardness, surface contamination spots, corrosion

  16. Conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin layers on hydrophobic surface as studied by biomolecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I; Madsen, Jan B; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the conformational changes of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) adsorbed on a hydrophobic surface (polystyrene (PS)) as a function of concentration in bulk solution (up to 2mg/mL) have been investigated with biomolecular probe-based approaches, including bicinchoninic acid (BCA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), and enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA). The conformation and hydrodynamic diameter of highly purified BSM molecules, as characterized by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS), respectively, showed a slight, yet gradual coiling and compaction in response to the increase in BSM concentration in bulk solution. Adsorbed masses of BSM onto hydrophobic surface, as probe by BCA, showed a continuously increasing trend up to 2mg/mL. But, the signals from EIA and ELLA, which probe the concentration of available unglycosylated C-terminals and the central glycosylated regions, respectively, showed complicated non-linear responses with increasing surface concentration. The results from this study support the conventional amphiphilic, triblock model of BSM in the adsorption onto hydrophobic surface from aqueous solution. The biomolecular probe-based approaches employed in this study, however, provided further details on the conformational changes of BSM on surface, in particular the accessibility of glycosylated and unglycosylated domains with increasing surface concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scanning probe microscopy estimation of the wear resistance of the surface of a modified PVC film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, A. S.; Gorbushin, P. N.; Sosnov, E. A.; Kolert, K.; Malygin, A. A.

    2017-04-01

    An atomic force microscopy technique is proposed to determine the wear resistance of a protective coating deposited by the sol-gel method on the surface of a polyvinylchloride film. The force of action of a probe on a sample is estimated under various scanning conditions. It is shown that the obtained data on the resistance of a coating to the action of a probe in the contact mode can be used to qualitatively estimate the adhesion of the coating to the surface of a polymer matrix.

  18. Inspection of Pipe Inner Surface using Advanced Pipe Crawler Robot with PVDF Sensor based Rotating Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vimal AGARWAL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to corrosive environment, pipes used for transportation of water and gas at the plants often get damaged. Defects caused by corrosion and cracking may cause serious accidents like leakage, fire and blasts. It also reduces the life of the transportation system substantially. In order to inspect such defects, a Polyvinyledene Fluoride (PVDF based cantilever smart probe is developed to scan the surface quality of the pipes. The smart probe, during rotation, touches the inner surface of the pipe and experience a broad-band excitation in the absence of surface features. On the other hand, whenever the probe comes across any surface projection, there is a change in vibration pattern of the probe, which causes a high voltage peak/pulse. Such peaks/pulses could give useful information about the location and nature of a defect. Experiments are carried out on different patterns, sizes and shapes of surface projections artificially constructed inside the pipe. The sensor system has reliably predicted the presence and distribution of projections in every case. It is envisaged that the new sensing system could be used effectively for pipe health monitoring.

  19. Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy in PCR product analysis by peptide nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Danfeng; Yu, Fang; Kim, Junyoung; Scholz, Judith; Nielsen, Peter E; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-14

    Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) was recently developed for PCR product analysis, which allowed for real-time monitoring of hybridization processes and for the detection of trace amounts of PCR products, with a detection limit of 100 fmol on the peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe surface, and 500 fmol on the DNA probe surface. By selectively labeling the strands of PCR-amplified DNA, it was shown that the heat denaturation process in combination with the application of low-salt condition substantially reduced the interference from the antisense strands and thus simplified the surface hybridization. Furthermore, SPFS was demonstrated to be capable of quantitatively discriminating the difference induced by single nucleotide substitution, even within one minute of contact time.

  20. The electrical double layer on gold probed by electrokinetic and surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesbers, M.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Gold surfaces, obtained by vacuum deposition of 15-nm gold films on glass and silica wafers, were studied in aqueous solutions by streaming potential measurements and colloidal-probe AFM force measurements. In the force measurements both a bare and a gold-coated silica particle (6 m in diameter)

  1. Safety assessment by multiphoton fluorescence/second harmonic generation/hyper-Rayleigh scattering tomography of ZnO nanoparticles used in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M E; König, K; Kellner-Hoefer, M; Breunig, H G; Werncke, W; Meinke, M C; Patzelt, A; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2012-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are commonly used as UV filters in commercial sunscreen products. Their penetration into the skin is intensively discussed in the literature. In the present in vivo study, penetration of ZnO NPs (30 nm in size) into human skin was investigated by multiphoton tomography. Based on the non-linear effects of a second harmonic generation and hyper-Rayleigh scattering, the distribution of ZnO NPs in the horny layers of the epidermis, as well as the furrows, wrinkles and orifice of the hair follicles was analyzed. This method permitted distinguishing between the particulate and dissolved forms of Zn. A detection limit of 0.08 fg/μm(3) was estimated. Taking advantage of this sensitivity, it was clearly shown that ZnO NPs penetrate only into the outermost layers of stratum corneum, furrows and into the orifices of the hair follicles and do not reach the viable epidermis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Rb2Na(NO33: A Congruently Melting UV-NLO Crystal with a Very Strong Second-Harmonic Generation Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Zou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of congruently melting noncentrosymmetric (NCS mixed alkali metal nitrate, Rb2Na(NO33, have been grown through solid state reactions. The material possesses layers with NaO8 hexagonal bipyramids and NO3 triangular units. Rb+ cations are residing in the interlayer space. Each NaO8 hexagonal bipyramid shares its corners and edges with two and three NO3 units, respectively, in order to fulfill a highly dense stacking in the unit cell. The NaO8 groups share their six oxygen atoms in equatorial positions with three different NO3 groups to generate a NaO6-NO3 layer with a parallel alignment. The optimized arrangement of the NO3 groups and their high density in the structure together produce a strong second-harmonic generation (SHG response. Powder SHG measurements indicate that Rb2Na(NO33 has a strong SHG efficiency of five times that of KH2PO4 (KDP and is type I phase-matchable. The calculated average nonlinear optical (NLO susceptibility of Rb2Na(NO33 turns out to be the largest value among the NLO materials composed of only [NO3]− anion. In addition, Rb2Na(NO33 exhibits a wide transparency region ranging from UV to near IR, which suggests that the compound is a promising NLO material.

  3. Determining the influence of age and diabetes on the second-harmonic generation strength of dermal collagen fibers in vivo by using electronic noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Wei-Chun; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Argon

    2013-02-01

    It is commonly believed that intrinsic skin aging is associated with the change of the collagen structures. The influence of the diabetes on the skin collagen is also considered to be similar to aging. Moreover, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) in collagen fibers is known to reflect the detailed collagen structures. It is thus highly valuable to adopt the SHG intensity as a collagen structure indicator. With the help of SHG, recently one can achieve in vivo imaging which provides the information of what really happens beneath the human skin. However, when analyzing the images, the SHG brightness of each pixel highly depends on the illumination condition, the depth of the SHG source, and the voltage of PMT. Therefore, it is important to calibrate these factors before statistical analysis. In this paper, we present our recent development that calibrates the in vivo SHG images by using noises. We first determine the regions of signals and noises by setting a threshold relating to the standard deviation of the image. By using the assumption that the noise was amplified by PMT with an amplification ratio the same as the SHG signal, we can define the brightness of the noise region as a parameter representing the voltage of PMT, and use this parameter to calibrate all SHG images. After calibrating, we can then compare different images from volunteers and analyze the influence of aging and diabetes on the SHG intensity from collagen fibers, even if the voltage of PMT was not fixed.

  4. Comparison of Picrosirius Red Staining With Second Harmonic Generation Imaging for the Quantification of Clinically Relevant Collagen Fiber Features in Histopathology Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Mathewson, Kara; Mehta, Guneet; Keikhosravi, Adib; Liu, Yuming; Lemancik, Stephanie; Ricke, William A; Weber, Sharon M; Kao, W John; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2016-09-01

    Stromal collagen alignment has been shown to have clinical significance in a variety of cancers and in other diseases accompanied by fibrosis. While much of the biological and clinical importance of collagen changes has been demonstrated using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in experimental settings, implementation into routine clinical pathology practice is currently prohibitive. To translate the assessment of collagen organization into routine pathology workflow, a surrogate visualization method needs to be examined. The objective of the present study was to quantitatively compare collagen metrics generated from SHG microscopy and commonly available picrosirius red stain with standard polarization microscopy (PSR-POL). Each technique was quantitatively compared with established image segmentation and fiber tracking algorithms using human pancreatic cancer as a model, which is characterized by a pronounced stroma with reorganized collagen fibers. Importantly, PSR-POL produced similar quantitative trends for most collagen metrics in benign and cancerous tissues as measured by SHG. We found it notable that PSR-POL detects higher fiber counts, alignment, length, straightness, and width compared with SHG imaging but still correlates well with SHG results. PSR-POL may provide sufficient and additional information in a conventional clinical pathology laboratory for certain types of collagen quantification. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  5. Computation of Second Harmonic Generation for Crystalline Urea and KDP. An ab Initio Approach through the Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rérat, Michel; Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Dovesi, Roberto

    2016-01-12

    The electronic second harmonic generation (SHG) tensor, d, of crystalline urea and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is evaluated as a function of frequency using a Gaussian type basis set and the Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) and Kohn-Sham (CPKS) schemes as implemented in the CRYSTAL code. The results of various functionals, including LDA, GGA (PBE), and global and range-separated hybrids (B3LYP, PBE0, LC-BLYP), as well as Hartree-Fock, are compared. It is found that the calculated SHG intensity always decreases as the percentage of exact exchange increases. The hybrid functionals turn out to provide results that agree well with experiment. For urea and KDP the percentage of exact exchange determined by the inverse dielectric constant is too large. At 1064 nm the vibrational contribution for urea is found to be less than 5% of the total value. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first coupled (self-consistent) calculation of SHG for any periodic system.

  6. Comparison of Picrosirius Red Staining With Second Harmonic Generation Imaging for the Quantification of Clinically Relevant Collagen Fiber Features in Histopathology Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drifka, Cole R.; Loeffler, Agnes G.; Mathewson, Kara; Mehta, Guneet; Keikhosravi, Adib; Liu, Yuming; Lemancik, Stephanie; Ricke, William A.; Weber, Sharon M.; Kao, W. John; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal collagen alignment has been shown to have clinical significance in a variety of cancers and in other diseases accompanied by fibrosis. While much of the biological and clinical importance of collagen changes has been demonstrated using second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in experimental settings, implementation into routine clinical pathology practice is currently prohibitive. To translate the assessment of collagen organization into routine pathology workflow, a surrogate visualization method needs to be examined. The objective of the present study was to quantitatively compare collagen metrics generated from SHG microscopy and commonly available picrosirius red stain with standard polarization microscopy (PSR-POL). Each technique was quantitatively compared with established image segmentation and fiber tracking algorithms using human pancreatic cancer as a model, which is characterized by a pronounced stroma with reorganized collagen fibers. Importantly, PSR-POL produced similar quantitative trends for most collagen metrics in benign and cancerous tissues as measured by SHG. We found it notable that PSR-POL detects higher fiber counts, alignment, length, straightness, and width compared with SHG imaging but still correlates well with SHG results. PSR-POL may provide sufficient and additional information in a conventional clinical pathology laboratory for certain types of collagen quantification. PMID:27449741

  7. Micro-four-point probes in a UHV scanning electron microscope for in-situ surface-conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraki, I.; Nagao, T.; Hasegawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    For in-situ measurements of surface conductivity in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), we have installed micro-four-point probes (probe spacings down to 4 mum) in a UHV scanning electron microscope (SEM) combined with scanning reflection-high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). With the aid of piezoactuators...... for precise positioning of the probes, local conductivity of selected surface domains of well-defined superstructures could be measured during SEM and RHEED observations. It was found that the surface sensitivity of the conductivity measurements was enhanced by reducing the probe spacing, enabling...

  8. Probing the switching state of a surface-mounted azobenzene derivative using femtosecond XUV photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunau, Jan; Heinemann, Nils; Rohwer, Timm; Zargarani, Dordaneh; Kuhn, Sonja; Jung, Ullrich; Kipp, Lutz; Magnussen, Olaf; Herges, Rainer; Bauer, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy using femtosecond XUV light pulses is applied to probe the isomerization state of the molecular switch 3-(4-(4-hexyl-phenylazo)-phenoxy)-propane-1-thiol deposited by liquid phase self-assembly on Au(111). Spectral shifts of valence-electronic signatures that we associate with the carbon C2s orbital enable us to distinguish the trans and the cis isomerization state of the adsorbed molecules. These preliminary results envision the potential to probe reversible switching processes of surface-mounted molecules in real time by tracking the temporal evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a femtosecond XUV photoemission experiment.

  9. Two-photon-excited autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy for the visualization of penetration of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles into human tooth tissue ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunina, Natalia A.; Popov, Alexey P.; Lademann, Jürgen; Tuchin, Valery V.; Myllylä, Risto; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2012-06-01

    Penetration of nanoparticles into tooth tissues is of significant interest in solving problems related to reduction of tooth sensitivity, enamel strengthening and restoration and cosmetic bleaching. In this work we demonstrate two-photonexcited autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy for visualization of penetration of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles into tooth tissues.

  10. Measurement of identified π0 and inclusive photon second-harmonic parameter v2 and Implications for Direct Photon Production in VsNN=200 GeV Au+Au

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzmann, T.

    2006-01-01

    The azimuthal distribution of identified π0 and inclusive photons has been measured in VsNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The second-harmonic parameter (v2) was measured to describe the observed anisotropy of the azimuthal

  11. Detection of surface-plasmon evanescent fields using a metallic probe tip covered with fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wakamatsu, T; Shinbo, K; Kato, K; Kaneko, F

    1999-01-01

    A new experimental system has been constructed to detect evanescent fields of metal surface plasmons (SPs) using a metallic probe tip covered with fluorescence cadmium sulfide (CdS). The evanescent fields of the SPs sensitive to the metal interfaces were observed as fluorescent light from CdS on the tip. No additional lock-in detection technique with a vibrating probe tip is necessary in the system, in spite of the scattered light enhanced by SP due to the surface roughness. The fluorescent light measured for the Al film sample shows exponential decay with distance from the sample surface, indicating that the SP evanescent fields are detected with our apparatus. (10 refs).

  12. Probing the surfaces of core-shell and hollow nanoparticles by solvent relaxation NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M R; Wray, D; Paul, A; Griffiths, P C

    2017-12-26

    Measurement of the spin-spin NMR relaxation time (or its inverse, the rate) of water molecules in aqueous nanoparticle dispersions has become a popular approach to probe of the nature and structure of the particle surface and any adsorbed species. Here, we report on the characterisation of aqueous dispersions of hollow amorphous nanoparticles that have two liquid accessible surfaces (inner cavity surface and outer shell surface) plus the solid (silica) and core-shell (titania-silica) nanoparticle precursors from which the hollow particles have been prepared. In all cases, the observed water relaxation rates scale linearly with particle surface area, with the effect being more pronounced with increasing levels of titania present at the particle surface. Two distinct behaviours were observed for the hollow nanoparticles at very low volume fractions, which appear to merge with increasing surface area (particle concentration). Herewith, we further show the versatility of solvent NMR spectroscopy as a probe of surface character. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Analysis of surface plasmon polariton nanofocusing by asymmetric metal-coated dielectric probe: Partial metal-coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Ngo Thi; Tanaka, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masahiro; Chien, Dao Ngoc

    2017-07-01

    For the purpose of developing the probe using surface plasmon polariton (SPP) nanofocusing that is valid for incident linearly polarized (LP) wave, the partially metal-coated dielectric conical probe is investigated numerically by the volume integral equation. It is found that it possible to perform SPP nanofocusing using this probe for incident LP Gaussian beam in addition to incident radially polarized (RP) beam. The basic characteristics of the strongly localized and enhanced optical near-fields on the tip of the probe and optical intensities inside the probe are investigated. For the incident LP beams, it is found that the optimum structure of the partially metal-coated dielectric probe exists. For the case of incident RP beam, partial metal-coating of the probe degrades the characteristic of nanofocusing, i.e., fully metal-coated conventional probe is the optimum shape for incident RP beam.

  14. Probing electronic state at atomic scale on the surface of SrVO3 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Ryota; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro

    2014-03-01

    Probing electronic structure of atomically well controlled surface of Perovskite-type 3d transition-metal oxides have been attracting much interest because of their intriguing emergent physical properties by heterostructure engineering. In this study, we have especially focused on SrVO3, where importance of correlation effects has been considered. We successfully obtained atomically flat surfaces of SrVO3, which gave us the great opportunity to visualize correlated electronic state at atomic scale by means of spectroscopic imaging scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Based on the experimental data, we discuss spectroscopic signature of many body effects on the surface of SrVO3 system.

  15. Pump-probe surface photovoltage spectroscopy measurements on semiconductor epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Dipankar; Porwal, S.; Sharma, T. K.; Kumar, Shailendra; Oak, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    Pump-probe Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy (SPS) measurements are performed on semiconductor epitaxial layers. Here, an additional sub-bandgap cw pump laser beam is used in a conventional chopped light geometry SPS setup under the pump-probe configuration. The main role of pump laser beam is to saturate the sub-bandgap localized states whose contribution otherwise swamp the information related to the bandgap of material. It also affects the magnitude of Dember voltage in case of semi-insulating (SI) semiconductor substrates. Pump-probe SPS technique enables an accurate determination of the bandgap of semiconductor epitaxial layers even under the strong influence of localized sub-bandgap states. The pump beam is found to be very effective in suppressing the effect of surface/interface and bulk trap states. The overall magnitude of SPV signal is decided by the dependence of charge separation mechanisms on the intensity of the pump beam. On the contrary, an above bandgap cw pump laser can be used to distinguish the signatures of sub-bandgap states by suppressing the band edge related feature. Usefulness of the pump-probe SPS technique is established by unambiguously determining the bandgap of p-GaAs epitaxial layers grown on SI-GaAs substrates, SI-InP wafers, and p-GaN epilayers grown on Sapphire substrates.

  16. Immobilization of human papillomavirus DNA probe for surface plasmon resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Ji, Yanhong; Ma, Suihua; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Yao; He, Yonghong; Guo, Jihua

    2009-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a kind of double-stranded DNA virus whose subspecies have diversity. Near 40 kinds of subspecies can invade reproductive organ and cause some high risk disease, such as cervical carcinoma. In order to detect the type of the subspecies of the HPV DNA, we used the parallel scan spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging technique, which is a novel type of two- dimensional bio-sensing method based on surface plasmon resonance and is proposed in our previous work, to study the immobilization of the HPV DNA probes on the gold film. In the experiment, four kinds of the subspecies of the HPV DNA (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV58) probes are fixed on one gold film, and incubate in the constant temperature condition to get a HPV DNA probe microarray. We use the parallel scan spectral SPR imaging system to detect the reflective indices of the HPV DNA subspecies probes. The benefits of this new approach are high sensitive, label-free, strong specificity and high through-put.

  17. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) to probe monolayers of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataka, Kenichi; Stripp, Sven Timo; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) represents a variation of conventional infrared spectroscopy and exploits the signal enhancement exerted by the plasmon resonance of nano-structured metal thin films. The surface enhancement decays in about 10nm with the distance from the surface and is, thus, perfectly suited to selectively probe monolayers of biomembranes. Peculiar to membrane proteins is their vectorial functionality, the probing of which requires proper orientation within the membrane. To this end, the metal surface used in SEIRAS is chemically modified to generate an oriented membrane protein film. Monolayers of uniformly oriented membrane proteins are formed by tethering His-tagged proteins to a nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) modified gold surface and SEIRAS commands molecular sensitivity to probe each step of surface modification. The solid surface used as plasmonic substrate for SEIRAS, can also be employed as an electrode to investigate systems where electron transfer reactions are relevant, like e.g. cytochrome c oxidase or plant-type photosystems. Furthermore, the interaction of these membrane proteins with water-soluble proteins, like cytochrome c or hydrogenase, is studied on the molecular level by SEIRAS. The impact of the membrane potential on protein functionality is verified by monitoring light-dark difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin (SRII) at different applied potentials. It is demonstrated that the interpretations of all of these experiments critically depend on the orientation of the solid-supported membrane protein. Finally, future directions of SEIRAS including cellular systems are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The study of radiation-induced damage and remodeling of extracellular matrix of rectum and bladder by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochueva, Marina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Ignatjeva, Natalya Yu.; Zakharkina, Olga L.; Kuznetzov, Sergej S.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Babak, Ksenia V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Maslennikova, Anna V.

    2014-02-01

    Adverse events in normal tissues after irradiation of malignant tumors are of great importance in modern radiation oncology. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy allows observe the structure of collagen fibers and bundles without additional staining. The study objective was evaluation the dose-time dependences of the structural changes occurring in collagen of rat rectum and bladder after gamma-irradiation. Animals were irradiated by a local field at single doses of 10 Gy and 40 Gy. The study of collagen state was carried out in a week and a month after radiation exposure. Paraffin-embedded material was sectioned on the slices 10 mkm thick and SHG-imaging was performed by LSM 510 Meta (Carl Zeiss, Germany). Excitation was implemented with a pulsed (100-fs) titanium-sapphire laser at a wavelength of 800 nm and a pulse repetition frequency of 80 MHz, registration was performed at two wavelengths: 362-415 nm according to collagen fluorescence and 512-576 nm according to myoglobin fluorescence. In a week after irradiation, sings of epithelial damage and edema of submucosal layer, more significant after the dose of 40 Gy were observed on LSM-images. The SHG signal decreased at this time reflecting the processes of collagen degradation independently either in bladder or in rectum. In a month after radiation the increase of size and number of collagen-bearing structures was observed, more essential after irradiation in a dose of 40 Gy. LSM microscopy with SHG allows evaluate changes of normal tissues after ionizing radiation and get information in addition to standard and special histological staining.

  19. Optical system design of a speckle-free ultrafast Red-Green-Blue (RGB) source based on angularly multiplexed second harmonic generation from a TZDW source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H.

    2015-03-01

    We report the optical system design of a novel speckle-free ultrafast Red-Green-Blue (RGB) source based on angularly multiplexed simultaneous second harmonic generation from the efficiently generated Stokes and anti-Stokes pulses from a commercially available photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with two zero dispersion wavelengths (TZDW). We describe the optimized configuration of the TZDW fiber source which supports excitations of dual narrow-band pulses with peak wavelengths at 850 nm, 1260 nm and spectral bandwidths of 23 nm, 26 nm, respectively within 12 cm of commercially available TZDW PCF. The conversion efficiencies are as high as 44% and 33% from the pump source (a custom-built Yb:fiber master-oscillator-power-amplifier). As a result of the nonlinear dynamics of propagation, the dual pulses preserve their ultrashort pulse width (with measured autocorrelation traces of 200 fs and 227 fs,) which eliminates the need for dispersion compensation before harmonic generation. With proper optical design of the free-space harmonic generation system, we achieve milli-Watt power level red, green and blue pulses at 630 nm, 517 nm and 425 nm. Having much broader spectral bandwidths compared to picosecond RGB laser sources, the source is inherently speckle-free due to the ultra-short coherence length (99.4% excitation purities of the three primaries, leading to the coverage of 192% NTSC color gamut (CIE 1976). The reported RGB source features a very simple system geometry, its potential for power scaling is discussed with currently available technologies.

  20. Nano/micro Sr{sub 2}Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 18} crystallites: Size dependent structural, second harmonic and piezoelectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tukaram, Shet; Bhimireddi, Rajasekhar; Varma, K.B.R., E-mail: kbrvarma@mrc.iisc.ernet.in

    2016-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Synthesis of Sr{sub 2}Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 18} nano/micro crystallites and their size dependent non-linear optical and piezoelectric responses. - Highlights: • Nano/microcrystallites of Sr{sub 2}Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 18} were synthesized via sol-gel route. • Crystallite size dependent structural and physical properties were studied. • SHG intensity (1.4 times that of KDP powder) from these crystallites was recorded. • PFM studies on isolated crystallite of 480 nm exhibited d{sub 33} as high as 27 pm/V. • Single domain nature of the crystallites below 160 nm was observed. - Abstract: Strontium bismuth titanate (Sr{sub 2}Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 18}) powders comprising crystallites of average sizes in the range of 94–1400 nm were prepared via citrate-assisted sol-gel route. With an increase in the average crystallite size there was a change in the lattice parameters and shift in the Raman vibration modes. Second harmonic signal (532 nm) intensity of the Sr{sub 2}Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 18} powders increased with the increase in the average crystallite size and the maximum intensity obtained in the reflection mode was 1.4 times as high as that of the powdered KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Piezo Force Microscopic analyses carried out on isolated crystallite of size 74 nm, established a single domain nature with the coercive field as high as 347 kV/cm. There was a systematic increase in the d{sub 33} value with an increase in the size of the isolated crystallites and a high piezoelectric coefficient of ∼27 pm/V was obtained from an isolated crystallite of size 480 nm.

  1. Surface density dependence of PCR amplicon hybridization on PNA/DNA probe layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Danfeng; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Fang

    2005-01-01

    at an intermediate sodium concentration (approximately 100 mM). These effects were mainly ascribed to the electrostatic cross talk among the hybridized DNA molecules and the secondary structure of PCR amplicons. For the negatively charged DNA probes, the hybridization reaction was subjected additionally to the DNA...... biotin/streptavidin interaction. Despite the neutral backbone of PNA, the hybridization reactions were strongly influenced by the variation of ionic strength. The association rates exhibited a monotonic decrease with ionic strength increase and the maximum hybridization signal was achieved......Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to extensively investigate the hybridization behaviors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons on a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) or DNA probe layer that was previously attached on a streptavidin-modified gold surface via...

  2. In situ surface reduction of a NiO-YSZ-alumina composite using scanning probe microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Thydén, Karl Tor Sune

    2014-01-01

    In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning of topogr......In situ surface reductions of NiO-YSZ-Al2O3 composites into Ni-YSZ-Al2O3 cermets were carried out at 312–525 °C in a controlled atmosphere high-temperature scanning probe microscope (CAHT-SPM) in dry and humidified 9 % H2 in N2. The reduction of NiO was followed by contact mode scanning...

  3. On the issue of the surface contamination of a Langmuir Probe sensor: Demeter ISL results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    The Demeter Instrument Sonde de Langmuir (ISL) comprises two Langmuir Probe sensors. It includes a classical cylindrical sensor and a 6-sector spherical Segmented Langmuir Probe (SLP) sensor. The CNES Demeter satellite was launched in June 2004 on a 700-km altitude high-inclination orbit. ISL worked flawlessly till the satellite was decommissioned in March 2011. It provided more than 6 years of data. For operational reasons, the science payload was only operated below magnetic latitude 65°. It was switched off twice per orbit when above 65°. A transient behavior of the ISL sensors was systematically observed each time it was turned on at the beginning of each half-orbit segment. This transient behavior is attributed to surface contamination of the sensors. Some surface contamination of the sensor is indeed inferred from the recording of a series of I-V curves at different sweep rates using a special mode designed to monitor the evolution of the surface state of the sensor during the mission. As independently observed from the comparison between Demeter ISL measurements and Ground-based radar ionospheric sounding measurements, (J.-L. Berthelier, private communication, 2011) it is shown that the electron temperature measurements performed by a contaminated Langmuir Probe are significantly higher than the true physical value. Based on the work of Piel at al., a method was developed to determine the electrical characteristics of the surface contamination layer, and to remove the effect of the contamination layer on the determination of the main plasma parameters from the analysis of the I-V curve (the plasma electron density Ne and the Electron temperature Ne). Potential contamination issues for Langmuir Probes on future planetary mission orbiters will be addressed and ways to avoid or at least mitigate the effects of will be discussed.

  4. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  5. Transmission X-ray scattering as a probe for complex liquid-surface structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuto, Masafumi; Yang, Lin; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Kuzmenko, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    The need for functional materials calls for increasing complexity in self-assembly systems. As a result, the ability to probe both local structure and heterogeneities, such as phase-coexistence and domain morphologies, has become increasingly important to controlling self-assembly processes, including those at liquid surfaces. The traditional X-ray scattering methods for liquid surfaces, such as specular reflectivity and grazing-incidence diffraction, are not well suited to spatially resolving lateral heterogeneities due to large illuminated footprint. A possible alternative approach is to use scanning transmission X-ray scattering to simultaneously probe local intermolecular structures and heterogeneous domain morphologies on liquid surfaces. To test the feasibility of this approach, transmission small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (TSAXS/TWAXS) studies of Langmuir films formed on water meniscus against a vertically immersed hydrophilic Si substrate were recently carried out. First-order diffraction rings were observed in TSAXS patterns from a monolayer of hexagonally packed gold nanoparticles and in TWAXS patterns from a monolayer of fluorinated fatty acids, both as a Langmuir monolayer on water meniscus and as a Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer on the substrate. The patterns taken at multiple spots have been analyzed to extract the shape of the meniscus surface and the ordered-monolayer coverage as a function of spot position. These results, together with continual improvement in the brightness and spot size of X-ray beams available at synchrotron facilities, support the possibility of using scanning-probe TSAXS/TWAXS to characterize heterogeneous structures at liquid surfaces.

  6. Transmission X-ray scattering as a probe for complex liquid-surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuto, Masafumi; Yang, Lin; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Kuzmenko, Ivan

    2016-01-28

    The need for functional materials calls for increasing complexity in self-assembly systems. As a result, the ability to probe both local structure and heterogeneities, such as phase-coexistence and domain morphologies, has become increasingly important to controlling self-assembly processes, including those at liquid surfaces. The traditional X-ray scattering methods for liquid surfaces, such as specular reflectivity and grazing-incidence diffraction, are not well suited to spatially resolving lateral heterogeneities due to large illuminated footprint. A possible alternative approach is to use scanning transmission X-ray scattering to simultaneously probe local intermolecular structures and heterogeneous domain morphologies on liquid surfaces. To test the feasibility of this approach, transmission small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (TSAXS/TWAXS) studies of Langmuir films formed on water meniscus against a vertically immersed hydrophilic Si substrate were recently carried out. First-order diffraction rings were observed in TSAXS patterns from a monolayer of hexagonally packed gold nanoparticles and in TWAXS patterns from a monolayer of fluorinated fatty acids, both as a Langmuir monolayer on water meniscus and as a Langmuir–Blodgett monolayer on the substrate. The patterns taken at multiple spots have been analyzed to extract the shape of the meniscus surface and the ordered-monolayer coverage as a function of spot position. These results, together with continual improvement in the brightness and spot size of X-ray beams available at synchrotron facilities, support the possibility of using scanning-probe TSAXS/TWAXS to characterize heterogeneous structures at liquid surfaces.

  7. The Probing Radio Signal Polarization Effect on Separation Efficiency of Surface Target Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pinchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was a quantitative analysis of the level of interference with radar monitoring characteristics of surface targets, caused by the scattered electromagnetic field, arising due to the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, which is a study aspect a radiooceanography encompasses. Backscatter signal, arising from the interaction of radio waves and sea surface, extends in a direction opposite the probing radar signal of spread marine and coastal radar stations.With radar sounding of sea surface at high incidence angles of radio waves, a basic physical mechanism to form the received signal is resonant (Bragg scattering, and at small incidence angles of radio waves it is quasi-specular reflection. Consequently, the energy of electromagnetic radiation, backscattered by the sea surface, depends on the type of wave polarization: for horizontal polarization it is less than for vertical one.The paper presents a mathematical model, which describes dependence of interference level caused by interaction between radio waves and sea surface, on the radio wave polarization for the case when the same polarization is used to sent-out and receive a radio wave.To determine the noise reduction to be achievable with radar monitoring the surface targets by selecting the polarization of the probing radar signal, a signal/noise ratio is analyzed for its different polarizations.It is shown that in order to reduce the noise level caused by the interaction between radio waves and sea surface, it is possible to use the differences in the level of scattered radio signals of different polarization: with horizontally-polarized radar operation at incidence angles of 75°- 85° a signal/noise ratio is by 20-35 dB higher than that of vertically- polarized one.

  8. Cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes with substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines: a new class of highly active organometallic second order NLO-phores with excellent transparency with respect to second harmonic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragonetti, Claudia; Righetto, Stefania; Roberto, Dominique; Ugo, Renato; Valore, Adriana; Fantacci, Simona; Sgamellotti, Antonio; De Angelis, Filippo

    2007-10-28

    [Ir(ppy)(2)(5-R-1,10-phen)][PF(6)] (ppy = cyclometallated 2-phenylpyridine, phen = phenanthroline, R = H, Me, NMe(2), NO(2)) and [Ir(ppy)(2)(4-R',7-R'-1,10-phen)][PF(6)] (R' = Me, Ph) complexes are characterized by one of the highest second order NLO response (measured by the EFISH technique) reported for a metal complex, mainly due (as suggested by a theoretical SOS-TDDFT investigation) to MLCT processes from the ppy-Ir based moiety acting as donor push system to pi* orbitals of phen, acting as an acceptor pull system; the good transparency to the second harmonic emission renders these NLO-phores appealing as building blocks for molecular materials with second harmonic generation.

  9. Nanoscale Surface Photovoltage Mapping of 2D Materials and Heterostructures by Illuminated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shearer, Melinda J.

    2018-02-01

    Nanomaterials are interesting for a variety of applications, such as optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, they often have spatial heterogeneity, i.e. composition change or physical change in the topography or structure, which can lead to varying properties that would influence their applications. New techniques must be developed to understand and correlate spatial heterogeneity with changes in electronic properties. Here we highlight the technique of surface photovoltage-Kelvin probe force microscopy (SPV-KFM), which is a modified version of non-contact atomic force microscopy capable of imaging not only the topography and surface potential, but also the surface photovoltage on the nanoscale. We demonstrate its utility in probing monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructures, which form an ultrathin p-n junction promising for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. We show surface photovoltage maps highlighting the different photoresponse of the two material regions as a result of the effective charge separation across this junction. Additionally, we study the variations between different heterostructure flakes and emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis and transfer of these materials to obtain consistent properties and measurements.

  10. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  11. Helical polymer 1/infinity[P2Se6(2-)]: strong second harmonic generation response and phase-change properties of its K and Rb salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, In; Malliakas, Christos D; Jang, Joon I; Canlas, Christian G; Weliky, David P; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2007-12-05

    The selenophosphates A2P2Se6 (A = K, Rb) crystallize in the chiral trigonal space group P3121, with a = 7.2728(9) A, c = 18.872(4) A, and Z = 3 at 298(2) K and a = 14.4916(7) A, c = 18.7999(17) A, and Z = 12 at 173(2) K for K+ salt and a = 7.2982(5) A, c = 19.0019(16) A, and Z = 3 at 100(2) K for Rb+ salt. The A2P2Se6 feature parallel one-dimensional helical chains of 1/infinity[P2Se62-] which depict an oxidative polymerization of the ethane-like [P2Se6]4- anion. On cooling well below room temperature K2P2Se6 exhibits a displacive phase transition to a crystallographic subgroup and forms a superstructure with a cell doubling along the a- and b-axes. The Rb analogue does not exhibit the phase transition. The compounds are air stable and show reversible glass-crystal phase-change behavior with a band gap red shift of 0.11 and 0.22 eV for K+ and Rb+ salts, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, 31P magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis for crystalline and glassy K2P2Se6 give further understanding of the phase transition and the local structure of the amorphous state. K2P2Se6 exhibits excellent mid-IR transparency and a strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response. The SHG response is type-I phase-matchable and in the wavelength range of 1000-2000 nm was measured to be 50 times larger than that of the commercially used material AgGaSe2. Glassy K2P2Se6 also exhibits an SHG response without the application of electric field poling. In connection with the NLO properties the thermal expansion coefficients for K2P2Se6 are reported.

  12. Soluble semiconductors AAsSe2 (A = Li, Na) with a direct-band-gap and strong second harmonic generation: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tarun K; Jang, Joon I; Song, Jung-Hwan; Malliakas, Christos D; Freeman, Arthur J; Ketterson, John B; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2010-03-17

    AAsSe(2) (A = Li, Na) have been identified as a new class of polar direct-band gap semiconductors. These I-V-VI(2) ternary alkali-metal chalcoarsenates have infinite single chains of (1/infinity)[AsQ(2)(-)] derived from corner-sharing pyramidal AsQ(3) units with stereochemically active lone pairs of electrons on arsenic. The conformations and packing of the chains depend on the structure-directing alkali metals. This results in at least four different structural types for the Li(1-x)Na(x)AsSe(2) stoichiometry (alpha-LiAsSe(2), beta-LiAsSe(2), gamma-NaAsSe(2), and delta-NaAsSe(2)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed an average cubic NaCl-type structure for alpha-LiAsSe(2), which was further demonstrated to be locally distorted by pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. The beta and gamma forms have polar structures built of different (1/infinity)[AsSe(2)(-)] chain conformations, whereas the delta form has nonpolar packing. A wide range of direct band gaps are observed, depending on composition: namely, 1.11 eV for alpha-LiAsSe(2), 1.60 eV for LiAsS(2), 1.75 eV for gamma-NaAsSe(2), 2.23 eV for NaAsS(2). The AAsQ(2) materials are soluble in common solvents such as methanol, which makes them promising candidates for solution processing. Band structure calculations performed with the highly precise screened-exchange sX-LDA FLAPW method confirm the direct-gap nature and agree well with experiment. The polar gamma-NaAsSe(2) shows very large nonlinear optical (NLO) second harmonic generation (SHG) response in the wavelength range of 600-950 nm. The theoretical studies confirm the experimental results and show that gamma-NaAsSe(2) has the highest static SHG coefficient known to date, 337.9 pm/V, among materials with band gaps larger than 1.0 eV.

  13. In Situ X-Ray Probing Reveals Fingerprints of Surface Platinum Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friebel, Daniel

    2011-08-24

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pt L{sub 3} edge is a useful probe for Pt-O interactions at polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. We show that XAS using the high energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) mode, applied to a well-defined monolayer Pt/Rh(111) sample where the bulk penetrating hard x-rays probe only surface Pt atoms, provides a unique sensitivity to structure and chemical bonding at the Pt-electrolyte interface. Ab initio multiple-scattering calculations using the FEFF8 code and complementary extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results indicate that the commonly observed large increase of the white-line at high electrochemical potentials on PEMFC cathodes originates from platinum oxide formation, whereas previously proposed chemisorbed oxygen-containing species merely give rise to subtle spectral changes.

  14. XPS for probing the dynamics of surface voltage and photovoltage in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sezen, Hikmet [Department of Chemistry, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ozbay, Ekmel [Departments of Physics and Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Suzer, Sefik, E-mail: suzer@fen.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photo response of n- and p-GaN samples are recorded by XPS using the Snapshot Mode with 0.1 s time resolution, and also under square wave electrical (SQW) pulses. • Extent and dynamics of surface voltage and photovoltage are examined in the microseconds to seconds range. • It is observed that for the p-GaN charging/discharging processes have multiple components with time constants of microseconds to seconds. • The otherwise overlapping Ga3d peaks of the composite sample containing both n- and p-GaN are split into two distinct components of n- and p- separately. - Abstract: We describe application of two different data gathering techniques of XPS for probing the dynamics of surface voltage and surface photovoltage (SPV) developed in microseconds to seconds time-domain, in addition to the conventional steady-state measurements. For the longer (seconds to milliseconds) regime, capturing the data in the snapshot fashion is used, but for the faster one (down to microseconds), square wave (SQW) electrical pulses at different frequencies are utilized to induce and probe the dynamics of various processes causing the surface voltage, including the SPV, via the changes in the peak positions. The frequency range covers anywhere from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup 5} Hz for probing changes due to charging (slow), dipolar (intermediate), and electronic (fast) processes associated with the external stresses imposed. We demonstrate its power by application to n- and p-GaN, and discuss the chemical/physical information derived thereof. In addition, the method allows us to decompose and identify the peaks with respect to their charging nature for a composite sample containing both n- and p-GaN moieties.

  15. Vertical structure of the near-surface expanding ionosphere of comet 67P probed by Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, K. L.; Henri, P.; Vallières, X.; Galand, M.; Odelstad, E.; Eriksson, A. I.; Johansson, F. L.; Altwegg, K.; Behar, E.; Beth, A.; Broiles, T. W.; Burch, J. L.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Nilsson, H.; Rubin, M.; Vigren, E.

    2017-07-01

    The plasma environment has been measured for the first time near the surface of a comet. This unique data set has been acquired at 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during ESA/Rosetta spacecraft's final descent on 2016 September 30. The heliocentric distance was 3.8 au and the comet was weakly outgassing. Electron density was continuously measured with Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC)-Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) and RPC-LAngmuir Probe (LAP) during the descent from a cometocentric distance of 20 km down to the surface. Data set from both instruments have been cross-calibrated for redundancy and accuracy. To analyse this data set, we have developed a model driven by Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis-COmetary Pressure Sensor total neutral density. The two ionization sources considered are solar extreme ultraviolet radiation and energetic electrons. The latter are estimated from the RPC-Ion and Electron Sensor (IES) and corrected for the spacecraft potential probed by RPC-LAP. We have compared the results of the model to the electron densities measured by RPC-MIP and RPC-LAP at the location of the spacecraft. We find good agreement between observed and modelled electron densities. The energetic electrons have access to the surface of the nucleus and contribute as the main ionization source. As predicted, the measurements exhibit a peak in the ionospheric density close to the surface. The location and magnitude of the peak are estimated analytically. The measured ionospheric densities cannot be explained with a constant outflow velocity model. The use of a neutral model with an expanding outflow is critical to explain the plasma observations.

  16. Probing the surface structure of hydroxyapatite using NMR spectroscopy and first principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Helen; Duer, Melinda; Groom, Nicholas; Pickard, Chris; Bristowe, Paul

    2008-01-28

    The surface characteristics of hydroxyapatite (HA) are probed using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and first principles calculations. The NMR spectrum is taken from a bone sample and the first principles calculations are performed using a plane-wave density functional approach within the pseudopotential approximation. The computational work focuses on the (100) and (200) surfaces, which exhibit a representative range of phosphate, hydroxyl and cation bonding geometries. The shielding tensors for the 31P, 1H and 17O nuclei are calculated from the relaxed surface structures using an extension of the projector augmented-wave method. The calculated 31P chemical shifts for the surface slab are found to be significantly different from the bulk crystal and are consistent with the NMR data from bone and also synthetically prepared nanocrystalline samples of HA. Rotational relaxations of the surface phosphate ions and the sub-surface displacement of other nearby ions are identified as causing the main differences. The investigation points to further calculations of other crystallographic surfaces and highlights the potential of using NMR with ab initio modelling to fully describe the surface structure and chemistry of HA, which is essential for understanding its reactivity with the surrounding organic matrix.

  17. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  18. Efficient second harmonics generation of a laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and its applications. Laser diode reiki Nd:YAG laser no kokoritsu daini kochoha hassei to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, S.; Oka, M. (Sony Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-08-10

    Stabilization of the second harmonics in a laser-diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and its application are described. The laser is a quantum noise limiting laser, in which a mode competing noise is generated from an interaction between the laser medium Nd:YAG and the type II nonlinear optical crystal KTiOPO{sub 4} when generating a second harmonics in the resonator. However, the quantum noise limiting second harmonics was obtained by means of inserting (1/4) wave length plate in the resonator to release the bond between two intersecting inherent polarization modes. This stabilized green laser is of a single lateral mode is nearly free of aberration. Therefore, an optical disc prototype having three times as much of the currently used density was made using an objective lens having high number of openings to collect lights, which was verified capable of regeneration at a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, higher output is possible by means of parallelizing the excitation, and high output is realized from edge excitation at a fiber bundle. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Probing the Surface of Platinum during the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A. [Physical; Favaro, Marco [Advanced; Joint; Chemical; Ross, Philip N. [Materials; Yano, Junko [Joint; Molecular; Liu, Zhi [State; Division; Hussain, Zahid [Advanced; Crumlin, Ethan J. [Advanced; Joint Center

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the surface chemistry of electrocatalysts in operando can bring insight into the reaction mechanism, and ultimately the design of more efficient materials for sustainable energy storage and conversion. Recent progress in synchrotron based X-ray spectroscopies for in operando characterization allows us to probe the solid/liquid interface directly while applying an external potential, applied here to the model system of Pt in alkaline electrolyte for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We employ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) to identify the oxidation and reduction of Pt-oxides and hydroxides on the surface as a function of applied potential, and further assess the potential for hydrogen adsorption and absorption (hydride formation) during and after the HER. This new window into the surface chemistry of Pt in alkaline brings insight into the nature of the rate limiting step, the extent of H ad/absorption and it’s persistence at more anodic potentials.

  20. Modeling protein binding and elution over a chromatographic surface probed by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Tiago; Mota, José P B; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2010-03-26

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is used as a scaled-down, analytical, pseudo-chromatography tool for analyzing protein binding and elution over an ion-exchange surface under cyclic sorption conditions. A micrometric-scale adsorption surface was produced by immobilizing a typical ion exchange ligand--diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)--onto commercially available planar gold sensor chip surfaces pre-derivatized with a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid with known density. An explicit mathematical formulation is provided for the deconvolution and interpretation of the SPR sensorgrams. An adsorption rate model is proposed to describe the SPR sensorgrams for bovine serum albumin, used here as model protein, when the DEAE surface is subjected to a cyclic series of binding and elution steps. Overall, we demonstrate that the adsorption rate model is capable of quantitatively describing BSA binding and elution for protein titers from dilute conditions up to overloaded conditions and a broad range of salt concentrations. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Probing the surface profile and friction behavior of heterogeneous polymers: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, L.; Sorkin, V.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2017-04-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate molecular structure alternation and friction behavior of heterogeneous polymer (perfluoropolyether) surfaces using a nanoscale probing tip (tetrahedral amorphous carbon). It is found that depending on the magnitude of the applied normal force, three regimes exist: the shallow depth-sensing (SDS), deep depth-sensing (DDS), and transitional depth-sensing (TDS) regimes; TDS is between SDS and DDS. In SDS, the tip is floating on the polymer surface and there is insignificant permanent alternation in the polymer structure due to largely recoverable atomic deformations, and the surface roughness profile can be accurately measured. In DDS, the tip is plowing through the polymer surface and there is significant permanent alternation in the molecular structure. In this regime, the lateral friction force rises sharply and fluctuates violently when overcoming surface pile-ups. In SDS, the friction can be described by a modified Amonton’s law including the adhesion effect; meanwhile, in DDS, the adhesion effect is negligible but the friction coefficient is significantly higher. The underlying reason for the difference in these regimes rests upon different contributions by the repulsion and attraction forces between the tip and polymer surfaces to the friction force. Our findings here reveal important insights into lateral depth-sensing on heterogeneous polymer surfaces and may help improve the precision of depth-sensing devices.

  2. General three-dimensional image simulation and surface reconstruction in scanning probe microscopy using a dexel representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoping; Villarrubia, J S

    2007-12-01

    The ability to image complex general three-dimensional (3D) structures, including reentrant surfaces and undercut features using scanning probe microscopy, is becoming increasing important in many small length-scale applications. This paper presents a dexel data representation and its algorithm implementation for scanning probe microscope (SPM) image simulation (morphological dilation) and surface reconstruction (erosion) on such general 3D structures. Validation using simulations, some of which are modeled upon actual atomic force microscope data, demonstrates that the dexel representation can efficiently simulate SPM imaging and reconstruct the sample surface from measured images, including those with reentrant surfaces and undercut features.

  3. Surface and downhole prospecting tools for planetary exploration: tests of neutron and gamma ray probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R C; Chu, P; Hahn, S; James, M R; Lawrence, D J; Prettyman, T H; Johnson, J B; Podgorney, R K

    2008-06-01

    The ability to locate and characterize icy deposits and other hydrogenous materials on the Moon and Mars will help us understand the distribution of water and, therefore, possible habitats at Mars, and may help us locate primitive prebiotic compounds at the Moon's poles. We have developed a rover-borne neutron probe that localizes a near-surface icy deposit and provides information about its burial depth and abundance. We have also developed a borehole neutron probe to determine the stratigraphy of hydrogenous subsurface layers while operating within a drill string segment. In our field tests, we have used a neutron source to "illuminate" surrounding materials and gauge the instruments' efficacy, and we can simulate accurately the observed instrument responses using a Monte Carlo nuclear transport code (MCNPX). An active neutron source would not be needed for lunar or martian near-surface exploration: cosmic-ray interactions provide sufficient neutron flux to depths of several meters and yield better depth and abundance sensitivity than an active source. However, for deep drilling (>or=10 m depth), a source is required. We also present initial tests of a borehole gamma ray lithodensity tool and demonstrate its utility in determining soil or rock densities and composition.

  4. Virus-based surface patterning of biological molecules, probes, and inorganic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Suji; Jeon, Seongho; Kwak, Eun-A; Kim, Jong-Man; Jaworski, Justyn

    2014-10-01

    An essential requirement for continued technological advancement in many areas of biology, physics, chemistry, and materials science is the growing need to generate custom patterned materials. Building from recent achievements in the site-specific modification of virus for covalent surface tethering, we show in this work that stable 2D virus patterns can be generated in custom geometries over large area glass surfaces to yield templates of biological, biochemical, and inorganic materials in high density. As a nanomaterial building block, filamentous viruses have been extensively used in recent years to produce materials with interesting properties, owing to their ease of genetic and chemical modification. By utilizing un-natural amino acids generated at specific locations on the filamentous fd bacteriophage protein coat, surface immobilization is carried out on APTES patterned glass resulting in precise geometries of covalently linked virus material. This technique facilitated the surface display of a high density of virus that were labeled with biomolecules, fluorescent probes, and gold nanoparticles, thereby opening the possibility of integrating virus as functional components for surface engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface enhanced SHG from macrocycle, catenane and rotaxane thin films : experiments and theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arfaoui, I.; Bermudez, V.; De Nadai, C.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Kajzar, F.; Leigh, D.A.; Lubomska, M.; Mendoza, S.M.; Niziol, J.; Rudolf, Petra; Zerbetto, F.; Grote, JG; Kaino, T; Kajzar, F

    2005-01-01

    Surface enhanced second harmonic generation experiments on supramolecules: macrocycles, catenanes and rotaxanes, monolayers and multilayers deposited by vacuum evaporation on silver layers are reported and described. The measurements show that the molecules are ordered in thin films. The highest

  6. Defined surface immobilization of glycosaminoglycan molecules for probing and modulation of cell-material interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Luo, Ying

    2013-07-08

    As one important category of biological molecules on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been widely studied for biomedical applications. With the understanding that the biological functions of GAGs are driven by the complex dynamics of physiological and pathological processes, methodologies are desired to allow the elucidation of cell-GAG interactions with molecular level precision. In this study, a microtiter plate-based system was devised through a new surface modification strategy involving polydopamine (PDA) and GAG molecules functionalized with hydrazide chemical groups. A small library of GAGs including hyaluronic acid (with different molecular weights), heparin, and chondroitin sulfate was successfully immobilized via defined binding sites onto the microtiter plate surface under facile aqueous conditions. The methodology then allowed parallel studies of the GAG-modified surfaces in a high-throughput format. The results show that immobilized GAGs possess distinct properties to mediate protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and inflammatory responses, with each property showing dependence on the type and molecular weight of specific GAG molecules. The PDA-assisted immobilization of hydrazide-functionalized GAGs allows biomimetic attachment of GAG molecules and retains their bioactivity, providing a new methodology to systematically probe fundamental cell-GAG interactions to modulate the bioactivity and biocompatibility of biomaterials.

  7. Scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM) in fluids: mapping mechanical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Justin; Park, Matthew; Cusick, Brian; Kowalewski, Tomasz

    2006-03-28

    One of the major thrusts in proximal probe techniques is combination of imaging capabilities with simultaneous measurements of physical properties. In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM), the most straightforward way to accomplish this goal is to reconstruct the time-resolved force interaction between the tip and surface. These tip-sample forces can be used to detect interactions (e.g., binding sites) and map material properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. Here, we describe a previously unreported approach, which we refer to as scanning probe acceleration microscopy (SPAM), in which the TMAFM cantilever acts as an accelerometer to extract tip-sample forces during imaging. This method utilizes the second derivative of the deflection signal to recover the tip acceleration trajectory. The challenge in such an approach is that with real, noisy data, the second derivative of the signal is strongly dominated by the noise. This problem is solved by taking advantage of the fact that most of the information about the deflection trajectory is contained in the higher harmonics, making it possible to filter the signal by "comb" filtering, i.e., by taking its Fourier transform and inverting it while selectively retaining only the intensities at integer harmonic frequencies. Such a comb filtering method works particularly well in fluid TMAFM because of the highly distorted character of the deflection signal. Numerical simulations and in situ TMAFM experiments on supported lipid bilayer patches on mica are reported to demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  8. Probing dark excitons in atomically thin semiconductors via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Scuri, Giovanni; Wild, Dominik S.; High, Alexander A.; Dibos, Alan; Jauregui, Luis A.; Shu, Chi; de Greve, Kristiaan; Pistunova, Kateryna; Joe, Andrew Y.; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Kim, Philip; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2017-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers with a direct bandgap feature tightly bound excitons, strong spin-orbit coupling and spin-valley degrees of freedom. Depending on the spin configuration of the electron-hole pairs, intra-valley excitons of TMD monolayers can be either optically bright or dark. Dark excitons involve nominally spin-forbidden optical transitions with a zero in-plane transition dipole moment, making their detection with conventional far-field optical techniques challenging. Here, we introduce a method for probing the optical properties of two-dimensional materials via near-field coupling to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). This coupling selectively enhances optical transitions with dipole moments normal to the two-dimensional plane, enabling direct detection of dark excitons in TMD monolayers. When a WSe2 monolayer is placed on top of a single-crystal silver film, its emission into near-field-coupled SPPs displays new spectral features whose energies and dipole orientations are consistent with dark neutral and charged excitons. The SPP-based near-field spectroscopy significantly improves experimental capabilities for probing and manipulating exciton dynamics of atomically thin materials, thus opening up new avenues for realizing active metasurfaces and robust optoelectronic systems, with potential applications in information processing and communication.

  9. Surface topography acquisition method for double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2017-10-02

    This paper proposes an approach to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces based on dual-probe wavelength scanning interferometry (DPWSI). The principle and mathematical model is discussed and the measurement system is calibrated with a combination of standard step-height samples for both probes vertical calibrations and a specially designed calibration artefact for building up the space coordinate relationship of the dual-probe measurement system. The topography of the specially designed artefact is acquired by combining the measurement results with white light scanning interferometer (WLSI) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for reference. The relative location of the two probes is then determined with 3D registration algorithm. Experimental validation of the approach is provided and the results show that the method is able to measure double-sided near-right-angle structured surfaces with nanometer vertical resolution and micrometer lateral resolution.

  10. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  11. Surface chemistry. Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öström, H; Öberg, H; Xin, H; LaRue, J; Beye, M; Dell'Angela, M; Gladh, J; Ng, M L; Sellberg, J A; Kaya, S; Mercurio, G; Nordlund, D; Hantschmann, M; Hieke, F; Kühn, D; Schlotter, W F; Dakovski, G L; Turner, J J; Minitti, M P; Mitra, A; Moeller, S P; Föhlisch, A; Wolf, M; Wurth, W; Persson, M; Nørskov, J K; Abild-Pedersen, F; Ogasawara, H; Pettersson, L G M; Nilsson, A

    2015-02-27

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and oxygen (O) on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC-O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Generation of more than 300 mW diffraction-limited light at 405 nm by second-harmonic generation of a tapered diode laser with external cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Holm, J.; Sumpf, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed a blue laser source consisting of a single-frequency tapered diode laser with external cavity feedback that is frequency doubled by a quasi-phase matched KTP (PPKTP) in a bowtie ring cavity and extract more than 360 mW of power at 405 nm. The conversion efficiency from fundame...... fundamental laser power to second harmonic power is 35 %, while it is 64 % from coupled fundamental power to extracted blue light. Thermal effects and gray tracking set an upper limit on the amount of generated blue light....

  13. Particles as probes for complex plasmas in front of biased surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Basner, R; Loffhagen, D; Schubert, G; Fehske, H; Kersten, H

    2008-01-01

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purposes. Local electric fields can be determined from the behaviour of particles in the plasma, e.g. particles may serve as electrostatic probes. Since in many cases of applications in plasma technology it is of great interest to describe the electric field conditions in front of floating or biased surfaces, the confinement and behaviour of test particles is studied in front of floating walls inserted into a plasma as well as in front of additionally biased surfaces. For the latter case, the behaviour of particles in front of an adaptive electrode, which allows for an efficient confinement and manipulation of the grains, has been experimentally studied in dependence on the discharge parameters and on different bias conditions of the electrode. The effect of the partially biased surface (dc, rf) on the charged micro-particles has been inves...

  14. Spectroellipsometric, AFM and XPS probing of stainless steel surfaces subjected to biological influences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnichenko, M.; Chevolleau, Th.; Pham, M.T.; Poperenko, L.; Maitz, M.F

    2002-11-30

    Surface modification of austenitic stainless steel (SS) 316L after incubation in growing cell cultures and cell-free media as control has been studied. The following treatments were applied: mouse fibrosarcoma cells L929 for 3 and 7 days, polymorphonuclear neutrophils for 3 and 7 days and human osarcoma cells SAOS-2 for 7 and 14 days. Cells were enzymatically removed in all cases. The modified surfaces were probed in comparison with untreated ones by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). XPS shows the appearance of the peak of bonded nitrogen at 400.5 eV characteristic for adsorbed proteins on the surface for each type of cells and for the cell-free medium. Migration of Ni in the adsorbed layer is observed in all cases for samples after the cell cultures. The protein layer thickness is ellipsometrically determined to be within 2.5-6.0 nm for all treated samples with parameterization of its optical constants in Cauchy approach. The study showed that for such biological treatments of the SS the protein layer adsorption is the dominating process in the first 2 weeks, which could play a role in the process of corrosion by complex forming properties with metal ions.

  15. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio, E-mail: ogino-toshio-rx@ynu.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Local hydrophobicity of phase-separated sapphire (0001) surfaces was investigated. • These surfaces are featured by coexistence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. • Each domain was characterized by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy in water. • Both domains can be distinguished by adhesive forces of the probe to the surfaces. • Characterization in aqueous environment is important in bio-applications of sapphire. - Abstract: Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO{sub 2} probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  16. The attachment and characterization of DNA probes on gallium arsenide-based semiconductor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joonhyuk

    2007-12-01

    Immobilization of nucleic acid molecules on solid surfaces is the core of numerous important technologies in the genomics, disease diagnostics and biosensors applications. The architecture and density of immobilized probe molecules depend on the type of the solid surface on which they are anchored. Even though many different types of surfaces have been studied as substrates for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) attachment, the development of a new type of substrate, which is reproducible, stable, highly controlled and easily transferred to practical applications, is still needed. Recent studies have shown that As terminated GaAs-based semiconductors can be used as substrates for immobilized DNA layers. In this study, I aim to understand the attachment of nucleic acid onto the surfaces of As-terminated GaAs-based semiconductors and focus on improving the "brush-structure", which is essential for high quality of biochip based on a DNA layer. Attachment of 8-base and 100-base thiolated ssDNA layers on arsenic terminated GaAs(001) was achieved and characterized. The covalent bonds between the thiolated oligonucleotides with As atoms on the GaAs surface were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the surface morphology was obtained using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). In addition, I studied the effect of DNA length and the presence of a good solvent, such as water, on the oligonucleotides on a GaAs surface. I also investigated the effects of the thiol-based spacer and electrolyte concentration to improve the brush-like structure of the DNA layer. Finally, irradiation effects and AlGaAs resonators have been studied for the applications of DNA brush layer on GaAs as biosensor during the change of attachment probe DNA and hybridization to target DNA. For the 8-base thiolated ssDNA case, AFM results showed that the layer thickness was about ˜2.2 nm in dry mode and increased in wet mode. Replacement

  17. Effect of the probe location on the absorption by an array of gold nano-particles on a dielectric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi Moghaddam, Sina; Avşar, Dilan; Ertürk, Hakan; Pınar Mengüç, M.

    2017-08-01

    Effect of silicon atomic force microscope probe position and particle spacing on the local absorption of an array of gold nanoparticles placed over a dielectric borosilicate glass surface are evaluated. An improved, vectorized version of discrete dipole approximation coupled with surface interactions is employed throughout the study. It is shown that surface evanescent waves interacting with the system of nanoparticles and atomic force microscope probe result in a near-field coupling between them. This coupling can enhance or reduce the local absorption by the nanoparticles depending on the position of atomic force microscope tip in three-dimensional space and direction of propagation of the surface evanescent wave. The position of the atomic force microscope's tip and spacing that maximize the absorption are identified. This concept can be used for selective heating of nanoparticles placed over a surface that enables precision manufacturing at nanometer scales.

  18. Study on characteristics of eddy current array coil operated in transmit-receive mode and surface inspection using this probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hun; Jee, Dong Hyun; Cho, Chan Hee; Kim, In Chul [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Eddy current array (ECA) technology provides the ability to electronically scan without mechanical scanning for a footprint of probe that consists of several eddy current coils arranged side-by-side and two dimensionally. Compared to single-coil eddy current technology, the ECA technology has a higher inspection speed and reliability because a large area can be covered in a single-probe pass and the obtained images can facilitate data interpretation. In this study, we developed an eddy current array probe with 2×16 coil arrays and a multiplexer that can select transmit-receive coils sequentially and operate in transmit-receive mode. Surface inspection was performed using this probe for specimens that had various flaws and the characteristics of transmit-receive mode ECA technology was studied through an analysis of the obtained eddy current signals and C-scan images.

  19. Relaxor ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic and optical second harmonic properties in lanthanum lithium niobate (La{sub 0.05}Li{sub 0.85}NbO{sub 3}) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Moreno, Carlos A., E-mail: cdiazmoreno@utep.edu [Department of Physics of University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Ding, Yu; Li, Chunqiang [Department of Physics of University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Portelles, Jorge [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, San lázaro y L, 10400 (Cuba); Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, B.C. 22860 (Mexico); Heiras, J. [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, B.C. 22860 (Mexico); Hurtado-Macias, A. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados S.C., Miguel de Cervantes #120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Farias, J.R. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, UACJ, Avenida del Charro #450 N. Cd. Juárez, Chihuahua, C.P. 32310 (Mexico); González-Hernández, J. [Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial, Santiago de Querétaro 76130, Qro (Mexico); Yacamán, M.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); and others

    2017-07-01

    Relaxor ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism and Second Harmonic Generation properties were founded and studied as a function of a reduction heat treatment at 650 °C in a Ar-5%H{sub 2} atmosphere in stoichiometric La{sub 0.05}Li{sub 0.85}NbO{sub 3} nanoparticles of 40 nm. A diffuse dielectric anomaly related with relaxor behavior from 25 °C to 800 °C in a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz was founded. It also shows ferromagnetic anhysterestic type and ferroelectric hysteresis loops at room temperature with a magnetic spin remnant of 2.5 × 10{sup −3} emu/g and polarization saturation of 0.235 μC/cm{sup 2}, remnant polarization of 0.141 μC/cm{sup 2}, coercive field of 1.35 kV/cm, respectively. It shows very good second harmonic generation signal at 450 nm and 500 nm. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, indicate an ABO{sub 3} perovskite structure, new electronic binding energy structure for La (5s, 4d), Li (1s), Nb (4s, 3d, 4p) and oxygen (1s, 2s) and new vibrations modes on octahedron NbO{sub 6} related to multiferroic single phase nanoparticles, respectively.

  20. Lavoisier: A Low Altitude Balloon Network for Probing the Deep Atmosphere and Surface of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaasefiere, E.; Berthelier, J. J.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quemerais, E.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Rannou, P.; Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Coscia, D.; Jambon, A.; hide

    2005-01-01

    The in-situ exploration of the low atmosphere and surface of Venus is clearly the next step of Venus exploration. Understanding the geochemistry of the low atmosphere, interacting with rocks, and the way the integrated Venus system evolved, under the combined effects of inner planet cooling and intense atmospheric greenhouse, is a major challenge of modern planetology. Due to the dense atmosphere (95 bars at the surface), balloon platforms offer an interesting means to transport and land in-situ measurement instruments. Due to the large Archimede force, a 2 cubic meter He-pressurized balloon floating at 10 km altitude may carry up to 60 kg of payload. LAVOISIER is a project submitted to ESA in 2000, in the follow up and spirit of the balloon deployed at cloud level by the Russian Vega mission in 1986. It is composed of a descent probe, for detailed noble gas and atmosphere composition analysis, and of a network of 3 balloons for geochemical and geophysical investigations at local, regional and global scales.

  1. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...

  2. Direct Surface and Droplet Microsampling for Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis with an Integrated Dual-Probe Microfluidic Chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cong-Min [Institute of Microanalytical; Zhu, Ying [Institute of Microanalytical; Jin, Di-Qiong [Institute of Microanalytical; Kelly, Ryan T. [Environmental; Fang, Qun [Institute of Microanalytical

    2017-08-15

    Ambient mass spectrometry (MS) has revolutionized the way of MS analysis and broadened its application in various fields. This paper describes the use of microfluidic techniques to simplify the setup and improve the functions of ambient MS by integrating the sampling probe, electrospray emitter probe, and online mixer on a single glass microchip. Two types of sampling probes, including a parallel-channel probe and a U-shaped channel probe, were designed for dryspot and liquid-phase droplet samples, respectively. We demonstrated that the microfabrication techniques not only enhanced the capability of ambient MS methods in analysis of dry-spot samples on various surfaces, but also enabled new applications in the analysis of nanoliter-scale chemical reactions in an array of droplets. The versatility of the microchip-based ambient MS method was demonstrated in multiple different applications including evaluation of residual pesticide on fruit surfaces, sensitive analysis of low-ionizable analytes using postsampling derivatization, and high-throughput screening of Ugi-type multicomponent reactions.

  3. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO2 probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  4. Research on the best measurement situation between optical probe and tissue surfaces in non-invasive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuyao; Liu, Rong; Yu, Hui; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Jun; Xu, Kexin

    2016-11-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is often used for the non-invasive detection of composition in the human body, such as that of blood glucose and haemoglobin, due to its high penetration depth into tissues. Although it is feasible to position the optical probe precisely, contact situation between probe and human tissues is a difficult problem to determine because of physiological tremor and mechanical performance of bio-soft tissue. Here, we proposed a novel estimation method for the situation between the optical probe and tissue surfaces based on the dynamic auto-correlation matrix of two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) and radar chart. The diffuse reflectance spectra from the left palm of 4 healthy volunteers were collected while the optical probe gradually approached and pressed bio-tissues with a custom-design controlling device. 2DCOS in the wavelength with lower absorption (1000-1400 nm) was calculated under the perturbation of relative-distance and contact pressure between the optical probe and tissue surface. The synchronous 2DCOS showed that the surface reflection and diffuse reflectance were greatly affected by the contact conditions in 1100 nm, 1220 nm, and 1300 nm. Then the dynamic auto-correlation matrix of 2DCOS was established for the adjacent spectra, and the significant difference wavelengths were used to build radar charts to determine the critical contact situation visually. Results showed that the maximum variations of dynamic auto-correlation matrix appeared at near 1300 nm, and the relative distance between the probe and tissue corresponding to the critical contact state can be easily observed with radar charts with 0.25 mm uncertainty, which was consistent with the self-feeling of each volunteer. So this method can be applied to exactly determine the optimal measurement status for the non-invasive body composition detection in vivo. It is important for the design of human-machine interface and the accuracy improvement of body

  5. Protein-GAG interactions: new surface-based techniques, spectroscopies and nanotechnology probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, E A; Terry, C J; Rees, C; Rudd, T R; Duchesne, L; Skidmore, M A; Lévy, R; Thanh, N T K; Nichols, R J; Clarke, D T; Fernig, D G

    2006-06-01

    New approaches, rooted in the physical sciences, have been developed to gain a more fundamental understanding of protein-GAG (glycosaminoglycan) interactions. DPI (dual polarization interferometry) is an optical technique, which measures real-time changes in the mass of molecules bound at a surface and the geometry of the bound molecules. QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation), an acoustic technique, measures the mass and the viscoelastic properties of adsorbates. The FTIR (Fourier-transform IR) amide bands I, II and III, resulting from the peptide bond, provide insight into protein secondary structure. Synchrotron radiation CD goes to much shorter wavelengths than laboratory CD, allowing access to chromophores that provide insights into the conformation of the GAG chain and of beta-strand structures of proteins. To tackle the diversity of GAG structure, we are developing noble metal nanoparticle probes, which can be detected at the level of single particles and so enable single molecule biochemistry and analytical chemistry. These new approaches are enabling new insights into structure-function relationships in GAGs and together they will resolve many of the outstanding problems in this field.

  6. Direct protein quantification in complex sample solutions by surface-engineered nanorod probes

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2017-06-30

    Detecting biomarkers from complex sample solutions is the key objective of molecular diagnostics. Being able to do so in a simple approach that does not require laborious sample preparation, sophisticated equipment and trained staff is vital for point-of-care applications. Here, we report on the specific detection of the breast cancer biomarker sHER2 directly from serum and saliva samples by a nanorod-based homogeneous biosensing approach, which is easy to operate as it only requires mixing of the samples with the nanorod probes. By careful nanorod surface engineering and homogeneous assay design, we demonstrate that the formation of a protein corona around the nanoparticles does not limit the applicability of our detection method, but on the contrary enables us to conduct in-situ reference measurements, thus further strengthening the point-of-care applicability of our method. Making use of sandwich assays on top of the nanorods, we obtain a limit of detection of 110 pM and 470 pM in 10-fold diluted spiked saliva and serum samples, respectively. In conclusion, our results open up numerous applications in direct protein biomarker quantification, specifically in point-of-care settings where resources are limited and ease-of-use is of essence.

  7. Probing the nanoadhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to titanium implant surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Sebastian; Donos, Nikolaos; Spratt, Dave; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    As titanium (Ti) continues to be utilized in great extent for the fabrication of artificial implants, it is important to understand the crucial bacterium-Ti interaction occurring during the initial phases of biofilm formation. By employing a single-cell force spectroscopy technique, the nanoadhesive interactions between the early-colonizing Streptococcus sanguinis and a clinically analogous smooth Ti substrate were explored. Mean adhesion forces between S. sanguinis and Ti were found to be 0.32±0.00, 1.07±0.06, and 4.85±0.56 nN for 0, 1, and 60 seconds contact times, respectively; while adhesion work values were reported at 19.28±2.38, 104.60±7.02, and 1,317.26±197.69 aJ for 0, 1, and 60 seconds, respectively. At 60 seconds surface delays, minor-rupture events were modeled with the worm-like chain model yielding an average contour length of 668±12 nm. The mean force for S. sanguinis minor-detachment events was 1.84±0.64 nN, and Poisson analysis decoupled this value into a short-range force component of -1.60±0.34 nN and a long-range force component of -0.55±0.47 nN. Furthermore, a solution of 2 mg/mL chlorhexidine was found to increase adhesion between the bacterial probe and substrate. Overall, single-cell force spectroscopy of living S. sanguinis cells proved to be a reliable way to characterize early-bacterial adhesion onto machined Ti implant surfaces at the nanoscale.

  8. Surface Photochemistry: Benzophenone as a Probe for the Study of Modified Cellulose Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Vieira Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the use of benzophenone, a very well characterized probe, to study new hosts (i.e., modified celluloses grafted with alkyl chains bearing 12 carbon atoms by surface esterification. Laser-induced room temperature luminescence of air-equilibrated or argon-purged solid powdered samples of benzophenone adsorbed onto the two modified celluloses, which will be named C12-1500 and C12-1700, revealed the existence of a vibrationally structured phosphorescence emission of benzophenone in the case where ethanol was used for sample preparation, while a nonstructured emission of benzophenone exists when water was used instead of ethanol. The decay times of the benzophenone emission vary greatly with the solvent used for sample preparation and do not change with the alkylation degree in the range of 1500–1700 micromoles of alkyl chains per gram of cellulose. When water was used as a solvent for sample preparation, the shortest lifetime for the benzophenone emission was observed; this result is similar to the case of benzophenone adsorbed onto the “normal” microcrystalline cellulose surface, with this latter case previously reported by Vieira Ferreira et al. in 1995. This is due to the more efficient hydrogen abstraction reaction from the glycoside rings of cellulose when compared with hydrogen abstraction from the alkyl chains of the modified celluloses. Triplet-triplet transient absorption of benzophenone was obtained in both cases and is the predominant absorption immediately after laser pulse, while benzophenone ketyl radical formation occurs in a microsecond time scale both for normal and modified celluloses.

  9. A Dual Surface Barrier Detector Unit for Beta-Sensitive Endoscopic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, R. R.; Hyder, A.

    2004-02-01

    The excellent targeting of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as /sup 18/F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to cancer has inspired the development of a number of handheld beta probes to assist in surgeries. The use of these devices could potentially be expanded to utilization in minimally invasive techniques such as endoscopy. In this work, we describe the development and initial testing of a miniature beta-sensitive detector unit suitable for use in minimally invasive procedures. The detector consisted of two surface barrier detectors (active area=3 mm diameter and depletion layer depth=0.5 mm) mounted back-to-back in a PC board frame. This geometry allowed the rear detector to be shielded from the beta flux striking the front detector (most photons passed through the detector) so that its signal could be used to correct for photon contamination of the beta flux detected by the front detector. Initial testing of the system included measurement of the beta and photon detection sensitivities (1.87/spl plusmn/0.02 cps/nCi (0.05/spl plusmn/5.4/spl times/10/sup -4/ cps/Bq) and 1.2/spl times/10/sup -4//spl plusmn/9/spl times/10/sup -5/ cps/nCi (3.24/spl times/10/sup -6//spl plusmn/2.4/spl times/10/sup -6/ cps/Bq), respectively) and mapping of the two-dimensional point spread function. The spatial resolution of the system is 3.05 mm FWHM. The potential effectiveness of the detector in clinical use was investigated by surveying a simulated esophagus containing radiotracer-avid areas of cancer. The results from this test demonstrated the ability of the detection system to distinguish focal areas of increased FDG uptake from surrounding normal tissue in a realistic annihilation photon flux environment. These encouraging results indicate that this detector unit is suitable for incorporation into a new beta-sensitive endoscopic probe system currently under development.

  10. Resonant-convergent PCM response theory for the calculation of second harmonic generation in makaluvamines A-V: pyrroloiminoquinone marine natural products from poriferans of genus Zyzzya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Bruce F; Norman, Patrick

    2015-05-28

    The first-order hyperpolarizability, β, has been calculated for a group of marine natural products, the makaluvamines. These compounds possess a common cationic pyrroloiminoquinone structure that is substituted to varying degrees. Calculations at the MP2 level indicate that makaluvamines possessing phenolic side chains conjugated with the pyrroloiminoquinone moiety display large β values, while breaking this conjugation leads to a dramatic decrease in the calculated hyperpolarizability. This is consistent with a charge-transfer donor-π-acceptor (D-π-A) structure type, characteristic of nonlinear optical chromophores. Dynamic hyperpolarizabilities calculated using resonance-convergent time-dependent density functional theory coupled to polarizable continuum model (PCM) solvation suggest that significant resonance enhancement effects can be expected for incident radiation with wavelengths around 800 nm. The results of the current work suggest that the pyrroloiminoquinone moiety represents a potentially useful new chromophore subunit, in particular for the development of molecular probes for biological imaging. The introduction of solvent-solute interactions in the theory is conventionally made in a density matrix formalism, and the present work will provide detailed account of the approximations that need to be introduced in wave function theory and our program implementation. The program implementation as such is achieved by a mere combination of existing modules from previous developments, and it is here only briefly reviewed.

  11. Immunoassay using probe-labelling immunogold nanoparticles with silver staining enhancement via surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuping; Ji, Xiaohui; Xu, Weiqing; Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Lianying; Bai, Yubai; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a novel immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and immunogold labelling with silver staining enhancement. Immunoreactions between immunogold colloids modified by a Raman-active probe molecule (e.g., 4-mercaptobenzoic acid) and antigens, which were captured by antibody-assembled chips such as silicon or quartz, were detected via SERS signals of Raman-active probe molecule. All the self-assembled steps were subjected to the measurements of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra to monitor the formation of a sandwich structure onto a substrate. The immunoassay was performed by a sandwich structure consisting of three layers. The first layer was composed of immobilized antibody molecules of mouse polyclonal antibody against Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (PAb) on a silicon or quartz substrate. The second layer was the complementary Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (Antigen) molecules captured by PAb on the substrate. The third layer was composed of the probe-labelling immunogold nanoparticles, which were modified by mouse monoclonal antibody against Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (MAb) and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) as the Raman-active probe on the surface of gold colloids. After silver staining enhancement, the antigen is identified by a SERS spectrum of MBA. A working curve of the intensity of a SERS signal at 1585 cm(-1) due to the [small nu](8a) aromatic ring vibration of MBA versus the concentration of analyte (Antigen) was obtained and the non-optimized detection limit for the Hepatitis B virus surface antigen was found to be as low as 0.5 [micro sign]g mL(-1).

  12. Immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe surface for molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooe, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Akihito; Nishishita, Naoki; Hirano, Yoshiaki

    2007-04-01

    adsorption reaction between ɛ-polylysine and endotoxin. ɛ-polylysine has the structure of straight chain molecule composed by 25-30 residues made by lysine, and it is used as an antimicrobial agent, moreover, cellulose beads with immobilized ɛ-polylysine is used as the barrier filter for endotoxin removal. Therefore, it is expected that the endotoxin be adsorbed to the immobilized ɛ-polylysine onto the probe. As the result of this reaction, the mass of the probe is increased, and endotoxin can be detected by using of Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In our previous research, we have already acquired the proteins immobilization technique onto Au and Si surface. In this report, the proposal of molecular adsorption type endotoxin detection system, and the immobilization of ɛ-polylysine onto the probe are described. We use X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the ɛ-polylysine immobilization, and the adsorptive activity of immobilized ɛ-polylysine is measured by XPS and AFM. The purpose of this study is to bring about the realization of "Real-time endotoxin detection system".

  13. Surface Absorption Polarization Sensors (SAPS), Final Technical Report, Laser Probing of Immobilized SAPS Actuators Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph I. Cline

    2010-04-22

    A novel hypothesized detection scheme for the detection of chemical agents was proposed: SAPS ``Surface-Adsorbed Polarization Sensors''. In this technique a thin layer of molecular rotors is adsorbed to a surface. The rotors can be energized by light absorption, but are otherwise locked in position or alternatively rotate slowly. Using polarized light, the adsorbed rotors are turned as an ensemble. Chemical agent (analyte) binding that alters the rotary efficiency would be detected by sensitive polarized absorption techniques. The mechanism of the SAPS detection can be mechanical, chemical, or photochemical: only a change in rotary efficiency is required. To achieve the goal of SAPS detection, new spectroscopic technique, polarized Normal Incidence Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (polarized NICRDS), was developed. The technique employs very sensitive and general Cavity Ringdown absorption spectroscopy along with the ability to perform polarized absorption measurements. Polarized absorption offers the ability to measure the angular position of molecular chromophores. In the new experiments a thin layer of SAPS sensors (roughly corresponding to a monolayer coverage on a surface) immobilized in PMMA. The PMMA layer is less than 100~nm thick and is spin-coated onto a flat fused-silica substrate. The new technique was applied to study the photoisomerization-driven rotary motion of a family of SAPS actuators based on a family of substituted dibenzofulvene rotors based upon 9-(2,2,2- triphenylethylidene)fluorene. By varying the substitution to include moieties such as nitro, amino, and cyano the absorption spectrum and the quantum efficiency of photoisomerization can be varied. This SAPS effect was readily detected by polarized NICRDS. The amino substituted SAPS actuator binds H+ to form an ammonium species which was shown to have a much larger quantum efficiency for photoisomerization. A thin layer of immobilized amino actuators were then shown by polarized NICRDS

  14. Absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of KDP, KD(asterisk)P, BaB2O4, LiIO3, MgO:LiNbO3, and KTP measured by phase-matched second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Robert C.; Byer, Robert L.; Masuda, Hisashi; Fan, Yuan Xuan

    1990-01-01

    Both absolute and relative nonlinear optical coefficients of six nonlinear materials measured by second-harmonic generation are discussed. A single-mode, injection-seeded, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with spatially filtered output was used to generate the 1.064-micron fundamental radiation. The following results were obtained: d36(KDP) = 0.38 pm/V, d36(KD/asterisk/P) = 0.37 pm/V, (parallel)d22(BaB2O4)(parallel) = 2.2 pm/V, d31(LiIO3) = -4.1 pm/V, d31(5 percentMgO:MgO LiNbO3) = -4.7 pm/V, and d(eff)(KTP) = 3.2 pm/V. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be better than 10 percent.

  15. Surface potential measurement of n-type organic semiconductor thin films by mist deposition via Kelvin probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Akihiro; Satoh, Nobuo; Katori, Shigetaka

    2017-08-01

    We partially deposited fullerene (C60) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester thin films that are typical n-type semiconductor materials on indium-tin oxide by mist deposition at various substrate temperatures. The topographic and surface potential images were observed via dynamic force microscopy/Kelvin probe force microscopy with the frequency modulation detection method. We proved that the area where a thin film is deposited depends on the substrate temperature during deposition from the topographic images. It was also found that the surface potential depends on the substrate temperature from the surface potential images.

  16. Plasmon Enhanced Optical Near-field Probing of Metal Nanoaperture Surface Emitting Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiro Hashizume; Fumio Koyama

    2004-01-01

    ...) for sub-wavelength optical near-filed probing, which exhibits the strong plasmon enhancement of both optical near-fields and voltage signals with forming a metal nano-particle in the nano-aperture...

  17. Feasibility of the Use of Transesophageal Echocardiography as a Surface Probe for Puncturing and Catheterization of the Internal Jugular Vein: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yi; Ou, Mengchan; Yu, Hai

    2017-10-04

    To compare the transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) probe as a surface probe with the vascular probe for guiding internal jugular vein (IJV) catheterization. Prospective, randomized, controlled pilot study. University hospital. One hundred cardiac surgery patients, including 50 adult and 50 pediatric patients. Patients in the TEE probe group received right IJV catheterization using the TEE probe, while the vascular probe group used the vascular probe for catheterization. The puncture time, first-attempt success rate, quality of the imaging with needle tip positioning, wire positioning, and catheter positioning were recorded. The incidence of complication or any adverse event also was observed. Adult patients: In the vascular probe group, the success rate for first attempt IJV catheterization was 24/25 (96%), while in the TEE probe group, the success rate for first attempt IJV catheterization was 25/25 (100%). There was no statistical difference in the puncture time, image quality, needle tip positioning, wire positioning, and catheter positioning between groups (p > 0.05). Pediatric patients: The success rate for first-attempt IJV catheterization was 100% in both groups, and there were no statistical differences in the puncture time, image quality, and positioning between the 2 groups (p > 0.05). No complications or adverse events were observed in either group. The TEE probe, used as a surface probe, can be used to guide IJV puncturing and catheterization in cardiac surgery patients with favorable feasibility and safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Growth, structure, crystalline perfection and characterization of Mg(II)-incorporated tris(thiourea)Zn(II) sulfate crystals: Enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, K. [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Crystal Growth and X-ray Analysis Activity, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Meenakshisundaram, S.P., E-mail: aumats2009@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar-608 002 (India)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small quantity incorporation of Mg(II)- enhances the SHG efficiency of ZTS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystal stress is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of Mg(II)-incorporated ZTS is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystalline perfection is evaluated by HRXRD. - Abstract: Single crystals of Mg(II)-incorporated tris(thiourea)Zn(II) sulfate (MZTS) have been grown from aqueous solution at room temperature by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The incorporation of Mg(II)- into the crystalline lattice was well confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The reduction in the intensities observed in powder X-ray diffraction patterns of doped specimen and slight shifts in vibrational frequencies in FT-IR indicate the lattice stress as a result of doping. Thermal studies reveal the purity of the material and no decomposition is observed up to the melting point. High transmittance is observed in the visible region and the band gap energy is estimated by Kubelka-Munk algorithm. Surface morphology of doped material was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Decreased crystalline perfection by doping observed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) analysis is justified by the crystal stress. Even a small quantity incorporation of Mg(II)- enhances the SHG efficiency significantly. The as-grown crystal is further characterized by microhardness and dielectric studies.

  19. Surface Crack Detection for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Materials Using Pulsed Eddy Current Based on Rectangular Differential Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialong Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the surface defect inspection of carbon fiber reinforced composite, the differential and the direct measurement finite element simulation models of pulsed eddy current flaw detection were built. The principle of differential pulsed eddy current detection was analyzed and the sensitivity of defect detection was compared through two kinds of measurements. The validity of simulation results was demonstrated by experiments. The simulation and experimental results show that the pulsed eddy current detection method based on rectangular differential probe can effectively improve the sensitivity of surface defect detection of carbon fiber reinforced composite material.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe or Adsorbate-Surface Bonding: Benzene and Monosubstituted Benzenes Adsorbed at Gold Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Absorption at Gold and Corresponding SERS Bandwidth for eenzene and Monosubstituted Benzenes Adsorbt -te Potential a -AV b F H mV vs sce cm cm cm C6H6 500 978...Bonding: Benzene and Monosubstituted Benzenes Adsorbed at Gold Electrodes by Ping Gao and Michael J. Weaver Prepared for Publication in the Journal of...Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of Adsorbate-Surface Bonding: Benzene and Mono- Technical Report No. 51 substituted Benzenes Adsorbed at Gold Electrodes

  1. Effect of surface free energy on PDMS transfer in microcontact printing and its application to ToF-SIMS to probe surface energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Shirahata, Naoto; Saini, Gaurav; Zhang, Feng; Pei, Lei; Asplund, Matthew C; Kurth, Dirk G; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Sautter, Ken; Nakanishi, Takashi; Smentkowski, Vincent; Linford, Matthew R

    2009-05-19

    Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) transfer during microcontact printing (microCP) has been observed in previous reports, which generally focused on only one or a few different substrates, in this work we investigate the extent of PDMS transfer onto a series of surfaces with a wide range of hydrophobicities using an uninked, unpatterned PDMS stamp. These surfaces include clean silicon, clean titanium, clean gold, "dirty" silicon, polystyrene, Teflon, surfaces modified with PEG, amino, dodecyl, and hexadecyl monolayers, and also two loose molecular materials. The PDMS transferred onto planar surfaces is, in general, easily detected by wetting and spectroscopic ellipsometry. More importantly, it is detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) because of the sensitivity of this technique to PDMS. The effect of surface free energy on PDMS transfer in microcontact printing is investigated, and the relationship between the amount of PDMS in ToF-SIMS spectra and the surface tensions of initial surfaces is revealed. We show that PDMS transfer can be applied as a probe of surface free energies using ToF-SIMS, where PDMS preferentially transfers onto more hydrophilic surface features during stamping, with little being transferred onto very hydrophobic surface features. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the ToF-SIMS image data further confirms and clarifies these results. Our data lend themselves to the hypothesis that it is the free energy of the surface that plays a major role in determining the degree of PDMS transfer during microCP.

  2. A molecular surface science study of the structure of adsorbates on surfaces: Importance to lubrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mate, C.M.

    1986-09-01

    The interaction and bonding of atoms and molecules on metal surfaces is explored under ultra-high vacuum conditions using a variety of surface science techniques: high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), work function measurements, and second harmonic generation (SHG). 164 refs., 51 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Interaction of an AFM Probe with the Surface of an SCN Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bune, Adris; Kaukler, William; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations is conducted in order to estimate forces of probe-substrate interaction in the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). First a review of available molecular dynamic techniques is given. Implementation of MD simulation is based on an object-oriented code developed at the University of Delft. Modeling of the sample material - succinonitrile (SCN) - is based on the Lennard-Jones potentials. For the polystyrene probe an atomic interaction potential is used. Due to object-oriented structure of the code modification of an atomic interaction potential is straight forward. Calculation of melting temperature is used for validation of the code and of the interaction potentials. Various fitting parameters of the probe-substrate interaction potentials are considered, as potentials fitted to certain properties and temperature ranges may not be reliable for the others. This research provides theoretical foundation for an interpretation of actual measurements of an interaction forces using AFM.

  4. Probing surface and bulk electrochemical processes on the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Arruda, Thomas M [ORNL; Kim, Yunseok [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Bark, C [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bristowe, Nicholas C [University of Cambridge; Artacho, Emilio [University of Cambridge; Littlewood, Peter B [ORNL; Eom, Professor Chang-Beom [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Local electrochemical phenomena on the surfaces of LaAlO3-SrTiO3 heterostructure are explored using unipolar and bipolar dynamic electrochemical strain microscopy (D-ESM). The D-ESM suggests the presence of at least two distinct electrochemical processes, including fast reversible low-voltage process and slow high-voltage process. The latter process is associated with static surface deformations in the sub-nm regime. These behaviors are compared with Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy hysteresis data. The possible origins of observed phenomena are discussed and these studies suggest that charge-writing behavior in LAO-STO include strong surface/bulk electrochemical component and are more complicated than simple screening by surface adsorbates.

  5. Probing surface and bulk electrochemical processes on the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M; Kim, Yunseok; Ivanov, Ilia N; Jesse, Stephen; Bark, Chung W; Bristowe, Nicholas C; Artacho, Emilio; Littlewood, Peter B; Eom, Chang-Beom; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-05-22

    Local electrochemical phenomena on the surfaces of the LaAlO(3)-SrTiO(3) heterostructure are explored using unipolar and bipolar dynamic electrochemical strain microscopy (D-ESM). The D-ESM suggests the presence of at least two distinct electrochemical processes, including fast reversible low-voltage process and slow high-voltage process. The latter process is associated with static surface deformations in the sub-nanometer regime. These behaviors are compared with Kelvin probe force microscopy hysteresis data. The possible origins of observed phenomena are discussed, and these studies suggest that charge-writing behavior in LAO-STO includes a strong surface/bulk electrochemical component and is more complicated than simple screening by surface adsorbates.

  6. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Koeplinger, Kenneth A. [Merck Research Laboratories; Vavek, Marissa [Merck Research Laboratories; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony [Rutgers University

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  7. Visualization of surface transformations during laser ablation of solids by femtosecond pump-probe time-resolved microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-García, Irene; Vadillo, José M.; Javier Laserna, J.

    2015-11-01

    A femtosecond time-resolved microscope (fs-TRM) based on pump-probe excitation has been used to follow the dynamic of the processes occurring during laser-matter interaction, from initial surface alterations to final solidification through transient melting. The time-resolved microscope described in the manuscript has been designed to allow a precise control of the excitation beam to cover ranges below and above the plasma formation energy, and a large temporal variation in the pump-probe delay to include the different timescales of the different processes occurring up to the plasma formation. The microscope has been demonstrated to be robust and allows the subpicosecond monitoring of laser ablation single-shot events, of importance in the analysis of ultra thin layers, or biological tissues. The fs-TRM excites (pump) the sample with 35-fs laser pulses at 800 nm and follows the processes by a second (probe) beam at 400 nm. The relative delay between both beams allows the acquisition of pictures with a temporal resolution of 200 fs up to 3 ns after the reaching of the pump pulse. In the ablative regime near the ablation threshold, transient surface reflectivity patterns (dynamic Newton fringes) are observed from a ps to ns time-scale. The timescale and number of such rings are affected by the fluence value. Significant differences between metals (Al, Cu and Sn), semiconductors (Si) and polymers (polytetrafluoroethylene and polyurethane) have been also observed in the transformation patterns.

  8. vanA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probe designed to monitor vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakipoglu, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Fadime; Icgen, Bulent

    2016-10-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and vancomycin are common to treat severe Gram-positive bacterial infections. The gene vanA confers high-level resistance to these antibiotics, and these phenomena have been shown to be transferable. Release of vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria to surface waters is, therefore, of particular concern since they might proliferate and spread in different environments. Monitoring of the fate of vanA gene in these waters provides information on the exposure and potential threats of those bacteria for the environment and public health. Therefore, this study aimed at preparing a 25-mer-oligonucleotide DNA probe based on the 909 bp BamHI-ClaI fragment from Enterococcus faecium plasmids pVEF1 and pVEF2 through the use of Vector NTI Express Software. The newly designed vanA probe displayed highly specific hybridization with vanA-positive Enterococcus faecalis tested at 46 °C, 55 % formamide, and 0.020 M NaCl stringency conditions. In situ fluorescein hybridizations under the same stringency conditions were also used to monitor river water samples by using fluorescein microscopy. The results showed that the vanA-targeted oligonucleotide DNA probe prepared was not only highly specific but also quantitative tool for monitoring vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant bacteria in surface waters.

  9. Oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces by scanning near-field optical lithography using uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steen; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Birkelund, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Optically induced oxidation of hydrogen-passivated silicon surfaces using a scanning near-field optical microscope was achieved with both uncoated and aluminum-coated fiber probes. Line scans on amorphous silicon using uncoated fiber probes display a three-peak profile after etching in potassium...

  10. Near-field optical microscopy of localized excitations on rough surfaces: influence of a probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Starting from the general principles of near-field optical microscopy. I consider the influence of a probe when being used to image localized dipolar excitations and suggest a way of evaluating the perturbation thus introduced. Using the rigorous microscopic (electric) point-dipole description, I...

  11. Septic and nonseptic olecranon bursitis. Utility of the surface temperature probe in the early differentiation of septic and nonseptic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; McAfee, J H; Lucas, L M; Kumar, K L; Romney, D M

    1989-07-01

    Forty-six consecutive cases of olecranon bursitis were prospectively analyzed during a 1-year period. Eleven cases were septic; 35 cases were nonseptic. In addition to bursal fluid analysis, the surface temperature over the involved olecranon bursa and the contralateral (control) olecranon process was obtained by using a surface temperature probe. We compared the temperature difference between the involved and control sides in all septic and nonseptic cases. In nonseptic cases, the mean surface temperature difference was 0.7 degree C vs 3.7 degrees C in septic cases. In all septic cases, the temperature difference was 2.2 degrees C or greater (range, 2.2 degrees C to 5.1 degrees C; SD, 1.1). Use of the surface probe temperature difference proved 100% sensitive and 94% specific in discriminating septic from nonseptic cases. It seems to be more helpful than the bursal fluid leukocyte count, the predominant cell type, or Gram's stain in the early differentiation of septic and nonseptic olecranon bursitis.

  12. Role of lactobacillus cell surface hydrophobicity as probed by AMF in adhesion to surfaces at low and high ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Meij, van der H.C.; Vries, de J.; Norde, W.

    2005-01-01

    The S-layer present at the outermost cell surface of some lactobacillus species is known to convey hydrophobicity to the lactobacillus cell surface. Yet, it is commonly found that adhesion of lactobacilli to solid substrata does not proceed according to expectations based on cell surface

  13. Prediction of Metastasis Using Second Harmonic Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    and high F/B (representing a three-column version of the cartoon in Figure 5): Low F/B Medium F/B High F/B Coeff P- value Coeff P- value Coeff P...predict time to metastasis in ER+ IDC patients that received hormonal therapy? Aim 1a. Use a training set of F/B values to derive a predictive... values to test the ability of the F/B algorithm to predict time to metastasis. Test this F/B algorithm against, and in combination with, the predictive

  14. Printed second harmonic active organic nanofiber arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Organic nanofibers from semiconducting conjugated molecules are well suited to meet refined demands for advanced applications in future optoelectronics and nanophotonics. In contrast to their inorganic counterparts, the properties of organic nanowires can be tailored at the molecular level by che...

  15. In situ real-time gravimetric and viscoelastic probing of surface films formation on lithium batteries electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargel, Vadim; Shpigel, Netanel; Sigalov, Sergey; Nayak, Prasant; Levi, Mikhael D; Daikhin, Leonid; Aurbach, Doron

    2017-11-09

    It is generally accepted that solid-electrolyte interphase formed on the surface of lithium-battery electrodes play a key role in controlling their cycling performance. Although a large variety of surface-sensitive spectroscopies and microscopies were used for their characterization, the focus was on surface species nature rather than on the mechanical properties of the surface films. Here we report a highly sensitive method of gravimetric and viscoelastic probing of the formation of surface films on composite Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 electrode coupled with lithium ions intercalation into this electrode. Electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring measurements were performed with LiTFSI, LiPF 6 , and LiPF 6  + 2% vinylene carbonate solutions from which structural parameters of the surface films were returned by fitting to a multilayer viscoelastic model. Only a few fast cycles are required to qualify surface films on Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 anode improving in the sequence LiPF 6  < LiPF 6  + 2% vinylene carbonate < LiTFSI.

  16. A way for studying the impact of PEDOT:PSS interface layer on carrier transport in PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM bulk hetero junction solar cells by electric field induced optical second harmonic generation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Zubair, E-mail: zubairtarar@um.edu.my; Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Sulaiman, Khaulah [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Taguchi, Dai; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    Electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement was employed to study the impact of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) interface layer on the carrier transport mechanism of the PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). We revealed that the electric fields in the PCDTBT and PC{sub 71}BM were allowed to be measured individually by choosing fundamental laser wavelengths of 1000 nm and 1060 nm, respectively, in dark and under illumination. The results showed that the direction of the internal electric fields in the PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM BHJ layer is reversed by introducing the PEDOT:PSS layer, and this results in longer electron transport time in the BHJ layer. We conclude that TR-EFISHG can be used as a novel way for studying the impact of interfacial layer on the transport of electrons and holes in the bulk-heterojunction OSCs.

  17. Coexistence of Strong Second Harmonic Generation Response and Wide Band Gap in AZn4 Ga5 S12 (A=K, Rb, Cs) with 3D Diamond-like Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hua; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Yu-Jun; Yu, Ju-Song; Wu, Xin-Tao; Wu, Li-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR, 2-20 μm) second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) materials with outstanding performances are of great importance in laser science and technology. However, the enormous challenge to design and synthesize an excellent MIR NLO material lies in achieving simultaneously a strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response [dij >0.6 × AgGaS2 (AGS)] and wide band gap (Eg >3.5 eV). Herein three new MIR NLO materials, AZn4 Ga5 S12 (A=K, Rb, Cs) are reported, which crystallize in the KCd4 Ga5 S12 -type structure and adopt a 3D diamond-like framework (DLF) consisting of MS4 (M=Zn/Ga) tetrahedra; achieving the desired balance with strong powder SHG response (1.2-1.4 × AGS) and wide band gap (Eg ≈3.65 eV). Moreover, they also show large laser induced damage thresholds (LIDTs, 36 × AGS), a wide range of optical transparency (0.4-25 μm) and ultrahigh thermal stability (up to 1400 K). Upon analyzing the structure-property relationship of AXII4 XIII5 Q12 family, these 3D DLF structures can be used as a highly versatile and tunable platform for designing excellent MIR NLO materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Dispersion of the second harmonic generation in GaN{sub x}As{sub 1−x} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Ab initio study the effect of vary the concentration of N on SHG of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1−x} alloys. • Reducing N content increase the effective second-order susceptibility coefficients. • We found significant enhance in the properties of the new alloys. -- Abstract: The all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method has been used for an ab initio theoretical study to investigate the effect of vary the concentration of nitrogen on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1−x} (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) alloys. Based on the density functional theory the nonlinear optical susceptibilities (NLO) namely the SHG are calculated and their spectra are analyzed. We find that reducing N concentration leads to reduce the energy band gap resulting in enhancing the functionality of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1−x} alloys and hence increasing the second-order susceptibility. A surprising finding is a nonlinear relationship between the composition and the absorption/emission energies, leading to significantly enhancing the properties not obtainable from the parent GaAs and GaN binary systems.

  19. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of

  20. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  1. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  3. A model for oxidation-driven surface segregation and transport on Pt-alloys studied by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, P. A. J.; Kreuzer, H. J.; Cerezo, A.; Smith, G. D. W.

    2011-08-01

    Using a purpose-built 3D atom probe, we have previously shown that exposure to oxidising gases (NO, N2O, O2) induces Rh surface segregation in Pt-Rh alloys, the extent of which is strongly dependent on treatment temperature, crystallographic plane and the presence of ternary alloy additions. In this paper, the segregation trends identified on three different crystallographic surfaces of Pt-Rh are analysed using thermodynamic and kinetic arguments. The segregation model we present is generic for diffusion on alloy surfaces in the presence of active gases. From it we obtain activation energies and diffusion coefficients for the processes of metal-oxide species diffusion both perpendicular to and laterally across the surface. Using these we propose a simple model for the interaction of chemically active gases with the surfaces of such alloys. Applying this understanding to sequential oxidation/reduction treatments would in principle allow improved control of the surface composition of alloy catalysts. Related applications of this model include optimisation of core-shell catalyst nanoparticles.

  4. A nanometre-scale resolution interference-based probe of interfacial phenomena between microscopic objects and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Naranjo, Jose C.; Ugaz, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Interferometric techniques have proven useful to infer proximity and local surface profiles of microscopic objects near surfaces. But a critical trade-off emerges between accuracy and mathematical complexity when these methods are applied outside the vicinity of closest approach. Here we introduce a significant advancement that enables reflection interference contrast microscopy to provide nearly instantaneous reconstruction of an arbitrary convex object’s contour next to a bounding surface with nanometre resolution, making it possible to interrogate microparticle/surface interaction phenomena at radii of curvature 1,000 times smaller than those accessible by the conventional surface force apparatus. The unique view-from-below perspective of reflection interference contrast microscopy also reveals previously unseen deformations and allows the first direct observation of femtolitre-scale capillary condensation dynamics underneath micron-sized particles. Our implementation of reflection interference contrast microscopy provides a generally applicable nanometre-scale resolution tool that can be potentially exploited to dynamically probe ensembles of objects near surfaces so that statistical/probabilistic behaviour can be realistically captured. PMID:23715278

  5. Probing the surface chemistry of polycrystalline ZnO with scanning tunneling microscopy and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, G.S.; Bonnell, D.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    This paper describes the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy to examine polycrystalline ZnO surface in ultrahigh vacuum after bake-out, after a low temperature anneal that cleaned the surface, after a high temperature anneal, which segregated bismuth to the surface, after being dosed with O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and after exposure to air. The tunneling spectra depend both on the proximity to structural features, such as grain boundaries, and on the chemical composition of the surface. For example, the segregation of bismuth to the surface causes the tunneling spectra to have a p-type rectification. Our results also indicate that the rectification of tunneling spectra acquired in air is caused by surface hydration and that images of surfaces that have not been heated in vacuum have inferior resolution due to a reduction in the height of the apparent tunnel barrier. Spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy has been used to demonstrate that surface hydration has a greater effect on the crystallite surfaces than on the grain boundary surfaces.

  6. Mapping Protein Surface Accessibility via an Electron Transfer Dissociation Selectively Cleavable Hydrazone Probe*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Lisa; O'Brien, John P.; Browning, Karen S.; Tao, Zhihua; Liu, Hung-Wen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    A protein's surface influences its role in protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand binding. Mass spectrometry can be used to give low resolution structural information about protein surfaces and conformations when used in combination with derivatization methods that target surface accessible amino acid residues. However, pinpointing the resulting modified peptides upon enzymatic digestion of the surface-modified protein is challenging because of the complexity of the peptide mixture and low abundance of modified peptides. Here a novel hydrazone reagent (NN) is presented that allows facile identification of all modified surface residues through a preferential cleavage upon activation by electron transfer dissociation coupled with a collision activation scan to pinpoint the modified residue in the peptide sequence. Using this approach, the correlation between percent reactivity and surface accessibility is demonstrated for two biologically active proteins, wheat eIF4E and PARP-1 Domain C. PMID:22393264

  7. Electronic transport at semiconductor surfaces - from point-contact transistor to micro-four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Grey, Francois

    2002-01-01

    The electrical properties of semiconductor surfaces have played a decisive role in one of the most important discoveries of the last century, transistors. In the 1940s, the concept of surface states-new electron energy levels characteristic of the surface atoms-was instrumental in the fabrication...... of the first point-contact transistors, and led to the successful fabrication of field-effect transistors. However, to this day, one property of semiconductor surface states remains poorly understood, both theoretically and experimentally. That is the conduction of electrons or holes directly through...

  8. Probing the intrinsically oil-wet surfaces of pores in North Sea chalk at subpore resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Skovbjerg, Lone Lindbæk; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2009-01-01

    Ultimate Oil recovery from chalk reservoirs is limited by many factors - including the grain size and the surface properties of the small mainly biogenic calcite particles that chalk is made off . Wettability, the tendency for water or oil to spread over a surface, of the particle surfaces is one......, not a product of later migration of oil into the reservoir, which is known to alter the wettability of the surfaces. The data indicated distinct patches, with diameters ranging from 500 to 50 nm, which appears to have different wettability The size of the patches is significantly less than the size of the chalk...

  9. Monitoring of ppm level humic acid in surface water using ZnO-chitosan nano-composite as fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basumallick, Srijita; Santra, Swadeshmukul

    2017-05-01

    Surface water contains natural pollutants humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid at ppm level which form carcinogenic chloro-compounds during chlorination in water treatment plants. We report here synthesis of ZnO-chitosan (CS) nano-composites by simple hydrothermal technique and examined their application potential as fluorescent probe for monitoring ppm level HA. These ZnO-CS composites have been characterized by HRTEM, EDX, FTIR, AFM and Fluorescence Spectra. HRTEM images show the formation of ZnO-CS nano-composites of average diameter of 50-250 nm. Aqueous dispersions of these nano-composites show fluorescence emission at 395 nm when excited at 300 nm which is strongly quenched by ppm level HA indicating their possible use in monitoring ppm level HA present in surface water.

  10. Pronounced Surface Band Bending of Thin-Film Silicon Revealed by Modeling Core Levels Probed with Hard X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippler, David; Wilks, Regan G; Pieters, Bart E; van Albada, Sacha J; Gerlach, Dominic; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Bär, Marcus; Rau, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    Enhancing the probing depth of photoemission studies by using hard X-rays allows the investigation of buried interfaces of real-world device structures. However, it also requires the consideration of photoelectron-signal attenuation when evaluating surface effects. Here, we employ a computational model incorporating surface band bending and exponential photoelectron-signal attenuation to model depth-dependent spectral changes of Si 1s and Si 2s core level lines. The data were acquired from hydrogenated boron-doped microcrystalline thin-film silicon, which is applied in silicon-based solar cells. The core level spectra, measured by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using different excitation energies, reveal the presence of a 0.29 nm thick surface oxide layer. In the silicon film a downward surface band bending of eVbb = -0.65 eV over ∼6 nm obtained via inverse modeling explains the observed core level shifts and line broadening. Moreover, the computational model allows the extraction of the "real" Si 1s and Si 2s bulk core level binding energies as 1839.13 and 150.39 eV, and their natural Lorentzian line widths as 496 and 859 meV, respectively. These values significantly differ from those directly extracted from the measured spectra. Because band bending usually occurs at material surfaces we highly recommend the detailed consideration of signal integration over depth for quantitative statements from depth-dependent measurements.

  11. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Michael J [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  12. Uncertainty analysis of point by point sampling complex surfaces using touch probe CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barini, Emanuele; Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a study concerning point by point scanning of complex surfaces using tactile CMMs. A four factors-two level full factorial experiment was carried out, involving measurements on a complex surface configuration item comprising a sphere, a cylinder and a cone, combined in a singl...

  13. Reversible Hydrogenation and Bandgap Opening of Graphene and Graphite Surfaces Probed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Wojtaszek, Magdalena; Arramel, [No Value; Tombros, Nikolaos; van Wees, Bart J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of hydrogenation on the topography and electronic properties of graphene and graphite surfaces are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The surfaces are chemically modified using an Ar/H2 plasma. By analyzing thousands of scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements

  14. Probing cluster surface morphology by cryo spectroscopy of N2 on cationic nickel clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Sebastian; Mohrbach, Jennifer; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2017-11-01

    We present the cryogenic (26 K) IR spectra of selected [Nin(N2)m]+ (n = 5-20, m = 1 - mmax), which strongly reveal n- and m-dependent features in the N2 stretching region, in conjunction with density functional theory modeling of some of these findings. The observed spectral features allow us to refine the kinetic classification [cf. J. Mohrbach, S. Dillinger, and G. Niedner-Schatteburg, J. Chem. Phys. 147, 184304 (2017)] and to define four classes of structure related surface adsorption behavior: Class (1) of Ni6+, Ni13+, and Ni19+ are highly symmetrical clusters with all smooth surfaces of equally coordinated Ni atoms that entertain stepwise N2 adsorption up to stoichiometric N2:Nisurface saturation. Class (2) of Ni12+ and Ni18+ are highly symmetrical clusters minus one. Their relaxed smooth surfaces reorganize by enhanced N2 uptake toward some low coordinated Ni surface atoms with double N2 occupation. Class (3) of Ni5+ and Ni7+ through Ni11+ are small clusters of rough surfaces with low coordinated Ni surface atoms, and some reveal semi-internal Ni atoms of high next-neighbor coordination. Surface reorganization upon N2 uptake turns rough into rough surface by Ni atom migration and turns octahedral based structures into pentagonal bipyramidal structures. Class (4) of Ni14+ through Ni17+ and Ni20+ are large clusters with rough and smooth surface areas. They possess smooth icosahedral surfaces with some proximate capping atom(s) on one hemisphere of the icosahedron with the other one largely unaffected.

  15. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... setup, but the terminology used and data analysis were also ameliorated in order to simplify the interpretation of the results. We used the mentioned technique in the following projects: • The electronic transport dimensionality of epitaxial grahene grown on SiC is detected and important physical...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...

  16. Synthesis, second-harmonic generation (SHG), and photoluminescence (PL) properties of noncentrosymmetric bismuth selenite solid solutions, Bi2-xLnxSeO5 (Ln = La and Eu; x = 0-0.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hai-Xin; Jo, Hongil; Oh, Seung-Jin; Ok, Kang Min

    2018-02-01

    A series of La3+ or Eu3+-doped noncentrosymmetric (NCS) bismuth selenite solid solutions, Bi2-xLnxSeO5 (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3), have been successfully synthesized via standard solid-state reactions under vacuum with Bi2O3, La2O3 (or Eu2O3), and SeO2 as starting materials. Crystal structures and phase purities of the resultant materials were thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction using the Rietveld method. The results clearly show that the reported materials crystallize in the orthorhombic space group, Abm2 (No. 39), and exhibit pseudo-three-dimensional frameworks consisting of BiO3, BiO5, and SeO3 polyhedra that share edges and corners. Detailed diffraction studies indicate that the cell volume of Bi2-xLnxSeO5 decreases with an increasing amount of Ln3+ on the Bi3+ sites. However, no ordering between Ln3+ and Bi3+ was observed in the Bi2-xLnxSeO5 solid solutions. Powder second-harmonic generation (SHG) measurements, using 1064 nm radiation, reveal that SHG efficiencies of Bi2-xLnxSeO5 solid solutions continuously decrease as more Ln3+ cations are added to the sites of polarizable Bi3+ cations. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements on Bi2-xEuxSeO5 exhibit three specific emission peaks at 592, 613, and 702 nm (5D0 → 7F1, 2, 4) owing to the 4f-4f intrashell transitions of Eu3+ ions.

  17. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  18. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok, Franciszek; Kaspers, Mark R; Bernhart, Alexander M; Nikiel, Marek; Jany, Benedykt R; Indyka, Paulina; Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Möller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001)-c(8 × 2)-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons. PMID:25247129

  19. Probing the molecular structures of plasma-damaged and surface-repaired low-k dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John N; Lin, Qinghuang; Bielefeld, Jeffery D; Chen, Zhan

    2015-10-21

    Fully understanding the effect and the molecular mechanisms of plasma damage and silylation repair on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials is essential to the design of low-k dielectrics with defined properties and the integration of low-k dielectrics into advanced interconnects of modern electronics. Here, analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact angle goniometry (CA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to provide a comprehensive characterization of the surface and bulk structure changes of poly(methyl)silsesquioxane (PMSQ) low-k thin films before and after O2 plasma treatment and silylation repair. O2 plasma treatment altered drastically both the molecular structures and water structures at the surfaces of the PMSQ film while no bulk structural change was detected. For example, ∼34% Si-CH3 groups were removed from the PMSQ surface, and the Si-CH3 groups at the film surface tilted toward the surface after the O2 plasma treatment. The oxidation by the O2 plasma made the PMSQ film surface more hydrophilic and thus enhanced the water adsorption at the film surface. Both strongly and weakly hydrogen bonded water were detected at the plasma-damaged film surface during exposure to water with the former being the dominate component. It is postulated that this enhancement of both chemisorbed and physisorbed water after the O2 plasma treatment leads to the degradation of low-k properties and reliability. The degradation of the PMSQ low-k film can be recovered by repairing the plasma-damaged surface using a silylation reaction. The silylation method, however, cannot fully recover the plasma induced damage at the PMSQ film surface as evidenced by the existence of hydrophilic groups, including C-O/C[double bond, length as m-dash]O and residual Si-OH groups. This work provides a molecular level picture on the surface structural changes of low

  20. Probing the effects of surface hydrophobicity and tether orientation on antibody-antigen binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-04-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection for many applications, but their current use is limited by poor reliability, and efforts to change this have not yielded fruitful results. One difficulty which limits the rational engineering of next-generation devices is that little is known, at the molecular level, about the antibody-antigen binding process near solid surfaces. Atomic-level structural information is scant because typical experimental techniques (X-ray crystallography and NMR) cannot be used to image proteins bound to surfaces. To overcome this limitation, this study uses molecular simulation and an advanced, experimentally validated, coarse-grain, protein-surface model to compare fab-lysozyme binding in bulk solution and when the fab is tethered to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The results show that the tether site in the fab, as well as the surface hydrophobicity, significantly impacts the binding process and suggests that the optimal design involves tethering fabs upright on a hydrophilic surface. The results offer an unprecedented, molecular-level picture of the binding process and give hope that the rational design of protein-microarrays is possible.