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Sample records for surfaces facies distribution

  1. Seismic facies; Facies sismicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johann, Paulo Roberto Schroeder [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao e Producao Corporativo. Gerencia de Reservas e Reservatorios]. E-mail: johann@petrobras.com.br

    2004-11-01

    The method presented herein describes the seismic facies as representations of curves and vertical matrixes of the lithotypes proportions. The seismic facies are greatly interested in capturing the spatial distributions (3D) of regionalized variables, as for example, lithotypes, sedimentary facies groups and/ or porosity and/or other properties of the reservoirs and integrate them into the 3D geological modeling (Johann, 1997). Thus when interpreted as curves or vertical matrixes of proportions, seismic facies allow us to build a very important tool for structural analysis of regionalized variables. The matrixes have an important application in geostatistical modeling. In addition, this approach provides results about the depth and scale of the wells profiles, that is, seismic data is integrated to the characterization of reservoirs in depth maps and in high resolution maps. The link between the different necessary technical phases involved in the classification of the segments of seismic traces is described herein in groups of predefined traces of two approaches: a) not supervised and b) supervised by the geological knowledge available on the studied reservoir. The multivariate statistical methods used to obtain the maps of the seismic facies units are interesting tools to be used to provide a lithostratigraphic and petrophysical understanding of a petroleum reservoir. In the case studied these seismic facies units are interpreted as representative of the depositional system as a part of the Namorado Turbiditic System, Namorado Field, Campos Basin.Within the scope of PRAVAP 19 (Programa Estrategico de Recuperacao Avancada de Petroleo - Strategic Program of Advanced Petroleum Recovery) some research work on algorithms is underway to select new optimized attributes to apply seismic facies. One example is the extraction of attributes based on the wavelet transformation and on the time-frequency analysis methodology. PRAVAP is also carrying out research work on an

  2. Comparison of geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping with grain size data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Wook; Jang, Dong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping.

  3. Comparison of Geostatistical Kriging Algorithms for Intertidal Surface Sediment Facies Mapping with Grain Size Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    No-Wook Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the predictive performance of different geostatistical kriging algorithms for intertidal surface sediment facies mapping using grain size data. Indicator kriging, which maps facies types from conditional probabilities of predefined facies types, is first considered. In the second approach, grain size fractions are first predicted using cokriging and the facies types are then mapped. As grain size fractions are compositional data, their characteristics should be considered during spatial prediction. For efficient prediction of compositional data, additive log-ratio transformation is applied before cokriging analysis. The predictive performance of cokriging of the transformed variables is compared with that of cokriging of raw fractions in terms of both prediction errors of fractions and facies mapping accuracy. From a case study of the Baramarae tidal flat, Korea, the mapping method based on cokriging of log-ratio transformation of fractions outperformed the one based on cokriging of untransformed fractions in the prediction of fractions and produced the best facies mapping accuracy. Indicator kriging that could not account for the variation of fractions within each facies type showed the worst mapping accuracy. These case study results indicate that the proper processing of grain size fractions as compositional data is important for reliable facies mapping.

  4. Research on 3D Distribution of Meandering River Sand Body Using Sedimentary Facies Method and 3D Geological Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian; CAO Dai-yong

    2006-01-01

    Sedimentary facies study is an important method in describing the property and distribution of reservoir. 3D geological modeling is a powerful tool in 3D characterization of geological bodies. By combining the sedimentary facies study with 3D geological modeling to generate 3D sedimentary facies model, the 3D geometry and distribution feature of sand bodies can be more accurately characterized, particularly in 3D view. In Liuchu oilfield of Jizhong depression, the Ed2IV formation was recognized as meandering river deposition facies and five sedimentary facies were identified, which include point bar sand, levee, channel margin, abandoned channel and floodplain. All the 24 sand body facies in Ed2IV were mapped and the 3D sedimentary facies model established based on 2D facies maps. The result shows that the 3D sedimentary facies model is well matched for the research result of sedimentary facies. Being an extension of traditional sedimentary study, the 3D sedimentary facies model can be used to describe the 3D geometry and distribution orders of a single sand body more reliably and more accurately.

  5. Sediments of the Dry Tortugas, south Florida, USA: Facies distribution on a ramp-like isolated carbonate platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischler, Eberhard; Isaack, Anja; Hudson, J. Harold

    2017-04-01

    Four sedimentary facies may be delineated based on quantitative analysis of texture and composition of modern surface sediments on the Dry Tortugas carbonate platform. These include (1) mollusk-Halimeda wackestone, (2) mollusk packstone-to-grainstone, (3) coralgal-Halimeda grainstone, and (4) coralgal grainstone. Even though the Tortugas platform is characterized by an open circulation due to deep, broad marginal channels and a lack of a continuous surface-breaking marginal reef, facies are not distributed at random and show bathymetrical zonation. Also, facies appear to cover wide belts rather than forming a mosaic. Mollusk-Halimeda wackestone occurs in protected platform interior areas ca. 10-18 m deep. Mollusk packstone-to-grainstone occurs in more open platform interior settings adjacent to channels and in deeper outer reef areas of 14-25 m water depth. Coralgal-Halimeda grainstone is found on shallow marginal shoals (1-11 m deep), and coralgal grainstone on the somewhat deeper (3-16 m), seaward edges of these shoals. However, there is bathymetrical overlap of facies in intermediate depths of ca. 5-17 m. This limitation has implications for the interpretation of the fossil record, because changes in water depth are commonly thought to be reflected in facies changes, e.g., in sequence stratigraphy. Comparison with previous sediment studies of the 1930s, 1960s, and 1970s in the area exhibit a decrease in coral fragments and increases in coralline algal and mollusk shell fragments. These observations might be a result of environmental changes such as coral decline and die-outs during temperature events, disease, and the increase in macroalgae (due to the ecological extinction of the echinoid Diadema). The results suggest that more long-term studies are needed that further explore the influence of environmental change on reef sediment composition. Dry Tortugas surface sediments consist of lower portions of Halimeda plates and mollusk shell fragments and higher

  6. Annual variation of topography and surface sedimentary facies of 2014~2015 years in the Gochang coast, southwestern Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; Kang, Sol Ip

    2016-04-01

    The Gochang coast is characterized by macro-tide, open-coast, linear shoreline, and sand substrates. It is located on the southwestern coast of Korea along the eastern part of the Yellow Sea, comprising the Donghori, Gwangseungri, and Myengsasipri areas from the north to south. This study has investigated annual variation of topography, accumulation rates, surface sediment texture, and sedimentary facies during 2014~2015. In the intertidal area, topographic elevation and surface sediments were measured and sampled at 63 sites during the 7 seasons from winter (Feb.) in 2014 to summer (Aug.) in 2015. Surface sediments of the subtidal area were sampled at 110 and 119 sites with 500 m interval for the two seasons of winter and summer in 2015, respectively. In the Gochang coast of 2014~2015 years, surface sedimentary facies represent a fining trend from shoreline to offshore. Area distribution of sedimentary facies also becomes finer from the north to south. Annual accumulation rates of the Gochang intertidal area represent av. -0.081m/yr from winter to winter, av. -0.018m/yr from spring to spring, av. -0.019m/yr from summer to summer during 2014~2015, respectively. It was indicative of an erosion-dominated environment. Keywords: macro-tide, open-coast, surface sediment, accumulation rate, Gochang coast Acknowledgements: This study was supported by the research grant from the Korean Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries (PJT200538). This presentation is an interim result of the coastal research program in the study area.

  7. Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution of the Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Flavia; Lokier, Stephen W.

    2014-05-01

    The distribution of benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies from Recent coastline environments adjacent to the coastline of Abu Dhabi (UAE) was studied in detail with the aim to: 1) provide reliable analogs for understanding and interpreting the depositional environment of ancient shallow-marine sediments from the UAE; 2) assess any modifications in the distribution of benthic environments and sedimentary facies in an area affected by significant anthropogenic activities - particular construction and land reclamation. A total of 100 sea-floor sediment samples were collected in different shallow-marine sedimentary environments (nearshore shelf, beach-front, channels, ooid shoals, lagoon and mangals) close to the coastline of Abu Dhabi Island. Where possible, we revisited the sampling sites used in several studies conducted in the middle of last century (prior to any significant anthropogenic activities) to assess temporal changes in Recent benthic foraminifera and sedimentary facies distribution during the last 50 years. Five foraminiferal assemblages were recognized in the studied area. Species with a porcellaneous test mainly belonging to the genera Quinqueloculina, Triloculina, Spiroloculina, Sigmoilinita are common in all studied areas. Larger benthic foraminifera Peneroplis and Spirolina are particularly abundant in samples collected on seaweed. Hyaline foraminifera mostly belonging to the genera Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina and Rosalina are also common together with Miliolidae in the nearshore shelf and beach front. Agglutinated foraminifera (Clavulina, Textularia, Ammobaculites and Reophax) are present in low percentages. The species belonging to the genera Ammobaculites and Reophax are present only in the finest grain samples particularly in lagoons and mangal environments and have not been reported previously in the studied area. The majority of the ooid shoal sediments, the coarser sediments of the beach-front and samples collected in dredged channels

  8. Modeling 3-D permeability distribution in alluvial fans using facies architecture and geophysical acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Dai, Zhenxue; Guo, Gaoxuan; Teatini, Pietro

    2017-02-01

    Alluvial fans are highly heterogeneous in hydraulic properties due to complex depositional processes, which make it difficult to characterize the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K). An original methodology is developed to identify the spatial statistical parameters (mean, variance, correlation range) of the hydraulic conductivity in a three-dimensional (3-D) setting by using geological and geophysical data. More specifically, a large number of inexpensive vertical electric soundings are integrated with a facies model developed from borehole lithologic data to simulate the log10(K) continuous distributions in multiple-zone heterogeneous alluvial megafans. The Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, is used as an example to test the proposed approach. Due to the non-stationary property of the K distribution in the alluvial fan, a multiple-zone parameterization approach is applied to analyze the conductivity statistical properties of different hydrofacies in the various zones. The composite variance in each zone is computed to describe the evolution of the conductivity along the flow direction. Consistently with the scales of the sedimentary transport energy, the results show that conductivity variances of fine sand, medium-coarse sand, and gravel decrease from the upper (zone 1) to the lower (zone 3) portion along the flow direction. In zone 1, sediments were moved by higher-energy flooding, which induces poor sorting and larger conductivity variances. The composite variance confirms this feature with statistically different facies from zone 1 to zone 3. The results of this study provide insights to improve our understanding on conductivity heterogeneity and a method for characterizing the spatial distribution of K in alluvial fans.

  9. Facies Analysis of Fahliyan Formation in North Dezful Embayment, Southwest Iran: Implications for Porosity Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouhi, M.; Jahani, D.; Taati Qurayem, F.; Aminzadeh, A.

    2009-04-01

    Fahliyan Formation (Neocomian) is one of the important hydrocarbon reservoirs of khami group in south west of Iran. This Formation has 332m thickness in type section and mainly consist of carbonate rocks. In this study, the Fahliyan Formation was investigated in subsurface section of AZN#B Well in the north Dezful Embayment (with281m thickness). Lower boundary of Fahliyan Formation with Garau Formation is continuous and the upper contact with Gadvan formation is conformable According to this study 13 carbonate microfacies and one shaily facies were recognized which are grouped into four facies associations(micro facies group). These facies associations present platform to basin depositional setting and are nominated as : A (Tidal-flat), B (Lagoon), C (Bar) and D (Open marine). Based on available data set including cutting samples, thin sections and well log analysis, it seems the Fahliyan Formation was deposited in a Carbonate shelf setting and the studied profile indicates the shallowest part of the platform. Secondary porosities due to dolomitization and Stylolitization played an important role in increasing reservoir quality of the formation. Other types of porosities occupied by later cementations and had no contribution in reservoir quality.

  10. Distribution and composition of verdine and glaucony facies from the sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thamban, M.; Rao, V.P.

    Investigations on green grains from sediments of the western continental margin of India, between Ratnagiri and Cape Comorin, (water depth 37-330 m) indicate the presence of verdine and glaucony facies. Verdine facies occurs over an area of about...

  11. Sedimentary Facies and Distribution of Reservoir Rocks from the Feixianguan Formation in the Daxian-Xuanhan Region, NE Sichuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    , solution openings (caves) and minute fissures. Macropores and coarse pore throats are common. The reservoir rocks are apparently controlled by sedimentary facies in distribution patterns. Vertically, they occur dominantly in the second and first members of the Feixianguan Formation, and laterally in the platform exposed shoals and restricted platforms, where good natural gas potential is expected.

  12. Geostatistical modeling of facies, bitumen grade and particle size distribution for the Joslyn oil sand open pit mine project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babak, Olena; Insalaco, Enzo; Mittler, Andreas [Total EandP Canada Ltd. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Joslyn North Mine Project is currently in the pre-development stage; the aim of this study is to use different available data to draw a geological model of facies, bitumen grade, full particle size distribution (PSD) and ore/waste discrimination. The study was conducted with the database of around 800 wells, stochastic, indicator and Gaussian simulations were performed along with a sensitivity study. Results demonstrated the importance of some parameters for evaluating grade cases including variogram uncertainty, sampling limitations and errors in geostatistical workflow. In addition, modeling the full PSD dataset was shown to be useful. This study demonstrated how to use available database through an overall workflow to develop case scenarios for bitumen in place in ore and characterize the ore material.

  13. Modeling 3-D permeability distribution in alluvial fans using facies architecture and geophysical acquisitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Dai, Zhenxue; Guo, Gaoxuan; Teatini, Pietro

    2017-01-01

      Alluvial fans are highly heterogeneous in hydraulic properties due to complex depositional processes, which make it difficult to characterize the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K...

  14. Effects of relative sea level changes on facies and diagenetic variability of a Pennsylvanian outcrop and near-surface reservoir analog, SE Kansas (Missourian, Drum Limestone)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Perez, I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fieldman, H.R.; Franseen, E.K. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The Drum Limestone contains facies that are an analog to important petroleum reservoirs elsewhere in the Mid-continent. It consists predominantly of an oolitic shoal and algal buildup complex deposited and the seaward edge of a shale delta. This study integrates outcrop, core, well log, petrographic, and high-resolution reflection seismic data to understand the role of relative sea level fluctuations in the depositional and diagenetic history of the Drum reservoir facies. The Drum Limestone forms an E-W belt 30 km wide, is up to 21 m thick, and thins to less than one meter thick both up-dip and down-dip of the depositional shelf edge. The basal contact of the Drum Limestone is regionally erosive and interpreted to represent a relative sea level drop. The erosion surface is overlain by a basal oolite with lithoclasts. Two-thirds of the Drum oolite facies coexisted partially with algal-bryozoan buildups, in shallow-waters at the shelf edge. Ooids were likely transported by tidal and wave currents to paleotopographic lows forming basinward prograding (SSW direction) clinoforms. Landward, Drum facies grade to stromatolites, and basinward the oolite pinches out. An interpreted relative sea level fall at the end of this Drum depositional stage resulted in a sharp, regionally traceable surface with evidences of likely subaerial exposure in shelf positions, and represented basinward by an oolitic lithoclastic breccia capped by an incipient hardground. The surface is overlain by Drum trough-crossbedded (N-NE direction) bioclastic oolitic facies interbedded with shales, deposited during a relative sea level rise. This upper third of oolite deposition was influenced by siliciclastic input from the south that eventually overtook carbonate sedimentation. Facies and diagenetic changes documented for the Drum Limestone analog are providing important details on reservoir heterogeneities at a scale important for Mid-continent reservoirs.

  15. Sedimentary facies, geomorphic features and habitat distribution at the Hudson Canyon head from AUV multibeam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Rona, Peter A.; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2015-11-01

    Mapping of physical benthic habitats at the head of Hudson Canyon was performed by means of integrated analysis of acoustic data, video surveys and seafloor sampling. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery for the identification of geomorphological features and the characterization of surficial sediments. Habitat characterization in terms of seafloor texture and identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual analysis of still photographs from underwater vehicles. Habitat classes were defined on the basis of the seafloor texture observed on photos and then compared with the geophysical data in order to associate habitats to acoustic classes and/or geomorphological features. This enabled us to infer habitat distribution on the basis of morpho-acoustic classes and extrapolate results over larger areas. Results from bottom trawling were used to determine the overall biodiversity within the identified habitats. Our analysis revealed a variety of topographic and sedimentological structures that provide a wide range of physical habitats. A variety of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel patches and mudstone outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including cold-water corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields below 300 m depth suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition may contributes to creation of specific benthic habitats. Hummocky terrain has been delineated along the canyon rims and associated with extensive, long-term burrowing activity by golden tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps). These results show the relationships of physical features to benthic habitat variation, support the notion of the area as a biodiversity hotspot and define essential habitats for planning of sustainable regional fisheries.

  16. Facies distribution, depositional environment, and petrophysical features of the Sharawra Formation, Old Qusaiba Village, Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muhammad Asif; Kaminski, Michael; Umran Dogan, A.

    2016-04-01

    moderate-scale transgressive episodes, while the thin shale interbeds in the middle and upper part of the Sharawra Formation represent small-scale transgressions. Overall, the Sharawra Formation contains a series of repetitive transgressive and regressive events and has been interpreted as a pro-deltaic deposit in previous studies. In the present study, the lowermost sandstone thickly bedded facies lie within the transition zone environment. The siltstone facies and the horizontally stratified facies show a middle shore face environment. The middle shore face environment is present locally. The bioturbation in the uppermost facies is indicative of the upper shore face environment. The porosity values do not vary much, as the average porosity for the sandstone facies is about 15%, for the siltstones it ranges about 7%. The permeability is variable throughout the formation, the values range from 50 to 300 md. Although sandstone has a good porosity and permeability, the siltstone facies exhibit poor petrophysical characteristics. In terms of reservoir characterization, the mineralogical mature, moderately well sorted top most sandstone facies, with appreciable porosity and permeability can be considered as a potential reservoir rock. This study has provided a base for future quantitative studies in this important formation in the area.

  17. Application of micro-seismic facies to coal bed methane exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Donghui; Dong Shouhua; Zhang Cong; Deng Shuaiqi; Li Shujie

    2011-01-01

    A neural network is applied to high-quality 3-D seismic data during micro-seismic facies analysis to perform the waveform analysis and training on single reflection events.Modeled seismic channels are established and the real seismic channels are classified.Thus,a distribution of micro-seismic facies having a high precision over a flat surface was acquired.This method applied to existing geological data allows the distribution of areas rich in coal bed methane to be clearly defined.A distribution map of the micro-seismic facies in the research area is shown.The data accord well with measured methane contents,indicating that the analysis using micro-seismic facies is reliable and effective.This method could be applied to coal bed methane exploration and is of great importance to future exploration work and to an increase in the drilling success rate.

  18. Carbon isotope characteristics, origin and distribution of the natural gases from the Tertiary salty lacustrine facies in the West Depression Region in the Qaidam Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓宝; 胡勇; 马立元; 孟自芳; 段毅; 周世新; 彭德华

    2003-01-01

    The Tertiary in the West Depression Region of the Qaidam Basin has the typical inland salty lacustrine deposits in China. 34 natural gas samples were collected from 13 oil fields in the West Depression Region in the basin, the chemical compositions and carbon isotopes of methane, ethane, propane, and butane were measured. According to the carbon isotope characteristics of natural gases in combination with geochemical characteristics of the source rocks and crude oils, the natural gases can be divided into sapropelic associated gas, mixed organic matter-derived associated gas, coal-derived gas and mixed gas. The carbon isotope characteristics, origin and distribution of the natural gases are considered to be related with the types and distribution of organic inputs in lake environments with different salinities. The lake salinity can regionally forecast the distribution of the different genetic types of natural gas. Compared with the different genetic types of natural gas from other Chinese basins, the carbon isotopes of the heavy hydrocarbons of the natural gas from the Tertiary salt lacustrine facies in the Qaidam Basin are extremely heavier. Therefore, this should be considered when natural gases are genetically classified in the basin.

  19. A facies distribution model controlled by a tectonically inherited sea bottom topography in the carbonate rimmed shelf of the Upper Tithonian-Valanginian Southern Tethyan continental margin (NW Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilone, Luca; Sulli, Attilio

    2016-08-01

    The Upper Tithonian-Valanginian shallow-water carbonates outcropping in the Palermo Mts (NW Sicily) consist of several facies associations reflecting different depositional environments of a carbonate rimmed shelf, pertaining to the Southern Tethyan continental margin. The reconstructed depositional model, based on the sedimentological features, cyclic facies arrangement and biota distribution, shows that a wide protected lagoon, dominated by algae, molluscs and scattered patch reefs, was bordered landward by a tidal flat, where stromatolitic algal mats were cyclically subaerial exposed, and seaward by a marine sand belt and reef complex. Oolitic packstone-grainstone lithofacies, cyclically subjected to subaerial exposure, suggests the occurrence of a barrier island, located nearly to the lagoonal carbonate shoreline, allowing the development of narrow embayments with restricted circulation. In the outer platform, the oolitic lithofacies of the marine sand belt pass landward into the protected lagoon, where washover oolite sands occur, and seaward into a high-energy zone (back-reef apron) gradually merging in the reef complex. In the latter, coral framestone occupied the inner sector (reef flat), while the facies association dominated by boundstone with Ellipsactinia sp. developed in the outer sectors (reef wall), adjacent to the fore-reef and upper slope environments. Stratigraphic evidence, associated with the recognized facies associations, helped to reconstruct the geo-tectonic setting of the carbonate platform, where the distribution of the depositional facies along the shelf and their extension were influenced by the tectonically-inherited sea bottom topography. In a regime of extensional tectonics, localized and thin succession of high-energy prograding oolite sand belt depositional facies occupied structural highs (footwall uplift), while the largely diffused and thick low energy aggrading peritidal-to-lagoonal depositional facies developed in subsiding

  20. Source, tectonic setting, and facies distribution of the Silurian Sharawra Formation, the Old Qusaiba village, central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Muhammad Asif; Kaminski, Michael A.; Dogan, A. Umran

    2017-06-01

    Three outcrops of the Silurian Sharawra Formation at its type locality in Old Qusaiba Village in Central Saudi Arabia were studied for lithofacies distribution, petrographical, and geochemical characteristics. The outcrops were logged and nine different lithofacies were identified in the field. Petrographic analysis shows the Sharawra Formation to be mainly subarkosic associated with increasing mica content near to its contact with the underlying Qusaiba Shale Formation. Major and trace element geochemistry indicates that the sediments of the formation were deposited in a passive continental margin. The source area discriminating plots reveal acidic or felsic rocks such as granites as the probable provenance of the Sharawra sediments. The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) and Chemical Index of Weathering (CIW) indicate a moderate degree of weathering in the source area of these Silurian sediments. This study provides a baseline for future characterization studies of Paleozoic siliciclastic formations in Saudi Arabia and neighbouring countries.

  1. Coal facies studies in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel [INCAR (CSIC), Ap. Co., 73, 33080, Oviedo (Spain); Jimenez, Amalia [Geology, University of Oviedo, 33005, Oviedo (Spain)

    2004-04-23

    This work is a synthesis of the distribution of the main coal basins and sub-basins in Spain as well as the research carried out on their coal facies. The coal fields are distributed through the Paleozoic (mainly Pennsylvanian), Mesozoic (Cretaceous) and Cenozoic times. Peats also exist in the southeast Spain (Granada area), although these types of deposits are not included in this review. Spanish coal basins are both of a paralic and intramontane type and the coal rank is highly variable, from lignite in the case of the younger coal seams to anthracite for those of Carboniferous age.

  2. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. (Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)); Richert, J.P. (Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France))

    1994-07-01

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  3. Facies composition and scaling relationships of extensional faults in carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastesen, Eivind; Braathen, Alvar

    2010-05-01

    :1000. In general the complete dataset shows a positive correlation between thickness (T) of fault cores and the displacement (D) on faults. For increasing displacement relationships, the D/T relationship is not constant. The D/T relationship is generally higher for small faults than for larger faults, which implies that comparisons between small and large fault with respect to this parameter should be handled with care. Fault envelope composition, as reflected by the relative proportions of different fault facies in the core, varies with displacement. In small scale faults (0-1 m displacement), secondary calcite layers and fault gouge dominate, whereas shale dominated fault rocks (shale smear) and carbonate dominated fault rocks (breccias) constitute minor components. Shale dominated fault rocks are restricted to shale-rich protoliths, and fault breccias to break-down of lenses formed near fault jogs. In medium scale faults (1-10m), fault rocks form the dominating facies, whereas the amount of secondary calcite layers decreases due to transformation into breccias. Further, in shale rich carbonates the fault cores consist of composite facies associations. In major faults (10-300 m displacement) fault rock layers and lenses dominate the fault cores. A common observation in large scale faults is a distinct layering of different fault rocks, shale smearing of major shale layers and massive secondary calcite layers along slip surfaces. Fault core heterogeneity in carbonates is ascribed to the distribution of fault facies, such as fault rocks, secondary calcite layers and shale smear. In a broader sense, facies distribution and thickness are controlled by displacement, protolith and tectonic environment. The heterogeneous properties and the varied distribution observed in this study may be valuable in forecasting fault seal characteristics of carbonate reservoirs.

  4. A Method for Determining Sedimentary Micro-Facies Belts Automatically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linfu Xue; Qitai Mei; Quan Sun

    2003-01-01

    It is important to understand the distribution of sedimentary facies, especially the distribution of sand body that is the key for oil production and exploration. The secondary oil recovery requires analyzing a great deal of data accumulated within decades of oil field development. At many cases sedimentary micro-facies maps need to be reconstructed and redrawn frequently, which is time-consuming and heavy. This paper presents an integrated approach for determining the distribution of sedimentary micro-facies, tracing the micro-facies boundary, and drawing the map of sedimentary micro-facies belts automatically by computer technique. The approach is based on the division and correlation of strata of multiple wells as well as analysis of sedimentary facies. The approach includes transform, gridding, interpolation, superposing, searching boundary and drawing the map of sedimentary facies belts, and employs the spatial interpolation method and "worm" interpolation method to determine the distribution of sedimentary micro-facies including sand ribbon and/or sand blanket. The computer software developed on the basis of the above principle provides a tool for quick visualization and understanding the distribution of sedimentary micro-facies and reservoir. Satisfied results have been achieveed by applying the technique to the Putaohua Oil Field in Songliao Basin, China.

  5. Pore morphology and distribution in the Shaly facies of Opalinus Clay (Mont Terri, Switzerland): Insights from representative 2D BIB-SEM investigations on mm to nm scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M.E.; Desbois, G.; Urai, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    We used Broad-Ion-Beam polishing in combination with Scanning Electron Microscopy to study the microstructure and porosity in the Shaly facies of Opalinus Clay (northern Switzerland). With resolutions of a few nm, we studied areas of around 1 mm2, sufficiently large to be statistically representativ

  6. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  7. The formation and evolution of Chepaizi-Mosuowan paleo-uplift and its control on the distributions of sedimentary facies in the Junggar Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The Chepaizi-Mosuowan paleo-uplift is a large-scale uplift stretching across the Junggar Basin formed during the Yanshanian. It has experienced four evolutionary stages: the initial forming stage (J1), the intense development stage (J2+3), the waning and burial stage (K-E), and the tilting and extinction stage (N-Q). The most intense period of activities is the Middle Jurassic. Dur-ing the Early Jurassic, the Chepaizi-Mosuowan paleo-structure was a low amplitude uplift. Because of the subsequent strong uplifting during Middle-Late Jurassic, the Middle and Upper Jurassic were eroded. With the evolution of the Chepaizi-Mosuowan paleo-uplift, the sedimentary pattern of the basin changed, and the paleo-uplift separated the northern depositional systems from those in the south side. As a result, the basin tectonics controlled the distribution and evolution of the depositional systems. During Early Jurassic, while the paleo-uplift was low, its controlling effect on depositional systems was limited and sediments coming from the northwest could reach the central and southern parts of the basin. With the strong uplifting of the Chepaizi-Mosuowan paleo-structure during Middle-Late Jurassic, sediments from the northwest provenance could only deposit in the northern graben of the paleo-uplift. The intense erosion of the Middle-Upper Jurassic also changed the former sedimentary center of the basin into a source area, supplying sediments for grabens on both sides of the paleo-uplift. In the Cretaceous, regional subsidence caused the paleo-uplift to be buried again and subsequently sediments accumulated on top of it. The depositional facies are dominated by fluvial in the Early Cretaceous and shallow lacustrine to deltaic in the Late Cretaceous. In the history of the long-lasting development of this paleo-uplift, large-scale erosions of the paleohigh not only provided sufficient sediments to the center of the Junggar Basin, but also created favorable conditions for the formation

  8. Surficial Sediment Facies features near Shorty's Island on the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The surficial bed-sediment facies, herein after referred to as the sediment facies, quantitatively describes the dominant sediment substrate on the surface of the...

  9. Distribution of Topological Defects on Axisymmetric Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Tie-Yan; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a general method of determining the distribution of topological defects on axisymmetric surface,and study the distribution of topological defects on biconcave-discoid surface, which is the geometric configuration of red blood cell. There are three most possible cases of the distribution of the topological defects on the biconcave surface:four defects charged with 1/2, two defects charged with +1, or one defect charged with 2. For the four defect charged with 1/2, they sit at the vertices of a square imbedded in the equator of biconcave surface.

  10. On equilibrium charge distribution above dielectric surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Slyusarenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the equilibrium state of the charged many-particle system above dielectric surface is formulated. We consider the case of the presence of the external attractive pressing field and the case of its absence. The equilibrium distributions of charges and the electric field, which is generated by these charges in the system in the case of ideally plane dielectric surface, are obtained. The solution of electrostatic equations of the system under consideration in case of small spatial heterogeneities caused by the dielectric surface, is also obtained. These spatial inhomogeneities can be caused both by the inhomogeneities of the surface and by the inhomogeneous charge distribution upon it. In particular, the case of the "wavy" spatially periodic surface is considered taking into account the possible presence of the surface charges.

  11. Galaxy selection and the surface brightness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, S S; Schombert, J M

    1995-01-01

    Optical surveys for galaxies are biased against the inclusion of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Disney (1976) suggested that the constancy of disk central surface brightness noticed by Freeman (1970) was not a physical result, but instead was an artifact of sample selection. Since LSB galaxies do exist, the pertinent and still controversial issue is if these newly discovered galaxies constitute a significant percentage of the general galaxy population. In this paper, we address this issue by determining the space density of galaxies as a function of disk central surface brightness. Using the physically reasonable assumption (which is motivated by the data) that central surface brightness is independent of disk scale length, we arrive at a distribution which is roughly flat (\\ie approximately equal numbers of galaxies at each surface brightness) faintwards of the Freeman (1970) value. Brightwards of this, we find a sharp decline in the distribution which is analogous to the turn down in the luminosity ...

  12. Coupling among Microbial Communities, Biogeochemistry, and Mineralogy across Biogeochemical Facies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegen, James C.; Konopka, Allan; McKinely, Jim; Murray, Christopher J.; Lin, Xueju; Miller, Micah D.; Kennedy, David W.; Miller, Erin A.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-07-29

    Physical properties of sediments are commonly used to define subsurface lithofacies and these same physical properties influence subsurface microbial communities. This suggests an (unexploited) opportunity to use the spatial distribution of facies to predict spatial variation in biogeochemically relevant microbial attributes. Here, we characterize three biogeochemical facies—oxidized, reduced, and transition—within one lithofacies and elucidate relationships among facies features and microbial community biomass, diversity, and community composition. Consistent with previous observations of biogeochemical hotspots at environmental transition zones, we find elevated biomass within a biogeochemical facies that occurred at the transition between oxidized and reduced biogeochemical facies. Microbial diversity—the number of microbial taxa—was lower within the reduced facies and was well-explained by a combination of pH and mineralogy. Null modeling revealed that microbial community composition was influenced by ecological selection imposed by redox state and mineralogy, possibly due to effects on nutrient availability or transport. As an illustrative case, we predict microbial biomass concentration across a three-dimensional spatial domain by coupling the spatial distribution of subsurface biogeochemical facies with biomass-facies relationships revealed here. We expect that merging such an approach with hydro-biogeochemical models will provide important constraints on simulated dynamics, thereby reducing uncertainty in model predictions.

  13. The sediment composition and predictive mapping of facies on the Propeller Mound—A cold-water coral mound (Porcupine Seabight, NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, Katrin; Titschack, Jürgen; Dorschel, Boris; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Freiwald, André

    2010-10-01

    Here we provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative insight on recent sediment composition and facies distribution of a cold-water coral (CWC) mound using the example of the Propeller Mound on the Irish continental margin (Hovland Mound Province, Porcupine Seabight). Five facies types on Propeller Mound are defined: (1) living coral framework, (2) coral rubble, (3) dropstone, (4) hardground, representing the on-mound facies, and (5) hemipelagic sediment facies, which describes the off-mound area. This facies definition is based on already published video-data recorded by Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV), photo-data of gravity cores, box cores, and dredges from sediment surfaces as well as on the composition of the sediment fraction coarser than 125 μm, which has been analyzed on five selected box cores. Sediment compositions of the living coral framework and coral rubble facies are rather similar. Both sediment types are mainly produced by corals (34 and 35 wt%, respectively), planktonic foraminifers (22 and 29 wt%, respectively), benthic foraminifers (both 7 wt%), and molluscs (21 and 10 wt%, respectively), whereas the living coral framework characteristically features additional brachiopods (6 wt%). Hardgrounds are well-lithified coral rudstones rich in coral fragments (>30 surf%), foraminifers, echinoderms, and bivalves. The dropstone facies and the hemipelagic sediment typically carry high amounts of lithoclasts (36 and 53 wt%, respectively) and planktonic foraminifers (35 and 32 wt%, respectively); however, their faunal diversity is low compared with the coral-dominated facies (12 and <2 wt% coral fragments, 7 and 6 wt% benthic foraminifers, and 4 and 0 wt% balanids). Using the maximum likelihood algorithm within ArcGIS 9.2, spatial prediction maps of the previously described mound facies are calculated over Propeller Mound and are based on mound morphology parameters, ground-truthed with the sedimentary and faunal information from box cores, photographs

  14. Parts-based geophysical inversion with application to water flooding interface detection and geological facies detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwei

    I built parts-based and manifold based mathematical learning model for the geophysical inverse problem and I applied this approach to two problems. One is related to the detection of the oil-water encroachment front during the water flooding of an oil reservoir. In this application, I propose a new 4D inversion approach based on the Gauss-Newton approach to invert time-lapse cross-well resistance data. The goal of this study is to image the position of the oil-water encroachment front in a heterogeneous clayey sand reservoir. This approach is based on explicitly connecting the change of resistivity to the petrophysical properties controlling the position of the front (porosity and permeability) and to the saturation of the water phase through a petrophysical resistivity model accounting for bulk and surface conductivity contributions and saturation. The distributions of the permeability and porosity are also inverted using the time-lapse resistivity data in order to better reconstruct the position of the oil water encroachment front. In our synthetic test case, we get a better position of the front with the by-products of porosity and permeability inferences near the flow trajectory and close to the wells. The numerical simulations show that the position of the front is recovered well but the distribution of the recovered porosity and permeability is only fair. A comparison with a commercial code based on a classical Gauss-Newton approach with no information provided by the two-phase flow model fails to recover the position of the front. The new approach could be also used for the time-lapse monitoring of various processes in both geothermal fields and oil and gas reservoirs using a combination of geophysical methods. A paper has been published in Geophysical Journal International on this topic and I am the first author of this paper. The second application is related to the detection of geological facies boundaries and their deforation to satisfy to geophysica

  15. Facies analysis of a Toarcian-Bajocian shallow marine/coastal succession (Bardas Blancas Formation) in northern Neuquén Basin, Mendoza province, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Graciela S.; Kietzmann, Diego A.; Palma, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Strata of the Bardas Blancas Formation (lower Toarcian-lower Bajocian) are exposed in northern Neuquén Basin. Five sections have been studied in this work. Shoreface/delta front to offshore deposits predominate in four of the sections studied exhibiting a high abundance of hummocky cross-stratified, horizontally bedded and massive sandstones, as well as massive and laminated mudstones. Shell beds and trace fossils of the mixed Skolithos-Cruziana ichnofacies appear in sandstone beds, being related with storm event deposition. Gravel deposits are frequent in only one of these sections, with planar cross-stratified, normal graded and massive orthoconglomerates characterizing fan deltas interstratified with shoreface facies. A fifth outcrop exhibiting planar cross-stratified orthoconglomerates, pebbly sandstones with low-angle stratification and laminated mudstones have been interpreted as fluvial channel deposits and overbank facies. The analysis of the vertical distribution of facies and the recognition of stratigraphic surfaces in two sections in Río Potimalal area let recognized four transgressive-regressive sequences. Forced regressive events are recognized in the regressive intervals. Comparison of vertical distribution of facies also shows differences in thickness in the lower interval among the sections studied. This would be related to variations in accommodation space by previous half-graben structures. The succession shows a retrogradational arrangement of facies related with a widespread transgressive period. Lateral variation of facies let recognize the deepening of the basin through the southwest.

  16. Surficial Sediment Facies features near the Myrtle Bend Confluence with the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The surficial bed-sediment facies, herein after referred to as the sediment facies, quantitatively describes the dominant sediment substrate on the surface of the...

  17. Distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenxin Cao; Lenan Wu; Dayong Li

    2006-01-01

    @@ The relationships of the resonant wavelength of optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors to the modulation layer refractive index, thickness and the refractive index of the bulk medium are obtained by using theoretical calculation model of optical fiber SPR sensors under certain conditions, which indicates that resonant wavelength of the sensors is approximately linear with modulation layer thickness. Based on the linear relationship, multiple SPR sensors with different resonant wavelengths can be fabricated in a single optical fiber named as distributed optical fiber surface plasmon resonance sensors (DOFSPRSs).Experimental results are presented, showing that it is practical to fabricate more than one SPR sensors in a single optical fiber.

  18. Genetic Types of Meter-Scale Cyclic Sequences and Fabric Natures of Facies Succession

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    instantaneous exposed punctuated surface, drowned punctuated surface as well as their relative surface. The development of instantaneous punctuated surface used as the boundary of meter-scale cyclic sequence brings about the limitations of Walters Law on the explanation of facies distribution in time and space, and reaffirm the importance of Sander′s Rule on analysis of stratigraphic records. These non-continuous surface could be traced for long distance and some could be correlative within same basin range. The study of meter-scale cyclic sequences and their regularly vertical stacking patterns in long-term sequences indicate that the research into cyclicity of stratigraphic records is a useful way to get more regularity from stratigraphic records that are frequently complex as well as non-integrated.

  19. 大牛地气田下石盒子组岩相-测井相与砂体储集关系及其平面分布的油气意义%Relationships between lithofacies-logging facies and sandbody reservoir properties and the petroleum geological significance of lithofacies-logging facies horizontal distribution of Xiashihezi Formation in Daniudi gas field, Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常兴浩; 田景春; 李良; 张翔; 李蓉; 古娜; 杨忠亮

    2013-01-01

    Taking Xiashihezi Formation in the Daniudi gas field as the research object and using the data of the drilling cores,logging,properties and productive capacity,etc.,this paper studies the relationship between different lithofacies-logging facies and reservoir sandbody properties and productive capacity in detail.The results show that the reservoir sandbody containing pebbly coarsegrained sandstone lithofacies whose gamma well log is box shape has the best physical property and the highest productive capacity,that the reservoir sandbody containing coarse-grained sandstone and medium-grained sandstone facies whose gamma well log is bell shape or dentation box shape has better physical property and middle productive capacity,and that the reservoir sandbody containing finegrained sandstone facies whose gamma well log is funnel shape has poor physical property and low productivity.Based on the statistical analysis of the superior lithofacies-logging facies,of more than 700 wells in study area and according to the plane distribution characteristics of the sedimentary microfacies and the sandbody,taking the He 3-1 small layer for example,the authors make the lithofacies-logging facies plane distribution map of the He 3-1 small layer,and depict the plane distribution characteristics of the superior lithofacies-logging facies of the He 3-1 small layer.The plane distribution map reflects the distribution rule of the physical property and production ability and also highlights the plane distribution of the gas reservoir sandbody.The achievements provide the forecast basis for appraising the traps of lithology.%以鄂尔多斯盆地大牛地气田上古生界下石盒子组为研究对象,利用钻井岩心、测井、物性和产能等资料,研究不同岩相-测井相与储集砂体物性及产能的关系,结果表明:(含砾)粗粒砂岩相(箱形)储集砂体物性最好,产能最高;其次为粗粒砂岩相-中粒砂岩相(伽马测井曲线为钟形或齿状箱形)储

  20. 3D modeling of stratigraphic units and simulation of seismic facies in the Lion gulf margin; Modelisation 3D des unites stratigraphiques et simulation des facies sismiques dans la marge du golfe du Lion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihi, H.

    1997-05-12

    This work aims at providing a contribution to the studies carried out on reservoir characterization by use of seismic data. The study mainly consisted in the use of geostatistical methods in order to model the geometry of stratigraphic units of the Golfe du Lion margin and to simulate the seismic facies from high resolution seismic data. We propose, for the geometric modelling, a methodology based on the estimation of the surfaces and calculation afterwards of the thicknesses, if the modelling of the depth is possible. On the other hand the method consists in estimating the thickness variable directly and in deducing the boundary surfaces afterwards. In order to simulate the distribution of seismic facies within the units of the western domain, we used the truncated Gaussian method. The used approach gave a satisfactory results, when the seismic facies present slightly dipping reflectors with respect to the reference level. Otherwise the method reaches its limits because of the problems of definition of a reference level which allows to follow the clino-forms. In spite of these difficulties, this simulation allows us to estimate the distribution of seismic facies within the units and then to deduce their probable extension. (author) 150 refs.

  1. Incorporating Skew into RMS Surface Roughness Probability Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Stahl, H. Philip.

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of RMS surface roughness data is the application of a Gaussian probability distribution. This handling of surface roughness ignores the skew present in the surface and overestimates the most probable RMS of the surface, the mode. Using experimental data we confirm the Gaussian distribution overestimates the mode and application of an asymmetric distribution provides a better fit. Implementing the proposed asymmetric distribution into the optical manufacturing process would reduce the polishing time required to meet surface roughness specifications.

  2. Scattering from Alpha-Stable Non-Gaussian Distributed Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yu-Chao; GUO Li-Xin; WU Zhen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    @@ The scattering problem of alpha-stable non-Gaussian distributed rough surfaces is studied. The alpha-stable non-Gaussian distribution is used to describe the surfaces that exhibit sharp and sparse peaks, not usually seen in Gaussian distributed surfaces. Then a magnetic field integral equation is formulated to calculate the scattered field and the scattering coefficient. Numerical simulations show that the magnitude distribution of the scattered field is affected significantly by the probability distribution of the surface when the height of the surface changes in a random way. In addition, simulation results are presented as bistatic scattering coefficient for alpha-stable distributed surfaces.

  3. Surface temperature distribution in broiler houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Baracho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Brazilian meat production scenario broiler production is the most dynamic segment. Despite of the knowledge generated in the poultry production chain, there are still important gaps on Brazilian rearing conditions as housing is different from other countries. This research study aimed at analyzing the variation in bird skin surface as function of heat distribution inside broiler houses. A broiler house was virtually divided into nine sectors and measurements were made during the first four weeks of the grow-out in a commercial broiler farm in the region of Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil. Rearing ambient temperature and relative humidity, as well as light intensity and air velocity, were recorded in the geometric center of each virtual sector to evaluate the homogeneity of these parameters. Broiler surface temperatures were recorded using infrared thermography. Differences both in surface temperature (Ts and dry bulb temperature (DBT were significant (p<0.05 as a function of week of rearing. Ts was different between the first and fourth weeks (p<0.05 in both flocks. Results showed important variations in rearing environment parameters (temperature and relative humidity and in skin surface temperature as a function of week and house sector. Air velocity data were outside the limits in the first and third weeks in several sectors. Average light intensity values presented low variation relative to week and house sector. The obtained values were outside the recommended ranges, indicating that broilers suffered thermal distress. This study points out the need to record rearing environment data in order to provide better environmental control during broiler grow-out.

  4. Facies analysis of an Upper Jurassic carbonate platform for geothermal reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hartmann, Hartwig; Buness, Hermann; Dussel, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Upper Jurassic Carbonate platform in Southern Germany is an important aquifer for the production of geothermal energy. Several successful projects were realized during the last years. 3D-seismic surveying has been established as a standard method for reservoir analysis and the definition of well paths. A project funded by the federal ministry of economic affairs and energy (BMWi) started in 2015 is a milestone for an exclusively regenerative heat energy supply of Munich. A 3D-seismic survey of 170 square kilometer was acquired and a scientific program was established to analyze the facies distribution within the area (http://www.liag-hannover.de/en/fsp/ge/geoparamol.html). Targets are primarily fault zones where one expect higher flow rates than within the undisturbed carbonate sediments. However, since a dense net of geothermal plants and wells will not always find appropriate fault areas, the reservoir properties should be analyzed in more detail, e.g. changing the viewpoint to karst features and facies distribution. Actual facies interpretation concepts are based on the alternation of massif and layered carbonates. Because of successive erosion of the ancient land surfaces, the interpretation of reefs, being an important target, is often difficult. We found that seismic sequence stratigraphy can explain the distribution of seismic pattern and improves the analysis of different facies. We supported this method by applying wavelet transformation of seismic data. The splitting of the seismic signal into successive parts of different bandwidths, especially the frequency content of the seismic signal, changed by tuning or dispersion, is extracted. The combination of different frequencies reveals a partition of the platform laterally as well as vertically. A cluster analysis of the wavelet coefficients further improves this picture. The interpretation shows a division into ramp, inner platform and trough, which were shifted locally and overprinted in time by other

  5. Noncontact Monitoring of Surface Temperature Distribution by Laser Ultrasound Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Akira; Ihara, Ikuo

    2011-07-01

    A laser ultrasound scanning method for measuring a surface temperature distribution of a heated material is presented. An experiment using an aluminum plate heated up to 120 °C is carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. A series of one-dimensional surface acoustic wave (SAW) measurements within an area of a square on the aluminum surface are performed by scanning a pulsed laser for generating SAW using a galvanometer system, where the SAWs are detected at a fixed location on the surface. An inverse analysis is then applied to SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction. The two-dimensional distribution of the surface temperature in the square is constructed by combining the one-dimensional surface temperature distributions obtained within the square. The surface temperature distributions obtained by the proposed method almost agrees with those obtained using an infrared radiation camera.

  6. Control of facies/potential on hydrocarbon accumulation:a geological model for Iacustrine rift basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Dongxia; Pang Xiongqi; Zhang Shanwen; Wang Yongshi; Zhang Jun

    2008-01-01

    The formation and distribution of hydrocarbon accumulations are jointly controlled by"stratigraphic facies"and"fluid potential",which can be abbreviated in"control of facies/potential on hydrocarbon accumulation".Facies and potential control the time-space distribution of hydrocarbon accumulation macroscopically and the petroliferous characteristics of hydrocarbon accumulation microscopically.Tectonic facies and sedimentary facies control the time-space distribution.Lithofacies and petrophysical facies control the petroliferous characteristics.Favorable facies and high porosity and permeability control hydrocarbon accumulation in the lacustrine rift basins in China.Fluid potential is represented by the work required,which comprises the work against gravity,pressure,interfacial energy and kinetic energy.Hydrocarbon migration and accumulation are controlled by the joint action of multiple driving forces,and are characterized by accumulation in the area of low potential.At the structural high,low geopotential energy caused by buoyancy control anticlinal reservoir.The formation of lithological oil pool is controlled by low interfacial energy caused by capillary force.Low compressive energy caused by overpressure and faulting activity control the formation of the faulted block reservoir.Low geopotential energy of the basin margin caused by buoyancy control stratigraphic reservoir.The statistics of a large number of oil reservoirs show that favorable facies and low potential control hydrocarbon accumulation in the rift basin.where over 85% of the discovered hydrocarbon accumulations are distributed in the trap with favorable facies and lOW potentials.The case study showed that the prediction of favorable areas by application of the near source-favorable facies-low potential accumulation model correlated well with over 90% of the discovered oil pools' distribution of the middle section of the third member of the Shahejie Formation in the Dongying Depression,Bohai Bay

  7. Coal facies studies in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosdale, Peter J. [Coalseam Gas Research Institute, School of Earth Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4814 (Australia)

    2004-04-23

    Despite the economic importance of coal to the Australian economy, detailed studies of controls on variation in coal type are remarkably few. However, important contributions have been made in the understanding of coal facies development. Tertiary lignite deposits of the Gippsland Basin provide key insights into the development of lithotype cyclicity and its relationship to relative sea-level changes, with individual paling-up cycles being correlated to parasequences. Studies of Permian hard coals have identified relationships between coal type and surrounding sediments. Unfortunately, these relationships have been widely over-interpreted in a manner that has diminished their real value.

  8. Convergent surface water distributions in U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.K. Steele; J.B. Heffernan; N. Bettez; J. Cavender-Bares; P.M. Groffman; J.M. Grove; S. Hall; S.E. Hobbie; K. Larson; J.L. Morse; C. Neill; K.C. Nelson; J. O' Neil-Dunne; L. Ogden; D.E. Pataki; C. Polsky; R. Roy Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Earth's surface is rapidly urbanizing, resulting in dramatic changes in the abundance, distribution and character of surface water features in urban landscapes. However, the scope and consequences of surface water redistribution at broad spatial scales are not well understood. We hypothesized that urbanization would lead to convergent surface water abundance and...

  9. Coal facies studies in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalkreuth, Wolfgang D. [Laboratorio de Carvao e de Petrologia Organica, Instituto de Geociencias, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-04-23

    The present study is a compilation of published data on coal facies studies in Canada based on coal petrological and other methods. The geological age of the coals range from the Devonian coal deposits in Arctic Canada to coals of Tertiary age in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin, intermontane British Columbia and Arctic Canada. In terms of rank, the coal deposits studied range from lignite to low volatile bituminous. Coal petrological methods include maceral and microlithotype analyses, frequently integrated with data from palynological and geochemical analyses. Most recently, a number of studies have applied sequence stratigraphic concepts to the coal-bearing strata including the interpretation of coal petrological data in the context of this concept.

  10. Predicted seafloor facies of Central Santa Monica Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Gardner, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- Mapping surficial seafloor facies (sand, silt, muddy sand, rock, etc.) should be the first step in marine geological studies and is crucial when modeling sediment processes, pollution transport, deciphering tectonics, and defining benthic habitats. This report outlines an empirical technique that predicts the distribution of seafloor facies for a large area offshore Los Angeles, CA using high-resolution bathymetry and co-registered, calibrated backscatter from multibeam echosounders (MBES) correlated to ground-truth sediment samples. The technique uses a series of procedures that involve supervised classification and a hierarchical decision tree classification that are now available in advanced image-analysis software packages. Derivative variance images of both bathymetry and acoustic backscatter are calculated from the MBES data and then used in a hierarchical decision-tree framework to classify the MBES data into areas of rock, gravelly muddy sand, muddy sand, and mud. A quantitative accuracy assessment on the classification results is performed using ground-truth sediment samples. The predicted facies map is also ground-truthed using seafloor photographs and high-resolution sub-bottom seismic-reflection profiles. This Open-File Report contains the predicted seafloor facies map as a georeferenced TIFF image along with the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data used in the study as well as an explanation of the empirical classification process.

  11. Arc Length Based Grid Distribution For Surface and Volume Grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1996-01-01

    Techniques are presented for distributing grid points on parametric surfaces and in volumes according to a specified distribution of arc length. Interpolation techniques are introduced which permit a given distribution of grid points on the edges of a three-dimensional grid block to be propagated through the surface and volume grids. Examples demonstrate how these methods can be used to improve the quality of grids generated by transfinite interpolation.

  12. Arc length based grid distribution for surface and volume grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastin, C.W. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Techniques are presented for distributing grid points on parametric surfaces and in volumes according to a specified distribution of arc length. Interpolation techniques are introduced which permit a given distribution of grid points on the edges of a three-dimensional grid block to be propagated through the surface and volume grids. Examples demonstrate how these methods can be used to improve the quality of grids generated by transfinite interpolation.

  13. Distribution of {sup 129}I in terrestrial surface water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuegao [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Meng [College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Yi, Peng, E-mail: pengyi1915@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Yu, Zhongbo [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Li [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-15

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. {sup 129}I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of {sup 129}I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of {sup 129}I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on {sup 129}I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  14. Water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuewu; CHEN Huixin; LIU Qingquan; GONG Xin; ZHANG Dawei; LI Lianxiang

    2005-01-01

    The water content distribution in the surface layer of Maoping slope has been studied by testing the water content at 31 control sites. The water content profiles at these sites have also been determined. The water content distributions at different segments have been obtained by using the Kriging method of geostatistics. By comparing the water content distributions with the landform of the slope, it was shown that the water content is closely dependent on the landform of the slope. The water content distribution in the surface layer provided a fundamental basis for landslide predication and treatment.

  15. Determination of Surface Stress Distributions in Steel Using Laser-Generated Surface Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi; Yifei; Ni; Chenyin; Shen; Zhonghua; Ni; Xiaowu; Lu; Jian

    2008-05-01

    High frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a pulsed laser and detected by a specially designed poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) transducer to investigate surface stress distribution. Two kinds of stressed surfaces are examined experimentally. One is a steel plate elastically deformed under simple bending forces, where the surface stress varies slowly. The other is a welded steel plate for which the surface stress varies very rapidly within a small area near the welding seam. Applying a new signal processing method developed from correlation technique, the velocity distribution of the SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution, is obtained in these two samples with high resolution.

  16. Sedimentary facies of the central part of radial tidal sand ridge system of the eastern China coast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong YIN; Xinqin ZOU; Dakui ZHU; Jiaxiang HUANG

    2008-01-01

    A unique radial tidal sand ridge system (RTSRS) has developed under a complex tidal current field on the eastern China coast between the Yangtze River delta to the south and the abandoned Yellow River (Huanghe) delta to the north. The present study examines the sedimentary evolution of a ridge-channel pair in the central RTSRS. Three cores, with two on the ridges and one in the channel, were drilled to reveal the late Pleistocene-Holocene deposits of the system. Five sedimentary facies were distinguished, i.e. ridge-shallow subtidal facies, ridge-deep subtidal facies, near-surface channel bottom facies, middle tidal flat facies and low tidal flat facies. The ridge-shallow subtidal facies consists of sandy strata with ripple cross bed-dings, horizontal lamina, and massive beddings. Bioturbation seldom occurs. The ridge-deep subtidal facies is primarily characterized by sandy and muddy interlayers with common flaser and lenticular bedding structures. Bioturbation appears abundantly. Massive and graded sediment sequences of storm origin are pre-sent as characterized by rich shell fragments. The near-surface channel bottom facies consists of loose, soft, clayey silt deposits with deformed sedimentary layers. This facies occurs in the deeper part of the active chan-nels. The middle tidal flat and lower tidal flat facies composed of silt-clay couplets prevailed primarily in the tidal flats. Incomplete sedimentary successions show that coastal plain deposits dominate in the study area during 12-13 ka B.P. The sandy ridge and channel facies became dominant during 4 6 ka B.P. when the sea level receded temporarily. Tidal ridge and channel in the study area became active during the last four decades. Sediment reworking due to typhoon and sandy ridge migration plays a key role in shaping the present radial ridge system.

  17. Sedimentary facies of Maastrichtian to Danian deposits in Amur River area, Russian Far East

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigeyuki Suzuki; Abdul R. Ashraf; Hakuyu Okada

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentary facies of the Tsagayan Formation is distributed in the eastern Zeya-Bureya Basin has been analyzed. The formation is of the Maastrichtian to Danian in age and characterized by the cyclicity of the fining-upwards successions. Analysis of environmental changes during the K/T boundary is the focus of this study. Five facies have been identified: Facies A, thick and laterally extensive coarse-grained to medium-grained sandstone units, interpreted as channelfill deposits; Facies B, parallel-laminated to massive mudstone units interpreted as interchannel lakes and flood plain deposits; Facies C, sheet-like medium-grained to fine-grained sandstones interpreted as crevasse splay deposits;Facies D, coal to coaly mudstone beds interpreted as deposits ofpeatlands; Facies E, very poorly sorted sandy mudstone beds interpreted as debris flow deposits. Fluvial environments with the low-relief flat topography was inferred. A channel transported large volumes of clasts, and a flood basin with interchannel lakes and peatlands was deciphered. Any distinct change of sedimentary environments has not been identified throughout the Tsagayan Formation (including the K/T boundary). However, two beds of debris flow deposits were identified. The one occurs at the uppermost part of the lower Tsagayan Subformation and contains dinosaur fossils. The other is intercalated in the upper Tsagayan Subformation.

  18. Sedimentary facies and paleoenvironmental interpretation of a Holocene marsh in the Gironde Estuary in France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianhua; MASSE Laurent; TASTET Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The Monards Marsh is located on the northeastern bank of the Gironde Estuary in France. Lithological, sedimentological and micropalaeontological investigations were made on four cores to determine the evolution of Holocene sedimentary environments and processes in this area over the last 6 000 a. Three main lithological facies are distinguished from bottom to top: (1) grey laminated silty-sandy clay; (2) homogeneous dark grey silty clay; and (3) compact silty clay. About 26 benthic foraminifera species are identified and divided into six groups according to their ecological characteristics. In association with lithology, sedimentary structures and grainulometry, the distribution of foraminifera group is used to define external slikke, internal slikke, external schorre, internal schorre, and continental marsh facies. Combined with 14C(AMS) dating, these data indicate four successive paleoenvironments in the Monards Marsh: (1) Holocene transgression resulted in the development of a basal schorre facies overlying fluvial deposits that transformed to slikke facies sedimentation; the transgression maximum occurred around 5 600 to 5 400 a BP and was inferred to be associated with the last phase of the rapid Holocene sea-level rise; (2) post-trangressive maximum sedimentation resulted in a regressive sequence of deposits prograding towards the estuary, corresponding to the stabilisation of sea level after 5 400 a BP; (3) a slight positive tendency in the sea level around 2 800 a BP recorded in the central part of the marsh; and (4) the wetland to a continental marsh environment. The sequential pattern for the evolution of wetlands in this estuarine area during the Holocene is fluvial facies-blackish schorre facies-slikke facies-blackish schorre facies-continental marsh facies. Characteristics of sedimentary facies distribution and evolution reveal that the development of Holocene salt marsh in this area was controlled by the sea-level change and tidal range. The

  19. Temperature Distribution Measurement of The Wing Surface under Icing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Kimura, Shigeo; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Collaboration; Univ of Notre Dame Collaboration; Kanagawa Institute of Technology Collaboration; Univ of Electro-(UEC) Team, Comm

    2016-11-01

    De- or anti-icing system of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. Icing is a phenomenon which is caused by a collision of supercooled water frozen to an object. For the in-flight icing, it may cause a change in the wing cross section that causes stall, and in the worst case, the aircraft would fall. Therefore it is important to know the surface temperature of the wing for de- or anti-icing system. In aerospace field, temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) has been widely used for obtaining the surface temperature distribution on a testing article. The luminescent image from the TSP can be related to the temperature distribution. (TSP measurement system) In icing wind tunnel, we measured the surface temperature distribution of the wing model using the TSP measurement system. The effect of icing conditions on the TSP measurement system is discussed.

  20. The Development of a Distributed Surface Machining System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.C.Kao; M.S.Chen

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a distributed surface machining system. Traditional manufacturing engineering activity analysis has been conducted in developing the proposed system structure. The advantages of a distributed system structure such as easy to manage, high expandability and flexibility will enhance the efficiency of an integral system operation, and achieve the goal of networked manufacture. The IDEF0 was used to describe each stage of the traditional surface machining activities, and then UML (Unified Modeling Language) technology was adopted to verify the feasibility and accuracy of the established integrated system. The developed distributed system structure and sub-functional modules (CAD/CAM/CAPP) have been implemented based on the proposed systematic approach; and a freeform surface has been used as an example for verification. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented and could be adopted to assist engineers in integrating machining activities that are located in dispersed places; and various domains experts also can exchange their expertise among themselves. Thus, the development time of a product machining processes can be shortened and so is its enhancement on the competitive advantages. In addition, this distributed system has also integrated multi-functional ontology and service agent to facilitate the selection and reconfiguration in manufacturing customization.The proposed system has presented the feasibility in incorporating the agent-based technology in a distributed freeform surface machining environment. Service agents communicate via pre-defined performatives underlying knowledge query and manipulation language (KQML) for the surface machining capability. The developed system has then successfully demonstrated the feasibility in implementing the agent-based technology into a distributed surface machining system.

  1. Facies Constrained Elastic Full Waveform Inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Z.

    2017-05-26

    Current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion (FWI) as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example for reservoir analysis, face inherent limitations on resolution and also on the potential trade-off between elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues. However, current approaches to add such constraints are based on averaged type rock physics regularization terms. Since the true earth model consists of different facies, averaging over those facies naturally leads to smoothed models. To overcome this, we propose a novel way to utilize facies based constraints in elastic FWI. A so-called confidence map is calculated and updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and the prior information. The numerical example shows that the proposed method can reduce the cross-talks and also can improve the resolution of inverted elastic properties.

  2. Facies studies of bituminous coals in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Grzegorz J. [Polish Geological Institute, Lower Silesian Branch, al. Jaworowa 19, 53-122, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2004-04-23

    Polish bituminous coal basins are associated exclusively with Carboniferous deposits, differing in origin and geological structure. This paper presents only short review of papers of Polish authors on coal facies studies of Carboniferous coals occurring in the Lower Silesian Coal Basin (LSCB), Upper Silesian Coal Basin (USCB) and Lublin Coal Basin (LCB) of Poland. Facies investigations of Carboniferous coals of Poland have been in progress over 20 years. The results of these studies have provided new information on such subjects as: (1) recognition of main depositional conditions in paleomires, (2) determine prevailing paleoplant communities, (3) appraisal of peat-forming environment reconstruction-types and characteristics of paleomires. These facies analyses are connected to results of such studies as: pure coal petrology, using maceral and microlithotype composition as parameters of the environment of coal deposition, combined results of petrological, palynological and sedimentological studies.

  3. Correlation of Upper Devonian and Lower Carboniferous Depositional Sequences in Different Facies Belts on Southern Margin of Upper Yangtze Platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental problem in sequence stratigraphy is whether the sequences are global in extent and whether the sea level changes are eustatic in nature. Study on the Upper Devonian and Lower Carboniferous depositional sequences in different facies belts on the southern margin of the Upper Yangtze platform shows that different orders of sequences possess distinctive distribution and correlation in space, although the sea level changes in various orders of sequences may be primarily global in nature. The present paper regards the distribution in space, especially in different facies belts, as a criterion for defining and recognizing the various orders of sequences. The orthosequence (third-order sequence) is probably global in nature, which may be discerned in various depositional facies belts on the continental margin and can be correlated over long distances, sometimes maybe worldwide. Commonly, correlation of the subsequences (fourth-order sequences with time interval of 0.5 Ma to 1.5 Ma) is difficult in different facies belts, although some of them are probably also worldwide in distribution. A subsequence should be distinguishable and correlatable within at least one facies belt. The higher-order sequences, including parasequences (fifth-order sequences) and microsequences (sixth-order sequences), are regional or local in distribution. They may have reflected the longer and shorter Milankovitch cycles respectively. Orthosequences and subsequences are usually recognizable in different facies belts, while parasequences and microsequences may be distinguished only in shallow marine deposits, but not in slope and basin facies deposits.

  4. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  5. Models for Facies and Compositional Variations in Gale Crater lake sediments, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzinger, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Murray formation, Gale crater, Mars contains one major depositional facies - laminated mudstone - deposited in a lake; and minor additional facies - ripple cross laminated and trough cross bedded sandstones - representing subaqueous delta foreslope, fluvial, or eolian environments. The persistence of fine lamination, locally with scour and drape truncation surfaces, and absence of desiccation cracks, prism cracks, intraclasts, displacive evaporite crystals and nodules all suggest a perennial lake formed at depths great enough to avoid seasonal desiccation. Possible eolian and fluvial deposits would indicate base level lowering during longer-term lake level oscillation. Two compositional facies are observed based on elemental and mineralogic data, a hematite-sulfate (HS) facies and magnetite-silica (MS) facies. The HS facies comprises the lower few meters of stratigraphy exposed in the foothills of Mt Sharp, and transitions upward without any major change in the physical facies into the MS facies which persists through 10 meters up to higher levels in the Murray formation. Thinning of lamination from 2 mm to 0.5 mm coincides with the compositional facies transition. At the highest stratigraphic levels studied by Curiosity hematitic rocks are encountered again but lack significant sulfates that are not associated with later diagenesis; physical facies are a mixture of finely laminated mudstones and trough crossbedded fine sandstones. Two models best fit the physical and compositional data. In the first case, variations in the composition of fine clastic detritus delivered to the lake via marginal sediment plumes, coupled with redox oscillations in the composition of authigenic minerals precipitated from the lake. In the second model, originally reduced sediments of either detrital or authigenic origin are oxidized during burial diagenesis related to circulation of oxidizing groundwaters, converting reduced species, e.g. magnetite and sulfides, to hematite and Fe

  6. Exact solutions to model surface and volume charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, P.; Jash, A.; Bhattacharya, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    Many important problems in several branches of science and technology deal with charges distributed along a line, over a surface and within a volume. Recently, we have made use of new exact analytic solutions of surface charge distributions to develop the nearly exact Boundary Element Method (neBEM) toolkit. This 3D solver has been successful in removing some of the major drawbacks of the otherwise elegant Green's function approach and has been found to be very accurate throughout the computational domain, including near- and far-field regions. Use of truly distributed singularities (in contrast to nodally concentrated ones) on rectangular and right-triangular elements used for discretizing any three-dimensional geometry has essentially removed many of the numerical and physical singularities associated with the conventional BEM. In this work, we will present this toolkit and the development of several numerical models of space charge based on exact closed-form expressions. In one of the models, Particles on Surface (ParSur), the space charge inside a small elemental volume of any arbitrary shape is represented as being smeared on several surfaces representing the volume. From the studies, it can be concluded that the ParSur model is successful in getting the estimates close to those obtained using the first-principles, especially close to and within the cell. In the paper, we will show initial applications of ParSur and other models in problems related to high energy physics.

  7. Facies analysis and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of Upper Cretaceous sequences in the eastern Para-Tethys Basin, NW Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omidvar, M.; Safari, A.; Vaziri-Moghaddam, H.; Ghalavand, H.

    2016-07-01

    Upper Cretaceous mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sequences are among the most important targets for hydrocarbon exploration in the Moghan area, located in the eastern Para-Tethys Basin. Despite of their significance, little is known about their facies characteristics and depositional environments. Detailed facies analysis and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of these sequences have been carried out in eight surface sections. Accordingly, four siliciclastic facies, eight carbonate facies and one volcanic facies have been recognized. Detailed facies descriptions and interpretations, together with the results of facies frequency analysis, standard facies models and Upper Cretaceous depositional models of Para-Tethys Basin, have been integrated and a non-rimmed carbonate platform is presented. This platform was affected by siliciclastic influx, in the form of coastal fan delta and submarine fans in the shallow- to deep-marine parts, respectively. This model is interpreted to be shallower in the central and northeastern parts of the Moghan area. Toward the southeast and southwest, this shallow platform turns into deep marine settings along steep slopes without remarkable marginal barriers. (Author)

  8. Spatial distribution of surface hoar crystals in sparse forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shea

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface hoar size and location relate directly to avalanche initiation trigger points, and they do so in small-scale spatial distributions. Physically, surface hoar will grow where the snow surface is cold relative to the air and water vapour is plentiful. Vapour aside, snow cools at night primarily by longwave radiation emittance. Emittance can be restricted by clouds, trees, and terrain features. With 96 independent spatial point samples of surface hoar size, we show the extreme small-scale size variation that trees can create, ranging from 0 to 14 mm in an area of 402 m2. We relate this size variation to the effects of trees by using satellite photography to estimate the amount that trees impinge on sky view for each point. Though physically related to longwave escape, radiation balance can be as difficult to estimate as surface hoar size itself. Thus, we estimate point surface hoar size by expected maximum areal crystal size and dry terrain greyscale value only. We confirm this relation by using it at a different area and in a different formation cycle. There, its overall average error was 1.5 mm for an area with surface hoar sizes ranging from 0 to 7 mm.

  9. Visualizing surface strain distribution of facial skin using stereovision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagisa Miura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental technique has been developed for measuring and visualizing strain distribution on facial skin. A stereovision technique based on digital image correlation is employed for obtaining the displacement distribution on the human face. Time-variation of the movement of the facial skin surface is obtained from consecutive images obtained using a pair of high-speed cameras. The strains on the facial skin surface are then obtained from the measured displacements. The performance of the developed system is demonstrated by applying it to the measurement of the strain on facial skin during the production of sound. Results show that the strains on facial skin can be visualized. Further discussion on the relationship between the creation of wrinkles and strains is possible with the help of the developed system.

  10. Uneven spatial distribution of surface EMG: what does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Alessio; Merletti, Roberto; Gazzoni, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to show how changes in surface electromyographic activity (sEMG) during a repetitive, non-constant force contraction can be detected and interpreted on the basis of the amplitude distribution provided by high-density sEMG techniques. Twelve healthy male subjects performed isometric shoulder elevations, repeating five times a force ramp profile up to 25 % of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). A 64-electrode matrix was used to detect sEMG from the trapezius muscle. The sEMG amplitude distribution was obtained for the force levels in the range 5-25 % MVC with steps of 5 % MVC. The effect of force level, subject, electrode position and ramp repetition on the sEMG amplitude distribution was tested. The sEMG amplitude was significantly smaller in the columns of the electrode grid over the tendons (repeated measures ANOVA, p pattern of the upper trapezius muscle.

  11. Engineered antifouling microtopographies: surface pattern effects on cell distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Joseph T; Sheats, Julian T; Brennan, Anthony B

    2014-12-23

    Microtopography has been observed to lead to altered attachment behavior for marine fouling organisms; however, quantification of this phenomenon is lacking in the scientific literature. Here, we present quantitative measurement of the disruption of normal attachment behavior of the fouling algae Ulva linza by antifouling microtopographies. The distribution of the diatom Navicula incerta was shown to be unaffected by the presence of topography. The radial distribution function was calculated for both individual zoospores and cells as well as aggregates of zoospores from attachment data for a variety topographic configurations and at a number of different attachment densities. Additionally, the screening distance and maximum values were mapped according to the location of zoospore aggregates within a single unit cell. We found that engineered topographies decreased the distance between spore aggregates compared to that for a smooth control surface; however, the distributions for individual spores were unchanged. We also found that the local attachment site geometry affected the screening distance for aggregates of zoospores, with certain geometries decreasing screening distance and others having no measurable effect. The distribution mapping techniques developed and explored in this article have yielded important insight into the design parameters for antifouling microtopographies that can be implemented in the next generation of antifouling surfaces.

  12. Tertiary facies architecture in the Kutai Basin, Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Steve J.; Chambers, John L. C.

    1999-04-01

    The Kutai Basin occupies an area of extensive accommodation generated by Tertiary extension of an economic basement of mixed continental/oceanic affinity. The underlying crust to the basin is proposed here to be Jurassic and Cretaceous in age and is composed of ophiolitic units overlain by a younger Cretaceous turbidite fan, sourced from Indochina. A near complete Tertiary sedimentary section from Eocene to Recent is present within the Kutai Basin; much of it is exposed at the surface as a result of the Miocene and younger tectonic processes. Integration of geological and geophysical surface and subsurface data-sets has resulted in re-interpretation of the original facies distributions, relationships and arrangement of Tertiary sediments in the Kutai Basin. Although much lithostratigraphic terminology exists for the area, existing formation names can be reconciled with a simple model explaining the progressive tectonic evolution of the basin and illustrating the resulting depositional environments and their arrangements within the basin. The basin was initiated in the Middle Eocene in conjunction with rifting and likely sea floor spreading in the Makassar Straits. This produced a series of discrete fault-bounded depocentres in some parts of the basin, followed by sag phase sedimentation in response to thermal relaxation. Discrete Eocene depocentres have highly variable sedimentary fills depending upon position with respect to sediment source and palaeo water depths and geometries of the half-graben. This contrasts strongly with the more regionally uniform sedimentary styles that followed in the latter part of the Eocene and the Oligocene. Tectonic uplift documented along the southern and northern basin margins and related subsidence of the Lower Kutai Basin occurred during the Late Oligocene. This subsidence is associated with significant volumes of high-level andesitic-dacitic intrusive and associated volcanic rocks. Volcanism and uplift of the basin margins

  13. Micro-facies of Dead Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Ina; Schwab, Markus J.; Brauer, Achim; Frank, Ute; Dulski, Peter; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Enzel, Yehouda; Waldmann, Nicolas; Ariztegui, Daniel; Drilling Party, Dsddp

    2013-04-01

    Lacustrine sediments infilling the Dead Sea basin (DSB) provide a rare opportunity to trace changing climates in the eastern Mediterranean-Levant region throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. In this context, high-resolution investigation of changes in sediment micro- facies allow deciphering short-term climatic fluctuations and changing environmental conditions in the Levant. The Dead Sea is a terminal lake with one of the largest drainage areas in the Levant, located in the Mediterranean climate zone and influenced also by the Saharo-Arabian deserts. Due to drastic climatic changes in this region, an exceptionally large variety of lacustrine sediments has been deposited in the DSB. These sediments, partially the results of changing lake levels, primarily represent changes in precipitation (e.g. Enzel et al., 2008). Evaporites (halite and gypsum) reflect dry climatic conditions during interglacials, while alternated aragonite-detritus (AAD) is deposited during glacial lake level high-stands. Here we present the first micro-facies inventory of a ~450 m long sediment profile from the deepest part of the northern DSB (ICDP site 5017-1, ~300 m water depth). The sediment record comprises the last two glacial-interglacial cycles, with mainly AAD facies in the upper part of the Amora Formation (penultimate glacial) and the last glacial Lisan Formation. The last interglacial Samra and the Holocene Zeelim Formations are predominantly characterized by thick bedded halite deposits, intercalated by partly laminated detrital marl sequences. Representative sections of the different facies types have been analyzed for micro-facies on petrographic thin sections, supported by high-resolution µXRF element scanning, magnetic susceptibility measurements and microscopic fluorescence analysis. Furthermore, Holocene sediments retrieved at the deep basin core site have been compared to their shallow-water counterpart at the western margin of the lake (core DSEn; Migowski et al., 2004

  14. Stratigraphy and Facies Analysis of a 122 M Long Lacustrine Sequence from Chalco Lake, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D. A.; Ortega, B.; Caballero, M.; Lozano, S.; Pi, T.; Brown, E. T.

    2010-12-01

    ostracode valves. This facies is distributed mostly between 20-40 m depth and 100-122 m depth.

  15. Ride control of surface effect ships using distributed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgeir J. Sørensen

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available A ride control system for active damping of heave and pitch accelerations of Surface Effect Ships (SES is presented. It is demonstrated that distributed effects that are due to a spatially varying pressure in the air cushion result in significant vertical vibrations in low and moderate sea states. In order to achieve a high quality human comfort and crew workability it is necessary to reduce these vibrations using a control system which accounts for distributed effects due to spatial pressure variations in the air cushion. A mathematical model of the process is presented, and collocated sensor and actuator pairs are used. The process stability is ensured using a controller with appropriate passivity properties. Sensor and actuator location is also discussed. The performance of the ride control system is shown by power spectra of the vertical accelerations obtained from full scale experiments with a 35 m SES.

  16. Polarized reflectance and transmittance distribution functions of the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieronymi, Martin

    2016-07-11

    Two aspects of ocean modelling are treated: representation of ocean waves considering all size-classes of waves and tracing of light-interactions at the wavy sea surface. Nonlinear wave profiles are realized accounting for a wide range of climatologically relevant sea states and wind speeds. Polarized ray tracing is used to investigate air-incident and whitecap-free reflectance and transmittance distributions with high angular resolution subject to sea-characterizing parameters, such as significant wave height, peak wave period, wind speed, and surface roughness. Wave-shadowing effects of incident and multiple reflected rays are fully considered. Their influence mostly starts with incidence angles greater than 60°, i.e., when the sun is near the horizon, and is especially pronounced for steep sea states. The net effect of multiple reflections is a redistribution of reflectance and transmittance fractions in their respective hemispheres and a slight increase of the net transmission of light into the sea. Revised reflectance and transmittance distribution functions, RDF and TDF, are provided depending on surface roughness in terms of the mean-square slope; reference is made to other sea state parameters. In comparison with the slope statistics approach, uncertainties related to sun near the horizon are reduced and on average this study yields somewhat higher reflectance values with some variability related to the sea state. By means of provided data, irradiance and radiance reflectances can be computed using desired sky radiance distributions, e.g., clear sky, overcast or partly cloudy sky, as well as wind or sea state information including wave propagation direction.

  17. FIBER ORIENTATION DISTRIBUTION OF PAPER SURFACE CALCULATED BY IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshiharu Enomae; Yoon-Hee Han; Akira Isogai

    2004-01-01

    Anisotropy of paper is an important parameter of paper structure. Image analysis technique was improved for accurate fiber orientation in paper surfaces. Image analysis using Fast Fourier Transform was demonstrated to be an effective means to determine fiber orientation angle and its intensity. Binarization process of micrograph images of paper surface and precise calculation for average Fourier coefficients as an angular distribution by interpolation developed were found to improve the accuracy. This analysis method was applied to digital optical micrographs and scanning electron micrographs of paper. A laboratory handsheet showed a large deviation in the average value of fiber orientation angle, but some kinds of machine-made paper showed about 90 degrees in the orientation angle with very small deviations as expected. Korea and Japanese paper made in the traditional ways showed its own characteristic depending on its hand making processes.

  18. Facies conditions of the 2. Lusatian seam horizon in the area East of Peitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenisch, R.; Liskow, C.

    1988-07-01

    Characterizes the Miocene brown coal deposit in the area Peitz, Jaenschwalde and Guben (GDR) by methods of paleobotany and paleogeography. Results of macropetrographic facies analysis and geophysical borehole measurements were employed in the study. Geologic profiles of the region as well as maps of seam distribution were drawn up. The analysis proves that prehistoric river meanders divide the brown coal moor into a northern and a southern section. A description of the paleoenvironment and the sedimentation process is given. A correlation between coal facies and technological coal quality is pointed out. The study is being used to develop a geologic seam model for this brown coal mining area. 9 refs.

  19. Sequence associations of sedimentary facies in continental basins and their applications to palaeogeographic mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Hua-feng; CHENG Ri-hui; KONG Qing-ying; BAI Yun-feng; YU Ming-feng

    2004-01-01

    According to the characteristics of sedimentary facies and their vertical associations, sequence association of sedimentary facies can be divided into 2 types and 28 subtypes. The first type (type A) is a sedimentary sequence without volcanic rocks, including 18 subtypes. The second type (type B) is a volcanogenic succession including 10 subtypes.Each subtype may reflect certain filling condition under certain sedimentary environment. Time and space distribution of different types of sequence associations can reflect tectonics that controlled the basin evolution, sedimentary environments and palaeogeography.

  20. Geomorphological facies reconstruction of Late Quaternary alluvia by the application of fluvial architecture concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Peter

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the methodical implications, the benefits, and the constraints of applying the fluvial architecture concept to Late Quaternary shallow-subsurface alluvial deposits. The focus is upon a typical small- to mesoscale valley floor of the temperate zone. The studied reach is part of the river Wetter catchment (517 km 2) in central Germany. A large number of studies on Late Quaternary terrestrial paleoenvironmental change of the temperate zone refer to such small- to mesoscale catchments, which are mostly occupied by mixed- to suspended-load rivers. As in many cases mostly coring-based evidence is available, the observation and measurement is limited to lithology and lithofacies boundaries; facies geometry must be inferred. Moreover, in those environments differences in lithofacies are obscured by a significantly reduced range of grain size distributions. An example of an ancient channel belt of Late Glacial to Holocene age serves to delineate the methodical practice and utility of the fluvial architecture approach. Field evidence is obtained from detailed cross-sectional surveys and comprises descriptions of lithofacies, structural, pedogenetical, biotic features, Munsell color, and total organic carbon magnetic volume susceptibility. Cross-sectional lithofacies information is represented by spatially attributed, scaled borehole logs. The example also accentuates the need for applying additional stratigraphical methods such as physical age determination, macrofossil analysis, and tephrological stratigraphy. These methods form the basis to discern stacked channel facies and derive a diachrony of channel forms. Thus, the adapted architecture approach provides a significant surplus of information on channel dimensions, ages, and channel-floodplain interconnectedness. Distinct fluvial landforms such as channels, levees, abandoned channels, swamps, and floodplain flats can be highlighted. A number of methodical constraints are discussed in detail, e

  1. Cl-rich minerals in Archean granulite facies ironstones from the Beartooth Mountains, Montana, USA: Implications for fluids involved in granulite metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    The implications of Cl-rich minerals in granulite facies rocks are discussed. Results from ironstones of the Beartooth Mountains, Montana are discussed. It is suggested that CO2-brine immiscibility might be applicable to granulite facies conditions, and if so, then aqueous brines might be preferentially adsorbed onto mineral surfaces relative to CO2.

  2. Felsic granulite with layers of eclogite facies rocks in the Bohemian Massif; did they share a common metamorphic history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Radim; Faryad, Shah Wali

    2017-08-01

    High pressure granulite and granulite gneiss from the Rychleby Mountains in the East Sudetes form an approximately 7 km long and 0.8 km wide body, which is enclosed by amphibolite facies orthogneiss with a steep foliation. Well preserved felsic granulite is located in the central part of the body, where several small bodies of mafic granulite are also present. In comparison to other high pressure granulites in the Bohemian Massif, which show strong mineral and textural re-equilibration under granulite facies conditions, the mafic granulite samples preserve eclogite facies minerals (garnet, omphacite, kyanite, rutile and phengite) and their field and textural relations indicate that both mafic and felsic granulites shared common metamorphic history during prograde eclogite facies and subsequent granulite facies events. Garnet from both granulite varieties shows prograde compositional zoning and contains inclusions of phengite. Yttrium and REEs in garnet show typical bell-shaped distributions with no annular peaks near the grain rims. Investigation of major and trace elements zoning, including REEs distribution in garnet, was combined with thermodynamic modelling to constrain the early eclogite facies metamorphism and to estimate pressure-temperature conditions of the subsequent granulite facies overprint. The first (U)HP metamorphism occurred along a low geothermal gradient in a subduction-related environment from its initial stage at 0.8 GPa/460 °C and reached pressures up to 2.5 GPa at 550 °C. The subsequent granulite facies overprint (1.6-1.8 GPa/800-880 °C) affected the rocks only partially; by replacement of omphacite into diopside + plagioclase symplectite and by compositional modification of garnet rims. The mineral textures and the preservation of the eclogite facies prograde compositional zoning in garnet cores confirm that the granulite facies overprint was either too short or too faint to cause recrystallisation and homogenisation of the eclogite

  3. Distribution of Prestin on Outer Hair Cell Basolateral Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ning; ZHAI Suo-qiang; YANG Shi-ming; HAN Dong-yi; ZHAO Hong-bo

    2008-01-01

    Prestin has been identified as a motor protein responsible for outer hair cell (OHC) electromotility and is expressed on the OHC surface. Previous studies revealed that OHC eleetromotility and its associated nonlinear capacitance were mainly located at the OHC lateral wall and absent at the apical cutieular plate and the basal nucleus region. Immunofluorescent staining for prestin also failed to demonstrate prestin expression at the OHC basal ends in whole-mount preparation of the organ of Corti. However, there lacks a definitive demonstration of the pattern of prestin distribution. The OHC lateral wall has a trilaminate organization and is composed of the plasma membrane, cortical lattice, and subsurface cisternae. In this study, the location of prestin proteins in dissociated OHCs was examined using immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. We found that prestin was uniformly expressed on the basolateral surface, including the basal pole. No staining was seen on the cuticular plate and stereocilia. When co-stained with a membrane marker di-8-ANEPPS, prestin-labeling was found to be in the outer layer of the OHC lateral wall. After separating the plasma membrane from the underlying subsurface eisternae using a hypotonic extracellular solution, prestin-labeling was found to be in the plasma membrane, not the subsurface cisternae. The data show that prestin is expressed in the plasma membrane on the entire OHC basolateral surface.

  4. Traces in the dark: sedimentary processes and facies gradients in the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenhoff, Sven O.; Fishman, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    currents, were active across all facies belts. Suspended sediment settling from near the ocean surface, however, most likely played a role in the deposition of some of the mudstones, and was probably responsible for deposition of the radiolarites. The distribution pattern of high-TOC sediments in proximal and lower-TOC deposits in some distal facies is interpreted as a function of higher accumulation rates during radiolarian depositional events leading to a decrease in suspension-derived organic carbon in radiolarite laminae. The presence of burrows in all FAs and nearly all facies in the upper Bakken shale member indicates that dysoxic conditions prevailed during its deposition. This study shows that in intracratonic high-TOC mudstone successions such as the upper Bakken shale member bed-load processes most likely dominated sedimentation, and conditions promoted a thriving infaunal benthic community. As such, deposition of the upper Bakken shale member through dynamic processes in an overall dysoxic environment represents an alternative to conventional anoxic depositional models for world-class source rocks.

  5. Prima Facie Questions in Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Isham, C J

    2009-01-01

    The long history of the study of quantum gravity has thrown up a complex web of ideas and approaches. The aim of this article is to unravel this web a little by analysing some of the {\\em prima facie\\/} questions that can be asked of almost any approach to quantum gravity and whose answers assist in classifying the different schemes. Particular emphasis is placed on (i) the role of background conceptual and technical structure; (ii) the role of spacetime diffeomorphisms; and (iii) the problem of time.

  6. Bubble size distribution in surface wave breaking entraining process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN; Lei; YUAN; YeLi

    2007-01-01

    From the similarity theorem,an expression of bubble population is derived as a function of the air entrainment rate,the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) spectrum density and the surface tension.The bubble size spectrum that we obtain has a dependence of a-2.5+nd on the bubble radius,in which nd is positive and dependent on the form of TKE spectrum within the viscous dissipation range.To relate the bubble population with wave parameters,an expression about the air entrainment rate is deduced by introducing two statistical relations to wave breaking.The bubble population vertical distribution is also derived,based on two assumptions from two typical observation results.

  7. Beta Distribution of Surface Elevation of Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军; 徐德伦

    2001-01-01

    A probability density function (PDF) is derived of beta distribution with both λ3 (skewness) and λ4 (kurtosis) as parameters for weakly nonlinear wave surface elevation by use of a method recently proposed by Srokosz. This PDF not only has a simpler form than the well-known Gram-Charlier Series PDF derived by Longuet-Higgins, but also overcomes an obvious shortcoming of the latter that when the series is unsuitably truncated, the resulting PDF is locally negative. To test the derived beta PDF, laboratorial experiments of wind waves are conducted. The experimental data indicate that the theoretical requirements of the parameters in the beta PDF are fulfilled. The experimental results show that the present PDF is in better agreement with the measured data than the beta PDF only including parameter λ3, and also than the Gram-Charlier Series PDF truncated up to the term of H6.

  8. Formaldehyde Surface Distributions and Variability in the Mexico City Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Mohr, C.; Steinbrecher, R.; Ruiz Suarez, L.

    2007-05-01

    Formaldehyde ambient air mole fractions were measured throughout the dry season in March at three different locations in the Mexico City basin. The continuously running instruments were operated at Tenago del Aire, a site located in the Chalco valley in the southern venting area of the basin, at the Intituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) in the northern part of the city and about 30 km north of the city at the campus of the Universidad Tecnològica de Tecamac (UTTEC). The technique used is the Hantzsch technology with a time resolution of 2 minutes and a detection limit of 100 ppt. Daily maxima peaked at 35 ppb formaldehyde in the city and about 15 to 20 ppb at the other sites. During night formaldehyde levels dropped to about 5 ppb or less. It is evident that the observed spatial and temporal variability in near surface formaldehyde distributions is strongly affected by local and regional advection processes.

  9. Alisitos Formation, calcareous facies: Early Cretaceous episode of tectonic calm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Vidal, F.

    1986-07-01

    The Alisitos Formation (Aptian-Albian), shaped as a marine volcanic arc, crops out along the western side of the peninsula of Baja California bounding the Peninsular Range batholith. Lithologically, this formation is formed by volcanic-breccias, porphyritic flows, biohermal limestones, and tuffaceous and pyroclastic sediments. The distribution of the different facies depends on the nature of volcanism and the distance from a volcanic center, although the presence of massive biohermal limestone indicates that in the Early Cretaceous (during the tectonic episodes), the volcanic activity decreased to the level that the environmental conditions were favorable for the development of an organic reef barrier, behind an island arc. Such conditions existed south of the Agua Blanca fault and extended to El Arco, Baja California. Based upon field observations and petrological analysis of the Alisitos limestone, an attempt is made to recreate the environmental condition in the Punta China and San Fernando, Baja California, sites.

  10. Heterogeneous and Evolving Distributions of Pluto's Volatile Surface Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, William M.; Olkin, C. B.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M. W.; Young, E. F.

    2013-10-01

    We report observations of Pluto's 0.8 to 2.4 µm reflectance spectrum with IRTF/SpeX on 70 nights over the 13 years from 2001 to 2013. The spectra show numerous vibrational absorption features of simple molecules CH4, CO, and N2 condensed as ices on Pluto's surface. These absorptions are modulated by the planet's 6.39 day rotation period, enabling us to constrain the longitudinal distributions of the three ices. Absorptions of CO and N2 are concentrated on Pluto's anti-Charon hemisphere, unlike absorptions of less volatile CH4 ice that are offset by roughly 90° from the longitude of maximum CO and N2 absorption. In addition to the diurnal/longitudinal variations, the spectra show longer term trends. On decadal timescales, Pluto's stronger CH4 absorption bands have deepened, while the amplitude of their diurnal variation has diminished, consistent with additional CH4 absorption by high northern latitude regions rotating into view as the sub-Earth latitude moves north (as defined by the system's angular momentum vector). Unlike the CH4 absorptions, Pluto's CO and N2 absorptions are declining over time, suggesting more equatorial or southerly distributions of those species. The authors gratefully thank the staff of IRTF for their tremendous assistance over the dozen+ years of this project. The work was funded in part by NSF grants AST-0407214 and AST-0085614 and NASA grants NAG5-4210 and NAG5-12516.

  11. Multi-waveform classification for seismic facies analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chengyun; Liu, Zhining; Wang, Yaojun; Li, Xingming; Hu, Guangmin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic facies analysis provides an effective way to delineate the heterogeneity and compartments within a reservoir. Traditional method is using the single waveform to classify the seismic facies, which does not consider the stratigraphy continuity, and the final facies map may affect by noise. Therefore, by defining waveforms in a 3D window as multi-waveform, we developed a new seismic facies analysis algorithm represented as multi-waveform classification (MWFC) that combines the multilinear subspace learning with self-organizing map (SOM) clustering techniques. In addition, we utilize multi-window dip search algorithm to extract multi-waveform, which reduce the uncertainty of facies maps in the boundaries. Testing the proposed method on synthetic data with different S/N, we confirm that our MWFC approach is more robust to noise than the conventional waveform classification (WFC) method. The real seismic data application on F3 block in Netherlands proves our approach is an effective tool for seismic facies analysis.

  12. Sedimentary facies and gas accumulation model of Lower Shihezi Formation in Shenguhao area, northern Ordos basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weibing; Chen, Lin; Lu, Yongchao; Zhao, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    The Lower Shihezi formation of lower Permian series in Shenguhao develops the highest gas abundance of upper Paleozoic in China, which has already commercially produced on a large scale. The structural location of Shenguhao belongs to the transition zone of Yimeng uplift and Yishan slope of northern Ordos basin, China. Based on the data of core, well logging and seismic, the sedimentary facies and gas accumulation model have been studied in this paper. Sedimentary facies analysis shows that the braided delta is the major facies type developed in this area during the period of Lower Shihezi formation. The braided delta can be further divided into two microfacies, distributary channel and flood plain. The distributary channel sandbody develops the characteristics of scour surface, trough cross beddings and normal grading sequences. Its seismic reflection structure is with the shape of flat top and concave bottom. Its gamma-ray logging curve is mainly in a box or bell shape. The flood plain is mainly composed of thick mudstones. Its seismic reflection structure is with the shape of parallel or sub-parallel sheet. Its gamma-ray logging curve is mainly in a linear tooth shape. On the whole, the distribution of sandbody is characterized by large thickness, wide area and good continuity. Based on the analysis of the sea level change and the restoration of the ancient landform in the period of Lower Shihezi formation, the sea level relative change and morphology of ancient landform have been considered as the main controlling factors for the development and distribution of sedimentary facies. The topography was with big topographic relief, and the sea level was relatively low in the early stage of Low Shihezi formation. The sandbody distributed chiefly along the landform depressions. The sandbody mainly developed in the pattern of multiple vertical superpositions with thick layer. In the later stage, landform gradually converted to be flat, and strata tended to be gentle

  13. Strain localization in shear zones during exhumation: a graphical approach to facies interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Augier, Romain; Laurent, Valentin; Roche, Vincent; Jolivet, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Strain localization is a fundamental process determining plate tectonics. It is expressed in the ductile field by shear zones where strain concentrates. Despite their worldwide distribution in most metamorphic units, their detailed characterization and processes comprehension are far to be fully addressed. In this work, a graphic approach to tectono-metamorphic facies identification is applied to the Delfini Shear Zone in Syros (Cyclades, Greece), which is mostly characterized by metabasites displaying different degree of retrogression from fresh eclogite to prasinite. Several exhumation mechanisms brought them from the depths of the subduction zone to the surface, from syn-orogenic exhumation to post-orogenic backarc extension. Boudinage, grain-size reduction and metamorphic reactions determinate strain localization across well-deformed volumes of rocks organized in a hierarchic frame of smaller individual shear zones (10-25 meters thick). The most representative of them can be subdivided in 5 tectono-metamorphic (Tm) facies, TmA to E. TmA records HP witnesses and older folding stages preserved within large boudins as large as 1-2 m across. TmB is characterized by much smaller and progressively more asymmetric boudins and sigmoids. TmC is defined by well-transposed sub- to plane-parallel blueschist textures crossed by chlorite-shear bands bounding the newly formed boudins. When strain increases (facies TmD-E), the texture is progressively retrograded to LP-HT greenschist-facies conditions. Those observations allowed us to establish a sequence of stages of strain localization. The first stage (1) is determined by quite symmetric folding and boudinage. In a second stage (2), grain-size reduction is associated with dense shear bands formation along previously formed glaucophane and quartz-rich veins. With progressively more localized strain, mode-I veins may arrange as tension gashes that gradually evolve to blueschist shear bands. This process determinates the

  14. Comparison of turbidite facies associations in modern passive-margin Mississippi fan with ancient active-margin fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R. J.; McPherson, J. G.; O'Connell, S.

    1988-07-01

    Our comparison of the modern passive-margin Mississippi fan (DSDP Leg 96) with ancient active-margin fans (e.g. Eocene Hecho Group, Spain) reveals major differences in turbidite facies associations (Mutti and Ricci Lucchi scheme) and in seismic characteristics in the lower fan area. The lower (outer) Mississippi fan is composed of channel (Facies B and F) and non-channel facies (C? and D), whereas ancient fans are characterized by non-channelized, thickening-upward, depositional lobe facies (C and D). An absence of depositional lobes in the lower Mississippi fan is also suggested by a lack of convex-upward (mounded) seismic reflections with bidirectional downlap. Continuous seismic reflections of the lower Mississippi fan may represent "sheet sands", but not those of true depositional lobes with mounded character. Extensive channelization in modern passive-margin fans appears to be a product of the lateral shifting of a major sinuous distributary system, developed as a consequence of low gradients and the transport of sediment with a relatively low sand/mud ratio. In contrast, channels in active-margin fans are short and of low sinuosity as a result of high gradients and the transport of sediment with a relatively high sand/mud ratio. The turbidite facies association scheme, which was developed exclusively from ancient active-margin fans, should be applied to mature passive-margin fans with qualifications because of the differences in spatial distribution of turbidite facies and their associations.

  15. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  16. Sedimentary Micro-facies and Macro Heterogeneity of Reservoir Beds in the Third Member of the Qingshankou Formation, Qian'an Area,Songliao Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of drill cores and well logs shows that the main micro-facies of the third member sand bodies of the Qingshankou Formation in Qian'an are subaqueous distributary channel facies,sheet sand facies and subaqueous fan facies (olistostrome). Maps showing the distribution of these micro-facies together with inter-channel bay and prodelta mocro-facies are presented for different time-slices (lower, middle and upper parts of the Qingshankou Formation). These maps reveal the instability and change of sediment transport in the Baokang sedimentary system during the depositional period. Sediment transport was from the west in the early stage, from the south in the middle stage and from the northwest in the late stage. Values of thickness, porosity and permeability of the sand bodies in the third member of the Qingshankou Formation show that they have low to medium porosity and low permeability, and are characterized by serious reservoir heterogeneity. The joints between micro-facies and subaqueous fan micro-facies are characterized by the highest heterogeneity,the sheet sand and distal sand bar subfacies come next, and the heterogeneity of the subaqueous distributary channel sand bodies is relatively weak.

  17. Facies control on seismites in an alluvial-aeolian system: The Pliocene dunefield of the Teruel half-graben basin (eastern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesa, Carlos L.; Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; Ezquerro, Lope; Alfaro, Pedro; Rodríguez-Pascua, Miguel Ángel; Lafuente, Paloma; Arlegui, Luis; Simón, José L.

    2016-10-01

    The recognition of seismically induced soft-sediment deformation structures (SSDS) in sedimentary successions characterized by different facies, and hence by different rheology, is challenging. This is the case for high porosity and high permeability aeolian facies interbedded with muddy wet interdune deposits and alluvial conglomerates and sandstones. Several types of SSDS have been studied in two exposures of the Upper Pliocene (2.9-2.6 Ma) sediments of a fault-bounded intracontinental aeolian dune field in the Teruel Basin (Iberian Chain, eastern Spain). Among SSDS, load and fluid-escape structures, apart from several animal tracks, have been recognized. Those structures show an irregular distribution through the studied stratigraphic sections, being scarce in homogenous aeolian sands and frequent in water-related facies. A detailed study of the distribution and geometry of SSDS and their relationships with respect to the stratigraphic architecture and facies has allowed a critical discrimination of trigger mechanisms, i.e. biological or physical overloading vs. earthquakes. The seismically induced structures are concentrated into seven deformed beds, showing an uneven lateral distribution and geometry closely controlled by the hosting sedimentary facies and their rheology. These seismites resulted from liquefaction during moderate earthquakes (estimated magnitude from 5.0 to 6.8). The most probable seismogenic source was the Sierra del Pobo normal fault zone, located 2 km to the East. Results show how an appropriate recognition of sedimentary facies is crucial to understand the lateral variability of seismites in sedimentary environments characterized by sharp facies changes.

  18. Exterior 3D lamb problem: Harmonic load distributed over a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'yasov, Kh. Kh.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Sekerzh-Zen'kovich, S. Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The solutions of the exterior Lamb problem with a distributed harmonic surface load acting on the boundary of an elastic half-space are studied. A load normal to the surface and distributed over the surface as the Poisson kernel is considered. The solution is constructed with the use of integral transforms and the finite-element method.

  19. DISTRIBUTED EXTERNAL SURFACE HARDENING OF CAR DESIGN BY WINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fomin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves coverage of features and results of the research conducted by the authors to determine the feasibility and establishment of pre-stressed-strained state of freight cars by winding in order to improve their strength characteristics. It is also necessary to present the theoretical justification for the effectiveness of the application of this method for car designs and an appropriate example for the tank-car. Methodology. The conducted study is based on an analysis of known works on the subject, mathematical justification and computer modeling. At the calculations of rolling stock components contemporary conventional techniques were used. Findings. Authors found that the winding method for pre-stressed-strained state is effective and appropriate for use in the construction of railway rolling stock and, in particular freight cars. Freight car designs with the pre-stressed-strained state are characterized by a number of strength advantages, among which there is an improvement of the work on the perception of operational loads and resource conservation. Originality. For the first time it is proposed the improvement of bearing capacity of freight car constructions through the creation of its component in the directed stress-strained state. It is also for the first time proposed the use of distributed external surface hardening by the method of winding to create a pre-stress-strained state of structural components of freight cars. The methods for winding designs of freight cars and their implementation were considered. Practical value. The studies developed a number of technical solutions for improving the design of freight cars and tank-container, which has been patented. Corresponding solutions for the tank-car are partially presented. Practical implementation of such solutions will significantly improve the technical, economic and operational performances of car designs.

  20. Concentration distributions of thoron and radon near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katase, Akira [Tohwa Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-01

    One dimensional diffusion model with a constant diffusion coefficient is applied to the thoron concentration distributions in air above the ground. The experimental distributions are well described by the exponential function obtained from the model. Diffusion coefficients and thoron exhalation rates are estimated from the measured distributions, which are the average values for three months. The present values of thoron exhalation are however several times as small as those measured by other researchers. (author)

  1. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Fengjun Zhang; Yannong Dong; Jan Arild Skjervheim; Ning Liu

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. But while the volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade, it is not yet possible to make use of all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. The goal of this project is to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management. Facies (defined here as regions of relatively uniform petrophysical properties) are common features of all reservoirs. Because the flow properties of the various facies can vary greatly, knowledge of the location of facies boundaries is of utmost importance for the prediction of reservoir performance and for the optimization of reservoir management. When the boundaries between facies are fairly well known, but flow properties are poorly known, the average properties for all facies can be determined using traditional techniques. Traditional history matching honors dynamic data by adjusting petrophysical properties in large areas, but in the process of adjusting the reservoir model ignores the static data and often results in implausible reservoir

  2. Surface Elevation Distribution of Sea Waves Based on the Maximum Entropy Principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴德君; 王伟; 钱成春; 孙孚

    2001-01-01

    A probability density function of surface elevation is obtained through improvement of the method introduced byCieslikiewicz who employed the maximum entropy principle to investigate the surface elevation distribution. The densityfunction can be easily extended to higher order according to demand and is non-negative everywhere, satisfying the basicbehavior of the probability. Moreover because the distribution is derived without any assumption about sea waves, it isfound from comparison with several accepted distributions that the new form of distribution can be applied in a widerrange of wave conditions. In addition, the density function can be used to fit some observed distributions of surface verti-cal acceleration although something remains unsolved.

  3. Las facies Keuper al SW de la provincia de Soria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando, S.

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sedimentological analysis of the materials that correspond to the Keuper facies in the area situated between the Iberian Ranges and the Central System. Acording to the obtained data, two main aspects are emphasized: - During the Upper Triassic, a c1ear retreat of the roast line towards the East took place, since this area constituted the litoral zone during the sedimentation of the Rot and Muschelkalk. - Facies change lateraly from West to East as proximal alluvial Can sediments pass into facies interpreted as distal alluvial fans and continental sabkha environment.Se analizan, desde el punto de vista sedimentológico, unos materiales correspondientes a las facies Keuper entre la Cordillera Ibérica y el Sistema Central. Dos aspectos resaltan tras este análisis: - Desplazamiento de la línea de costa (que durante la sedimentación del Rot y del Muschelkalk estaba situada en esta zona hacia el Este. - Marcado cambio lateral de facies desde el Oeste hacia el Este, pasando de unas facies proximales-medias de abanico aluvial a unas facies distales y ambiente de sabkha continental.

  4. Humidity distribution affected by freely exposed water surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models for the water vapor flux at a water-air interface are required in various scientific, reliability and civil engineering aspects. Here, a study of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed water is presented. A model predicting a spatial distribution and time...

  5. Partial melting of metavolcanics in amphibolite facies regional metamorphism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alan Bruce Thompson

    2001-12-01

    Metavolcanic rocks containing low-Ca amphiboles (gedrite, cummingtonite) and biotite can undergo substantial dehydration-melting. This is likely to be most prominent in Barrovian Facies Series (kyanite-sillimanite) and occurs at the same time as widespread metapelite dehydration- melting. In lower pressure facies series, metavolcanics will be represented by granulites rich in orthopyroxene when dehydration occurs at much lower temperatures than melting. In higher pressure facies series it is not well known whether metavolcanic rocks dehydrate or melt at temperatures lower or similar to that of metapelites.

  6. Coal facies studies in the eastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hower, James C. [Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511-8433 (United States); Eble, Cortland F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2004-04-23

    Coals in the eastern United States (east of the Mississippi River) have been the subject of a number of coal facies studies, going back to the 19th century. Such studies would not necessarily fall within a strict modern classification of coal facies studies, but if a study encompassed some aspects of paleobotany, palynology, petrology, geochemistry, or sedimentology, we assumed that some data and interpretations may be of use in evaluations of the facies. References are presented, as a guide for further research, with annotation in the tables.

  7. The diversity and distribution of fungi on residential surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel I Adams

    Full Text Available The predominant hypothesis regarding the composition of microbial assemblages in indoor environments is that fungal assemblages are structured by outdoor air with a moderate contribution by surface growth, whereas indoor bacterial assemblages represent a mixture of bacteria entered from outdoor air, shed by building inhabitants, and grown on surfaces. To test the fungal aspect of this hypothesis, we sampled fungi from three surface types likely to support growth and therefore possible contributors of fungi to indoor air: drains in kitchens and bathrooms, sills beneath condensation-prone windows, and skin of human inhabitants. Sampling was done in replicated units of a university-housing complex without reported mold problems, and sequences were analyzed using both QIIME and the new UPARSE approach to OTU-binning, to the same result. Surfaces demonstrated a mycological profile similar to that of outdoor air from the same locality, and assemblages clustered by surface type. "Weedy" genera typical of indoor air, such as Cladosporium and Cryptococcus, were abundant on sills, as were a diverse set of fungi of likely outdoor origin. Drains supported more depauperate assemblages than the other surfaces and contained thermotolerant genera such as Exophiala, Candida, and Fusarium. Most surprising was the composition detected on residents' foreheads. In addition to harboring Malassezia, a known human commensal, skin also possessed a surprising richness of non-resident fungi, including plant pathogens such as ergot (Claviceps purperea. Overall, fungal richness across indoor surfaces was high, but based on known autecologies, most of these fungi were unlikely to be growing on surfaces. We conclude that while some endogenous fungal growth on typical household surfaces does occur, particularly on drains and skin, all residential surfaces appear - to varying degrees - to be passive collectors of airborne fungi of putative outdoor origin, a view of the origins

  8. Multiscale approach to (micro)porosity quantification in continental spring carbonate facies: Case study from the Cakmak quarry (Denizli, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, Eva; Foubert, Anneleen; Oligschlaeger, Dirk; Claes, Steven; Soete, Jeroen; Bertier, Pieter; Özkul, Mehmet; Virgone, Aurélien; Swennen, Rudy

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate spring deposits gained renewed interest as potential contributors to subsurface reservoirs and as continental archives of environmental changes. In contrast to their fabrics, petrophysical characteristics - and especially the importance of microporosity (quarry (Denizli, Turkey): the extended Pond, the dipping crystalline Proximal Slope Facies and the draping Apron and Channel Facies deposits formed by encrustation of biological substrate. Integrating mercury injection capillary pressure, bulk and diffusion Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), NMR profiling and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements with microscopy and micro-computer tomography (µ-CT), shows that NMR T2 distributions systematically display a single group of micro-sized pore bodies, making up between 6 and 33% of the pore space (average NMR T2 cut-off value: 62 ms). Micropore bodies are systematically located within cloudy crystal cores of granular and dendritic crystal textures in all facies. The investigated properties therefore do not reveal differences in micropore size or shape with respect to more or less biology-associated facies. The pore network of the travertine facies is distinctive in terms of (i) the percentage of microporosity, (ii) the connectivity of micropores with meso- to macropores, and (ii) the degree of heterogeneity at micro- and macroscale. Results show that an approach involving different NMR experiments provided the most complete view on the 3-D pore network especially when microporosity and connectivity are of interest.

  9. Using informative priors in facies inversion: The case of C-ISR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valakas, G.; Modis, K.

    2016-08-01

    Inverse problems involving the characterization of hydraulic properties of groundwater flow systems by conditioning on observations of the state variables are mathematically ill-posed because they have multiple solutions and are sensitive to small changes in the data. In the framework of McMC methods for nonlinear optimization and under an iterative spatial resampling transition kernel, we present an algorithm for narrowing the prior and thus producing improved proposal realizations. To achieve this goal, we cosimulate the facies distribution conditionally to facies observations and normal scores transformed hydrologic response measurements, assuming a linear coregionalization model. The approach works by creating an importance sampling effect that steers the process to selected areas of the prior. The effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated by an example application on a synthetic underdetermined inverse problem in aquifer characterization.

  10. Vesta Evolution from Surface Mineralogy: Mafic and Ultramafic Mineral Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; McSween, H. Y; Marchi, S.; Capria, M. T.; Capaccioni, F.; Frigeri, A.; Pieters, C. M.; Ruesch, O.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Hiesinger, H.; Magni, G.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Sunshine, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Vesta is the only intact, differentiated, rocky protoplanet and it is the parent body of HED meterorites. Howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites represent regolith, basaltic-crust, lower-crust and possibly ultramafic-mantle samples of asteroid Vesta. Only a few of these meteorites, the orthopyroxene-rich diogenites, contain olivine, a mineral that is a major component of the mantles of differentiated bodies, including Vesta. The HED parent body experienced complex igneous processes that are not yet fully understood and olivine and diogenite distribution is a key measurement to understand Vesta evolution. Here we report on the distribution of olivine and its constraints on vestan evolution models.

  11. Controlling factors and distribution patterns of lithologic pools in the fluvial facies of the 3rd and 4th members of the Quantou Formation in the Songliao Basin%松辽盆地泉头组三、四段河流相储层岩性油藏控制因素及分布规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺; 崔坤宁; 张晨晨; 金明玉

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from drilling, logging, seismic and lab, we make a study of the Fuyang oil-bearing interval in Songliao Basin by using theories of continental sequence stratigraphy, sedimentary geology and hydrocarbon accumulation. The Fuyang oil-bearing interval in Songliao Basin is a low-porosity and low-permeability reservoir of fluvial facies. The overlapping mudstone of lacustrine facies in the 1" member of the Cretaceous Qings-hankou Formation is both source rock and regional seal, and therefore hydrocarbons generated in the upper source rocks migrated downward and accumulated in the lower reservoirs. Oil-source correlation shows that average distance of downward vertical migration of hydrocarbons is 300 m with the longest distance of 500 m. At the end of the Mingshui Formation deposition, stress field inversion resulted in various faults cutting through source rocks and the Fuyang oil-bearing interval and many fractures inside the source rocks and reservoirs. At the same time, source rocks reached the peak of hydrocarbon generation. Driven by tectonic stress and overpressure due to hydrocarbon generation, the hydrocarbons migrated downward along the faults and fractures and accumulated in the Fuyang oil-bearing interval. Hence the major period for hydrocarbon accumulation is the late period of the Mingshui Formation deposition. With favorable reservoir quality, meandering river point bars are major reservoirs for oil and gas. The existence of mudstone seals of shallow lacustrine facies leads to the formation of two sets of oil-bearing intervals. Oil pools mainly developed in the Fuyang oil-bearing interval which was close to the oil source and have a uniform oil-water contact in the basin. High mature source rocks in the 1" member of the Qingshankou Formation determine that oil pools are mainly distributed in the central depression zone. Relatively low net-to-gross ratio leads to the predominance of lithlogic oil pools in the Fuyang oil-bearing interval.%依

  12. Stress distribution and surface instability of an inclined granular layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng He-Peng; Jiang Yi-Min; Peng Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Static granular materials may avalanche suddenly under continuous quasi-static drives.This phenomenon,which is important in many engineering applications,can be explained by analyzing the stability of the elastic solutions.We show this for a granular layer driven by its inclination angle in gravity,where the elastic problem can be solved generally and analytically.It is found that a loss of stability may occur only at the free surface of the layer.This result is considered to be relevant for understanding surface avalanches and the flows observed experimentally.

  13. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  14. Silicon distribution on the lunar surface obtained by Kaguya GRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ja; Kobayashi, Masanori; Elphic, Richard; Karouji, Yuzuru; Hamara, Dave; Kobayashi, Shingo; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Rodriguez, Alexis; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Reedy, Robert; Hasebe, Nobuyuki

    Gamma ray spectrometry (GRS) provides a powerful tool to map and characterize the elemental composition of the upper tens centimeters of solid planetary surfaces. Elemental maps generated by the Kaguya GRS (KGRS) include natural radioactive as well as major elements maps (e.g., Fe, Ca, and Ti). Analysis of the Si gamma ray has been investigated using the 4934 keV Si peak produced by the thermal neutron interaction (28) Si(n,gammag) (29) Si, generated during the interaction of galactic cosmic rays and surface material containing Si. The emission rate of gamma rays is directly proportional to the abundance of Si from the lunar surface; however, it is also affected by the thermal neutron density in the lunar surface. Thus, we corrected the Si GRS data by a low energy neutron data (appear to consist of primarily of mafic rocks. Our elemental map of Si using Kaguya GRS data shows that the highland areas of both near side and far side of the Moon have higher abundance of Si, and the mare regions of the near side of the Moon have the lowest Si abundance on the Moon. Our study clearly shows that there are a number of Si enriched areas compared to that of Apollo 16 site. This result is similar to the mineralogical data obtained by Diviner. The feldspathic highland areas are confirmed through the elemental map of Si by the Kaguya GRS data. When the Si map of Kaguya GRS data is compared with the LRO’s mineralogical map, a reasonable agreement in understanding of the dichotomy between lunar mafic and feldspathic regions of the moon is confirmed. On the other hand, compositional matches between the surface rocks and GRS data may represent the dominant rock composition for a given region.

  15. UHT granulite-facies metamorphism in Rogaland, S Norway, is polyphase in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Antonin; Duchene, Stéphanie; Bingen, Bernard; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; Bosse, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Propensity of metamorphic assemblages to remain metastable after melt extraction complicates singularly the petrologist's task to discriminate between a single granulite-facies P-T path and a polyphase one. Using an integrated petrological and in-situ geochronological approach in key rock-samples, we reconstruct the pressure-temperature-time path of Sveconorwegian metamorphism across a 30 km-wide metamorphic gradient ranging from upper amphibolite facies to ultra-high temperature (UHT) granulite-facies in Rogaland, S. Norway. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria in the Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-Ti2O-O2 chemical system (PerpleX code) are carried out with an emphasis on moderately oxidized, spinel-bearing assemblages resulting from either garnet or sapphirine breakdown. Geochronological U-(Th)-Pb data acquired on both monazite (LA-ICP-MS) and zircon (SIMS) are complemented by minor- and trace-elements signatures of both minerals, to monitor REE distribution through time and to evaluate garnet apparition or demise. Coupling field, petrological and geochronological data lead to a polyphase metamorphic history, lasting about 100 My. The onset of regional granulite facies metamorphism at 1035 Ma is associated with the emplacement of large volumes of granitic magmas in the amphibolite to granulite facies transition zone. In the deeper part of the crustal section, localized sapphirine-bearing restitic lithologies testify to UHT temperatures (900-920 °C). These conditions were reached at ca. 1010 Ma following a tight clockwise P-T path associated with minor exhumation (7 to 5.5 kbar) and subsequent cooling to 700 °C. A distinct thermal episode, initiated at ca. 950 Ma, reached UHT granulite-facies conditions with the intrusion of massif-type anorthosite plutons at ca. 930 Ma producing a 5-km wide aureole. The aureole is delimited by the presence of osumilite in high Fe-Al rocks yielding quantitative estimates of 900-950 °C at a maximum pressure of 5 kbar

  16. Discontinuity surfaces in the Lower Cretaceous of the high Andes (Mendoza, Argentina): Trace fossils and environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, M. G.; Buatois, L. A.

    The paleoecologic and paleoenvironmental significance of trace fossils related to discontinuity surfaces in the Lower Cretaceous marine deposits of the Aconcagua area are analysed here. Carbonate-evaporite shoaling-upward cycles, developed by high organic production in a shallow hypersaline restricted environment, make up the section. Two types of cycles are defined, being mainly distinguished by their subtidal unit. Cycle I begins with a highly dolomitized lower subtidal unit (Facies A), followed upward by an intensely bioturbated upper subtidal unit (Facies B). The nodular packstone facies (B 1) is capped by a discontinuity surface (firmground or hardground) and occasionally overlain by an oystreid bed (Facies C). Cycle II is characterized by a pelletoidal subtidal unit (Facies B 2) with an abnormal salinity impoverished fauna. Both cycles end with intertidal to supratidal evaporite deposits (Facies D and E, respectively). Attention is particularly focused on cycle I due to its ichologic content. The mode of preservation and the distribution of trace fossils in nodular packstone facies are controlled by original substrate consolidation. Thalassinoides paradoxicus (pre-omission suite) represents colonization in a soft bottom, while Thalassinoides suevicus (omission suite pre-lithification) is apparently restricted to firm substrates. When consolidation processes are interrupted early, only an embryonic hard-ground that represents a minor halt in sedimentation was developed. Sometimes, consolidation processes continued leading to an intraformational hardground. Colonization by Trypanites solitarius (omission suite post-lithification) and Exogyra-like oystreids possibly characterizes hard substrate stage. When two discontinuity surfaces follow closely, a post-omission suite may be defined in relation to the lower cemented surface. As trace fossils are so closely related to changes in the degree of bottom lithification, they prove to be very useful as indicators of

  17. Fine-Grained Turbidites: Facies, Attributes and Process Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stow, Dorrik; Omoniyi, Bayonle

    2016-04-01

    Within turbidite systems, fine-grained sediments are still the poor relation and sport several contrasting facies models linked to process of deposition. These are volumetrically the dominant facies in deepwater and, from a resource perspective, they form important marginal and tight reservoirs, and have great potential for unconventional shale gas, source rocks and seals. They are also significant hosts of metals and rare earth elements. Based on a large number of studies of modern, ancient and subsurface systems, including 1000s of metres of section logging, we define the principal genetic elements of fine-grained deepwater facies, present a new synthesis of facies models and their sedimentary attributes. The principal architectural elements include: non-channelised slope-aprons, channel-fill, channel levee and overbank, turbidite lobes, mass-transport deposits, contourite drifts, basin sheets and drapes. These comprise a variable intercalation of fine-grained facies - thin-bedded and very thin-bedded turbidites, contourites, hemipelagites and pelagites - and associated coarse-grained facies. Characteristic attributes used to discriminate between these different elements are: facies and facies associations; sand-shale ratio, sand and shale geometry and dimensions, sand connectivity; sediment texture and small-scale sedimentary structures; sediment fabric and microfabric; and small-scale vertical sequences of bed thickness. To some extent, we can relate facies and attribute characteristics to different depositional environments. We identify four distinct facies models: (a) silt-laminated mud turbidites, (b) siliciclastic mud turbidites, (c) carbonate mud turbidites, (d) disorganized silty-mud turbidites, and (e) hemiturbidites. Within the grainsize-velocity matrix turbidite plot, these all fall within the region of mean size < 0.063mm, maximum grainsize (one percentile) <0.2mm, and depositional velocity 0.1-0.5 m/s. Silt-laminated turbidites and many mud

  18. The global distribution of near-surface hydrogen on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); Bish, D. L. (David L.); Vaniman, D. T. (David T.); Squyres, Steven W.; Boynton, W. V. (William V.); Elphic, R. C. (Richard C.); Funsten, H. O. (Herbert O.); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Tokar, R. L. (Robert L.); Moore, K. R. (Kurt R.)

    2004-01-01

    Prime objectives of the neutron spectrometer (NS) component of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments aboard Mars Odyssey are to identify the major reservoirs of hydrogen on Mars, determine their relative contributions to its total water inventory, and estimate the portion of the current inventory that is near the surface. Although more information is required than is currently available, epithermal neutron currents alone can provide a significant lower bound of hydrogen abundances on Mars. Observations from Viking 1, Viking 2, and Mars Pathfinder positively identified two of these reservoirs. By far the largest near-surface reservoir is comprised of the two residual polar caps, which together are sufficient to cover Mars with a global ocean about 30 m deep. The second is contained in the atmosphere, which if deposited on the surface, would cover Mars with a thin film of water about 10{sup -5} m deep. Although negligible in comparison, the fact that an atmospheric reservoir exists shows that it can provide a conduit that couples transient reservoirs of near-surface water ice. It has long been speculated that Mars has had, and may still retain, a far larger reservoir of water. Topographic features such as rampart craters, collapsed chaotic terrain, massive outflow channels, and valley networks provide strong support for the past existence of large bodies of surface water. Measurements of the areal size and depth of all paleo-water and volcanic features led to an estimate of a total water inventory equivalent to a global ocean that was between 100 and 500 m thick. Measurements of the D/H ratio have allowed predictions that between 5 and 50 m of this inventory was lost to space. Altogether, these estimates lead to between 20 and 465 m of water from the juvenile Martian inventory that is not accounted for. First analyses of Mars Odyssey neutron and gamma-ray data showed that reservoirs of hydrogen do indeed exist poleward of about {+-}50{sup o} latitude. Mars

  19. Modern Pearl River Delta and Permian Huainan coalfield, China: A comparative sedimentary facies study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suping, P.; Flores, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Sedimentary facies types of the Pleistocene deposits of the Modern Pearl River Delta in Guangdong Province, China and Permian Member D deposits in Huainan coalfield in Anhui Province are exemplified by depositional facies of anastomosing fluvial systems. In both study areas, sand/sandstone and mud/mudstone-dominated facies types formed in diverging and converging, coeval fluvial channels laterally juxtaposed with floodplains containing ponds, lakes, and topogenous mires. The mires accumulated thin to thick peat/coal deposits that vary in vertical and lateral distribution between the two study areas. This difference is probably due to attendant sedimentary processes that affected the floodplain environments. The ancestral floodplains of the Modern Pearl River Delta were reworked by combined fluvial and tidal and estuarine processes. In contrast, the floodplains of the Permian Member D were mainly influenced by freshwater fluvial processes. In addition, the thick, laterally extensive coal zones of the Permian Member D may have formed in topogenous mires that developed on abandoned courses of anastomosing fluvial systems. This is typified by Seam 13-1, which is a blanket-like body that thickens to as much as 8 in but also splits into thinner beds. This seam overlies deposits of diverging and converging, coeval fluvial channels of the Sandstone D, and associated overbank-floodplain deposits. The limited areal extent of lenticular Pleistocene peat deposits of the Modern Pearl River Delta is due to their primary accumulation in topogenous mires in the central floodplains that were restricted by contemporaneous anastomosing channels.

  20. Distribution and ecology of deep-water benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poag, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    Bathyal and abyssal foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico are distributed among thirteen generic predominance facies. Five predominance facies nearly encircle the Gulf basin along the slope and rise; a sixth predominance facies blankets the Sigsbee Plain, and a seventh is restricted to the Mississippi Fan. The remaining eight predominance facies have more restricted distributions. The areal patterns of these predominance facies can be related chiefly to water mass and substrate characteristics; modifications are brought about by calcite dissolution, upwelling, and sill depth. Analysis of ancient generic predominance facies is useful in predicting relative paleobathymetry and other paleoenvironmental properties. ?? 1984.

  1. Condensation on surface energy gradient shifts drop size distribution toward small drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley M; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul H

    2014-02-25

    During dropwise condensation from vapor onto a cooled surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Drop surface coverage dictates the heat transfer characteristics and depends on both drop size and number of drops present on the surface at any given time. Thus, manipulating drop distributions is crucial to maximizing heat transfer. On earth, manipulation is achieved with gravity. However, in applications with small length scales or in low gravity environments, other methods of removal, such as a surface energy gradient, are required. This study examines how chemical modification of a cooled surface affects drop growth and coalescence, which in turn influences how a population of drops evolves. Steam is condensed onto a horizontally oriented surface that has been treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact angle (hydrophilic, hydrophobic) or a continuous radial gradient of contact angles (hydrophobic to hydrophilic). The time evolution of number density and associated drop size distributions are measured. For a uniform surface, the shape of the drop size distribution is unique and can be used to identify the progress of condensation. In contrast, the drop size distribution for a gradient surface, relative to a uniform surface, shifts toward a population of small drops. The frequent sweeping of drops truncates maturation of the first generation of large drops and locks the distribution shape at the initial distribution. The absence of a shape change indicates that dropwise condensation has reached a steady state. Previous reports of heat transfer enhancement on chemical gradient surfaces can be explained by this shift toward smaller drops, from which the high heat transfer coefficients in dropwise condensation are attributed to. Terrestrial applications using gravity as the primary removal mechanism also stand to benefit from inclusion of gradient surfaces because the critical threshold size required for

  2. Variscan terrane of deep-crustal granulite facies in Yushugou area, southern Tianshan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王润三; 周鼎武; 王居里; 王焰; 刘养杰

    1999-01-01

    The Yushugou terrane of deep-crustal granulite facies in southern Tianshan consists of two parts, granulite and metaperidotite. The whole terrane is a metamorphism of (high-pressure) granulite facies, and typical mineral associations are: Gt-Cpx-Pl-Tit-Ilm (±Qz) (silica-saturated and oversaturated mafic rocks), Gt-Ky (pseudomorph)-Pl-Ru-Ilm±Qz (metapelitic rocks) and Spi-Opx-Cpx-Ol (meta-ultramafic rocks). The peak-stage P-T conditions are 795—964℃, 0.97—1.42 GPa, which are obtained with mineral chemistry, assemblage analyses and P-T estimation. The Sm-Nd isochron age of peak-stage metamorphic minerals is (315±3.62) Ma. All of these indicate that the terrane is a deep-crustal body, which subduets to the depth of 40—50 km in the middle late-Paleozoic, undergoing metamorphism of (high-pressure) granulite facies, and exhumed again to the surface by tectonic uplifting.

  3. Measurement of bidirectional reflection distribution function on material surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Hongyuan Wang; Zhile Wang

    2009-01-01

    Two automatic measurement methods of bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) are pre sented based on absolute and relative definition. Measurement principle and scheme of the methods are analyzed. A real-time measurement device is developed, the measurement spectral range of which is from ultraviolet to near infrared with 2.4-nm wavelength resolution, and the angular range is 0掳鈥? 360掳 in az imuth angle and 0掳 - 85掳 in zenith angle with 0.01掳 angle resolution. Absolute measurements of BRDF on tinfoil and ceramic tile are performed and the test materials present apparent specular reflection char acteristics. The theoretical error in the experiment is about 6.05%. The BRDF measurement results are closely related to the precision of measurement platform, the sensitivity of measurement instrument, and the stability of illuminating light source.

  4. Local field distribution and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanostructure platinum surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiao-Jing; He Su-Zhen; Wu Chen-Xu

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the local electric field distribution near the nanostructure metallic surface is obtained by solving the Laplace equation, and furthermore, the configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a Pt nanoparticle surface is obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the uneven local electric field distribution induced by the nanostructure surface can influence the configuration of carbon monoxide (CO) molecules by a force, which drags the adsorbates to the poles of the nanoparticles. This result, together with our results obtained before, may explain the experimental results that the nanostructure metallic surface can lead to abnormal phenomena such as anti-absorption infrared effects.

  5. Coccolith distribution patterns in South Atlantic and Southern Ocean surface sediments in relation to environmental gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckel, B.; Baumann, K.-H.; Henrich, R.;

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the coccolith compositions of 213 surface sediment samples from the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean were analysed with respect to the environmental parameters of the overlying surface waters. From this data set, the abundance patterns of the main species and their ecological...... species, six surface sediment assemblages have been identified, which reflect the distribution and characteristics of the overlying surface waters. Their distribution appears to be mainly a function of the relative position of the nutricline and thermocline in the overlying photic zone. © 2006 Elsevier...

  6. Mesogranulation and the solar surface magnetic field distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Chaouche, L Yelles; Pillet, V Martínez; Wiegelmann, T; Bonet, J A; Knölker, M; Rubio, L R Bellot; Iniesta, J C del Toro; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Schmidt, W; Solanki, S K

    2010-01-01

    The relation of the solar surface magnetic field with mesogranular cells is studied using high spatial (~ 100 km) and temporal (~ 30 sec) resolution data obtained with the IMaX instrument aboard SUNRISE. First, mesogranular cells are identified using Lagrange tracers (corks) based on horizontal velocity fields obtained through Local Correlation Tracking. After ~ 20 min of integration, the tracers delineate a sharp mesogranular network with lanes of width below about 280 km. The preferential location of magnetic elements in mesogranular cells is tested quantitatively. Roughly 85% of pixels with magnetic field higher than 100 G are located in the near neighborhood of mesogranular lanes. Magnetic flux is therefore concentrated in mesogranular lanes rather than intergranular ones. Secondly, magnetic field extrapolations are performed to obtain field lines anchored in the observed flux elements. This analysis, therefore, is independent of the horizontal flows determined in the first part. A probability density fun...

  7. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    and to map the distribution of 11 abundant and/or ecologically important planktonic foramini- feral species; (2) to evaluate the extent to which patterns of foraminiferal abundance and diversity in Recent bottom sediments reflect the details of surface...

  8. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface sediments of the eastern continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, M.S.; Naidu, S.A.; Subbaiah, Ch.V.; Sarma, V.V.S.S.; Reddy, N.P.C.

    The sources and distribution of organic matter (OM) in surface sediments of the eastern continental margin of India, including the region influenced by river discharge, were investigated using content, molar C:N ratios and stable isotopes of carbon...

  9. Effect of attenuation correction on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Some selected wave profiles recorded using a ship borne wave recorder are analysed to study the effect of attenuation correction on the distribution of the surface amplitudes. A new spectral width parameter is defined to account for wide band...

  10. GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION, REDOX ZONATION, AND CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AT A GROUNDWATER/SURFACE WATER INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three transects along a groundwater/surface water interface were characterized for spatial distributions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and geochemical conditions to evaluate the natural bioremediation potential of this environmental system. Partly on the basis of ground p...

  11. RESUSPENSION METHOD FOR ROAD SURFACE DUST COLLECTION AND AERODYNAMIC SIZE DISTRIBUTION CHARACTERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Chen; Hongfeng Zheng; Wei Wang; Hongjie Liu; Ling Lu; Linfa Bao; Lihong Ren

    2006-01-01

    Traffic-generated fugitive dust is a source of urban atmospheric particulate pollution in Beijing. This paper introduces the resuspension method, recommended by the US EPA in AP-42 documents, for collecting Beijing road-surface dust. Analysis shows a single-peak distribution in the number size distribution and a double-peak mode for mass size distribution of the road surface dust. The median diameter of the mass concentration distribution of the road dust on a high-grade road was higher than that on a low-grade road. The ratio of PM2.5 to PM10 was consistent with that obtained in a similar study for Hong Kong. For the two selected road samples, the average relative deviation of the size distribution was 10.9% and 11.9%. All results indicate that the method introduced in this paper can effectively determine the size distribution of fugitive dust from traffic.

  12. Comparative assessment of surface fluxes from different sources using probability density distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulev, Sergey; Tilinina, Natalia; Belyaev, Konstantin

    2015-04-01

    Surface turbulent heat fluxes from modern era and first generation reanalyses (NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim, MERRA NCEP-CFSR, JRA) as well as from satellite products (SEAFLUX, IFREMER, HOAPS) were intercompared using framework of probability distributions for sensible and latent heat fluxes. For approximation of probability distributions and estimation of extreme flux values Modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution has been used. Besides mean flux values, consideration is given to the comparative analysis of (i) parameters of the MFT probability density functions (scale and location), (ii) extreme flux values corresponding high order percentiles of fluxes (e.g. 99th and higher) and (iii) fractional contribution of extreme surface flux events in the total surface turbulent fluxes integrated over months and seasons. The latter was estimated using both fractional distribution derived from MFT and empirical estimates based upon occurrence histograms. The strongest differences in the parameters of probability distributions of surface fluxes and extreme surface flux values between different reanalyses are found in the western boundary current extension regions and high latitudes, while the highest differences in the fractional contributions of surface fluxes may occur in mid ocean regions being closely associated with atmospheric synoptic dynamics. Generally, satellite surface flux products demonstrate relatively stronger extreme fluxes compared to reanalyses, even in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes where data assimilation input in reanalyses is quite dense compared to the Southern Ocean regions.

  13. Spatial Distribution of Surface Soil Moisture in a Small Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture is an important hydrological question. We measured the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture (upper 6 cm) using an Amplitude Domain Reflectometry sensor at the plot scale (2 × 2 m) and small catchment scale (0.84 ha) in...

  14. Spatial Distribution of Surface Soil Moisture in a Small Forested Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture is an important hydrological question. We measured the spatial distribution of surface soil moisture (upper 6 cm) using an Amplitude Domain Reflectometry sensor at the plot scale (2 × 2 m) and small catchment scale (0.84 ha) in...

  15. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  16. LUBRICATION BASIS THEORY OF WORM PAIR AND TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION ON WORM GEAR SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The lubrication basis theory of worm pair is given. The lubrication state of worm gear is analyzed. It is found that the temperature distribution on the tooth surface of worm gear is closely related with the lubrication state and that the temperature on the tooth surface of worm gear is consistent with the characteristic term of mesh and motion of worm pair.

  17. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux measure...

  18. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  19. Surface micro-distributions of pigment and the relation between smearing and local mass distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, K. E-mail: karin.bulow@nuclear.lu.se; Kristiansson, P.; Larsson, T.; Malmberg, S.; Elfman, M.; Malmqvist, K.; Pallon, J.; Shariff, A

    2001-07-01

    In this work, the process of smearing and its time evolution have been investigated. When smearing occurs, the print is removed from the printed paper and colours other parts of the paper or the printing press and destroys the final product. To study the re-distribution of ink, cyan ink with Cu as a tracer in the coloured pigment has been used. Non-printed paper has been pressed against the paper, 1 and 5 s after the printing. The micro-distributions of ink on both printed and non-printed papers have then been studied using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Basis weight was measured with the off-axis scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM) technique and this data was correlated with the data from the print. One conclusion is that the process of smearing is not dependent on the shape of the pigment distribution, i.e. copper, or the content of copper in a specific pixel. On the contrary, the smearing was found to be related to the structure of the paper and that it mainly occurs where the paper is thicker.

  20. On alpha stable distribution of wind driven water surface wave slope

    CERN Document Server

    Joelson, Maminirina

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new formulation of the probability distribution function of wind driven water surface slope with an $\\alpha$-stable distribution probability. The mathematical formulation of the probability distribution function is given under an integral formulation. Application to represent the probability of time slope data from laboratory experiments is carried out with satisfactory results. We compare also the $\\alpha$-stable model of the water surface slopes with the Gram-Charlier development and the non-Gaussian model of Liu et al\\cite{Liu}. Discussions and conclusions are conducted on the basis of the data fit results and the model analysis comparison.

  1. An Impact Model of the Imbrium Basin for Distribution of Thorium on Lunar Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Meng-Hua; LIU Liang-Gang; XU Ao-Ao

    2008-01-01

    @@ We consider the thorium distributions that are coincident with the distribution of ejecta after the Mare Imbrium impact occurs on the lunar surface and derive a simple model on the sphericaJ target to predict the thickness of Imbrium ejecta deposits as a function of distance from the centre of the Imbrium basin.Then we use the result of Lunar Prospector's gamma ray experiment to test the hypothesis that the distribution of thorium on the lunar surface has an origin from the Mare Imbrium.

  2. Reexamination of Correlations for Nucleate Site Distribution on Boiling Surface by Fractal Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangChunxin

    1997-01-01

    Nucleate site distribution plays an essential role in nucleate boiling process.In this paper,it is pointed out that the size and spatial distributioin density of nucleate sites presented on real boiling surface can be described by the normalized fractal distribution function,and the physical meaning of parameters involved in some experimental correlations proposed by early investigations are identified according to fractal distribution function.It is further suggested that the surface micro geometry characteristics such as the shape of cavities should be described and analyzed qualitatively by using fractal theory.

  3. Organic facies applied to petroleum exploration; Facies organica: conceitos, metodos e estudos de casos na industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Taissa Rego; Araujo, Carla Viviane; Souza, Igor Viegas Alves F. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Geoquimica,]. E-mail: taissamenezes@petrobras.com.br; Mendonca Filho, Joao Graciano; Mendonca, Joalice de Oliveira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia

    2008-06-15

    The concept of organic facies, as well as the definitions and means of the different facies became a very important tool to petroleum exploration. The application of this concept is the best way to integrate microscopy and geochemical techniques to study kerogen contained in sedimentary rocks. Thus, palynofacies analysis and bulk geochemical methods are used to characterize the total particulate organic matter. Palynofacies analysis involves the integrated study of all aspects of the kerogen assemblage: identification of the individual particulate components, assessment of their absolute and relative proportions and preservation states. The correlation between palynofacies and geochemical data provides the organic facies models that point out the depositional environmental conditions and hydrocarbon source rock potential. (author)

  4. Analysis of plasma distribution near the extraction region in surface produced negative ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukano, A; Hatayama, A

    2014-02-01

    In study of a negative ion source, it is important to understand the plasma characteristics near the extraction region. A recent experiment in the NIFS-R&D ion source has suggested that a "double ion plasma layer" which is a region consisting of hydrogen positive and negative ions exists near the plasma grid (PG). Density distribution of plasma near the extraction region is studied analytically. It is shown that the density distribution depends on an amount of the surface produced negative ions and the double ion plasma layer is formed near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production.

  5. Effect of charge distribution on the electrostatic adsorption of Janus nanoparticles onto charged surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D. M.; Cao, Q. Q.; Zuo, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    We carried out coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrostatic adsorption of Janus nanoparticles which consist of oppositely charged hemispheres onto charged surfaces. Films with different conformations were formed by Janus nanoparticles. The effects of charge distributions of Janus nanoparticles and the surface on the film structures and dynamic adsorption behavior were investigated in detail. When the surface is highly charged, Janus nanoparticles tend to form single particles or small clusters. In these cases, the surface charge distribution plays an important role in regulating the process of electrostatic adsorption. When the amount of surface charges is reduced, the effect of charge distribution of Janus nanoparticles becomes significant. The repulsive interactions between Janus nanoparticles determine the aggregation behavior of Janus nanoparticles as well as the shape of adsorption structures, which tends to separate Janus nanoparticles and results in a thin adsorption layer and small clusters. When the number of positive charges on the surface of Janus nanoparticle approaches that of negative charges, Janus nanoparticles aggregate into large clusters close to charged surface. The charge distribution of Janus nanoparticles becomes pronounced in the process of electrostatic adsorption.

  6. Effect of charge distribution on the electrostatic adsorption of Janus nanoparticles onto charged surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Hu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrostatic adsorption of Janus nanoparticles which consist of oppositely charged hemispheres onto charged surfaces. Films with different conformations were formed by Janus nanoparticles. The effects of charge distributions of Janus nanoparticles and the surface on the film structures and dynamic adsorption behavior were investigated in detail. When the surface is highly charged, Janus nanoparticles tend to form single particles or small clusters. In these cases, the surface charge distribution plays an important role in regulating the process of electrostatic adsorption. When the amount of surface charges is reduced, the effect of charge distribution of Janus nanoparticles becomes significant. The repulsive interactions between Janus nanoparticles determine the aggregation behavior of Janus nanoparticles as well as the shape of adsorption structures, which tends to separate Janus nanoparticles and results in a thin adsorption layer and small clusters. When the number of positive charges on the surface of Janus nanoparticle approaches that of negative charges, Janus nanoparticles aggregate into large clusters close to charged surface. The charge distribution of Janus nanoparticles becomes pronounced in the process of electrostatic adsorption.

  7. Facies volcánicas del depósito de avalancha de detritos del volcán Tata Sabaya, Andes Centrales Volcanic facies of the debris avalanche deposit of Tata Sabaya Volcano, Central Andes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benigno Godoy

    2012-09-01

    evolution of a volcano. These flows are formed by edifice instability, which could be due to several factors such as the presence of hydrother-mally altered areas, climatic changes, earthquakes, shallow magma intrusions (cryptodomes and/or dykes and/or fault activity beneath or close to the volcano. The final product of this avalanche flow, known as debris avalanche deposit (DAD shows typical hummocky and closed drainage morphologies. More than 14 volcanic centers of the Central Andes have volcanic DAD's, being Tata Sabaya (Bolivia one of them. The collapse that has originated the deposit could have been generated by a combination of magmatic and seismic activity in the volcano. The deposit associated to the partial collapse of Tata Sabaya volcano is distributed on its lower southern flank and partially fills the north-western part of the Salar de Coipasa basin. The deposit covers a minimum area of 230 km² and has an estimated minimum volume of 6±1 km³. The deposit is formed by 6 different types of hummocks, according to their compositions: lavic, pyroclastic, sedimentary, mixed, pyroclastic breccia and basaltic-andesitic hummocks. Based on the predominant hummock type and the spatial distribution, the deposit has been divided into 6 different facies (Toreva Block Facies, Volcanic Hummocks Facies, Central Facies, Sedimentary Hummocks Facies, Mixed Facies and Pyroclastic Breccia Hummocks Facies. Taking into account the facies distribution and their characteristics, we infer the pre-collapse structure of the volcano.

  8. Uranium, rare metals, and granulite-facies metamorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Cuney

    2014-09-01

    The Tranomaro metasomatized marbles recrystallizing under granulite-facies conditions represent a demonstrative example of fluid transfer from granulite-facies supracrustals to traps represented by regional scale skarns. Such fluids may be at the origin of the incompatible element enrichment detected in leucosomes of migmatites from St Malo in Brittany (France and Black Hills in South Dakota. The northern French Massif Central provides us with an example of a potential association between incompatible element enrichment of granitic melts and granulite-facies metamorphism. U- and F-enriched fine-grained granites are emplaced along a crustal scale shear zone active during the emplacement within the St Sylvestre peraluminous leucogranitic complex. We propose that during granulite-facies metamorphism dominated by carbonic waves in a deep segment of the continental crust, these shear zones control: (i the percolation of F-, LILE-, rare metal-rich fluids liberated primarily by the breakdown of biotite; (ii the enhancement of partial melting by F-rich fluids at intermediate crustal levels with the generation of F-, LILE-, rare metal-rich granitic melts; (iii their transfer through the crust with protracted fractionation facilitated by their low viscosity due to high F-Li contents; and finally (iv their emplacement as rare metal intrusions at shallow crust levels.

  9. [Vaginal ecology, climate, landscapes and populations (xenoecies and facies)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, J M; Nourrit, J; Michel-Nguyen, A; Sempe, M; Nicoli, R M

    1994-06-01

    Brief study of vaginal populations, the human vagina being considered as a biotopic cavity. Allusion to dynamic aspects ("vaginal climate", "landscapes") and to various bacterial populations. Introduction of the concept of xenoecies and of facies. This study is preceded by essential definitions of terms widely used in ecology.

  10. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of the habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  11. Surface flow types, near-bed hydraulics and the distribution of stream macroinvertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Reid

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in hydraulic conditions in streams often results in distinct water surface patterns, or surface flow types. Visual assessments of the distribution of surface flow types have been used to provide rapid assessment of habitat heterogeneity. The efficacy of this approach is predicated on the notion that surface flow types consistently represent a distinct suite of hydraulic conditions with biological relevance. This study tested this notion, asking three specific questions. First, do surface flow types provide a characterisation of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates? Second, how well do near-bed hydraulic conditions explain macroinvertebrate distributions? Third, what components of near-bed hydraulic conditions exert the strongest influence on macroinvertebrate distributions?

    Results show that hydraulic conditions (incorporating direct measurements of near-bed velocity and turbulence in three dimensions and substratum character (incorporating estimates of particle size distribution, and biofilm and macrophyte cover within each surface flow type were largely distinct and that macroinvertebrate assemblages differed across flow types in taxon richness and assemblage composition, thus supporting the notion that rapid assessments of surface flow type distributions provide biologically relevant information.

    Macroinvertebrate assemblages were most strongly correlated with water depth, size of a flow type patch, near-bed velocity in the downstream direction, turbulence in the transverse direction, % pebble, % sand, % silt and clay and macrophyte cover. This study suggests that surface flow type mapping provides an assessment of physical habitat that is relevant to macroinvertebrates. The strong relationship detected between macroinvertebrate assemblages and transverse turbulence also highlights the value of directly measuring near-bed hydraulics. Further investigations are required to test the

  12. Comparative assessment of surface fluxes from different sources: a framework based on probability distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulev, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface turbulent heat fluxes from modern era and first generation reanalyses (NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim, MERRA NCEP-CFSR, JRA) as well as from satellite products (SEAFLUX, IFREMER, HOAPS) were intercompared using framework of probability distributions for sensible and latent heat fluxes. For approximation of probability distributions and estimation of extreme flux values Modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution has been used. Besides mean flux values, consideration is given to the comparative analysis of (i) parameters of the MFT probability density functions (scale and location), (ii) extreme flux values corresponding high order percentiles of fluxes (e.g. 99th and higher) and (iii) fractional contribution of extreme surface flux events in the total surface turbulent fluxes integrated over months and seasons. The latter was estimated using both fractional distribution derived from MFT and empirical estimates based upon occurrence histograms. The strongest differences in the parameters of probability distributions of surface fluxes and extreme surface flux values between different reanalyses are found in the western boundary current extension regions and high latitudes, while the highest differences in the fractional contributions of surface fluxes may occur in mid ocean regions being closely associated with atmospheric synoptic dynamics. Generally, satellite surface flux products demonstrate relatively stronger extreme fluxes compared to reanalyses, even in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes where data assimilation input in reanalyses is quite dense compared to the Southern Ocean regions. Our assessment also discriminated different reanalyses and satellite products with respect to their ability to quantify the role of extreme surface turbulent fluxes in forming ocean heat release in different regions.

  13. Chemically Reactive Solute Distribution in a Steady MHD Boundary Layer Flow over a Stretching Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S Uddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned to find the distribution of the chemically reactant solute in the MHD flow of an electrically conducting viscous incompressible fluid over a stretching surface. The first order chemical reaction and the variable solute distribution along the surface are taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations along with appropriate boundary conditions for flow field and reactive solute are transformed into a set of non-linear self-similar ordinary differential equations by using scaling group of transformations. An exact analytic solution is obtained for the velocity field. Using this velocity field, we obtain numerical solution for the reactant concentration field. It reveals from the study that the values of concentration profile enhances with the increase of the magnetic field and decreases with increase of Schmidt number as well as the reaction rate parameter. Most importantly, when the solute distribution along the surface increases then the concentration profile decreases.

  14. CLINICAL SURFACES -- Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh

    2009-01-01

    and browsing of patient data on public displays. We present the design and implementation of CLINICAL SURFACES, and report from an evaluation of the system at a large hospital. The evaluation shows that using distributed public displays to support activity-based computing inside a hospital is very useful...... and activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval...... for clinical work, and that the apparent contradiction between maintaining privacy of medical data in a public display environment can be mitigated by the use of CLINICAL SURFACES....

  15. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution and Surface Area of Porous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Peter; Krevor, Sam

    2015-04-01

    An important control on rate of interfacial processes between minerals and aqueous solutions such as nucleation of solids, and mineral dissolution and growth is reactive surface area. In geochemical modelling, the continuum hypothesis is based on the assumption that the system can be represented by a sufficiently large number of representative elemental volumes. There has been recent interest in studying the impact of this assumption on reaction-transport coupled systems. In this study, the impact of pore-scale heterogeneity on the distribution of reactive surface area is discussed. 3D images obtained using x-ray micro-tomography were used to characterise the distribution of reactive surface area. The results were compared to independent observations. Mineral identification using x- ray diffraction and fluorescence suggested general agreement with CT analysis. Nitrogen BET surface areas were one to two orders of magnitude higher than measurements from x-ray imagery. Co- registered images of Berea sandstone from x-ray and energy dispersive spectroscopy imagery suggested that quartz, K-feldspar and most clays could be identified. However, minor minerals such as albite and illite did not exhibit enough contrast. In Berea sandstone, mineral surface area fraction was poorly correlated to the mineral volumetric fraction. Clay and feldspar minerals exhibited higher surface area fractions than bulk mineralogy suggested. In contrast, in the Edwards carbonate samples, modal mineral composition correlated with mineral-specific surface area. Berea sandstone revealed a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. Conversely, the carbonate samples suggested a continuous range of pore sizes across length scales. A comparison with pore network model simulations from the literature was made. First order estimates of mineral specific correlations between geometric area measured in the x-ray images were used to convert the CT

  16. Comparison of climatic threshold of geographical distribution between dominant plants and surface pollen in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEDDADI; Rachid; BEAUDOUIN; Celia

    2008-01-01

    The geographical distribution of dominant plant species in China was georeferenced and climatic variables were interpolated into all grids.Accordingly,the percentage distributions of principal pollen taxa based on 1860 surface pollen sites in China were selected and the related climate values were interpolated with the same method. The geographical and climatic comparison between the two data-sets indicated that the climate threshold of most pollen taxa from surface pollen is coherent with plant distributions. The climatic envelopes of dominant plant are mostly accordant with those of pollen taxa at certain levels. However, some distinct offsets of the climate ranges exist between the two datasets for most pollen taxa identified at family level, such as Ericaceae,Asteraceae, Poaceae and Chenopodiaceae. The present study provides for the first time rich information on temperature and precipitation in relation to pollen and plant distribution based on the datasets on a continental scale useful for global ecological modeling and Quaternary palaeoclimate reconstruction.

  17. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  18. Assessing linkages between spatial facies changes and dimensional variations of glaciers in the upper Indus Basin, western Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Iram; Shukla, Aparna; Romshoo, Shakil A.

    2017-05-01

    The present study provides an insight into the heterogeneous response of 45 glaciers in the Lidder and Sindh river basins, western Himalaya, and explores the linkages between glacier facies variability and changing glacier parameters. Results show that the region has undergone an overall deglaciation of 12 ± 1.5% (11.9 ± 1.4 km2) from 1996 to 2014. Fluctuations in the temperature and precipitation patterns seem to be the primary factor controlling the changes in glacier dimensions (R2 > 0.82 in all cases). Glacier facies changes suggest depletion in snow-ice cover ( 18 ± 2.3%) and an increase in ice-mixed debris ( 4 ± 1.4%), supraglacial debris ( 6 ± 1.5%), and periglacial debris ( 17 ± 1.2%). These glacier facies transitions are possibly the result of ice-melting; however, its relative rate and elevation decides the nature of facies conversion. An increase in the proportion of supraglacial debris has led to the conversion of 11 clean glaciers to sparsely debris-covered glaciers and 5 sparsely debris-covered glaciers to debris-covered glaciers. The size of the glaciers greatly influenced the rate of conversion of glaciers, and glaciers glaciers also experienced maximum shrinkage. Further, the glaciers with varying supraglacial debris cover respond differently, as sparsely debris-covered glaciers exhibit the highest rates of retreat (25 ± 7.3 m/y), followed by clean (23.7 ± 7.3 m/y) and debris-covered glaciers (13.1 ± 7.3 m/y). Thus, the findings of this work clearly show that the climate change driven dimensional changes of glaciers and variations in the spatial distribution of glacier facies have strong mutual control on each other.

  19. Facies analysis of the Late Cretaceous deposits from Corni Quarry (north-eastern border of Gilău Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoil Săsăran

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The Late Cretaceous deposits outcropping along the northeastern border of Gilău Mountains form a NW-SE-oriented crest. The crest is delimited westwards by the crystalline formations of Baia de Arieş Nappe. Within these deposits, two distinctive sedimentary complexes could be separated: a The Gosau-type facies formation, that can be correlated to the “Lower Gosau Subgroup” (Wagreich & Faupl, 1994, represented by alluvial/fluvial fans and shallow marine deposits; b The flysch-type formation, that is similar with the “Upper Gosau Subgroup” (Wagreich & Faupl, 1994 and includes deep sea deposits (hemipelagites/turbidites.The syndepositional and postdepositional tectonics controlled the sedimentation and facies distribution; the shallow carbonate deposits are embedded in distal shelf marine ones. Isolated blocks of various sizes represent the rudist-bearing limestones (from m2 up to hundreds of m2. The present study focuses on the identification of facies and depositional environments of the limestones outcropping along Pleşcuţa valley, in Corni Quarry (SW from Finişel village. Based on sedimentological features and faunal associations, the following facies associations have been identified: 1 Marls and limestone with terrigenous clasts; 2 Build-ups with tubular/massive corals and rudists; 3 pillarstone-type bioaccumulations with branching/platy corals; 4 bioclastic rudstone/grainstone; 5 bioclastic floatstone/ packstone. All these facies associations indicate a coastal environment developed along a shelf margin influenced by both the terrigenous supply, and the relative sea level variations.

  20. Modeling the Images of Relativistic Jets Lensed by Galaxies with Different Mass Surface Density Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Larchenkova, T. I.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Lyskova, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    The images of relativistic jets from extragalactic sources produced by gravitational lensing by galaxies with different mass surface density distributions are modeled. In particular, the following models of the gravitational lens mass distribution are considered: a singular isothermal ellipsoid, an isothermal ellipsoid with a core, two- and three-component models with a galactic disk, halo, and bulge. The modeled images are compared both between themselves and with available observations. Dif...

  1. On the joint distribution of surface slopes for the fourth order nonlinear random sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张书文; 孙孚; 管长龙

    1999-01-01

    Based upon the nonlinear model of Longuet-Higgins the joint distribution of wave surface slopes is theoretically investigated. It is shown that in the fourth order approximation, the distribution is given by truncated Gram-Charlier series. The types of wave-wave coupling interactions are related to the order of approximation to nonlinearity of sea surface, which eventually defines the truncated term of the Gram-Charlier series. For each order approximation, the coefficients in the series are modified comparatively to the corresponding ones for the previous order approximation. If the nonlinear effect of the kurtosis is considered, the wave surface must be as accurate at least as to the third order approximation, and with regard to skewness, the wave surface must be as accurate at least as to the fourth order approximation.

  2. DISCUSSION ON DEFECTS DISTRIBUTION NEAR THE STEEL SURFACE IRRADIATED BY INTENSE PULSED ION BEAM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Y.Le; S.Yan; W.J.Zhao; B.X.Han; W.Xiang

    2002-01-01

    The surface defect distribution in stainless steel irradiated with intense pulsed ion beam(IPIB) of current density above 60A/cm2 and acceleration voltage 300-500keV wasdiscussed and analyzed. The defects near the surface of stainless steel were generatedin two ways: (1) generated by the bombardment of energetic ions and (2) induced bythe high level stress near the surface. Thus the temperature and stress distributionsnear the steel surface were calculated by means of our STEIPIB code, which treatedwith the thermal-dynamical process in the target irradiated by the IPIB. Based onthese distributions, the generations and movements of these defects were discussedand compared with the experiment results.

  3. Application of seismic facies and attributes analysis on the identification of Permian igneous rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yongzhong; Yang Haijun; Liu Yongfu; Wang Shuangshuang; Yang Peng; Zhao Jixiang

    2012-01-01

    Seismic facies and attributes analysis techniques are introduced.The geological characteristics of some oil fields in western China are used in conjunction with drilling results and logging data to identify the lithology,intrusion periods,and distribution range of the Permian igneous rocks in this area.The lithologic classification,the vertical and horizontal distribution,and the intrusion periods of igneous rock were deduced through this study.Combining seismic facies and attributes analysis based on optimization can describe the igneous rock in detail.This is an efficient way to identify lithology and intrusion periods.Using geological data and GR-DT logging cross-plots the Permian igneous rock from TP to TT was divided into three periods.The lithology of the first period is tuff and clasolite with a thickness ranging from 18 to 80 ms.The second is basalt with a thickness ranging from 0 to 20 ms.The third is tuff and clasolite and dacite whose thickness ranges from 60 to 80 ms.These results can help understand the clasolite trap with low amplitude and the lithologic trap of the Carboniferous and Silurian.They can also guide further oil and/or gas exploration.

  4. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints.

  5. Pore-Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution and Reactive Surface Area of Porous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P. E. P.; Krevor, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The reactive surface area is an important control on interfacial processes between minerals and aqueous fluids in porous rocks. Spatial heterogeneity in the surface area can lead to complications in modelling reactive transport processes, but quantitative characterisation of this property has been limited. In this paper 3D images obtained using x-ray micro-tomography were used to characterise heterogeneity in surface area in one sandstone and five carbonate rocks. Measurements of average surface area from x-ray imagery were 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than measurements from nitrogen BET. A roughness factor, defined as the ratio of BET surface area to x-ray based surface area, was correlated to the presence of clay or microporosity. Coregistered images of Berea sandstone from x-ray and energy dispersive spectroscopy imagery were used to guide the identification of quartz, K-feldspar, dolomite, calcite and clays in x-ray images. In Berea sandstone, clay and K-feldspar had higher average surface area fractions than their volumetric fractions in the rock. In the Edwards carbonate, however, modal mineral composition correlated with surface area. By sub-sampling digital images, statistical distributions of the surface area were generated at various length scales of subsampling. Comparing these to distributions used in published modelling studies showed that the common practice of leaving surface area and pore volume uncorrelated in a pore leads to unrealistic combinations of surface area and pore volume in the models. We suggest these models adopt a moderate correlation based on observations. In Berea sandstone, constraining ratios of surface area to pore volume to a range of values between that of quartz-lined and five times that of clay-lined spheres appeared sufficient.

  6. Constraining the distribution of methane on the surface and in the troposphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Juan Manuel; Adamkovics, Mate; Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface supports large lakes of stable hydrocarbon liquids, while active weather and a seasonal cycle operate in the troposphere, transporting methane between the atmosphere, the surface, and, potentially, the sub-surface on various timescales. Yet the detailed distribution of methane both in the lower atmosphere and in the surface is relatively unknown, though efforts to measure the boundary layer methane abundance are maturing. Using a combination of general circulation modeling and both ground-based and Cassini observations of Titan, we are working toward measuring and interpreting the variability of lower-atmosphere humidity, and clarifying the distribution of surface liquids and their connection to the atmosphere. We present recent results that provide initial estimates of the latitudinal variation of low-level atmospheric methane, and their implications for the presence of surface liquids. Determining whether or not the observed seas represent the entire reservoir of surface methane on Titan will affect our understanding of the atmospheric circulation and surface-atmosphere interactions that affect the hydrologic cycle, and lead to a better insight into Titan's climate system and its evolution.

  7. INFLUENCE OF CARBON CONTENT OF MARTENSITE STEELS ON HARDNESS RE-DISTRIBUTION NEAR WORN SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.P. Ma

    2002-01-01

    After three-body abrasion, the hardness re-distribution near the worn surface has aclose relationship with the carbon content of martensite steel. It is considered thatthere is a competition between the work-hardening and the temper softening, whichresults from deformation and friction heat of material. When the carbon content ofmartensite steel is below about 0.6%, the subsurface hardness distribution of materialis a softened layer sandwiched between two hardened layers, but above 0.6%C, nosoftened region appears on the hardness re-distribution curve.

  8. Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

    1993-07-01

    The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

  9. Mechanisms of surface pressure distribution within a laminar separation bubble at different Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghwi; Kawai, Soshi; Nonomura, Taku; Anyoji, Masayuki; Aono, Hikaru; Oyama, Akira; Asai, Keisuke; Fujii, Kozo

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms behind the pressure distribution and skin friction within a laminar separation bubble (LSB) are investigated by large-eddy simulations around a 5% thickness blunt flat plate at the chord length based Reynolds number 5.0 × 103, 6.1 × 103, 1.1 × 104, and 2.0 × 104. The characteristics inside the LSB change with the Reynolds number; a steady laminar separation bubble (LSB_S) at the Reynolds number 5.0 × 103 and 6.1 × 103, and a steady-fluctuating laminar separation bubble (LSB_SF) at the Reynolds number 1.1 × 104, and 2.0 × 104. Different characteristics of pressure and skin friction distributions are observed by increasing the Reynolds number, such that a gradual monotonous pressure recovery in the LSB_S and a plateau pressure distribution followed by a rapid pressure recovery region in the LSB_SF. The reasons behind the different characteristics of pressure distributions at different Reynolds numbers are discussed by deriving the Reynolds averaged pressure gradient equation. It is confirmed that the viscous stress distributions near the surface play an important role in determining the formation of different pressure distributions. Depending on the Reynolds numbers, the viscous stress distributions near the surface are affected by the development of a separated laminar shear layer or the Reynolds shear stress. In addition, we show that the same analyses can be applied to the flows around a NACA0012 airfoil.

  10. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenfeng; Huang, Chihua

    2017-10-01

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address this issue, a rainfall-simulation experiment was conducted with treatments that included two different initial soil surface roughnesses and two rainfall intensities. Soil surface roughness was determined by using photogrammetric method. For each simulated event, runoff and sediment samples were collected at different experimental times. The effective (undispersed) PSD of each sediment sample and the ultimate (after dispersion) PSD were used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment movement. The results show that soil surface roughness significantly delayed runoff initiation, but had no significant effect on the steady runoff rate. However, a significant difference in the soil loss rate was observed between the smooth and rough soil surfaces. Sediments from smooth soil surfaces were more depleted in clay-size particles, but more enriched in sand-size particles than those from rough soil surfaces, suggesting that erosion was less selective on smooth than on rough soil surfaces. The ratio of different sizes of transported sediment to the soil matrix indicates that most of the clay was eroded in the form of aggregates, silt-size particles were transported mainly as primary particles, and sand-size particles were predominantly aggregates of finer particles. Soil surface roughness has a crucial effect on the sediment size distribution and erosion processes. Significant differences of the enrichment ratios for the effective PSD and the ultimate PSD were observed under the two soil surface roughness treatments. These findings demonstrate that we should consider each particle size separately rather than use only the total sediment discharge in

  11. Analysis of hydrogeochemical facies in groundwater of upper part of Cross River Basin, southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Ukpai N.; Celestine, Okogbue O.; Solomon, Onwuka O.

    2017-07-01

    Upper Cross River Hydrogeological Basin lies within latitudes 60 021N to 60 241N and longitudes 80 001E to 80 161E, and is generally underlain by shales of Asu River group of Albian age. The area has Histories of intensive mineralization which influenced groundwater system, resulting to occurrence of different water types. This study determines the various water types via evaluation of major ion concentration from representative water samples collected across the area. Twenty (20) water samples were analyzed using Spectrophotometer of HACH DR/2010 series, and results showed that groundwater in the area is generally hard and polluted with TDS in some places. Statistical inspection was performed on the results using aqua-chem, and it delineated five hydro-chemical facies, namely: Ca-Mg-Cl-S04, Ca-Mg-HCO3-Cl-SO4, Ca-Mg-HCO3, Na-K-HCO3 and Na-K-Cl-SO4; all lie between slight acidic and weak alkaline water. These chemical facies (water types) diffused from non-point sources in urban area and point source from south of Abakaliki town. The dispersion of the facies plumes is possibly controlled by advection process through structural weak zones such as fractures. Hydraulic heads determined from hand-dug wells indicate local potentiometric surfaces, hence, showed local groundwater flow system which is possibly controlled by the underlying low permeable aquicludes formed by shales. The protective capacity of the aquitards was somewhat reduced by the permeating fractures which exposed the aquifers to polluting effects of mineralized water-types.

  12. Petrology of blueschist facies metamorphic rocks of the Meliata Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Shah Wali

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Meliata blueschists originated from basalts, limestones, pelites, psammitic and amphibolite facies basement rocks. Compositionally, the metabasalts have a geochemical signature mostly indicative of a transitional arc-MORB origin, but some mafic rocks having affinity with within plate basalts also present. The mafic blueschists consist of blue amphibole, epidote and albite, rarely also garnet, Na-pyroxene and chloritoid. Apart from phengite and quartz the metapelites and metapsammites contain one or more of the minerals: chloritoid, paragonite, glaucophane, albite, chlorite, occasionally also Na-pyroxene and garnet. Amphibolite facies rocks contain relic garnet, plagioclase and hornblende, the latter two replaced by albite and blue amphibole, respectively. The zoning patterns of blue amphibole, garnet and chloritoid suggest their formation during prograde stage of metamorphism. P-T conditions of meta-morphism are estimated to be about 350-460 oC and 10-12 kbar.

  13. Two-dimensional monitoring of surface temperature distribution of a heated material by laser-ultrasound scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, I.; Yamada, H.; Takahashi, M.

    2011-01-01

    A non-contact method with a laser-ultrasonic technique for measuring two-dimensional temperature distribution on a material surface is presented. The method consists of a laser-ultrasonic measurement of a one-dimensional temperature distribution on a material surface and its two-dimensional area mapping. The surface temperature is basically determined from a temperature dependence of the velocity of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating on a material surface. One-dimensional surface temperature distributions are determined by an inverse analysis consisting of a SAW measurement and a finite difference calculation. To obtain a two-dimensional distribution of surface temperature on a material surface, SAW measurements within the area of a square on the surface are performed by a pulsed laser scanning with a galvanometer system. The inverse analysis is then applied to each of the SAW data to determine the surface temperature distribution in a certain direction, and the obtained one-dimensional distributions are combined to construct a two-dimensional distribution of surface temperature. It has been demonstrated from the experiment with a heated aluminum plate that the temperature distributions of the area of a square on the aluminium surface determined by the ultrasonic method almost agree with those measured using an infrared camera.

  14. Facies, stratal and stacking patterns of syn-rift sequences along present-day and fossil hyperextended rifted margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes, Charlotte; Epin, Marie-Eva; Gillard, Morgane; Chenin, Pauline; Ghienne, Jean-Francois; Manatschal, Gianreto; Karner, Garry D.; Johnson, Christopher A.

    2017-04-01

    Research on the formation and evolution of deep-water rifted margins has undergone a major paradigm shift in recent years. An increasing number of studies of present-day and fossil rifted margins allows us to identify and characterize the architecture of hyperextended rifted margins. However, at present, little is known about the depositional environments, sedimentary facies and stacking and stratal patterns in syn-rift sequences within these domains. In this context, characterizing and understanding the spatial and temporal evolution of the stratal and stacking patterns is a new challenge. The syn-rift sequence at rifted margins is deposited during the initial stages of stretching to the onset of oceanic accretion and comprises pre-, syn- and post-kinematic deposits along the margin. A difficulty arises from the fact that the observed stratigraphic geometries and facies relationships result from the complex interplay between sediment supply and creation of accommodation, which in turn are controlled by regional synchronous events (i.e. crustal necking and onset of seafloor spreading) and diachronous events (i.e. migration of deformation during rifting, lags in sediment input to the distal margin). These parameters are poorly constrained in hyperextended rift systems. Indeed, the complex structural evolution of hyperextended systems include an evolution from initially distributed to localized extension (i.e. necking) and the development of poly-phase in-sequence and/or out of sequence extensional faulting associated with mantle exhumation and magmatic activity. This multiphase structural evolution can generate complex accommodation patterns over a highly structured top basement but can only be recognized if there is sufficient sediment input to record the events. In our presentation, we show preliminary results for fossil Alpine Tethys margins exposed in the Alps and seismic examples of the present-day deep water rifted margins offshore Australian-Antarctica, East

  15. Bayesian inversion for facies detection: An extensible level set framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, M.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2009-10-01

    In many cases, it has been assumed that the variability in hydrologic parameters can be adequately described through a simple geostatistical model with a given variogram. In other cases, variability may be best described as a series of "jumps" in parameter behavior, e.g., those that occur at geologic facies contacts. When using indirect measurements such as pump tests to try to map such heterogeneity (during inverse modeling), the resulting images of the subsurface are always affected by the assumptions invoked. In this paper, we discuss inversion for parameter fields where prior information has suggested that major variability can be described by boundaries between geologic units or facies. In order to identify such parameter fields, we propose a Bayesian level set inversion protocol framework, which allows for flexible zones of any shape, size, and number. We review formulas for defining facies locations using the level set method and for moving the boundaries between zones using a gradient-based technique that improves fit through iterative deformation of the boundaries. We describe the optimization algorithm employed when multiple level set functions are used to represent a field with more than two facies. We extend these formulas to the investigation of the inverse problem in a Bayesian context in which prior information is taken into account and through which measures of uncertainty can be derived. We also demonstrate that the level set method is well suited for joint inversion problems and present a strategy for integrating different data types (such as hydrologic and geophysical) without assuming strict petrophysical relations. Our framework for joint inversion also contrasts with many previous methods in that all data sources (e.g., both hydrologic and geophysical) contribute to boundary delineation at once.

  16. Comparison of satellite and airborne sensor data on sea surface temperature and suspended solid distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Saito, K.; Hayakawa, S.; Narigasawa, K.

    1992-07-01

    Sea surface temperature and suspended solid were observed simultaneously by LANDSAT TM, NOAA AVHRR and airborne MSS. The authors compared the following items through the data, i.e., 1) Sea surface temperature, 2) Suspended solid in the sea water, 3) Monitoring ability on ocean environment. It was found that distribution patterns of sea surface temperature and suspended solid in the Ariake Sea obtained from LANDSAT TM are similar with those from airborne MSS in a scale of 1:300,000. Sea surface temperature estimated from NOAA AVHRR data indicates a fact of an ocean environment of the Ariake Sea and the around sea area. It is concluded that the TM data can be used for the monitoring of sea environment. The NOAA AVHRR data is useful for the estimation of sea surface temperature with the airborne MSS data.

  17. STOCHASTIC FRACTURED ROCK FACIES FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA BLESSENT

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los resultados de una simulación de flujo de agua subterránea en rocas fracturadas. Se emplea un enfoque estocástico (modelo estocástico equivalente en medio poroso fracturado para construir el modelo conceptual y para usar este último en la roca de baja permeabilidad encontrada en el sitio elegido como caso de estudio (Olkiluoto, Finlandia. La roca que se investiga se encuentra localizada alrededor de un grupo de pozos de sondeo y cubre un área de algunas hectáreas. Las mediciones de campo de pruebas de interferencia hidráulica se utilizan para calibrar el modelo de flujo de agua subterránea. Múltiples combinaciones de facies estocásticos se consideran para evaluar el impacto de la distribución y del número de facies en las cargas hidráulicas y en los caudales. Este estudio cuantifica la variabilidad de los resultados numéricos, lo cual es importante para el análisis de la incertidumbre en los sistemas hidrogeológicos. Por otra parte, este estudio muestra que el modelo conceptual de facies estocásticos es una alternativa adecuada a los modelos conceptuales de redes de fracturas discretas.

  18. Multiparameter Elastic Full Waveform Inversion With Facies Constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2017-08-17

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) aims fully benefit from all the data characteristics to estimate the parameters describing the assumed physics of the subsurface. However, current efforts to utilize full waveform inversion as a tool beyond acoustic imaging applications, for example in reservoir analysis, faces inherent challenges related to the limited resolution and the potential trade-off between the elastic model parameters. Adding rock physics constraints does help to mitigate these issues, but current approaches to add such constraints are based on including them as a priori knowledge mostly valid around the well or as a boundary condition for the whole area. Since certain rock formations inside the Earth admit consistent elastic properties and relative values of elastic and anisotropic parameters (facies), utilizing such localized facies information in FWI can improve the resolution of inverted parameters. We propose a novel confidence map based approach to utilize the facies-based constraints in both isotropic and anisotropic elastic FWI. We invert for such a confidence map using Bayesian theory, in which the confidence map is updated at each iteration of the inversion using both the inverted models and a prior information. The numerical examples show that the proposed method can reduce the trade-offs and also can improve the resolution of the inverted elastic and anisotropic properties.

  19. Three-dimensional facies architecture of the Salem Limestone (middle Mississippian), Eastern Margin of Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, A.; Keith, B.D.; Thompson, T.A. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Mapping of sedimentary surfaces in the Middle Mississippian Salem Limestone exposed on sawed quarry walls in south-central Indiana has revealed a hierarchy of depositional units representative of the extremely dynamic hydrographic regime of the upper shoreface zone. The depositional units on the scale of microform and mesoform are represented by the microfacies and the facies respectively. Based on their hierarchy, genetically related depositional units and associated bounding surfaces were grouped together to construct four architectural packages (APs) of the scale of mesoforms. AP-I is dominantly an echinoderm- and bryozoan-rich grainstone and consists of bedforms ranging from small ripples bounded by first-order surfaces to two- and three- dimensional megaripples bounded by the second-order surfaces. It formed as part of a giant ramp (asymmetric wavefield) within the intrashoal channel setting. AP-II, also a skeletal grainstone, is a complex of giant sandwaves that moved into the area under the infulence of a storm and partly filled the basal channel form of AP-I. Large avalanche foresets with tangential toesets prevail. AP-III is a dark-gray spatially discontinuous skeletal grainstone to packstone that laterally grades into a skeletal packstone to wackestone. It locally developed overhangs, rips-ups, and hardground on its upper surface. AP-IV is a skeletal and oolitic grainstone formed of tabular two-dimensional megaripples (planar cross-beds) and three-dimensional oscillatory megaripples (trough cross-beds). These architectural packages based on the bedform architecture and micro-and mesoscale compositional changes can be used to characterize micro-, meso, and macroscale heterogeneities. Models of facies architecture from this and similar outcrop studies can be applied to the subsurface Salem reservoirs in the Illinois Basin using cores.

  20. Spatial distributions of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities have been resilient to long-term surface warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Geraint A; Ward, Peter; Thorpe, Sally E

    2017-08-29

    The biogeographic response of oceanic planktonic communities to climatic change has a large influence on the future stability of marine food webs and the functioning of global biogeochemical cycles. Temperature plays a pivotal role in determining the distribution of these communities and ocean warming has the potential to cause major distributional shifts, particularly in polar regions where the thermal envelope is narrow. We considered the impact of long-term ocean warming on the spatial distribution of Southern Ocean mesozooplankton communities through examining plankton abundance in relation to sea surface temperature between two distinct periods, separated by around 60 years. Analyses considered 16 dominant mesozooplankton taxa (in terms of biomass and abundance) in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, from net samples and in situ temperature records collected during the Discovery Investigations (1926-1938) and contemporary campaigns (1996-2013). Sea surface temperature was found to have increased significantly by 0.74°C between the two eras. The corresponding sea surface temperature at which community abundance peaked was also significantly higher in contemporary times, by 0.98°C. Spatial projections indicated that the geographical location of community peak abundance had remained the same between the two eras despite the poleward advance of sea surface isotherms. If the community had remained within the same thermal envelope as in the 1920s-1930s, community peak abundance would be 500 km further south in the contemporary era. Studies in the northern hemisphere have found that dominant taxa, such as calanoid copepods, have conserved their thermal niches and tracked surface isotherms polewards. The fact that this has not occurred in the Southern Ocean suggests that other selective pressures, particularly food availability and the properties of underlying water masses, place greater constraints on spatial distributions in this region. It

  1. Bayesian inversion of seismic attributes for geological facies using a Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad Atif; Curtis, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Markov chain Monte-Carlo (McMC) sampling generates correlated random samples such that their distribution would converge to the true distribution only as the number of samples tends to infinity. In practice, McMC is found to be slow to converge, convergence is not guaranteed to be achieved in finite time, and detection of convergence requires the use of subjective criteria. Although McMC has been used for decades as the algorithm of choice for inference in complex probability distributions, there is a need to seek alternative approaches, particularly in high dimensional problems. Walker & Curtis (2014) developed a method for Bayesian inversion of 2-D spatial data using an exact sampling alternative to McMC which always draws independent samples of the target distribution. Their method thus obviates the need for convergence and removes the concomitant bias exhibited by finite sample sets. Their algorithm is nevertheless computationally intensive and requires large memory. We propose a more efficient method for Bayesian inversion of categorical variables, such as geological facies that requires no sampling at all. The method is based on a 2-D Hidden Markov Model (2D-HMM) over a grid of cells where observations represent localized data constraining each cell. The data in our example application are seismic attributes such as P- and S-wave impedances and rock density; our categorical variables are the hidden states and represent the geological rock types in each cell-facies of distinct subsets of lithology and fluid combinations such as shale, brine-sand and gas-sand. The observations at each location are assumed to be generated from a random function of the hidden state (facies) at that location, and to be distributed according to a certain probability distribution that is independent of hidden states at other locations - an assumption referred to as `localized likelihoods'. The hidden state (facies) at a location cannot be determined solely by the observation at that

  2. Nature of the Martian surface as inferred from the particle-size distribution of lunar-surface material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of lunar particle size distribution data indicates that the surface material is composed of two populations. One population is caused by comminution from the impact of the larger-sized meteorites, while the other population is caused by the melting of fine material by the impact of smaller-sized meteorites. The results are referred to Mars, and it is shown that the Martian atmosphere would vaporize the smaller incoming meteorites and retard the incoming meteorites of intermediate and large size, causing comminution and stirring of the particulate layer. The combination of comminution and stirring would result in fine material being sorted out by the prevailing circulation of the Martian atmosphere and the material being transported to regions where it could be deposited. As a result, the Martian surface in regions of prevailing upward circulation is probably covered by either a rubble layer or by desert pavement; regions of prevailing downward circulation are probably covered by sand dunes.

  3. Global dominance of coralline red-algal facies: A response to Miocene oceanographic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfar, Jochen; Mutti, Maria

    2005-06-01

    Rhodoliths (free-living coralline red algae) can thrive under a wide range of temperatures, reduced light, and increased nutrient levels, and often form a distinct so-called rhodalgal lithofacies that is an important component of Cenozoic shallow-water carbonates. Global distributions illustrate that from the late-early to early-late Miocene (Burdigalian early Tortonian), rhodalgal facies reached peak abundances and commonly replaced coral-reef environments, accompanied by a decline in other carbonate-producing phototrophs. We argue that the dominance of red algae over coral reefs was triggered in the Burdigalian by enhanced trophic resources associated with a global increase in productivity, as evidenced by a long-term shift toward higher carbon isotope values. Rhodalgal lithofacies expanded further in the middle Miocene when strengthened thermal gradients associated with the establishment of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet led to enhanced upwelling while climate change generated increased weathering rates, introducing land-derived nutrients into the oceans. Globally cooler temperatures following a climatic optimum in the early-middle Miocene contributed to sustain the dominance of red algae and prevented the recovery of coral reefs. The global shift in nearshore shallow-water carbonate producers to groups tolerant of higher levels of trophic resources provides further evidence for increased nutrient levels during that time interval and shows the sensitivity of shallow-water carbonate facies as indicators of past oceanographic conditions.

  4. Relation between facies, diagenesis, and reservoir quality of Rotliegende reservoirs in north Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, F.; Gast, R.; Kraft, T. (BEB Erdgas Erdol GmbH, Hannover (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    In north Germany, the majority of Rotliegende gas fields is confined to an approximately 50 km-wide east-west-orientated belt, which is situated on the gently north-dipping flank of the southern Permian basin. Approximately 400 billion m[sup 3] of natural gas has been found in Rotliegende reservoir sandstones with average porosities of depths ranging from 3500 to 5000 m. Rotliegende deposition was controlled by the Autunian paleo-relief, and arid climate and cyclic transgressions of the desert lake. In general, wadis and large dunefields occur in the hinterland, sebkhas with small isolate dunes and shorelines define the coastal area, and a desert lake occurs to the north. The sandstones deposited in large dunefields contain only minor amounts of illite, anhydrite, and calcite and form good reservoirs. In contrast, the small dunes formed in the sebkha areas were affected by fluctuations of the desert lake groundwaters, causing the infiltration of detrital clay and precipitation of gypsum and calcite. These cements were transformed to illite, anhydrite, and calcite-II during later diagenesis, leading to a significant reduction of the reservoir quality. The best reservoirs occur in the shoreline sandstones because porosity and permeability were preserved by early magnesium-chlorite diagenesis. Since facies controls diagenesis and consequently reservoir quality, mapping of facies also indicates the distribution of reservoir and nonreservoir rocks. This information is used to identify play area and to interpret and calibrate three-dimensional seismic data.

  5. Permian sequence stratigraphy of slope facies in southern Guizhou and chronostratigraphic correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史晓颖; 梅仕龙; 孙岩

    2000-01-01

    The Permian in slope facies area of southern Guizhou consists of 16 third order sequences, which can be grouped as four sequence sets and further into two mesosequences. Most of them are delineated by conformable or submarine erosion surfaces, and well controlled by conodont and fusulinid zones. Four important sea-level falls are recognized in the area, which occur respectively at the basal Sweetognathodus white! zone, lower S.aff. hanzhongensis zone, middle Jinogondolella xuanhanensis zone and the basal Clarkina y/n/zone. Among the recognized transgression events, three are regarded as the most significant. They occur respectively at the basal Neogondolella exculptus zone, basal Jinogondolella nankingensis zone and the lower Clarkina postbitteri zone, and are all accompanied by faunal turnovers. The key surfaces in sequences can be used to fine-tune the boundaries of bio-chronozones, stages and series.

  6. Patterns of distribution of phosphomono-esterases on surfaces of demineralized bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Vilmann, H

    1979-01-01

    Decalcification over short periods (5 days) with MnNa2 EDTA, MgNa2 EDTA and EGTA according to a method described in the present paper, creates sections of high quality with simultaneous good preservation of phosphomonoesterases on bone surfaces. In fact, the enzyme distribution seems to be compar......Decalcification over short periods (5 days) with MnNa2 EDTA, MgNa2 EDTA and EGTA according to a method described in the present paper, creates sections of high quality with simultaneous good preservation of phosphomonoesterases on bone surfaces. In fact, the enzyme distribution seems...... to be comparable to that obtained by using undecalcified sections. Na2 EDTA creates, on the other hand, poor preservation of alkaline phosphatase probably due to the fact that this chelate contrary to the other chelates removes the essential metal from the protein, leaving an unstable enzyme molecule which...... undergoes denaturation. Decalcification over longer periods (15 days) does not influence the pattern of distribution of acid phosphatase, whereas the alkaline phosphatase reaction becomes depressed in certain surface areas. The significance of this differential distribution is discussed. It might...

  7. Thorium distribution on the lunar surface observed by Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianmin; Zhang, Xubing; Wu, Ke

    2016-07-01

    The thorium distribution on the lunar surface is critical for understanding the lunar evolution. This work reports a global map of the thorium distribution on the lunar surface observed by Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). Our work exhibits an interesting symmetrical structure of thorium distribution along the two sides of the belt of Th hot spots. Some potential positions of KREEP volcanism are suggested, which are the Fra Mauro region, Montes Carpatus, Aristarchus Plateau and the adjacent regions of Copernicus Crater. Based on the lunar map of thorium distribution, we draw some conclusions on two critical links of lunar evolution: (1) the thorium abundance within the lunar crust and mantle, in the last stage of Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) crystallization, may have a positive correlation with the depth in the crust, reaches a peak when coming through the transitional zone between the crust and mantle, and decreases sharply toward the inside of the mantle; thus, the Th-enhanced materials originated from the lower crust and the layer between the crust and mantle, (2) in PKT, KREEP volcanism might be the primary mechanism of Th-elevated components to the lunar surface, whereas the Imbrium impact acted as a relatively minor role.

  8. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  9. Surface-orientation-dependent distribution of subsurface cation-exchange defects in olivine-phosphate nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung-Yoon; Choi, Si-Young; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Seongsu

    2015-01-27

    Atomic-scale exchange between two different cations of similar size in crystalline oxides is one of the major types of point defects when multiple cations in oxygen interstitials are arrayed in an ordered manner. Although a number of studies have been performed on a variety of Li-intercalation olivine phosphates to determine the distribution of exchange defects in bulk, understanding of the thermodynamic stability of the defects in subsurface regions and its dependency on the crystallographic orientation at the surface has remained elusive. Through a combination of small-angle neutron scattering, atomic-scale direct probing with scanning transmission electron microscopy, and theoretical ab initio calculations, we directly demonstrate that the antisite exchange defects are distributed in a highly anisotropic manner near the surfaces of LiFePO4 crystals. Moreover, a substantial amount of cation exchanges between Li and Fe sites is identified as an energetically favorable configuration in some surface regions, showing excellent agreement with the calculation results of negative defect formation energies. The findings in this study provide insight into developing better ways to avoid degradation of lithium mobility through the surface as well as scientifically notable features regarding the distribution of exchange defects in olivine phosphates.

  10. Probability distribution of surface wind speed induced by convective adjustment on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    The influence of convective adjustment on the spatial structure of Venusian surface wind and probability distribution of its wind speed is investigated using an idealized weather research and forecasting model. When the initially uniform wind is much weaker than the convective wind, patches of both prograde and retrograde winds with scales of a few kilometers are formed during active convective adjustment. After the active convective adjustment, because the small-scale convective cells and their related vertical momentum fluxes dissipate quickly, the large-scale (>4 km) prograde and retrograde wind patches remain on the surface and in the longitude-height cross-section. This suggests the coexistence of local prograde and retrograde flows, which may correspond to those observed by Pioneer Venus below 10 km altitude. The probability distributions of surface wind speed V during the convective adjustment have a similar form in different simulations, with a sharp peak around ∼0.1 m s-1 and a bulge developing on the flank of the probability distribution. This flank bulge is associated with the most active convection, which has a probability distribution with a peak at the wind speed 1.5-times greater than the Weibull fitting parameter c during the convective adjustment. The Weibull distribution P(> V) (= exp[-(V/c)k]) with best-estimate coefficients of Lorenz (2016) is reproduced during convective adjustments induced by a potential energy of ∼7 × 107 J m-2, which is calculated from the difference in total potential energy between initially unstable and neutral states. The maximum vertical convective heat flux magnitude is proportional to the potential energy of the convective adjustment in the experiments with the initial unstable-layer thickness altered. The present work suggests that convective adjustment is a promising process for producing the wind structure with occasionally generating surface winds of ∼1 m s-1 and retrograde wind patches.

  11. Modeling phase distribution of water-soluble organics in aqueous solutions using surface tension data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, B.; Hiatt, J.; Aumann, E.; Cabrera, J.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2006-12-01

    A good fraction (greater than 30 percent) of submicron particle mass in the atmosphere is often composed of water-soluble organic carbon. Identifiable, water-miscible organics, such as, known sugars, small alcohols, small diacids, etc. comprise only a small fraction of the water-soluble mass (about 1-2 percent). Most of the water-soluble mass is often composed of unidentifiable, humic-like materials, which are commonly refereed to as HULIS. Humic substances are known to form colloids in aqueous solutions at very low aqueous concentrations. Thus, it is likely for HULIS to also be colloid-forming in aqueous solutions. Here, we present surface tension measurements of water-miscible and colloid-forming organics, using methanol and sodium laurate as analogs, respectively. By relating the change in surface tension to chemical potential of the solution, we determine a relationship between surface tension and the surface excess of solute; that is, the number of molecules of solute adsorbed at the surface. Assuming surface acts as a monolayer, we model the adsorption with a Langmuir isotherm to extract the surface excess as a function of solute mole fraction. This relationship allows us to calculate the solute's distribution between bulk and surface phases for methanol, and in bulk, surface and colloid phases for sodium laurate. A colloid of sodium laurate contains approximately 100 laurate anions in a spherical cluster. We present adsorption constants for methanol and sodium laurate (derived from our surface tension data), critical micelle concentration for sodium laurate (derived from our surface tension data), and all the other thermocehmical constants (obtained from the literature) required to constrain a model for determining phase partitioning of organics in aqueous solutions.

  12. Multispectral UV imaging for surface analysis of MUPS tablets with special focus on the pellet distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikova, Anna; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well as p...... image analysis is a promising approach for the automatic quality control of MUPS tablets during the manufacturing process.......In the present study the applicability of multispectral UV imaging in combination with multivariate image analysis for surface evaluation of MUPS tablets was investigated with respect to the differentiation of the API pellets from the excipients matrix, estimation of the drug content as well...... on the tablet surface allowed an estimation of the true drug content in the respective MUPS tablet. In addition, the pellet distribution in the MUPS formulations could be estimated by UV image analysis of the tablet surface. In conclusion, this study revealed that UV imaging in combination with multivariate...

  13. A contactless ultrasonic surface wave approach to characterize distributed cracking damage in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Suyun; Song, Homin; Oelze, Michael L; Popovics, John S

    2017-03-01

    We describe an approach that utilizes ultrasonic surface wave backscatter measurements to characterize the volume content of relatively small distributed defects (microcrack networks) in concrete. A simplified weak scattering model is used to demonstrate that the scattered wave field projected in the direction of the surface wave propagation is relatively insensitive to scatterers that are smaller than the propagating wavelength, while the scattered field projected in the opposite direction is more sensitive to sub-wavelength scatterers. Distributed microcracks in the concrete serve as the small scatterers that interact with a propagating surface wave. Data from a finite element simulation were used to demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach, and also to optimize a testing configuration to collect data. Simulations were validated through experimental measurements of ultrasonic backscattered surface waves from test samples of concrete constructed with different concentrations of fiber filler (0.0, 0.3 and 0.6%) to mimic increasing microcrack volume density and then samples with actual cracking induced by controlled thermal cycles. A surface wave was induced in the concrete samples by a 50kHz ultrasonic source operating 10mm above the surface at an angle of incidence of 9°. Silicon-based miniature MEMS acoustic sensors located a few millimeters above the concrete surface both behind and in front of the sender were used to detect leaky ultrasonic surface waves emanating from concrete. A normalized backscattered energy parameter was calculated from the signals. Statistically significant differences in the normalized backscattered energy were observed between concrete samples with varying levels of simulated and actual cracking damage volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution, Arrangement and Interconnectedness of Cell Surface Receptor sites in the body of an Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utoh-Nedosa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors have been identified as the sites of disease infectivity in living organisms in a previous study. Drugs used for the treatment or cure of infections have to eliminate infections through attacking infective organisms at the cell surface receptors to which the infective organisms are attached. Problem statement: The present study examines a wide sample of living things to get more information on the relationship of one cell surface receptor to other cell surface receptors in the body of an organism. Approach: The arrangement of cell surface receptors on the external covering of a few samples of fruits, leaves, stems, dry wood of a plant; wall gecko and some parts of the human body, were examined and photographed. Transverse and/or Longitudinal sections of soursop fruit and sycamore fruit were also examined and photographed. The five different coverings of the fleshy part of a coconut were also photographed. The photographs were studied to note the relationship of disease infection attached to cell surface receptors on the external surface of an organ to disease infection on the innermost covering of the same organ. Results: The results of the study showed that all living things had ubiquitous distribution of cell surface receptors which are usually observable with the unaided eye as dots or spots on the external covering of an organ, tissue or cell. The dots or receptor sites of cell surface receptors in the study are arranged in lines which were perpendicular, oblique, transverse or arranged in any other lineal geometrical form. The lineally arranged cell surface receptors were noted to be connected by grooves, channels or pipes which joined other receptor channels or intersected with them. Smaller cell surface receptor channels emptied into bigger channels or continued as small sized channels that ran side by side in a connective tissue bundle. These connective tissue bundles that carried many independent small-sized cell

  15. Distributions of surface sediments surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula and its environmental significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chunjuan; CHEN Zhihua; LI Chunshun; DU Dewen; YAN Shijuan; ZHU Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed grain size composition to provide information on the types and distributions as well as depositional varieties of marine surface sediments from the area surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula. The samples retrieved from the study area contain gravel, sand, silt and clay. As suggested by bathymetry and morphology, the study area is characterized by neritic, hemipelagic and pelagic deposits. The glacial-marine sediments can be divided into two types, residual paratill and compound paratill, which are primarily transported by glaciers and as ice-rafted debris. Ocean current effects on deposition are more obvious, and the deposit types are distributed consistently with terrain variations.

  16. Geomorphology, facies architecture, and high-resolution, non-marine sequence stratigraphy in avulsion deposits, Cumberland Marshes, Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, K. M.

    2001-02-01

    This paper demonstrates field relationships between landforms, facies, and high-resolution sequences in avulsion deposits. It defines the building blocks of a prograding avulsion sequence from a high-resolution sequence stratigraphy perspective, proposes concepts in non-marine sequence stratigraphy and flood basin evolution, and defines the continental equivalent to a parasequence. The geomorphic features investigated include a distributary channel and its levee, the Stage I crevasse splay of Smith et al. (Sedimentology, vol. 36 (1989) 1), and the local backswamp. Levees and splays have been poorly studied in the past, and three-dimensional (3D) studies are rare. In this study, stratigraphy is defined from the finest scale upward and facies are mapped in 3D. Genetically related successions are identified by defining a hierarchy of bounding surfaces. The genesis, architecture, geometry, and connectivity of facies are explored in 3D. The approach used here reveals that avulsion deposits are comparable in process, landform, facies, bounding surfaces, and scale to interdistributary bayfill, i.e. delta lobe deposits. Even a simple Stage I splay is a complex landform, composed of several geomorphic components, several facies and many depositional events. As in bayfill, an alluvial ridge forms as the feeder crevasse and its levees advance basinward through their own distributary mouth bar deposits to form a Stage I splay. This produces a shoestring-shaped concentration of disconnected sandbodies that is flanked by wings of heterolithic strata, that join beneath the terminal mouth bar. The proposed results challenge current paradigms. Defining a crevasse splay as a discrete sandbody potentially ignores 70% of the landform's volume. An individual sandbody is likely only a small part of a crevasse splay complex. The thickest sandbody is a terminal, channel associated feature, not a sheet that thins in the direction of propagation. The three stage model of splay evolution

  17. [Distribution and sources of oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in surface soil of Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Xiu; Zhang, Zhi-Huan; Peng, Xu-Yang; Zhu, Lei; Lu, Ling

    2011-11-01

    62 surface soil samples were collected from different environmental function zones in Beijing. Sulfur and oxygen heterocyclic aromatic compounds were detected by GC/MS. The objectives of this study were to identify the composition and distribution of these compounds, and discuss their sources. The results showed that the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soils mainly contained dibenzofuran, methyl- and C2-dibenzofuran series, dibenzothiophene, methyl-, C2- and C3-dibenzothiophene series and benzonaphthothiophene series. The composition and distribution of the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil samples varied in the different environmental function zones, of which some factories and the urban area received oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds most seriously. In Beijing, the degree of contamination by oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the north surface soil was higher than that in the south. There were preferable linear correlations between the concentration of dibenzofuran series and fluorene series, as well as the concentration of dibenzothiophene series and dibenzofuran series. The oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil were mainly derived from combustion products of oil and coal and direct input of mineral oil, etc. There were some variations in pollution sources of different environmental function zones.

  18. Anachronistic facies in the Lower Triassic of South China and their implications to the ecosystems during the recovery time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction not only severely distressed the Paleozoic ecosystems but also dramatically changed the sedimentary systems, resulting in a peculiar Early Triassic ecosystem and submarine environment during the recovery time following the mass extinction. The Lower Triassic is characteristic of the wide occurrence of various distinctive sediments and related sedimentary structures, such as flatpebble conglomerates, vermicular limestone, subtidal wrinkle structures, microbialite, carbonate seafloor fans, thin-bedded limestone and zebra limestone-mudstone. These sediments were common in the Precambrian to Early Ordovician marine settings, and then they occurred only in some extreme and unusual environments with the expansion of metazoan faunas. However, the Early Triassic witnessed an "anachronistic" reappearance of some distinctive sedimentary records in normal shallow marine settings. The study of these anachronistic facies should be of great importance for the understanding of the unique ecosystem and marine environment through the great Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition. The anachronistic facies characterized by vermicular limestone have been documented in many localities in South China and occur at various horizons of the Lower Triassic. Most types of re- ported distinctive sediments over the world have been observed in the Lower Triassic of South China. This provides an excellent opportunity for understanding the Early Triassic environment and its co- evolution with the biotic recovery. Among the anachronistic facies the vermicular limestone is the most characteristic and common distinctive sediments in the Lower Triassic of South China but has received relatively few investigations. Taking it as a case study, we will detail the variation of vermicular limestone and its stratigraphic distribution in the Three Gorges area, Hubei Province. The investigation on the vermicular limestone and other distinctive sediments from the Lower Triassic of South

  19. Anachronistic facies in the Lower Triassic of South China and their implications to the ecosystems during the recovery time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO XiaoMing; TONG JinNan; YAO HuaZhou; ZHANG KeXin; ZQ CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction not only severely distressed the Paleozoic ecosystems but also dramatically changed the sedimentary systems,resulting in a peculiar Early Triassic ecosystem and submarine environment during the recovery time following the mass extinction.The Lower Triassic is characteristic of the wide occurrence of various distinctive sediments and related sedimentary structures,such as flat-pebble conglomerates,vermicular limestone,subtidal wrinkle structures,microbialite,carbonate seafloor fans,thin-bedded limestone and zebra limestone-mudstone.These sediments were common in the Precambrian to Early Ordovician marine settings,and then they occurred only in some extreme and unusual environments with the expansion of metazoan faunas.However,the Early Triassic witnessed an "anachronistic" reappearance of some distinctive sedimentary records in normal shallow marine settings.The study of these anachronistic facies should be of great importance for the understanding of the unique ecosystem and marine environment through the great Paleozoic-Mesozoic transition.The anachronistic facies characterized by vermicular limestone have been documented in many localities in South China and occur at various horizons of the Lower Triassic.Most types of reported distinctive sediments over the world have been observed in the Lower Triassic of South China.This provides an excellent opportunity for understanding the Early Triassic environment and its coevolution with the biotic recovery.Among the anachronistic facies the vermicular limestone is the most characteristic and common distinctive sediments in the Lower Triassic of South China but has Received relatively few investigations.Taking it as a case study,we will detail the variation of vermicular limestone and its stratigraphic distribution in the Three Gorges area,Hubei Province.The investigation on the vermicular limestone and other distinctive sediments from the Lower Triassic of South China further indicates

  20. Distribution Pattern of Heavy Metals in the Surface Sediments of the Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Grain size analysis and chemical analysis of heavy metals are made for 312 surface samples of the Jiaozhou Bay. Nineteen samples of the waste water taken from the sewage discharge outlets along the eastern coast of the bay are also analyzed for heavy metals. Results show that heavy metals are richer in the east and poorer in the west of the bay. Sedimentary dynamic studies reveal that the distribution of heavy metals in the surface sediments of the Jiaozhou Bay is under the control of hydrodynamics.

  1. Improving Distributed Runoff Prediction in Urbanized Catchments with Remote Sensing based Estimates of Impervious Surface Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chormanski, Jaroslaw; Van de Voorde, Tim; De Roeck, Tim; Batelaan, Okke; Canters, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The amount and intensity of runoff on catchment scale are strongly determined by the presence of impervious land-cover types, which are the predominant cover types in urbanized areas. This paper examines the impact of different methods for estimating impervious surface cover on the prediction of peak discharges, as determined by a fully distributed rainfall-runoff model (WetSpa), for the upper part of the Woluwe River catchment in the southeastern part of Brussels. The study shows that detailed information on the spatial distribution of impervious surfaces, as obtained from remotely sensed data, produces substantially different estimates of peak discharges than traditional approaches based on expert judgment of average imperviousness for different types of urban land use. The study also demonstrates that sub-pixel estimation of imperviousness may be a useful alternative for more expensive high-resolution mapping for rainfall-runoff modelling at catchment scale.

  2. The Thickness Distribution of Oxidation Film on Tapered Pipe Surface in Dieless Drawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Qin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thickness distribution of oxidation film on the surface of AISI304 stainless steel tapered pipe, its influence factors, and the effect of metal matrix deformation on oxidation behavior during dieless drawing were studied in this paper. The results showed that oxidation rate was affected strongly by induction heating temperature and deformation degree. The thickness distribution of oxidation film was uneven and increased from the larger diameter end to the smaller diameter end along the axial direction of tapered pipe. When induction heating temperature raised or the distance between heat and cold sources was increased, or feed speed was decreased, oxidation rate was accelerated and oxidation film on the tapered pipe surface thickened significantly, due to massive cracks in oxidation film induced by deformation of metal matrix. The density and width of cracks in oxidation film were enlarged, and the thickness of oxidation film increased with the increase in deformation degree.

  3. Grain-size related nitrogen distribution in southern Yellow Sea surface sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Forty-eight surface sediments of the southern Yellow Sea are separated into three grain-size fractions. Four forms of extractable nitrogen (nitrogen in ion-exchangeable form (Nie), nitrogen in weak-acid extractable form (Nwa), nitrogen in strong-alkali extractable form (Nsa) and nitrogen in strong-oxidant form (Nso)) are obtained by the sequential extraction. The results show that the contents and the distributions of the extractable nitrogen in the southern Yellow Sea surface sediments are closely related to sediment grain size. The distributions of Nie, Nso and total nitrogen (TN) present positive correlations with fine particles content, while Nwa and Nsa does not have such correlation. The net contents of all the forms of nitrogen increase with sediment grain size finer.

  4. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and reactive surface area of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P. E.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for CO2 injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. In this study we have created μm resolution 3D images of 3 sandstone and 4 carbonate rocks using x-ray microtomography. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxiliary characterisation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against N2 BET surface area and He porosity measurements of the imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. [1] Maher, Steefel, Depaolo and Vianni (2006) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 70, 337-363 [2] Landrot, Ajo-Franklin, Yang, Cabrini and Steefel (2012) Chemical Geology 318-319, 113-125 [3] Li, Peters and Celia (2007) American Journal of Science 307, 1146

  5. Spatial distribution of the intensity noise of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramati, A; Hermier, J P; Khoury, A Z; Giacobino, E; Schnitzer, P; Michalzik, R; Ebeling, K J; Poizat, J P; Grangier, P

    1999-07-01

    We studied anticorrelated quantum fluctuations between the TEM(00) and the TEM(01) transverse modes of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser by measuring the transverse spatial distribution of the laser beam intensity noise. Our experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of a phenomenological model that accounts for quantum correlations between transverse modes in a light beam.

  6. Normal loads program for aerodynamic lifting surface theory. [evaluation of spanwise and chordwise loading distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medan, R. T.; Ray, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    A description of and users manual are presented for a U.S.A. FORTRAN 4 computer program which evaluates spanwise and chordwise loading distributions, lift coefficient, pitching moment coefficient, and other stability derivatives for thin wings in linearized, steady, subsonic flow. The program is based on a kernel function method lifting surface theory and is applicable to a large class of planforms including asymmetrical ones and ones with mixed straight and curved edges.

  7. Roughness distribution of multiple hit and long surface diffusion length noise reduced discrete growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disrattakit, P.; Chanphana, R.; Chatraphorn, P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally, the universality class of a discrete growth model is identified via the scaling of interface width. This method requires large-scale simulations to minimize finite-size effects on the results. The multiple hit noise reduction techniques (m > 1 NRT) and the long surface diffusion length noise reduction techniques (ℓ > 1 NRT) have been used to promote the asymptotic behaviors of the growth models. Lately, an alternative method involving comparison of roughness distribution in the steady state has been proposed. In this work, the roughness distribution of the (2 +1)-dimensional Das Sarma-Tamborenea (DT), Wolf-Villain (WV), and Larger Curvature (LC) models, with and without NRTs, are calculated in order to investigate effects of the NRTs on the roughness distribution. Additionally, effective growth exponents of the noise reduced (2 +1)-dimensional DT, WV and LC models are also calculated. Our results indicate that the NRTs affect the interface width both in the growth and the saturation regimes. In the steady state, the NRTs do not seem to have any impact on the roughness distribution of the DT model, but it significantly changes the roughness distribution of the WV and LC models to the normal distribution curves.

  8. Surface speciation of yttrium and neodymium sorbed on rutile: Interpretations using the charge distribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Moira K.; Hiemstra, Tjisse; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J.; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2012-10-01

    The adsorption of Y3+ and Nd3+ onto rutile has been evaluated over a wide range of pH (3-11) and surface loading conditions, as well as at two ionic strengths (0.03 and 0.3 m), and temperatures (25 and 50 °C). The experimental results reveal the same adsorption behavior for the two trivalent ions onto the rutile surface, with Nd3+ first adsorbing at slightly lower pH values. The adsorption of both Y3+ and Nd3+ commences at pH values below the pHznpc of rutile. The experimental results were evaluated using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model, and Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). The coordination geometry of possible surface complexes were constrained by molecular-level information obtained from X-ray standing wave measurements and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies. X-ray standing wave measurements showed an inner-sphere tetradentate complex for Y3+ adsorption onto the (1 1 0) rutile surface (Zhang et al., 2004b). The MD simulation studies suggest additional bidentate complexes may form. The CD values for all surface species were calculated based on a bond valence interpretation of the surface complexes identified by X-ray and MD. The calculated CD values were corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water. At low pH, the tetradentate complex provided excellent fits to the Y3+ and Nd3+ experimental data. The experimental and surface complexation modeling results show a strong pH dependence, and suggest that the tetradentate surface species hydrolyze with increasing pH. Furthermore, with increased surface loading of Y3+ on rutile the tetradentate binding mode was augmented by a hydrolyzed-bidentate Y3+ surface complex. Collectively, the experimental and surface complexation modeling results demonstrate that solution chemistry and surface loading impacts Y3+ surface speciation. The approach taken of incorporating molecular-scale information into surface complexation models

  9. Facies patterns and depositional environments of Palaeozoic cephalopod limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, J.; Aigner, T.

    1985-07-01

    In the eastern Anti-Atlas (Morocco) a platform and basin topography was established during the late Devonian, probably as a result of early Variscan tensional tectonics. Cephalopod limestones were deposited on shallow pelagic platforms, platform slopes and shallow, slowly subsiding basins. On the platform a transition from land areas into nearshore quartzose brachiopod coquinas, crinoidal limestones, condensed cephalopod limestones and finally into nodular limestones is observed. The latter often become disintegrated into incipient debris flows which pass into nodular limestone/marl alternations of a shallow basin. Deeper basins with shale sedimentation lack cephalopod limestones. Similar facies types also occur in the late Devonian of the Montagne Noire (France), Rheinisches Schiefergebirge (West Germany), Moravian Karst (Czechoslovakia), Holy Cross Mountains (Poland) and in the early Carboniferous of the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain). Due to strong late Variscan compressional tectonics and limited outcrops, detailed facies patterns could not be mapped in these regions, but the same facies types as in the eastern Anti-Atlas suggest similar coast/platform, slope and shallow basin topographies. During cephalopod limestone deposition water depth on the platforms was in the order of several tens to about one hundred metres, as is inferred from repeated subaerial exposures and distinctive depositional and faunal/floral features. Water depth in the adjacent shallow basins might have reached several hundreds of metres. Cephalopod limestones represent a typical stage in the evolution of geosynclines, characterized by extremely low sedimentation rates (1-5 m m.y. -1). This stage is preceded by deposition of thick neritic clastics and/or carbonates and is succeeded by deposition of deep-water clastics or flysch.

  10. Numerical investigation of the spatiotemporal distribution of chemical species in an atmospheric surface barrier-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. I.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Using a one dimensional time dependent convection-reaction-diffusion model, the temporal and spatial distributions of species propagating downstream of an atmospheric pressure air surface barrier discharge was studied. It was found that the distribution of negatively charged species is more spatially spread compared to positive ions species, which is attributed to the diffusion of electrons that cool down and attach to background gas molecules, creating different negative ions downstream of the discharge region. Given the widespread use of such discharges in applications involving the remote microbial decontamination of surfaces and liquids, the transport of plasma generated reactive species away from the discharge region was studied by implementing mechanical convection through the discharge region. It was shown that increased convection causes the spatial distribution of species density to become uniform. It was also found that many species have a lower density close to the surface of the discharge as convection prevents their accumulation. While for some species, such as NO2, convection causes a general increase in the density due to a reduced residence time close to the discharge region, where it is rapidly lost through reactions with OH. The impact of the applied power was also investigated, and it was found that the densities of most species, whether charged or neutral, are directly proportional to the applied power.

  11. Calculation of the integral magnetic field of a star accounting for the surface distribution of elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, E.; Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    The observable magnetic field of a star is the result of integration over its visible hemisphere, related to the information transferring medium: the spectral line profile. The hitherto practised simple integration of the magnetic field strength neglects the spotty face of the star and is physically wrong. Because of the topographically distributed line-generating elements in the stellar atmosphere, the contribution of all parts of the surface to the integration is different. For an effective computation, both the magnetic field and the element distribution are transformed from globes to Mercator maps and arranged as right-angled matrices. The numerical evaluation is performed by a special computer program, which uses matrices and vector algebra. The theory is based on the mathematical derivation of convolution integrals for the rotation of the star and the line profiles formed in its atmosphere, whereby the radiation from all surface areas in direction to the observer is integrated, accounting for the geometrical and radiation transfer conditions of the disk-like visible hemisphere and the element distribution of chemically peculiar (CP) stars. The computation starts from a given magnetic field structure on the surface of a star and progresses straightforward over convolution integrals to the phase curves of the integral magnetic field strength. The calculation procedure is independent of a special generation model of the stellar magnetic field and possesses common validity. In consideration of other approaches to the problem of field structure analysis, also the inversion of the convolution is discussed.

  12. CLINICAL SURFACES - Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardram, Jakob E.; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh; Sørensen, Steffen

    A multi-display environment (MDE) is made up of co-located and networked personal and public devices that form an integrated workspace enabling co-located group work. Traditionally, MDEs have, however, mainly been designed to support a single “smart room”, and have had little sense of the tasks and activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval and browsing of patient data on public displays. We present the design and implementation of CLINICAL SURFACES, and report from an evaluation of the system at a large hospital. The evaluation shows that using distributed public displays to support activity-based computing inside a hospital is very useful for clinical work, and that the apparent contradiction between maintaining privacy of medical data in a public display environment can be mitigated by the use of CLINICAL SURFACES.

  13. Changes in snow distribution and surface topography following a snowstorm on Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Leonard, Katherine; Maksym, Ted; Lehning, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Snow distribution over sea ice is an important control on sea ice physical and biological processes. We combine measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer and blowing snow on an Antarctic sea ice floe with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a typical storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1-10 cm over an area of 100 m × 100 m. The pre-storm surface exhibits multidirectional elongated snow dunes formed behind aerodynamic obstacles. Newly deposited dunes are elongated parallel to the predominant wind direction during the storm. Snow erosion and deposition occur over 62% and 38% of the area, respectively. Snow deposition volume is more than twice that of erosion (351 m3 versus 158 m3), resulting in a modest increase of 2 ± 1 cm in mean snow depth, indicating a small net mass gain despite large mass relocation. Despite significant local snow depth changes due to deposition and erosion, the statistical distributions of elevation and the two-dimensional correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. Pre-storm and post-storm surfaces also exhibit spectral power law relationships with little change in spectral exponents. These observations suggest that for sea ice floes with mature snow cover features under conditions similar to those observed in this study, spatial statistics and scaling properties of snow surface morphology may be relatively invariant. Such an observation, if confirmed for other ice types and conditions, may be a useful tool for model parameterizations of the subgrid variability of sea ice surfaces.

  14. Three-dimensional analysis of elastic stress distribution of indented ceramic surface by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsuyuki NEZU

    2006-01-01

    The three-dimensional stress distributions in the area surrounding indentation pattern for three different materials,Al2O3,Si3N4 and SiC were analyzed by finite element method(FEM). Those theoretical results were also compared with the experimental ones by Rockwell hardness test. The effect of loading stress on the plastic deformation in specimens,surface was investigated on the assumption of shear strain energy theory by Huber-Mises when the materials were indented. The distributions of nomal stress,shear stress,and Mises stress were analysed with variations of loading conditions. It is clear that the analytical results for the stress distributions,the crack length and its density of probability are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Elastic-plastic Contact between Rough Surfaces with Gauss and Exponential Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Rodríguez F.J.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to model the elastic-plastic contact between rough surfaces, the exponential probabilistic distribution function of asperity heights, proposed by Greenwood and Williamson (1966, is analyzed as an approach of the Gaussian distribution function, and it is found to be impractical in most studied cases. The exponential probabilistic distribution modified function proposed by Polycarpou and Etsión (1999 is applied to the recent model of elastic-plastic contact of Kogut and Etsión (2004, to facilitate the calculations in obtaining the contact parameters (real area, normal load and mean pressure using Simpson square method subroutines showing results with a minimum error in the order of 2.2%. The results show that it is possible to simplify the modeling and simulation of more complex contact cases and the determination of other parameters of contact.

  16. Coal facies studies in Brazil. A short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa da Silva, Zuleika Carretta [Rua Eca de Queiroz, 682/402, 90670-020, Porto Alegre RS (Brazil)

    2004-04-23

    Coal facies studies in Brazil have been done for south Brazilian coal measures over the last 20 years using different methods for reconstructing paleoenvironments of peat formation and deposition. The first studies were based on Teichmuller's concept of macerals; from 1984 to 1993, microlithotypes and palynomorphs were used according to the methodology described by Hacquebard and Donaldson. In the 1990s, a new method of interpreting paleoenvironments implementing organic geochemistry, sequence stratigraphy and the use of biomarkers has become more common in the literature, as well as the use of Diessel's Gelification Index (GI) and Tissue Preservation Index (TPI)

  17. On the Distribution of X-ray Surface Brightness from Diffuse Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Voit, G M; Bryan, Greg L.

    2001-01-01

    Hot intergalactic gas in clusters, groups, and filaments emanates a continuous background of 0.5-2.0 keV X-rays that ought to be detectable with the new generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present selected results from a program to simulate the surface-brightness distribution of this background with an adaptive-mesh cosmological hydrodynamics code. We show that the bright end of this distribution is well approximated by combining the cluster temperature function with a beta-model for surface brightness and appropriate luminosity-temperature and core radius-luminosity relations. Our simulations verify that the X-ray background from hot gas vastly exceeds observational limits if non-gravitational processes do not modify the intergalactic entropy distribution. An entropy floor of ~100 keV cm^2, which could be established by either heating or cooling, appears necessary to reconcile the simulated background with observations. Because the X-ray background distribution is so sensitive to the effects of non-gr...

  18. [Residue characteristics and distributions of perfluorinated compounds in surface seawater along Shenzhen coastline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Wu; Zhang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shen, Jin-Can; Yang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    In order to explore the residue characteristics and distributions of 15 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in 18 surface seawater samples along Shenzhen coastline, high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) combined with solid phase extraction enrichment was applied in this research. The results indicated that residue level of PFCs in coastal surface seawater samples was significantly affected by human activities. Sigma PFCs residue levels in surface seawater from Shenzhen west coast, which locates below the estuary of Pearl River and Donghao River, are much higher than those from the east coast, which has low development and sparse population (P<0.05). Under natural conditions, sigma PFCs residue levels in coastal surface seawater samples from Shenzhen Bays are higher than those out of bays. The major residue species in surface seawater samples along Shenzhen coast were medium- and short-chain PFCs, including perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexanoic acid and perfluoropentanoic acid. Their similar environmental behavior (P<0.05, P<0.01) is likely associated with the production process of PFCs-related products. Furthermore, cluster analysis results show that PFOS (R2 = 0.4092) level can be used as a representative parameter for evaluating PFCs contamination status in surface seawater along Shenzhen coast.

  19. Spatial distribution of spin polarization in a channel on the surface of a topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Shao, Huaihua; Liu, Yiman; Tang, Dongsheng; Zhou, Guanghui

    2012-05-09

    We study the spatial distribution of electron spin polarization for a gate-controlled T-shaped channel on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (3D TI). We demonstrate that an energy gap depending on channel geometry parameters is definitely opened due to the spatial confinement. Spin surface locking in momentum space for a uniform wide channel with Hamiltonian linearity in the wavevector is still kept, but it is broken with Hamiltonian nonlinearity in the wavevector, like that for two-dimensional surface states widely studied in the literature. However, the spin surface locking for a T-shaped channel is broken even with Hamiltonian linearity in the wavevector. Interestingly, the magnitude and direction of the in-plane spin polarization are spatially dependent in all regions due to the breaking of translational symmetry of the T-shaped channel system. These interesting findings for an electrically controlled nanostructure based on the 3D TI surface may be testable with the present experimental technique, and may provide further understanding the nature of 3D TI surface states.

  20. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.

    1994-12-31

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages.

  1. Spatial distribution of potential near surface moisture flux at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E. [Geologic Survey, Mercury, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    An estimate of the areal distribution of present-day surface liquid moisture flux at Yucca Mountain was made using field measured water contents and laboratory measured rock properties. Using available data for physical and hydrologic properties (porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, moisture retention functions) of the volcanic rocks, surface lithologic units that are hydrologically similar were delineated. Moisture retention and relative permeability functions were assigned to each surface unit based on the similarity of the mean porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the surface unit to laboratory samples of the same lithology. The potential flux into the mountain was estimated for each surface hydrologic unit using the mean saturated hydraulic conductivity for each unit and assuming all matrix flow. Using measured moisture profiles for each of the surface units, estimates were made of the depth at which seasonal fluctuations diminish and steady state downward flux conditions are likely to exist. The hydrologic properties at that depth were used with the current relative saturation of the tuff, to estimate flux as the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This method assumes a unit gradient. The range in estimated flux was 0.02 mm/yr for the welded Tiva Canyon to 13.4 mm/yr for the nonwelded Paintbrush Tuff. The areally averaged flux was 1.4 mm/yr. The major zones of high flux occur to the north of the potential repository boundary where the nonwelded tuffs are exposed in the major drainages.

  2. Influence of snow depth distribution on surface roughness in alpine terrain: a multi-scale approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Veitinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In alpine terrain, the snow covered winter surface deviates from its underlying summer terrain due to the progressive smoothing caused by snow accumulation. Terrain smoothing is believed to be an important factor in avalanche formation, avalanche dynamics and affects surface heat transfer, energy balance as well as snow depth distribution. To characterize the effect of snow on terrain we use the concept of roughness. Roughness is calculated for several snow surfaces and its corresponding underlying terrain for three alpine basins in the Swiss Alps characterized by low medium and high terrain roughness. To this end, elevation models of winter and summer terrain are derived from high-resolution (1 m measurements performed by airborne and terrestrial LIDAR. We showed that on basin scale terrain smoothing not only depends on mean snow depth in the basin but also on its variability. Terrain smoothing can be modelled in function of mean snow depth and its standard deviation using a power law. However, a relationship between terrain smoothing and snow depth does not exist on a pixel scale. Further we demonstrated the high persistence of snow surface roughness even in between winter seasons. Those persistent patterns might be very useful to improve the representation of a winter terrain without modelling of the snow cover distribution. This can potentially improve avalanche release area definition and in the long term natural hazard management strategies.

  3. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 1. distribution of fine and coarse components in surface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V. E.; Eagle, R.J.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations over the floor of Bikini lagoon. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long- lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show what modifications occurred since the sediment composition was first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. In this report a comparison is made of the amount and distribution of fine material associated with the lagoon surface sediment before and after the testing of nuclear devices. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material in-the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. Five cratering events at Bikini Atoll generated sufficient material to account for the inventory of new fine material found over the bottom surface of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to alter the geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  4. Discussion on wind factor influencing the distribution of biological soil crusts on surface of sand dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongSheng Wu; Hasi Erdun; RuiPing Yin; Xin Zhang; Jie Ren; Jian Wang; XiuMin Tian; ZeKun Li; HengLu Miao

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions, whose formation and development have an important impact on the restoration process of the desert ecosystem. In order to explore the relationship between surface airflow and development characteristics of biological soil crusts, we studied surface airflow pattern and development characteristics of biological soil crusts on the fixed dune profile through field observation. Results indicate that the speed of near-surface airflow is the lowest at the foot of windward slope and the highest at the crest, showing an increasing trend from the foot to the crest. At the leeward side, although near-surface airflow increases slightly at the lower part of the slope after an initial sudden decrease at upper part of the slope, its overall trend decreases from the crest. Wind velocity variation coefficient varied at different heights over each observation site. The thickness, shear strength of biological soil crusts and percentage of fine particles at crusts layer decreased from the slope foot to the upper part, showing that biological soil crusts are less developed in high wind speed areas and well developed in low wind speed areas. It can be seen that there is a close relationship between the distribution of biological soil crusts in different parts of the dunes and changes in airflow due to geomorphologic variation.

  5. A Universal Isotherm Model to Capture Adsorption Uptake and Energy Distribution of Porous Heterogeneous Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2017-08-31

    The adsorbate-adsorbent thermodynamics are complex as it is influenced by the pore size distributions, surface heterogeneity and site energy distribution, as well as the adsorbate properties. Together, these parameters defined the adsorbate uptake forming the state diagrams, known as the adsorption isotherms, when the sorption site energy on the pore surfaces are favorable. The available adsorption models for describing the vapor uptake or isotherms, hitherto, are individually defined to correlate to a certain type of isotherm patterns. There is yet a universal approach in developing these isotherm models. In this paper, we demonstrate that the characteristics of all sorption isotherm types can be succinctly unified by a revised Langmuir model when merged with the concepts of Homotattic Patch Approximation (HPA) and the availability of multiple sets of site energy accompanied by their respective fractional probability factors. The total uptake (q/q*) at assorted pressure ratios (P/P s ) are inextricably traced to the manner the site energies are spread, either naturally or engineered by scientists, over and across the heterogeneous surfaces. An insight to the porous heterogeneous surface characteristics, in terms of adsorption site availability has been presented, describing the unique behavior of each isotherm type.

  6. Improved Displacement Transfer Functions for Structure Deformed Shape Predictions Using Discretely Distributed Surface Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    In the formulations of earlier Displacement Transfer Functions for structure shape predictions, the surface strain distributions, along a strain-sensing line, were represented with piecewise linear functions. To improve the shape-prediction accuracies, Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were formulated using piecewise nonlinear strain representations. Through discretization of an embedded beam (depth-wise cross section of a structure along a strain-sensing line) into multiple small domains, piecewise nonlinear functions were used to describe the surface strain distributions along the discretized embedded beam. Such piecewise approach enabled the piecewise integrations of the embedded beam curvature equations to yield slope and deflection equations in recursive forms. The resulting Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, written in summation forms, were expressed in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains along the strain-sensing line. By feeding the surface strains into the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions, structural deflections could be calculated at multiple points for mapping out the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The shape-prediction accuracies of the Improved Displacement Transfer Functions were then examined in view of finite-element-calculated deflections using different tapered cantilever tubular beams. It was found that by using the piecewise nonlinear strain representations, the shape-prediction accuracies could be greatly improved, especially for highly-tapered cantilever tubular beams.

  7. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  8. Distribution of 137Cs In the Surface Soil of Serpong Nuclear Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of 137Cs in the surface soil layer of Serpong Nuclear Site (SNS was investigated by field sampling. The Objectives of the investigation is finding the profile of 137Cs distribution in the surface soil and the Tf value that can be used for estimation of radiation dose from livestock product-man pathways. The results indicates that the 137Cs activity in surface soil of SNS is 0.80 ± 0,29 Bq/kg, much lower than in the Antarctic. The contribution value of 137Cs from the operation of G.A.Siwabessy Reactor until now is undetectable. The Tf of 137Cs from surface soil to Panisetum Purpureum, Setaria Spha Celata and Imperata Cylindrica grasses were 0.71 ± 0.14, 0.84 ± 0.27 and 0.81 ± 0.11 respectively. The results show that value of the transfer factor of 137Cs varies between cultivated and uncultivated soil and also with the soils with thick humus

  9. Stochastic Joint Simulation of Facies and Diagenesis: A Case Study on Early Diagenesis of the Madison Formation (Wyoming, USA Simulation stochastique couplée faciès et diagenèse. L’exemple de la diagenèse précoce dans la Formation Madison (Wyoming, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbier M.

    2011-10-01

    are based on the plurigaussian and nested algorithms. Finally, a discussion on the distribution of the potential reservoir heterogeneities is proposed, taking into account the sedimentary characteristics (facies, architectures, etc. and the diagenetic impact. Nous proposons dans cet article une approche intégrée visant à reproduire à la fois les faciès sédimentaires et les phases diagénétiques associées, au sein d’un modèle statique de réservoir. Dans le Wyoming (USA, la Formation Madison (d’âge Mississippien est une formation carbonatée, épaisse de 200 à 350 m, affleurant dans plusieurs zones du bassin d’avant-pays des Bighorn. Au sein de cette série, nous avons identifié neuf faciès sédimentaires, groupés en trois séquences de faciès (basées sur l’empilement vertical des faciès : 1 une séquence inter- à supratidale; 2 une séquence subtidale peu profonde à intertidale; 3 une séquence subtidale profonde et ouverte. Ces faciès ont ensuite été intégrés au sein d’un modèle de dépôts synthétique, correspondant à une rampe carbonatée évoluant graduellement vers une géométrie de plate-forme dont seule la partie la plus interne est reconnue. Ce travail a permis de proposer un cadre chronostratigraphique pour la série, qui couvre au moins six séquences de dépôts de troisième ordre (certaines d’entre elles étant localement absentes car érodées. L’étude de la diagenèse s’est concentrée sur l’identification et la succession des phases diagénétiques précoces (micritisation, cimentation calcitique, dolomitisation, etc.. Pour les besoins de la modélisation, sept « empreintes diagénétiques » ont été définies, chacune d’entre elles correspondant à une succession de phases diagénétiques coexistant au sein d’un même faciès sédimentaire. De plus, nous avons quantifié la proportion relative de chaque empreinte diagénétique affectant un faciès sédimentaire. Un modèle maillé 3D a alors

  10. An Investigation into Surface Temperature Distributions of High-B Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Bearing in mind the application to high-magnetic-field (high-B) radio pulsars, we investigate two-dimensional (2D) thermal evolutions of neutron stars (NSs). We pay particular attention to the influence of different equilibrium configurations on the surface temperature distributions. The equilibrium configurations are constructed in a systematic manner, in which both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are determined self-consistently with the inclusion of general relativistic effects. To solve the 2D heat transfer inside the NS interior out to the crust, we have developed an implicit code based on a finite-difference scheme that deals with anisotropic thermal conductivity and relevant cooling processes in the context of a standard cooling scenario. In agreement with previous studies, the surface temperatures near the pole become higher than those in the vicinity of the equator as a result of anisotropic heat transfer. Our results show that the ratio of the highest to the lowest surface temperatures changes...

  11. Deuterium distributions on delayed hydride crack fracture surfaces of Zr-2.5Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, T. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Palmer, G.R. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada); Shek, G.K. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) fracture surfaces on unirradiated Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material have been characterized by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Although the fracture surface is rough and oxidized, NRA was able to detect the deuteride on the surface and to determine an average deuteride thickness. This thickness, which represents half of the fractured hydride thickness, was 1 {mu}m in the case of a specimen containing an average D concentration of 68 wppm and fractured at 517-525 K. On a specimen selected for its large ligament zones, D distributions on a tunnelled DHC crack was compared to those on the adjacent ligament zones. The hydriding of these ligament zones - in spite of their different appearance - is consistent with fracture by a DHC mechanism. ((orig.))

  12. Distribution and Pollution Characteristics Analysis of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediment in Bi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qianrui; Danek, Tomas; Cheng, Xianfeng; Dong, Tao; Qi, Wufu; Zou, Liling; Zhao, Xueqiong; Zhao, Xinliang; Xiang, Yungang

    2016-10-01

    The author analyzes distribution characteristics of heavy metals’ content in surface sediments of Bi River (Cu, Zn, As and Cd) and evaluates the potential ecological harm of heavy metal pollution in surface sediment by index method of potential ecological harm. Results show that heavy metals, such as Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Cd in surface sediments of Bi River are badly out of limitation. Especially, the heavy metals’ content in Jinding mining area is far higher than the national first class standard. The content of heavy metal is still high in the intersection of Bi River and Lancang River, which have certain influence on the Lancang River sediment and its water system. And, Pb and Cd, as the main pollutants, should be regarded as a key research subject.

  13. A Screen Space GPGPU Surface LIC Algorithm for Distributed Memory Data Parallel Sort Last Rendering Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, Burlen; Karimabadi, Homa; Rortershteyn, Vadim

    2014-07-01

    The surface line integral convolution(LIC) visualization technique produces dense visualization of vector fields on arbitrary surfaces. We present a screen space surface LIC algorithm for use in distributed memory data parallel sort last rendering infrastructures. The motivations for our work are to support analysis of datasets that are too large to fit in the main memory of a single computer and compatibility with prevalent parallel scientific visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. By working in screen space using OpenGL we can leverage the computational power of GPUs when they are available and run without them when they are not. We address efficiency and performance issues that arise from the transformation of data from physical to screen space by selecting an alternate screen space domain decomposition. We analyze the algorithm's scaling behavior with and without GPUs on two high performance computing systems using data from turbulent plasma simulations.

  14. Marine habitat mapping of the Milford Haven Waterway, Wales, UK: Comparison of facies mapping and EUNIS classification for monitoring sediment habitats in an industrialized estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Drew A.; Hayn, Melanie; Germano, Joseph D.; Little, David I.; Bullimore, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    A detailed map and dataset of sedimentary habitats of the Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) was compiled for the Milford Haven Waterway Environmental Surveillance Group (MHWESG) from seafloor images collected in May, 2012 using sediment-profile and plan-view imaging (SPI/PV) survey techniques. This is the most comprehensive synoptic assessment of sediment distribution and benthic habitat composition available for the MHW, with 559 stations covering over 40 km2 of subtidal habitats. In the context of the MHW, an interpretative framework was developed that classified each station within a 'facies' that included information on the location within the waterway and inferred sedimentary and biological processes. The facies approach provides critical information on landscape-scale habitats including relative location and inferred sediment transport processes and can be used to direct future monitoring activities within the MHW and to predict areas of greatest potential risk from contaminant transport. Intertidal sediment 'facies' maps have been compiled in the past for MHW; this approach was expanded to map the subtidal portions of the waterway. Because sediment facies can be projected over larger areas than individual samples (due to assumptions based on physiography, or landforms) they represent an observational model of the distribution of sediments in an estuary. This model can be tested over time and space through comparison with additional past or future sample results. This approach provides a means to evaluate stability or change in the physical and biological conditions of the estuarine system. Initial comparison with past results for intertidal facies mapping and grain size analysis from grab samples showed remarkable stability over time for the MHW. The results of the SPI/PV mapping effort were cross-walked to the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) classification to provide a comparison of locally derived habitat mapping with European-standard habitat

  15. Detailed analytical approach to the Gaussian surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function specular component applied to the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; Potvin, Guy

    2005-11-01

    A statistical sea surface specular BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) model is developed that includes mutual shadowing by waves, wave facet hiding, and projection weighting. The integral form of the model is reduced to an analytical form by making minor and justifiable approximations. The new form of the BRDF thus allows one to compute sea reflected radiance more than 100 times faster than the traditional numerical solutions. The repercussions of the approximations used in the model are discussed. Using the analytical form of the BRDF, an analytical approximation is also obtained for the reflected sun radiance that is always good to within 1% of the numerical solution for sun elevations of more than 10 degrees above the horizon. The model is validated against measured sea radiances found in the literature and is shown to be in very good agreement.

  16. Sensitivity of biogenic volatile organic compounds to land surface parameterizations and vegetation distributions in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chun; Huang, Maoyi; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.; Qian, Yun; Guenther , A.; Gu, Dasa; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Liu, Ying; Walters, Stacy; Pfister, G.; Jin, Jiming; Shilling, John E.; Warneke, Carsten

    2016-05-27

    Current climate models still have large uncertainties 24 in estimating biogenic trace gases, which can significantly affect atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation that ultimately influences air quality and aerosol radiative forcing. These uncertainties result from many factors, including uncertainties in land-surface processes and specification of vegetation types, both of which can affect the simulated near-surface fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). In this study, the latest version of Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature MEGAN (MEGAN v2.1) is coupled within the land surface parameterization CLM4 in the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). In this implement, MEGAN v2.1 shares a consistent vegetation map with CLM4 for estimating BVOC emissions. This is unlike MEGAN v2.0 in the public version of WRF-Chem that uses a standalone vegetation map that differs from what is used by land surface parameterizations. This improved modeling framework is used to investigate the impact of two land surface parameterizations, CLM4 and Noah, on BVOCs and examine the sensitivity of BVOCs to vegetation distributions in California. The measurements collected during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the California Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Experiment (CalNex) conducted during June of 2010 provide an opportunity to evaluate the simulated BVOCs. Sensitivity experiments show that land surface parameterizations do influence the simulated BVOCs, but that impact is much smaller than that of vegetation distributions. This study indicates that more effort is needed to obtain the most appropriate and accurate land cover datasets for climate and air quality models in terms of simulating BVOCs, oxidant chemistry, and consequently secondary organic aerosol formation.

  17. Distribution of near-surface permafrost in Alaska: estimates of present and future conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Nield, Shawn J.; Johnson, Kristofer D.; Finley, Andrew O.

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude regions are experiencing rapid and extensive changes in ecosystem composition and function as the result of increases in average air temperature. Increasing air temperatures have led to widespread thawing and degradation of permafrost, which in turn has affected ecosystems, socioeconomics, and the carbon cycle of high latitudes. Here we overcome complex interactions among surface and subsurface conditions to map nearsurface permafrost through decision and regression tree approaches that statistically and spatially extend field observations using remotely sensed imagery, climatic data, and thematic maps of a wide range of surface and subsurface biophysical characteristics. The data fusion approach generated medium-resolution (30-m pixels) maps of near-surface (within 1 m) permafrost, active-layer thickness, and associated uncertainty estimates throughout mainland Alaska. Our calibrated models (overall test accuracy of ~85%) were used to quantify changes in permafrost distribution under varying future climate scenarios assuming no other changes in biophysical factors. Models indicate that near-surface permafrost underlies 38% of mainland Alaska and that near-surface permafrost will disappear on 16 to 24% of the landscape by the end of the 21st Century. Simulations suggest that near-surface permafrost degradation is more probable in central regions of Alaska than more northerly regions. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for potential remobilization of frozen soil carbon pools under warmer temperatures. Additionally, warmer and drier conditions may increase fire activity and severity, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and carbon remobilization relative to climate alone. The mapping of permafrost distribution across Alaska is important for land-use planning, environmental assessments, and a wide-array of geophysical studies.

  18. Statistical distributions describing microbial quality of surfaces and foods in food service operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montville, Rebecca; Schaffner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    Data on the microbial quality of food service kitchen surfaces and ready-to-eat foods were collected over a period of 10 years in Rutgers University dining halls. Surface bacterial counts, total aerobic plate counts, and total and fecal coliform counts were determined using standard methods. Analysis was performed on foods tested more than 50 times (primarily lunch meats and deli salads) and on surfaces tested more than 500 times (36 different surfaces types, including pastry brushes, cutting boards, and countertops). Histograms and statistical distributions were determined using Microsoft Excel and Palisades Bestfit, respectively. All data could be described by lognormal distributions, once data above and below the lower and upper limits of detection were considered separately. Histograms for surfaces counts contained one peak near 1 CFU/4 cm2. Surfaces with higher levels of contamination tended to be nonmetal, with the exception of buffalo chopper bowls, which commonly had high counts. Mean counts for foods ranged from 2 to 4 log CFU/g, with shrimp salad, roast beef, and bologna having higher means. Coleslaw, macaroni salad, and potato salad (all commercially processed products, not prepared in the dining halls) had lowest overall means. Coliforms were most commonly found in sealeg salad (present in 61% of samples) and least commonly found in coleslaw (present in only 7% of samples). Coliform counts (when present) were highest on average in shrimp salad and lowest in coleslaw. Average coliform counts for most products were typically between 1 and 2 log most probable number per gram. Fecal coliforms were not typically found in any deli salads or lunch meats.

  19. Preliminary Facies Reconstruction of a Late Pleistocene Cypress Forest Discovered on the Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, S. M.; Bentley, S. J.; DeLong, K. L.; Xu, K.; Caporaso, A.; Obelcz, J. B.; Harley, G. L.; Reese, C. A.; Truong, J. T.

    2016-12-01

    We are investigating the origin and preservation of an ancient bald cypress forest (Taxodium distichum) discovered on the continental shelf seafloor, offshore of Gulf Shores, Alabama, USA, in 20 m water depth. The forest was likely buried in the late Pleistocene, possibly exhumed by Hurricane Ivan in 2004, and is now exposed as stumps in life position with little evidence of decay before recent marine exposure. Radiocarbon analyses show that the forest age is near (and in some cases beyond) the limits of 14C dating, at least 41-45 ky BP. In August 2015 and July 2016, submersible vibracores (up to 5 m in length) were collected. Ongoing core analyses include: organic content (loss on ignition), granulometry, and core logging using a Geotek Multi Sensor Core Logger to generate imagery, bulk density, and x-ray fluorescence data. To bolster 14C analyses, cores collected in 2016 are presently being dated using optically stimulated luminescence. Local stratigraphy consists of a surface facies of Holocene transgressive sands, underlain by possible estuarine sediments of interbedded sand and mud (potentially Holocene or Pleistocene), overlying a swamp or delta plain facies (likely Pleistocene) containing woody debris and mud. Deeper woody facies are thought to include the soil horizons of the ancient cypress forest. Cores collected in 2016 revealed a Pleistocene paleosol beneath Holocene sands in a nearby trough. Elevation differences between swamp and paleosol horizons will be evaluated from bathymetric and subbottom data, to help characterize the preserved ancient landscape. Initial interpretation based on close proximity of Pleistocene swamp and oxidized paleosol sediments, and regional geomorphic gradients suggest that this relatively diverse assemblage of facies developed up to tens of km from the glacial-age coastline, and relatively rapid burial prevented erosion by coastal processes during the Holocene transgression thus preserving the tree stumps and wood debris.

  20. Salt facies and budgets as environmental indicators in the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiro, Yael; Goldstein, Steven L.; Stein, Mordechai; Garcia-Veigas, Javier; Levy, Elan J.; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-04-01

    Deep drilling in the Dead Sea reveals thick sections of halite that precipitated during the last three interglacials, when lake levels were low. Pore water and halite fluid inclusions show an increase in Mg concentration and a decrease in Na/Cl ratio during precipitation of halite, both during the last interglacial and the beginning of the Holocene. A mass balance based on the thickness of the halite layers and the changes in the chemical composition of the brine has been developed in order to calculate the change in the lake levels. Results indicate a drastic decrease in fresh water input, with the average discharge at 30% and 50% of the modern over thousands of years during the last interglacial and early Holocene, respectively. However, packages of detritus alternating with the halite indicate wetter episodes over intervals of centuries to a few millennia with conditions similar to the present-day, as well as more severe conditions with ~10% of the modern discharge over periods of decades to a few centuries. The different facies of halite in the core are well preserved. The lake level calculation based on the salt budget shows that although the lake level decreased drastically, the lake was always >100 m depth, and the absence of significant halite dissolution supports this conclusion. Thus, the halite reflects deep-water facies. There are two main halite crystal types. Small cumulate crystals that are formed on the lake surface, which alternate with bottom-growth crystals with relatively scarce fluid inclusion bands. The frequency of the crystal alternation varies between seasonal and multi-year changes and reflects the hydrological and limnological regime. The small cumulate crystals require that the lake surface was supersaturated with respect to halite, indicating high evaporation and possibly a thermally stratified water column. The bottom-growth crystals are formed only when it is not disturbed by the "rain" of cumulate crystals, with a lower degree of

  1. Is the turbidite facies association scheme valid for interpreting ancient submarine fan environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, G.; Damuth, J. E.; Moiola, R. J.

    1985-04-01

    Although turbidite facies reflect only processes of deposition, turbidite facies associations are routinely used to identify ancient submarine-fan subenvironments (e.g., upper fan, channel, lobe, etc.). The assumption that process of deposition also reflects environment of deposition may not be valid for the following reasons: (1) Mutti and Ricci Lucchi's facies association scheme for submarine fans has been developed exclusively from ancient turbidite sequences; however, the true relationship between such turbidite facies associations and related fan subenvironments has not been confirmed from modern fans; (2) individual channel-levee systems of many modern submarine fans are in many cases large enough to contain the entire ancient fan systems on which these facies associations are based; (3) large channel-levee systems comparable to those of modern fans have not been recognized in outcrops. Consequently, the validity of turbidite facies associations for interpreting ancient submarine-fan subenvironments must be considered tenuous until confirmed in modern fans.

  2. Retrieval of Temperature and Species Distributions from Multispectral Image Data of Surface Flame Spread in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annen, K. D.; Conant, John A.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2001-01-01

    Weight, size, and power constraints severely limit the ability of researchers to fully characterize temperature and species distributions in microgravity combustion experiments. A powerful diagnostic technique, infrared imaging spectrometry, has the potential to address the need for temperature and species distribution measurements in microgravity experiments. An infrared spectrum imaged along a line-of-sight contains information on the temperature and species distribution in the imaged path. With multiple lines-of-sight and approximate knowledge of the geometry of the combustion flowfield, a three-dimensional distribution of temperature and species can be obtained from one hyperspectral image of a flame. While infrared imaging spectrometers exist for collecting hyperspectral imagery, the remaining challenge is retrieving the temperature and species information from this data. An initial version of an infrared analysis software package, called CAMEO (Combustion Analysis Model et Optimizer), has been developed for retrieving temperature and species distributions from hyperspectral imaging data of combustion flowfields. CAMEO has been applied to the analysis of multispectral imaging data of flame spread over a PMMA surface in microgravity that was acquired in the DARTFire program. In the next section of this paper, a description of CAMEO and its operation is presented, followed by the results of the analysis of microgravity flame spread data.

  3. Length distributions of nanowires: Effects of surface diffusion versus nucleation delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2017-04-01

    It is often thought that the ensembles of semiconductor nanowires are uniform in length due to the initial organization of the growth seeds such as lithographically defined droplets or holes in the substrate. However, several recent works have already demonstrated that most nanowire length distributions are broader than Poissonian. Herein, we consider theoretically the length distributions of non-interacting nanowires that grow by the material collection from the entire length of their sidewalls and with a delay of nucleation of the very first nanowire monolayer. The obtained analytic length distribution is controlled by two parameters that describe the strength of surface diffusion and the nanowire nucleation rate. We show how the distribution changes from the symmetrical Polya shape without the nucleation delay to a much broader and asymmetrical one for longer delays. In the continuum limit (for tall enough nanowires), the length distribution is given by a power law times an incomplete gamma-function. We discuss interesting scaling properties of this solution and give a recipe for analyzing and tailoring the experimental length histograms of nanowires which should work for a wide range of material systems and growth conditions.

  4. Facies del subfondo del canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego Sub-bottom facies of the Beagle Channel, Tierra del Fuego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bujalesky

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available El canal Beagle conecta los océanos Pacífico y Atlántico en el extremo meridional de Sudamérica y se ubica en el ambiente subantártico. Conforma una cuenca de unos 300 m de profundidad máxima y está separada del océano Atlántico por un umbral de 30 m de profundidad. El canal es un valle tectónico que fue completamente cubierto por el hielo glacial durante la última glaciación. Posteriormente, el canal fue ocupado por un lago glacial desde los 12.000 a los 8.000 años A.P., cuando fue invadido por el mar que alcanzó un nivel máximo entre los 6.000 y 5.000 años A.P. Con el objetivo de analizar las facies sedimentarias superficiales y del subfondo del canal se realizó un relevamiento geofísico con sonar de barrido lateral y un perfilador de 3,5 kHz. Sobre un basamento constituido por rocas metamórficas del Mesozoico, se identificaron depósitos de till y secuencias granodecrecientes que representan distintos estadios del retroceso glaciar, evidenciando hacia la sección superior facies lacustres y por encima depósitos de la transgresión marina del Holoceno. Además, se han identificado paleocauces y secuencias fluviales cubiertas por sedimentos marinos transgresivos.The Beagle Channel connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans in the southernmost part of South America, and has a subantarctic environment. It is a deep basin (300 m depth separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a shallow sill (30 m depth. The Beagle Channel is a tectonic valley that was completely covered by ice during the Last Glaciation. Later, it was occupied by a glacial lake from 12,000 to 8,000 years B.P. and then flooded by the sea, reaching a maximum sea level between 6,000 and 5,000 years B.P. A geophysical survey (side scan sonar and 3.5 kHz profiler was carried out in the channel to analyze the sea-bed and sub-bottom sedimentary facies. Metamorphic Mesozoic basement rocks are overlain by glacial deposits (till and fining upwards sequences. These sequences

  5. A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caksen, H; Odabaş, D; Tuncer, O; Kirimi, E; Tombul, T; Ikbal, M; Ataş, B; Ari Yuca, S

    2004-01-01

    A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies: Congenital asymmetric crying facies (ACF) is caused by congenital hypoplasia or agenesis of the depressor anguli oris muscle (DAOM) on one side of the mouth. It is well known that this anomaly is frequently associated with cardiovascular, head and neck, musculoskeletal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and genitourinary anomalies. In this article we report 35 ACF patients (28 children and 7 adults) and found additional abnormalities in 16 of them (i.e. 45%). The abnormalities were cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, mega-cisterna magna, mental motor retardation, convulsions, corpus callosum dysgenesis, cranial bone defect, dermoid cyst, spina bifida occulta, hypertelorism, micrognatia, retrognatia, hemangioma on the lower lip, short frenulum, cleft palate, low-set ears, preauricular tag, mild facial hypoplasia, sternal cleft, congenital heart defect, renal hypoplasia, vesicoureteral reflux, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, congenital joint contractures, congenital hip dislocation, polydactyly, and umbilical and inguinal hernia. Besides these, one infant was born to a diabetic mother, and had atrial septal defect and the four other children had 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance, respectively Although many of these abnormalities were reported in association with ACF, cerebellar atrophy, sternal cleft, cranial bone defect, infant of diabetic mother, 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance were not previously published.

  6. Facies transition and depositional architecture of the Late Eocene tide-dominated delta in northern coast of Birket Qarun, Fayum, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Zaki A.

    2016-07-01

    Late Eocene successions in the Fayum Depression display notable facies transition from open-marine to brackish-marine realms. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic characteristics of the depositional facies are integrated with ichnological data for the recognition of four facies associations (FA1 to FA4). The transition from open-marine sandstones (FA1) to the brackish-marine deposits (FA2) heralds a transgressive - regressive dislocation. The shallowing- and coarsening-upward progradation from the basal prodelta mudstone-dominated facies (FA2a) to deltafront heterolithics (FA2b) and sandstone facies (FA2c) are overlain by finning-upward delta plain deposits which are expressed by the delta plain mudstone (FA2d) and erosive-based distributary channel fills (FA4). Prodelta/deltfront deposits of FA2 are arranged in thinning- and coarsening-upward parasequences which are stacked in a shallowing-upward progressive cycle. Shallow-marine fossiliferous sandstones (FA3) mark the basal part of each parasequence. Stratigraphic and depositional architectures reflect a tide-dominated delta rather than an estuarine and incised valley (IV) model. This can be evinced by the progressive facies architecture, absence of basal regional incision or a subaerial unconformity and the stratigraphic position above a maximum flooding surface (MFS), in addition to the presence of multiple tidally-influenced distributary channels. Stratigraphic and depositional characteristics of the suggested model resemble those of modern tide-dominated deltaic systems. Accordingly, this model contributes to our understanding of the depositional models for analogous brackish-marine environments, particularly tide-dominated deltas in the rock record.

  7. The crater-facies kimberlite system of Tokapal, Bastar District, Chhattisgarh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainkar, Datta; Lehmann, Bernd; Haggerty, Stephen E.

    2004-09-01

    Discovery of diamondiferous kimberlites in the Mainpur Kimberlite Field, Raipur District, Chhattisgarh in central India, encouraged investigation of similar bodies in other parts of the Bastar craton. The earlier known Tokapal ultramafic intrusive body, located beyond the 19-km milestone in Tokapal village along the Jagdalpur-Geedam road, was reinterpreted as crater-facies kimberlite. Its stratigraphic position in the Meso-Neoproterozoic intracratonic sedimentary Indravati basin makes it one of the oldest preserved crater-facies kimberlite systems. Ground and limited subsurface data (dug-, tube-wells and exploratory boreholes) have outlined an extensive surface area (>550 ha) of the kimberlite. The morphological and surface color features of this body on enhanced satellite images suggest that there is a central feeder surrounded by a collar and wide pyroclastic apron. Exploration drilling indicates that the central zone probably corresponds to a vent overlain by resedimented volcaniclastic (epiclastic) rocks that are surrounded by a 2-km-wide spread of pyroclastic rocks (lapilli tuff, tuff/ash beds and volcaniclastic breccia). Drill-holes also reveal that kimberlitic lapilli tuffs and tuffs are sandwiched between the Kanger and Jagdalpur Formations and also form sills within the sedimentary sequence of the Indravati basin. The lapilli tuffs are commonly well stratified and display slumping. Base surges and lava flows occur in the southern part of the Tokapal system. The geochemistry and petrology of the rock correspond to average Group I kimberlite with a moderate degree of contamination. However, the exposed rock is intensely weathered and altered with strong leaching of mobile elements (Ba, Rb, Sr). Layers of vesicular fine-grained glassy material represent kimberlitic lava flows. Tuffs containing juvenile lapilli with pseudomorphed olivine macrocrysts are set in a talc-serpentine-carbonate matrix with locally abundant spinel and sphene. Garnet has not been

  8. Spatial scales of light transmission through Antarctic pack ice: Surface flooding vs. floe-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, S.; Meiners, K.; Krumpen, T.; Ricker, R.; Nicolaus, M.

    2016-12-01

    Snow on sea ice plays a crucial role for interactions between the ocean and atmosphere within the climate system of polar regions. Antarctic sea ice is covered with snow during most of the year. The snow contributes substantially to the sea-ice mass budget as the heavy snow loads can depress the ice below water level causing flooding. Refreezing of the snow and seawater mixture results in snow-ice formation on the ice surface. The snow cover determines also the amount of light being reflected, absorbed, and transmitted into the upper ocean, determining the surface energy budget of ice-covered oceans. The amount of light penetrating through sea ice into the upper ocean is of critical importance for the timing and amount of bottom sea-ice melt, biogeochemical processes and under-ice ecosystems. Here, we present results of several recent observations in the Weddell Sea measuring solar radiation under Antarctic sea ice with instrumented Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV). The combination of under-ice optical measurements with simultaneous characterization of surface properties, such as sea-ice thickness and snow depth, allows the identification of key processes controlling the spatial distribution of the under-ice light. Thus, our results show how the distinction between flooded and non-flooded sea-ice regimes dominates the spatial scales of under-ice light variability for areas smaller than 100-by-100m. In contrast, the variability on larger scales seems to be controlled by the floe-size distribution and the associated lateral incidence of light. These results are related to recent studies on the spatial variability of Arctic under-ice light fields focusing on the distinctly differing dominant surface properties between the northern (e.g. summer melt ponds) and southern (e.g. year-round snow cover, surface flooding) hemisphere sea-ice cover.

  9. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szilagyi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature (<Ts> by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (<Ts>, pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature (<Tws> and ET rate (ETw, obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. <Tws>, in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska, was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000–2007 catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops.

  10. Particulate distribution of plutonium and americium in surface waters from the Spanish Mediterranean coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molero, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Merino, J.; Vidal-Quadras, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Vives Batlle, J.; Mitchell, P.I. [University Coll., Dublin (Ireland)

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of the particulate distribution of plutonium and americium in Spanish Mediterranean coastal waters have been carried out. Plutonium-239,340 and {sup 241}Am concentrations have been measured in suspended particulate matter by filtering (< 0.22 {mu}m) large volume (200-300 litres) sea water samples. Results indicate that particulate plutonium constitutes on average 11 {+-} 4% of the total concentration in sea water. In the case of americium this percentage rises to 45 {+-} 14%. From the {sup 241}Am/{sup 239,240}Pu activity ratios it is clear that suspended particulate matter is enriched in {sup 241}Am relative to {sup 239,240}Pu by a factor 8 {+-} 4. Plutonium and americium in surface Mediterranean coastal waters appear to be fractionated as they present a different transfer rate to the particles. Our measurements allowed us to estimate sediment-water distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), which are a key parameter to interpret differences between the behaviour of plutonium and americium in sea water. Distribution coefficients K{sub d} have been estimated to be (1.4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} litres kg{sup -1} for plutonium and (0.9 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 6} litres kg{sup -1} for americium in surface Mediterranean coastal waters. (author).

  11. Abundance and Distribution Characteristics of Microplastics in Surface Seawaters of the Incheon/Kyeonggi Coastal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Doo-Hyeon; Kim, In-Sung; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Song, Young Kyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics in marine environments are of emerging concern due to their widespread distribution, their ingestion by various marine organisms, and their roles as a source and transfer vector of toxic chemicals. However, our understanding of their abundance and distribution characteristics in surface seawater (SSW) remains limited. We investigated microplastics in the surface microlayer (SML) and the SSW at 12 stations near-shore and offshore of the Korean west coast, Incheon/Kyeonggi region. Variation between stations, sampling media, and sampling methods were compared based on abundances, size distribution, and composition profiles of microsized synthetic polymer particles. The abundance of microplastics was greater in the SML (152,688 ± 92,384 particles/m(3)) than in SSW and showed a significant difference based on the sampling method for SSWs collected using a hand net (1602 ± 1274 particles/m(3)) and a zooplankton trawl net (0.19 ± 0.14 particles/m(3)). Ship paint particles (mostly alkyd resin polymer) accounted for the majority of microplastics detected in both SML and SSWs, and increased levels were observed around the voyage routes of large vessels. This indicates that polymers with marine-based origins become an important contributor to microplastics in coastal SSWs of this coastal region.

  12. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high. At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  13. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GEShulan; SHIXuefa; HANYibing

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high.At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  14. [Distribution of soil organic carbon in surface soil along a precipitation gradient in loess hilly area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Guang-hui; Luan, Li-li; Li, Zhen-wei; Geng, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Along the 368-591 mm precipitation gradient, 7 survey sites, i.e. a total 63 investigated plots were selected. At each sites, woodland, grassland, and cropland with similar restoration age were selected to investigate soil organic carbon distribution in surface soil (0-30 cm), and the influence of factors, e.g. climate, soil depth, and land uses, on soil organic carbon distribution were analyzed. The result showed that, along the precipitation gradient, the grassland (8.70 g . kg-1) > woodland (7.88 g . kg-1) > farmland (7.73 g . kg-1) in concentration and the grassland (20.28 kg . m-2) > farmland (19.34 kg . m-2) > woodland (17.14 kg . m-2) in density. The differences of soil organic carbon concentration of three land uses were not significant. Further analysis of pooled data of three land uses showed that the surface soil organic carbon concentration differed significantly at different precipitation levels (Psoil organic carbon concentration (r=0.838, Psoil organic carbon increased with annual precipitation 0. 04 g . kg-1 . mm-1, density 0.08 kg . m-2 . mm-1. The soil organic carbon distribution was predicted with mean annual precipitation, soil clay content, plant litter in woodland, and root density in farmland.

  15. Sedimentology and clast fabric of subaerial debris flow facies in a glacially-influenced alluvial fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, N.; Kocsis, S.

    1988-09-01

    A large alluvial fan (2 km 2), constructed between 11,000 and 7000 years B.P. at the mouth of Cinquefoil Creek in interior British Columbia, Canada, is identified as "glacially-influenced, debris flow-dominated". The fan was rapidly constructed during and immediately after deglaciation when large volumes of glacial debris were resedimented downslope; fans of this type are widespread in the glaciated portion of the North American Cordillera. Diamict facies, deposited as debris flows, account for 48% of the fan volume, sheetflodd gravels 37%, and other facies 15%. Diamicts show three facies types; crudely-bedded facies containing rafts of soft sediment that are attributed to downslope collapse and mixing of heterogeneous glacial deposits. These occur within the core of the fan. Massive and weakly graded (inverse to normal) diamict facies, derived from the downslope flow of weathered volcanic bedrock, occur within a well-defined bed that can be traced across the entire fan. The occurrence of weakly graded facies as lateral equivalents to massive facies within the same bed, implies the partial development of turbulent, high-velocity "streams" within a viscous debris flow moving over a slope of 6°. Clast fabrics in these facies show weakly-clustered a-axes dipping up and downslope comparable to other debris flows and lahars. The Cinquefoil fan, its internal structure and facies, provides a good "modern" analogue for ancient diamictite sequences deposited in areas of active uplift, rifting and glaciation.

  16. Seismic facies of incised-channel fill deposits of paleo-Seomjin River in the South Sea, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung Ho; Kong, Gee Soo; Choul Kim, Dae; Lee, Gwang Soo; Yoo, Dong Geun

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution (Chirp and Sparker system) seismic profiles and piston core samples were analyzed to investigate the depositional environment of paleo-channel in the continental shelf of South Sea. Approximately 1,940 line-km data of chirp and sparker profiles was acquired. Along with seismic profiles, 20 piston core and 10 box core samples collected in 2015. The paleo-channel of Seomjin River is distributed in the continental shelf, with approximately 109 km long, 800-5,000 m wide, and more than 890 km2. The paleo-channel of meandering and straight type is dominant in the inner shelf while changed to braided type in the outer shelf. The paleo-channels in sparker seismic data formed presumably as fluvial systems when the shelf was exposed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The seismic facies of incision fill divided into five types basis of an erosional surface and internal seismic reflectors: (1) transparent to semi-transparent incised channel fill, (2) parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill, (3) complex incised channel fill, (4) divergent incised channel fill, and (5) chaotic incised channel fill. The chaotic incised channel fill deposits are consists of gravel with shell fragments in the outer shelf and indicate the LGM to early transgressive (fluvial lag deposits). The complex incised channel fill deposits are dominated by sand and gravel with shell fragments in the mid to outer shelf. The cores which were obtained above the transparent to semi-transparent and parallel to sub-parallel incised channel fill deposits are dominated by mud. These types are dominant in the upstream (inner shelf). The acoustically transparent zones of this type with low-energy, passively infilling depositional environment, suggest the presence of basin muddy deposits. These muddy sediments were likely deposited during a more advanced stage of the Holocene transgression. Thus, the paleo-channel of Seomjin River is strongly controlled by sea-level change and sediment

  17. Cloud Masking and Surface Temperature Distribution in the Polar Regions Using AVHRR and other Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, Joey C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface temperature is one of the key variables associated with weather and climate. Accurate measurements of surface air temperatures are routinely made in meteorological stations around the world. Also, satellite data have been used to produce synoptic global temperature distributions. However, not much attention has been paid on temperature distributions in the polar regions. In the polar regions, the number of stations is very sparse. Because of adverse weather conditions and general inaccessibility, surface field measurements are also limited. Furthermore, accurate retrievals from satellite data in the region have been difficult to make because of persistent cloudiness and ambiguities in the discrimination of clouds from snow or ice. Surface temperature observations are required in the polar regions for air-sea-ice interaction studies, especially in the calculation of heat, salinity, and humidity fluxes. They are also useful in identifying areas of melt or meltponding within the sea ice pack and the ice sheets and in the calculation of emissivities of these surfaces. Moreover, the polar regions are unique in that they are the sites of temperature extremes, the location of which is difficult to identify without a global monitoring system. Furthermore, the regions may provide an early signal to a potential climate change because such signal is expected to be amplified in the region due to feedback effects. In cloud free areas, the thermal channels from infrared systems provide surface temperatures at relatively good accuracies. Previous capabilities include the use of the Temperature Humidity Infrared Radiometer (THIR) onboard the Nimbus-7 satellite which was launched in 1978. Current capabilities include the use of the Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard NOAA satellites. Together, these two systems cover a span of 16 years of thermal infrared data. Techniques for retrieving surface temperatures with these sensors in the polar regions have

  18. Pore Scale Heterogeneity in the Mineral Distribution, Surface Area and Adsorption in Porous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, P. E. P.; Krevor, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of heterogeneity in chemical transport and reaction is not understood in continuum (Darcy/Fickian) models of reactive transport. This is manifested in well-known problems such as scale dependent dispersion and discrepancies in reaction rate observations made at laboratory and field scales [1]. Additionally, this is a source of uncertainty for carbon dioxide injection, which produces a reactive fluid-rock system particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2, 3]. We use x-ray micro tomography to describe the non-normal 3-dimensional distribution of reactive surface area within a porous medium according to distinct mineral groups. Using in-house image processing techniques, thin sections, nitrogen BET surface area, backscattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectroscopy, we compare the surface area of each mineral phase to those obtained from x-ray CT imagery. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. We combine the mineral specific surface area characterisation to dynamic tomography, imaging the flow of water and solutes, to observe flow dependent and mineral specific adsorption. The observations may contribute to the incorporation of experimentally based statistical descriptions of pore scale heterogeneity in reactive transport into upscaled models, moving it closer to predictive capabilities for field scale

  19. Non-seagrass meadow sedimentary facies of the Pontinian Islands, Tyrrhenian Sea: A modern example of mixed carbonate siliciclastic sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandano, Marco; Civitelli, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    The soft bottom of the Mediterranean continental shelf is characterized by a heterozoan skeletal assemblage ( sensu [James, N.P., 1997. The cool-water carbonate depositional realm. In: James, N.P., Clarke, J. (Eds), Cool-water Carbonates. Spec. Publ. Soc. Sediment. Geol., vol. 56, pp.1-20.]). Although the contemporary presence of terrigenous and skeletal carbonate sediments has been well established [Tortora, P., 1996. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the last postglacial sea-level rise: an example from the Central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy). J. Sed. Res. 66, 391-405.; Fornós, J.J., Ahr, W.M., 1997. Temperate carbonates on a modern, low-energy, isolated ramp: the Balearic Platform, Spain. Journal of Sedimentary Research , 67, 364-373.; Fornós, J.J., Ahr, W.M., 2006. Present-day temperate carbonate sedimentation on the Balearic Platform, western Mediterranean: compositional and textural variation along a low-energy isolated ramp. In: Pedley, H.M., Carannante, G. (Eds.) 2006, Cool-water Carbonates: Depositional Systems and Palaeoenvironmental Controls. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 255, pp. 121-135], the interactions between carbonate and terrigenous-siliciclastic sedimentation has not been documented well enough. A total of 33 surface sediment samples from the Pontinian shelf (Tyrrhenian Sea, central Mediterranean) have been analysed. Sampling stations range from 15 to 250 mwd (meter water depth) and are located along five transects (PonzaW, PonzaNW, Ponza NE, Ponza E, Zannone), plus four samples collected around Palmarola Island. Sectors colonized by seagrass meadows have not been sampled. A total of 6 sedimentary facies (F) and 10 microfacies (mf) have been recognized by using component analyses, grain size percentage, sorting, carbonate content and authigenic mineralization rate. These facies and microfacies represent the Pontian Islands shelf sedimentation, in the interval between the upper infralittoral and the

  20. Impact of surface reflection on transmission eigenvalue statistics and energy distributions inside random media

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lowell, Zachary; Zhao, Liyi; Genack, Azriel Z

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface reflection upon transmission through and energy distributions within random media has generally been described in terms of the boundary extrapolation lengths $z_b, z_b'$ at the input and output end of an open sample, which are the distance beyond the sample surfaces at which the energy density within the sample extrapolates to zeroThe importance of reflection at the sample boundaries plays a key role in the scaling of transmission. Here we consider the impact of surface reflection on the propagation of diffusive waves in terms of the modification of the distribution of transmission eigenvalues (DTE). We review our finding of a transition in the analytical form of the DTE at the point that the sample length equals $|z_b-z_b'|$. The highest transmission eigenvalue for stronger asymmetry in boundary reflection is strictly smaller than unity. The average transmission and profiles of energy density inside the sample can still be described in terms of the sample length, $L$, and the boundary e...

  1. Surface Rupture and Slip Distribution Resulting from the 2013 M7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitman, N. G.; Gold, R. D.; Briggs, R. W.; Barnhart, W. D.; Hayes, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 24 September 2013 M7.7 earthquake in Balochistan, Pakistan, produced a ~200 km long left-lateral strike-slip surface rupture along a portion of the Hoshab fault, a moderately dipping (45-75º) structure in the Makran accretionary prism. The rupture is remarkably continuous and crosses only two (0.7 and 1.5 km wide) step-overs along its arcuate path through southern Pakistan. Displacements are dominantly strike-slip, with a minor component of reverse motion. We remotely mapped the surface rupture at 1:5,000 scale and measured displacements using high resolution (0.5 m) pre- and post-event satellite imagery. We mapped 295 laterally faulted stream channels, terrace margins, and roads to quantify near-field displacement proximal (±10 m) to the rupture trace. The maximum near-field left-lateral offset is 15±2 m (average of ~7 m). Additionally, we used pre-event imagery to digitize 254 unique landforms in the "medium-field" (~100-200 m from the rupture) and then measured their displacements compared to the post-event imagery. At this scale, maximum left-lateral offset approaches 17 m (average of ~8.5 m). The width (extent of observed surface faulting) of the rupture zone varies from ~1 m to 3.7 km. Near- and medium-field offsets show similar slip distributions that are inversely correlated with the width of the fault zone at the surface (larger offsets correspond to narrow fault zones). The medium-field offset is usually greater than the near-field offset. The along-strike surface slip distribution is highly variable, similar to the slip distributions documented for the 2002 Denali M7.9 earthquake and 2001 Kunlun M7.8 earthquake, although the Pakistan offsets are larger in magnitude. The 2013 Pakistan earthquake ranks among the largest documented continental strike-slip displacements, possibly second only to the 18+ m surface displacements attributed to the 1855 Wairarapa M~8.1 earthquake.

  2. Estimating the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size from NMR T2 distributions and micro-tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Francisco; Leiderman, Ricardo; Souza, Andre; Carneiro, Giovanna; Bagueira, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, we formulate and solve an inverse problem to recover the surface relaxivity as a function of pore size. The input data for our technique are the T2 distribution measurement and the micro-tomographic image of the rock sample under investigation. We simulate the NMR relaxation signal for a given surface relaxivity function using the random walk method and rank different surface relaxivity functions according to the correlation of the resulting simulated T2 distributions with the measured T2 distribution. The optimization is performed using genetic algorithms and determines the surface relaxivity function whose corresponding simulated T2 distribution best matches the measured T2 distribution. In the proposed methodology, pore size is associated with a number of collisions in the random walk simulations. We illustrate the application of the proposed method by performing inversions from synthetic and laboratory input data and compare the obtained results with those obtained using the uniform relaxivity assumption.

  3. Distribution and composition of authigenic minerals in surface sediments of the western Gulf of Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kunshan; SHI Xuefa; QIAO Shuqing; KORNKANITNAN Narumol; KHOKIATTIWONG Somkiat

    2015-01-01

    Generation, morphology, and distribution of authigenic minerals directly reflect sedimentary environment and material sources. Surface sediments were collected from the western Gulf of Thailand during 2011–2012, and 159 samples were analyzed to determine detrital minerals. Authigenic minerals, including siderite, pyrite, and glauconite, are abundant whereas secondary minerals, such as chlorite and limonite, are distributed widely in the study area. Siderite has a maximum content of 19.98 g/kg and appears in three types from nearshore to continental shelf, showing the process of forming-maturity-oxidation. In this process, the MnO content in siderite decreases, but Fe2O3 and MgO content increase. Colorless or transparent siderite pellets are fresh grains generated within a short time and widely distributed throughout the region; high content appears in coastal area where river inputs are discharged. Translucent cemented double pellets appearing light yellow to red are mature grains; high content is observed in the central shelf. Red-brown opaque granular pellets are oxidized grains, which are concentrated in the eastern gulf. Pyrite is mostly distributed in the central continental shelf with an approximately north–south strip. Pyrite are mainly observed in foraminifera shell and distributed in clayey silt sediments, which is similar to that in the Yangtze River mouth and the Yellow Sea. The pyrite in the gulf is deduced from genetic types associated with sulfate reduction and organic matter decomposition. Majority of glauconite are granular with few laminar. Glauconite is concentrated in the northern and southern parts within the boundary of 9.5° to 10.5°N and is affected by river input diffusion. The distribution of glauconite is closely correlated with that of chlorite and plagioclase, indicating that glauconite is possibly derived from altered products of chlorite and plagioclase. The K2O content of glauconite is low or absent, indicating its short

  4. Modeling the Images of Relativistic Jets Lensed by Galaxies with Different Mass Surface Density Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Larchenkova, T I; Lyskova, N S

    2011-01-01

    The images of relativistic jets from extragalactic sources produced by gravitational lensing by galaxies with different mass surface density distributions are modeled. In particular, the following models of the gravitational lens mass distribution are considered: a singular isothermal ellipsoid, an isothermal ellipsoid with a core, two- and three-component models with a galactic disk, halo, and bulge. The modeled images are compared both between themselves and with available observations. Different sets of parameters are shown to exist for the gravitationally lensed system B0218+357 in multicomponent models. These sets allow the observed geometry of the system and the intensity ratio of the compact core images to be obtained, but they lead to a significant variety in the Hubble constant determined from the modeling results.

  5. Oxidation-state distribution of plutonium in surface and subsurface waters at Thule, northwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahon, C.A.; Vintró, L.L.; Mitchell, P.I.

    2000-01-01

    chemical form) is present as fully dissolved species. Most of this plutonium would seem to be of weapons fallout origin, as the mean Pu-238/Pu-239,Pu-240 activity ratio in the water column (dissolved phase) at Thule (0.06 +/- 0.02; n = 10) is similar to the global fallout ratio at this latitude......The speciation of plutonium in Arctic waters sampled on the northwest Greenland shelf in August 1997 is discussed in this paper. Specifically, we report the results of analyses carried out on seawater sampled (a) close to the Thule air base where, in 1968, a US military aircraft carrying four......(V, VI) (mean, 68 +/- 6%; n = 6), with little if any distinction apparent between surface and bottom waters. Further, the oxidation state distribution at stations close to the accident site is similar to that measured at Upernavik, remote from this site. It is also similar to the distribution observed...

  6. Distribution of /sup 137/Cs in surface intertidal sediments from the Solway Firth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.G.; Miller, J.M.; Roberts, P.D. (Institute of Geological Sciences, Keyworth (UK))

    1984-05-01

    The distribution of /sup 137/Cs from the Sellafield (Windscale) nuclear fuel reprocessing plant has been examined in detail in the surface intertidal sediments of the inner Solway Firth by means of a hovercraft-borne radiometric survey. With the exception of a belt of relatively active sands to the south of Silloth, caesium distribution is generally consistent with that of fine-grained sediment such that the highest concentrations occur in mud flat and salt marsh sediments which are most extensive in sheltered coastal embayments. /sup 137/Cs activities in July 1980 were typically 2 to 30 pCi g/sup -1/ but locally exceeded 50 pCi g/sup -1/. These levels are considerably lower than those recorded in locations, such as the outer Solway and Ravenglass estuary, which are closer to the Sellafield outfall.

  7. l-distributions of the first electron transferred to multiply charged ions interacting with solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, M. A.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the angular momentum distributions of the electron transferred into the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions escaping the solid surfaces. The population probabilities are calculated within the framework of two-state-vector model; in the case of large values of the angular momentum quantum numbers l the model takes into account an importance of a wide space region around the projectile trajectory. The reionization of the previously populated states is also taken into account. The corresponding ionization rates are obtained by the appropriate etalon equation method; in the large-l case the radial electronic coordinate rho is treated as variational parameter. The theoretical predictions based on the proposed population-reionization mechanism fit the available beam-foil experimental data; the obtained large-l distributions are also used to elucidate the recent experimental data concerning the multiply charged Rydberg ions interacting with micro-capillary foil.

  8. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions between column and surface measurements downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol volume size distribution is one of the most important parameters in retrieving aerosol optical properties and studying radiative forcing. The column-integrated aerosol volume size distribution for AERONET was obtained from inversion product level 1.5 (22 bins between 0.1 and 30 μm in diameter) from the measurements of CIMEL sunphotometer (CE-318); that for SKYNET was obtained using skyrad.pack V5 (20 bins, 0.02-33 μm) from the measurements of PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02). The aerosol volume size distribution at the surface was measured using a wide range aerosol spectrometer system consisting of a scanning mobility particle scanner (Grimm, Model 5.419; 89 bins, 0.005-0.35 μm) and an optical particle counter (Grimm, Model 1.109; 31 bins, 0.27-34 μm). The measurement was conducted in Yongin, downwind of Seoul, Korea, from April 30 to June 27, 2015. The measurement site is located on the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) in the global campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. To investigate the discrepancy in effective diameter and fine mode volume fraction, we compared the volume size distributions when the measurement time coincided within 5 minutes because the measurement intervals were different between instruments.

  9. Energy and angular distributions of excited rhodium atoms ejected from the rhodium (100) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maazawi, M.; Maboudian, R.; Postawa, Z.; Winograd, N. (Department of Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (US))

    1991-05-15

    Multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy has been used to determine the polar-angle and the kinetic-energy distribution of Rh atoms desorbed from the ion-bombarded Rh{l brace}100{r brace} surface in the fine-structure components of the {ital a}{sup 4}{ital F}{sub {ital J}} ground-state multiplet ({ital J}=9/2 and 7/2). The overall behavior is found to be very similar to that observed for higher-lying metastable levels. The energy distribution of the metastable level ({sup 4}{ital F}{sub 7/2} with excitation energy of {similar to}0.2 eV) is found to be broader than the ground-state ({sup 4}{ital F}{sub 9/2}) distribution. The energy distribution of the excited ejected atoms is shown to depend mainly on the electron configuration of the excited state. The measured spectra have also been used to investigate the dependence of the excitation probability on the emission velocity. It is shown that the excitation probability depends strongly on this parameter, approaching an exponential dependence on the reciprocal of the normal component of velocity at higher velocities ({gt}5{times}10{sup 5} cm/sec).

  10. Evaporation Flux Distribution of Drops on a Hydrophilic or Hydrophobic Flat Surface by Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chiyu; Liu, Guangzhi; Wang, Moran

    2016-08-16

    The evaporation flux distribution of sessile drops is investigated by molecular dynamic simulations. Three evaporating modes are classified, including the diffusion dominant mode, the substrate heating mode, and the environment heating mode. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drop-substrate interactions are considered. To count the evaporation flux distribution, which is position dependent, we proposed an azimuthal-angle-based division method under the assumption of spherical crown shape of drops. The modeling results show that the edge evaporation, i.e., near the contact line, is enhanced for hydrophilic drops in all the three modes. The surface diffusion of liquid molecular absorbed on solid substrate for hydrophilic cases plays an important role as well as the space diffusion on the enhanced evaporation rate at the edge. For hydrophobic drops, the edge evaporation flux is higher for the substrate heating mode, but lower than elsewhere of the drop for the diffusion dominant mode; however, a nearly uniform distribution is found for the environment heating mode. The evidence shows that the temperature distribution inside drops plays a key role in the position-dependent evaporation flux.

  11. Effect of Vegetation Patterns on SAR derived Surface Soil Moisture Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, C. N.; Schneider, K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture can be regarded as one of the important life sustaining entities on our planet. Among its various functions, the first is probably to enable the growth of vegetation on the land surface. Apart from this, water stored in soils plays many other important roles in the global water (and energy) cycle. In the past decades, radar imaging has proven its potential to quantitatively estimate the near surface water content of soils at high spatial resolutions. The use of active microwave data to measure surface soil moisture requires the consideration of several factors like e.g. soil texture, surface roughness, and vegetation. Among these factors, the presence of a vegetation cover is perhaps the major impediment to accurate quantitative retrievals of soil moisture. On the one hand, the vegetation has a disturbing effect on the radar reflectivity and thus causes errors in the soil moisture retrieval which is generally based on theoretical or experimental relationships between the dielectric properties of the soil surface and the radar backscattering coefficient. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of vegetation with e.g. different crop types with different transpiration coefficients and different phenological development, etc, can cause large variations in the plant water consumption and thus has a significant impact on the soil moisture patterns. We have developed methods to estimate the amount of biomass for different crop types and the underlying surface soil water content directly from polarimetric L-band SAR images. While the horizontally-transmit horizontally-receive co-polarization (hh) is most sensitive towards the dielectric soil properties, the horizontally-transmit vertically-receive cross-polarization (hv) is much more sensitive towards the backscattering from the vegetation canopy. In addition the polarimetric observables entropy (H), alpha angle (α), and the total reflected power (span), all of which are highly affected by the canopy

  12. Aerodynamically-driven condensate layer thickness distributions on isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Gunes, D.; Nazih-Anous, N.

    A simple yet rather general mathematical model is presented for predicting the distribution of condensate layer thickness when aerodynamic shear is the dominant mechanism of liquid flow along the surface. The Newtonian condensate film is treated using well-known thin-layer (lubrication theory) approximations, and condensate supply is taken to be the result of either convective diffusion or inertial impaction. Illustrative calculations for a circular cylinder in a crossflow at Re = 100,000 reveal the consequences of alternate condensate arrival mechanisms and the existence of thicker reverse-flow films behind the position of gas boundary-layer separation. The present formulation is readily generalized to include transient liquid layer flows on noncircular objects of variable surface temperature, as encountered in turbine-blade materials testing or operation.

  13. A geometrical optics polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function for dielectric and metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, M W; Schmidt, J D; Havrilla, M J

    2009-11-23

    A polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF), based on geometrical optics, is presented. The pBRDF incorporates a visibility (shadowing/masking) function and a Lambertian (diffuse) component which distinguishes it from other geometrical optics pBRDFs in literature. It is shown that these additions keep the pBRDF bounded (and thus a more realistic physical model) as the angle of incidence or observation approaches grazing and better able to model the behavior of light scattered from rough, reflective surfaces. In this paper, the theoretical development of the pBRDF is shown and discussed. Simulation results of a rough, perfect reflecting surface obtained using an exact, electromagnetic solution and experimental Mueller matrix results of two, rough metallic samples are presented to validate the pBRDF.

  14. Light Scattering of Rough Orthogonal Anisotropic Surfaces with Secondary Most Probable Slope Distributions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-Xia; CHENG Chuan-Fu

    2011-01-01

    @@ We study the light scattering of an orthogonal anisotropic rough surface with secondary most probable slope distribution It is found that the scattered intensity profiles have obvious secondary maxima, and in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence, the secondary maxima are oriented in a curve on the observation plane,which is called the orientation curve.By numerical calculation of the scattering wave fields with the height data of the sample, it is validated that the secondary maxima are induced by the side face element, which constitutes the prismoid structure of the anisotropic surface.We derive the equation of the quadratic orientation curve.Experimentally, we construct the system for light scattering measurement using a CCD.The scattered intensity profiles are extracted from the images at different angles of incidence along the orientation curves.The experimental results conform to the theory.

  15. Surface Emitting Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser around 8.3μm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wan-Hong; LIU Jun-Qi; LU Quan-Yong; ZHANG Wei; JIANG Yu-Chao; LI Lu; WANG Li-Jun; LIU Feng-Qi; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2010-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers emitting at wavelengths from8.1 μm at 90 K to 8.4 μm at 210K.The second-order metalized grating is carefully designed using a modified coupled-mode theory and fabricated by contact lithography.The devices show single mode behavior with a side mode suppression ratio above 18dB at all working temperatures.At 90K,the device emits an optical power of 101 mW from the surface and 199mW from the edge.In addition,a double-lobe far-field pattern with a separation of 2.2° is obtained in the direction along the waveguide.

  16. Narrowing of terrace-width distributions during growth on vicinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, A. BH.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    We present analytic and numerical results for the steady-state, non-equilibrium terrace-width distribution (TWD) of steps during growth on vicinal surfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo shows that the TWD narrows progressively with increasing flux until the model breaks down. The narrowing corresponds to kinetic repulsion between moving steps, due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the adatom diffusion current on a growing surface. With a 1-dimensional (1D) model, from a Burton-Cabrera-Frank approach, we make contact with previous work, in which the attachment asymmetry can also be due to electromigration or to asymmetry in attachment rates; we deduce an expression for the narrowing via a Fokker-Planck analysis. We illustrate how Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers (although inducing an instability in 2D) also lead to such asymmetry and narrowing.

  17. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  18. Determination of lunar surface ages from crater frequency–size distribution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Shylaja

    2005-12-01

    Crater size –frequency distribution is one of the powerful techniques to estimate the ages of planetary surfaces,especially from remote sensing studies.This has been applied to images of the Moon obtained from Clementine mission in 1994.Simple techniques of measurement of the diameter of the craters (in pixels)are used and converted into linear dimensions.Among the several maria studied,the results of Mare Humorum and the central region of Mare Imbrium are reported.The results are compared with age estimates from other sources.

  19. STM investigations of local potential barrier distribution of the atomic surface of graphite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To modulate the tunneling gap with the lock-in amplifier in the scanning tunneling microscopy(STM), information of the tunneling current variation can be obtained. The local potential barrier distribution of graphite surface atoms is got by means of such technology. Compared with STM image under topography observation mode, the local potential barrier image has higher resolu tion and less influence on the tip and better anti-interference capability. Obs erved results of the graphite are given and discussed in this paper.

  20. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography for Geotechnical Monitoring Using "Large N" Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Lindsey, N.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Robertson, M.; Bjella, K.; Gelvin, A.; Ulrich, C.; Wu, Y.; Freifeld, B. M.; Daley, T. M.; Dou, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface wave tomography using ambient noise sources has found broad application at the regional scale but has not been adopted fully for geotechnical applications despite the abundance of noise sources in this context. The recent development of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) provides a clear path for inexpensively recording high spatial resolution (survey as well as direct-push data on ice content. We also compare vintages of ambient noise DAS data to evaluate the short-term repeatability of the technique in the face of changing noise environments. The resulting dataset demonstrates the utility of using DAS for real-time shear-modulus monitoring in support of critical infrastructure.

  1. Effect of surface waves on the irradiance distribution in the upper ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesekera, Hemantha; Pegau, W Scott; Boyd, Timothy

    2005-11-14

    The distribution of irradiance in the upper ocean was examined from sensors mounted on an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). Apparent and inherent optical properties along with physical variability ranging from scales O(10 cm) to O(1 km) were collected off the coast of Oregon during the summer of 2004. Horizontal wavenumber spectra of downwelling irradiance showed that irradiance varied as a function of wavenumber and depth. The analysis indicates that irradiance variability between 1 and 20 m spatial scales was attributed to the focusing effects of surface wave geometry. The dominant wavelength of focusing at depths of 2 - 6 m was about 2 m for ~6 m s-1 wind speeds.

  2. A Statistical Distribution of Surface Elevation for Nonlinear Random Sea Waves and Its Physical Explanation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙孚; 丁平兴

    1994-01-01

    Based upon the nonlinear model of random sea waves,a commonly applicable statisticaldistribution of wave surface elevation exact to the third order is derived through the direct calculations ofeach order moment.The distribution arrived reduces,in the sense of being exact to H6,to the Gram-Charlierseries due to Longuet-Higgins for deep water,provided that only the two simplest kinds of wave-wave inter-actions are taken into account The reason why the agreement of Gram-Charlier series with experimental databecomes worse and worse as the terms of series are increased is explicited for the first time.

  3. Investigation of drug distribution in tablets using surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkala, Tamás; Farkas, Attila; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Marosi, György

    2013-03-25

    This paper reports the first application of surface enhanced Raman chemical imaging on pharmaceutical tablets containing the active ingredient (API) in very low concentrations. Taking advantage of the extremely intensive Raman signals in the presence of silver colloids, image aquisition time was radically decreased. Moreover, the investigation of drug distribution below the detection limit of regular micro-Raman spectrometry was made feasible. The characteristics of different manufacturing technologies could be revealed at very low API concentrations by using chemometric methods for processing and evaluating the large number of varying spectra provided with this imaging method.

  4. Palynostratigraphy and sedimentary facies of Middle Miocene fluvial deposits of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dino, Rodolfo; Soares, Emílio Alberto Amaral; Antonioli, Luzia; Riccomini, Claudio; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Palynostratigraphic and sedimentary facies analyses were made on sedimentary deposits from the left bank of the Solimões River, southwest of Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. These provided the age-dating and subdivision of a post-Cretaceous stratigraphic succession in the Amazonas Basin. The Novo Remanso Formation is subdivided into upper and lower units, and delineated by discontinuous surfaces at its top and bottom. The formation consists primarily of sandstones and minor mudstones and conglomerates, reflecting fluvial channel, point bar and floodplain facies of a fluvial meandering paleosystem. Fairly well-preserved palynoflora was recovered from four palynologically productive samples collected in a local irregular concentration of gray clay deposits, rich in organic material and fossilized wood, at the top of the Novo Remanso Formation upper unit. The palynoflora is dominated by terrestrial spores and pollen grains, and is characterized by abundant angiosperm pollen grains ( Tricolpites, Grimsdalea, Perisyncolporites, Tricolporites and Malvacearumpollis). Trilete spores are almost as abundant as the angiosperm pollen, and are represented mainly by the genera Deltoidospora, Verrutriletes, and Hamulatisporis. Gymnosperm pollen is scarce. The presence of the index species Grimsdalea magnaclavata Germeraad et al. (1968) indicates that these deposits belong to the Middle Miocene homonymous palynozone (Lorente, 1986; Hoorn, 1993; Jaramillo et al., 2011). Sedimentological characteristics (poorly sorted, angular to sub-angular, fine to very-coarse quartz sands facies) are typical of the Novo Remanso Formation upper part. These are associated with a paleoflow to the NE-E and SE-E, and with an entirely lowland-derived palinofloristic content with no Andean ferns and gymnosperms representatives. All together, this suggests a cratonic origin for this Middle Miocene fluvial paleosystem, which was probably born in the Purus Arch eastern flank and areas surrounding the

  5. Paleotopographic controls on facies development in various types of braid-delta depositional systems in lacustrine basins in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Feng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Braid-delta depositional systems are widely developed in most continental basins in China. Research indicates that, for different types of braid delta, the facies sequence and association, which are critical to the prediction of the distribution of reservoirs, differ greatly. This study illustrates the differences in braid-delta depositional systems in terms of sedimentary characteristics, associated systems and reservoir distributions using three typical paleodeltas in western China: the Zhenbei delta of the upper Triassic Yanchang Formation in the Ordos Basin, the Yuanba delta of the upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation in the Sichuan Basin and the Jimsar delta of the upper Permian Wutonggou Formation in the Junggar Basin. A stratigraphic framework was established using seismic data, logs and cores by choosing stable mud sections as regional correlation markers and, topographies of these deltas were reconstructed based on the decompaction and paleobathymetric corrections. Based on both the paleotopography of these deltas and the differences of their sedimentary facies, these braided deltas can be classified into two systems: steep-gradient braid-delta-turbidite system and low-gradient braid-delta-lacustrine system. Moreover, the low-gradient braid-delta-lacustrine system can be further divided into interfingered and sharp contact sub-types according to the contact relation between the delta sands and lacustrine muds. This study shows that the paleotopography of basin margins strongly controls the accommodation as braid deltas prograde into lacustrine basins and, influences the location of the shoreline in response to changes in the lake level. Furthermore, paleotopography plays a significant role in facies and reservoir distribution which is important for petroleum exploration and development.

  6. Impact of submesoscales on surface material distribution in a gulf of Mexico mesoscale eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haza, A. C.; Özgökmen, T. M.; Hogan, P.

    2016-11-01

    Understanding material distribution at the ocean's surface is important for a number of applications, in particular for buoyant pollutants such as oil spills. The main tools to estimate surface flows are satellite altimeters, as well as data-assimilative ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). Current-generation altimeter products rely on the geostrophic approximation to derive surface currents. Recent modeling and experimental work revealed existence of ageostrophic submesoscale motions within the upper ocean boundary layer. The next frontier is how submesoscales influence transport pathways in the upper ocean, which is a multi-scale problem involving the interaction of submesoscale and mesoscale coherent structures. Here we focus on a mesoscale eddy that exhibits submesoscale fluctuations along its rim. The high-resolution OCGM fields are then treated with two filters. A Lanczos filter is applied to velocity fields to remove the kinetic energy over the submesoscales. Then a Gaussian filter is used for the modeled sea surface height to simulate a geostrophic velocity field that would be available from gridded satellite altimeter data. Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are then generated from full-resolution and filtered fields to compare Lagrangian characteristics corresponding to different realizations of the surface velocity fields. It is found that while mesoscale currents exert a general control over the pathways of the tracer initially launched in the mesoscale eddy, there is a leak across the mesoscale transport barriers, induced by submesoscale motions. This leak is quantified as 20% of the tracer when using the submesoscale filter over one month of advection, while it increases to 50% using the geostrophic velocity field. We conclude that LCS computed from mesoscale surface velocity fields can be considered as a good first-order proxy, but the leakage of material across them in the presence of submesoscales can be significant.

  7. Limitations of fibre optic distributed temperature sensing for quantifying surface water groundwater interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Roshan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of surface water–groundwater interactions using fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS has increased in recent years. However, only a few studies to date have explored the limitations of FO-DTS in detecting groundwater discharge to streams. A FO_DTS system was therefore tested in a flume under controlled laboratory conditions for its ability to accurately measure the discharge of hot or cold groundwater into a simulated surface water flow. In the experiment the surface water (SW and groundwater (GW velocities, expressed as ratios (vgw/vsw, were varied from 0.21% to 61.7%; temperature difference between SW-GW were varied from 2 to 10 °C; the direction of temperature gradient were varied with both cold and-hot water injection; and two different bed materials were used to investigate their effects on FO_DTS's detection limit of groundwater discharge. The ability of the FO_DTS system to detect the discharge of groundwater of a different temperature in the laboratory environment was found to be mainly dependent upon the surface and groundwater flow velocities and their temperature difference. A correlation was proposed to estimate the groundwater discharge from temperature. The correlation is valid when the ratio of the apparent temperature response to the source temperature difference is above 0.02.

  8. Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J. (Environmental Science Division); (USDOE)

    2011-08-02

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

  9. Spatial Distribution and Pattern Persistence of Surface Soil Moisture and Temperature Over Prairie from Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daoyi; Engman, Edwin T.; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Images remotely sensed aboard aircraft during FIFE, namely, PBMR (microwave) soil moisture and NS001 thermal infrared surface temperature, were mapped on the same coordinate system covering the 20 km x 20 km experimental site. For both kinds of image data, the frequency distributions were close to symmetric, and the area average compared reasonably well with the ground based measurements. For any image on any given day, the correlation between the remotely sensed values and collocated ground based measurements over the area was usually high in the case of NS001 surface temperature but low in the case of PBMR soil moisture. On the other hand, at any given flux station the correlation between the PBMR and gravimetric soil moisture over all available days was usually high. The correlation pixel by pixel between images of PBMR on different days was generally high. The preservation of the spatial patterns of soil moisture was also evaluated by considering the correlation station by station between ground-based soil moisture measurements on different days; no persistence of spatial pattern was apparent during wet periods, but a definite pattern gradually established itself toward the end of each drying episode. The spatial patterns of surface temperature revealed by NS001 were not preserved even within a single day. The cross-correlations among the two kinds of images and the vegetation index NDVI were normally poor. This suggests that different processes of vegetation growth, and of the near-surface soil water and energy budgets.

  10. Distribution and sources of n-alkanes in surface sediments of Taihu Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The last study on n-alkanes in surface sediments of Taihu Lake was in 2000, only 13 surface sediment samples were analysed, in order to have a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of n-alkanes in the surface sediments of Taihu Lake, 41 surface sediment samples were analyzed by GC-MS. C10 to C37 were detected, the total concentrations of n-alkanes ranged from 2109 ng g−1 to 9096 ng g−1 (dry weight. There was strong odd carbon predominance in long chain n-alkanes and even carbon predominance in short chain n-alkanes. When this finding was combined with the analysis results of wax n-alkanes (WaxCn, carbon preference index (CPI, unresolved complex mixture (UCM, hopanes and steranes, it was considered that the long chain n-alkanes were mainly from terrigenous higher plants, and that the short chain n-alkanes mainly originated from bacteria and algae in the lake, compared with previous studies, there were no obvious anthropogenic petrogenic inputs. Terrestrial and aquatic hydrocarbons ratio (TAR and C21−/C25+ indicated that terrigenous input was higher than aquatic sources and the nearshore n-alkanes were mainly from land-derived sources. Moreover, the distribution of short chain n-alkanes presented a relatively uniform pattern, while the long chain n-alkanes presented a trend that concentrations dropped from nearshore places to the middle of lake.

  11. Surface-water radon-222 distribution along the west-central Florida shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.G.; Robbins, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    In February 2009 and August 2009, the spatial distribution of radon-222 in surface water was mapped along the west-central Florida shelf as collaboration between the Response of Florida Shelf Ecosystems to Climate Change project and a U.S. Geological Survey Mendenhall Research Fellowship project. This report summarizes the surface distribution of radon-222 from two cruises and evaluates potential physical controls on radon-222 fluxes. Radon-222 is an inert gas produced overwhelmingly in sediment and has a short half-life of 3.8 days; activities in surface water ranged between 30 and 170 becquerels per cubic meter. Overall, radon-222 activities were enriched in nearshore surface waters relative to offshore waters. Dilution in offshore waters is expected to be the cause of the low offshore activities. While thermal stratification of the water column during the August survey may explain higher radon-222 activities relative to the February survey, radon-222 activity and integrated surface-water inventories decreased exponentially from the shoreline during both cruises. By estimating radon-222 evasion by wind from nearby buoy data and accounting for internal production from dissolved radium-226, its radiogenic long-lived parent, a simple one-dimensional model was implemented to determine the role that offshore mixing, benthic influx, and decay have on the distribution of excess radon-222 inventories along the west Florida shelf. For multiple statistically based boundary condition scenarios (first quartile, median, third quartile, and maximum radon-222 inshore of 5 kilometers), the cross-shelf mixing rates and average nearshore submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) rates varied from 100.38 to 10-3.4 square kilometers per day and 0.00 to 1.70 centimeters per day, respectively. This dataset and modeling provide the first attempt to assess cross-shelf mixing and SGD on such a large spatial scale. Such estimates help scale up SGD rates that are often made at 1- to 10-meter

  12. Variation of surface sediments in the Dongho beach before and after the typhoon Kompasu in 2010, southwestern coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryang, Woo Hun; So, Kwang-Suk

    2015-04-01

    The Dongho beach, located on the southwestern coast of Korea, is marco-tide, open-coast, and pocket-type. In the Dongho beach, this study has focused on the typhoon effects of topography, surface sediment, and sedimentary environment, appeared before and after the typhoon Kompasu in 2010. The typhoon Kompasu moved along the southwestern coasts and across midlands of the Korean Peninsula from 1 to 2 September in 2010. Coastal effect of the moving typhoon was investigated in terms of the surface variations of surface sediment facies and sedimentary environment. Surface topography and sediments before and after the typhoon (August - September 2010) were measured and sampled along the Dongho survey line of 23 sites, respectively. The surface topography in the mid-to-low tidal zone became low after the typhoon rather than that before the typhoon. The lower topographic change is indicative of surface sediment erosion caused by the typhoon wave. The pocket-type Dongho beach is mainly composed of fine to coarse sands, and the ratio of fine sand is the largest. The spatial distribution of surface sediments shows a coast-parallel band of fine and medium sands during three seasons of spring, fall, and winter, whereas medium sands dominated in the northern part of the study area during the summer. Before the typhoon, spatial distribution pattern of sedimentary facies showed a trend of coast-parallel bands of fine sand facies and medium sand facies, whereas that after the typhoon was partly different. Keywords: coastal effect, Typhoon Kompasu in 2010, surface sediment, macro-tide, beach Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Korea Institute of Marine Science and Technology Promotion (KIMST) through the project grant of Tracking and Prediction on Impacts of Ancient Extreme Climatic Events in the West and South Coastal Zone of Korea and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education

  13. Facies del subfondo del canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bujalesky

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available El canal Beagle conecta los océanos Pacífico y Atlántico en el extremo meridional de Sudamérica y se ubica en el ambiente subantártico. Conforma una cuenca de unos 300 m de profundidad máxima y está separada del océano Atlántico por un umbral de 30 m de profundidad. El canal es un valle tectónico que fue completamente cubierto por el hielo glacial durante la última glaciación. Posteriormente, el canal fue ocupado por un lago glacial desde los 12.000 a los 8.000 años A.P., cuando fue invadido por el mar que alcanzó un nivel máximo entre los 6.000 y 5.000 años A.P. Con el objetivo de analizar las facies sedimentarias superficiales y del subfondo del canal se realizó un relevamiento geofísico con sonar de barrido lateral y un perfilador de 3,5 kHz. Sobre un basamento constituido por rocas metamórficas del Mesozoico, se identificaron depósitos de till y secuencias granodecrecientes que representan distintos estadios del retroceso glaciar, evidenciando hacia la sección superior facies lacustres y por encima depósitos de la transgresión marina del Holoceno. Además, se han identificado paleocauces y secuencias fluviales cubiertas por sedimentos marinos transgresivos.

  14. Seismic modeling, rock physics, avo and seismic attribute analysis for illuminating sandstone facies of the Late Ordovic Ian Mamuniyat Reservoir, R-Field, Murzuq Basin-Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushalah, Yousf Milad

    The Late Ordovician Mamuniyat Formation is the main hydrocarbon reservoir in the R-Field in Murzuq Basin, SW Libya. The Lower Mamuniyat, which is the only unit that was encountered in the study area, is composed of sandstone facies called Clean Mamuniyat and shaly sandstone facies called Dirty Mamuniyat. One major problem with the development of the R-Field is the difficulty of distinguishing the two units so this project was aimed to develop better methods for distinguishing between the two units of the Lower Mamuniyat. The other problem is to distinguish the transgressive shaly facies of the Bir Tlacsin, which has an impact on the hydrocarbon accumulation. Those issues manifested in limit of seismic resolution and interference that resulted from the converted shear mode waves. The dissertation was divided into three chapters. In the first chapter, seismic modeling using a deterministic and a Ricker wavelet were used to investigate the interference effects on the poststack seismic data and a bandpass filter was used to remove those effects. Instantaneous frequency, spectral-based colored inversion and rock physics were, then applied to determine the distributions of the sandstone facies of the Lower Mamuniyat Formation and to interpret the depositional setting of it. In the second chapter, spectral decomposition and inverted density were utilized to determine the distribution of the shaly facies of Bir Tlacsin, and its temporal thickness and to remap the top reservoir. In the last chapter, amplitude variation with offset (AVO) modeling, ray tracing, and spectral analysis were used to investigate the mode conversion and its effect on AVO signature, the amplitude of the near-mid and far offsets and frequency contents. Data enhancement then was performed using partial stacks and a bandpass filter.

  15. Radar backscattering from snow facies of the Greenland ice sheet: Results from the AIRSAR 1991 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignot, Eric; Jezek, K.; Vanzyl, J. J.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Lou, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    In June 1991, the NASA/JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR) acquired C- (lambda = 5.6cm), L- (lambda = 24cm), and P- (lambda = 68m) band polarimetric SAR data over the Greenland ice sheet. These data are processed using version 3.55 of the AIRSAR processor which provides radiometrically and polarimetrically calibrated images. The internal calibration of the AIRSAR data is cross-checked using the radar response from corner reflectors deployed prior to flight in one of the scenes. In addition, a quantitative assessment of the noise power level at various frequencies and polarizations is made in all the scenes. Synoptic SAR data corresponding to a swath width of about 12 by 50 km in length (compared to the standard 12 x 12 km size of high-resolution scenes) are also processed and calibrated to study transitions in radar backscatter as a function of snow facies at selected frequencies and polarizations. The snow facies on the Greenland ice sheet are traditionally categorized based on differences in melting regime during the summer months. The interior of Greenland corresponds to the dry snow zone where terrain elevation is the highest and no snow melt occurs. The lowest elevation boundary of the dry snow zone is known traditionally as the dry snow line. Beneath it is the percolation zone where melting occurs in the summer and water percolates through the snow freezing at depth to form massive ice lenses and ice pipes. At the downslope margin of this zone is the wet snow line. Below it, the wet snow zone corresponds to the lowest elevations where snow remains at the end of the summer. Ablation produces enough meltwater to create areas of snow saturated with water, together with ponds and lakes. The lowest altitude zone of ablation sees enough summer melt to remove all traces of seasonal snow accumulation, such that the surface comprises bare glacier ice.

  16. Distribution of sterols and the sources of pollution in surface sediments of Ulungur lake, Xinjiang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaorui; Lu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zilong; Ran, Dan; Huang, Yating

    2013-01-01

    Domestic sewage discharged into lakes brings great pressure to the ecological environment. This study selected sediment from an inland lake as a research object to evaluate pollution of the environment. Eight sterols were used to evaluate the content of pollutants, while the ratios of sterols were used as the index to analyze the sources of pollution. The correlations were analyzed between sterols and total organic carbon (TOC), salinity and particle size. The distribution and composition of sterol compounds were determined in 12 surface sediment samples collected from Ulungur lake. The total concentrations of detected sterols in the sediments ranged from 1.3 to 36.3 μg/g.dw. The most abundant sterol detected was β-sitosterol (STI) with average concentrations of 2.6 μg/g.dw, followed by cholesterol (CHOE), stigmasterol (STIG) and stigmastanol (STAN). The concentration of coprostanol (COP) was between 0.03 and 1.66 μg/g.dw. Through correlation analysis, it was found that there was a significant correlation between fecal sterols and plant sterols. So the plant sterols shall not be neglected in evaluating the sources of pollution for their impact to identify the fecal sources. The study suggests that the composition and distribution of sterols in surface sediment provide useful information for environmental contamination monitoring and assessment in the inland lake.

  17. Calculation of distribution coefficients in the SAMPL5 challenge from atomic solvation parameters and surface areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Martins, Diogo; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2016-11-01

    In the context of SAMPL5, we submitted blind predictions of the cyclohexane/water distribution coefficient (D) for a series of 53 drug-like molecules. Our method is purely empirical and based on the additive contribution of each solute atom to the free energy of solvation in water and in cyclohexane. The contribution of each atom depends on the atom type and on the exposed surface area. Comparatively to similar methods in the literature, we used a very small set of atomic parameters: only 10 for solvation in water and 1 for solvation in cyclohexane. As a result, the method is protected from overfitting and the error in the blind predictions could be reasonably estimated. Moreover, this approach is fast: it takes only 0.5 s to predict the distribution coefficient for all 53 SAMPL5 compounds, allowing its application in virtual screening campaigns. The performance of our approach (submission 49) is modest but satisfactory in view of its efficiency: the root mean square error (RMSE) was 3.3 log D units for the 53 compounds, while the RMSE of the best performing method (using COSMO-RS) was 2.1 (submission 16). Our method is implemented as a Python script available at https://github.com/diogomart/SAMPL5-DC-surface-empirical.

  18. The Effect of Surface Ice and Topography on the Atmospheric Circulation and Distribution of Nitrogen Ice on Pluto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot; Soto, Alejandro; Michaels, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed general circulation model (GCM) for Pluto is used to investigate the unexpected and highly heterogeneous distribution of nitrogen surface ice imaged by the New Horizons spacecraft on the surface of Pluto. The GCM is based on the GFDL Flexible Modeling System (FMS) dynamical core, solved on a discretized latitude/longitude horizontal grid and a pressure-based hybrid vertical coordinate. Model physics include a 3-band radiative scheme, molecular thermal conduction within the atmosphere, subsurface thermal conduction, and a nitrogen volatile cycle. The radiative-conductive model takes into account the 2.3, 3.3 and 7.8 μm bands of CH4, including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. The subsurface conduction model assumes a water ice regolith. In the case of nitrogen surface ice deposition, additional super-surface layers are added above the water ice regolith to properly account for conductive energy flow through the nitrogen ice. The nitrogen volatile cycle is based on a vapor pressure equilibrium assumption between the atmosphere and surface. Prior to the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft, the expectation was that the volatile surface ice distribution on the surface of Pluto would be strongly controlled by the latitudinal temperature gradient resulting primarily from the slow seasonal variations of radiative-conductive equilibrium. If this were the case, then Pluto would have broad latitudinal bands of both ice covered surface and ice free surface, as dictated by the season. Furthermore, the circulation, and thus the transport of volatiles, was thought to be driven almost exclusively by sublimation and deposition flows (so-called "condensation flows") associated with the volatile cycle. In contrast to expectations, images from New Horizon showed an extremely complex, heterogeneous distribution of surface ices draped over topography of substantial geologic diversity. To maintain such an ice distribution, the atmospheric circulation and

  19. Surface activity distribution measurements and establishment of a dose rate map inside the destroyed Chernobyl reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesnokov, A.V.; Fedin, V.I.; Gulyaev, A.A. [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1999-02-01

    A Gamma Locator designed for contamination survey inside the reactor hall of the 4th unit of Chernobyl NNP has been developed. The device consists of a detector head and a remote control computer connected by a 150 m long cable. The detector head (dimensions: 500 mm by 500 mm by 400 mm; weight: about 40 kg) is a collimated scintillation gamma detector (the collimation angle is 10 deg.). It is installed on a scanning unit and was placed inside the reactor hall. The Gamma Locator scans all surfaces of the reactor hall with angular steps ({<=} 1 deg. vertically as well as horizontally) and the particle fluence from the corresponding direction is recorded. The distance between the device head and the measured surface is instantaneously registered by a laser distance gauge. Inside the collimator there is a small CCD camera which makes it possible to obtain a visible image of the measured surface. The effective surface activity levels are presented in colour on the screen of the control computer. The gamma detector essentially consists of a CsI(TI) scintillator crystal ({phi} 8 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm in thickness) and a Si photodiode. The detector energy resolution is about 8% for radiation from {sup 137}Cs. The exposure dose rate distribution in the reactor hall is estimated from the measured effective surface activities ({sup 137}Cs is the main gamma emitting isotope inside the reactor hall). The results of dose rate calculations are presented in colour superposed on a drawing of the reactor hall. (au) 1 tab., 28 ills., 16 refs.

  20. Analysis of distribution rule of surface stress on cross wedge rolling contact zone by finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xuedao; Li, Lianpeng; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Contact surface of cross-wedge rolling is a complicated space surface and distribution rule of contact surface stress is very complicated. So far, its analyzed result was still based on slippery line method. Designing mould and actual production mainly depend on experiential factor. Application and development of cross-wedge rolling was baffled seriously. Based on the forming characteristics of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape, the ANSYS/DYNA software was developed secondly on the basis of itself, and the corresponding command program was compiled. Rolling process of cross-wedge rolling with flat wedge-shape was simulated successfully. Through simulation, space surface shape of contact surface was achieved, and distribution rule of contact surface stress was analyzed detailed and obtained. The results provide important theoretical foundation for avoiding appearing bug on surface of rolled part, instructing to design cross-wedge mould and confirming force and energy parameter.

  1. Research on Diageneses of Cambrian Shoal Facies Carbonate Rocks in the Xiadong Area, Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀莲; 蒋凌志

    2001-01-01

    With continuous outcrops, developed shoal facies rocks, complete types of diagenesis and changeable diagenetic environments, Cambrian strata are well developed in the Xiadong area, Yichang, Hubei Province. Under the combined influence of numerous diageneses, secondary pores can be formed, which result in better reservoir properties of the rock strata. The Cambrian rocks in this area consist of mainly carbonate rocks and secondarily detrital rocks. The carbonate rocks are dominated by grainstones including wormkalk, calcirudite-calcarenite, oolitic limestone and oncolitic limestone. Graded bedding and cross bedding are well developed in the strata, which indicates that the formation environment is of a high-energy shoal facies. In this area, there has developed a sequence of stable Cambrian platform carbonate deposition. The evolution trend is as follows: open sea shelf facies? intertidal low-energy restricted sea facies? intertidal high-energy shoal facies? coastal shoal facies? evaporite tidal-flat facies. The diageneses that the strata have experienced mainly include dolomitization, dedolomitization and dissolution, which are constructive diageneses for the formation of secondary pores, such as intercrystal pores, intercrystal solution pores, gypsum mold pores and caverns of dolomite. The diagenetic facies intervals can be divided into the unitary and the compound ones, totalling 22 in the area. In the early atmospheric fresh-water diagenetic environment and the late epidiagenetic environment, Cambrian rocks, especially dolomite of the Middle and Upper Cambrian, experienced extensive and profound fresh water corrosion, forming pore intervals with a porosity ranging from 5% to 15%.

  2. Facies discrimination in a mixed fluvio-eolian setting using elemental whole rock geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Johan; Friis, Henrik; Stollhofen, Harald

    2007-01-01

    performed on the geochemical data has enabled discrimination of seven of the eight facies types. Furthermore, the facies discrimination method allowed a quantitative estimate of the degree of fluvial reworking of eolian sand. We believe that the method presented here, when calibrated to a reference well...

  3. Sea surface temperature data from a world wide distribution from 01 January 1971 to 31 December 2000 (NODC Accession 0000712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature data were collected in a world wide distribution from January 1, 1971 to December 31, 2000. Data were submitted by Japan Meteorological...

  4. Confronting AeroCom models with particle size distribution data from surface in situ stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Stephen; Fiebig, Markus; Mann, Graham; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The size distribution is the most important property for describing any interaction of an aerosol particle population with its surroundings. In first order, it determines both, the aerosol optical properties quantifying the direct aerosol climate effect, and the fraction of aerosol particles acting as cloud condensation nuclei quantifying the indirect aerosol climate effect. Aerosol schemes of modern climate models resolve the aerosol particle size distribution (APSD) explicitly. In improving the skill of climate models, it is therefore highly useful to confront these models with precision APSD data observed at surface stations. Corresponding previous work focussed on comparing size integrated, seasonal particle concentrations at selected sites with ensemble model averages to assess overall model skill. Building on this work, this project intends to refine the approach by comparing median particle size and integral concentration of fitted modal size distributions. It will also look at skill differences between models in order to find reasons for matches and discrepancies. The presentation will outline the project, and will elaborate on input requested from modelling groups to participate in the exercise.

  5. Examining Urban Impervious Surface Distribution and Its Dynamic Change in Hangzhou Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longwei Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of urban distribution and its expansion using remote sensing data has received increasing attention in the past three decades, but little research has examined spatial patterns of urban distribution and expansion with buffer zones in different directions. This research selected Hangzhou metropolis as a case study to analyze spatial patterns and dynamic changes based on time-series urban impervious surface area (ISA datasets. ISA was developed from Landsat imagery between 1991 and 2014 using a hybrid approach consisting of linear spectral mixture analysis, decision tree classifiers, and post-processing. The spatial patterns of ISA distribution and its dynamic changes in eight directions—east, southeast, south, southwest, west, northwest, north, and northeast—at the temporal scale were analyzed with a buffer zone-based approach. This research indicated that ISA can be extracted from Landsat imagery with both producer and user accuracies of over 90%. ISA in Hangzhou metropolis increased from 146 km2 in 1991 to 868 km2 in 2014. Annual ISA growth rates were between 15.6 km2 and 48.8 km2 with the lowest growth rate in 1994–2000 and the highest growth rate in 2005–2010. Urban ISA increase before 2000 was mainly due to infilling within the urban landscape, and, after 2005, due to urban expansion in the urban-rural interfaces. Urban expansion in this study area has different characteristics in various directions that are influenced by topographic factors and urban development policies.

  6. [Distribution of matrix-bound phosphine in surface sediments of Jinpu Bay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Li-Li; Zong, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Shu-Fang; Yin, Guo-Yu; Li, Tao; Hou, Li-Jun

    2013-10-01

    This work investigated the distribution of matrix-bound phosphine in surface sediments of Jinpu Bay and associated environmental factors in summer, using the gas chromatography combined with a pulsed flame detector (GC-PFPD). It showed that phosphine ubiquitously presented in the sediments of Jinpu Bay. Contents of matrix-bound phosphine varied between 62. 58 and 190. 81 ng.kg-1, with the average value of 114.42 ng.kg-1. In addition, the spatial distribution of matrix-bound phosphine indicated that matrix-bound phosphine in inshore sediments had relatively higher contents than those in offshore sediments. Statistical analysis showed that matrix-bound phosphine significantly related to organic phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase activity ( R = 0. 882, P = 0. 01; R = 0. 819, P =0. 023). However, there were no correlations between matrix-bound phosphine and organic nitrogen, inorganic phosphorus and sediment grain sizes. These results implied that accumulation and distribution of matrix-bound phosphined were mainly affected by the decomposition of organic phosphorus by microorganisms.

  7. Analysis of Meteorological Elements and Distribution Characters of Surface Solar Radiation in Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Ai-zhen; HUANG; Ren-li

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relation between solar radiation distribution and meteorological elements in Guangxi. [Method] Based on the observed data of solar radiation in Guangxi from 1995 to 2009, the total radiation, solar distribution and interannual changes in Guangxi were analyzed. By dint of observed data in Nanning station, the annual, seasonal and monthly changes of net radiation in Nanning and the linear relation between total radiation, solar distribution characteristics and interannual changes were discussed. [Result] The global radiation of surface solar radiation in the low latitude was higher tan the high latitude, as BeihaiNanningGuilin. The solar radiation changes and the seasonal changes in different places varied, as summerautumnspringwinter. The total radiation and solar radiation hours were consistent. The total solar radiation and the low cloud was in negative relation, but was in positive relation with sunny weather. The total solar radiation was in positive relation with ground temperature, except in winter. [Conclusion] The study provided effective theoretical basis and data reference to the study of climate and development of solar energy.

  8. Analysis of Meteorological Elements and Distribution Characters of Surface Solar Radiation in Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Ai-zhen; HUANG; Ren-li

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the relation between solar radiation distribution and meteorological elements in Guangxi. [Method] Based on the observed data of solar radiation in Guangxi from 1995 to 2009, the total radiation, solar distribution and interannual changes in Guangxi were analyzed. By dint of observed data in Nanning station, the annual, seasonal and monthly changes of net radiation in Nanning and the linear relation between total radiation, solar distribution characteristics and interannual changes were discussed. [Result] The global radiation of surface solar radiation in the low latitude was higher tan the high latitude, as Beihai>Nanning>Guilin. The solar radiation changes and the seasonal changes in different places varied, as summer>autumn>spring>winter. The total radiation and solar radiation hours were consistent. The total solar radiation and the low cloud was in negative relation, but was in positive relation with sunny weather. The total solar radiation was in positive relation with ground temperature, except in winter. [Conclusion] The study provided effective theoretical basis and data reference to the study of climate and development of solar energy.

  9. Effects of Wearing Different Personal Equipment on Force Distribution at the Plantar Surface of the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The wearing of personal equipment can cause specific changes in muscle activity and posture. In the present study, we investigated the influence of differences in equipment related weight loading and load distribution on plantar pressure. In addition, we studied functional effects of wearing different equipment with a particular focus on relevant changes in foot shape. Methods. Static and dynamic pedobarography were performed on 31 male soldiers carrying increasing weights consisting of different items of equipment. Results. The pressure acting on the plantar surface of the foot increased with higher loading, both under static and dynamic conditions (p < 0.05. We observed an increase in the contact area (p < 0.05 and an influence of load distribution through different ways to carry the rifle. Conclusions. The wearing of heavier weights leads to an increase in plantar pressure and contact area. This may be caused by flattening of the transverse and longitudinal arches. The effects are more evident in subjects with flat feet deformities which seem to flatten at an earlier load condition with a greater amount compared to subjects with normal arches. Improving load distribution should be a main goal in the development of military equipment in order to prevent injuries or functional disorders of the lower extremity.

  10. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: Spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-06-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500-700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  11. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  12. [Distribution Characteristics and Source Identification of Organochlorine Pesticides in Surface Soil in Karst Underground River Basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng-lan; Sun, Yu-chuan; Zhang, Mei; Yu, Qin; Xu, Xin

    2016-03-15

    Six typical surface soil samples were taken in Laolongdong underground river basin, and 20 OCPs were analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with micro-⁶³Ni electron capture detector. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution, composition and source of organochlorine pesticides ( OCPs) in the surface soil of Laolongdong underground river basin, and to further evaluate the pollution level. The results showed that 20 OCPs were inordinately detected in the soil samples and the detection rate of 16 OCPs (except for p,p'-DDE, cis-Chlordane, trans-Chlordane, dieldrin) was 100%. Moreover, the CHLs and DDTs were the main contaminants, and there were obvious differences in the concentrations of organochlorine pesticides between different sampling points. The concentration range of total OCPs was 5.57-2,618.57 ng · g⁻¹ with a mean of 467.28 ng · g⁻¹. Compared with other regions both at home and abroad, the concentrations of HCHs and DDTs in the surface soil samples of the studied area were arranged from high to middle levels. The total concentrations of OCPs, HCHs, DDTs and CHLs had a similar variation tendency in spatial distribution, upstream > midstream > downstream, and the concentrations of OCPs in upstream were obviously higher than those in midstream and downstream. Source analysis indicated that the HCHs mainly came from the use of lindane. DDTs in soil came from not only the early residues but also recently illegal use of industrial DDTs and the input of dicofol. In addition, chlordan was mainly from the early residues and atmospheric deposition. Compared with the Environmental Quality Standard for Soils of China and Netherlands, the level of OCPs in Xinli vilage soil was categorized as highly polluted, but the levels of OCPs in Longjing bay, Xia spit, and Zhao courtyard soils were classified as slightly polluted, while the Longjing adjacency and gaozhong temple soils belonged to unpolluted ones.

  13. The distribution of sulfur dioxide and other infrared absorbers on the surface of Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Lopes-Gautier, R. M. C.; Davies, A.G.; Kamp, L.W.; Mosher, J.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Clark, R.N.; Fanale, F.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer was used to investigate the distribution and properties of sulfur dioxide over the surface of Io, and qualitative results for the anti-Jove hemisphere are presented here. SO2, existing as a frost, is found almost everywhere, but with spatially variable concentration. The exceptions are volcanic hot spots, where high surface temperatures promote rapid vaporization and can produce SO2-free areas. The pervasive frost, if fully covering the cold surface, has characteristic grain sizes of 30 to 100 Urn, or greater. Regions of greater sulfur dioxide concentrations are found. The equatorial Colchis Regio area exhibits extensive snowfields with large particles (250 to 500 ??m diameter, or greater) beneath smaller particles. A weak feature at 3.15 ??m is observed and is perhaps due to hydroxides, hydrates, or water. A broad absorption in the 1 ??m region, which could be caused by iron-containing minerals, shows a concentration in Io'S southern polar region, with an absence in the Pele plume deposition ring. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Concentration level and geographical distribution of nitrobenzene in Chinese surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jijun; LIU Linghua; LIU Xiaoru; ZHOU Huaidong; WANG Zijian; HUANG Shengbiao

    2008-01-01

    Nitrobenzene was reported to occur at relatively high concentrations in some Chinese surface water and to cause an environmental pollution event in 2005. In order to map the distribution of nitrobenzene in the Chinese surface water throughout China, surface water samples were collected from over 600 sites in the 7 major watersheds and three drainage areas. The samples were analyzed for concentration of nitrobenzene. Overall, nitrobenzene was more frequently detected at higher concentrations in the rivers of North China, including Songhuajiang River, Liaohe River, Haihe River, Yellow River, Huaihe River and Northwest drainage area rivers, compared with those in the rivers of South China, including Yangtze river, Pearl river, Southeast drainage area rivers and Southwest drainage rivers. The detection rate of nitrobenzene was the 83.2 % for all the samples, with a mean value of 18.1 ng/L and a range of < 0.3-8,450.0 ng/L. The highest mean concentration of nitrobenzene was observed in the Yellow River, followed by Huaihe River . The results of this investigation indicated that nitrobenzene should be of particular concern in China and its ecological and health risk should be assessed.

  15. The Distribution of Star Formation and Metals in the Low Surface Brightness Galaxy UGC 628

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J E; Wang, Sharon X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the MUSCEL Program (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry and Evolution of LSB galaxies), a project aimed at determining the star-formation histories of low surface brightness galaxies. MUSCEL utilizes ground-based optical spectra and space-based UV and IR photometry to fully constrain the star-formation histories of our targets with the aim of shedding light on the processes that led low surface brightness galaxies down a different evolutionary path from that followed by high surface brightness galaxies, such as our Milky Way. Here we present the spatially-resolved optical spectra of UGC 628, observed with the VIRUS-P IFU at the 2.7-m Harlen J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and utilize emission-line diagnostics to determine the rate and distribution of star formation as well as the gas-phase metallicity and metallicity gradient. We find highly clustered star formation throughout UGC 628, excluding the core regions, and a log(O/H) metallicity around -4.2, with mo...

  16. A short report of the investigations made on the facies of German coal deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehmer, Janet [An den Rothen 96, D-97080 Wurzburg (Germany)

    2004-04-23

    In 1996, Commission II of the ICCP set up a coal facies working group. The first step was to collate literature on coal facies analysis for different countries. This report provides an overview on the investigations made on the facies interpretations of German coal deposits over the last 50 years with an emphasis on Tertiary coals. It outlines the major deposits present in Germany and gives the main facies interpretations of coals of lignite and bituminous rank. Furthermore, it points out that there lies a certain ambiguity in the interpretation of specific maceral associations, which could confuse facies analyses without the support of interdisciplinary studies and thus suggests that the working group should address this point for future work.

  17. Distribution and sources of hydrocarbons in surface sediments of Gemlik Bay (Marmara Sea, Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlü, Selma; Alpar, Bedri

    2006-07-01

    Seabottom sediments from Gemlik Bay, one of the most polluted spots in SW Marmara Sea, were analyzed for parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentration of 14 PAH compounds in sediment samples collected from 61 locations are distributed in a broad spectrum from low to very high concentration levels (50.8-13482 ng g-1). No significant correlation was found between summation operatorPAHs and organic carbon content while summation operatorPAHs increase slightly with silt/clay ratio. Therefore the distribution and concentrations of PAHs would be determined more by direct input, rather than by the type of sediment found locally. The most polluted areas are distributed nearshore eastern (Gemlik) and southern (Kursunlu, Mudanya and Trilye) coasts which are mainly influenced by rapid ecotourism development, direct discharges from rivers, surface run-off and drainage from port areas, domestic and industrial effluent discharges through outfalls and various contaminants from ships. Special PAH compound ratios, such as Phe/Anth, Flu/Py, B[a]A/Chry; LMWPAH/HMWPAH; Per/; Per/summation operatorPAH; Per/summation operator(penta-aromatics) and Flu/(Py+Flu), were calculated to evaluate different hydrocarbon origins and their relative importance. Pyrolytic activity is dominant along the highly-populated eastern and southern coasts. Meanwhile, petrogenic activity mixed with pyrolytic activity is a matter of fact in front of the main industrial-tourism ports and anchoring areas as well. Higher concentration of perylene are distributed along the mostly polluted eastern and southern coastal areas, however, the concentrations of perylene relative to the penta-aromatic isomers are dominant especially in the northern and deepest sectors of the bay, indicating diagenetic origin for the presence of perylene.

  18. Facies architecture and high-resolution sequence stratigraphy of an Upper Cretaceous platform margin succession, southern central Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomar, Luis; Gili, Eulalia; Obrador, Antonio; Ward, William C.

    2005-04-01

    Excellent exposures of Upper Cretaceous (Santonian) carbonate platforms on the northern flank of Sant Corneli anticline (southern central Pyrenees) provide detailed information of facies architecture in both depositional strike and dip directions. Basic accretional units are differentiated by facies contrast across mappable surfaces. These surfaces do not show clear evidence of subaerial erosion and are correlated basinward with bedding planes across which there are subtle changes in skeletal composition. Two types of basic accretional units have been identified based on bedding patterns, internal facies architecture and skeletal composition: (1) Rudist buildups consist of a rudist and coral belt at the platform margin, passing landward into a slender-hippuritid lithosome, locally overlain by a bioclastic blanket that passes basinward, into bioclastic "apron-like" clinobeds and into fine-grained packstone/wackestone. (2) Calcarenite wedges consist of yellow-brown, benthic-foraminifer-rich grainstones to grain-dominated packstones, with scattered rudist shells and small coral colonies, passing basinward into mud-dominated packstones to wackestones, with variable siliciclastic content (quartz sand to silt and clay). Rudist buildups and calcarenite wedges alternate, although not rhythmically. These changes in platform skeletal composition reflect changes in the dominant type of carbonate-producing biota independently of the changes in accommodation. Both types of basic accretional units: rudist buildups and calcarenite wedges, form simple sequences and parasequences according to internal lithofacies arrangement and inferred sea-level cyclicity (cycles or paracycles). High-frequency sea-level cyclicity fits in the Milankovitch frequency band. Long-term changes in accommodation governing aggradation, progradation and backstepping of basic sequences and parasequences reflect tectonic influence rather than long-term changes in eustatic sea level.

  19. Inferring snow pack ripening and melt out from distributed ground surface temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-O. Schmid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal snow cover and its melting are heterogeneous both in space and time. Describing and modelling this variability are important because it affects divers phenomena such as runoff, ground temperatures or slope movements. This study investigates the derivation of melting characteristics based on spatial clusters of temperature measurements. Results are based on data from Switzerland where ground surface temperatures were measured with miniature loggers (iButtons at 40 locations, referred to as footprints. At each footprint, ten iButtons have been distributed randomly few cm below the ground surface over an area of 10 m × 10 m. Footprints span elevations of 2100–3300 m a.s.l. and slope angles of 0–55°, as well as diverse slope expositions and types of surface cover and ground material. Based on two years of temperature data, the basal ripening date and the melt-out date are determined for each iButton, aggregated to the footprint level and further analysed. The date of melt out could be derived for nearly all iButtons, the ripening date could be extracted for only approximately half of them because it requires ground freezing below the snow pack. The variability within a footprint is often considerable and one to three weeks difference between melting or ripening of the points in one footprint is not uncommon. The correlation of mean annual ground surface temperatures, ripening date and melt-out date is moderate, making them useful intuitive complementary measured for model evaluation.

  20. Experimental validation of a sub-surface model of solar power for distributed marine sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Gregory G.; Cantin, Heather P.; Shafer, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    The capabilities of distributed sensor systems such as marine wildlife telemetry tags could be significantly enhanced through the integration of photovoltaic modules. Photovoltaic cells could be used to supplement the primary batteries for wildlife telemetry tags to allow for extended tag deployments, wherein larger amounts of data could be collected and transmitted in near real time. In this article, we present experimental results used to validate and improve key aspects of our original model for sub-surface solar power. We discuss the test methods and results, comparing analytic predictions to experimental results. In a previous work, we introduced a model for sub-surface solar power that used analytic models and empirical data to predict the solar irradiance available for harvest at any depth under the ocean's surface over the course of a year. This model presented underwater photovoltaic transduction as a viable means of supplementing energy for marine wildlife telemetry tags. The additional data provided by improvements in daily energy budgets would enhance the temporal and spatial comprehension of the host's activities and/or environments. Photovoltaic transduction is one method that has not been widely deployed in the sub-surface marine environments despite widespread use on terrestrial and avian species wildlife tag systems. Until now, the use of photovoltaic cells for underwater energy harvesting has generally been disregarded as a viable energy source in this arena. In addition to marine telemetry systems, photovoltaic energy harvesting systems could also serve as a means of energy supply for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), as well as submersible buoys for oceanographic data collection.

  1. The geographic distribution of strontium isotopes in Danish surface waters - A base for provenance studies in archaeology, hydrology and agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Karin Margarita; Frei, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Sr isotope signatures are reported for 192 surface water (lakes/ponds and rivers/creeks) samples from within Denmark and an isotope distribution map is presented that may serve as a base for provenance applications, including archaeological migration studies, ground water – surface ...

  2. Neoproterozoic Molar-tooth Structure and Constraint of Depositional Facies and Environment in the North China Platform in Jiangsu, Anhui and Liaoning, Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongqing; GAO Linzhi; LIU Yanxue

    2005-01-01

    Molar tooth structure (MTS) represented by complex ptygmatical shapes is widely distributed in the Proterozoic of the world.MTS filled by fine,equant sparry calcite (or dolomite) displays an abrupt contact with hosting rocks,which are mainly composed of carbonaceous micrites and fine-grained carbonates with local silts and stormdominated deposits with graded,cross or wave beddings,numerous erosional surfaces and truncated and fills or guttered bases.Occurrence of MTS suggests a result of the constraint of sedimentary facies,and the storm-base in ramp settings is the maximum depth for the formation of MTS.Vertical succession of MTS-bearing carbonates shows a deposition stacked by high-frequency shallow subtidal and peritidal cycles.An individual cyclic MTS-bearing sequence is characterized by thinning,shallowing and dynamic decreasing-upward,and peritidal caps of purple red iron and organic carbonaceous sediments with more complicated shapes of MTS are common on the top of individual MTS-bearing sequences.

  3. An Active-Distributed Temperature Sensing method to quantify groundwater - surface water exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nataline; Bour, Olivier; Lavenant, Nicolas; Faucheux, Mickaël; Fovet, Ophélie; Longuevergne, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying groundwater and surface water interactions are key elements for the management of water quality and quantity, but also for the preservation of groundwater dependent ecosystems and riparian habitat. We developed a methodology to quantify groundwater and surface water interactions, by setting up an active heat tracer experiment using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS). The experimental setup consists in heating an armoured fiber-optic cable that has been previously deployed along the streambed within the sediments. Then, the increase in temperature along the heated cable is a function of the thermal properties of the sediments and of the fluid flow velocity within the sediments. The cable is heated electrically through the steel armouring of the cable while the elevations in temperature are continuously monitored. We tested this methodology on the Kerbernez catchment, located in south-western Brittany (France) and which is part of the AgrHys hydrological observatory. We deploy the cable in a first-order stream within this small agricultural catchment (0.12 km2). Temperature was monitored along 60 meters of stream with a spatial and temporal resolution respectively equal to 29 cm and 30 s. To interpret the data, we used an analytical solution developed for geothermal energy that considers advection and conduction of temperature in porous media. To validate the use of the analytical solution and to define the limits of the method, a 2D numerical model has been developed. This model simulates heat transport and conduction with steady state fluid flow using the Conjugate Heat Transfer module of COMSOL Multiphysics ®. During heating and cooling, the measured temperature was particularly variable along the section with temperature increases that range between 16 to 36°C. This variability can directly be associated with local variations of water fluxes by applying the appropriate analytical solution. Henceforth, it is

  4. Distinguishing fluvio-deltaic facies by bulk geochemistry and heavy minerals: an example from the Miocene of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Rasmussen, Erik S.; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Interpretations of seismic profiles, gamma-ray logs and sediment descriptions were used to classify seven facies in Miocene fluvio-deltaic deposits ofDenmark. An impartial approach was adopted by not including analytical data in the facies definition. This approach allowed identification...... is found from the delta slope facies offshore to the delta toe and shelf facies. This trend is interpreted as a result of sorting by turbidity currents. The mixed origin of the transgressive lag facies is shown by the poorer sorting in this facies. By indicating the amount of alteration the sediments have...... been exposed to, the Ti-mineral maturity has proven useful in characterizing the facies. This systematic approach of tying depositional environments to a well-calibrated sequence stratigraphic model has generated analytical results which are valid as reference levels for future facies identifications....

  5. Assessing Biogenecity of Stromatolites: Return to the Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, R. S.; Jameson, S.; Rutter, A.; McCarthy, K.; Planavsky, N. J.; Severson, M.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of richly microfossiliferous cherty stromatolites near Schreiber and Kakabeka Falls, Ontario, in the 1.9 Ga Gunflint Iron Formation, firmly established the field of pre-Cambrian paleontology. In the half-century since this discovery, paradigm shifts in the ecology of the microfossils as well as the utility of stromatolites as biological markers has caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the pre-Cambrian fossil record. This research summarizes facies evaluation of the two stromatolite marker beds in the Gunflint-correlative Biwabik Iron Formation of Minnesota. The centimeter-scale microstratigraphy of cores drilled through the central and eastern Mesabi Iron Range was coupled with field descriptions of outcrops and mines in both the Biwabik and Gunflint iron formations. Eight lithologic facies associated with the stromatolites are identified: A) Pebble conglomerate clasts ranging in size of 0.5-3 cm, syneresis cracks, and septarian nodules with medium to coarse grain matrix; B) siltstone with subparallel sub-mm to 5 cm magnetitic and non-magnetic bands; C) stromatolitic boundstone comprising stratiform, pseudocolumnar, domal, undulatory, flat-laminated, dendritic, columnar, and mico-digitate forms and oncoids 0.5 to 2 cm diameter; D) grainstone with medium to coarse siliceous and carbonate ooids and peloids; E) massive green crystalline beds with bands of magnetite, quartz, calcite, disseminated pyrite and localized ankerite; F) autobreccicated fabric of 0.3 to 10 mm clasts; G) medium to coarse sandstone; H) quartzite. Correlation between 11 cores near Hoyt Lakes and 9 cores through the basal stromatolite layer at the MinnTac Mine near Virginia revealed that stromatolites formed both on conglomerate and medium quartz sandstone. Multiple forms of stromatolite may occur in a vertical succession (flat-laminated to undulatory to psuedocolumnar to columnar) or a core may be dominated by one type, typically columnar-stratiform. Where stromatolites do

  6. Temperature effect of irradiated target surface on distribution of nanoparticles formed by implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Popok, V N

    2001-01-01

    The composition layers, containing the metal nanoparticles, synthesized thorough implantation of the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 ion/cm sup 2 into the sodium-calcium silicate glass by the ion current of 3 mu A/cm sup 2 and the sublayer temperature of 35 deg C are studied. The obtained implantation results are analyzed in dependence on the temperature effects, developing for the glass samples of various thickness. The data on the silver distribution, the metal nanoparticles formation and growth by depth are obtained from the optical reflection spectra. It is demonstrated that minor changes in the surface temperature of the irradiated glass sublayer lead to noticeable diversities in the regularities of the nanoparticles formation in the sample volume

  7. Transmission comb of a distributed Bragg reflector with two surface dielectric gratings

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xiaobo

    2016-02-19

    The transmission behaviour of a distributed Bragg reector (DBR) with surface dielectric gratings on top and bottom is studied. The transmission shows a comb-like spectrum in the DBR band gap, which is explained in the Fano picture. The number density of the transmission peaks increases with increasing number of cells of the DBR, while the ratio of the average full width at half maximum to the corresponding average free spectral range, being only few percent for both transversal electric and magnetic waves, is almost invariant. The transmission peaks can be narrower than 0.1 nm and are fully separated from each other in certain wavebands. We further prove that the transmission combs are robust against randomness in the heights of the DBR layers. Therefore, the proposed structure is a candidate for an ultra-narrow-band multichannel filter or polarizer.

  8. Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in close binary stars II. Nonlinear evolution and surface distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2003-01-01

    Observations of magnetically active close binaries with orbital periods of a few days reveal the existence of starspots at preferred longitudes (with respect to the direction of the companion star). We numerically investigate the non-linear dynamics and evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the convection zoneof a fast-rotating component of a close binary system and explore whether the tidal effects are able to generate non-uniformities in the surface distribution of erupting flux tubes. Assuming a synchronised system with a rotation period of two days and consisting of two solar-type components, both the tidal force and the deviation of the stellar structure from spherical shape are considered in lowest-order perturbation theory. The magnetic field is initially stored in the form of toroidal magnetic flux rings within the stably stratified overshoot region beneath the convection zone. Once the field has grown sufficiently strong, instabilities initiate the formation of rising flux loops, which rise through the...

  9. Statistical distribution of surface elevation for the fourth order nonlinear random sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管长龙; 孙孚

    1997-01-01

    Based upon the nonlinear model of random sea waves, the statistical distribution of wave surface elevation exact to the fourth order is derived as the truncated Gram-Charlier series, by calculating directly each order moment. The phenomenon found by Huang et al. that the agreement between observed data and investigated series deteriorates much more when the series is kept to λ8 is explained. The effect of the approximation order on the truncation of series and the determination of coefficients is investigated. For the mth order approximation, the derived series is truncated at H3m-3 with the absence of H3m-4, and the coefficients of H3m-3 and H3m-6 are connected by a simple algebraic relation.

  10. Sequence Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Facies of Lower Oligocene Yacheng Formation in Deepwater Area of Qiongdongnan Basin, Northern South China Sea:Implications for Coal-Bearing Source Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinfeng Ren; Hua Wang; Ming Sun; Huajun Gan; Guangzeng Song; Zhipeng Sun

    2014-01-01

    For unveiling coal-bearing source rocks in terrestrial-marine transitional sequences, the sequence stratigraphic framework and sedimentary facies of Lower Oligocene Yacheng Formation of Qiongdongnan Basin were investigated using seismic profiles, complemented by well bores and cores. Three third-order sequences are identified on the basis of unconformities on basin margins and cor-relative conformities in the basin center, namely SQYC3, SQYC2 and SQYC1 from bottom to top. Coal measure in Yacheng Formation of Qiongdongnan Basin were deposited within a range of facies asso-ciations from delta plain/tidal zone to neritic sea, and three types of favourable sedimentary facies as-sociations for coal measure were established within the sequence stratigraphic framework, including braided delta plain and alluvial fan, lagoon and tidal flat, and fan delta and coastal plain facies associa-tions. Results shown that, in the third-order sequences, coal accumulation in landward areas (such as delta plain) of the study area predominantly correlates with the early transgressive systems tract (TST) to middle highstand systems tract (HST), while in seaward areas (such as tidal flat-lagoon) it correlates with the early TST and middle HST. The most potential coal-bearing source rocks formed where the accommodation creation rate (Ra) and the peat-accumulation rate (Rp) could reach a state of balance, which varied among different sedimentary settings. Furthermore, intense tectonic subsidence and fre-quent alternative marine-continental changes of Yacheng Formation during the middle rift stage were the main reasons why the coal beds shown the characteristics of multi-beds, thin single-bed, and rapidly lateral changes. The proposed sedimentary facies associations may aid in predicting distribution of coal-bearing source rocks. This study also demonstrates that controlling factors analysis using sequence stratigraphy and sedimentology may serve as an effective approach for coal

  11. Fourier and granulometry methods on 3D images of soil surfaces for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Green, O.; Munkholm, Lars Juhl;

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to present and compare two methods for evaluating soil aggregate size distribution based on high resolution 3D images of the soil surface. The methods for analyzing the images are discrete Fourier transform and granulometry. The results of these methods correlate...... with a measured weight distribution of the soil aggregates. The results have shown that it is possible to distinguish between the cultivated and the uncultivated soil surface. A sensor system suitable for capturing in-situ high resolution 3D images of the soil surface is also described. This sensor system...... is based on a SICK LMS111 laser range scanner....

  12. Visual Mapping of Sedimentary Facies Can Yield Accurate And Geomorphically Meaningful Results at Morphological Unit to River Segment Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternack, G. B.; Wyrick, J. R.; Jackson, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long practiced in fisheries, visual substrate mapping of coarse-bedded rivers is eschewed by geomorphologists for inaccuracy and limited sizing data. Geomorphologists perform time-consuming measurements of surficial grains, with the few locations precluding spatially explicit mapping and analysis of sediment facies. Remote sensing works for bare land, but not vegetated or subaqueous sediments. As visual systems apply the log2 Wentworth scale made for sieving, they suffer from human inability to readily discern those classes. We hypothesized that size classes centered on the PDF of the anticipated sediment size distribution would enable field crews to accurately (i) identify presence/absence of each class in a facies patch and (ii) estimate the relative amount of each class to within 10%. We first tested 6 people using 14 measured samples with different mixtures. Next, we carried out facies mapping for ~ 37 km of the lower Yuba River in California. Finally, we tested the resulting data to see if it produced statistically significant hydraulic-sedimentary-geomorphic results. Presence/absence performance error was 0-4% for four people, 13% for one person, and 33% for one person. The last person was excluded from further effort. For the abundance estimation performance error was 1% for one person, 7-12% for three people, and 33% for one person. This last person was further trained and re-tested. We found that the samples easiest to visually quantify were unimodal and bimodal, while those most difficult had nearly equal amounts of each size. This confirms psychological studies showing that humans have a more difficult time quantifying abundances of subgroups when confronted with well-mixed groups. In the Yuba, mean grain size decreased downstream, as is typical for an alluvial river. When averaged by reach, mean grain size and bed slope were correlated with an r2 of 0.95. At the morphological unit (MU) scale, eight in-channel bed MU types had an r2 of 0.90 between mean

  13. Sedimentary facies reconstruction and kinematic restoration of tight gas fields. Studies from the Upper Permian in Northwestern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vackiner, Anna Alexandra [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group

    2013-11-01

    Outstanding Ph.D. thesis nominated for a Springer Theses Prize by the RWTH Aachen University, Germany. A multi-disciplinary study with application in the oil and gas industry. Approx. 60 color figures. The thesis of Anna Alexandra Vackiner focuses on the geometric architecture and tectonic evolution of the Permian series, combining seismic interpretation (3D block), field studies in an analogue basin (Panamint Valley in California), as well as 2D restoration of representative cross sections through time in order to illustrate the complex interaction between multiphase extension, inversion and salt diapirism. It will be of major interest for exploration geologists involved in tectonically complex areas. - Francois Roure, August 2012 This thesis improves the understanding and localization of the Upper Rotliegend II tight gas reservoir rock facies. It provides insights into the detailed Upper Rotliegend II palaeo-topography and local tectonically induced sediment thickness changes prior to a multi-phase tectonic overprinting. The research presented in this study further focuses on the tectonically induced synsedimentary facies distribution in transtensional continental settings on the basis of a comparison with a modern field analogue, which enables a detailed analysis of the reservoir rock's distribution and its properties. The study is rounded off with an analysis of the influence of the multiphase tectonic overprinting on the mature Upper Rotliegend II reservoir rocks.

  14. Aerosol size distribution and refractive index from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements in the surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandithurai, G.; Devara, P.C.S.; Raj, P.E.; Sharma, S. [Indian Inst. of Tropical Meteorology, Pune (India)

    1996-05-01

    The results of an inversion method by iteration for determining the aerosol size distribution and the refractive index of atmospheric aerosols in the surface layer from bistatic lidar angular scattering measurements, followed by a brief description of the experimental and data retrieval techniques are presented. The continuous wave, bistatic Argon ion lidar at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune (18{degree}31{prime}N, 73{degree}51{prime}E, 559 m AMSL), India has been used for the measurements. Results of the analysis of 420 samples collected over a 7 years` period indicate mean value of size and refractive indices of 4.0 and 1.6, respectively, with greater fraction of larger particles during premonsoon while smaller particles during post-monsoon months at the lidar site. The retrieved aerosol parameters are compared with those determined from spectroradiometer observations at the same site. The results are found well in agreement with those obtained previously by the authors using the library search method. The above observations of angular distribution of scattered intensity are used with an aerosol model to infer the dominant type of aerosols present in the environment in and around the experimental station.

  15. [Seasonal Provincial Characteristics of Vertical Distribution of Dust Loadings and Heavy Metals near Surface in City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shu-ting

    2015-06-01

    With the emergence of urban high-rise building, the vertical space of human daily life gradually extended upward. Seasonal characteristics of vertical distribution of dust loadings and heavy metals near surface are remarkable. In this study, we collected dust deposited on the windowsill at different space height (1th-8th floor) from three buildings in Guiyang city during spring, summer, autumn and winter, and analyzed the deposition fluxes of dust and elements including Ca, Fe, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The results showed that: the total changing trend of vertical distribution of dust loadings was that the deposition fluxes of dust in winter were the highest, followed by those in spring, and the deposition fluxes of dust in summer were the lowest. The degree of variation on dust loadings dependent on the change of elevation was the highest in winter, followed by that in summer, and was relatively lower in spring and autumn. The effect on dust loadings by seasonal changing was relatively heavier on windowsill on the lower level than on the higher level. The levels of elements were the highest in spring dust, while those in autumn were relatively lower. Among the 8 elements, the variability of Zn in dust related to space time variation was the most obvious, and that of Ca was weaker. The atmospheric inversion condition might be one of the reasons that improved the deposition fluxes of dust and the contents of Ph and Zn in dust during winter and spring.

  16. Spatial Distribution and Anthropogenic Assessment of Heavy Metals in the Surface Sediments of Klang River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Naji; Ahmad Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to quantify the concentration and distribution of metals(Cd,Zn,Ni,Cu,Pb,and Fe)in the surface sediments and to assess the status of metal contaminations in the Klang River,Malaysia.The concentrations of metals(μg/g,Fe%,dry weight)were as follows:0.57-2.19 μg/g Cd;31.89-272.33 μg/g Zn;5.96-24.47μg/g Ni;10.57-52.87μg/g Cu;24.23-64.11μg/g Pb and 1.56%-3.03% Fe.Sequential extraction technique(SET)showed that mean anthropogenic portions of metals were in the order of Zn(60.22%),Cu(56.01%),Cd(45.63%),Ni (42.08%),Pb(33.22%)and Fe(10.26%).The highest concentrations of metals(p<0.05)were found in the stations located close to industrial parks and highly populated areas.The results of the present study showed that the effectiveness of total organic carbon(TOC)contents in controlling the distribution and enrichment of metals was a more important factor compared to grain size.The study also indicated that the control of metals pollution from direct influx of domestic wastes and insufficiently treated industrial wastes in the Mang River was an important and desirable way to minimize the detrimental effects of metals.

  17. Distribution of uranium isotopes in surface water of the Llobregat river basin (Northeast Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, A.; Devesa, R.; Valles, I.; Serrano, I.; Soler, J.; Blazquez, S.; Ortega, X.; Matia, L. [University of Politecn Cataluna, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A study is presented on the distribution of U-234, U-238, U-235 isotopes in surface water of the Llobregat river basin (Northeast Spain), from 2001 to 2006. Sixty-six superficial water samples were collected at 16 points distributed throughout the Llobregat river basin. Uranium isotopes were measured by alpha spectrometry (PIPS detectors). The test procedure was validated according to the quality requirements of the ISO17025 standard. The activity concentration for the total dissolved uranium ranges from 20 to 261 mBq L{sup -1}. The highest concentrations of uranium were detected in an area with formations of sedimentary rock, limestone and lignite. A high degree of radioactive disequilibrium was noted among the uranium isotopes. The U-234/R-238 U activity ratio varied between 1.1 and 1.9 and the waters with the lowest uranium activity registered the highest level of U-234/U-238 activity ratio. Correlations between uranium activity in the tested water and chemical and physical characteristics of the aquifer were found.

  18. Distribution of heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments in Dubai Creeks, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howari, Fares M

    2005-01-01

    Dubai is developing rapidly and many developmental activities are concentrated around its Creek. The present study reports the lateral distribution of heavy metals and compares it with local historical record of heavy metal concentrations. For this purpose surface sediment samples were collected and analyzed for metal contents, total organic carbon content (TOC), mineralogy and grain size. The percentages of the different grain size fraction of the collected sediments were as follow 65% for sand size, 15% for silt size fraction, and the rest accounted for clay size fraction. The microscopic analyses indicate that the sediment composed mainly from carbonate and quartz with traces of rock fragments. Such mineral composition is not believed to be a potential source of heavy metal. The study found that the average recorded heavy metal concentrations in the collected sediment samples were 87, 96, 127, 38.5, and 279 ppm for Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Those values were slightly higher than metal concentrations recoded in 2001 with 1.22 (Cr), 2.5 (Cu), 2.87 (Ni), 0.69 (Pb), and 2.1 (Zn) folds. However, in 2001 and 2003 the measured metal contents, along the creek, were lower than those of the average earth crust. Along the Creek most metals recorded the highest concentrations in the upper reach of the Creek. The distribution of the measured heavy metals was not affected significantly with the TOC values. The present study also documented obvious related point sources of pollution.

  19. Evaluation of missing pellet surface geometry on cladding stress distribution and magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sunderland, Dion [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); ANATECH Corp, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Pytel, Martin [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Stress concentrations are related to pellet defect geometries. • The presence of radial cracks cause increases in stress concentration. • Increasing the size of MPS causes an increase hoop stress concentrations. - Abstract: Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects in nuclear fuel pellets that result from pellet mishandling or manufacturing. The presence of MPS defects can cause significant clad stress concentrations that can lead to through-wall cladding failure for certain combinations of fuel burnup, and reactor power level or power change. Consequently, the impact of MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase, or ramp rate, in both pressurized and boiling water reactors (PWRs and BWRs, respectively). Improved three-dimensional (3-D) fuel performance models of MPS defect geometry can provide better understanding of the probability for pellet clad mechanical interaction (PCMI), and correspondingly the available margin against cladding failure by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) has been developing the Bison-CASL fuel performance code to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding stress concentrations resulting from MPS defects. This paper evaluates the cladding hoop stress distributions as a function of MPS defect geometry with discrete pellet radial cracks for a set of typical operating conditions in a PWR fuel rod. The results provide a first step toward a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress, as well as the temperature distributions within the fuel and clad; and are used to develop stress concentration factors for comparing 2-D and 3-D models.

  20. Spatial distribution of lead concentrations in urban surface soils of New Orleans, Louisiana USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Michael T; Suedel, Burton; Presley, Steven M; Rainwater, Thomas R; Austin, Galen P; Cox, Stephen B; McDaniel, Les N; Rigdon, Richard; Goebel, Timothy; Zartman, Richard; Leftwich, Blair D; Anderson, Todd A; Kendall, Ronald J; Cobb, George P

    2010-10-01

    Immediately following hurricane Katrina concern was raised over the environmental impact of floodwaters on the city of New Orleans, especially in regard to human health. Several studies were conducted to determine the actual contaminant distribution throughout the city and surrounding wetlands by analyzing soil, sediment, and water for a variety of contaminants including organics, inorganics, and biologics. Preliminary investigations by The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech University concluded that soils and sediments contained pesticides, semi-volatiles, and metals, specifically arsenic, iron, and lead, at concentrations that could pose a significant risk to human health. Additional studies on New Orleans floodwaters revealed similar constituents as well as compounds commonly found in gasoline. More recently, it has been revealed that lead (Pb), arsenic, and vanadium are found intermittently throughout the city at concentrations greater than the human health soil screening levels (HHSSLs) of 400, 22 (non-cancer endpoint) and 390 μg/g, respectively. Of these, Pb appears to present the greatest exposure hazard to humans as a result of its extensive distribution in city soils. In this study, we spatially evaluated Pb concentrations across greater New Orleans surface soils. We established 128 sampling sites throughout New Orleans at approximately half-mile intervals. A soil sample was collected at each site and analyzed for Pb by ICP-AES. Soils from 19 (15%) of the sites had Pb concentrations exceeding the HHSSL threshold of 400 μg/g. It was determined that the highest concentrations of Pb were found in the south and west portions of the city. Pb concentrations found throughout New Orleans in this study were then incorporated into a geographic information system to create a spatial distribution model that can be further used to predict Pb exposure to humans in the city.

  1. Surface chlorophyll distributions in the upper Gulf of Thailand investigated using satellite imagery and ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranapratheprat, Anukul

    MERIS data and Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model coupled with the Princeton Ocean Model (POM), were used to investigate seasonal variations in surface chlorophyll distributions and their controlling factors to clarify phytoplankton dynamics in the upper Gulf of Thailand. Chlorophyll maps were produced by application on MERIS Level 2 data an empirical algorithm derived from the regression analysis of the relationship between chlorophyll-a concentration and remote sensing reflectance ratio. The results indicated that the patterns of seasonal chlorophyll distributions corresponded to local wind and water circulations. The model simulation highlighted the importance of river water as a significant nutrient source, and its movement after discharge into the sea is controlled by seasonal circulations. High chlorophyll concentration located along the western coast following the direction of counter-clockwise circulation, forced by the northeast winds, while chlorophyll accumulation was observed in the northeastern corner of the gulf due to clockwise circulation, driven by the southwest winds. These key simulated results are consistent with those of field observations and satellite images captured in the same periods of time, and also described seasonal shifting of blooming areas previously reported. Sensitivity analysis of simulated chlorophyll distributions suggested that not only nutrients but also wind-induced vertical movement plays a significant role in controlling phytoplankton growth. Plankton blooms occur in zones of upwelling or where vertical diffusivities are low. Increasing nutrients in the water column due to river loads leads to increasing potential for severe plankton blooms when other photosynthetic factors, such as water stability and light, are optimized. The knowledge of seasonal patterns of blooming can be used to construct environmental risk maps which are very useful for planning to mitigate the eutrophic problems

  2. MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Yannong Dong; Ning Liu; Guohua Gao; Fengjun Zhang; Ruijian Li

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. The volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade. The techniques developed in this research will make it easier to use all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. In this project, we have developed computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Specifically, we have developed methods for adjusting porosity and permeability fields to match both production and time-lapse seismic data and have also developed a procedure to adjust the locations of boundaries between facies to match production data. In all cases, the history matched rock property fields are consistent with a prior model based on static data and geologic information. Our work also indicates that it is possible to adjust relative permeability curves when history matching production data.

  3. Distribution and sources of organic matter in surface marine sediments across the North American Arctic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; O'Connor, Alison E.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou; Yunker, Mark B.; Gobeil, Charles; Macdonald, Robie W.

    2013-09-01

    As part of the International Polar Year research program, we conducted a survey of surface marine sediments from box cores along a section extending from the Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. We used bulk elemental and isotopic compositions, together with biomarkers and principal components analysis, to elucidate the distribution of marine and terrestrial organic matter in different regions of the North American Arctic margin. Marked regional contrasts were observed in organic carbon loadings, with the highest values (≥1 mg C m-2 sediment) found in sites along Barrow Canyon and the Chukchi and Bering shelves, all of which were characterized by sediments with low oxygen exposure, as inferred from thin layers (cutin acids) all indicate marked regional differences in the proportions of marine and terrigenous organic matter present in surface sediments. Regions such as Barrow Canyon and the Mackenzie River shelf were characterized by the highest contributions of land-derived organic matter, with compositional characteristics that suggested distinct sources and provenance. In contrast, sediments from the Canadian Archipelago and Davis Strait had the smallest contributions of terrigenous organic matter and the lowest organic carbon loadings indicative of a high degree of post-depositional oxidation.

  4. Flux of benzo(a)pyrene to the ground surface and its distribution in the ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milukaite, A. [Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    1998-07-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) has been investigated in bulk atmospheric deposition, moss, needles of pine and some species of vascular plants. At two remote Lithuanian sites, for 1990-1995 the flux of benzo(a)pyrene from the atmosphere to the ground surface varied between 0.3 to 4.8 {mu}g{sup -2} mo{sup -1}. Consequently the territory of Lithuania (65,000 km{sup 2}) yearly was exposed to 624-2574 kg of carcinogen. The distribution of BP in soil and various vascular plant tissues (trifolium tepens, Elitrygea repens, Thymus serpyllum) indicates that benzo(a)pyrene is assimilated by flora. The concentration of BP is different in various organs of vascular plants and mostly depends on the degree of soil pollution. More than 300 samples of moss, mostly Hylocomium spendens and Pleurozium schreberi were analysed for BP. From 3.1 to 896.0 {mu}g kg{sup -1} of BP were measured in the moss samples. The flux of BP to the ground surface correlates well with its concentration in moss. A map of BP flux across Lithuania was created. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Surface-etched distributed Bragg reflector lasers in photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Raymond Kirk

    Semiconductor lasers have been used as a highly efficient, coherent source of light for commercial, industrial, and medical applications. Recently, much work has been done to engineer optical devices with a high degree of functionality. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) achieve technology's twin goals of miniaturization and integration by implementing multiple optical functions on a single chip. This dissertation shows that asymmetric cladding surface-etched distributed Bragg reflector (ACSE-DBR) lasers are ideal candidates for monolithic photonic integration for the purpose of optical heterodyning. The active laser devices in these ACSE-DBR lasers exhibit high quantum efficiencies, tunable performance, and narrow spectral linewidths. The asymmetric cladding ridge waveguides are shown to provide low-loss routing structures, enabling monolithic integration of active and passive devices with a small layout footprint. This technology is applied to two specific purposes: a dual wavelength source for generating terahertz radiation via optical heterodyning, and high-power DBR laser arrays for spectral beam combining. A dual-wavelength PIC at 850 nm for the purpose of optical heterodyning is presented in this work. The engineering of the active and passive structures is extensively analyzed. These structures are shown to be ideally suited for high pulsed-power optical heterodyning applications. A high-power DBR laser array is also presented for use in spectral beam combining systems. The laser structure for this application is engineered for high-power applications. The engineering of the lateral optical guiding structure as well as the surface-etched grating is discussed.

  6. Scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy from surface drifters in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwada, Dhruv; LaCasce, Joseph H.; Speer, Kevin G.

    2016-10-01

    The scale-dependent distribution of kinetic energy is probed at the surface in the Gulf of Mexico using surface drifters from the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) experiment. The second-order velocity structure function and its decomposition into rotational and divergent components are examined. The results reveal that the divergent component, compared to the rotational component, dominates at scales below 5 km, and the pattern is reversed at larger scales. The divergent component has a slope near 2/3 below 5 km, similar to an energy cascade range (k-5/3). The third-order velocity structure function at scales below 5 km is negative and implies a forward cascade of energy to smaller scales. The rotational component has a steeper slope, roughly 1.5, from scales of 5 km up to the deformation radius. This is similar to a 2-D enstrophy cascade, although the slope is shallower than the predicted 2. There is a brief 2/3 range from the deformation radius to 200 km, suggestive of a 2-D inverse cascade.

  7. Magma ascent, fragmentation and depositional characteristics of "dry" maar volcanoes: Similarities with vent-facies kimberlite deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuijs, Jaap F.; Mattsson, Hannes B.

    2013-02-01

    Several maar craters within the Lake Natron-Engaruka monogenetic volcanic field (LNE-MVF) of northern Tanzania show compelling evidence for magmatic fragmentation and dry deposition. This is in contradiction of the common belief that most maars are formed through the explosive interaction between ascending magma and ground- or surface water. We here present a detailed study on the eruptive and depositional characteristics of the Loolmurwak and Eledoi maar volcanoes, two of the largest craters in the LNE-MVF, focusing on high-resolution stratigraphy, sedimentology, grain size distribution, pyroclast textures and morphologies, bulk geochemistry and mineral chemistry. At both maars, ejected material has been emplaced by a combination of pyroclastic surges and fallout. Indicators of phreatomagmatic fragmentation and wet deposition, such as impact sags, accretionary lapilli, vesiculated tuffs and plastering against obstacles, are absent in the deposits. Juvenile material predominantly occurs as fluidal-shaped vesicular melt droplets and contains no glass shards produced by the breakage of bubble walls. The Eledoi deposits comprise a large amount of inversely graded beds and lenses, which result from grain flow in a dry depositional environment. Preferential deposition of fine material toward the northern side of its crater can be related to effective wind winnowing in a dry eruption plume. This large variety of observations testifies to the dominance of magmatic fragmentation as well as dry deposition at the Loolmurwak and Eledoi maars, which is in line with what has been found for other structures in the LNE-MVF but contrasts with current ideas on maar formation. We infer that a volatile-rich, olivine melilitic magma was formed by small amounts of partial melting at upper mantle depths. With minimum average ascent rates of 5.3 m s- 1 for Loolmurwak and 26.2 m s- 1 for Eledoi, this magma rapidly moved toward the surface and exsolved a substantial amount of volatiles

  8. Exact Solutions of Chemically Reactive Solute Distribution in MHD Boundary Layer Flow over a Shrinking Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandaneswar Midya

    2012-01-01

    An analytical study of the distribution of a reactant solute undergoing a first-order chemical reaction in the boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible Buid over a linearly shrinking surface is presented. The Row is permeated by an externally applied magnetic Geld normal to the plane of the flow. The equations governing the Row and concentration Reid are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity variables. Closed form exact solutions of the reduced concentration equation are obtained for both prescribed power-law surface concentration (PSC) and power-law wall mass flux (PMF) as boundary conditions. The study reveals that the concentration over a shrinking sheet is signiRcantly different from that of a stretching surface. It s found that te solute boundary layer thickness is enhanced with the increasing values of the Schmidt number and the power-law index parameter, but decreases with enhanced vaJues of magnetic and reaction rate parameters for the PSC case. For the PMF case, the solute boundary layer thickness decreases with the increase of the Schmidt number, magnetic and reaction rate parameter for power-law index parameter n = 0. Negative solute boundary layer thickness is observed for the PMF case when n = 1 and 2, and these facts may not be realized in real-world applications.%An analytical study of the distribution of a reactant solute undergoing a first-order chemical reaction in the boundary layer flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid over a linearly shrinking surface is presented.The flow is permeated by an externally applied magnetic field normal to the plane of the flow.The equations governing the flow and concentration field are reduced into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity variables.Closed form exact solutions of the reduced concentration equation are obtained for both prescribed power-law surface concentration (PSC) and power-law wall

  9. Pb, Cu, and Zn distributions at humic acid-coated metal-oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingge; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Levard, Clement; Siebner, Hagar; Gu, Baohua; Bargar, John R.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    (II) mobilized from the ESHA coatings onto the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces increased from 40% (no added Ca) to 58% (with 2 mM Ca) after 72 h of reaction time, possibly due to displacement of Pb(II) by Ca(II) from binding sites in the ESHA coatings. In contrast, Pb(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II) present in the ESHA coatings were found to be unreactive with the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface. The observed reactivities of the three ESHA-coated metal-oxide surfaces with respect to metal-ion sorption are consistent with the trend observed for the uncoated metal-oxide surfaces: α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) > α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) > α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1). In addition, Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 9.0 as a result of the increasingly negative surface charge. These results show that intrinsic properties (nature of binding sites, binding affinities, and surface charge) of the ESHA coatings and metal-oxide surfaces, as well as external parameters such as pH and competing ions, are key factors governing the distribution and speciation of metal ions at complex NOM/mineral interfaces.

  10. Facies discrimination in a mixed fluvio-eolian setting using elemental whole rock geochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Johan; Friis, Henrik; Stollhofen, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Fluvio-eolian successions are generally characterized by a high degree of complexity and internal heterogeneity. Quantifying the rapid facies changes in time and space is a major challenge to hydrocarbon reservoir characterisation.We present a method for facies discrimination in fluvio-eolian suc......Fluvio-eolian successions are generally characterized by a high degree of complexity and internal heterogeneity. Quantifying the rapid facies changes in time and space is a major challenge to hydrocarbon reservoir characterisation.We present a method for facies discrimination in fluvio......-eolian successions. The method is developed on the modern fluvio-eolian sediments from the Skeleton Coast dune field, Namibia. The examined sediments comprise eight different facies types; eolian dune sands, inter dune fluvial channel sands, intra erg mass flow deposits, intra erg hyperconcentrated flow deposits...... performed on the geochemical data has enabled discrimination of seven of the eight facies types. Furthermore, the facies discrimination method allowed a quantitative estimate of the degree of fluvial reworking of eolian sand. We believe that the method presented here, when calibrated to a reference well...

  11. LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY AND FACIES ARCHITECTURE OF THE OLIGOCENE CONGLOMERATES AT MONTE PAREI (FANES. DOLOMITES, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LORENZ KEIM

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The only occurrence of Tertiary (Oligocene sediments in the Dolomites at Monte Parei results from a complex tectonic and sedimentary history. The Tertiary marine clastic succession is sealing the Dinaric (Late Cretaceous to Paleogene deformed basement. The basin-fill can be differentiated into four lithofacies which show extensive lateral interfingering: ,local scarp breccias with giant blocks (facies A, chaotic breccias of debris flow origin (facies B, balanid and shell coquina beds (facies C and conglomeratic grain and debris flows with sandstone intercalations (facies D. Transport directions (imbricate clasts and cross bedding and petrographic composition indicate two different source areas. Sediments of facies B were shed from a structural high in the SW, while carbonate-siliciclastic debris of facies C and D originated from a pebbly or rocky shore in the N. Lithofacies and facies interrelationships clearly indicate the control by synsedimentary tectonic activity. Neoalpine closure of the basin by overthrusting lead to the preservation of the sediments. 

  12. Subcellular distribution of uranium in the roots of Spirodela punctata and surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Xiaoqin, E-mail: xiaoqin_nie@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Dong, Faqin, E-mail: fqdong2004@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liu, Ning [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology (Sichuan University), Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Liu, Mingxue [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China); Zhang, Dong; Kang, Wu [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry,China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Sun, Shiyong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jie [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Wastes and Environmental Safety Laboratory, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. • The particles including 35% Fe (wt%) released from the cells after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h. • Most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal. • FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed. - Abstract: The subcellular distribution of uranium in roots of Spirodela punctata (duckweed) and the process of surface interaction were studied upon exposure to U (0, 5–200 mg/L) at pH 5. The concentration of uranium in each subcelluar fraction increased significantly with increasing solution U level, after 200 mg/L uranium solution treatment 120 h, the proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. OM SEM and EDS showed after 5–200 mg/L U treatment 4–24 h, some intracellular fluid released from the root cells, after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h, the particles including 35% Fe (wt%) and other organic matters such as EPS released from the cells, most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal, similar crystal has been found in the cell wall and organelle fractions after 50 mg/L U treatment 120 h. FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed.

  13. Spatiotemporal distributions of Fukushima-derived radionuclides in nearby marine surface sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kusakabe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatiotemporal distributions of anthropogenic radionuclides in marine surface sediments off Miyagi, Fukushima, and Ibaraki Prefectures were analyzed on the basis of data collected during the monitoring program launched by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Science and Technology in 2011 right after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident began. Concentrations of 137Cs in the surface sediments varied spatially by two orders of magnitude, from 1.7 to 580 Bq kg-dry−1, and there was no obvious correlation between 137Cs concentration and the proximity of the sampling location to the accident site. The total inventory of 137Cs accumulated in the upper 3 cm of surface sediments in the monitoring area was estimated to be 3.78 × 1013 Bq, that is, 0.1–2% of the total 137Cs flux from the plant to the ocean as a result of the accident (the percentage depends on the model used to estimate the total flux. The spatial variations of 137Cs concentration and inventory depended on two main factors: the 137Cs concentration in the overlying water during the first several months after the accident and the physical characteristics of the sediments (water content and bulk density. The temporal variations of the concentrations of other anthropogenic radionuclides (90Sr, 95Nb, 110 mAg, 125Sb, 129Te, and 129 mTe in the sediments were also investigated. Activity ratios of these nuclides to 137Cs suggest that the nuclides themselves were not homogenized before they were removed from seawater to the sediments.

  14. Distribution of benthic foraminifers (>125 um) in the surface sediments of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Poore, Richard Z.; Foley, Kevin M.

    1999-01-01

    Census data on benthic foraminifers (>125 ?m) in surface sediment samples from 49 box cores are used to define four depth-controlled biofacies, which will aid in the paleoceanographic reconstruction of the Arctic Ocean. The shelf biofacies contains a mix of shallow-water calcareous and agglutinated species from the continental shelves of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas and reflects the variable sedimentologic and oceanic conditions of the Arctic shelves. The intermediate-depth calcareous biofacies, found between 500 and 1,100 meters water depth (mwd), contains abundant Cassidulina teretis , presumably indicating the influence of Atlantic-derived water at this depth. In water depths between 1,100 and 3,500 m, a deepwater calcareous biofacies contains abundant Oridorsalis umbonatus . Below 3,500 mwd, the deepwater mixed calcareous/agglutinated biofacies of the Canada, Makarov, and Eurasian Basins reflects a combination of low productivity, dissolution, and sediment transport. Two other benthic foraminiferal species show specific environmental preferences. Fontbotia wuellerstorfi has a depth distribution between 900 and 3,500 mwd, but maximum abundance occurs in the region of the Mendeleyev Ridge. The elevated abundance of F. wuellerstorfi may be related to increased food supply carried by a branch of Atlantic water that crosses the Lomonosov Ridge near the Russian Continental Shelf. Triloculina frigida is recognized to be a species preferring lower slope sediments commonly disturbed by turbidites and bottom currents. INTRODUCTION At present, our understanding of the Arctic Ocean lags behind our understanding of other oceans, and fundamental questions still exist about its role in and response to global climate change. The Arctic Ocean is particularly sensitive to climatic fluctuations because small changes in the amounts of sea-ice cover can alter global albedo and thermohaline circulation (Aagaard and Carmack, 1994). Numerous questions still exist regarding the nature

  15. Nature and origin of fluids in granulite facies metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    The various models for the nature and origin of fluids in granulite facies metamorphism were summarized. Field and petrologic evidence exists for both fluid-absent and fluid-present deep crustal metamorphism. The South Indian granulite province is often cited as a fluid-rich example. The fluids must have been low in H2O and thus high in CO2. Deep crustal and subcrustal sources of CO2 are as yet unproven possibilities. There is much recent discussion of the possible ways in which deep crustal melts and fluids could have interacted in granulite metamorphism. Possible explanations for the characteristically low activity of H2O associated with granulite terranes were discussed. Granulites of the Adirondacks, New York, show evidence for vapor-absent conditions, and thus appear different from those of South India, for which CO2 streaming was proposed. Several features, such as the presence of high-density CO2 fluid inclusions, that may be misleading as evidence for CO2-saturated conditions during metamorphism, were discussed.

  16. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  17. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. These conditions were probably assisted by contemporaneous faulting along structurally weak hinge lines where the dominant structural elements are normal step faults. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type.

  18. Middle Eocene seagrass facies from Apennine carbonate platforms (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Laura; Benedetti, Andrea; Brandano, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Two stratigraphic sections located in the Latium-Abruzzi (Monte Porchio, Central Apennines, Central Italy) and in the Apulian carbonate platform (S. Cesarea-Torre Tiggiano, Salento, Southern Italy) were measured and sampled to document the sedimentological characteristic and the faunistic assemblages of Middle Eocene seagrass deposits. The faunistic assemblages are dominated by porcellaneous foraminifera Orbitolites, Alveolina, Idalina, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Triloculina and abundant hooked-shaped gypsinids, associated with hooked red algae and green algae Halimeda. Fabiania, rotaliids and textulariids as well as nummulitids are subordinated. The samples were assigned to Lutetian (SBZ13-16) according to the occurrence of Nummulites cf. lehneri, Alveolina ex. gr. elliptica, Idalina berthelini, Orbitolites complanatus, Slovenites decastroi and Medocia blayensis. At Santa Cesarea reticulate nummulites occur in association with Alveolina spp. and Halkyardia minima marking the lower Bartonian (SBZ17). Three main facies associations have been recognised: I) larger porcellaneous foraminiferal grainstones with orbitolitids and alveolinids deposited into high-energy shallow-water settings influenced by wave processes that reworked the sediments associated with a seagrass; II) grainstone to packstone with small porcellaneous foraminifera and abundant permanently-attached gypsinids deposited in a more protected (e.g., small embayment) in situ vegetated environment; III) bioclastic packstone with parautochthonous material reworked from the seagrass by rip currents and accumulated into rip channels in a slightly deeper environment. The biotic assemblages suggest that the depositional environment is consistent with tropical to subtropical vegetated environments within oligotrophic conditions.

  19. Sequence Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Facies in the Lower Member of the Permian Shanxi Formation, Northeastern Ordos Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Du; Zaixing Jiang; Ying Zhang; Jie Xu

    2013-01-01

    The Lower Permian Shanxi(山西) Formation is one of the main gas-bearing stratigraphic units in northeastern Ordos(鄂尔多斯) Basin,China.Based on an integrated investigation of well logs,cores,and outcrop,we delineated the sedimentary facies of the lower member of the Shanxi Formation and divided the succession into three third-order sequences from base to top as SQ1,SQ2,and SQ3.The lower region of Shanxi Formation was deposited in the following sedimentary facies or subfacies: subaqueous braided channel,subaqueous interdistributary,mouth bar,swamp and shelf in the Daniudi(大牛地)Gas Field and braided channel,and shelf and lake at Heidaigou(黑岱沟)outcrop.Braided-river deposits form the lowstand systems tract (LST) in each sequence.Braided channels mark the sequence boundaries at Heidaigou outcrop.A shelf and lake depositional environment with dark gray mudstone forms the transgressive systems tract (TST).The location where dark gray mudstone first appears above the braided channel marks the first flooding surface (FFS),and the end of that marks the maximum flooding surface (MFS).The highstand systems tract (HST) deposits are fine-grained sediments with an aggradational parasequence at Heidaigou outcrop and swamp coalbed in the Daniudi Gas Field.Mouth-bar sand bodies in braided delta front,which form the LST in each sequence,form excellent reservoirs in the Daniudi Gas Field.

  20. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  1. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo [Beijing Normal University, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Lin, Xue [Northwest University, School of Cultural Heritage, Xi' an (China)

    2016-09-15

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces. (orig.)

  2. Simulations of flow mode distributions on rough fracture surfaces using a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Shigorina, E.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Under idealized conditions (smooth surfaces, linear relationship between Bond number and Capillary number of droplets) steady-state flow modes on fracture surfaces have been shown to develop from sliding droplets to rivulets and finally (wavy) film flow, depending on the specified flux. In a recent study we demonstrated the effect of surface roughness on droplet flow in unsaturated wide aperture fractures, however, its effect on other prevailing flow modes is still an open question. The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of complex flow modes on fracture surfaces employing an efficient three-dimensional parallelized SPH model. The model is able to simulate highly intermittent, gravity-driven free-surface flows under dynamic wetting conditions. The effect of surface tension is included via efficient pairwise interaction forces. We validate the model using various analytical and semi-analytical relationships for droplet and complex flow dynamics. To investigate the effect of surface roughness on flow dynamics we construct surfaces with a self-affine fractal geometry and roughness characterized by the Hurst exponent. We demonstrate the effect of surface roughness (on macroscopic scales this can be understood as a tortuosity) on the steady-state distribution of flow modes. Furthermore we show the influence of a wide range of natural wetting conditions (defined by static contact angles) on the final distribution of surface coverage, which is of high importance for matrix-fracture interaction processes.

  3. Rock size distributions on lava flow surfaces: New results from a range of compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M. P.; Anderson, S. W.; Bulmer, M. H.

    2005-12-01

    We measured block sizes along 15-25m orthogonal transects on 12 lava flows of compositions ranging from basalt to rhyolite. At each site, we stretched a line across the flow surface then measured the length of each block cut by this line that were greater than 3-12cm (depending on composition). The measurements from each site were reduced to cumulative size frequency distribution plots, with block size (D) plotted against the fraction of the line f(D) composed of blocks greater than or equal to that size, and fitted with an exponential curve of the form f(D) = k exp(-qD) where k is the intercept and q is the decay parameter. Average block size and geometric mean were also determined for each site. Our data show no clear trends linking average or mean block size to composition, although there does seem to be relationship between block size and the decay parameter. Block size corresponds with the decay parameter at each site except for the basaltic andesite flow at Paint Pot Crater (CA). Many sites at this flow were covered with secondary spatter deposits. Largest blocks and smallest decay parameters were found for the andesite flows at Sabancaya (Peru), while the basalt flows at Cima (CA) exhibited the smallest blocks and largest decay parameters. The second largest block sizes occurred at the four Inyo domes composed of both crystal-rich and glassy rhyolite, and these domes also showed the second smallest decay parameters. All four of the Inyo domes were emplaced along the same feeder dike trend, and the average and mean sizes and decay parameters at these domes are nearly identical, suggesting that composition, extrusion rate, or eruption history controls the block size distributions. However, values for the two andesitic flows, Mt. Shasta (CA) and Sabancaya, were very different, suggesting that extrusion rate and/or eruption history exert a stronger control over the block size distributions than does composition. LIDAR data sets are capable of detecting sub

  4. Organic facies characteristics of the Carboniferous Pamucakyayla Formation, western Taurus, Antalya Nappes, Kemer (Antalya/Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertan Gulludag, Cevdet; Altunsoy, Mehmet; Ozcelik, Orhan

    2015-04-01

    The study area is located in the western part of the Taurus Belt (SW Turkey). This region exhibits a complex structure involving two autochthonous units surrounded and imbricated with three allochthonous complexes. Antalya Nappes is a complex tectonic imbricate structure including sedimantary and ultrabasic rocks. In this study, organic facies characteristics of Carboniferous coaly units in the Pamucakyayla region (Kemer, Antalya-Turkey) were examined. The Carboniferous Pamucakyayla Formation, which is characterized by sandstone, claystone, marl and coaly units. This units includes different levels of coal seams in different thicknesses. Organic matter is composed predominantly of woody and amorphous material, with a minor contribution of planty and coaly material. Kerogen in the deposits is type II/III, as indicated by organic petrographic observations and Rock-Eval data. Total organic carbon (TOC) values are generally between 0.01 and 1.44 %, but reach 5.81 % in the formation. Tmax values vary between 446 and 451 °C and indicate mature zone (Based on the value of 0.25 % TOC). Organic facies type BC, C and CD were identified in the investigated units. Organic facies BC is related sandstoneand marl lithofacies. This facis is deposited under an anoxic water column in a fine grained clastics, where rapid deposition creates anoxia in the sediments after deposition. This facies is characterized by average values of HI around 317 (equivalent to type II kerogene), TOC around 0.02 %, and an average of S2 of 0.04 mg HC/g of rock. Organic facies C is related to sandstone, marl and coal lithofacies. This facies is characterized by average values of HI around 176 (equivalent to type III kerogene), TOC around 0.19 %, and an average of S2 of 0.03 mg HC/g of rock. The organic matter is partly oxidized, and terrestrial. Organic facies C is the "gas-prone" facies. Organic facies CD is related to limestone, marl and coal lithofacies. This facies is characterized by average values

  5. Surface degassing and modifications to vesicle size distributions in active basalt flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K.V.; Mangan, M.T.; Newman, S.

    1994-01-01

    The character of the vesicle population in lava flows includes several measurable parameters that may provide important constraints on lava flow dynamics and rheology. Interpretation of vesicle size distributions (VSDs), however, requires an understanding of vesiculation processes in feeder conduits, and of post-eruption modifications to VSDs during transport and emplacement. To this end we collected samples from active basalt flows at Kilauea Volcano: (1) near the effusive Kupaianaha vent; (2) through skylights in the approximately isothermal Wahaula and Kamoamoa tube systems transporting lava to the coast; (3) from surface breakouts at different locations along the lava tubes; and (4) from different locations in a single breakout from a lava tube 1 km from the 51 vent at Pu'u 'O'o. Near-vent samples are characterized by VSDs that show exponentially decreasing numbers of vesicles with increasing vesicle size. These size distributions suggest that nucleation and growth of bubbles were continuous during ascent in the conduit, with minor associated bubble coalescence resulting from differential bubble rise. The entire vesicle population can be attributed to shallow exsolution of H2O-dominated gases at rates consistent with those predicted by simple diffusion models. Measurements of H2O, CO2 and S in the matrix glass show that the melt equilibrated rapidly at atmospheric pressure. Down-tube samples maintain similar VSD forms but show a progressive decrease in both overall vesicularity and mean vesicle size. We attribute this change to open system, "passive" rise and escape of larger bubbles to the surface. Such gas loss from the tube system results in the output of 1.2 ?? 106 g/day SO2, an output representing an addition of approximately 1% to overall volatile budget calculations. A steady increase in bubble number density with downstream distance is best explained by continued bubble nucleation at rates of 7-8/cm3s. Rates are ???25% of those estimated from the vent

  6. Integrating bio-, chemo- and sequence stratigraphy of the Late Ordovician, Early Katian: A connection between onshore and offshore facies using carbon isotope analysis: Kentucky, Ohio, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allison; Brett, Carlton; McLaughlin, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    , and mineralized surfaces. They also contain well studied fossil assemblages and event beds, which at the scale of an outcrop, allow for detailed paleoenvironmental interpretation. The offshore record of this interval, known almost exclusively from a few drill cores, displays an abrupt transition to distal, siliciclastic dominated facies, recording a more dysoxic and organic rich interval. Internal correlation of these shales has relied mostly on limited graptolite biostratigraphic and geochemical analysis. Here we seek to establish age relationships across a major facies transition between these two interrelated paleoenvironmental settings using high resolution whole rock carbon isotope analysis to integrate new and previous work on lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and sequence stratigraphy of a series of cores and outcrops. Results to date demonstrate the persistence of carbon isotopic patterns (including the globally recognized GICE positive carbon isotopic excursion) permitting extension of correlation into basinal facies where tracking of stratigraphic sequences becomes difficult. A complicated relationship across the region is emerging involving both rapid facies transitions and submarine erosional cutout of units toward the center of the Sebree Trough. This study demonstrates the utility of an integrated stratigraphic approach for establishing high resolution regional correlations allowing for interpretations across a major facies transitions.

  7. The Effect of Surface Ice and Topography on the Atmospheric Circulation and Distribution of Nitrogen Ice on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Soto, Alejandro; Michaels, Timothy I.

    2016-10-01

    A newly developed general circulation model (GCM) for Pluto is used to investigate the impact of a heterogeneous distribution of nitrogen surface ice and large scale topography on Pluto's atmospheric circulation. The GCM is based on the GFDL Flexible Modeling System (FSM). Physics include a gray model radiative-conductive scheme, subsurface conduction, and a nitrogen volatile cycle. The radiative-conductive model takes into account the 2.3, 3.3 and 7.8 μm bands of CH4 and CO, including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. including non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. The nitrogen volatile cycle is based on a vapor pressure equilibrium assumption between the atmosphere and surface. Prior to the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft, the expectation was that the volatile ice distribution on the surface of Pluto would be strongly controlled by the latitudinal temperature gradient. If this were the case, then Pluto would have broad latitudinal bands of both ice covered surface and ice free surface, as dictated by the season. Further, the circulation, and the thus the transport of volatiles, was thought to be driven almost exclusively by sublimation and deposition flows associated with the volatile cycle. In contrast to expectations, images from New Horizon showed an extremely complex, heterogeneous distribution of surface ices draped over substantial and variable topography. To produce such an ice distribution, the atmospheric circulation and volatile transport must be more complex than previously envisioned. Simulations where topography, surface ice distributions, and volatile cycle physics are added individually and in various combinations are used to individually quantify the importance of the general circulation, topography, surface ice distributions, and condensation flows. It is shown that even regional patches of ice or large craters can have global impacts on the atmospheric circulation, the volatile cycle, and hence, the distribution of

  8. Identification and Large-Scale Mapping of Riverbed Facies along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River for Hyporheic Zone Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Hou, Z.; Murray, C. J.; Perkins, W. A.; Arntzen, E.; Richmond, M. C.; Mackley, R.; Johnson, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the sediment layer underlying a river channel within which river water and groundwater may interact, and plays a significant role in controlling energy and nutrient fluxes and biogeochemical reactions in hydrologic systems. The area of this study is the HZ along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State, where daily and seasonal river stage changes, hydromorphology, and heterogeneous sediment texture drive groundwater-river water exchange and associated biogeochemical processes. The recent alluvial sediments immediately underlying the river are geologically distinct from the surrounding aquifer sediments, and serve as the primary locale of mixing and reaction. In order to effectively characterize the HZ, a novel approach was used to define and map recent alluvial (riverine) facies using river bathymetric attributes (e.g., slope, aspect, and local variability) and simulated hydrodynamic attributes (e.g., shear stress, flow velocity, river depth). The riverine facies were compared with riverbed substrate texture data for confirmation and quantification of textural relationships. Multiple flow regimes representing current (managed) and historical (unmanaged) flow hydrographs were considered to evaluate hydrodynamic controls on the current riverbed grain size distributions. Hydraulic properties were then mapped at reach and local scales by linking textural information to hydraulic property measurements from piezometers. The spatial distribution and thickness of riverine facies is being further constrained by integrating 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography. The mapped distributions of riverine facies and the corresponding flow, transport and biogeochemical properties are supporting the parameterization of multiscale models of hyporheic exchange between groundwater and river water and associated biogeochemical transformations.

  9. Outcropping gravitational and deformational sedimentary facies of the Maracangalha formation and their importance for the exploitation of the Reconcavo basin; Facies sedimentares gravitacionais e deformacionais da Formacao Maracangalha em afloramento e sua importancia na exploracao da Bacia do Reconcavo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Gabriel Soares [Shell Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: gabriel.guerra@shell.com.br; Borghi, Leonardo [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia]. E-mail: lborghi@ufrj.br

    2003-07-01

    The Maracangalha Formation (Reconcavo Basin, Early Cretaceous) shows gravitational and deformational facies (Caruacu beds and Pitanga Member), which constitute gas reservoirs in the Candeias - Maracangalha petroleum system. Ten sedimentary facies of this nature were described in this formation - 3 previously defined by Mutti (Turbidite sandstones, 1992), and 2 by Mutti et alii (Estr. Mem. Sci. Geol., 28, 1996) - which were organized in 'ramp' and 'shelf-slope' facies associations. The ramp facies association divides itself in 'turbidite' and 'inundite' facies tracts, and the shelf-slope facies association is divided into 'sandy' and 'heterolithic'. The proposed depositional paleoenvironment evolves lacustrine deltas dominated by river flooding, which evolves from a ramp morphology to a shelf and slope one. Electrical logs and seismofacies patterns are suggested for the facies associations. (author)

  10. Facies and facies association of the siliciclastic Brak River and carbonate Gemsbok formations in the Lower Ugab River valley, Namibia, W. Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciullo, F. V. P.; Ribeiro, A.; Trouw, R. A. J.; Passchier, C. W.

    2007-03-01

    The Neoproterozoic Zerrissene Turbidite Complex of central-western Namibia comprises five turbiditic units. From the base to the top they are the Zebrapüts Formation (greywacke and pelite), Brandberg West Formation (marble and pelite), Brak River Formation (greywacke and pelite with dropstones), Gemsbok River Formation (marble and pelite) and Amis River Formation (greywacke and pelites with rare carbonates and quartz-wacke). In the Lower Ugab River valley, five siliciclastic facies were recognised in the Brak River Formation. These are massive and laminated sandstones, classical turbidites (thick- and thin-bedded), mudrock, rare conglomerate and breccia. For the carbonate Gemsbok River Formation four facies were identified including massive non-graded and graded calcarenite, fine grained evenly bedded blue marble and calcareous mudrock. Most of these facies are also present in the other siliciclastic units of the Zerrissene Turbidite Complex as observed in other areas. The vertical facies association of the siliciclastic Brak River Formation is interpreted as representing sheet sand lobe to lobe-fringe palaeoenvironment with the abandonment of siliciclastic deposition at the top of the succession. The vertical facies association of the carbonate Gemsbok Formation is interpreted as the slope apron succession overlain by periplatform facies, suggesting a carbonate slope sedimentation of a prograding depositional shelf margin. If the siliciclastic-carbonate paired succession would represent a lowstand relative sea-level and highstand relative sea-level, respectively, the entire turbidite succession of the Zerrissene Turbidite Complex can be interpreted as three depositional sequences including two paired siliciclastic-carbonate units (Zebrapüts-Brandberg West formations; Brak River-Gemsbok formations) and an incomplete succession without carbonate at the top (Amis River Formation).

  11. Surface charge dynamics and OH and H number density distributions in near-surface nanosecond pulse discharges at a liquid / vapor interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Caroline; Petrishchev, Vitaly; Yin, Zhiyao; Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2015-10-01

    The present work provides insight into surface charge dynamics and kinetics of radical species reactions in nanosecond pulse discharges sustained at a liquid-vapor interface, above a distilled water surface. The near-surface plasma is sustained using two different discharge configurations, a surface ionization wave discharge between two exposed metal electrodes and a double dielectric barrier discharge. At low discharge pulse repetition rates (~100 Hz), residual surface charge deposition after the discharge pulse is a minor effect. At high pulse repetition rates (~10 kHz), significant negative surface charge accumulation over multiple discharge pulses is detected, both during alternating polarity and negative polarity pulse trains. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and two-photon absorption LIF (TALIF) line imaging are used for in situ measurements of spatial distributions of absolute OH and H atom number densities in near-surface, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas. Both in a surface ionization wave discharge and in a double dielectric barrier discharge, peak measured H atom number density, [H] is much higher compared to peak OH number density, due to more rapid OH decay in the afterglow between the discharge pulses. Higher OH number density was measured near the regions with higher plasma emission intensity. Both OH and especially H atoms diffuse out of the surface ionization wave plasma volume, up to several mm from the liquid surface. Kinetic modeling calculations using a quasi-zero-dimensional H2O vapor / Ar plasma model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The results demonstrate the experimental capability of in situ radical species number density distribution measurements in liquid-vapor interface plasmas, in a simple canonical geometry that lends itself to the validation of kinetic models.

  12. Petrological and zircon evidence for the Early Cretaceous granulite-facies metamorphism in the Dabie orogen, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Qiang-Qiang; Zheng, Yong-Fei; Chen, Yi-Xiang

    2017-07-01

    . The spatial and temporal distribution of Early Cretaceous granulite-facies metamorphic rocks in this region is associated with the bimodal magmatism within a short period of 120-130 Ma in the postcollisional stage. This provides a direct link in petrogenesis between the granulitic, migmatic and magmatic rocks in the collisional orogen to active continental rifting, whereby high heat flow was transferred from the asthenospheric mantle into the thinned orogenic lithosphere for partial melting.

  13. Investigation of the delay time distribution of high power microwave surface flashover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J.; Krompholz, H.; Neuber, A.

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing and modeling the statistics associated with the initiation of gas breakdown has proven to be difficult due to a variety of rather unexplored phenomena involved. Experimental conditions for high power microwave window breakdown for pressures on the order of 100 to several 100 torr are complex: there are little to no naturally occurring free electrons in the breakdown region. The initial electron generation rate, from an external source, for example, is time dependent and so is the charge carrier amplification in the increasing radio frequency (RF) field amplitude with a rise time of 50 ns, which can be on the same order as the breakdown delay time. The probability of reaching a critical electron density within a given time period is composed of the statistical waiting time for the appearance of initiating electrons in the high-field region and the build-up of an avalanche with an inherent statistical distribution of the electron number. High power microwave breakdown and its delay time is of critical importance, since it limits the transmission through necessary windows, especially for high power, high altitude, low pressure applications. The delay time distribution of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover has been examined for nitrogen and argon as test gases for pressures ranging from 60 to 400 torr, with and without external UV illumination. A model has been developed for predicting the discharge delay time for these conditions. The results provide indications that field induced electron generation, other than standard field emission, plays a dominant role, which might be valid for other gas discharge types as well.

  14. Distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in surface subtidal sediments near the Sellafield plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.G.; Roberts, P.D.; Miller, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    Detailed distributions of total gamma activity, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 106/Ru and /sup 95/Zr + /sup 95/Nb in surface seabed sediments near the Sellafield plant are presented. The results are derived from a towed seabed gamma-ray spectrometer survey in September, 1982. All the distributions are similar, with contours of equal activity parallel to the coast defining a 'ridge' of higher activity which is displaced northwards relative to the outfall. Nuclide concentrations decrease with increasing distance from Sellafield; rates of decrease being in the order Zr + Nb > Ru > Cs. This can be related to the levels of the nuclides discharged, their sorption characteristics and their half lives. The pattern of seabed activity seems to have been fairly stable over the period 1978-85, but there is evidence of a small northward shift. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 106/Ru in 1985 were considerably lower than in 1978 or 1982. This is explicable in terms of the fall in discharge levels allied, in the case of Ru, to its short half life and, for Cs, the desorption observed in laboratory experiments. Nuclide ratios in sediment samples yield apparent transit times for the transport of nuclides in the survey area of 1.7-3.7 years. These times are generally greater than those obtained from sediments in the more distant Solway Firth and Ravenglass Estuary. It is suggested that they reflect fairly intense bioturbation causing mixing of relatively recent effluent with that from earlier discharges. This is supported by structures observed in X-radiographs of box cores, an abundant burrowing benthos and by interpretations of nuclide profiles and radiocarbon dating of sediment cores by other workers. A lag effect, of up to two years across the survey area, appears to be superimposed on that due to mixing.

  15. Calibration of the Distributed Hydrological Model mHM using Satellite derived Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M.; Samaniego, L. E.; Cuntz, M.

    2012-12-01

    A combined investigation of the water and energy balance in hydrologic models can lead to a more accurate estimation of hydrological fluxes and state variables, such as evapotranspiration and soil moisture. Hydrologic models are usually calibrated against discharge measurements, and thus are only trained on information of few points within a catchment. This procedure does not take into account any spatio-temporal variability of fluxes or state variables. Satellite data are a useful source of information to account for this spatial distributions. The objective of this study is to calibrate the distributed hydrological model mHM with satellite derived Land Surface Temperature (LST) fields provided by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). LST is preferred to other satellite products such as soil moisture or evapotranspiration due to its higher precision. LST is obtained by solving the energy balance by assuming that the soil heat flux and the storage term are negligible on a daily time step. The evapotranspiration is determined by closing the water balance in mHM. The net radiation is calculated by using the incoming short- and longwave radiation, albedo and emissivity data provided by LSA-SAF. The Multiscale Parameter Regionalization technique (MPR, Samaniego et al. 2010) is used to determine the aerodynamic resistance among other parameters. The optimization is performed within the time period 2008-2010 using three objective functions that consider 1) only discharge, 2) only LST, and 3) a combination of both. The proposed method is applied to seven major German river basins: Danube, Ems, Main, Mulde, Neckar, Saale, and Weser. The annual coefficient of correlation between LSA-SAF incoming shortwave radiation and 28 meteorological stations operated by the German Weather Service (DWD) is 0.94 (RMSE = 29 W m-2) in 2009. LSA-SAF incoming longwave radiation could be further evaluated at two eddy covariance stations with a very similar

  16. Radial Distribution of Stars, Gas, and Dust in SINGS Galaxies. I. Surface Photometry and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Boissier, S.; Dale, D. A.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Madore, B. F.; Bendo, G.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Calzetti, D.; Moustakas, J.; Kennicutt, R. C., Jr.

    2009-10-01

    We present ultraviolet through far-infrared (FIR) surface brightness profiles for the 75 galaxies in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). The imagery used to measure the profiles includes Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV data, optical images from Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, near-IR data from Two Micron All Sky Survey, and mid- and FIR images from Spitzer. Along with the radial profiles, we also provide multi-wavelength asymptotic magnitudes and several nonparametric indicators of galaxy morphology: the concentration index (C 42), the asymmetry (A), the Gini coefficient (G), and the normalized second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (\\overline{M}_{20}). In this paper, the first of a series, we describe the technical aspects regarding the surface photometry, and present a basic analysis of the global and structural properties of the SINGS galaxies at different wavelengths. The homogeneity in the acquisition, reduction, and analysis of the results presented here makes these data ideal for multiple unanticipated studies on the radial distribution of the properties of stars, dust, and gas in galaxies. Our radial profiles show a wide range of morphologies and multiple components (bulges, exponential disks, inner and outer disk truncations, etc.) that vary not only from galaxy to galaxy but also with wavelength for a given object. In the optical and near-IR, the SINGS galaxies occupy the same regions in the C 42-A-G-\\overline{M}_{20} parameter space as other normal galaxies in previous studies. However, they appear much less centrally concentrated, more asymmetric, and with larger values of G when viewed in the UV (due to star-forming clumps scattered across the disk) and in the mid-IR (due to the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 8.0 μm and very hot dust at 24 μm). In an accompanying paper by Muñoz-Mateos et al., we focus on the radial

  17. Probability distributions of whisker-surface contact: quantifying elements of the rat vibrissotactile natural scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jennifer A; Towal, R Blythe; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of natural scene statistics has been a powerful approach for understanding neural coding in the auditory and visual systems. In the field of somatosensation, it has been more challenging to quantify the natural tactile scene, in part because somatosensory signals are so tightly linked to the animal's movements. The present work takes a step towards quantifying the natural tactile scene for the rat vibrissal system by simulating rat whisking motions to systematically investigate the probabilities of whisker-object contact in naturalistic environments. The simulations permit an exhaustive search through the complete space of possible contact patterns, thereby allowing for the characterization of the patterns that would most likely occur during long sequences of natural exploratory behavior. We specifically quantified the probabilities of 'concomitant contact', that is, given that a particular whisker makes contact with a surface during a whisk, what is the probability that each of the other whiskers will also make contact with the surface during that whisk? Probabilities of concomitant contact were quantified in simulations that assumed increasingly naturalistic conditions: first, the space of all possible head poses; second, the space of behaviorally preferred head poses as measured experimentally; and third, common head poses in environments such as cages and burrows. As environments became more naturalistic, the probability distributions shifted from exhibiting a 'row-wise' structure to a more diagonal structure. Results also reveal that the rat appears to use motor strategies (e.g. head pitches) that generate contact patterns that are particularly well suited to extract information in the presence of uncertainty. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone characteristics to the radial distribution of sea surface temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepika Rai; S Pattnaik; P V Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) is crucial for the development and maintenance of a tropical cyclone(TC) particularly below the storm core region. However, storm data below the core region is the mostdifficult to obtain, hence it is not clear yet that how sensitive the radial distribution of the SST impactthe storm characteristic features such as its inner-core structures, translational speed, track, rainfalland intensity particularly over the Bay of Bengal. To explore the effects of radial SST distributionon the TC characteristics, a series of numerical experiments were carried out by modifying the SSTat different radial extents using two-way interactive, triply-nested, nonhydrostatic Advanced WeatherResearch and Forecast (WRF-ARW) model. It is found that not only the SST under the eyewall (coreregion) contribute significantly to modulate storm track, translational speed and intensity, but also thoseoutside the eyewall region (i.e., 2–2.5 times the radius of maximum wind (RMW)) play a vital role indefining the storm’s characteristics and structure. Out of all the simulated experiments, storm wherethe positive radial change of SST inducted within the 75 km of the storm core (i.e., P75) produced thestrongest storm. In addition, N300 (negative radial changes at 300 km) produced the weakest storm.Further, it is found that SST, stronger within 2–2.5 times of the RMW for P75 experiment, plays adominant role in maintaining 10 m wind speed (WS10), surface entropy flux (SEF) and upward verticalvelocity (w) within the eyewall with warmer air temperature (T) and equivalent potential temperature(θe) within the storm’s eye compared to other experiments.

  19. Facies architecture within a regional glaciolacustrine basin: Copper River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew R.; Huddart, David; Thomas, Geoffrey S. P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper defines the principal architectural elements present within the Pleistocene, glaciolacustrine basin-fill of the Copper River Basin in Alaska. The Copper River drains an intermontane basin via a single deeply incised trench through the Chugach Mountains to the Gulf of Alaska. This trench was blocked by ice during the last glacial cycle and a large ice-dammed lake, referred to as Lake Atna, filled much of the Copper Basin. Facies analysis within the basin floor allows a series of associations to be defined consistent with the basinward transport of sediment deposited along calving ice margins and at the basin edge. Basinward transport involves a continuum of gravity driven processes, including slumping, cohesive debris flow, hyperconcentrated/concentrated density flows, and turbidity currents. This basinward transport results in the deposition of a series of subaqueous fans, of which two main types are recognised. (1) Large, stratified, basin floor fans, which extend over at least 5 km and are exposed in the basin centre. These fans are composed of multiple lobes, incised by large mega-channels, giving fan architectures that are dominated by horizontal strata and large, cross-cutting channel-fills. Individual lobes and channel-fills consist of combinations of: diamict derived from iceberg rainout and the ice-marginal release of subglacial sediment; multiple units of fining upward gravels which grade vertically into parallel laminated and rippled fine sands and silts, deposited by a range of density flows and currents derived from the subaqueous discharge of meltwater; and rhythmites grading vertically into diamicts deposited from a range of sediment-density flows re-mobilising sediment deposited by either iceberg rainout or the ice-marginal release of sediment. (2) Small, complex, proximal fans, which extend over less than 2 km, and are exposed in the southern part of the basin. These fans are composed of coalescing and prograding lobes of diamict and

  20. Reactive solute transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies: The Lagrangian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanian, Mohamad Reza; Dai, Zhenxue; Huang, Chaocheng

    2014-01-01

    Physical and chemical heterogeneities have a large impact on reactive transport in porous media. Examples of heterogeneous attributes affecting reactive mass transport are the hydraulic conductivity (K), and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd). This paper uses the Deng et al. (2013) conceptual model for multimodal reactive mineral facies and a Lagrangian-based stochastic theory in order to analyze the reactive solute dispersion in three-dimensional anisotropic heterogeneous porous media with hierarchical organization of reactive minerals. An example based on real field data is used to illustrate the time evolution trends of reactive solute dispersion. The results show that the correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient does have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. The anisotropy ratio does not have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. Furthermore, through a sensitivity analysis we investigate the impact...

  1. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of surface ozone (O3 concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM. Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage

  2. Response of the global surface ozone distribution to Northern Hemisphere sea surface temperature changes: implications for long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kan; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George; Zhang, Jiachen; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Yanli; Tao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    The response of surface ozone (O3) concentrations to basin-scale warming and cooling of Northern Hemisphere oceans is investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Idealized, spatially uniform sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of ±1 °C are individually superimposed onto the North Pacific, North Atlantic, and North Indian oceans. Our simulations suggest large seasonal and regional variability in surface O3 in response to SST anomalies, especially in the boreal summer. The responses of surface O3 associated with basin-scale SST warming and cooling have similar magnitude but are opposite in sign. Increasing the SST by 1 °C in one of the oceans generally decreases the surface O3 concentrations from 1 to 5 ppbv. With fixed emissions, SST increases in a specific ocean basin in the Northern Hemisphere tend to increase the summertime surface O3 concentrations over upwind regions, accompanied by a widespread reduction over downwind continents. We implement the integrated process rate (IPR) analysis in CESM and find that meteorological O3 transport in response to SST changes is the key process causing surface O3 perturbations in most cases. During the boreal summer, basin-scale SST warming facilitates the vertical transport of O3 to the surface over upwind regions while significantly reducing the vertical transport over downwind continents. This process, as confirmed by tagged CO-like tracers, indicates a considerable suppression of intercontinental O3 transport due to increased tropospheric stability at lower midlatitudes induced by SST changes. Conversely, the responses of chemical O3 production to regional SST warming can exert positive effects on surface O3 levels over highly polluted continents, except South Asia, where intensified cloud loading in response to North Indian SST warming depresses both the surface air temperature and solar radiation, and thus photochemical O3 production. Our findings indicate a robust linkage between basin-scale SST

  3. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  4. ATL_FAC: usSEABED facies data for the entire U.S. Atlantic Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The facies data layer (_FAC.txt) is a point coverage of known sediment samplings, inspections, and probings from the usSEABED data collection and integrated using...

  5. Adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic-assisted adenoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background /Objectives: To study 30 cases of patients of chronic adenoiditis with adenoid facies and refractory chronic rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy. Materials and method: 7 cases of adenoid facies and 23 cases of chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoiditis were managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy during the study period of 12 months from August 2012 to July 2013. Result: endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy proves to be more effective in managing adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoid hyperplasia. Conclusion: visualization of the adenoid mass using endoscope helps complete removal of the diseased adenoids. Endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy is treatment of choice in adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoid hyperplasia and more effective than conventional adenoidectomy.

  6. Fluvial facies reservoir productivity prediction method based on principal component analysis and artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyu Gao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to forecast the well productivity because of the complexity of vertical and horizontal developments in fluvial facies reservoir. This paper proposes a method based on Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Neural Network to predict well productivity of fluvial facies reservoir. The method summarizes the statistical reservoir factors and engineering factors that affect the well productivity, extracts information by applying the principal component analysis method and approximates arbitrary functions of the neural network to realize an accurate and efficient prediction on the fluvial facies reservoir well productivity. This method provides an effective way for forecasting the productivity of fluvial facies reservoir which is affected by multi-factors and complex mechanism. The study result shows that this method is a practical, effective, accurate and indirect productivity forecast method and is suitable for field application.

  7. The Influence Of Initial Velocity Distribution On Ionization Dynamics Of Rydberg Atoms Approaching Solid Surfaces In The Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božnic, D. K.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the ionization dynamics of slow hydrogenlike Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number n >> 1 ) approaching solid surface in a weak electric field. The recently obtained etalon-equation method results for the simulation of experimental signal are used to investigate the influence of the initial velocity distribution. It is demonstrated that an agreement with the experimental signal can be obtained with the broadened velocity distributions.

  8. A Probability Distribution of Surface Elevation for Wind Waves in Terms of the Gram-Charlier Series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄传江; 戴德君; 王伟; 钱成春

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory experiments are conducted to study the probability distribution of surface elevation for wind waves and the convergence is discussed of the Gram-Charlier series in describing the surface elevation distribution. Results show that the agreement between the Gram-Charlier series and the observed distribution becomes better and better as the truncated order of the series increases in a certain range, which is contrary to the phenomenon observed by Huang and Long (1980). It is also shown that the Gram-Charlier series is sensitive to the anomalies in the data set which will make the agreement worse if they are not preprocessed appropriately. Negative values of the probability distribution expressed by the Gram-Charlier series in some ranges of surface elevations are discussed, but the absolute values of the negative values as well as the ranges of their occurrence become smaller gradually as more and more terms are included. Therefore the negative values will have no evident effect on the form of the whole surface elevation distribution when the series is truncated at higher orders. Furthermore, a simple recurrence formula is obtained to calculate the coefficients of the Gram-Charlier series in order to extend the Gram-Charlier series to high orders conveniently.

  9. Suppressing the multimodal size distribution of InAs/GaAs quantum dots through flattening the surface fluctuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A method of suppressing the multimodal size distribution of InAs/GaAs quantum dots(QDs) using molecular beam epitaxy through flattening the substrate surface is reported in this work.It is found that the surface roughness plays an important role in the growth of QDs through continuous surface evolution(SEQDs).SEQDs are the main components of small QD ensemble in QDs with multimodal size distribution.It is suggested that most of the SEQDs are very likely to nucleate during the growth interruption rather than during the deposition.The growth of QDs on a smoother surface has largely reduced the density of SEQDs.The photoluminescence line width of uniform QDs is found to be only 17 meV at a low temperature.

  10. Computing the force distribution on the surface of complex, deforming geometries using vortex methods and Brinkman penalization

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Siddhartha; Novati, Guido; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of forces on the surface of complex, deforming geometries is an invaluable output of flow simulations. One particular example of such geometries involves self-propelled swimmers. Surface forces can provide significant information about the flow field sensed by the swimmers, and are difficult to obtain experimentally. At the same time, simulations of flow around complex, deforming shapes can be computationally prohibitive when body-fitted grids are used. Alternatively, such simulations may employ penalization techniques. Penalization methods rely on simple Cartesian grids to discretize the governing equations, which are enhanced by a penalty term to account for the boundary conditions. They have been shown to provide a robust estimation of mean quantities, such as drag and propulsion velocity, but the computation of surface force distribution remains a challenge. We present a method for determining flow- induced forces on the surface of both rigid and deforming bodies, in simulations using re-...

  11. Sedimentary facies and hydrocarbon accumulation in the Third member of Shahejie Formation in Beijing-Tianjin Depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, X.; Zhang, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The exploration practice in the Beijing-Tianjin area shows that the key point of improving seismic interpretation level in a complex district lies in the high accuracy of seismic work, extraction of available seismic information and the use of the comprehensive interpretation method basing on both structure interpretation and seismic stratigraphy. This paper presents the geological interpretation results of analyzing the Third member of Shahejie Formation in Beijing-Tianjin Depression by using the method stated above. It describes the seismic facies, sedimentary facies as well as the generation, accumulation and distribution of hydrocarbons, and points out that the lower part of the member is a subaqueous fan and point bar deposit, while the middle part is a fan-delta deposit. According to the thermo-evolution-profile and TTI estimated, it is assumed that the lower part of the member is source rock with sandstone development and is also a very good reservoir rock because of having two sets of source rock reservoir and seal rock. Having structures such as Jiuzhou anticline and its down dip and Liuquan fault structure, it is favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation. 4 figures.

  12. The changing microstructural arrangement of graphite during deformation and hydrothermal alteration of amphibolite-facies mylonite, Alpine Fault, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, M.; Toy, V.; Timms, N.; Craw, D.; Little, T. A.; Halfpenny, A.; Beyssac, O.

    2015-12-01

    Graphitisation in a convergent plate boundary setting, such as the Alpine Fault, New Zealand, is associated both with fault weakening and orogenic gold mineralisation. Previously, these processes have been investigated in rocks that experienced mineralisation at maximum of greenschist-facies conditions. However, metals are most mobile at upper greenschist- to amphibolite-facies. We examine the microstructural record of mobilisation of graphite at these conditions due to dislocation and diffusion creep in the Alpine Fault zone and as a function of varying shear strain magnitude. We have mapped graphite distribution across a strain gradient in samples, recovered from Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP) boreholes, by using reflected light and scanning electron microscopy. Raman spectrometry was used to determine the degree of maturity of the carbonaceous material. In the schists and protomylonites, graphite occurs as very fine (1-5μm), dusty grains, dispersed as inclusions in the main mineral phases (quartz, anorthite, muscovite, biotite). Further into the mylonite zone, the modal proportion of graphite increases and it forms clusters and trains, aligned with the foliation. In the brittlely-deformed rocks (cataclasites and gouges on or near the fault principal slip zone) graphite is most abundant (Schleicher et al., in press. N.Z.J.Geol&Geophys). We thus infer hydrothermal enrichment caused graphite remobilization, re-deposition, and enrichment in structurally controlled microstructural sites. We will discuss implications of these microstructural and mineralogical changes for strain localisation and deformation-induced permeability.

  13. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BOMASS PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2004-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

  14. Speciation, distribution, and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in Xiamen Bay surface sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Cai; LIU Yang; LI Wenquan; SUN Xiuwu; JI Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the survey of surface sediment in Xiamen Bay in October 2011, the speciation, distribution, and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr) in this area were studied us-ing the sequential extraction method and ecological risk assessment method. The results indicated:(1) the total concentrations of these heavy metals were influenced by runoff, industrial wastewater, and sewage, and were all higher in the coastal area than the offshore area while the highest area of Pb was a little far-ther away from the coastal water due to atmosphere deposition;(2) sequential extractions suggested that Cu was mainly composed with residual and Fe/Mn-oxide bound fractions, Pb was bound to Fe/Mn-oxide, Zn and Cr were dominated by residual, and Cd bound to exchangeable and carbonate fractions; (3) the order of migration and transformation sequence was Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Cr and the degree of pollution was Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Cr;and (4) the ratios of the secondary and primary phases showed that Zn and Cr were both clean, Cu may be polluted, Pb was moderately polluted, while Cd was heavily polluted.

  15. Evaluation of Missing Pellet Surface Geometry on Cladding Stress Distribution and Magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Nathan A.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Spencer, Ben; Pytel, Martin; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-10-01

    Missing pellet surface (MPS) defects are local geometric defects that periodically occur in nuclear fuel pellets, usually as a result of the mishandling during the manufacturing process. The presences of these defects can lead to clad stress concentrations that are substantial enough to cause a through wall failure for certain conditions of power level, burnup, and power increase. Consequently, the impact of potential MPS defects has limited the rate of power increase or ramp rates in both PWR and BWR systems. Improved 3D MPS models that consider the effect of the MPS geometry can provide better understanding of the margins against PCMI clad failure. The Peregrine fuel performance code has been developed as a part the Consortium of Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) to consider the inherently multi-physics and multi-dimensional mechanisms that control fuel behavior, including cladding failure by the presence of MPS defects. This paper presents an evaluation of the cladding stress concentrations as a function of MPS defect geometry. The results are the first step in a probabilistic approach to assess cladding failure during power maneuvers. This analysis provides insight into how varying pellet defect geometries affect the distribution of the cladding stress and fuel and cladding temperature and will be used to develop stress concentration factors for 2D and 3D models.

  16. The Distribution of Mass Surface Densities in a High-Mass Protocluster

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Wanggi; Kainulainen, Jouni; Ma, Bo; Butler, Micheal J

    2016-01-01

    We study the probability distribution function (PDF) of mass surface densities, $\\Sigma$, of infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G028.37+00.07 and its surrounding giant molecular cloud. This PDF constrains the physical processes, such as turbulence, magnetic fields and self-gravity, that are expected to be controlling cloud structure and star formation activity. The chosen IRDC is of particular interest since it has almost 100,000 solar masses within a radius of 8 parsecs, making it one of the most massive, dense molecular structures known and is thus a potential site for the formation of a "super star cluster." We study $\\Sigma$ in two ways. First, we use a combination of NIR and MIR extinction maps that are able to probe the bulk of the cloud structure up to $\\Sigma\\sim1\\:{\\rm{g\\:cm}^{-2}}\\:$($A_V\\simeq200$~mag). Second, we study the FIR and sub-mm dust continuum emission from the cloud utilizing Herschel PACS and SPIRE images and paying careful attention to the effects of foreground and background contamination. We...

  17. Factors influencing the occurrence and distribution of neonicotinoid insecticides in surface waters of southern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struger, John; Grabuski, Josey; Cagampan, Steve; Sverko, Ed; McGoldrick, Daryl; Marvin, Christopher H

    2017-02-01

    The widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides and recent increased regulatory scrutiny requires the generation of monitoring data with sufficient scope and resolution to provide decision makers with a better understanding of occurrence and distribution in the environment. This study presents a wide-scale investigation of neonicotinoid insecticides used across the range of agricultural activities from fifteen surface water sites in southern Ontario. Using statistical analysis, the correlation of individual compounds with land use was investigated, and the relationship between neonicotinoid occurrence and hydrologic parameters in calibrated water courses was also assessed. Of the five neonicotinoids studied, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam exhibited detection rates above 90% at over half the sites sampled over a three year period (2012-2014). At two sites in southwestern Ontario, the Canadian Federal freshwater guideline value for imidacloprid (230 ng/L) was exceeded in roughly 75% of the samples collected. For some watersheds, there were correlations between the occurrence of neonicotinoids and precipitation and/or stream discharge. Some watersheds exhibited seasonal maxima in concentrations of neonicotinoids in spring and fall, particularly for those areas where row crop agriculture is predominant; these seasonal patterns were absent in some areas characterized by a broad range of agricultural activities.

  18. Adenoid facies and chronic refractory rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic-assisted adenoidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background /Objectives: To study 30 cases of patients of chronic adenoiditis with adenoid facies and refractory chronic rhinosinusitis managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy. Materials and method: 7 cases of adenoid facies and 23 cases of chronic refractory rhinosinusitis with adenoiditis were managed by endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy during the study period of 12 months from August 2012 to July 2013. Result: endoscopic assisted adenoidectomy proves to be more effective in m...

  19. Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with satellite-surfaces. 1. Spatial distributions of reflected helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.M.; Rodgers, W.E.; Knuth, E.L.

    1975-06-01

    Interactions of satellite-speed helium atoms with practical satellite surfaces were investigated experimentally, and spatial distributions of satellite-speed helium beams scattered from four different engineering surfaces were measured. The 7000-m/s helium beams were produced using an arc-heated supersonic molecular beam source. The test surfaces included cleaned 6061-T6 aluminum plate, anodized aluminum foil, white paint, and quartz surfaces. Both in-plane (in the plane containing the incident beam and the surface normal) and out-of-plane spatial distributions of reflected helium atoms were measured for six different incidence angles (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 deg from the surface normal). It was found that a large fraction of the incident helium atoms were scattered back in the vicinity of the incoming beam, particularly in the case of glancing incidence angles. This unexpected scattering feature results perhaps from the gross roughness of these test surfaces. This prominent backscattering could yield drag coefficients which are higher than for surfaces with either forward-lobed or diffusive (cosine) scattering patterns. (auth)

  20. Stratigraphic Correlation of Middle Triassic Sequences among Different Paleogeographic Sedimentary Facies in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Affected by the Indosinian movement, the sediments in the main part of South China, Yangtzeplatform, started to transform from marine to continental during the Middle Triassic. In the meantime, a noticeable paleogeographic and sedimentary facies differentiation occurred in the marginal regions of the platforms and produced completely different lithologic and paleontologicsequences in various paleogeographic gradients and sedimentary facies areas, which brought about the difficulties for the stratigraphic correlation based on the traditional stratigraphies. This paper proposes to use some characteristic environmental events as the markers of the stratigraphic corre lation across various paleogeographic sedimentary facies, considering that some distinctive regionalenvironmental events should have affected at the same time on the entire basin or the connectedsedimentary regions and produced some closely related sedimentary records in the stratigraphic sequences though the affected intensity and recorded pattern might be different among the regions.The change of violent relative sea level (generally water depth) and the alteration of tectonic activity summarized from the dynamic mechanism of sedimentation are the best markers of environmental events for stratigraphic correlation. Based on the analysis and recognition of some significantenvironmental events at the typical stratigraphic sequences from various paleogeographic sedimentary facies and combined with the consideration of the variations in expressed form and strength fthe events among different paleogeographic gradients and sedimentary facies, the stratigraphic sequences from different sedimentary facies can be easily correlated directly. Furthermore, the evolutionary history of the whole sedimentary basin can be clearly established.

  1. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    methods for mapping geochemical anomalies caused by buried sources and for predicting undiscovered mineral deposits in covered areas. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 122, 55-70. Cumbrera, R., Ana M. Tarquis, Gabriel Gascó, Humberto Millán (2012) Fractal scaling of apparent soil moisture estimated from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Journal of Hydrology (452-453), 205-212. Martin Sotoca; J.J. Antonio Saa-Requejo, Juan Grau and Ana M. Tarquis (2016). Segmentation of singularity maps in the context of soil porosity. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 18, EGU2016-11402. Millán, H., Cumbrera, R. and Ana M. Tarquis (2016) Multifractal and Levy-stable statistics of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 40(3), 2384-2395.

  2. Patterns of distribution of phosphomono-esterases on surfaces of demineralized bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Vilmann, H

    1979-01-01

    be an indication of differential processes of bone transformations in such a way that bone surfaces corresponding to areas of enzyme reactions are depository whereas bone surfaces corresponding to areas of lack of enzyme reaction are resorptive. New experimental designs are, however, necessary before...... to resorptive surfaces and weak reaction of cells adjacent to depository surfaces. When, however, Fast dark blue R was used all surface cells reacted markedly. This method also revealed certain cell types with nuclear reaction....

  3. SU-E-T-165: Characterization of Dose Distributions in High-Dose-Rate Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Damato, A; Friesen, S; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize dose distributions in high-dose-rate(HDR) surface brachytherapy using an Ir-125 source for different geometries, field sizes and topology of the clinical targets(CT). To investigate the depth doses at the central axis(CAX), edges of the treatment fields(E), and lateral dose distributions(L) present when using flap applicators in skin cancer treatments. Methods: When malignancies diagnosed on the skin are treated, various geometries of the CT require proper adaptation of the flap or custom-made applicators to the treatment site. Consequently, the dose at the depth on CAX and field edges changes with variation of the curvatures and size of the applicators. To assess the dose distributions, we created a total of 10 treatment plans(TP) for 10×10 and 20×20 field sizes(FS) with a step size of 1cm. The geometry of the applicators was: planar(PA), curved to 30(CA30) and 60(CA60) degrees with respect to the CAX, half-cylinder(HC), and cylindrical shape(CS). One additional TP was created in which the applicators were positioned to form a dome shape(DS) with a diameter of 16cm. This TP was used to emulate treatment of the average sized scalp. All TPs were optimized to deliver a prescription dose at 8mm equidistantly from the planes containing the dwell positions. This optimization is equivalent to the clinical arrangement since the SSD for the flap applicators is 5mm and the prescription depth is 3mm in the majority of clinical cases. Results: The depths (in mm) of the isodose lines were: FS(10×10):PA[90%(9.1CAX,8.0E,7.6L),50%(28.3CAX,20E,17.3L), 25%(51.1CAX,40E,27L)],CA30[90%(10.3CAX,8.2E,7.9L),50%(32.1CAX, 16.2E,15.8L),25%(61.3CAX,36.7E,31.8L)],CA60[90%(12.2CAX,6.1E,6.3L ),50%(47CAX,14E,16.6L),25%(70.8CAX,31.9E,35.4L)],HC[90%(11.1CA X,6.3E,7.3L),50%(38.3CAX,14.6E,16.1L),25%(66.2CAX,33.8E,34.2L)];FS (20×20):PA[90%(11.1CAX,9.0E,7.0L),50%(34.4CAX,21.9E,15.3L),25%(7 0.4CAX,50.9E,34.8L)],CA30[90%(10.9CAX,7.5E,7.1L),50%(38.8CAX,16. 7E,15.4L),25

  4. Influence of hydrogen surface passivation on Sn segregation, aggregation, and distribution in GeSn/Ge(001) materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johll, Harman; Samuel, Milla; Koo, Ruey Yi; Kang, Hway Chuan; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Tok, Eng Soon

    2015-05-01

    Plane-wave density functional theory is used to investigate the impact of hydrogen passivation of the p(2×2) reconstructed Ge1-xSnx surface on Sn segregation, aggregation, and distribution. On a clean surface, Sn preferentially segregates to the surface layer, with surface coverages of 25%, 50%, and 100% for total Sn concentrations of 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10.0%, respectively. In contrast, a hydrogen passivated surface increases interlayer migration of Sn to subsurface layers, in particular, to the third layer from the surface, and results in surface coverages of 0%, 0%, and 50% corresponding to Sn concentrations of 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10.0%, respectively. Hydrogen transfer from a Ge-capped surface to the one enriched with increasing Sn surface coverage is also an unfavorable process. The presence of hydrogen therefore reduces the surface energy by passivating the reactive dangling bonds and enhancing Sn interlayer migration to the subsurface layers. For both clean and hydrogenated surfaces, aggregation of Sn at the surface layer is also not favored. We explain these results by considering bond enthalpies and the enthalpies of hydrogenation for various surface reactions. Our results thus point to reduced Sn segregation to the surface in a Ge1-xSnx epitaxial thin film if CVD growth, using hydride precursors in the hydrogen limited growth regime, is used. This would lead to a more abrupt interface and is consistent with recent experimental observation. Hydrogenation is therefore a promising method for controlling and manipulating elemental population of Sn in a Ge1-xSnx epitaxial thin film.

  5. The distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in surface subtidal sediments near the Sellafield plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. G.; Roberts, P. D.; Miller, J. M.

    1988-08-01

    Detailed distributions of total gamma activity, 137Cs, 106Ru and 95Zr + 95Nb in surface seabed sediments near the Sellafield plant are presented. The results are derived from a towed seabed gamma-ray spectrometer survey in September, 1982. All the distributions are similar, with contours of equal activity parallel to the coast defining a 'ridge' of higher activity which is displaced northwards relative to the outfall. This pattern appears to be largely a response to the transport of particle-associated radioeffluent modified in places by the type of seabed sediment present. At greater distance from Sellafield, the uptake of nuclides from solution seems to be more important. Nuclide concentrations decrease with increasing distance from Sellafield; rates of decrease being in the order Zr + Nb > Ru > Cs. This can be related to the levels of the nuclides discharged, their sorption characteristics and their half lives. The pattern of seabed activity seems to have been fairly stable over the period 1978 - 1985, but there is evidence of a small northward shift. Concentrations of 137Cs and 106Ru in 1985 were considerably lower than in 1978 or 1982. This is explicable in terms of the fall in discharge levels allied, in the case of Ru, to its short half life and, for Cs, the desorption observed in laboratory experiments. Nuclide ratios in sediment samples yield apparent transit times for the transport of nuclides in the survey area of 1·7 - 3·7 years. These times are generally greater than those obtained from sediments in the more distant Solway Firth and Ravenglass Estuary. It is suggested that they reflect fairly intense bioturbation causing mixing of relatively recent effluent with that from earlier discharges. This is supported by structures observed in X-radiographs of box cores, an abundant burrowing benthos and by interpretations of nuclide profiles and radiocarbon dating of sediment cores by other workers. A lag effect, of up to two years across the survey area

  6. Vertical changes in the probability distribution of downward irradiance within the near-surface ocean under sunny conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernez, Pierre; Stramski, Dariusz; Darecki, Miroslaw

    2011-07-01

    Time series measurements of fluctuations in underwater downward irradiance, Ed, within the green spectral band (532 nm) show that the probability distribution of instantaneous irradiance varies greatly as a function of depth within the near-surface ocean under sunny conditions. Because of intense light flashes caused by surface wave focusing, the near-surface probability distributions are highly skewed to the right and are heavy tailed. The coefficients of skewness and excess kurtosis at depths smaller than 1 m can exceed 3 and 20, respectively. We tested several probability models, such as lognormal, Gumbel, Fréchet, log-logistic, and Pareto, which are potentially suited to describe the highly skewed heavy-tailed distributions. We found that the models cannot approximate with consistently good accuracy the high irradiance values within the right tail of the experimental distribution where the probability of these values is less than 10%. This portion of the distribution corresponds approximately to light flashes with Ed > 1.5?, where ? is the time-averaged downward irradiance. However, the remaining part of the probability distribution covering all irradiance values smaller than the 90th percentile can be described with a reasonable accuracy (i.e., within 20%) with a lognormal model for all 86 measurements from the top 10 m of the ocean included in this analysis. As the intensity of irradiance fluctuations decreases with depth, the probability distribution tends toward a function symmetrical around the mean like the normal distribution. For the examined data set, the skewness and excess kurtosis assumed values very close to zero at a depth of about 10 m.

  7. Effect of spatial distribution of porous matrix surface charge heterogeneity on nanoparticle attachment in a packed bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the effect of spatial distribution of the porous matrix surface heterogeneity on nanoparticle deposition is numerically explored using lattice Boltzmann simulation methods and tracking of individual particles with Lagrangian algorithms. Packed beds with four different patterns of surface charge heterogeneity, on which favorable surfaces for particle attachment are located at different locations, are generated. The heterogeneity is binary, so that the porous surface can either accommodate nanoparticle attachment or not. It is found that the heterogeneity pattern has a stronger effect when the rate constant for particle attachment is high, when the particle size is small, and/or when the fraction of the surface area that is favorable to attachment is about 0.5. At fixed conditions, the heterogeneity pattern with randomly and uniformly distributed active surface area is the most favorite for particle attachment, compared to those where the active surface areas are banded perpendicularly to the flow direction. There exists a critical ratio of the Damkohler number to the Peclet number, beyond which the heterogeneity pattern effect becomes more visible.

  8. A North American and global survey of perfluoroalkyl substances in surface soils: Distribution patterns and mode of occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The distribution of 32 per/polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in surface soils was determined at 62 locations representing all continents (North America n = 33, Europe n = 10, Asia n = 6, Africa n = 5, Australia n = 4, South America n = 3 and Antarctica n = 1) using ultra perform...

  9. Using distributed temperature sensing to monitor field scale dynamics of ground surface temperature and related substrate heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Verhoef, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present one of the first studies of the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along fibre-optic cables to purposely monitor spatial and temporal variations in ground surface temperature (GST) and soil temperature, and provide an estimate of the heat flux at the base of the canopy layer

  10. Can satellite land surface temperature data be used similarly to ground discharge measurements for distributed hydrological model calibration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbari, C.; Mancini, M.; Li, J.; Su, Zhongbo

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a new methodology for the calibration of distributed hydrological models at basin scale by constraining an internal model variable using satellite data of land surface temperature. The model algorithm solves the system of energy and mass balances in terms of a representative equi

  11. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Technology For Clock Recovery In The Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology for clock recovery, and the performance of this technology in the Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) draft standard. FDDI, because it operates at 125 MBd over the fiber optic media, requires tight control of the jitter accumulated in each point-to-point fiber link. The clock recovery function must be able to recover the clock and correctly sample the bit stream, given a relatively narrow "eye opening" at its input. Furthermore, the clock must be maintained during the FDDI "line states," which can have a very low transition density. This paper will first describe the particular implementation of SAW technology used for clock recovery, the SAW filter, and will define it purpose within the clock recovery function. Then, the jitter characteristics of the FDDI signal at the input to clock recovery, as well as the performance of the SAW-based clock recovery function under these input conditions, will be discussed. Experimental results obtained using a typical, Commercially available, SAW filter-based module will be presented. The various "detuning" sources of the SAW filter, which detract from the capability of the SAW-based module to perform accurate sampling, will be discussed. The performance of the module under FDDI line state conditions, particularly Master Line State (MLS) and Quit Line State (QLS), will be analyzed. The QLS, which indicated a disabled upstream transmitter or a cable break, contains no transitions and therefore no information for clock recovery. A circuit will be presented which uses the station's local oscillator and the "signal detect" function of the fiber optic receiver to derive the recovered clock in the event of QLS.

  12. Distribution of fecal sterols in surface sediment of Sungai Tebrau, Johor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, N.; Ali, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    Decreasing quality of aquatic environments may harm human health in general. Sewage pollution from human and animal excretions is a major cause of environmental quality depletion. This study investigates the distribution of sewage contamination level in twenty surface sediment samples taken from Sungai Tebrau, Johor. Four principal fecal sterols have been identified and were found in all sediment samples, which are coprostanol, cholesterol, epicoprostanol and also cholestanol. Cholesterol as the major sterol and most abundant compound derived from a variety of sources ranged from 32.92 to 1,100.55 ngg-1 dry weights. Meanwhile, major fecal sterol, coprostanol has the lowest quantity of total sterol in all samples, constituting only 13% of total sterol. It ranged from 12.63 to 565.42 ngg-1 dry weights, but only two stations (ST12 and ST14) are sewage contaminated. Squatters and residential areas are a major contributor of poorly treated sewage into the aquatic environment. Coprostanol concentration alone is not reliable to indicate sewage contamination; diagnostic indices enhance reliability of sterols as a marker for sewage contamination. Indices applied in this study are coprostanol/cholesterol, coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) and also epicoprostanol/coprostanol. Resultsof coprostanol/cholesterol, coprostanol/(coprostanol+cholestanol) indices supported the findings that both ST12 and ST14 samples are contaminated with sewage. All samples consist of relativelyhigh concentration of epicoprostanol and high ratio value of epicoprostanol/coprostanol. Generally, it can be concluded that these sampling sites are not contaminated with sewage even though fecal sterols were detected in all samples as they were found to be at low concentration.

  13. Mobile Agents: A Distributed Voice-Commanded Sensory and Robotic System for Surface EVA Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Alena, Rick; Crawford, Sekou; Dowding, John; Graham, Jeff; Kaskiris, Charis; Tyree, Kim S.; vanHoof, Ronnie

    2003-01-01

    A model-based, distributed architecture integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: spacesuit biosensors, cameras, GPS, and a robotic assistant. The system transmits data and assists communication between the extra-vehicular activity (EVA) astronauts, the crew in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team. Software processes ("agents"), implemented in a system called Brahms, run on multiple, mobile platforms, including the spacesuit backpacks, all-terrain vehicles, and robot. These "mobile agents" interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. Different types of agents relate platforms to each other ("proxy agents"), devices to software ("comm agents"), and people to the system ("personal agents"). A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface enables people to communicate with their personal agents, supporting a speech-driven navigation and scheduling tool, field observation record, and rover command system. An important aspect of the engineering methodology involves first simulating the entire hardware and software system in Brahms, and then configuring the agents into a runtime system. Design of mobile agent functionality has been based on ethnographic observation of scientists working in Mars analog settings in the High Canadian Arctic on Devon Island and the southeast Utah desert. The Mobile Agents system is developed iteratively in the context of use, with people doing authentic work. This paper provides a brief introduction to the architecture and emphasizes the method of empirical requirements analysis, through which observation, modeling, design, and testing are integrated in simulated EVA operations.

  14. Spatial Distribution and Fuzzy Health Risk Assessment of Trace Elements in Surface Water from Honghu Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Chaoyang; Cai, Ying; Xiao, Minsi

    2017-09-04

    Previous studies revealed that Honghu Lake was polluted by trace elements due to anthropogenic activities. This study investigated the spatial distribution of trace elements in Honghu Lake, and identified the major pollutants and control areas based on the fuzzy health risk assessment at screening level. The mean total content of trace elements in surface water decreased in the order of Zn (18.04 μg/L) > Pb (3.42 μg/L) > Cu (3.09 μg/L) > Cr (1.63 μg/L) > As (0.99 μg/L) > Cd (0.14 μg/L), within limits of Drinking Water Guidelines. The results of fuzzy health risk assessment indicated that there was no obvious non-carcinogenic risk to human health, while carcinogenic risk was observed in descending order of As > Cr > Cd > Pb. As was regarded to have the highest carcinogenic risk among selected trace elements because it generally accounted for 64% of integrated carcinogenic risk. Potential carcinogenic risk of trace elements in each sampling site was approximately at medium risk level (10(-5) to 10(-4)). The areas in the south (S4, S13, and S16) and northeast (S8, S18, and S19) of Honghu Lake were regarded as the risk priority control areas. However, the corresponding maximum memberships of integrated carcinogenic risk in S1, S3, S10-S13, S15, and S18 were of relatively low credibility (50-60%), and may mislead the decision-makers in identifying the risk priority areas. Results of fuzzy assessment presented the subordinate grade and corresponding reliability of risk, and provided more full-scale results for decision-makers, which made up for the deficiency of certainty assessment to a certain extent.

  15. Angular Gamma Dose Rate Distribution at the Surface of Injected Ducted Concrete Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed Ahmed, Fikria M.; Abboud, Aida

    The shielding problems that arise due to the irregular penetrations such as neutral beam injection ducts should be treated carefully to aid in the shield design. The present work was undertaken to describe the effects arising due to radiation streaming through the neutral beam injector ducts (NBID) on the angular distribution of the total gamma ray doses at the outer surface of illmenite concrete shield ( = 4.6g/cm3). The shield is pierced with NBID of different diameters and lengths.The measurements were performed using a collimated beam of both gamma rays and neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The measurements were carried out using 7LiF teflon thermoliminescent dosimeters. Generally the obtained data reveal that the presence of the total dose increase at the centerline of NBID and which in turn tends to decrease with the increase of scattered angle. An empirical formula describing the differential dose rate ratio is predicted. The experimental data obtained reveal good agreement with the calculated ones.Translated AbstractDie radiale Verteilung der -Dosisrate auf der Oberfläuche einer durchlöcherten BetonabschirmungAbschirmprobleme, die ihren Ursprung in irregulärem Durchlaßvermögen haben, sollten sorgfältig untersucht werden, um die Konstruktion von Abschirmungen zu unterstützen. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird versucht, den Effekt von ausgetretener Strahlung (nach dem Mechanismus der neutralen Strahlinjektordurchführung NBID) auf die radiale Verteilung der totalen y- Strahlendosis auf der äußeren Oberfläche einer Illmenitbetonabschirmung ( = 4,6 g/cm3) aufzuzeigen. Der Schild ist mit NBID's verschiedener Längen und Durchmesser versehen. Die experimentellen Werte stimmen gut mit berechneten überein. Eine empirische Formel für die radiale Verteilung wird angegeben.

  16. Surface phase, morphology, and charge distribution transitions on vacuum and ambient annealed SrTi O3 (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Simon, Georg H.; Zou, Ke; Walker, Fred J.; Ahn, Charles; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-05-01

    The surface structures of SrTi O3 (100) single crystals were examined as a function of annealing time and temperature in either oxygen atmosphere or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Samples were subsequently analyzed for the effect the modulation of their charge distribution had on their surface potential. It was found that the evolution of the SrTi O3 surface roughness, stoichiometry, and reconstruction depends on the preparation scheme. LEED revealed phase transitions from a (1 ×1 ) termination to an intermediate c (4 ×2 ) reconstruction to ultimately a (√ 13 ×√ 13 ) -R 33 .7∘ surface phase when the surface was annealed in an oxygen flux, while the reverse transition from (√ 13 ×√ 13 ) -R 33 .7∘ to c (4 ×2 ) was observed when samples were annealed in UHV. When the surface reverted to c (4 ×2 ) , AES data indicated decreases in both the surface Ti and O concentrations. These findings were corroborated by NC-AFM imaging, where initially Ti O2 -terminated crystals developed half-unit cell high steps following UHV annealing, which is typically attributed to a mix of SrO and Ti O2 terminations. Surface roughness evolved nonmonotonically with UHV annealing temperature, which is explained by electrostatic modulations of the surface potential caused by increasing oxygen depletion. This was further corroborated by experiments in which the apparent roughness tracked in NC-AFM could be correlated with changes in the surface charge distribution that were controlled by applying a bias voltage to the sample. Based on these findings, it is suggested that careful selection of preparation procedures combined with application of an electric field may be used to tune the properties of thin films grown on SrTi O3 .

  17. Improved analytic methods for coal surface area and pore size distribution determination using 77 K nitrogen adsorption experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Gongda; Wang Kai; Ren Tingxiang

    2014-01-01

    77 K nitrogen adsorption was the most widely used technique for determining surface area and pore size distribution of coal. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model are com-monly used analytic methods for adsorption/desorption isotherm. A Chinese anthracite coal is tested in this study using an improved experimental method and adsorption isotherm analyzed by three adsorp-tion mechanisms at different relative pressure stages. The result shows that the micropore filling adsorp-tion predominates at the relative pressure stage from 6.8E?7 to 9E?3. Theoretically, BET and BJH model are not appropriate for analyzing coal samples which contain micropores. Two new analytic procedures for coal surface area and pore size distribution calculation are developed in this work. The results show that BET model underestimates surface area, and micropores smaller than 1.751 nm account for 35.5%of the total pore volume and 74.2%of the total surface area. The investigation of surface area and pore size distribution by incorporating the influence of micropore is significant for understanding adsorption mechanism of methane and carbon dioxide in coal.

  18. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  19. Probabilistic estimates of the distribution of near-surface (within 1m) permafrost in Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This medium resolution (i.e. 30-m pixels) spatial dataset provides an estimate of the occurrence of near-surface (within 1 m of the ground surface) permafrost in...

  20. Facies y microfacies de la rampa tithoniana-berriasiana de la cuenca neuquina (Formación Vaca Muerta en la sección del arroyo Loncoche - Malargüe, provincia de Mendoza Facies and microfacies of the Tithonian-Berriasian ramp from the Neuquén basin (Vaca Muerta Formation in the Loncoche creek section - Malargüe, Mendoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A. Kietzmann

    2008-12-01

    , grey shales, marls and siltstones, with bioclastic mudstones, wackestones, packstones, floatstones and rudstones. Facies associations corresponding to four types of depositional settings were distinguished: basin, outer ramp (distal and proximal, and middle ramp. The Nassellaria/Spumellaria ratio was used for bathymetrical interpretation and allows an estimation minor than 200 m depth. The strata pattern and vertical facies distribution show three depositional sequences between a tithonian homoclinal ramp and a berriasian steep homoclinal ramp system. The depositional sequence 1 consists of basin and distal outer ramp facies and it is characterized by a retrogradational pattern. It reaches 124 m in thickness, and may be assigned to the Virgatosphinctes mendozanus Zone up to the base of Corongoceras alternans Zone. Depositional sequences 2 and 3 consist of outer ramp and middle ramp facies. They are characterized by agradational and progradational patterns. The thickness of the sequences 2 is 66 m and is assigned to Corongoceras alternans Zone, meanwhile sequence 3 reachs 78 m and corresponds to Substeueroceras koeneni and Spiticeras damesi zones.

  1. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram Harold; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Sîretanu, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the

  2. Multi-scale Characterization and Modeling of Surface Slope Probability Distribution for ~20-km Diameter Lunar Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanti, P.; Robinson, M. S.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Craters ~20-km diameter and above significantly shaped the lunar landscape. The statistical nature of the slope distribution on their walls and floors dominate the overall slope distribution statistics for the lunar surface. Slope statistics are inherently useful for characterizing the current topography of the surface, determining accurate photometric and surface scattering properties, and in defining lunar surface trafficability [1-4]. Earlier experimental studies on the statistical nature of lunar surface slopes were restricted either by resolution limits (Apollo era photogrammetric studies) or by model error considerations (photoclinometric and radar scattering studies) where the true nature of slope probability distribution was not discernible at baselines smaller than a kilometer[2,3,5]. Accordingly, historical modeling of lunar surface slopes probability distributions for applications such as in scattering theory development or rover traversability assessment is more general in nature (use of simple statistical models such as the Gaussian distribution[1,2,5,6]). With the advent of high resolution, high precision topographic models of the Moon[7,8], slopes in lunar craters can now be obtained at baselines as low as 6-meters allowing unprecedented multi-scale (multiple baselines) modeling possibilities for slope probability distributions. Topographic analysis (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) 2-m digital elevation models (DEM)) of ~20-km diameter Copernican lunar craters revealed generally steep slopes on interior walls (30° to 36°, locally exceeding 40°) over 15-meter baselines[9]. In this work, we extend the analysis from a probability distribution modeling point-of-view with NAC DEMs to characterize the slope statistics for the floors and walls for the same ~20-km Copernican lunar craters. The difference in slope standard deviations between the Gaussian approximation and the actual distribution (2-meter sampling) was

  3. Age and duration of eclogite-facies metamorphism, North Qaidam HP/UHP terrane, Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinson, C.G.; Wooden, J.L.; Liou, J.G.; Bird, D.K.; Wu, C.L.

    2006-01-01

    Amphibolite-facies para-and orthogneisses near Dulan, at the southeast end of the North Qaidam terrane, enclose minor eclogite and peridotite which record ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphism associated with the Early Paleozoic continental collision of the Qilian and Qaidam microplates. Field relations and coesite inclusions in zircons from paragneiss suggest that felsic, mafic, and ultramafic rocks all experienced UHP metamorphism and a common amphibolite-facies retrogression. SHRIMP-RG U-Pb and REE analyses of zircons from four eclogites yield weighted mean ages of 449 to 422 Ma, and REE patterns (flat HREE, no Eu anomaly) and inclusions of garnet, omphacite, and rutile indicate these ages record eclogite-facies metamorphism. The coherent field relations of these samples, and the similar range of individual ages in each sample suggests that the ???25 m.y. age range reflects the duration of eclogite-facies conditions in the studied samples. Analyses from zircon cores in one sample yield scattered 433 to 474 Ma ages, reflecting partial overlap on rims, and constrain the minimum age of eclogite protolith crystallization. Inclusions of Th + REE-rich epidote, and zircon REE patterns are consistent with prograde metamorphic growth. In the Lu??liang Shan, approximately 350 km northwest in the North Qaidam terrane, ages interpreted to record eclogite-facies metamorphism of eclogite and garnet peridotite are as old as 495 Ma and as young as 414 Ma, which suggests that processes responsible for extended high-pressure residence are not restricted to the Dulan region. Evidence of prolonged eclogite-facies metamorphism in HP/UHP localities in the Northeast Greenland eclogite province, the Western Gneiss Region of Norway, and the western Alps suggests that long eclogite-facies residence may be globally significant in continental subduction/collision zones.

  4. Spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of near-surface CO2 concentration over China based on GOSAT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Cui, Weihong; Sun, Yunhua

    2014-11-01

    To study the spatial and temporal distribution characteristics of near-surface CO2 concentration over China, the data of GOSAT L4B and auxiliary data of Mt Waliguan background observations, population density, total energy consumption (coal) and GDP in 2009 were applied to this study. The ArcGIS Geostatistical Analytical Method was used. The ground-based validation was processed by comparing GOSAT data with Mt Waliguan background observations. The variation characteristics of the near-surface CO2 concentration over China was analysed spatially and temporally. The results show that: GOSAT retrieved near-surface products are consistent with Mt Waliguan ground-based measurement; Near-surface CO2 concentration over China is relatively concentrated, and has significant differences between the East and the West, with a overall characteristic that CO2 concentration in the east of China is high and in the west is low; Near-surface CO2 concentration over China has a significant seasonal variation characteristic, and the monthly average concentration rise to the highest value of 396.512 ppmv in April (spring), which is significantly higher than other seasons, decline to the lowest value of 382.781 ppmv in July (summer); All relationships illustrate a big uncertainty, resulting a conclusion that the reasons causing the spatial distribution of near-surface CO2 concentration may be varied, could not be easily determined as anthropogenic or natural ressons, which need further study.

  5. Semi-analytical analysis of the response of the air temperature over the land surface to the global vegetation distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fei; CHAO JiPing

    2009-01-01

    Response of the air temperature over the land surface to the global vegetation distribution is investigated, using a three-dimensional governing equation to simulate the steady, large-scale, limited amplitude perturbation of the free, inviscid and adiabatic atmosphere. The adoption of the static equation leads to a temperature governing equation in the terrain following coordinate. With the prescribed temperature as the upper boundary condition and the radiation balance as the lower boundary condition, the semi-analytical solution of the global circulation temperature can be calculated. In this article, only the air temperature (at 2 m height) over the land surface is analyzed, and the result suggests that this model can simulate the air temperature pattern over the land surface reasonably. A better simulation occurs when a simple feedback of the albedo on the temperature is included. Two sensitivity experiments are analyzed through this model. One suggests that the air temperature over the land surface descends obviously when the land surface is covered with ice all over, while another suggests that the air temperature rises a little when the land surface is covered with forest except the ice-covered area. This model appears to be a good tool to study the response of the air temperature to the vegetation distribution. Limitations of the model are also discussed.

  6. Fast assessment of the surface distribution of API and excipients in tablets using NIR-hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch-Lage, Felicidad; Amigo, José Manuel; Skibsted, Erik; Maspoch, Santiago; Coello, Jordi

    2011-06-15

    The inclusion of hyperspectral imaging systems in the manufacturing and development of pharmaceutical products is allowing a successful improvement in the quality control of solid dosage forms. The correct distribution not only of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) but also of the rest of excipients is essential to assure the correct behavior of the tablet when ingested. This is especially relevant in tablets with low content of potent APIs, in which the prescribed intake dosage frequently corresponds to half-a-tablet. Therefore, the aim of this work is to study the surface distribution of the compounds in tablets with low API content. The proposed procedure includes the scanning of the tablet surface using near infrared hyperspectral spectroscopy in association with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) techniques to obtain selective pictures for each individual compound and to allow the fast assessment of their distribution in the measured surface. As an example, a set of commercial Lorazepam tablets (approximately 1% mass fraction of API, and four excipients) were analyzed. The results obtained show the capacity of the proposed methodology as an expedite approach to evaluate the uniformity of the contents between and within tablets. A method to estimate the homogeneity distribution of API in the two halves of the tablet is also proposed.

  7. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  8. Facies analysis of Hlodufell basaltic subglacial to emergent volcano, SW Iceland: insights into sub-ice growth mechanisms and meltwater drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilling, I. P.

    2003-12-01

    Hlodufell is a subglacial to emergent basaltic volcano located 9km south of the Langjokull ice-cap in SW Iceland. This study is the first detailed facies analysis of this well-known volcano. The vertical facies architecture of the basal half of the volcano is typical of many basaltic subaqueous (including submarine) to emergent volcanoes, comprising basal pillow mounds overlain by Surtseyan eruption-fed subaqueously-deposited sediment gravity flows. However, facies in the upper part of the edifice demonstrate the influence of variable water levels more typical of englacial lakes. The Surtseyan sequence is overlain by two subaerial lava flow and cogenetic lava-fed delta sequences, separated by a second Surtseyan sequence. In addition, the uppermost lava flows are also draped by a thin veneer of Surtseyan tephra. Both lava-fed delta sequences are unusually dominated by subaerial lava breccias. This may be due to a number of factors that influence steep slope stability but the possibility of retreating ice walls should be considered. Detailed facies analysis also revealed evidence of the influence of ice on eruptive and depositional products throughout the history of the edifice. Some of the basal pillow mounds preserve metre-sized cavities with partial hyaloclastite fills, interpreted as meltout structures formed during sub-ice growth by ice-block stoping. Some mounds also have steep chill surfaces where pillows have been compressed against a rigid wall (now absent) interpreted as ice. The peripheral pillow mounds, particularly those to the immediate south of Hlodufell (Rani area) are draped by Surtseyan eruption-fed tephra deposited by erosive meltwater streamflows. The draping tephra was derived from both the first and second Surtseyan sequences. These observations illustrate that direct ice-contact and ice-block stoping was important during initial construction of the volcano and that meltwater drainage (particularly to the south) was important throughout its

  9. Cross-stratified Facies Observed by the Mars Science Laboratory Rover at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Lauren; Rubin, Dave; Grotzinger, John; Bell, Jim; Calef, Fred; Dromart, Gilles; Gupta, Sanjeev; Kah, Linda; Lewis, Kevin; Mangold, Nicolas; Schieber, Jurgen; Stack, Katie; Sumner, Dawn; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover has investigated a number of sedimentary rock outcrops since landing in Gale crater. From the Rocknest location, during sols 59 to 100, Curiosity observed a range of cross-bedded deposits spanning more than 60 m in lateral extent. Cross-bedding is best exposed in an ~80-cm-thick outcrop known as Shaler. Observations using the Mast Cameras of cross-bedding both at Shaler and Rocknest enabled the recognition of several distinct cross-bedded facies. Analysis of cross-bedding geometries provides insight into the depositional environment. On the basis of inferred grain size, erosional resistance, color, and sedimentary structures, we have identified four facies: 1) resistant cross-stratified facies, 2) smooth, fine-grained cross-stratified facies, 3) dark gray, pitted facies, and 4) recessive, vertically fractured facies. Sedimentary structures include simple and compound cross-bedding, angular discontinuities between lamina sets, and potential soft-sediment deformation. Trough cross-bedding suggests that bedforms had sinuous crestlines. Cross-bed sets range from centimeter to decimeter in scale. Small cm-scale climbing ripples were identified in the vicinity of Rocknest. Where climbing bedforms are visible, they climb at subcritical angles, resulting in preservation of only the lee slopes. Analysis of cross-bedding dip directions indicate a range of sediment transport directions. Grain transport under turbulent flows was required to produce the observed cross-bedded facies. We consider three possible depositional environments: eolian, fluvial, and pyroclastic surge. Pyroclastic surge deposits often contain bedforms with supercritical angles of climb, evidence for unidirectional transport radially away from a point source, contain volcanic indicators such as bombs and accretionary lapilli, and display distinct trends in grain size and facies from proximal to distal deposits or in vertical section. These characteristics do not

  10. Reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables based on distributed collaborative response surface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高海峰; 白广忱; 高阳; 鲍天未

    2015-01-01

    The fatigue life of aeroengine turbine disc presents great dispersion due to the randomness of the basic variables, such as applied load, working temperature, geometrical dimensions and material properties. In order to ameliorate reliability analysis efficiency without loss of reliability, the distributed collaborative response surface method (DCRSM) was proposed, and its basic theories were established in this work. Considering the failure dependency among the failure modes, the distributed response surface was constructed to establish the relationship between the failure mode and the relevant random variables. Then, the failure modes were considered as the random variables of system response to obtain the distributed collaborative response surface model based on structure failure criterion. Finally, the given turbine disc structure was employed to illustrate the feasibility and validity of the presented method. Through the comparison of DCRSM, Monte Carlo method (MCM) and the traditional response surface method (RSM), the results show that the computational precision for DCRSM is more consistent with MCM than RSM, while DCRSM needs far less computing time than MCM and RSM under the same simulation conditions. Thus, DCRSM is demonstrated to be a feasible and valid approach for improving the computational efficiency of reliability analysis for aeroengine turbine disc fatigue life with multiple random variables, and has great potential value for the complicated mechanical structure with multi-component and multi-failure mode.

  11. Distributions of clay minerals in surface sediments of the middle Bay of Bengal: Source and transport pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingrui; Liu, Shengfa; Shi, Xuefa; Feng, Xiuli; Fang, Xisheng; Cao, Peng; Sun, Xingquan; Wenxing, Ye; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Kornkanitnan, Narumol

    2017-08-01

    The clay mineral contents in 110 surface sediment samples collected from the middle of the Bay of Bengal were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to investigate the provenance and transport patterns. The illite content was highest, followed by chlorite, kaolinite and then smectite, with average weight percent distributions of 52%, 22%, 14% and 12%, respectively. Illite and chlorite had similar distribution pattern, with higher contents in the northern and central areas and lower contents in the southern area, whereas smectite showed the opposite distribution pattern. Kaolinite show no obvious higher or lower areas and the southern ;belt; was one of the highest content areas. Based on the spatial distribution characteristics and cluster analysis results, the study area can be classified into two provinces. Province I covers the southwestern area and contains high concentrations of illite and smectite sediments. Province II covers most sites and is also characterized by high concentrations of illite, but the weight percent of smectite is only half of that of province I. According to a quantitative estimate using end-member clay minerals contents, the relative contributions from the Himalayan source and the Indian source are 63% and 37% on average, respectively. Integrative analysis indicates that the hydrodynamic environment in the study area, especially the turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation, plays an important role in the spatial distribution and dispersal of the clay fraction in the sediments. The sediments in province I are mainly from the Indian source transported by the East Indian Coastal Current (EICC) and the surface monsoon circulation with minor contributions from the Himalayan source while the sediments in province II are mainly from the Himalayan source transported by turbidity and surface monsoonal circulation with little contribution from Indian river materials.

  12. Temperature distributions in laser-heated semi-infinite and finite-thickness media with convective surface losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loze, M K; Wright, C D

    1998-10-01

    The temperature distributions produced within semi-infinite and finite-thickness media heated by a moving laser beam with a Gaussian power-density profile are examined by use of a time-domain method. Convective losses, described by Newton's law of cooling, from the medium surfaces are included. Various medium absorption models are considered. The solutions are given as single integrals with respect to time of simple functions. The resulting expressions have been used to examine the role of surface losses in information storage and medical applications. The role of convective losses in optical recording systems is found to be insignificant. However, for medical applications, combined convective and evaporative surface losses represent an important surface-heat-loss mechanism.

  13. Surface potential distribution of a LaAlO3 film on mixed termination SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yun Hyeong; Cho, Jin Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Scanning probe microscope (SPM) is used to investigate the morphology and the electric properties of the surface, as well as the interface, of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) films. To establish the physical properties of the heteroepitaxial oxide interface, we characterized single- and mixed-termination of the STO substrates by using nanoscopic measurements of the electric and the structural properties, as well as the LAO film grown on the mixed-terminated STO substrates. In the case of the LAO film grown on the low-miscut STO substrate, the surface potential only showed a difference at the step edge while the LAO film on the high-miscut STO substrate showed a considerable change in the surface potential distribution at the region in which step bunching has occurred. In the poling experiment, a significant rise in the surface potential difference is observed after writing of the DC bias.

  14. Depositional Model of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia Based on Facies Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, Kathy

    2011-11-14

    A lithologic analysis of well exposed Marcellus outcrops has identified six different facies in West Virginia and neighboring states: (1) light gray calcareous shale, (2) fossiliferous limestone, (3) black calcareous shale, (4) black noncalcareous shale, (5) dark gray noncalcareous shale, and (6) K-bentonite. Close interbedding of these rock types attests to a complex, ever-changing environment on the eastern foreland ramp of the Appalachian Basin. The environmental setting was clearly not a deep trough, permanently anoxic, salinity stratified, sediment starved, and populated exclusively by phytoplankton—the traditional depositional model. To the contrary, our sedimentary data suggest a rather shallow water depth, intermittent anoxia, normal-marine salinity, a fluctuating input of siliciclastic mud, and faunal communities of low and moderate diversity. Interbedding of the shale and limestone lithofacies as well as the vertical stacking of facies associations is explained most simply by fluctuations in water depth coupled with fluctuations in sediment supply. The sea floor was, at times, immediately below wave base (Facies 1 and 2), around the depth of the thermocline (Facies 2 and 3), or below the thermocline (Facies 4 and 5), relative sea level changing through two sequences of lowstand, transgression, and highstand. Simultaneously the supply of siliciclastic mud was greater at times of lowstand (increased erosion) and highstand (prograding shoreline), and the supply smaller during transgression (sediment stored in distant coastal plain).

  15. Facies development and paleoenvironment of the Hajajah Limestone Member, Aruma Formation, central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Ismail, Abdelmoneim; Youssef, Mohamed; Nour, Hamdy

    2016-12-01

    The Campanian Hajajah Limestone Member of the Aruma Formation was formed during two regressive episodes. Each of them formed of three depositional facies, from base to top: 1) intra-shelf basin facies, made up of fossiliferous green shale and mudstone with ostracods and badly preserved foraminifers. 2) fore-reef facies, consists of hard, massive, marly coralline limestone. The upper part is rich with low divers, badly to moderate preserved, solitary and colonial corals, and, 3) back reef and near-shore facies, consists of fossiliferous sandy dolomitized, bioturbated limestone with abundant reworked corals, bivalves, gastropods, and aggregate grains. On the basis of field observations, micro-and macrofossils and microfacies analysis, the Hajajah Limestone Member was deposited in distal marine settings below storm wave base in a low-energy environment changed upward to fore-reef framework in an open marine environment with moderate to high energy conditions and terminated with shallow marine facies with accumulation of skeletal grains by storms during regression.

  16. The Utility of Remotely-Sensed Land Surface Temperature from Multiple Platforms For Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, T.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key parameter in watershed energy and water budgets that is relatively unexplored as a validation metric for distributed hydrologic models. Ground-based or remotely-sensed LST datasets can provide insights into a model's ability in reproducing water and energy fluxes across a large range of terrain, vegetation, soil and meteorological conditions. As a result, spatiotemporal LST observations can serve as a strong constraint for distributed simulations and can augment other available in-situ data. LST fields are particular useful in mountainous areas where temperature varies with terrain properties and time-variable surface conditions. In this study, we collect and process remotely-sensed fields from several satellite platforms - Landsat 5/7, MODIS and ASTER - to capture spatiotemporal LST dynamics at multiple resolutions and with frequent repeat visits. We focus our analysis of these fields over the Sierra Los Locos basin (~100 km2) in Sonora, Mexico, for a period encompassing the Soil Moisture Experiment in 2004 and the North American Monsoon Experiment (SMEX04-NAME). Satellite observations are verified using a limited set of ground data from manual sampling at 30 locations and continuous measurements at 2 sites. First, we utilize the remotely-sensed fields to understand the summer seasonal evolution of LST in the basin in response to the arrival of summer storms and the vigorous ecosystem greening organized along elevation bands. Then, we utilize the ground and remote-sensing datasets to test the distributed predictions of the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) under conditions accounting static and dynamic vegetation patterns. Basin-averaged and distributed comparisons are carried out for two different terrain products (INEGI aerial photogrammetry and ASTER stereo processing) used to derive the distributed model domain. Results from the comparisons are discussed in light of the utility of remotely-sensed LST

  17. Do morphometric parameters and geological conditions determine chemistry of glacier surface ice? Spatial distribution of contaminants present in the surface ice of Spitsbergen glaciers (European Arctic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Sara; Gajek, Grzegorz; Chmiel, Stanisław; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2016-12-01

    The chemism of the glaciers is strongly determined by long-distance transport of chemical substances and their wet and dry deposition on the glacier surface. This paper concerns spatial distribution of metals, ions, and dissolved organic carbon, as well as the differentiation of physicochemical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity) determined in ice surface samples collected from four Arctic glaciers during the summer season in 2012. The studied glaciers represent three different morphological types: ground based (Blomlibreen and Scottbreen), tidewater which evolved to ground based (Renardbreen), and typical tidewater glacier (Recherchebreen). All of the glaciers are functioning as a glacial system and hence are subject to the same physical processes (melting, freezing) and the process of ice flowing resulting from the cross-impact force of gravity and topographic conditions. According to this hypothesis, the article discusses the correlation between morphometric parameters, changes in mass balance, geological characteristics of the glaciers and the spatial distribution of analytes on the surface of ice. A strong correlation (r = 0.63) is recorded between the aspect of glaciers and values of pH and ions, whereas dissolved organic carbon (DOC) depends on the minimum elevation of glaciers (r = 0.55) and most probably also on the development of the accumulation area. The obtained results suggest that although certain morphometric parameters largely determine the spatial distribution of analytes, also the geology of the bed of glaciers strongly affects the chemism of the surface ice of glaciers in the phase of strong recession.

  18. Presence, distribution, and diversity of iron-oxidizing bacteria at a landfill leachate-impacted groundwater surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, R.; Gan, P.; Mackay, A.A.;

    2010-01-01

    We examined the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB) at a groundwater surface water interface (GSI) impacted by reduced groundwater originating as leachate from an upgradient landfill. IOB enrichments and quantifications were obtained, at high vertical resolution, by an iron/oxygen opposing...... gradient cultivation method. The depth-resolved soil distribution profiles of water content, Fe2+, and total Fe indicated sharp gradients within the top 10 cm sediments of the GSI, where the IOB density was the highest. In addition, the vertical distribution of iron-reducing bacteria at the same sampling...

  19. Predicting and rationalizing the effect of surface charge distribution and orientation on nano-wire based FET bio-sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vico, L.; Iversen, L.; Sørensen, Martin Hedegård

    2011-01-01

    A single charge screening model of surface charge sensors in liquids (De Vico et al., Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 706-717) is extended to multiple charges to model the effect of the charge distributions of analyte proteins on FET sensor response. With this model we show that counter-intuitive signal...... changes (e.g. a positive signal change due to a net positive protein binding to a p-type conductor) can occur for certain combinations of charge distributions and Debye lengths. The new method is applied to interpret published experimental data on Streptavidin (Ishikawa et al., ACS Nano, 2009, 3, 3969...

  20. Human arachnoid granulations Part I: a technique for quantifying area and distribution on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holman David W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are herniations of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses on the surface of the brain. Previous morphological studies of AGs have been limited in scope and only one has mentioned surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topographic distribution of AGs on the superior surface of the cerebral cortex. Methods En face images were taken of the superior surface of 35 formalin-fixed human brains. AGs were manually identified using Adobe Photoshop, with a pixel location containing an AG defined as 'positive'. A set of 25 standard fiducial points was marked on each hemisphere for a total of 50 points on each image. The points were connected on each hemisphere to create a segmented image. A standard template was created for each hemisphere by calculating the average position of the 25 fiducial points from all brains. Each segmented image was mapped to the standard template using a linear transformation. A topographic distribution map was produced by calculating the proportion of AG positive images at each pixel in the standard template. The AG surface area was calculated for each hemisphere and for the total brain superior surface. To adjust for different brain sizes, the proportional involvement of AGs was calculated by dividing the AG area by the total area. Results The total brain average surface area of AGs was 78.53 ± 13.13 mm2 (n = 35 and average AG proportional involvement was 57.71 × 10-4 ± 7.65 × 10-4. Regression analysis confirmed the reproducibility of AG identification between independent researchers with r2 = 0.97. The surface AGs were localized in the parasagittal planes that coincide with the region of the lateral lacunae. Conclusion The data obtained on the spatial distribution and en face surface area of AGs will be used in an in vitro model of CSF outflow. With an increase in the number of samples, this analysis technique can be used

  1. Mass-velocity and size-velocity distributions of ejecta cloud from shock-loaded tin surface using atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O.; Soulard, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-04-28

    The mass (volume and areal densities) versus velocity as well as the size versus velocity distributions of a shock-induced cloud of particles are investigated using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. A generic three-dimensional tin crystal with a sinusoidal free surface roughness (single wavelength) is set in contact with vacuum and shock-loaded so that it melts directly on shock. At the reflection of the shock wave onto the perturbations of the free surface, two-dimensional sheets/jets of liquid metal are ejected. The simulations show that the distributions may be described by an analytical model based on the propagation of a fragmentation zone, from the tip of the sheets to the free surface, in which the kinetic energy of the atoms decreases as this zone comes closer to the free surface on late times. As this kinetic energy drives (i) the (self-similar) expansion of the zone once it has broken away from the sheet and (ii) the average size of the particles which result from fragmentation in the zone, the ejected mass and the average size of the particles progressively increase in the cloud as fragmentation occurs closer to the free surface. Though relative to nanometric scales, our model may help in the analysis of experimental profiles.

  2. Distribution and significance of crystalline, perlitic and vesicular textures in the Ordovician Garth Tuff (Wales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, A. N.; Cas, R. A. F.; Orton, G. J.

    Diverse spherulitic and granular crystalline fabrics, perlitic textures and fabrics related to the growth and migration of vesicles occur in the Garth Tuff, a largely welded Ordovician ignimbrite. Defining the distribution of such textures helps to constrain the ignimbrite's cooling and degassing history. Suites of spherulitic and perlitic textures closely reflect variation in cooling rates. Seven facies are defined based on the style and intensity of crystallisation: (1) a medium to coarsely crystalline, equigranular facies; (2) an intensely spherulitic facies; (3) a sparsely spherulitic facies; (4) a pectinate facies; (5) a microcrystalline to cryptocrystalline, equigranular facies; (6) a lithophysal facies; and (7) a transitional perlite-pectinate facies. Textural changes from facies 1 to 5 reflect progressively higher cooling rates. Facies 1 occurs in proximal settings in the ignimbrite's core. Facies 2 to 5 successively envelop facies 1, with facies 2 becoming the dominant fabric in the ignimbrite's core in medial settings. Facies 5 is typically developed in the originally glassy perlitic zones at the ignimbrite's welded margins. Crystallisation under hydrous conditions is reflected by second-boiling textures in the sporadically developed lithophysal facies. The seventh facies reflects a subtle interplay between cooling, hydration and crystallisation which locally prevented perlitic fracturing. The distribution of amygdales reflects patterns of volatile migration and entrapment. In the lower levels of the ignimbrite, amygdales occur in irregular concentrations or rare subvertical pipe-like structures. Pipe-like structures attest to fumarolic activity while the ignimbrite was in a rheomorphic state. Amygdales are widespread and evenly distributed in the upper levels of the ignimbrite. However, the top of the welding profile is characterised by a thin, poorly vesiculated, originally vitrophyric horizon that abruptly caps an intense concentration of amygdales

  3. Measuring surface state density and energy distribution in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Eliezer; Cohen, Gilad; Gross, Shahar; Henning, Alexander; Matok, Max; Rosenwaks, Yossi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kretinin, Andrey V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Shtrikman, Hadas [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Braun Center for Submicrometer Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-02-15

    Semiconducting nanowires are expected to have applications in various areas as transistors, sensors, resonators, solar cells, and thermoelectric systems. Understanding the surface properties is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance devices. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires, their surface electronic properties, like surface states, can a have a large effect on the performance of both electronic and optoelectronic devices. At present, determination of the surface state density depends on a combination of experimental measurements of the capacitance and/or drain current, in a nanowire field-effect transistor, and a fitting to simulation. This technique follows certain assumptions, which can severely harm the accuracy of the extracted density of states. In this report, we demonstrate a direct measurement of the surface state density of individual InAs and silicon nanowires. The method is based on measuring the surface potential of a nanowire field-effect transistor, with respect to a changing gate bias. The extracted density of states at the surface helps to explain various electronic phenomena in such devices. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. The significance of a differential distribution of phosphomonoesterases on bone surfaces after prolonged demineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, H; Kirkeby, S

    1979-01-01

    with the patterns of apposition and resorption on the periosteal surfaces of this bone, revealed by in vivo staining with alizarin red S. Presence of reaction to acid phosphatase is, as shown before, an indication of resorptive surfaces, while the presence of reaction to alkaline phosphatase is an indication...

  5. Spatial distribution, temporal variation and risks of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in urban surface water in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhui; Gao, Lihong; Shi, Yali; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of 13 target compounds, including eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were detected in surface water samples at 35 sampling sites in the Beijing River system, China. The surface water samples were collected from the main rivers and lakes in the urban area monthly from July 2013 to June 2014 (except the frozen period). Laboratory analyses revealed that parabens were ubiquitous in the surface water of Beijing. PHBA was the predominant compound in the surface water samples, with the average concentration of 239ngL(-1), followed by the total amount of chlorinated parabens (average 50.1ng/L) and parabens (average 44.3ng/L). It is noteworthy that octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in the surface water. Significant difference was observed for paraben concentrations from different sampling sites, and the highest level of parabens was found in the Xiaotaihou River, which was mainly due to the untreated sewage discharge. Seasonal variation of target compounds in the urban surface water was also studied, and parabens exhibited a different temporal variation from chlorinated derivatives. A combination of factors including high residual chlorine level and water temperature as well as intense ultraviolet radiation might enhance the persistence of chlorinated parabens in chlorinated water during the wet season. Risk assessment showed that parabens and their chlorinated derivatives are not likely to produce biological effects on aquatic ecosystems at current levels in the surface water of Beijing.

  6. SU-E-J-87: Lung Deformable Image Registration Using Surface Mesh Deformation for Dose Distribution Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labine, A; Carrier, J; Bedwani, S [CHUM - Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chav, R [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie et orthopedie (LIO), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ecole de technologie superieure, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); DeGuise, J [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie et orthopedie (LIO), Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To allow a reliable deformable image registration (DIR) method for dose calculation in radiation therapy. This work proposes a performance assessment of a morphological segmentation algorithm that generates a deformation field from lung surface displacements with 4DCT datasets. Methods: From the 4DCT scans of 15 selected patients, the deep exhale phase of the breathing cycle is identified as the reference scan. Varian TPS EclipseTM is used to draw lung contours, which are given as input to the morphological segmentation algorithm. Voxelized contours are smoothed by a Gaussian filter and then transformed into a surface mesh representation. Such mesh is adapted by rigid and elastic deformations to match each subsequent lung volumes. The segmentation efficiency is assessed by comparing the segmented lung contour and the TPS contour considering two volume metrics, defined as Volumetric Overlap Error (VOE) [%] and Relative Volume Difference (RVD) [%] and three surface metrics, defined as Average Symmetric Surface Distance (ASSD) [mm], Root Mean Square Symmetric Surface Distance (RMSSD) [mm] and Maximum Symmetric Surface Distance (MSSD) [mm]. Then, the surface deformation between two breathing phases is determined by the displacement of corresponding vertices in each deformed surface. The lung surface deformation is linearly propagated in the lung volume to generate 3D deformation fields for each breathing phase. Results: The metrics were averaged over the 15 patients and calculated with the same segmentation parameters. The volume metrics obtained are a VOE of 5.2% and a RVD of 2.6%. The surface metrics computed are an ASSD of 0.5 mm, a RMSSD of 0.8 mm and a MSSD of 6.9 mm. Conclusion: This study shows that the morphological segmentation algorithm can provide an automatic method to capture an organ motion from 4DCT scans and translate it into a volume deformation grid needed by DIR method for dose distribution combination.

  7. The influence of facies heterogeneity on the doublet performance in low-enthalpy geothermal sedimentary reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crooijmans, R. A.; Willems, C. J L; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is used to study the influence of facies heterogeneity on energy production under different operational conditions of low-enthalpy geothermal doublet systems. Process-based facies modelling is utilised for the Nieuwerkerk sedimentary formation in the West Netherlands Basin...... and the energy recovery rate for different discharge rates and the production temperature (Tmin) above which the doublet is working. With respect to the results, we propose a design model to estimate the life time and energy recovery rate of the geothermal doublet. The life time is estimated as a function of N....../G, Tmin and discharge rate, while the design model for the energy recovery rate is only a function of N/G and Tmin. Both life time and recovery show a positive relation with an increasing N/G. Further our results suggest that neglecting details of process-based facies modelling may lead to significant...

  8. A systematic study to understand the effects of particle size distribution of magnetic fingerprint powders on surfaces with various porosities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Serkan; Özmen Monkul, Bahar; İpeksaç, Tuğba; Gürtekin Seden, Merve; Erol, Melek

    2015-05-01

    This study intends to design magnetite (Fe3 O4 )-based magnetic fingerprint powders with different particle size distributions. It also investigates the influence of particle size distribution on the visualization of latent fingermarks with as little background staining as possible on the surfaces with various porosities in a systematic way. Two strategies were used to prepare the magnetic fingerprint formulations for this study: milling of coarse magnetite particles for different durations, and mixing of sieved fine particles with different size ranges with coarse particles. Particle size analyses of the prepared magnetic powders, optical microscopy-based roughness analysis of the surfaces and SEM measurements of the visualized fingerprints and representative powders were performed. Mag2 of the formulations prepared through milling and Mag5 and Mag6 of the formulations prepared through sieving and mixing were more successful in the development of latent prints than the rest of the solutions.

  9. Refractive-index distributions generating as light rays a given family of curves lying on a surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghero, Francesco; Kotoulas, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    In the framework of geometrical optics, we consider the inverse problem consisting in obtaining refractive-index distributions n=n(u,v) of a two-dimensional transparent inhomogeneous isotropic medium from a known family f(u,v)=c of monochromatic light rays, lying on a given regular surface. Using some basic concepts of differential geometry, we establish a first-order linear partial differential equation relating the assigned family of light rays with all possible refractive-index profiles compatible with this family. In particular, we study the refractive-index distribution producing, as light rays, a given family of geodesic lines on some remarkable surfaces. We give appropriate examples to explain the theory.

  10. Upscaling retardation factor in hierarchical porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hailin; Dai, Zhenxue; Wolfsberg, Andrew V; Ye, Ming; Stauffer, Philip H; Lu, Zhiming; Kwicklis, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity controls spatial and temporal variability of reactive transport parameters and has significant impacts on subsurface modeling of flow, transport, and remediation. Upscaling (or homogenization) is a process to replace a heterogeneous domain with a homogeneous one such that both reproduce the same response. To make reliable and accurate predictions of reactive transport for contaminant in chemically and physically heterogeneous porous media, subsurface reactive transport modeling needs upscaled parameters such as effective retardation factor to perform field-scale simulations. This paper develops a conceptual model of multimodal reactive mineral facies for upscaling reactive transport parameters of hierarchical heterogeneous porous media. Based on the conceptual model, covariance of hydraulic conductivity, sorption coefficient, flow velocity, retardation factor, and cross-covariance between flow velocity and retardation factor are derived from geostatistical characterizations of a three-dimensional unbounded aquifer system. Subsequently, using a Lagrangian approach the scale-dependent analytical expressions are derived to describe the scaling effect of effective retardation factors in temporal and spatial domains. When time and space scales become sufficiently large, the effective retardation factors approximate their composite arithmetic mean. Correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the sorption coefficient can significantly affect the values of the effective retardation factor in temporal and spatial domains. When the temporal and spatial scales are relatively small, scaling effect of the effective retardation factors is relatively large. This study provides a practical methodology to develop effective transport parameters for field-scale modeling at which remediation and risk assessment is actually conducted. It does not only bridge the gap between bench-scale measurements to field-scale modeling, but also provide new insights into

  11. ON THE MULTIPLICATIVE PRODUCT OF THE DIRAC-DELTA DISTRIBUTION ON THE HYPER-SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Kananthai, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we give a sense to the distributional multiplicative product [Java Applet] where [Java Applet] is the Dirac-delta distribution, [Java Applet], [Java Applet], where [Java Applet] and [Java Applet] with [Java Applet] is the dimension of the Euclidean space [Java Applet], [Java Applet], [Java Applet], and [Java Applet] is a real number. On the certain conditions of [Java Applet] and [Java Applet] of such a multiplicative product, we obtain a formula related to the Green function i...

  12. On the multiplicative product of the Dirac-delta distribution on the hyper-surface

    OpenAIRE

    Kananthai, A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we give a sense to the distributional multiplicative product [Java Applet] where [Java Applet] is the Dirac-delta distribution, [Java Applet], [Java Applet], where [Java Applet] and [Java Applet] with [Java Applet] is the dimension of the Euclidean space [Java Applet], [Java Applet], [Java Applet], and [Java Applet] is a real number. On the certain conditions of [Java Applet] and [Java Applet] of such a multiplicative product, we obtain a formula related to the Green function i...

  13. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G.B.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Newman, S.F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Griffith, C.A.; Hibbitts, C.A.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Wagner, R.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 ??m. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 ??m and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (???0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 岩石物理相的控制因素及其定量表征方法研究%Researches of the Control Factors and the Quantitatively Characterization Method of Reservoir Petrophysical Facies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宁; 王贵文; 赖锦; 王书南; 柴毓; 吴恒; 张永辰; 赵显令

    2013-01-01

    在现今以“相控论”为主导、以地层及岩性等隐蔽型油气藏为主要目标的油气勘探阶段,岩石物理相在优质储集体预测、储层参数评价和剩余油气分布规律研究等储层地质学领域体现出了广阔的应用前景.然而对于其分类命名方案则尚未达成共识,目前虽有以数学为主和以地质研究为主的两大类划分方法,但这些方法要不适用条件有限,要不划分依据存在缺陷,且命名法则相对并不科学.基于以上现状和存在问题,本文在大量文献阅读的基础上,提出了一种基于“相控论”的岩石物理相划分方法,即通过岩石物理相的主要控制因素——构造相、沉积相和成岩相的叠加与复合来对其进行分类命名.最后以四川盆地蓬莱地区须二段储层为例,在对其构造相、沉积相和成岩相划分的基础上,通过三者的有机叠加与耦合对其岩石物理相进行分类命名,并提出了相应的定量表征方法,并进一步探讨不同岩石物理相类型与天然气产能的关系,利用岩石物理相寻找优质储集体及含气有利区,验证了该方法的有效性.该划分方法从地质相的角度出发,一方面充分考虑了影响油气富集的各因素,避免了从单一因素出发而造成的误差,能实现油藏精细描述,另一方面对岩石物理相的命名也更具科学性.%Nowadays the dominant oil and gas exploration theory has gradually transformed from “Source control theory”,“Belt controlled theory” to “Facies control theory”,and the exploration target mainly aims at the subtle reservoirs such as the lithologic and stratigraphic reservoirs,the reservoir petrophysical facies shows great prospects and potential in predicting high quality reservoirs,evaluating reservoir parameters and researching the distribution of residual oil and gas since its being proposed in 1990s.Though the division of petrophysical facies has always been a hot topic

  15. Effect of phase coupling on surface amplitude distribution of wind waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Nonlinear features of wind generated surface waves are considered here to be caused by nonrandomness (non-Uniform) in the phase spectrum. Nonrandomness in recorded waves, if present, would be generally obscured within the error level of observations...

  16. Spatial distribution, temporal variation and risks of parabens and their chlorinated derivatives in urban surface water in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenhui; Gao, Lihong [School of Chemistry and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Shi, Yali; Wang, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Liu, Jiemin, E-mail: liujm@ustb.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cai, Yaqi, E-mail: caiyaqi@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of 13 target compounds, including eight parabens, four chlorinated parabens and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), were detected in surface water samples at 35 sampling sites in the Beijing River system, China. The surface water samples were collected from the main rivers and lakes in the urban area monthly from July 2013 to June 2014 (except the frozen period). Laboratory analyses revealed that parabens were ubiquitous in the surface water of Beijing. PHBA was the predominant compound in the surface water samples, with the average concentration of 239 ng L{sup −1}, followed by the total amount of chlorinated parabens (average 50.1 ng/L) and parabens (average 44.3 ng/L). It is noteworthy that octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in the surface water. Significant difference was observed for paraben concentrations from different sampling sites, and the highest level of parabens was found in the Xiaotaihou River, which was mainly due to the untreated sewage discharge. Seasonal variation of target compounds in the urban surface water was also studied, and parabens exhibited a different temporal variation from chlorinated derivatives. A combination of factors including high residual chlorine level and water temperature as well as intense ultraviolet radiation might enhance the persistence of chlorinated parabens in chlorinated water during the wet season. Risk assessment showed that parabens and their chlorinated derivatives are not likely to produce biological effects on aquatic ecosystems at current levels in the surface water of Beijing. - Highlights: • Parabens and chlorinated parabens are ubiquitous in surface water in Beijing. • Octylparaben with longer chain was firstly detected in surface water. • Untreated sewage discharge was the main source of parabens in river. • Parabens exhibited a different seasonal variation from chlorinated derivatives. • The risks of target compounds are negligible at

  17. Changes in the modeled ice thickness distribution near the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) drifting ice camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, R. W.

    2003-06-01

    In the polar oceans the ice thickness distribution controls the exchange of heat between the ocean and the atmosphere and determines the strength of the ice. The Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment included a year-long field program centered on a drifting ice station in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas in the Arctic Ocean from October 1997 through October 1998. Here we use camp observations and develop methods to assimilate ice thickness and open water observations into a model in order to estimate the evolution of the thickness distribution in the vicinity of the camp. A thermodynamic model is used to simulate the ice growth and melt, and an ice redistribution model is used to simulate the opening and ridging processes. Data assimilation procedures are developed and then used to assimilate observations of the thickness distribution. Assimilated observations include those of the thin end of the distribution determined by aircraft surveys of the surface temperature and helicopter photographic surveys and aircraft microwave estimates of the open water fraction. The deformation of the ice was determined primarily from buoy and RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS) measurements of the ice velocity. Because of the substantial convergence and ridging observed in the spring and summer, the estimated mean ice thickness increases by 59%, from 1.53 to 2.44 m, over the year in spite of a net thermodynamic ice loss for most multiyear ice.

  18. Composition, Physical State, and Distribution of Ices at the Surface of Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBergh, Catherine; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Owen, Tobias C.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Roush, Ted L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of near-infrared observations of the icy surface of Triton, recorded on 1995 September 7, with the cooled grating spectrometer CGS4 at the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (Mauna Kea, HI). This analysis was performed in two steps. The step consisted of identifying the molecules composing Triton's surface by comparing the observations with laboratory transmission spectra (direct spectral analysis ); this also gives information on the physical state of the components.

  19. Distribution and characteristics of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Akito; Yano, Shinichiro; Hisano, Akihiro; Kindaichi, Michiaki; Sonoda, Ikuko; Tada, Akihide; Akagi, Hirokatsu

    2016-08-15

    This study was carried out to evaluate the present-day chemical properties of methylmercury in surface sediment in Minamata Bay where a dredging project was completed 28years ago. Present-day sediment from Minamata Bay consists of sandy silt, and the average loss-on-ignition in surface sediment was 7.0±2.3%. The average methylmercury concentrations in the upper sediment layers were significantly higher than those in the lower sediment layers. Currently, the concentrations in sediments in Minamata Bay do not exceed the Japanese regulatory standard value for mercury. The average concentration of methylmercury in Minamata Bay surface sediment was 1.74±1.0ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=107). The methylmercury concentration in Minamata Bay surface sediment was almost 16 times higher than that in surface sediment from Isahaya Bay surface sediment, which was 0.11±0.045ng/g on a dry weight basis (n=5).

  20. Surface Roughness and Dislocation Distribution in Compositionally Graded Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layer with Inserted Strained Si Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Sik

    2005-03-01

    We report the experimental investigation of surface roughness and dislocation distribution of 1 μm-thick, compositionally graded, relaxed SiGe buffer layer with a final Ge surface content of 30%. Tensile-strained Si layers are inserted at various locations in the graded buffer during SiGe epitaxial growths. Slight reduction in surface roughness from about 10.3 nm to about 7.8 nm by inserting two 20 nm thick tensile-strained Si layers followed by SiGe growths. It turns out that majority of the residual surface roughness is developed during the SiGe growths on top of the topmost strain Si layer. The surface immediately after the growth of tensile strained Si is very flat with about 1.1 nm RMS roughness and without crosshatch morphology. Cross-sectional TEM shows clear signs of increased interaction between dislocation half-loops at the top surface of the strained Si layers. Our observation shows that although thin Si layers under tensile-strain are effective in reducing cross-hatch, they could in the meantime impede dislocation propagation leading to higher threading dislocation density. Considerations for an optimized scheme exploiting the flattening function of tensile-strained layers will be discussed.