WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface-water mass analysis

  1. Analysis of trace levels of sulfonamide and tetracycline antimicrobials in groundwater and surface water using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, M.E.; Meyer, M.; Thurman, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for the trace analysis of two classes of antimicrobials consisting of six sulfonamides (SAs) and five tetracyclines (TCs), which commonly are used for veterinary purposes and agricultural feed additives and are suspected to leach into ground and surface water. The method used solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) with positive ion electrospray. The unique combination of a metal chelation agent (Na2EDTA) with a macroporous copolymer resulted in quantitative recoveries by solid-phase extraction (mean recovery, 98 ?? 12%) at submicrogram-per-liter concentrations. An ammonium formate/formic acid buffer with a methanol/water gradient was used to separate the antimicrobials and to optimize the signal intensity. Mass spectral fragmentation and ionization characteristics were determined for each class of compounds for unequivocal identification. For all SAs, a characteristic m/z 156 ion representing the sulfanilyl fragment was identified. TCs exhibited neutral losses of 17 amu resulting from the loss of ammonia and 35 amu from the subsequent loss of water. Unusual matrix effects were seen only for TCs in this first survey of groundwater and surface water samples from sites around the United States, requiring that TCs be quantitated using the method of standard additions.

  2. Application of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection for the analysis of selected drug residues in wastewater and surface water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petr Lacina; Ludmila Mravcová; Milada Vávrová

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical residues have become tightly controlled environmental contaminants in recent years,due to their increasing concentration in environmental components.This is mainly caused by their high level of production and everyday consumption.Therefore there is a need to apply new and sufficiently sensitive analytical methods,which can detect the presence of these contaminants even in very low concentrations.This study is focused on the application of a reliable analytical method for the analysis of 10 selected drug residues,mainly from the group of non-steroidal anti-iaffammatory drugs (salicylic acid,acetylsalicylic acid,clofibric acid,ibuprofen,acetaminophen,caffeine,naproxen,mefenamic acid,ketoprofen,and dicofenac),in wastewaters and surface waters.This analytical method is based on solid phase extraction,derivatization by N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) and finally analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with Time-of-Flight mass spectrometric detection (GCxGC-TOF MS).Detection limits ranged from 0.18 to 5 ng/L depending on the compound and selected matrix.The method was successfully applied for detection of the presence of selected pharmaceuticals in the Svratka River and in wastewater from the wastewater treatment plant in Brno-Modrice,Czech Republic.The concentration of pharmaceuticals varied from one to several hundreds of ng/L in surface water and from one to several tens of μg/L in wastewater.

  3. Analysis of anthelmintics in surface water by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrnčić, Mirta; Gros, Meritxell; Babić, Sandra; Kaštelan-Macan, Marija; Barcelo, Damia; Petrović, Mira

    2014-03-01

    A method based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqLIT-MS) has been developed to investigate occurrence of 10 anthelmintic drugs from different structural groups (moxidectin, flubendazole, fenbendazole, levamisol, mebendazole, oxibendazole, albendazole, triclabendazole, febantel and praziquantel) in surface water. Analytes were pre-concentrated by solid phase extraction (SPE) using hydrophilic-lipophilic polymeric based sorbent. Quantification of investigated analytes was done using deuterated compounds as internal standards in order to minimize matrix effect. Analyte recoveries from spiked samples at two concentration levels were above 75% for most of the analytes. The main advantages of developed method are fast separation using UHPLC and therefore short analysis time, combined with good sensitivity which is demonstrated by low ngL(-1) detection limits. The developed method was applied for analysis of anthelmintics in the Llobregat River (NE Spain) and its main tributaries (rivers Anoia and Cardener). Eight out of ten anthelmintics were detected in all analyzed samples with the concentrations in low ngL(-1) level. The method fills the gap on analytical methodologies for determination of anthelmintic drugs in the environment.

  4. Solid phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of sulfonamides, tetracyclines, analgesics and hormones in surface water and wastewater in Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, J-Y; Krein, A; Pfister, L; Hoffmann, L; Guignard, C

    2009-08-01

    In the early 1990s different studies highlighted the relationship between pharmaceuticals, human health and the environment. Among the emerging contaminants, antibiotics are obviously of high concern, because of their potential for inducing antibiotic resistance. In addition, natural and synthetic hormones are relevant because of their potential endocrine-disrupting effects on wildlife. This investigation focuses on the analysis of four classes of veterinary and human pharmaceuticals (sulfonamides, tetracyclines, analgesics and hormones) in surface water and wastewater in Luxembourg. The selected eleven pharmaceuticals include four sulfonamides (sulfathiazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfadimethoxine and sulfamethazine), two tetracyclines (tetracycline and oxytetracycline), two analgesics (ibuprofen and diclofenac), and three hormones (2 naturals, estrone and beta-estradiol, and a synthetic one, 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol). The most innovative parts of this study are the simultaneous extraction of the above-mentioned pharmaceuticals as well as tracking their behaviour during flood events in a small river catchment. The method includes pre-concentration by solid phase extraction using Oasis HLB (Hydrophilic Lipophilic Balance) which gave superior results compared to Chromabond C-18EC, Chromabond(R) EASY and Bond Elut PLEXA cartridges, also evaluated in this investigation. The analysis of the investigated pharmaceutical compounds is carried out by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The limits of quantification were 1 ng L(-1), except for beta-estradiol (2 ng L(-1)) and 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (6 ng L(-1)). Recovery rates range from 70 to 94%, with relative standard deviations between 4 and 19%. Application of this method to river concentration and flood events revealed high concentrations of ibuprofen (10-4000 ng L(-1)), with highest levels during flood events, while concentrations of estrogens (1-240 ng L(-1)) and

  5. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa, E-mail: ghozlanib@yahoo.fr [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, Laboratoire de Modelisation en ' Hydraulique et Environnement, BP 37, Le Belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45 Degree-Sign slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly on the specific gravity. The maximum wave amplitude and the time at which it occurred are also presented as a function of the initial submergence and specific gravity

  6. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45° slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly\\vadjust{\

  7. Modeling the improvement of ultrafiltration membrane mass transfer when using biofiltration pretreatment in surface water applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netcher, Andrea C; Duranceau, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    In surface water treatment, ultrafiltration (UF) membranes are widely used because of their ability to supply safe drinking water. Although UF membranes produce high-quality water, their efficiency is limited by fouling. Improving UF filtrate productivity is economically desirable and has been attempted by incorporating sustainable biofiltration processes as pretreatment to UF with varying success. The availability of models that can be applied to describe the effectiveness of biofiltration on membrane mass transfer are lacking. In this work, UF water productivity was empirically modeled as a function of biofilter feed water quality using either a quadratic or Gaussian relationship. UF membrane mass transfer variability was found to be governed by the dimensionless mass ratio between the alkalinity (ALK) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). UF membrane productivity was optimized when the biofilter feed water ALK to DOC ratio fell between 10 and 14. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  9. Multivariate statistical analysis for the surface water quality of the Luan River, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-wei ZHAO; Fu-yi CUI

    2009-01-01

    In order to analyze the characteristics of surface water resource quality for the reconstruction of old water treatment plant, multivariate statistical techniques such as cluster analysis and factor analysis were applied to the data of Yuqiao Reservoir--surface water resource of the Luan River, China. The results of cluster analysis demonstrate that the months of one year were divided into 3 groups and the characteristic of clusters was agreed with the seasonal characteristics in North China. Three factors were derived from the complicated set using factor analysis. Factor 1 included turbidity and chlorophyll, which seemed to be related to the anthropogenic activities; factor 2 included alkaline and hardness, which were related to the natural characteristic of surface water; and factor 3 included Cl and NO-N affected by mineral and agricultural activities. The sinusoidal shape of the score plots of the three factors shows that the temporal variations caused by natural and human factors are linked to seasouality.

  10. Salinity maxima associated with some sub-surface water masses in the upper layers of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varadachari, V.V.R.; Murty, C.S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    The distribution of some sub-surface water masses in the western bay of Bengal during the south-west monsoon period is presented. Based on the salinity maxima and sigma t values the existence of waters of Persian Gulf and Red Sea origin could...

  11. Protein analysis in dissolved organic matter: what free proteins from soil leachate and surface water can tell us a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W.

    2004-12-01

    Mass spectrometry based analysis of proteins is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not yet routinely been applied in environmental research. Based on observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this article gives an example about the possible use of protein analysis in ecology and environmental sciences focusing on different terrestrial ecosystems. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1) the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the DOM protein pool, and (2) identification of the organismic origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper, mass spectrometric protein analysis was applied to identify proteins from DOM and organism-free surface water samples derived from different environments. It is concluded, that mass spectrometric protein analysis is capable of distinguishing phylogenetic origin of proteins from leachates of different soil horizons, and from various sources of terrestrial surface water. Current limitation is imposed by the limited knowledge of complete genomes of soil organisms. The protein analysis allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific active enzymes. Further applications, such as in pollution research are conceivable. In summary, the analysis of proteins opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  12. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of surface water quality of Pratapgarh district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogeochemical study of surface water in Pratapgarh district has been carried out to assess the major ion chemistry and water quality for drinking and domestic purposes. For this purpose, twenty-five surface water samples were collected from river, ponds and canals and analysed for pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids (TDS), turbidity, hardness, major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+), major anions (HCO3 -, F-, Cl-, NO3 -, SO4 2-) and dissolved silica concentration. The analytical results show mildly acidic to alkaline nature of surface water resources of Pratapgarh district. HCO3 - and Cl- are the dominant anions, while cation chemistry is dominated by Na+ and Ca2+. The statistical analysis and data plotted on the Piper diagram reveals that the surface water chemistry is mainly controlled by rock weathering with secondary contributions from agriculture and anthropogenic sources. Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3 -, Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- and Na+-HCO3 --Cl- are the dominant hydrogeochemical facies in the surface water of the area. For quality assessment, values of analysed parameters were compared with Indian and WHO water quality standards, which shows that the concentrations of TDS, F-, NO3 -, Na+, Mg2+ and total hardness are exceeding the desirable limits in some water samples. Water Quality Index (WQI) is one of the most effective tools to communicate information on the quality of any water body. The computed WQI values of Pratapgarh district surface water range from 28 to 198 with an average value of 82, and more than half of the study area is under excellent to good category.

  13. Seasonal Variation of Phytoplankton Assemblages Related to Surface Water Mass in the Eastern Part of the South Sea in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pung-Guk Jang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the seasonal succession of phytoplankton assemblages in the eastern part of the South Sea of Korea in relation to surface water masses. The study areas are under the direct influence of the Tsushima Warm Current (TCW throughout the whole year, with its strength known to be seasonally variable. The region is also influenced by coastal waters (CW driven from the South Sea of Korea and East China Sea, particularly in summer, as indicated by low salinity in the surface water. Nutrient property of the TCW can reveals whether the origin of the TCW is the nutrient-rich Kuroshio Current or the oligotropic Taiwan Warm Current. Surface chlorophyll-a (Chl-a concentrations displayed a large seasonal variation for all stations, with high values found in spring and autumn and low values in summer and winter. At station M (offshore and P (intermediate location between M and R, Chl-a concentrations in October were higher than those in March, when spring bloom normally occurs. This may be related to deeper mixed layer depths in October. Diatoms dominated under conditions of high nutrient supply in which Chaetoceros spp. and Skeletonema costatum-like spp. were abundant. S. costatum-like spp. dominated at stations R (onshore station and P in December when there was greater nutrient supply, especially of phosphate. Flagellates and dinoflagellates dominated at all three stations after diatoms blooms. Dominant species were Scrippsiella trochoid in April and Ceratium furca in October at station R, and Gyrodinium spp. and Gymnodinium spp. at station M during summer, when the effect of the oligotropic Taiwan Warm Current and the oligotropic coastal water from East China Sea were strong. Redundancy analysis showed clear seasonal successions in the phytoplankton community and environmental conditions, in which both principal components 1 and 2 accounted for 69.6% of total variance. Our results suggested that environmental conditions seemed to be determined

  14. Speciation of gadolinium in surface water samples and plants by hydrophilic interaction chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Uwe; Lingott, Jana; Richter, Silke; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized for speciation analysis of gadolinium-based contrast agents in environmental samples, in particular surface river waters and plants. Surface water samples from the Teltow channel, near Berlin, were investigated over a distance of 5 km downstream from the influx of a wastewater treatment plant. The total concentration of gadolinium increased significantly from 50 to 990 ng L(-1) due to the influx of the contrast agents. After complete mixing with the river water, the concentration remained constant over a distance of at least 4 km. Two main substances [Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA) and Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A)] have been identified in the river water using standards. A gadolinium-based contrast agent, possibly Gd-DOTA (Dotarem(®)), was also detected in water plant samples taken from the Teltow channel. Therefore, uptake of contrast agents [Gadovist(®) (Gd-BTDO3A), Magnevist(®) (Gd-DTPA), Omniscan(®) (Gd-DTPA-BMA), Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA), and Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA)] by plants was investigated in a model experiment using Lepidium sativum (cress plants). HILIC-ICP-MS was used for identification of different contrast agents, and a first approach for quantification using aqueous standard solutions was tested. For speciation analysis, all investigated contrast agents could be extracted from the plant tissues with a recovery of about 54 % for Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA) up to 106 % for Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A). These experiments demonstrate that all contrast agents investigated are transported from the roots to the leaves where the highest content was measured.

  15. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  16. Trace level determinations of carbamate pesticides in surface water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 9-xanthydrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun-Young; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2013-08-30

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method, based on derivatization with 9-xanthydrol, has been established for the simultaneous determination of five carbamate pesticides (carbaryl, carbofuran, metolcarb, isoprocarb and ethiofencarb) in surface water. 4-Bromo-3,5-dimethylphenyl-N-methylcarbamate was chosen as the internal standard for analyzing water samples. The derivatization of carbamates was performed directly in water and the reaction conditions (9-xanthydrol of 50.0mM, HCl concentration of 0.05M, reaction for 60min at 60°C) were established through the optimization of various parameters. Under the established conditions, the limits of quantification were in the range of 0.007-0.028μg/L, and the intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation were each less than 15% at concentrations of 0.1, 1.0 and 10μg/L. None of the carbamate pesticides were detected in any of the sixteen surface waters analyzed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Automated simultaneous monitoring of nitrate and nitrite in surface water by sequential injection analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legnerová, Zlatuse; Solich, Petr; Sklenárová, Hana; Satínský, Dalibor; Karlícek, Rolf

    2002-06-01

    A fully automated procedure based on Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) methodology for simultaneous monitoring of nitrate and nitrite in surface water samples is described. Nitrite was determined directly using the Griess diazo-coupling reaction and the formed azo dye was measured at 540 nm in the flow cell of the fibre-optic spectrophotometer. Nitrate zone was passed through a reducing mini-column containing copperised-cadmium. After the reduction of nitrate into nitrite the sample was aspirated by flow reversal to the holding coil, treated with the reagent and finally passed through the flow cell. The calibration curve was linear over the range 0.05-1.00 mg N l(-1) of nitrite and 0.50-50.00 mg N l(-1) of nitrate; correlation coefficients were 0.9993 and 0.9988 for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. Detection limits were 0.015 and 0.10 mg N l(-1) for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) values (n = 3) were 1.10% and 1.32% for nitrite and nitrate, respectively. The total time of one measuring cycle was 250 s, thus the sample throughput was about 14 h(-1). Nitrate and nitrite were determined in the real samples of surface water, and the results have been compared with those obtained by two other flow methods; flow injection analysis based on the same reactions and isotachophoretic determination used in a routine environmental control laboratory.

  18. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  19. On-Line Derivatization Gas Chromatography Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for Determination of Endocrine Disruptors in Surface Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzing, Shin-Hwa; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2004-03-31

    A method has been developed for the determination of endocrine disruptors (EDs) (containing hydroxyl groups) in surface water from different sources. The surface water samples from different sites including school and local dormitory sewage effluents, lake water and river water were collected and analyzed. In this method, the pretreated sample is directly analyzed by GC-MS using on-line derivatization, where tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMA-OH) was used as the derivatizing agent. Use of large-volume direct sample introduction (DSI) and co-injection of the sample and TMAOH avoids external contaminations as observed in conventional derivatization protocols. Additionally, the use of chemical ionization (CI) and CI-MS/MS could enable detection of EDs at lower concentrations and reduce the matrices' interference thereby enhancing detection sensitivity of EDs for quantification. In this work, the use of dichloromethane as CI reagent for EDs is reported for the first time and could detect EDs to concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL. The recovery ranged from 74 to 112 % and the relative standard derivations for replicate analyses ranged from 5 to 17 %. We hope that this method will be applicable for routine analysis of EDs with hydroxyl functional groups.

  20. Simple and accurate measurement of carbamazepine in surface water by use of porous membrane-protected micro-solid-phase extraction coupled with isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, Hui Ling [Chemical Metrology Division, Applied Sciences Group, Health Sciences Authority, 1 Science Park Road, #01-05/06, The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore); Wong, Lingkai [Chemical Metrology Division, Applied Sciences Group, Health Sciences Authority, 1 Science Park Road, #01-05/06, The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528 (Singapore); Liu, Qinde, E-mail: liu_qinde@hsa.gov.sg [Chemical Metrology Division, Applied Sciences Group, Health Sciences Authority, 1 Science Park Road, #01-05/06, The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528 (Singapore); Teo, Tang Lin; Lee, Tong Kooi [Chemical Metrology Division, Applied Sciences Group, Health Sciences Authority, 1 Science Park Road, #01-05/06, The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528 (Singapore); Lee, Hian Kee, E-mail: chmleehk@nus.edu.sg [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2016-03-17

    To achieve fast and accurate analysis of carbamazepine in surface water, we developed a novel porous membrane-protected micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE) method, followed by liquid chromatography-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS/MS) analysis. The μ-SPE device (∼0.8 × 1 cm) was fabricated by heat-sealing edges of a polypropylene membrane sheet to devise a bag enclosing the sorbent. The analytes (both carbamazepine and isotope-labelled carbamazepine) were first extracted by μ-SPE device in the sample (10 mL) via agitation, then desorbed in an organic solvent (1 mL) via ultrasonication. Several parameters such as organic solvent for pre-conditioning of μ-SPE device, amount of sorbent, adsorption time, and desorption solvent and time were investigated to optimize the μ-SPE efficiency. The optimized method has limits of detection and quantitation estimated to be 0.5 ng L{sup −1} and 1.6 ng L{sup −1}, respectively. Surface water samples spiked with different amounts of carbamazepine (close to 20, 500, and 1600 ng L{sup −1}, respectively) were analysed for the validation of method precision and accuracy. Good precision was obtained as demonstrated by relative standard deviations of 0.7% for the samples with concentrations of 500 and 1600 ng kg{sup −1}, and 5.8% for the sample with concentration of 20 ng kg{sup −1}. Good accuracy was also demonstrated by the relative recoveries in the range of 96.7%–103.5% for all samples with uncertainties of 1.1%–5.4%. Owing to the same chemical properties of carbamazepine and isotope-labelled carbamazepine, the isotope ratio in the μ-SPE procedure was accurately controlled. The use of μ-SPE coupled with IDMS analysis significantly facilitated the fast and accurate measurement of carbamazepine in surface water. - Highlights: • μ-SPE coupled with IDMS for the measurement of carbamazepine. • The method is the first report of coupling μ-SPE with IDMS. • μ-SPE is fast, time

  1. Quantification of four artificial sweeteners in Finnish surface waters with isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkola, Noora; Sainio, Pirjo

    2014-01-01

    The artificial sweeteners sucralose (SCL), acesulfame (ACS), saccharin (SAC), and cyclamate (CYC) have been detected in environmental waters in Europe and North America. Higher environmental levels are expected in view of the increasing consumption of these food additives. In this study, an isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for quantifying the four artificial sweeteners in boreal lakes (n = 3) and rivers (n = 12). The highest concentrations of ACS, SAC, CYC and SCL were 9,600, 490, 210 and 1000 ng/L, respectively. ACS and SAC were detected in all studied samples, and CYC and SCL in 98% and 56% of the samples. Seasonal trends of ACS and SAC were observed in some rivers. ACS and SCL concentrations in rivers correlated linearly with population equivalents of the wastewater treatment plants in the catchment areas, whereas SAC and CYC concentrations depend more on the source.

  2. Spatial and temporal analysis of pesticides concentrations in surface water: Pesticides atlas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, M.G.; Zelfde, van 't M.; Tamis, W.L.M.; Snoo, de G.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dutch water boards have a well-established program for monitoring pesticide contamination of surface waters. These monitoring data have been processed into a graphic format accessible online and designed to provide insight into pesticide presence in Dutch surface waters and trends over time: the

  3. Determination of biocides and pesticides by on-line solid phase extraction coupled with mass spectrometry and their behaviour in wastewater and surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Heinz; Jaus, Sylvia; Hanke, Irene; Lueck, Alfred; Hollender, Juliane [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 133, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Alder, Alfredo C., E-mail: alfredo.alder@eawag.c [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Ueberlandstrasse 133, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    This study focused on the input of hydrophilic biocides into the aquatic environment and on the efficiency of their removal in conventional wastewater treatment by a mass flux analysis. A fully automated method consisting of on-line solid phase extraction coupled to LC-ESI-MS/MS was developed and validated for the simultaneous trace determination of different biocidal compounds (1,2-benzisothiazoline-3-one (BIT), 3-Iodo-2-propynylbutyl-carbamate (IPBC), irgarol 1051 and 2-N-octyl-4-isothiazolinone (octhilinone, OIT), carbendazim, diazinon, diuron, isoproturon, mecoprop, terbutryn and terbutylazine) and pharmaceuticals (diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole) in wastewater and surface water. In the tertiary effluent, the highest average concentrations were determined for mecoprop (1010 ng/L) which was at comparable levels as the pharmaceuticals diclofenac (690 ng/L) and sulfamethoxazole (140 ng/L) but 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the other biocidal compounds. Average eliminations for all compounds were usually below 50%. During rain events, increased residual amounts of biocidal contaminants are discharged to receiving surface waters. - Incomplete removal of biocides and pesticides during wastewater treatment.

  4. Radionuclide Determination In Surface Water Samples By Inductively Coupled Plasma With Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. T. Romero-Guzmán

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The determination of naturally occurring radionuclides in the environment by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of high resolution (ICP-SFMS has gained recognition over the last fifteen years, relative to the radiometric techniques, as the result of improvement in instrumental performance, sample introduction equipment and sample preparation. With the increase in instrumental sensitivity, it is now possible to measure ultratrace levels of many radioisotopes. The aim of this work was to determined the natural radionuclides (232Th, 234U, 235U and 238U in surface water using Inductively Coupled PlasmaSector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS. The samples were sampling from Lerma river, State of Mexico at february to april 2015. The process of treatment of sample consisted in perform an acid digestion according to the 3015A USEPA method followed of the direct measurement in ICP-SFMS. Results obtained were: a identify the presence of 232Th, 234U, 235U and 238U isotopes in water, b isotopic ratios were for 234U/238U=1.133 ± 0.016. ICPSFMS has gained popularity in the field of radiochemistry, particularly as a method of detection for long lived-actinides.

  5. Polydopamine-coated magnetic nanoparticles for isolation and enrichment of estrogenic compounds from surface water samples followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Estrogens, phytoestrogens, and mycoestrogens may enter into the surface waters from different sources, such as effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants, industrial plants, and animal farms and runoff from agricultural areas. In this work, a multiresidue analytical method for the determination of 17 natural estrogenic compounds, including four steroid estrogens, six mycoestrogens, and seven phytoestrogens, in river water samples has been developed. (Fe3O4)-based magnetic nanoparticles coated by polydopamine (Fe3O4@pDA) were used for dispersive solid-phase extraction, and the final extract was analyzed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation procedure, coated by pDA, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The sample preparation method was optimized in terms of extraction recovery, matrix effect, selectivity, trueness, precision, method limits of detection, and method limits of quantification (MLOQs). For all the 17 analytes, recoveries were >70 % and matrix effects were below 30 % when 25 mL of river water sample was treated with 90 mg of Fe3O4@pDA nanoparticles. Selectivity was tested by spiking river water samples with 50 other compounds (mycotoxins, antibacterials, conjugated hormones, UV filters, alkylphenols, etc.), and only aflatoxins and some benzophenones showed recoveries >60 %. This method proved to be simple and robust and allowed the determination of natural estrogenic compounds belonging to different classes in surface waters with MLOQs ranging between 0.003 and 0.1 μg L(-1). Graphical Abstract Determination of natural estrogenic compounds in water by magnetic solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

  6. Multivariate statistical analysis of surface water chemistry: A case study of Gharasoo River, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Sayadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Regional water quality is a hot spot in the environmental sciences for inconsistency of pollutants. In this paper, the surface water quality of the Gharasoo River in western Iran is assessed incorporating multivariate statistical techniques. Parameters like EC, TDS, pH, HCO3-, Cl-, SO4 2-, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ were analyzed. Principal component and factor analysis is showed the parameters generated 3 significant factors, which explained 73.06% of the variance in data sets. Factor 1 may be derived from agricultural activities and subsequent release of EC, TDS, SO4 2- and Na+ to the water. Factor 2 could be influenced by domestic pollution and explained the deliverance of HCO3-, Cl- and Mg2+ into the water. Factor 3 contains hydro-geochemical variable Ca2+ and pH, originating from mineralization of the geological components of bed sediments and soils of watershed area. Likewise, the clustering analysis generated 3 groups of the stations as the groups had similar characteristic features. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant correlations between HCO3- and Mg2+ (0.775, Ca2+ (0.552 as well as TDS and Na+ (0.726. With reference to multivariate statistical analyses it can be concluded that the agricultural, domestic and hydro-geochemical sources are releasing the pollutants into the Gharasoo River water.

  7. Holocene sea subsurface and surface water masses in the Fram Strait - Comparisons of temperature and sea-ice reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kirstin; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Two high-resolution sediment cores from eastern Fram Strait have been investigated for sea subsurface and surface temperature variability during the Holocene (the past ca 12,000 years). The transfer function developed by Husum and Hald (2012) has been applied to sediment cores in order to reconstruct fluctuations of sea subsurface temperatures throughout the period. Additional biomarker and foraminiferal proxy data are used to elucidate variability between surface and subsurface water mass conditions, and to conclude on the Holocene climate and oceanographic variability on the West Spitsbergen continental margin. Results consistently reveal warm sea surface to subsurface temperatures of up to 6 °C until ca 5 cal ka BP, with maximum seawater temperatures around 10 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation occurring at that time. Maximum Atlantic Water (AW) advection occurred at surface and subsurface between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP based on both foraminiferal and dinocyst temperature reconstructions. Probably, a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich surface ocean with strong AW advection prevailed in the eastern Fram Strait between 10 and 9 cal ka BP. Weakened AW contribution is found after ca 5 cal ka BP when subsurface temperatures strongly decrease with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. Cold late Holocene conditions are furthermore supported by high planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and high δ18O values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba. While IP25-associated indices as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling due to a decrease in early summer insolation and consequently sea-ice increase since about 7 cal ka BP in surface waters, planktic foraminiferal data including stable isotopes indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface AW influx since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of surface and subsurface waters during the later Holocene is most likely attributed to a strong

  8. Delineating suspended sediment concentration patterns in surface waters of the Changjiang Estuary by remote sensing analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; GAO Shu; WANG Yaping

    2010-01-01

    Three Landsat TM imageries (taken on 18 May 1987,4 August 1998 and 28 July 2007) were used as the data source to identify the spatial and temporal variations of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) in surface waters of the Changjiang Estuary.Atmospheric correction was carried out to determine the water-leaving reflectance using the FLAASH module.A regression equation between surveyed SSC and suspended sediment index was chosen to retrieve the SSC from the Landsat TM images.In addition,tidal harmonic analysis was performed to calculate tidal conditions corresponding to the acquisition time of satellite images.The results show that the SSC spatial patterns are similar to the in situ observation results,which show the highest SSC in the region of turbidity maximum zone in the Changjiang Estuary.For the period of 1987 to 2007,the SSC pattern is controlled mainly by tidal dynamic conditions and wind speeds,rather than sediment discharges from the river.

  9. Protein analysis in dissolved organic matter: What proteins from organic debris, soil leachate and surface water can tell us - a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Schulze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry based analysis of proteins is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not yet routinely been applied in environmental research. Based on observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolved organic matter (DOM, this article gives an example about the possible use of protein analysis in ecology and environmental sciences focusing on different terrestrial ecosystems. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1 the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the environmental protein pool, and (2 identification of the organismic origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper, mass spectrometric protein analysis was applied to identify proteins from decomposing plant material and DOM of soil leachates and surface water samples derived from different environments. It is concluded, that mass spectrometric protein analysis is capable of distinguishing phylogenetic origin of proteins from litter protein extracts, leachates of different soil horizons, and from various sources of terrestrial surface water. Current limitation is imposed by the limited knowledge of complete genomes of soil organisms. The protein analysis allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific active enzymes. Further applications, such as in pollution research are conceivable. In summary, the analysis of proteins opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  10. Protein analysis in dissolved organic matter: What proteins from organic debris, soil leachate and surface water can tell us - a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W. X.

    Mass spectrometry based analysis of proteins is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not yet routinely been applied in environmental research. Based on observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this article gives an example about the possible use of protein analysis in ecology and environmental sciences focusing on different terrestrial ecosystems. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1) the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the environmental protein pool, and (2) identification of the organismic origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper, mass spectrometric protein analysis was applied to identify proteins from decomposing plant material and DOM of soil leachates and surface water samples derived from different environments. It is concluded, that mass spectrometric protein analysis is capable of distinguishing phylogenetic origin of proteins from litter protein extracts, leachates of different soil horizons, and from various sources of terrestrial surface water. Current limitation is imposed by the limited knowledge of complete genomes of soil organisms. The protein analysis allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific active enzymes. Further applications, such as in pollution research are conceivable. In summary, the analysis of proteins opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  11. Protein analysis in dissolved organic matter: what free proteins from soil leachate and surface water can tell us – a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schulze

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry based analysis of proteins is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not yet routinely been applied in environmental research. Based on observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolved organic matter (DOM, this article gives an example about the possible use of protein analysis in ecology and environmental sciences focusing on different terrestrial ecosystems. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1 the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the DOM protein pool, and (2 identification of the organismic origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper, mass spectrometric protein analysis was applied to identify proteins from DOM and organism-free surface water samples derived from different environments. It is concluded, that mass spectrometric protein analysis is capable of distinguishing phylogenetic origin of proteins from leachates of different soil horizons, and from various sources of terrestrial surface water. Current limitation is imposed by the limited knowledge of complete genomes of soil organisms. The protein analysis allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific active enzymes. Further applications, such as in pollution research are conceivable. In summary, the analysis of proteins opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  12. Analysis of chlorpyrifos agricultural use in regions of frequent surface water detections in California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuyang; Starner, Keith; Spurlock, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a common surface water contaminant in California, USA. We evaluated five years of chlorpyrifos use and surface water monitoring data in California's principal agricultural regions. Imperial County and three central coastal regions accounted for only 10% of chlorpyrifos statewide use, but displayed consistently high aquatic benchmark exceedances (13.2%-57.1%). In contrast, 90% of use occurred in Central Valley regions where only 0.6%-6.5% of samples exceeded aquatic benchmarks. Differences among regions are attributable to crop type, use intensity, irrigation practices and monthly application patterns. Application method did not appear to be a factor.

  13. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species.

  14. [Correlative analysis of the diversity patterns of regional surface water, NDVI and thermal environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin-Long; Zhang, Xue-Lei

    2012-10-01

    Taking Zhengzhou City, the capital of Henan Province in Central China, as the study area, and by using the theories and methodologies of diversity, a discreteness evaluation on the regional surface water, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and land surface temperature (LST) distribution was conducted in a 2 km x 2 km grid scale. Both the NDVI and the LST were divided into 4 levels, their spatial distribution diversity indices were calculated, and their connections were explored. The results showed that it was of operability and practical significance to use the theories and methodologies of diversity in the discreteness evaluation of the spatial distribution of regional thermal environment. There was a higher overlap of location between the distributions of surface water and the lowest temperature region, and the high vegetation coverage was often accompanied by low land surface temperature. In 1988-2009, the discreteness of the surface water distribution in the City had an obvious decreasing trend. The discreteness of the surface water distribution had a close correlation with the discreteness of the temperature region distribution, while the discreteness of the NDVI classification distribution had a more complicated correlation with the discreteness of the temperature region distribution. Therefore, more environmental factors were needed to be included for a better evaluation.

  15. Analysis of captopril in surface waters by differential pulse voltammetry method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowska, I.; Markowski, P.; Wilk, K.

    2009-07-01

    One of the important problems concerning waters ecosystems is the presence of pharmaceuticals remains in different kinds of surface waters. These compounds cause huge changes in waters environment. They cause genetic changes in water organisms, are not also neutral for people in case of penetrating into drinking water. (Author)

  16. Source and age of carbon in peatland surface waters: new insights from 14C analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Michael; Garnett, Mark; Dinsmore, Kerry; Leith, Fraser

    2013-04-01

    analysis of peatland surface waters reveals multiple sources and ages for CO2, CH4, DOC and POC with different ages characterising individual peatlands. This implies that carbon transport from peat to stream is more complex than previously thought. Dual isotope (δ13C and 14C) analysis of carbon in its various aquatic forms is clearly a powerful tool in developing a better understanding of the functioning and stability of carbon-rich landscapes.

  17. Gas chromatographic determination of acid herbicides in surface water samples with electron-capture detection and mass spectrometric confirmation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, M.; Poll, J.M. van der

    1996-01-01

    The development of a multi-residue method for the determination of eight polar acidic herbicides (MCPA, MCPB, mecoprop, 2,4-D, dichlorprop, bentazone, dicamba and dikegulac) in surface water is described. The method involves an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure prior to instrumental an

  18. Characterization of organic composition in snow and surface waters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y; Birks, S J; Cho, S; Gibson, J J

    2015-06-15

    This study was conducted to characterize the composition of dissolved organic compounds present in snow and surface waters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) with the goal of identifying whether atmospherically-derived organic compounds present in snow are a significant contributor to the compounds detected in surface waters (i.e., rivers and lakes). We used electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS) to characterize the dissolved organic compound compositions of snow and surface water samples. The organic profiles obtained for the snow samples show compositional differences between samples from near-field sites (surface water samples in the AOSR. The composition of dissolved organic compounds at the upstream Athabasca River site (i.e., Athabasca River at Athabasca) is found to be different from samples obtained from downstream sites in the vicinity of oil sands operations (i.e., Athabasca River at Fort McMurray and Athabasca River at Firebag confluence). The upstream Athabasca River sites tended to share some compositional similarities with far-field snow deposition, while the downstream Athabasca River sites are more similar to local lakes and tributaries. This contrast likely indicates the relative role of regional snowmelt contributions to the Athabasca River vs inputs from local catchments in the reach downstream of Fort McMurray.

  19. Use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for large screening of organic pollutants in surface waters and soils from a rice production area in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Portolés Nicolau, Tania; Hernández Hernández, Félix; Díaz San Pedro, Ramón; Ibáñez Martínez, María; Bustos López, Martha Cristina; Botero Coy, Ana María; Fuentes, C. L.; Peñuela, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The irrigate district of Usosaldaña, an important agricultural area in Colombia mainly devoted to rice crop production, is subjected to an intensive use of pesticides. Monitoring these compounds is necessary to know the impact of phytosanitary products in the different environmental compartments. In this work, surface water and soil samples from different sites of this area have been analyzed by applying an analytical methodology for large screening based on the use of time-of-flight mass spe...

  20. Evaluation and Trend Analysis of Surface Water Quality in Zhengzhou in 1998-2008

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Xile; Lu Changhe

    2012-01-01

    Water pollution is one of the major environmental prob- lems, especially in urban areas. Due to rapid urban expansion and industrialization, water pollution in Zhengzhou City, the capital of Henan Province in central China has become a serious problem for its development. In this study, the surface water quality was evalu- ated using Nemerow Comprehensive Pollution Index (NCPI), and the change trend was calculated using methods of Mann-Kendall test and Sen's slope estimator, based on the monitoring data from 1998 to 2008. The results show that the NCP1 ranged from 3 to 50 in 70% of the monitoring cases, implying that most rivers were seriously polluted. However, this serious polltuon is expected to be gradually improved, as the concentration of water pollutants and NCPI declined significantly in most rivers. Water pollution in reservoirs was much lower than rivers, and the NCPI in the three monitored reservoirs was lower than 3 in most years, and shows a downward trend. Although the surface water quality was gradually improved, great efforts are still needed to enhance the protection and improvement of surface water environment.

  1. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2009 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2009 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2009 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan

  2. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  3. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  4. Analysis of underground and surface waters of the dump of the solid communal waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almášová Kristína

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the contamination of underground and surface waters in the surroundings of the dump of the solid communal waste at the locality Cemjata in the East Slovakia,as well as with the development of the contamination in the surrounding of the dump depending on the time on the basis of the analysisof samples withdrawn from the net of drillholes in the observed area. In the area investigated there is described geological, geomorphological, climatic and hydrogeological situation, as well as the dump itself. The results acquired show that the contamination of the area brought about by medium size industrial and agricultural activity in the vicinity of the dump of the solid communal waste and inside the area investigated is comparable with the dangerous effects of the dump of the solid communal waste.

  5. Analysis and occurrence of seven artificial sweeteners in German waste water and surface water and in soil aquifer treatment (SAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Brauch, Heinz-J; Lange, Frank T

    2009-07-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven commonly used artificial sweeteners in water is presented. The analytes were extracted by solid phase extraction using Bakerbond SDB 1 cartridges at pH 3 and analyzed by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode. Ionization was enhanced by post-column addition of the alkaline modifier Tris(hydroxymethyl)amino methane. Except for aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, recoveries were higher than 75% in potable water with comparable results for surface water. Matrix effects due to reduced extraction yields in undiluted waste water were negligible for aspartame and neotame but considerable for the other compounds. The widespread distribution of acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose in the aquatic environment could be proven. Concentrations in two influents of German sewage treatment plants (STPs) were up to 190 microg/L for cyclamate, about 40 microg/L for acesulfame and saccharin, and less than 1 microg/L for sucralose. Removal in the STPs was limited for acesulfame and sucralose and >94% for saccharin and cyclamate. The persistence of some artificial sweeteners during soil aquifer treatment was demonstrated and confirmed their environmental relevance. The use of sucralose and acesulfame as tracers for anthropogenic contamination is conceivable. In German surface waters, acesulfame was the predominant artificial sweetener with concentrations exceeding 2 microg/L. Other sweeteners were detected up to several hundred nanograms per liter in the order saccharin approximately cyclamate > sucralose.

  6. Analysis of Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China: Characteristics and Lessons for Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Zhang, Tongzhu; Liu, Bo; Lu, Feng; Fang, Shurong; You, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding historical accidents is important for accident prevention and risk mitigation; however, there are no public databases of pollution accidents in China, and no detailed information regarding such incidents is readily available. Thus, 653 representative cases of surface water pollution accidents in China were identified and described as a function of time, location, materials involved, origin, and causes. The severity and other features of the accidents, frequency and quantities of chemicals involved, frequency and number of people poisoned, frequency and number of people affected, frequency and time for which pollution lasted, and frequency and length of pollution zone were effectively used to value and estimate the accumulated probabilities. The probabilities of occurrences of various types based on origin and causes were also summarized based on these observations. The following conclusions can be drawn from these analyses: (1) There was a high proportion of accidents involving multi-district boundary regions and drinking water crises, indicating that more attention should be paid to environmental risk prevention and the mitigation of such incidents. (2) A high proportion of accidents originated from small-sized chemical plants, indicating that these types of enterprises should be considered during policy making. (3) The most common cause (49.8 % of the total) was intentional acts (illegal discharge); accordingly, efforts to increase environmental consciousness in China should be enhanced.

  7. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  8. Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2000 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant that will be managed by tie Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2000 will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at the Y-12 Plant: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of the Y-12 Plant (Figure 1). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant GWPP during CY 2000 will comply with: Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation regulations governing detection monitoring at nonhazardous Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (SWDF); and DOE Order 5400.1 surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring. Some of the data collected for these monitoring drivers also will be used to meet monitoring requirements of the Integrated Water Quality Program, which is managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC. Data from five wells that are monitored for SWDF purposes in the Chestnut Ridge Regime will be used to comply with requirements specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act post closure permit regarding corrective action monitoring. Modifications to the CY 2000 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in regulatory or programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells, or wells could be added or removed from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 Plant GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan.

  9. Representing spatial and temporal complexity in ecohydrological models: a meta-analysis focusing on groundwater - surface water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karlie; Mika, Sarah; Kolbe, Tamara; Abbott, Ben; Ciocca, Francesco; Marruedo, Amaia; Hannah, David; Schmidt, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jan; Karuse, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Sub-surface hydrologic processes are highly dynamic, varying spatially and temporally with strong links to the geomorphology and hydrogeologic properties of an area. This spatial and temporal complexity is a critical regulator of biogeochemical and ecological processes within the interface groundwater - surface water (GW-SW) ecohydrological interface and adjacent ecosystems. Many GW-SW models have attempted to capture this spatial and temporal complexity with varying degrees of success. The incorporation of spatial and temporal complexity within GW-SW model configuration is important to investigate interactions with transient storage and subsurface geology, infiltration and recharge, and mass balance of exchange fluxes at the GW-SW ecohydrological interface. Additionally, characterising spatial and temporal complexity in GW-SW models is essential to derive predictions using realistic environmental conditions. In this paper we conduct a systematic Web of Science meta-analysis of conceptual, hydrodynamic, and reactive and heat transport models of the GW-SW ecohydrological interface since 2004 to explore how these models handled spatial and temporal complexity. The freshwater - groundwater ecohydrological interface was the most commonly represented in publications between 2004 and 2014 with 91% of papers followed by marine 6% and estuarine systems with 3% of papers. Of the GW-SW models published since 2004, the 52% have focused on hydrodynamic processes and heat and reactive transport). Within the hydrodynamic subset, 25% of models focused on a vertical depth of limitations of incorporating spatial and temporal variability into GW-SW models are identified as the inclusion of woody debris, carbon sources, subsurface geological structures and bioclogging into model parameterization. The technological limitations influence the types of models applied, such as hydrostatic coupled models and fully intrinsic saturated and unsaturated models, and the assumptions or

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2006-01-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2010 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2010 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2010 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan

  12. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2007-09-01

    analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E. The updated sampling frequency for each monitoring well is in Appendix F, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix G.

  13. A Simplified Method for Sampling and Analysis of High Volume Surface Water for Organic Contaminants Using XAD-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S.; Do, L.V.; Young, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple compressed-gas driven system for field processing and extracting water for subsequent analyses of hydrophobic organic compounds is presented. The pumping device is a pneumatically driven pump and filtration system that can easily clarify at 4L/min. The extraction device uses compressed gas to drive filtered water through two parallel XAD-2 resin columns, at about 200 mL/min. No batteries or inverters are required for water collection or processing. Solvent extractions were performed directly in the XAD-2 glass columns. Final extracts are cleaned-up on Florisil cartridges without fractionation and contaminants analyzed by GC-MS. Method detection limits (MDLs) and recoveries for dissolved organic contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides are reported along with results of surface water analysis for the San Francisco Bay, CA.

  14. Novel analysis of oceanic surface water metagenomes suggests importance of polyphosphate metabolism in oligotrophic environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Temperton

    Full Text Available Polyphosphate is a ubiquitous linear homopolymer of phosphate residues linked by high-energy bonds similar to those found in ATP. It has been associated with many processes including pathogenicity, DNA uptake and multiple stress responses across all domains. Bacteria have also been shown to use polyphosphate as a way to store phosphate when transferred from phosphate-limited to phosphate-rich media--a process exploited in wastewater treatment and other environmental contaminant remediation. Despite this, there has, to date, been little research into the role of polyphosphate in the survival of marine bacterioplankton in oligotrophic environments. The three main proteins involved in polyphosphate metabolism, Ppk1, Ppk2 and Ppx are multi-domain and have differential inter-domain and inter-gene conservation, making unbiased analysis of relative abundance in metagenomic datasets difficult. This paper describes the development of a novel Isofunctional Homolog Annotation Tool (IHAT to detect homologs of genes with a broad range of conservation without bias of traditional expect-value cutoffs. IHAT analysis of the Global Ocean Sampling (GOS dataset revealed that genes associated with polyphosphate metabolism are more abundant in environments where available phosphate is limited, suggesting an important role for polyphosphate metabolism in marine oligotrophs.

  15. Use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for large screening of organic pollutants in surface waters and soils from a rice production area in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, F; Portolés, T; Ibáñez, M; Bustos-López, M C; Díaz, R; Botero-Coy, A M; Fuentes, C L; Peñuela, G

    2012-11-15

    The irrigate district of Usosaldaña, an important agricultural area in Colombia mainly devoted to rice crop production, is subjected to an intensive use of pesticides. Monitoring these compounds is necessary to know the impact of phytosanitary products in the different environmental compartments. In this work, surface water and soil samples from different sites of this area have been analyzed by applying an analytical methodology for large screening based on the use of time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) hyphenated to liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC). Several pesticides were detected and unequivocally identified, such as the herbicides atrazine, diuron or clomazone. Some of their main metabolites and/or transformation products (TPs) like deethylatrazine (DEA), deisopropylatrazine (DIA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline were also identified in the samples. Among fungicides, carbendazim, azoxystrobin, propiconazole and epoxiconazole were the most frequently detected. Insecticides such as thiacloprid, or p,p'-DDT metabolites (p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE) were also found. Thanks to the accurate-mass full-spectrum acquisition in TOF MS it was feasible to widen the number of compounds to be investigated to other families of contaminants. This allowed the detection of emerging contaminants, such as the antioxidant 3,5-di-tertbutyl-4-hydroxy-toluene (BHT), its metabolite 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (BHT-CHO), or the solar filter benzophenone, among others.

  16. Assessment of the contamination of drinking water supply wells by pesticides from surface water resources using a finite element reactive transport model and global sensitivity analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    SummaryA reactive transport model is employed to evaluate the potential for contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model considers various geologic settings, includes sorption and degradation processes and is tested by comparison with data from a tracer experiment where fluorescein dye injected in a river is monitored at nearby drinking water wells. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and relatively persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a newer biodegradable and strongly sorbing pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the Morris method is employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results show that the characteristics of clay aquitards (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depths are crucial factors when evaluating the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. This study suggests that it is unlikely that glyphosate in streams can pose a threat to drinking water wells, while MCPP in surface water can represent a risk: MCPP concentration at the drinking water well can be up to 7% of surface water concentration in confined aquifers and up to 10% in unconfined aquifers. Thus, the presence of confining clay aquitards may not prevent contamination of drinking water wells by persistent compounds in surface water. Results are consistent with data on pesticide occurrence in Denmark where pesticides are found at higher concentrations at shallow depths and close to streams.

  17. Application of water quality indices and analysis of the surface water quality monitoring network in semiarid North-Central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Lesly; Kretschmer, Nicole; Oyarzún, Jorge; Meza, Francisco; Núñez, Jorge; Maturana, Hugo; Soto, Guido; Oyarzo, Paula; Garrido, Marcela; Suckel, Felipe; Amezaga, Jaime; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2012-09-01

    Surface water quality has increasing importance worldwide and is particularly relevant in the semiarid North-Central Chile, where agriculture and mining activities are imposing heavy pressure on limited water resources. The current study presents the application of a water quality index in four watersheds of the 29°-33°S realm for the period 1999-2008, based on the Canadian Council of Ministers for the Environment approach and the Chilean regulation for irrigation water quality. In addition, two modifications to the index are tested and a comprehensive characterization of the existing monitoring network is performed through cluster analysis. The basins studied show fairly good water quality in the overall, specially the Limarí basin. On the other hand, the lower index values were obtained for the headwaters of Elqui, associated with the El Indio mining district. The first modification of the indicator (i.e., to consider parameters differentially according to their effect on human health or the environment) did not produce major differences with respect to the original index, given the generally good water quality. The second modification (i.e., to consider as threshold values the more restrictive figures derived from a set of regulations) yielded important differences in the indicator values. Finally, an adequate characterization of the monitoring network was obtained. The results presented spatial coherence and the information can be used as a basis for the optimization of the monitoring network if required.

  18. Quantitative analysis of urban pluvial flood alleviation by open surface water systems in new towns: Comparing Almere and Tianjin eco-city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Z.; Qu, L.; Zou, T.

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface runoff generated in urban areas due to larger proportion of impervious surfaces has, in many cases, exceeded the capacity of urban drainage systems. In response to such challenge, this paper introduces the quantitative analysis of pluvial flood alleviation by open surface water sys

  19. Quantitative analysis of urban pluvial flood alleviation by open surface water systems in new towns: Comparing Almere and Tianjin eco-city

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Z.; Qu, L.; Zou, T.

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface runoff generated in urban areas due to larger proportion of impervious surfaces has, in many cases, exceeded the capacity of urban drainage systems. In response to such challenge, this paper introduces the quantitative analysis of pluvial flood alleviation by open surface water sys

  20. Quantitative analysis of fuel-related hydrocarbons in surface water and wastewater samples by solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, J J; Hawthorne, S B; Miller, D J

    1996-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) parameters were examined on water contaminated with hydrocarbons including benzene and alkylbenzenes, n-alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Absorption equilibration times ranged from several minutes for low molecular weight compounds such as benzene to 5 h for high molecular weight compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene. Under equilibrium conditions, SPME analysis with GC/FID was linear over 3-6 orders of magnitude, with linear correlation coefficients (r(2)) greater than 0.96. Experimentally determined FID detection limits ranged from ∼30 ppt (w/w hydrocarbon/sample water) for high molecular weight PAHs (e.g., MW > 202) to ∼1 ppb for low molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons. Experimental distribution constants (K) were different with 100- and 7-μm poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, and poor correlations with previously published values suggest that K depends on the fiber coating thickness and the sorbent preparation method. The sensitivity of SPME analysis is not significantly enhanced by larger sample volumes, since increasing the water volume (e.g., from 1 to 100 mL) has little effect on the number of analyte molecules absorbed by the fiber, especially for compounds with K solids. Quantitative determinations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., in gasoline-contaminated water) can be performed using GC/MS with deuterated internal standard or standard addition calibration as long as the target components or standards had unique ions for quantitation or sufficient chromatographic resolution from interferences. SPME analysis gave good quantitative performance with surface waters having high suspended sediment contents, as well as with coal gasification wastewater which contained matrix organics at 10(6)-fold higher concentrations than the target aromatic hydrocarbons. Good agreement was obtained between a 45-min SPME and methylene chloride extraction for the determination of PAH concentrations in creosote

  1. A Geo-Environmental Analysis of the Groundwater Resource vis-a-vis Surface Water Scenario in Guwahati City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelkamal Das

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Guwahati city is located on a unique geo-environmental setting with an interface of hills and valleys along with a prominent river front. The existence of various surface water sources, geo-hydrological set up and rainfall intensity play a significant role in the ground water regime of the city. However, rapid urbanisation of the city during the last few decades has altered the landscape of the city and disturbed the water retention capacity as well as the flow dynamics of various surface water sources, thereby affecting the infiltration rate to a great extent. Unprecedented rise in the population of the city has exerted more pressure on the various sources of water, particularly the groundwater resource. It has thus become imperative to utilise the various sources of water in a more systematic and scientific manner, giving due emphasis to the water requirement and the prevailing hydrological conditions of the area. Moreover, it is also observed that the city experiences an average annual rainfall of 162 cm with about 110 rainy days per year. The city thus has enough potential for harvesting the rainwater it receives, instead of allowing it to flow untapped. Rainwater can be tapped and utilised to revive the various surface water sources of the city, thereby facilitating natural groundwater recharge, as surface water bodies like wetlands, lakes and ponds do act as potential groundwater recharge zones.

  2. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  3. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  4. Determination of bezafibrate, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, orlistat and enalapril in waste and surface waters using on-line solid-phase extraction liquid chromatography coupled to polarity-switching electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ac, Araceli; Segura, Pedro A; Gagnon, Christian; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2009-04-01

    We developed a rapid method for the monitoring of five selected pharmaceuticals in the influent and effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) as well as in the effluent-receiving waters. To that end, we optimized and validated an analytical method based on on-line solid-phase extraction (on-line SPE) coupled with reversed-phase liquid chromatography-switching polarity electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI(+/-)-MS/MS). The target analytes have a variable hydrophobic character and belong to various therapeutic classes including the lipid regulator bezafibrate, the chemotherapy drugs methotrexate and cyclophosphamide, the lipase inhibitor orlistat and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used in the treatment of hypertension, enalapril. The method combines positive and negative voltage switching modes, therefore all analytes can be determined using a single injection and without any reduction in sensitivity. In order to detect traces of these compounds, a preconcentration step before detection is performed by loading 1.00 mL of sample in an on-line SPE cartridge and eluting from the cartridge using a reversed-phase liquid chromatography gradient. Analysis of wastewater and surface water samples was greatly affected by co-eluting matrix compounds, to compensate for matrix effects quantitation was therefore performed using standard additions. Method intra-day precision was less than 6.5% and limits of detection in fortified matrix effluent samples ranged from 9 to 20 ng L(-1). Four of the target pharmaceuticals were detected in the WWTP effluents, enalapril and bezafibrate being the most abundant compounds with concentrations of 35 and 239 ng L(-1), respectively. Concentrations of these same compounds in surface water samples from sites downstream in the St. Lawrence River were 8 and 63 ng L(-1), respectively, which was mainly due to dilution.

  5. Multi-objective analysis of the conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater in a multisource water supply system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, João; da Conceição Cunha, Maria

    2017-04-01

    A multi-objective decision model has been developed to identify the Pareto-optimal set of management alternatives for the conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater of a multisource urban water supply system. A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, Borg MOEA, is used to solve the multi-objective decision model. The multiple solutions can be shown to stakeholders allowing them to choose their own solutions depending on their preferences. The multisource urban water supply system studied here is dependent on surface water and groundwater and located in the Algarve region, southernmost province of Portugal, with a typical warm Mediterranean climate. The rainfall is low, intermittent and concentrated in a short winter, followed by a long and dry period. A base population of 450 000 inhabitants and visits by more than 13 million tourists per year, mostly in summertime, turns water management critical and challenging. Previous studies on single objective optimization after aggregating multiple objectives together have already concluded that only an integrated and interannual water resources management perspective can be efficient for water resource allocation in this drought prone region. A simulation model of the multisource urban water supply system using mathematical functions to represent the water balance in the surface reservoirs, the groundwater flow in the aquifers, and the water transport in the distribution network with explicit representation of water quality is coupled with Borg MOEA. The multi-objective problem formulation includes five objectives. Two objective evaluate separately the water quantity and the water quality supplied for the urban use in a finite time horizon, one objective calculates the operating costs, and two objectives appraise the state of the two water sources - the storage in the surface reservoir and the piezometric levels in aquifer - at the end of the time horizon. The decision variables are the volume of withdrawals from

  6. Surface water sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of Energy and managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. Surface water monitoring will be conducted at nine sites within WAG 6. Activities to be conducted will include the installation, inspection, and maintenance of automatic flow-monitoring and sampling equipment and manual collection of various water and sediment samples. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the surface water monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and will be used in calculations to establish relationships between contaminant concentration (C) and flow (Q). The C-Q relationship will be used in calculating the cumulative risk associated with the off-WAG migration of contaminants.

  7. Use of an oxidative destruction and quadrupole mass spectrometric (QMS) detection for the determination of the organic elemental composition of suspended matter in surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, H.F.R.; Onderdelinden, D.; Visser, M.G.; Griepink, B.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the applicability of a system consisting of a combustion followed by QMS-detection for the determination of the elemental composition of organic matter suspended in surface water. The solid material obtained from several types of water was collected by centrifugation. The results

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Urban Pluvial Flood Alleviation by Open Surface Water Systems in New Towns: Comparing Almere and Tianjin Eco-City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengnan Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increased surface runoff generated in urban areas due to larger proportion of impervious surfaces has, in many cases, exceeded the capacity of urban drainage systems. In response to such challenge, this paper introduces the quantitative analysis of pluvial flood alleviation by open surface water systems in the case of Almere in the Netherlands and compares it with Tianjin Eco-City in China, with the aim of optimizing land use planning and urban design for new urban districts. The methodology is a combination of quantitative and qualitative analysis. With the analytical tool of ArcGIS, the authors have investigated the influence of spatial distribution of surface water system on the reduction of pluvial flood risks. The conclusions include some preliminary principles: (1 a densely distributed surface water network is preferable; (2 areas farther away from water body require water sensitive spatial intervention; and (3 optimizing the allocation of different types of ground surface could contribute to pluvial flood alleviation. An alternative design proposal for a typical urban block in Tianjin Eco-City has been put forward to illustrate these principles.

  9. Nutrients in ground water and surface water of the United States; an analysis of data through 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, D.K.; Hamilton, P.A.; Helsel, D.R.; Hitt, K.J.; Ruddy, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    Historical data on nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus species) concentrations in ground-and surface-water samples were compiled from 20 study units of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program and 5 supplemental study areas. The resultant national retrospective data sets contained analyses of about 12,000 Found-water and more than 22,000 surface-water samples. These data were interpreted on regional and national scales by relating the distributions of nutrient concentrations to ancillary data, such as land use, soil characteristics, and hydrogeology, provided by local study-unit personnel. The information provided in this report on environmental factors that affect nutrient concentrations in ground and surface water can be used to identify areas of the Nation where the vulnerability to nutrient contamination is greatest. Nitrate was the nutrient of greatest concern in the historical ground-water data. It is the only nutrient that is regulated by a national drinking-water standard. Nitrate concentrations were significantly different in ground water affected by various land uses. Concentrations in about 16 percent of the samples collected in agricultural areas exceeded the drinking-water standard. However, the standard was exceeded in only about 1 percent of samples collected from public-supply wells. A variety of ancillary factors had significant relations to nitrate concentrations in ground water beneath agricultural areas. Concentrations generally were highest within 100 feet of the land surface. They were also higher in areas where soil and geologic characteristics promoted rapid movement of water to the aquifer. Elevated concentrations commonly occurred in areas underlain by permeable materials, such as carbonate bedrock or unconsolidated sand and gravel, and where soils are generally well drained. In areas where water movement is impeded, denitrification might lead to low concentrations of nitrate in the ground water. Low concentrations were also

  10. Monitoring groundwater-surface water interaction using time-series and time-frequency analysis of transient three-dimensional electrical resistivity changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Elwaseif, Mehrez

    2012-01-01

    Time-lapse resistivity imaging is increasingly used to monitor hydrologic processes. Compared to conventional hydrologic measurements, surface time-lapse resistivity provides superior spatial coverage in two or three dimensions, potentially high-resolution information in time, and information in the absence of wells. However, interpretation of time-lapse electrical tomograms is complicated by the ever-increasing size and complexity of long-term, three-dimensional (3-D) time series conductivity data sets. Here we use 3-D surface time-lapse electrical imaging to monitor subsurface electrical conductivity variations associated with stage-driven groundwater-surface water interactions along a stretch of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 near Richland, Washington, USA. We reduce the resulting 3-D conductivity time series using both time-series and time-frequency analyses to isolate a paleochannel causing enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions. Correlation analysis on the time-lapse imaging results concisely represents enhanced groundwater-surface water interactions within the paleochannel, and provides information concerning groundwater flow velocities. Time-frequency analysis using the Stockwell (S) transform provides additional information by identifying the stage periodicities driving groundwater-surface water interactions due to upstream dam operations, and identifying segments in time-frequency space when these interactions are most active. These results provide new insight into the distribution and timing of river water intrusion into the Hanford 300 Area, which has a governing influence on the behavior of a uranium plume left over from historical nuclear fuel processing operations.

  11. Mitigation scenario analysis: modelling the impacts of changes in agricultural management practices on surface water quality at the catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sam; He, Yi; Hiscock, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Increasing human pressures on the natural environment through the demand for increased agricultural productivity have exacerbated and deteriorated water quality conditions within many environments due to an unbalancing of the nutrient cycle. As a consequence, increased agricultural diffuse water pollution has resulted in elevated concentrations of nutrients within surface water and groundwater bodies. This deterioration in water quality has direct consequences for the health of aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity, human health, and the use of water as a resource for public water supply and recreation. To mitigate these potential impacts and to meet commitments under the EU Drinking Water and Water Framework Directives, there is a need to improve our understanding of the impacts that agricultural land use and management practices have on water quality. Water quality models are one of the tools available which can be used to facilitate this aim. These simplified representations of the physical environment allow a variety of changes to be simulated within a catchment, including for example changes in agricultural land use and management practices, allowing for predictions of the impacts of those measures on water quality to be developed and an assessment to be made of their effectiveness in improving conditions. The aim of this research is to apply the water quality model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to the Wensum catchment (area 650 km2), situated in the East of England, to predict the impacts of potential changes in land use and land management practices on water quality as part of a process to select those measures that in combination will have the greatest potential to improve water quality. Model calibration and validation is conducted at three sites within the catchment against observations of river discharge and nitrate and total phosphorus loads at a monthly time-step using the optimisation algorithm SUFI-2 (Sequential Uncertainty Fitting Version 2

  12. Optimization of a Modified QuEChERS Method for Multiresidue Analysis of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Sewage and Surface Water by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhawaha, Akanksha S; Nagarnaik, Pranav M; Jadhav, Manjusha; Pudale, Anjali; Labhasetwar, Pawan K; Banerjee, Kaushik

    2017-05-01

    A quick, sensitive multiresidue method was developed for the analysis of 19 multiclass pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in surface water and sewage water. The proposed modified QuEChERS method involved the extraction of water samples (10 mL) with acetonitrile (10 mL) after the addition of 1% acetic acid, 4 g magnesium sulfate, and 0.2 g ammonium acetate, and was validated in distilled water, surface water, and sewage water with respect to linearity, LOD and LOQ, precision, and accuracy. The LOD and LOQ varied within the ranges of 0.001-0.167 and 0.002-0.25 ng/mL, respectively. Recoveries of the target compounds ranged from 73 to 125%, with precision RSD values <27%. The method provided a precise estimation of PPCPs in field samples, and acetaminophen, atenolol, metformin, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, methylparaben, and triclosan were detected in concentrations ranging from 0.10 to 1.40 and 0.10 to 3.4 ng/mL in surface water and sewage water, respectively. This is an innovative application of the QuEChERS approach for estimation of PPCPs from aqueous matrixes. The method provides significantly higher output (preparation of 25-30 samples a day) compared to conventional SPE-based methods (<10 samples a day).

  13. Evaluation of surface water and groundwater contamination in a MSW landfill area using hydrochemical analysis and electrical resistivity tomography: a case study in Sichuan province, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chengpeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    As a primary disposal mean of municipal solid waste in China, the landfill has been recognized as one of the major threats to the surrounding surface water and groundwater environment due to the emission of leachate. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of leachate on the surface water and groundwater environment of the region of the Chang'an landfill, which is located in Sichuan province, China. The surface water and groundwater were sampled for hydrochemical analysis. Three electrical resistivity tomography profiles were conducted to evaluate the impact of leachate on the groundwater environment, and several laboratory tests were carried out to build the relationship between the soil bulk resistivity and the void fluid resistivity. The results showed that a seasonal creek named Longfeng creek, which crosses the landfill site, was contaminated by the leachate. The concentrations of COD, BOD5, and chlorides (Cl) of surface water samples increased by 12.3-105.7 times. The groundwater quality in the surface loose sediments along the valley deteriorated obviously from the landfill to 500 m downstream area. The laboratory tests of soil samples indicated that the resistivity value of 13 Ωm is a critical value whether the groundwater in the loose sediments is polluted. The groundwater at the site adjacent to the spillway in the landfill was partially contaminated by the emission of leachate. The groundwater contamination zones at 580 m downstream of the landfill were recognized at the shallow zones from 60 m left bank to 30 m right bank of Longfeng creek. The improved understanding of groundwater contamination around the landfill is beneficial for the landfill operation and groundwater environment remediation.

  14. Distribution characteristics of volatile methylsiloxanes in Tokyo Bay watershed in Japan: Analysis of surface waters by purge and trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuichi; Minomo, Kotaro; Ohtsuka, Nobutoshi; Motegi, Mamoru; Nojiri, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2017-05-15

    Surface waters including river water and effluent from sewage treatment plants (STPs) were collected from Tokyo Bay watershed, Japan, and analyzed for seven cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs), i.e., D3, D4, D5, D6, L3, L4, and L5 by an optimized purge and trap extraction method. The total concentrations of seven VMSs (ΣVMS) in river water ranged from <4.9 to 1700ng/L (mean: 220ng/L). The individual mean concentrations of cyclic VMSs in surface waters were; 10ng/L for D3, 13ng/L for D4, 180ng/L for D5, and 18ng/L for D6. The concentrations of ΣVMS determined in STP effluents varied widely from 99 to 2500ng/L and the individual mean concentrations were 21ng/L for D3, 27ng/L for D4, 540ng/L for D5, and 45ng/L for D6. D5, which is widely used in personal-care products, was found to be the most abundant compound in both river water and STP effluent. Linear VMSs were detected at much lower frequency and concentrations than those of cyclic VMSs. The measured concentrations of D4 were below the no-observed effect concentration (NOEC). The annual emission of ΣVMS through STPs into Tokyo Bay watershed was estimated at 2300kg. Our results indicate widespread distribution of VMSs in Tokyo Bay watershed and the influence of domestic wastewater discharges as a source of VMSs in the aquatic environment.

  15. From Soil to Surface Water: a Meta-Analysis of Catchment-Scale Organic Matter Production and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, R. S.; Brooks, P. D.; Perdrial, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter plays a fundamental role in the ecology and biogeochemistry of many ecosystems, from soils to headwater streams to oceans. In most catchments, the terrestrial environment is the dominant source of organic matter for the aquatic system, and thus DOM represents a fundamental linkage between soil and surface water. With trends of increasing DOC concentrations observed in many areas of the world, there is growing interest in identifying which factors drive DOM concentration and chemistry. Studies of systems ranging from tropical rainforests to boreal landscapes have identified many catchment characteristics that co-vary with DOM concentration and chemistry. These include climate elements such as solar radiation and precipitation patterns, chemical measurements such as sulfate or chloride concentration, and land use impacts such as percent agriculture. The question of which catchment characteristics actually control DOM can be broken down into two parts: which factors control the production of mobile DOM and what drives DOM transport from the terrestrial to the aquatic system. Here we review studies covering a range of ecosystems, scales, and measurement techniques, to categorize the major state factors that drive catchment controls of aquatic organic matter. Specifically, we identify three major transport vectors that vary both in their timing of DOM transport to surface water and the propensity for DOM originating from terrestrial source areas to be modified during transport. We use this three vector conceptual model of transport to group catchments and identify reproducible signatures of DOM export with varying levels of disturbance. By developing a generalized conceptual model of catchment-scale controls on aquatic organic matter, we can predict how dissolved organic matter will respond to environmental change. This knowledge can then help guide best management practices.

  16. Liquid Chromatography with Post-Column Reagent Addition of Ammonia in Methanol Coupled to Negative Ion Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Determination of Phenoxyacid Herbicides and their Degradation Products in Surface Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele L. Etter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A new liquid chromatography (LC-negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI–tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS method with post-column addition of ammonia in methanol has been developed for the analysis of acid herbicides: 2,4-dichlorophenoxy ace- tic acid, 4-chloro-o-tolyloxyacetic acid, 2-(2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxybutyric acid, mecoprop, dichlorprop, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy butyric acid, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy propionic acid, dicamba and bromoxynil, along with their degradation products: 4-chloro-2- methylphenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoic acid. The samples were extracted from the surface water matrix using solid-phase extraction (SPE with a polymeric sorbent and analyzed with LC ESI- with selected reaction monitoring (SRM using a three-point confirmation approach. Chromatography was performed on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 (50 × 4.6 mm i.d., 1.8 µm with a gradient elution using water-methanol with 2 mM ammonium acetate mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.15 mL/min. Ammonia in methanol (0.8 M was added post-column at a flow rate of 0.05 mL/min to enhance ionization of the deg- radation products in the MS source. One SRM transition was used for quantitative analysis while the second SRM along with the ratio of SRM1/SRM2 within the relative standard deviation determined by standards for each individual pesticide and retention time match were used for confirmation. The standard deviation of ratio of SRM1/SRM2 obtained from standards run on the day of analysis for different phenoxyacid herbicides ranged from 3.9 to 18.5%. Limits of detection (LOD were between 1 and 15 ng L-1 and method detection limits (MDL with strict criteria requiring

  17. Analysis of land cover change and rainfall on the global land surface water coverage database for 1987-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Takeuchi, W.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, taking into account population density of the world, major river basin was delineated continent wise all over the world using HYDRO1k data. Then, monthly rainfall change from the year 1981 to 2014 and daily LSWC (Land surface water coverage) change from 1987 to 2015 based on each major river basin was computed and compared with each other. A good agreement was found between LSWC pattern and rainfall pattern, showing a seasonal variation characteristic in each year. However, it could be seen that rainfall is not the only factor that bring about change in LSWC. Also, it was found that the change of urban area is very strong. Especially in Yangtze basin, from 2000 to 2012, the urban changed from 0.07% to 0.83%. Moreover, the proportion of cropland increased significantly, especially in Ganges basin increased by 57.64%, grew to nearly 70% from 1992 to 2012. Besides, the trend of consistent growth was showed both in cropland and LSWC. It is indicated that the widespread expansion of cropland may bring about LSWC increasing.

  18. Residence time, chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater and surface water of a small agricultural watershed in the Coastal Plain, Bucks Branch, Sussex County, Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, John W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate is a common contaminant in groundwater and surface water throughout the Nation, and water-resource managers need more detailed small-scale watershed research to guide conservation efforts aimed at improving water quality. Concentrations of nitrate in Bucks Branch are among the highest in the state of Delaware and a scientific investigation was performed to provide water-quality information to assist with the management of agriculture and water resources. A combination of major-ion chemistry, nitrogen isotopic composition and age-dating techniques was used to estimate the residence time and provide a chemical and isotopic analysis of nitrate in the groundwater in the surficial aquifer of the Bucks Branch watershed in Sussex County, Delaware. The land use was more than 90 percent agricultural and most nitrogen inputs were from manure and fertilizer. The apparent median age of sampled groundwater is 18 years and the estimated residence time of groundwater contributing to the streamflow for the entire Bucks Branch watershed at the outlet is approximately 19 years. Concentrations of nitrate exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard of 10 milligrams per liter (as nitrogen) in 60 percent of groundwater samples and 42 percent of surface-water samples. The overall geochemistry in the Bucks Branch watershed indicates that agriculture is the predominant source of nitrate contamination and the observed patterns in major-ion chemistry are similar to those observed in other studies on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. The pattern of enrichment in nitrogen and oxygen isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) of nitrate in groundwater and surface water indicates there is some loss of nitrate through denitrification, but this process is not sufficient to remove all of the nitrate from groundwater discharging to streams, and concentrations of nitrate in streams remain elevated.

  19. Analysis of isotope element by electrolytic enrichment method for ground water and surface water in Saurashtra region, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajal Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been aimed for the assessment of isotope element Tritium (3H. It is a great threat to human health and environment for lengthy duration. The tritium exists in earth in diverse forms such as (1 small amounts of natural tritium are produced by alpha decay of lithium-7, (2 natural atmospheric tritium is also generated by secondary neutron cosmic ray bombardment of nitrogen, (3 atmospheric nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, although the contribution from nuclear power plants is small. Tritium or 3H is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with a half-life of 12.32 ± 0.02 years. Water samples from ground water, surface water, and precipitation were collected from different locations in Gujarat area and were analyzed for the same. Distillation of samples was done to reduce the conductivity. Deuterium and Hydrogen were removed by the process of physico-chemical fractionation in the tritium enrichment unit. The basis of physico-chemical fractionation is the difference in the strength of bonds formed by the light vs. the heavier isotope of a given element. A total of 10 cycles (runs were executed using Quintals process. Tritium concentration files were created with help of WinQ and Quick start software in Quintals process (Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer. The concentration of tritium in terms of tritium units (TU of various samples has been determined. The TU values of the samples vary in the range of 0.90–6.62 TU.

  20. 77 FR 57545 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Public Meeting on Monitoring Data Analysis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... Monitoring Data Analysis, Occurrence Forecasts, Binning, and the Microbial Toolbox AGENCY: Environmental... Rule (LT2 rule). At this meeting, EPA plans to discuss and solicit public input on data and information... the data and/or information discussed at this meeting during the agency's review of the LT2 rule...

  1. Multivariate analysis of surface water quality in the Three Gorges area of China and implications for water management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhao; Guo Fu; Kun Lei; Yanwu Li

    2011-01-01

    Multivariate statistical techniques,cluster analysis,non-parametric tests,and factor analysis were applied to analyze a water quality dataset including 13 parameters at 37 sites of the Three Gorges area,China,from 2003-2008 to investigate spatio-temporal variations and identify potential pollution sources.Using cluster analysis,the twelve months of the year were classified into three periods of lowflow (LF),normal-flow (NF),and high-flow (HF); and the 37 monitoring sites were divided into low pollution (LP),moderate pollution (MP),and high pollution (HP).Dissolved oxygen (DO),potassium permanganate index (CODMn),and ammonia-nitrogen (NH4+-N)were identified as significant variables affecting temporal and spatial variations by non-parametric tests.Factor analysis identified that the major pollutants in the HP region were organic matters and nutrients during NF,heavy metals during LF,and petroleum during HF.In the MP region,the identified pollutants primarily included organic matter and heavy metals year-around,while in the LP region,organic pollution was significant during both NF and HF,and nutrient and heavy metal levels were high during both LF and HF.The main sources of pollution came from domestic wastewater and agricultural activities and runoff; however,they contributed differently to each region in regards to pollution levels.For the HP region,inputs from wastewater treatment plants were significant; but for MP and LP regions,water pollution was more likely from the combined effects of agriculture,domestic wastewater,and chemical industry.These results provide fundamental information for developing better water pollution control strategies for the Three Gorges area.

  2. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  3. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  4. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  5. Surface Water Quality Assessment of Wular Lake, A Ramsar Site in Kashmir Himalaya, Using Discriminant Analysis and WQI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Aijaz Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate techniques, discriminant analysis, and WQI were applied to analyze a water quality data set including 27 parameters at 5 sites of the Lake Wular in Kashmir Himalaya from 2011 to 2013 to investigate spatiotemporal variations and identify potential pollution sources. Spatial and temporal variations in water quality parameters were evaluated through stepwise discriminant analysis (DA. The first spatial discriminant function (DF accounted for 76.5% of the total spatial variance, and the second DF accounted for 19.1%. The mean values of water temperature, EC, total-N, K, and silicate showed a strong contribution to discriminate the five sampling sites. The mean concentration of NO2-N, total-N, and sulphate showed a strong contribution to discriminate the four sampling seasons and accounted for most of the expected seasonal variations. The order of major cations and anions was Ca2+>Mg2+> Na+>K+ and Cl->SO42->SiO22- respectively. The results of water quality index, employing thirteen core parameters vital for drinking water purposes, showed values of 49.2, 46.5, 47.3, 40.6, and 37.1 for sites I, II, III, IV, and V, respectively. These index values reflect that the water of lake is in good condition for different purposes but increased values alarm us about future repercussions.

  6. Potentially hazardous substances in surface waters. II. Cholinesterase inhibitors in Dutch surface waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greve, P.A.; Freudenthal, J.; Wit, S.L.

    1972-01-01

    Several analytical methods were employed to determine the concentrations of cholinesterase inhibitors in several Dutch surface waters. An Auto-Analyzer method was used for screening purposes; thin-layer chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for identification and q

  7. GIS analysis of surface water chemistry susceptibility and response to industrial air pollution in the Kola Peninsula, northern Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigina, O. [Institute of Northern Ecology Problems, Apatity (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-01

    The Kola Peninsula is the most industrially developed and urbanized region in the Russian North. The main pollution sources are the large smelters Severonickel and Pechenganickel, which are responsible for {gt} 80% of SO{sub 2} emission and nearly 100% of the Ni and Cu emission in the region. The heterogeneous structure of the hydroponic network and geochemistry across the region cause natural variability in water chemistry. Due to moist and cool climate, large territories on the Kola are sensitive to acid precipitation, but around the smelters, geological peculiarities, erosion and alkaline dust emissions increase buffering capacity of waters to acidification. Lake and river monitoring implemented from 1989-93 by the laboratory of water ecosystems, Institute of Northern Ecology Problems was a basis for GIS-analysis (ARC/VIEW-2.1) of the major constituents of water chemistry attributed to anthropogenic load in the region. After correction for sea salt, acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of waters was calculated. The highest concentrations of anthropogenic non-sea sulfates were confined to the districts with high cation concentrations (Na{sup +} + K{sup +} + Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+}) that reduced negative effects. The most vulnerable regions were found in the northern tundra and high mountain tundra. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Multi-laboratory survey of qPCR enterococci analysis method performance in U.S. coastal and inland surface waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a frequently used technique for quantifying enterococci in recreational surface waters, but there are...

  9. Assessment of the contamination of drinking water supply wells by pesticides from surface water resources using a finite element reactive transport model and global sensitivity analysis techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    fluorescein dye injected in a river is monitored at nearby drinking water wells. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and relatively persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a newer biodegradable and strongly sorbing pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global...... contamination from surface water. This study suggests that it is unlikely that glyphosate in streams can pose a threat to drinking water wells, while MCPP in surface water can represent a risk: MCPP concentration at the drinking water well can be up to 7% of surface water concentration in confined aquifers...... and up to 10% in unconfined aquifers. Thus, the presence of confining clay aquitards may not prevent contamination of drinking water wells by persistent compounds in surface water. Results are consistent with data on pesticide occurrence in Denmark where pesticides are found at higher concentrations...

  10. 嘉兴市地表水质主要影响因素及治理对策分析%Analysis of Influencing Factors of Jiaxing Surface Water Quality and Strategies of Pollution Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕升; 陈吉; 苏营营

    2011-01-01

    选取区域内具有代表性的13个地袁水重点监测断面进行了系统调查,对近年来水质变化走势进行全面分析,对断面周边主要污染源进行排摸检查,分析了当前影响嘉兴市地表水质的主要因素,提出了持续改善区域水质的对策措施。%Jiaxing City lies in the downstream of Taihu Basin and belongs to the plain river network. The surface water quality got worse year by year since the 7th Five Years Programs. And during the 11th Five Years Programs, the worsening tendency was curbed and surface water quality was improved because of the pollution reduction policy. However, in the first half of this year, the surface water quality got worse again. In this study, thirteen typical river monitoring section planes were selected. With the analysis of surface water quality in recent years and checking of pollutant source around monitoring section planes, the study tries to find influencing factors of Jiaxing surface water quality and puts forward solutions of impro- ving the water quality in the area.

  11. Simultaneous Analysis of 18 Glucocorticoids in Surface Water%地表水体中同时分析18种糖皮质激素方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文景; 常红; 孙德智; 吴丰昌; 杨浩

    2015-01-01

    A method of ultra-performance liquid chomatography tandam mass spectrometry(UPLC-MS/ MS) combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for simultaneous analysis of 18 glucocorticoids in surface water. The analytes were first enriched and purified through a HLB cartridge, and eluted with acetonitrile/ ethyl acetate (1: 1, V/ V), then detected by UPLC-MS/ MS. The detection used gradient elution process with methanol and 0. 1℅ formic acid/ water (V/ V) as the mobile phase to achieve baseline separations of these 18 analytes. The linear range was 1. 0- 1 000 μg.L - 1 . The method detection limits ( MDLs) were 0. 10- 1. 0 ng.L - 1 except for cortisone acetate and cortisol acetate(10 ng.L - 1 ) with overall mean recoveries of 65℅ -108℅ in surface water. Application of this method for 5 surface waters from Beijing area showed that 8 glucocorticoids were detected with the concentration range of 0. 20-476 ng.L - 1 . Triamcinolone, triamcinolone acetonide, cortisol acetate and clobetasol propionate were detected for the first time in surface water samples, suggesting that this method is efficient for real sample analysis.%建立了一种采用固相萃取-超高效液相色谱串极质谱联用系统(UPLC-MS/ MS)同时测定地表水体中18种糖皮质激素的高灵敏分析方法.样品经过 HLB 固相萃取柱富集净化﹑ V(乙腈)/ V(乙酸乙酯)=1:1,洗脱后,用 UPLC-MS/ MS 测定.流动相为甲醇和0.1℅乙酸水溶液(体积比),采用梯度洗脱,实现了18种目标物质的基线分离,线性范围为1.0~1000μg.L -1.实际水样的加标回收率为65℅~108℅.整个分析的方法检出限(MDL)除醋酸可的松和醋酸氢化可的松为10 ng.L -1外,其他均在0.10 ng.L -1和1.0 ng.L -1之间.应用此方法于北京地表水体5个样品,检测到8种糖皮质激素,浓度范围0.20~476 ng.L -1,其中曲安西龙﹑曲安奈德﹑醋酸氢化可的松和丙酸氯倍他索在地表水中首次检出,证明了该方法的有效性.

  12. SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN THE RIVER PRUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA DUMITRAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Water is an increasingly important and why it is important to surfacewater quality, which is given by the analysis of physical - chemical, biological andobserving the investigation of water, biota, environments investigation. Analysis ofthe Prut river in terms of biological and physical elements - chemical. Evaluationof ecological and chemical status of water was done according to order of approvalof the standard classification nr.161/2006 surface water to determine the ecologicalstatus of water bodies

  13. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  15. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  16. Hydrogeochemistry and quality of surface water and groundwater in the vicinity of Lake Monoun, West Cameroon: approach from multivariate statistical analysis and stable isotopic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamtchueng, Brice T; Fantong, Wilson Y; Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Tiodjio, Rosine E; Takounjou, Alain F; Ndam Ngoupayou, Jules R; Kusakabe, Minoru; Zhang, Jing; Ohba, Takeshi; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph V; Ueda, Akira

    2016-09-01

    With the use of conventional hydrogeochemical techniques, multivariate statistical analysis, and stable isotope approaches, this paper investigates for the first time surface water and groundwater from the surrounding areas of Lake Monoun (LM), West Cameroon. The results reveal that waters are generally slightly acidic to neutral. The relative abundance of major dissolved species are Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+) for cations and HCO3 (-) ≫ NO3 (-) > Cl(-) > SO4 (2-) for anions. The main water type is Ca-Mg-HCO3. Observed salinity is related to water-rock interaction, ion exchange process, and anthropogenic activities. Nitrate and chloride have been identified as the most common pollutants. These pollutants are attributed to the chlorination of wells and leaching from pit latrines and refuse dumps. The stable isotopic compositions in the investigated water sources suggest evidence of evaporation before recharge. Four major groups of waters were identified by salinity and NO3 concentrations using the Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Consistent with the isotopic results, group 1 represents fresh unpolluted water occurring near the recharge zone in the general flow regime; groups 2 and 3 are mixed water whose composition is controlled by both weathering of rock-forming minerals and anthropogenic activities; group 4 represents water under high vulnerability of anthropogenic pollution. Moreover, the isotopic results and the HCA showed that the CO2-rich bottom water of LM belongs to an isolated hydrological system within the Foumbot plain. Except for some springs, groundwater water in the area is inappropriate for drinking and domestic purposes but good to excellent for irrigation.

  17. An On-Line Solid Phase Extraction-Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for the Determination of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Drinking and Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Mazzoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An UHPLC-MS/MS multiresidue method based on an on-line solid phase extraction (SPE procedure was developed for the simultaneous determination of 9 perfluorinated carboxylates (from 4 to 12 carbon atoms and 3 perfluorinated sulphonates (from 4 to 8 carbon atoms. This work proposes using an on-line solid phase extraction before chromatographic separation and analysis to replace traditional methods of off-line SPE before direct injection to LC-MS/MS. Manual sample preparation was reduced to sample centrifugation and acidification, thus eliminating several procedural errors and significantly reducing time-consuming and costs. Ionization suppression between target perfluorinated analytes and their coeluting SIL-IS were detected for homologues with a number of carbon atoms less than 9, but the quantitation was not affected. Total matrix effect corrected by SIL-IS, inclusive of extraction efficacy, and of ionization efficiency, ranged between −34 and +39%. The percentage of recoveries, between 76 and 134%, calculated in different matrices (tap water and rivers impacted by different pollutions was generally satisfactory. LODs and LOQs of this on-line SPE method, which also incorporate recovery losses, ranged from 0.2 to 5.0 ng/L and from 1 to 20 ng/L, respectively. Validated on-line SPE-LC/MS/MS method has been applied in a wide survey for the determination of perfluoroalkyl acids in Italian surface and ground waters.

  18. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  19. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  20. Comparison of fipronil sources in North Carolina surface water ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide that is widely used in residential and agricultural settings to control ants, roaches, termites, and other pests. Fipronil and its transformation products have been found in a variety of environmental matrices, but the source[s] which makes the greatest contribution to fipronil in surface water has yet to be determined. A sampling effort designed to prioritize known fipronil inputs (golf courses, residential areas, biosolids application sites and wastewater facilities) was conducted in North Carolina to learn more about the origins of fipronil in surface water. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis indicated that fipronil and its known derivatives were routinely present in all samples, but concentrations were substantially elevated near wastewater treatment plant outfalls (range 10–500 ng/L combined), suggesting that they predominate as environmental sources. Corresponding recycled wastewater samples, which were treated with NaOCl for disinfection, showed disappearance of fipronil and all known degradates. HRMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis techniques were used to determine that all fipronil-related compounds are oxidized to a previously unidentified fipronil sulfone chloramine species in recycled wastewater. The implications of the presence of a new fipronil-related compound in recycled wastewater need to be considered. Journal Article Highlights • The most important sources of fipronil in

  1. Watershed Scale Analysis of Groundwater Surface Water Interactions and Its Application to Conjunctive Management under Climatic and Anthropogenic Stresses over the US Sunbelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung Beom

    Although water is one of the most essential natural resources, human activities have been exerting pressure on water resources. In order to reduce these stresses on water resources, two key issues threatening water resources sustainability - interaction between surface water and groundwater resources and groundwater withdrawal impacts of streamflow depletion - were investigated in this study. First, a systematic decomposition procedure was proposed for quantifying the errors arising from various sources in the model chain in projecting the changes in hydrologic attributes using near-term climate change projections. Apart from the unexplained changes by GCMs, the process of customizing GCM projections to watershed scale through a model chain - spatial downscaling, temporal disaggregation and hydrologic model - also introduces errors, thereby limiting the ability to explain the observed changes in hydrologic variability. Towards this, we first propose metrics for quantifying the errors arising from different steps in the model chain in explaining the observed changes in hydrologic variables (streamflow, groundwater). The proposed metrics are then evaluated using a detailed retrospective analyses in projecting the changes in streamflow and groundwater attributes in four target basins that span across a diverse hydroclimatic regimes over the US Sunbelt. Our analyses focused on quantifying the dominant sources of errors in projecting the changes in eight hydrologic variables - mean and variability of seasonal streamflow, mean and variability of 3-day peak seasonal streamflow, mean and variability of 7-day low seasonal streamflow and mean and standard deviation of groundwater depth - over four target basins using an Penn state Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) between the period 1956-1980 and 1981-2005. Retrospective analyses show that small/humid (large/arid) basins show increased (reduced) uncertainty in projecting the changes in hydrologic attributes. Further

  2. Multi-laboratory survey of qPCR enterococci analysis method performance in U.S. coastal and inland surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Richard A; Siefring, Shawn; Varma, Manju; Oshima, Kevin H; Sivaganesan, Mano; Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith; Griffith, John; Weisberg, Stephen B; Noble, Rachel T; Blackwood, A Denene; Kinzelman, Julie; Anan'eva, Tamara; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stelzer, Erin A; Harwood, Valarie J; Gordon, Katrina V; Sinigalliano, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has become a frequently used technique for quantifying enterococci in recreational surface waters, but there are several methodological options. Here we evaluated how three method permutations, type of mastermix, sample extract dilution and use of controls in results calculation, affect method reliability among multiple laboratories with respect to sample interference. Multiple samples from each of 22 sites representing an array of habitat types were analyzed using EPA Method 1611 and 1609 reagents with full strength and five-fold diluted extracts. The presence of interference was assessed three ways: using sample processing and PCR amplifications controls; consistency of results across extract dilutions; and relative recovery of target genes from spiked enterococci in water sample compared to control matrices with acceptable recovery defined as 50 to 200%. Method 1609, which is based on an environmental mastermix, was found to be superior to Method 1611, which is based on a universal mastermix. Method 1611 had over a 40% control assay failure rate with undiluted extracts and a 6% failure rate with diluted extracts. Method 1609 failed in only 11% and 3% of undiluted and diluted extracts analyses. Use of sample processing control assay results in the delta-delta Ct method for calculating relative target gene recoveries increased the number of acceptable recovery results. Delta-delta tended to bias recoveries from apparent partially inhibitory samples on the high side which could help in avoiding potential underestimates of enterococci--an important consideration in a public health context. Control assay and delta-delta recovery results were largely consistent across the range of habitats sampled, and among laboratories. The methodological option that best balanced acceptable estimated target gene recoveries with method sensitivity and avoidance of underestimated enterococci densities was Method 1609 without extract

  3. Mass Defect from Nuclear Physics to Mass Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshahian, Soheil

    2017-09-01

    Mass defect is associated with the binding energy of the nucleus. It is a fundamental property of the nucleus and the principle behind nuclear energy. Mass defect has also entered into the mass spectrometry terminology with the availability of high resolution mass spectrometry and has found application in mass spectral analysis. In this application, isobaric masses are differentiated and identified by their mass defect. What is the relationship between nuclear mass defect and mass defect used in mass spectral analysis, and are they the same? [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  5. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  6. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  7. Pharmaceutical occurrence in groundwater and surface waters in forests land-applied with municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachran, Andrew D; Shea, Damian; Bodnar, Wanda; Nichols, Elizabeth Guthrie

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products in the environment are of increasing public importance because of their ubiquitous nature and documented effects on wildlife, ecosystems, and potentially humans. One potential, yet undefined, source of entry of pharmaceuticals into the environment is via the land application of municipal wastewater onto permitted lands. The objective of the present study is to determine the extent to which pharmaceuticals are mitigated by or exported from managed tree plantations irrigated with municipal wastewater. A specific focus of the present study is the presence of pharmaceutical compounds in groundwater and surface water discharge. The study site is a municipality that land-applies secondary treated wastewater onto 930 hectares of a 2000-hectare managed hardwood and pine plantation. A suite of 33 pharmaceuticals and steroid hormones was targeted in the analysis, which consisted of monthly grab sampling of groundwater, surface water, and wastewater, followed by concentration and cleanup via solid phase extraction and separation, detection, and quantification via liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. More than one-half of all compounds detected in irrigated wastewater were not present in groundwater and subsequent surface water. However, antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, caffeine, and other prescription and over-the-counter drugs remained in groundwater and were transported into surface water at concentrations up to 10 ng/L. These results provide important documentation for pharmaceutical fate and transport in forest systems irrigated with municipal wastewater, a previously undocumented source of environmental entry.

  8. Analysis of environmental setting, surface-water and groundwater data, and data gaps for the Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, Oklahoma, through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Harich, Christopher R.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Lewis, Jason M.; Shivers, Molly J.; Seger, Christian H.; Becker, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    The Citizen Potawatomi Nation Tribal Jurisdictional Area, consisting of approximately 960 square miles in parts of three counties in central Oklahoma, has an abundance of water resources, being underlain by three principal aquifers (alluvial/terrace, Central Oklahoma, and Vamoosa-Ada), bordered by two major rivers (North Canadian and Canadian), and has several smaller drainages. The Central Oklahoma aquifer (also referred to as the Garber-Wellington aquifer) underlies approximately 3,000 square miles in central Oklahoma in parts of Cleveland, Logan, Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties and much of the tribal jurisdictional area. Water from these aquifers is used for municipal, industrial, commercial, agricultural, and domestic supplies. The approximately 115,000 people living in this area used an estimated 4.41 million gallons of fresh groundwater, 12.12 million gallons of fresh surface water, and 8.15 million gallons of saline groundwater per day in 2005. Approximately 8.48, 2.65, 2.24, 1.55, 0.83, and 0.81 million gallons per day of that water were used for domestic, livestock, commercial, industrial, crop irrigation, and thermoelectric purposes, respectively. Approximately one-third of the water used in 2005 was saline water produced during petroleum production. Future changes in use of freshwater in this area will be affected primarily by changes in population and agricultural practices. Future changes in saline water use will be affected substantially by changes in petroleum production. Parts of the area periodically are subject to flooding and severe droughts that can limit available water resources, particularly during summers, when water use increases and streamflows substantially decrease. Most of the area is characterized by rural types of land cover such as grassland, pasture/hay fields, and deciduous forest, which may limit negative effects on water quality by human activities because of lesser emissions of man-made chemicals on such areas than

  9. A study of interaction between surface water and groundwater using environmental isotope in Huaisha River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xianfang; LIU Xiangchao; XIA Jun; YU Jingjie; TANG Changyuan

    2006-01-01

    The surface water and groundwater are important components of water cycle,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the important part in water cycle research.As the effective tracers in water cycle research,environmental isotope and hydrochemistry can reveal the interrelationships between surface water and groundwater effectively.The study area is the Huaisha River basin,which is located in Huairou district,Beijing.The field surveying and sampling for spring,river and well water were finished in 2002 and 2003.The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and water quality were measured at the laboratory.The spatial characteristics in isotope and evolution of water quality along river lines at the different area were analyzed.The altitude effect of oxygen isotope in springs was revealed,and then using this equation,theory foundation for deducing recharge source of spring was estimated.By applying the mass balance method,the annual mean groundwater recharge rate at the catchment was estimated.Based on the groundwater recharge analysis,combining the hydrogeological condition analysis,and comparing the rainfall-runoff coefficients from the 1960s to 1990s in the Huaisha River basin and those in the Chaobai River basin,part of the runoff in the Huaisha River basin is recharged outside of this basin,in other words,this basin is an un-enclosed basin.On the basis of synthetically analyses,combining the compositions of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and hydrochemistry,geomorphology,geology,and watershed systems characteristics,the relative contributions between surface water and groundwater flow at the different areas at the catchments were evaluated,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater was revealed lastly.

  10. A study of interaction between surface water and groundwater using environmental isotope in Huaisha River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Xianfang; LIU; Xiangchao; XIA; Jun; YU; Jingjie; TANG; Changyuan

    2006-01-01

    The surface water and groundwater are important components of water cycle,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater is the important part in water cycle research.As the effective tracers in water cycle research,environmental isotope and hydrochemistry can reveal the interrelationships between surface water and groundwater effectively.The study area is the Huaisha River basin,which is located in Huairou district,Beijing.The field surveying and sampling for spring,river and well water were finished in 2002 and 2003.The hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and water quality were measured at the laboratory.The spatial characteristics in isotope and evolution of water quality along river lines at the different area were analyzed.The altitude effect of oxygen isotope in springs was revealed,and then using this equation,theory foundation for deducing recharge source of spring was estimated.By applying the mass balance method,the annual mean groundwater recharge rate at the catchment was estimated.Based on the groundwater recharge analysis,combining the hydrogeological condition analysis,and comparing the rainfall-runoff coefficients from the 1960s to 1990s in the Huaisha River basin and those in the Chaobai River basin,part of the runoff in the Huaisha River basin is recharged outside of this basin,in other words,this basin is an un-enclosed basin.On the basis of synthetically analyses,combining the compositions of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and hydrochemistry,geomorphology,geology,and watershed systems characteristics,the relative contributions between surface water and groundwater flow at the different areas at the catchments were evaluated,and the interaction between surface water and groundwater was revealed lastly.

  11. 灌区地表水与地下水联合调控分析%Analysis of Irrigation Area of Surface Water and Groundwater Joint Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater overexploitation leads to funnel of groundwater , and lead to severe environ-mental problems such as the surface subsidence .Well drainage joint control model can regulate and control groundwater and surface water , scientific and reasonable to solve the competition between dif-ferent users of water , improve water resources allocation rate .Tahe irrigation area is located in the northwest in our country , because of the lack of scientific regulation of water resources , groundwater overexploitation , threat to the development of local economy .Through the irrigation area of groundwa-ter numerical simulation and equilibrium calculation , puts forward a model of groundwater and sur-face water joint control , optimal utilization of local water resources is of great significance .And pre-dict the local departments of water demand in 2020 , the results can guide the rational allocation of water resources.%地下水过度开采会导致地下水漏斗,并导致地表沉降等恶劣的环境问题。井渠联合调控模型可以科学地调控地下水和地表水,合理解决不同用户间的竞争用水,提高水资源分配率。阿克苏河灌区位于我国西北地区,由于当地缺乏科学的水资源调控,导致地下水过度开发,威胁到当地经济的发展。通过灌区地下水进行数值模拟和均衡计算,提出一种地下水与地表水联合调控模型,对当地水资源优化利用具有重要意义。同时预测了2020年当地各部门需水量,研究结果可以指导当地水资源合理配置。

  12. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  13. Time-dependent integrity during storage of natural surface water samples for the trace analysis of pharmaceutical products, feminizing hormones and pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prévost Michèle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monitoring and analysis of trace contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides require the preservation of the samples before they can be quantified using the appropriate analytical methods. Our objective is to determine the sample shelf life to insure proper quantification of ultratrace contaminants. To this end, we tested the stability of a variety of pharmaceutical products including caffeine, natural steroids, and selected pesticides under refrigerated storage conditions. The analysis was performed using multi-residue methods using an on-line solid-phase extraction combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS in the selected reaction monitoring mode. After 21 days of storage, no significant difference in the recoveries was observed compared to day 0 for pharmaceutical products, while for pesticides, significant losses occurred for DIA and simazine after 10 days (14% and 17% reduction respectively and a statistically significant decrease in the recovery was noted for cyanazine (78% disappearance. However, the estrogen and progestogen steroids were unstable during storage. The disappearance rates obtained after 21 days of storage vary from 63 to 72% for the feminizing hormones. Overall, pharmaceuticals and pesticides seem to be stable for refrigerated storage for up to about 10 days (except cyanazine and steroidal hormones can be quite sensitive to degradation and should not be stored for more than a few days.

  14. Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindic, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Soft ionization techniques, electrospray (ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI make the analysis of biomolecules by mass spectrometry (MS possible. MS is used for determination of the molecular weight of peptides and protein, sequence analysis, characterization of protein-ligand interactions etc. The detection limit, resolution and mass accuracy depend on instrument used (Table 1. Impurities (buffers, salts, detergents can reduce the ion intensities or even totally suppress them, so a separation method (chromatography, 2D-gel electrophoresis must be used for purification of the sample.Molecular mass of intact protein can be determined by ESI or MALDI MS. Multiply charged ions are produced by ESI MS, while singly charged ions are predominant in MALDI spectra (Fig. 2.Sequence analysis of proteins by MS can be performed using peptide mass fingerprint. In this method, proteins are separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis and digested with specific protease (Table 2 or digested and then separated by two-dimensional chromatography (Fig. 1. The obtained peptide mixtures are analyzed by MS or MALDI-TOF technique. The masses determined by MS are compared with calculated masses from database entries. Different algorithms have been developed for protein identification. Example of posttranslational modifications (N- and O-glycosylation and protein sequence complex analysis after dual digestion (endoproteinase digestion followed by endoglycosidase digestion is shown in Fig. 3.It is known that detection of peptides by MS is influenced by intrinsic properties like amino acid composition, the basicity of the C-terminal amino acid, hydrophobicity, etc. Arginine-containing peptides dominate in MS spectra of tryptic digest, so the chemical derivatization of lysine terminal residue by O-methilisourea or 2-methoxy-4,5-1H-imidazole was suggested (Fig. 4.The peptide mass fingerprint method can be improved further by peptide fragmentation using tandem

  15. Analysis on Heavy Metal Pollution in the Surface Water of Hebei Province%河北省地表水重金属污染状况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩雪; 邓静秋; 曹亚明

    2014-01-01

    通过对近几年水体中重金属检出率和超标率变化的分析、重金属的环境健康风险评价等对河北省地表水进行研究,研究结果表明:河北省地表水重金属污染虽然总体呈好转趋势,但仍然存在环境健康风险。由此分析了河北省地表水污染原因主要有地表径流少、企业排污等,进一步提出了建立有效的预防机制、加强环境监管能力等对策建议。%The surfa ce water in Hebei Province was studied by analyzing the detection rates and over standard rates of heavy metals in recent years, the environmental health risk assessment of heavy metals. The conclusion is that although heavy metal pollution is taking a turn for the better, environmental health risk still exists. The reasons for surface water pollution in Hebei province were mainly caused by the lack of surface runoff and the pollution of enterprise sewage. The countermeasures and propositions are establishing effective prevention mechanism and strengthening environmental supervision capacity etc.

  16. Analysis of total and dissolved heavy metals in surface water of a Mexican polluted river by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarazua, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico)]. E-mail: gzo@nuclear.inin.mx; Avila-Perez, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Tejeda, S. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F., C.P. 11801 (Mexico); Barcelo-Quintal, I. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, T. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-11-15

    The present area of study is located in the Upper Course of the Lerma River (UCLR). The Lerma is one of the most important rivers of Mexico, where it drains highly populated and industrialized regions. The aim of the present study is to determine the heavy metal concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb in dissolved and total phases of the UCLR by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF). The surface water samples were collected at 8 sites distributed following the stream flow direction of the river. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in each site in a 1-year period. A sample preparation method was applied in order to obtain the total and dissolved fraction and to destroy the organic matter. The total heavy metal average concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (2566 {mu}g/L) > Mn (300 {mu}g/L) > Cu (66 {mu}g/L) > Cr (21 {mu}g/L) > Pb (15 {mu}g/L). In general, the heavy metal concentrations in water of the UCLR are below the maximum permissible limits.

  17. Analysis of total and dissolved heavy metals in surface water of a Mexican polluted river by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazua, G.; Ávila-Pérez, P.; Tejeda, S.; Barcelo-Quintal, I.; Martínez, T.

    2006-11-01

    The present area of study is located in the Upper Course of the Lerma River (UCLR). The Lerma is one of the most important rivers of Mexico, where it drains highly populated and industrialized regions. The aim of the present study is to determine the heavy metal concentration of Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb in dissolved and total phases of the UCLR by means of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (TXRF). The surface water samples were collected at 8 sites distributed following the stream flow direction of the river. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in each site in a 1-year period. A sample preparation method was applied in order to obtain the total and dissolved fraction and to destroy the organic matter. The total heavy metal average concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (2566 μg/L) > Mn (300 μg/L) > Cu (66 μg/L) > Cr (21 μg/L) > Pb (15 μg/L). In general, the heavy metal concentrations in water of the UCLR are below the maximum permissible limits.

  18. Recovery from acidification in European surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data for 56 long-term monitoring sites in eight European countries are used to assess freshwater responses to reductions in acid deposition at a large spatial scale. In a consistent analysis of trends from 1980 onwards, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56 showed significant (p ≤0.05 decreasing trends in pollution-derived sulphate. Only two sites showed a significant increase. Nitrate, on the other hand, had a much weaker and more varied pattern, with no significant trend at 35 of 56 sites, decreases at some sites in Scandinavia and Central Europe, and increases at some sites in Italy and the UK. The general reduction in surface water acid anion concentrations has led to increases in acid neutralising capacity (significant at 27 of 56 sites but has also been offset in part by decreases in base cations, particularly calcium (significant at 26 of 56 sites, indicating that much of the improvement in runoff quality to date has been the result of decreasing ionic strength. Increases in acid neutralising capacity have been accompanied by increases in pH and decreases in aluminium, although fewer trends were significant (pH 19 of 56, aluminium 13 of 53. Increases in pH appear to have been limited in some areas by rising concentrations of organic acids. Within a general trend towards recovery, some inter-regional variation is evident, with recovery strongest in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, moderate in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, and apparently weakest in Germany. Keywords: acidification, recovery, European trends, sulphate, nitrate, acid neutralising capacity

  19. Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan for the Indiana District of the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James A.; Arvin, Donald V.

    2003-01-01

    This Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Indiana District for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

  20. Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleefsman, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    In the thesis Aerosol MALDI mass spectrometry for bioaerosol analysis is described how the aerosol mass spectrometer of the TU Delft has been further developed for the on-line analysis of bioaerosols. Due to the implemented improvements mass spectra with high resolution and a high mass range can be

  1. Solid-phase microextraction for determination of anilino-pyrimidine, dimethylcarbamate and thiadiazine pesticides in irrigation project surface water

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Filho,Clóvis F; Emídio,Elissandro S.; Dórea,Haroldo S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique for the determination of residues of the pyrimethanil, pirimicarb and buprofezin pesticides in surface waters from irrigated areas, with analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The optimized method used a 100 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber, agitation speed of the sample of 900 rpm and pH 7.0. Extraction and desorption times were 30 and 7 min, respectively. Linearity was achieved in...

  2. Innovative Use of Cr(VI) Plume Depictions and Pump-and-Treat Capture Analysis to Estimate Risks of Contaminant Discharge to Surface Water at Hanford Reactor Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Chuck W.; Hanson, James P.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Tonkin, M.

    2015-01-14

    The Hanford Site nuclear reactor operations required large quantities of high-quality cooling water, which was treated with chemicals including sodium dichromate dihydrate for corrosion control. Cooling water leakage, as well as intentional discharge of cooling water to ground during upset conditions, produced extensive groundwater recharge mounds consisting largely of contaminated cooling water and resulted in wide distribution of hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) contamination in the unconfined aquifer. The 2013 Cr(VI) groundwater plumes in the 100 Areas cover approximately 6 km2 (1500 acres), primarily in the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units (OUs). The Columbia River is a groundwater discharge boundary; where the plumes are adjacent to the Columbia River there remains a potential to discharge Cr(VI) to the river at concentrations above water quality criteria. The pump-and-treat systems along the River Corridor are operating with two main goals: 1) protection of the Columbia River, and 2) recovery of contaminant mass. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the pump-and-treat systems was needed to determine if the Columbia River was protected from contamination, and also to determine where additional system modifications may be needed. In response to this need, a technique for assessing the river protection was developed which takes into consideration seasonal migration of the plume and hydraulic performance of the operating well fields. Groundwater contaminant plume maps are generated across the Hanford Site on an annual basis. The assessment technique overlays the annual plume and the capture efficiency maps for the various pump and treat systems. The river protection analysis technique was prepared for use at the Hanford site and is described in detail in M.J. Tonkin, 2013. Interpolated capture frequency maps, based on mapping dynamic water level observed in observation wells and derived water levels in the vicinity of extraction and injection wells

  3. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALPFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources,...

  4. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  5. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  6. Benefit Analysis of Linghai Sewage Treatment Plant on Surface Water Environment%凌海市污水处理厂建设对地表水环境的效益分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董春艳

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction of Linghai wastewater treatment plant, and analyses the present environmental quality of surface water in Linghai. The main analysis forcus on the major pollutant emissions and the environmental benefitsafter the operation of the sewage treatment plant.%介绍了凌海市污水处理厂的建设概况,对凌海市地表水环境质量现状进行了分析,监测了污水处理厂运营后主要污染物的排放量,并探讨了凌海市污水处理厂建成运营后所产生的环境效益。

  7. The conservative behavior of dissolved organic carbon in surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean, during early summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuki; Takesue, Nobuyuki; Nishioka, Jun; Kondo, Yoshiko; Ooki, Atsushi; Kuma, Kenshi; Hirawake, Toru; Yamashita, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the optical properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) determined by ultraviolet-visible absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy were measured in surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea, western Arctic Ocean, during the early summer of 2013. Neither the DOC concentration nor the optical parameters of the DOM correlated with salinity. Principal component analysis using the DOM optical parameters clearly separated the DOM sources. A significant linear relationship was evident between the DOC and the principal component score for specific water masses, indicating that a high DOC level was related to a terrigenous source, whereas a low DOC level was related to a marine source. Relationships between the DOC and the principal component scores of the surface waters of the southern Chukchi Sea implied that the major factor controlling the distribution of DOC concentrations was the mixing of plural water masses rather than local production and degradation. PMID:27658444

  8. Dissolved organic matter in sea spray: a transfer study from marine surface water to aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Koch, B. P.; Flerus, R.; Kattner, G.; Harir, M.; Kanawati, B.; Lucio, M.; Tziotis, D.; Hertkorn, N.; Gebefügi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impose direct and indirect effects on the climate system, for example, by absorption of radiation in relation to cloud droplets size, on chemical and organic composition and cloud dynamics. The first step in the formation of Organic primary aerosols, i.e. the transfer of dissolved organic matter from the marine surface into the atmosphere, was studied. We present a molecular level description of this phenomenon using the high resolution analytical tools of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Our experiments confirm the chemoselective transfer of natural organic molecules, especially of aliphatic compounds from the surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes. Transfer from marine surface water to the atmosphere involves a chemical gradient governed by the physicochemical properties of the involved molecules when comparing elemental compositions and differentiating CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS bearing compounds. Typical chemical fingerprints of compounds enriched in the aerosol phase were CHO and CHOS molecular series, smaller molecules of higher aliphaticity and lower oxygen content, and typical surfactants. A non-targeted metabolomics analysis demonstrated that many of these molecules corresponded to homologous series of oxo-, hydroxy-, methoxy-, branched fatty acids and mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids as well as monoterpenes and sugars. These surface active biomolecules were preferentially transferred from surface water into the atmosphere via bubble bursting processes to form a significant fraction of primary organic aerosols. This way of sea spray production leaves a selective biological signature of the surface water in the corresponding aerosol that may be transported into higher altitudes up to the lower atmosphere, thus contributing to the formation of secondary organic aerosol on a global scale or transported laterally with

  9. Acute toxicity of resmethrin, malathion and methoprene to larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus amemcanus) and analysis of pesticide levels in surface waters after Scourge™, Anvil™ and Altsoid™ application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkosky, Ann M.; Ruggieri, Joseph P.; Terracciano, Stephen A.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; McElroy, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    Acute toxicity and immune response, combined with temperature stress effects, were evaluated in larval and juvenile American lobsters (Homarus americanus) exposed to malathion, resmethrin and methoprene. These pesticides were used to control West Nile virus in New York in 1999, the same year the American lobster population collapsed in western Long Island Sound (LIS). Whereas the suite of pesticides used for mosquito control changed in subsequent years, a field study was also conducted to determine pesticide concentrations in surface waters on Long Island and in LIS after operational applications. The commercial formulations used in 2002 and 2003—Scourge, Anvil and Altosid—contain the active ingredients resmethrin, sumithrin and methoprene, respectively. Concentrations of the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were also measured as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Acute mortality in Stage I-II larval lobsters demonstrated that they are extremely sensitive to continuous resmethrin exposure. Resmethrin LC50s for larval lobsters determined under flow-through conditions varied from 0.26–0.95 μg L−1 in 48- and 96-h experiments at 16°C, respectively. Increased temperature (24°C) did not significantly alter resmethrin toxicity. Malathion and methoprene were less toxic than resmethrin. The 48-h LC50 for malathion was 3.7 μg L−1 and methoprene showed no toxicity at the highest (10 μg L−1) concentration tested. Phenoloxidase activity was used as a measure of immune response for juvenile lobsters exposed to sublethal pesticide concentrations. In continuous exposures to sublethal doses of resmethrin (0.03 μg L−1) or malathion (1 μg L−1) for 7 d at 16 or 22°C, temperature had a significant effect on phenoloxidase activity (P ≤ 0.006) whereas pesticide exposure did not (P = 0.880). The analytical methods developed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LC-TOF-MS) provided high sensitivity with mass

  10. The influence of lithology on surface water sources | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of surface water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed “rainout effect”, which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the leeward side of the Oregon Coastal Range. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Results indicate a significant difference in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation was the most distinct during the summer when low flows reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall and winter) showed a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. This indicates that baseflow within streams drained by sandstone versus basalt is being supplied from two distinctly separate water sources. In addition, Marys River flow at the outle

  11. Determination of carbofuran in surface water and biological tissue by sol-gel immunoaffinity extraction and on-line preconcentration/HPLC/UV analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Avila, Luz E; Márquez-Lira, Bani P; Villanueva, Marcos; Covarrubias, Rosario; Zelada, Gustavo; Thibert, Valérie

    2012-01-15

    A selective and simple analytical method for the trace level determination of carbofuran in complex environmental and biological samples was developed based on immunoaffinity extraction (IAE) followed by on-line preconcentration and HPLC/UV analysis of the purified extract. The immunosorbent for IAE was prepared by sol-gel encapsulation of monoclonal anti-carbofuran antibodies, and was fully characterized for capacity, repeatability, binding strength, binding kinetics and cross-reactivity. Method performance was evaluated with two different types of difficult samples: dam water and methanolic extracts of epithelial cervical-uterine tissue. Linear behavior and quantitative recoveries were obtained from the analysis of samples spiked with carbofuran at 0.2-4 ng/mL (dam water, 50 mL samples) and 10-40 ng/mL (biological tissue extract, 2 mL samples). RSD (n=7) and detection limits were, respectively, 10.1% (spike 0.40 ng/mL) and 0.13 ng/mL for dam water; 8.5% (spike 20 ng/mL) and 5 ng/mL for the biological tissue extract. The excellent sample purification achieved with the IAE column allows precise and accurate determination of carbofuran in complex matrices, even when using non-selective UV detection in the chromatographic analysis.

  12. Estimation of real-time N load in surface water using dynamic data driven application system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Ouyang; S.M. Luo; L.H. Cui; Q. Wang; J.E. Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural, industrial, and urban activities are the major sources for eutrophication of surface water ecosystems. Currently, determination of nutrients in surface water is primarily accomplished by manually collecting samples for laboratory analysis, which requires at least 24 h. In other words, little to no effort has been devoted to monitoring real-time variations...

  13. Analysis of the impacts of major anion variations on surface water acidity particularly with regard to conifer harvesting: case studies from Wales and Northern England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the water quality of streams draining a range of acidic and acid sensitive, mainly afforested, upland catchments in mid- and north-Wales and northern-England are described to investigate the acidification effects of conifer harvesting in relation to natural variability. Most sites show a large range in pH and major cation and major anion concentrations. The waters draining from the smaller catchments are more acidic and aluminium bearing reflecting a higher proportion of runoff from the acidic soils in each area. However, there is often a less acidic component of runoff under base-flow conditions due to ground-water contributions particularly within the larger streams. Higher concentrations of nitrate occur for sites which have been felled although declines in concentration occur several years after felling. Multiple regression analysis reveals the importance of cation exchange and within catchment acidification associated with sulphate and nitrate generation. Sulphate also has a component associated with weathering but the patterns vary from catchment to catchment. Analysis of the influence of changing anion concentrations associated with tree harvesting reveals that the acidification induced by increases in nitrate can be offset or reversed by the lowering of chloride and sulphate concentrations due to decreased atmospheric scavenging by the vegetation, reduced evapotranspiration and increased surface runoff diluting the acidity generated. It is concluded that contemporary UK forestry guidelines with an emphasis on phased harvesting of catchments over several years and careful harvesting methodologies can alleviate most problems of stream acidification associated with felling activities and in some cases can reverse the acidification pattern.

  14. Comparison among Methods of Source Apportionment of PAHs and Their Application in Surface Water Analysis%地表水环境中PAHs源解析的方法比较及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许云竹; 花修艺; 董德明; 梁大鹏; 李仁声; 刘春阳

    2011-01-01

    通过对比分析水环境领域多环芳烃(PAHs)的源解析方法综述了各种源解析方法的原理、优缺点及具体适用范围,并在此基础上,分别从内陆河流湖泊及沿海区域两方面对国内外地表水环境中(包括上覆水及水底表层沉积物)PAHs的源解析方法的应用及解析结果进行分析比较.结果表明,内陆区域河流和湖泊上覆水及沉积物中的PAHs主要来源为矿物燃料及木材等高温燃烧源,河口及近海海水和沉积物中的PAHs主要来源为燃烧源及石油源,石油源对 PAHs 的贡献较内陆区域更明显.%Source apportionment of PAHs applied in the analysis of surface water was studied to control and eliminate water pollution. Comparing variable methods of source apportionment of PAHs, we analyzed and discussed the principle, characteristics and scope of the application of the methods that are usually divided into qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis. The applications and results of source apportionment of PAHs in surface water and sediments were contrasted and analyzed. Then, the source of contaminations was also analyzed briefly. The results of the source apportionment indicate that PAHs in aquatic environment and sediments in inland region mainly come from the combustion of coal, wood, and other minerals. PAHs in coastal areas which are in aquatic and sedimentary environments are derived from petroleum and other combustion processes. Subsequently, PAHs in coastal areas are more obviously from petroleum compared with that in inland region.

  15. Monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available the surface. The chelated Pluronic-DMDDO ligand can be used for affinity purification of histidine tagged proteins. A regeneration formulation based on anionic SDS detergent desorbed pluronic modified polymeric membranes and the possibility of re... ingredients, household products and industrial chemicals. Surface waters are the main sink of said EDCs. Accurate EDC detection is usually via time consuming and costly ex situ LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. An important class of biosensors include those...

  16. Continuous monitoring of summer surface water vapor isotopic composition above the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Steen-Larsen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present here surface water vapor isotopic measurements conducted from June to August 2010 at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling Project camp, NW Greenland (77.45° N, 51.05° W, 2484 m a.s.l.. Measurements were conducted at 9 different heights from 0.1 m to 13.5 m above the snow surface using two different types of cavity-enhanced near-infrared absorption spectroscopy analyzers. For each instrument specific protocols were developed for calibration and drift corrections. The inter-comparison of corrected results from different instruments reveals excellent reproducibility, stability, and precision with a standard deviations of ~ 0.23‰ for δ18O and ~ 1.4‰ for δD. Diurnal and intraseasonal variations show strong relationships between changes in local surface humidity and water vapor isotopic composition, and with local and synoptic weather conditions. This variability probably results from the interplay between local moisture fluxes, linked with firn–air exchanges, boundary layer dynamics, and large-scale moisture advection. Particularly remarkable are several episodes characterized by high (> 40‰ surface water vapor deuterium excess. Air mass back-trajectory calculations from atmospheric analyses and water tagging in the LMDZiso (Laboratory of Meteorology Dynamics Zoom-isotopic atmospheric model reveal that these events are associated with predominant Arctic air mass origin. The analysis suggests that high deuterium excess levels are a result of strong kinetic fractionation during evaporation at the sea-ice margin.

  17. Analysis of mass spectrometry data in proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole N

    2008-01-01

    that in turn allow protein identification, annotation of secondary modifications, and determination of the absolute or relative abundance of individual proteins. Advances in mass spectrometry-driven proteomics rely on robust bioinformatics tools that enable large-scale data analysis. This chapter describes......The systematic study of proteins and protein networks, that is, proteomics, calls for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins and peptides. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a key analytical technology in current proteomics and modern mass spectrometers generate large amounts of high-quality data...... some of the basic concepts and current approaches to the analysis of MS and MS/MS data in proteomics....

  18. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  19. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    .... ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events...

  20. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    during baseflow conditions were also taken. The analytical measurements included solid phase extraction, liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-HR-MS/MS). Quantification was achieved using reference standards and internal standards. Besides the well-known transformation products of triazine and chloroacetanilide herbicides, transformation products of other compound classes such as azoxystrobin acid (from azoxystrobin, strobilurin fungicide), chloridazon-desphenyl and chloridazon-methyl-desphenyl (from chloridazon, pyridazinone herbicide), and metamitron-desamino (from metamitron, triazinone herbicide) were analyzed in surface water. For a selection of widely used pesticides in the catchment, modelled ratios of transformation product versus parent pesticide concentrations were compared to the measured concentration ratios in the river for the application period and for two 2-month periods following application. Concentration ratios agreed within a factor of 10 for all pairs of parent pesticides and transformation products, and for all seasons, with a single exception. The ratio of chloridazon-desphenyl to chloridazon was under-predicted by a factor of approximately 20. The data revealed that chloridazon-desphenyl was also found in elevated concentrations in all baseflow samples, indicating its presence in the groundwater component of the catchment. The same was true for other transformation products (e.g., metamitron-desamino, chloridazon-methly-desphenyl, metolachlor-ESA), but to a lesser degree. Based on baseflow separation of the hydrograph, the concentration ratio estimation model was supplemented with an additional baseflow component. The concentrations in the baseflow component were estimated with a simple leaching relationship that was compared against measured baseflow concentrations and groundwater findings in Switzerland. The final model yielded good agreement for all compounds and is therefore deemed suitable for prioritization of

  1. Surface water hydrology and the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.; Yang, K.; Pitcher, L. H.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Ryan, J.; Hubbard, A.; Tedesco, M.; Behar, A.

    2016-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet now exceeds 260 Gt/year, raising global sea level by >0.7 mm annually. Approximately two-thirds of this total mass loss is now driven by negative ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB), attributed mainly to production and runoff of meltwater from the ice sheet surface. This new dominance of runoff as a driver of GrIS total mass loss will likely persist owing to anticipated further increases in surface melting, reduced meltwater storage in firn, and the waning importance of dynamical mass losses (ice calving) as the ice sheets retreat from their marine-terminating margins. It also creates the need and opportunity for integrative research pairing traditional surface water hydrology approaches with glaciology. As one example, we present a way to measure supraglacial "runoff" (i.e. specific discharge) at the supraglacial catchment scale ( 101-102 km2), using in situ measurements of supraglacial river discharge and high-resolution satellite/drone mapping of upstream catchment area. This approach, which is standard in terrestrial hydrology but novel for ice sheet science, enables independent verification and improvement of modeled SMB runoff estimates used to project sea level rise. Furthermore, because current SMB models do not consider the role of fluvial watershed processes operating on the ice surface, inclusion of even a simple surface routing model materially improves simulations of runoff delivered to moulins, the critical pathways for meltwater entry into the ice sheet. Incorporating principles of surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphology and into glaciological models will thus aid estimates of Greenland meltwater runoff to the global ocean as well as connections to subglacial hydrology and ice sheet dynamics.

  2. Quality-control results for ground-water and surface-water data, Sacramento River Basin, California, National Water-Quality Assessment, 1996-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Cathy; Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2003-01-01

    the reporting limit. Surrogate recoveries for pesticides analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), pesticides analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and volatile organic compounds in ground- and surface-water samples were within the acceptable limits of 70 to 130 percent and median recovery values between 82 and 113 percent. The recovery percentages for surrogate compounds analyzed by HPLC had the highest standard deviation, 20 percent for ground-water samples and 16 percent for surface-water samples, and the lowest median values, 82 percent for ground-water samples and 91 percent for surface-water samples. Results were consistent with the recovery results described for the analytical methods. Field matrix spike recoveries for pesticide compounds analyzed using GC/MS in ground- and surface-water samples were comparable with published recovery data. Recoveries of carbofuran, a critical constituent in ground- and surface-water studies, and desethyl atrazine, a critical constituent in the ground-water study, could not be calculated because of problems with the analytical method. Recoveries of pesticides analyzed using HPLC in ground- and surface-water samples were generally low and comparable with published recovery data. Other methodological problems for HPLC analytes included nondetection of the spike compounds and estimated values of spike concentrations. Recovery of field matrix spikes for volatile organic compounds generally were within the acceptable range, 70 and 130 percent for both ground- and surface-water samples, and median recoveries from 62 to 127 percent. High or low recoveries could be related to errors in the field, such as double spiking or using spike solution past its expiration date, rather than problems during analysis. The methodological changes in the field spike protocol during the course of the Sacramento River Basin study, which included decreasing the amount of spike solu

  3. Ordination of environmental data using principal component analysis: the case of the radium isotopes (Ra-226 and Ra-28) in surface waters in an area associated with NORM/TENORM mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Antunes, Marcos M., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b, E-mail: antunes@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios. Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: kelecom@uol.com.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Biologia Marinha; Carmo, Roberto F., E-mail: rfcarmo@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil SA, Caetite, BA (Brazil). Unidade de Concentracao de Uranio. Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica; Oliveira, Gabriela T. de [Centro Universitario de Sao Joao da Boa Vista (UNIFAE), SP (Brazil). Curso de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    The radium isotopes Ra-226 and Ra-228 were analyzed in surface water at six points, during eighteen months, from June 2006 to December 2007, in the neighborhood of a mine of phosphate associated with uranium in the region of Santa Quiteria, state of Ceara, Brazil. The soluble fraction (which passes through filter of 0.45 micron) and the particulate fraction (which is retained on the 0.45 micron filter) were analyzed using the Principal Component Analysis, PCA, a method for ranking environmental data, and were analyzed also by F test for testing the difference between radionuclides and the difference between the two analyzed fractions. The PCA has identified four groups of samples. Results of Ra-226 in soluble fraction are grouped in the negative part of axis 1 (Factor 1) and axis 2 (Factor 2). Results of Ra-228 in particulate fraction are grouped in the positive part of axis 1 (Factor 1) and in the negative part of axis 2. Results of Ra-226 in soluble fraction are grouped along the positive part of axis 1 (Factor 1). Finally, results of Ra-228 in the particulate fraction are grouped in the positive part of axis 1 (Factor 1) and axis 2 (Factor 2). This last group has two discrepant points (01 and 06). There is no statistical difference between the two analyzed fractions but there are statistical differences between analyzed radionuclides. Therefore, three conclusions can be identified: The use of PCA with radionuclides and analyzed fractions as parameters permits the grouping of collecting data by their environmental similarities; the mean concentration of Ra-226 was statistically higher than that of Ra-228; and there is no statistical difference between soluble and particulate fractions. (author)

  4. EFFECT OF INDUSTRIAL POLLUTION ON THE SPATIAL VARIATION OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Mir Sujaul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface water quality deterioration is the impact of anthropogenic activities at the study areas due to rapid industrialization. The study was done to know the spatial variation of the water quality of the Tunggak River and surrounding area because of industrial activities. In-situ parameters and ex-situ data of chemical, bio-chemical parameters and heavy metals were collected monthly to fulfill the objectives. The samples were collected from 10 selected stations and analyses were carried out using standard methods. Heavy metals were determined by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. SPSS statistical software was used for data analysis. The results of the study revealed that industrial effluents were the major source of pollutants and caused of spatial variation among the stations. Less amount of Dissolved Oxygen (DO and higher concentration of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD, ammoniacal-nitrogen and heavy metals made the water un-usable except irrigation. Analyzed surface water was classified based on Department of Environment-Water Quality Index (DOE-WQI Malaysia and found that the maximum stations except lower and uppermost were in class IV (highly polluted. Pollution rate was higher in the middle stations due to large number of industries were located in the middle and they discharged all their effluents in the river stream. Due to tidal interference in the lower stream and minimum industry in the upper stream pollution was less in those stations.

  5. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Nitrate reducing activity (NRA) is known to be mediated by microaerophilic to anaerobic bacteria and generally occurs in the sub-surface waters. However, we hypothesize that NRA could become prominent in the surface waters during upwelling. Hence...

  6. Mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainak Dutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 2DE and 2D-DIGE based proteomics analysis of serum from women with endometriosis revealed several proteins to be dysregulated. A complete list of these proteins along with their mass spectrometry data and subsequent bioinformatics analysis are presented here. The data is related to “Investigation of serum proteome alterations in human endometriosis” by Dutta et al. [1].

  7. Online open neuroimaging mass meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Kempton, Matthew J.; Williams, Steven C. R.

    We describe a system for meta-analysis where a wiki stores numerical data in a simple format and a web service performs the numerical computation. We initially apply the system on multiple meta-analyses of structural neuroimaging data results. The described system allows for mass meta-analysis, e...

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  9. The analysis of comet mass spectrometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balm, S. P.; Hare, J. P.; Kroto, H. W.

    1991-04-01

    The mass spectra from the Giotto PICCA experiment have been studied using computer simulations based on tabulated mass spectrometric data. It is shown that random mixtures of organic compounds give rise to mass spectra with peaks at about 45, 60, 75, and 90 amu; i.e., separated by about 15 amu. In particular it is shown that the products of Urey-Miller type experiments give mass spectra which can match the observed Giotto data closely. The analysis indicates that the material consists mainly of C/H/O/N (i.e., it is organic), but that the assignment to any well defined organic material is less certain. It is not clear that mass spectrometric studies of complex mixtures have the prospect of yielding this type of information without some form of preseparation.

  10. Convergent surface water distributions in U.S. cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.K. Steele; J.B. Heffernan; N. Bettez; J. Cavender-Bares; P.M. Groffman; J.M. Grove; S. Hall; S.E. Hobbie; K. Larson; J.L. Morse; C. Neill; K.C. Nelson; J. O' Neil-Dunne; L. Ogden; D.E. Pataki; C. Polsky; R. Roy Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Earth's surface is rapidly urbanizing, resulting in dramatic changes in the abundance, distribution and character of surface water features in urban landscapes. However, the scope and consequences of surface water redistribution at broad spatial scales are not well understood. We hypothesized that urbanization would lead to convergent surface water abundance and...

  11. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    OpenAIRE

    W.Wilopo; R.Resili; D.P.E. Putra

    2013-01-01

    There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our dat...

  12. Highly multiparametric analysis by mass cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry; Baranov, Vladimir; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A; Tanner, Scott

    2010-09-30

    This review paper describes a new technology, mass cytometry, that addresses applications typically run by flow cytometer analyzers, but extends the capability to highly multiparametric analysis. The detection technology is based on atomic mass spectrometry. It offers quantitation, specificity and dynamic range of mass spectrometry in a format that is familiar to flow cytometry practitioners. The mass cytometer does not require compensation, allowing the application of statistical techniques; this has been impossible given the constraints of fluorescence noise with traditional cytometry instruments. Instead of "colors" the mass cytometer "reads" the stable isotope tags attached to antibodies using metal-chelating labeling reagents. Because there are many available stable isotopes, and the mass spectrometer provides exquisite resolution between detection channels, many parameters can be measured as easily as one. For example, in a single tube the technique allows for the ready detection and characterization of the major cell subsets in blood or bone marrow. Here we describe mass cytometric immunophenotyping of human leukemia cell lines and leukemia patient samples, differential cell analysis of normal peripheral and umbilical cord blood; intracellular protein identification and metal-encoded bead arrays.

  13. Agricultural insecticides threaten surface waters at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, Sebastian; Schulz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Compared with nutrient levels and habitat degradation, the importance of agricultural pesticides in surface water may have been underestimated due to a lack of comprehensive quantitative analysis. Increasing pesticide contamination results in decreasing regional aquatic biodiversity, i.e., macroinvertebrate family richness is reduced by ∼30% at pesticide concentrations equaling the legally accepted regulatory threshold levels (RTLs). This study provides a comprehensive metaanalysis of 838 peer-reviewed studies (>2,500 sites in 73 countries) that evaluates, for the first time to our knowledge on a global scale, the exposure of surface waters to particularly toxic agricultural insecticides. We tested whether measured insecticide concentrations (MICs; i.e., quantified insecticide concentrations) exceed their RTLs and how risks depend on insecticide development over time and stringency of environmental regulation. Our analysis reveals that MICs occur rarely (i.e., an estimated 97.4% of analyses conducted found no MICs) and there is a complete lack of scientific monitoring data for ∼90% of global cropland. Most importantly, of the 11,300 MICs, 52.4% (5,915 cases; 68.5% of the sites) exceeded the RTL for either surface water (RTLSW) or sediments. Thus, the biological integrity of global water resources is at a substantial risk. RTLSW exceedances depend on the catchment size, sampling regime, and sampling date; are significantly higher for newer-generation insecticides (i.e., pyrethroids); and are high even in countries with stringent environmental regulations. These results suggest the need for worldwide improvements to current pesticide regulations and agricultural pesticide application practices and for intensified research efforts on the presence and effects of pesticides under real-world conditions. PMID:25870271

  14. Identification of ionic chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater by HPLC/MS using negative ion spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I.; Thurman, E.M.; Barcelo, D.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was combined with high-performance liquid chromatography/high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESP/MS) for the trace analysis of oxanilic and sulfonic acids of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The isolation procedure separated the chloroacetanilide metabolites from the parent herbicides during the elution from C18 cartridges using ethyl acetate for parent compounds, followed by methanol for the anionic metabolites. The metabolites were separated chromatographically using reversed-phase HPLC and analyzed by negative-ion MS using electrospray ionization in selected ion mode. Quantitation limits were 0.01 ??g/L for both the oxanilic and sulfonic acids based on a 100-mL water sample. This combination of methods represents an important advance in environmental analysis of chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater for two reasons. First, anionic chloroacetanilide metabolites are a major class of degradation products that are readily leached to groundwater in agricultural areas. Second, anionic metabolites, which are not able to be analyzed by conventional methods such as liquid extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, are effectively analyzed by SPE and high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry. This paper reports the first HPLC/MS identification of these metabolites in surface water and groundwater.

  15. Occurrence of selected estrogenic compounds and estrogenic activity in surface water and sediment of Langat River (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Lui, Tang Seok; Hamin, Nur'Aqilah; Razak, Siti Quistina Noorain Abdul; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2016-07-01

    The occurrence and estrogenic activities of steroid estrogens, such as the natural estrone (E1), 17β estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3), as well as the synthetic 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), were investigated in eight sampling points along the Langat River (Malaysia). Surface water samples were collected at 0.5 m and surface sediment 0-5 cm from the river surface. Instrument analysis of steroid estrogens was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS with an ultra-performance liquid chromatograph (Perkin Elmer FX15) coupled to a Q Trap function mass spectrophotometer (model 3200: AB Sciex). Steroid estrogen concentrations were higher in the Langat River sediments than those in its surface water. In surface water, E1 was not detected in any sampling point, E2 was only detected in two midstream sampling points (range 0-0.004 ng/L), E3 in three sampling points (range 0-0.002 ng/L), and EE2 in four sampling points (range 0-0.02 ng/L). E1 and E2 were detected in sediments from all sampling points, E3 in five sampling points, while EE2 only in one midstream sample (3.29E-4 ng/g). Sewage treatment plants, farming waste, and agricultural activities particularly present midstream and downstream were identified as potential sources of estrogens. Estrogenic activity expressed as estradiol equivalents (EEQs) was below 1 ng/L in all samples for both surface water and sediment, indicating therefore a low potential estrogenic risk to the aquatic environment. Although the health risks are still uncertain for drinking water consumers exposed to low levels of steroid estrogen concentrations, Langat River water is unacceptable for direct drinking purposes without treatment. Further studies of endocrine disruptors in Malaysian waters are highly recommended.

  16. Mass meta-analysis in Talairach space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2004-01-01

    We provide a method for mass meta-analysis in a neuroinformatics database containing stereotaxic Talairach coordinates from neuroimaging experiments. Database labels are used to group the individual experiments, e.g., according to cognitive function, and the consistent pattern of the experiments...... of experiments, and the distances to the null hypotheses are used to sort the voxels across groups of experiments. This allows for mass meta-analysis, with the construction of a list with the most prominent associations between brain areas and group labels. Furthermore, the method can be used for functional...

  17. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa C Van Dijk

    Full Text Available Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001 between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051. However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l(-1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l(-1 (MTR seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified.

  18. Artificial Ground Water Recharge with Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heviánková, Silvie; Marschalko, Marian; Chromíková, Jitka; Kyncl, Miroslav; Korabík, Michal

    2016-10-01

    With regard to the adverse manifestations of the recent climatic conditions, Europe as well as the world have been facing the problem of dry periods that reduce the possibility of drawing drinking water from the underground sources. The paper aims to describe artificial ground water recharge (infiltration) that may be used to restock underground sources with surface water from natural streams. Among many conditions, it aims to specify the boundary and operational conditions of the individual aspects of the artificial ground water recharge technology. The principle of artificial infiltration lies in the design of a technical system, by means of which it is possible to conduct surplus water from one place (in this case a natural stream) into another place (an infiltration basin in this case). This way, the water begins to infiltrate into the underground resources of drinking water, while the mixed water composition corresponds to the water parameters required for drinking water.

  19. Subunit mass analysis for monitoring antibody oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska, Izabela; Mo, Jingjie; Dong, Jia; Lewis, Michael J; Hu, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Methionine oxidation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM) of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Oxidation can reduce the in-vivo half-life, efficacy and stability of the product. Peptide mapping is commonly used to monitor the levels of oxidation, but this is a relatively time-consuming method. A high-throughput, automated subunit mass analysis method was developed to monitor antibody methionine oxidation. In this method, samples were treated with IdeS, EndoS and dithiothreitol to generate three individual IgG subunits (light chain, Fd' and single chain Fc). These subunits were analyzed by reversed phase-ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with an online quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the levels of oxidation on each subunit were quantitated based on the deconvoluted mass spectra using the UNIFI software. The oxidation results obtained by subunit mass analysis correlated well with the results obtained by peptide mapping. Method qualification demonstrated that this subunit method had excellent repeatability and intermediate precision. In addition, UNIFI software used in this application allows automated data acquisition and processing, which makes this method suitable for high-throughput process monitoring and product characterization. Finally, subunit mass analysis revealed the different patterns of Fc methionine oxidation induced by chemical and photo stress, which makes it attractive for investigating the root cause of oxidation.

  20. Linker-assisted immunoassay and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the analysis of glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.A.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Bhullar, B.S.; Thurman, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, sensitive, linker-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (L'ELISA) was compared to on-line solidphase extraction (SPE) with high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) for the analysis of glyphosate in surface water and groundwater samples. The L'ELISA used succinic anhydride to derivatize glyphosate, which mimics the epitotic attachment of glyphosate to horseradish peroxidase hapten. Thus, L'ELISA recognized the derivatized glyphosate more effectively (detection limit of 0.1 ??g/L) and with increased sensitivity (10-100 times) over conventional ELISA and showed the potential for other applications. The precision and accuracy of L'ELISA then was compared with on-line SPE/HPLC/MS, which detected glyphosate and its degradate derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate using negative-ion electrospray (detection limit 0.1 ??g/L, relative standard deviation ??15%). Derivatization efficiency and matrix effects were minimized by adding an isotope-labeled glyphosate (2-13C15N). The accuracy of L'ELISA gave a false positive rate of 18% between 0.1 and 1.0 ??g/L and a false positive rate of only 1% above 1.0 ??g/L. The relative standard deviation was ??20%. The correlation of L'ELISA and HPLC/MS for 66 surface water and groundwater samples was 0.97 with a slope of 1.28, with many detections of glyphosate and its degradate in surface water but not in groundwater.

  1. Proteome analysis of adenovirus using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Sara Bergström; Artemenko, Konstantin A; Pettersson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of proteins and their posttranslational modifications is important for understanding different biological events. For analysis of viral proteomes, an optimal protocol includes production of a highly purified virus that can be investigated with a high-resolving analytical method. In this Methods in Molecular Biology paper we describe a working strategy for how structural proteins in the Adenovirus particle can be studied using liquid chromatography-high-resolving mass spectrometry. This method provides information on the chemical composition of the virus particle. Further, knowledge about amino acids carrying modifications that could be essential for any part of the virus life cycle is collected. We describe in detail alternatives available for preparation of virus for proteome analysis as well as choice of mass spectrometric instrumentation suitable for this kind of analysis.

  2. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  3. Estimation of surface water quality in a Yazoo River tributary using the duration curve and recurrence interval approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Ouyang; Prem B. Parajuli; Daniel A. Marion

    2013-01-01

    Pollution of surface water with harmful chemicals and eutrophication of rivers and lakes with excess nutrients are serious environmental concerns. This study estimated surface water quality in a stream within the Yazoo River Basin (YRB), Mississippi, USA, using the duration curve and recurrence interval analysis techniques. Data from the US Geological Survey (USGS)...

  4. U.S. Geological Survey quality-assurance plan for surface-water activities in Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Colin C.; Loving, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    This Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

  5. Seleção dos indicadores da qualidade das águas superficiais pelo emprego da análise multivariada Surface water quality indicators in low Acaraú basin, Ceará, Brazil, using multivariable analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice M. de Andrade

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Os fatores antrópicos e naturais que determinam a qualidade das águas superficiais na Bacia do Baixo Acaraú foram identificados pelo emprego da técnica de Análise Fatorial/Análise da Componente Principal (AF/ACP. Foram realizadas quatro campanhas no período de fev./2003 a mar./2004, em sete pontos de amostragem localizados ao longo do Rio Acaraú. Foram analisados 25 parâmetros físico-químicos e bacteriológicos. Pelo emprego da AF/ACP, identificou-se que o modelo de melhor ajuste para expressar a qualidade das águas na Bacia do Baixo Acaraú foi aquele composto por quatro fatores, explicando 82,1% da variância total. O primeiro fator representa a componente de sólidos em suspensão, expressando o processo de erosão e escoamento superficial. O segundo fator é definido por uma componente de nutrientes associados aos esgotos sanitários, às áreas agrícolas e a outras fontes de poluição difusa; o terceiro fator é indicativo da ação antrópica (componente orgânica, enquanto o quarto representa os sais solúveis que expressam o processo natural do intemperismo das rochas. Outro ponto observado é que a análise fatorial não resultou em grande redução no número de variáveis, uma vez que o melhor ajuste do modelo ocorreu com a inclusão de 18 das 25 variáveis analisadas.Multivariate statistical technique, factor analysis/principal component analysis (FA/PCA, was applied to identify the human activity effects and natural processes on surface water quality in Low Acaraú basin, Ceará, Brazil. Water samples were collected in four different campaigns from Feb/2003 to Mar/2004, at seven sampling stations sited in low Acaraú watershed. Twenty-five physical, chemical and bacteriological parameters were examined in this study. The FA/PCA allowed the identification of the total variance. The best model was adjusted with four components, explaining 82.1% of the data variance. The first factor was mainly associated with suspended

  6. Assessment of groundwater–surface water interaction using long-term hydrochemical data and isotope hydrology: Headwaters of the Condamine River, Southeast Queensland, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jorge L., E-mail: jlmarti@ig.com.br [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Raiber, Matthias [CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, Brisbane (Australia); Cox, Malcolm E. [Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    A spatial analysis of hydrochemical data of groundwater and surface water was undertaken to identify groundwater-surface water connectivity in the headwaters of the Condamine River catchment, Southeast Queensland, Australia. An assessment of long-term hydrochemical and water level data supplemented by stable- and radioisotope measurements following a prolonged dry period dominated by baseflow, helped in determining patterns of interaction in different tributaries of the upper Condamine catchment. A conceptual hydrological model representing the major hydrochemical processes and their implications for stream-aquifer connectivity was developed and tested using multiple lines of evidence. The results of a multivariate statistical analysis highlight that there are two main regions with distinct hydrochemical facies (salinity, alkalinity, and predominant ions) in surface water. Geomorphology, geology, anthropogenic and climate influence were identified as the most relevant controlling factors of the spatial variability in water quality. Stable isotope data confirmed a clear evaporation trend in almost all surface water samples during baseflow conditions. Two water types can be identified and separated by the degree of evaporation and the proximity of one group to the local meteoric water line. The results confirm the discharge of groundwater from aquifers recharged by rainfall and located upstream of the surface water sampling sites. Overall, {sup 222}Rn data show a trend of increased activity in surface water towards the upstream portions of these tributaries, validating the use of this tracer to estimate groundwater input to the local creeks. The proportion of groundwater contribution to stream flow calculated by {sup 222}Rn and chloride mass balance is in agreement, and ranges between 20–70% in tributaries in the northern areas, and between 8–50% in the upper reaches of the main river channel. This study shows the efficacy of an integrated approach combining long

  7. Operational Surface Water Detection and Monitoring Using Radarsat 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bolanos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional on-site methods for mapping and monitoring surface water extent are prohibitively expensive at a national scale within Canada. Despite successful cost-sharing programs between the provinces and the federal government, an extensive number of water features within the country remain unmonitored. Particularly difficult to monitor are the potholes in the Canadian Prairie region, most of which are ephemeral in nature and represent a discontinuous flow that influences water pathways, runoff response, flooding and local weather. Radarsat-2 and the Radarsat Constellation Mission (RCM offer unique capabilities to map the extent of water bodies at a national scale, including unmonitored sites, and leverage the current infrastructure of the Meteorological Service of Canada to monitor water information in remote regions. An analysis of the technical requirements of the Radarsat-2 beam mode, polarization and resolution is presented. A threshold-based procedure to map locations of non-vegetated water bodies after the ice break-up is used and complemented with a texture-based indicator to capture the most homogeneous water areas and automatically delineate their extents. Some strategies to cope with the radiometric artifacts of noise inherent to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images are also discussed. Our results show that Radarsat-2 Fine mode can capture 88% of the total water area in a fully automated way. This will greatly improve current operational procedures for surface water monitoring information and impact a number of applications including weather forecasting, hydrological modeling, and drought/flood predictions.

  8. Analysis Economics of Realizing Mass Customization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiuhe; XIA Yan; FANG Shufen

    2006-01-01

    This paper breaks through the old study pattern, emphasizing the important of economic analysis and put forward the analytic method. The paper compares mass customization to just-in-time, analyses the two facets which include production and distribution. The production facet is influence of the indirect cost, scale economy, experiences economy and dynamic alliance. The reduction of indirect cost is the innovation, which has special angle comparatively traditional economic analysis. There is gaming between satisfying customer special demand and deciding price. Mass customization emphasizes that customer must achieve to loyalty not only content without increasing extra service charge-faith in company and product. The paper sets forth the economics of scale economy and dynamic alliance to embody the extensive economy. In addition it is another innovation that this paper analyses the defects of mass customization to evaluate the economic risk. Through comparing the traditional production mode, demonstrating the implement feasibility in company. That is mass customization has less economic risk whether or not. So the analysis proposes the evidences of the way of enterprise production.

  9. Sensors and OBIA synergy for operational monitoring of surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Eric; Thenard, Lucas

    2010-05-01

    This contribution will focus on combining Object Based Image Analysis (i.e. OBIA with e-Cognition 8) and recent sensors (i.e. Spot 5 XS, Pan and ALOS Prism, Avnir2, Palsar) to address the technical feasibility for an operational monitoring of surface water. Three cases of river meandering (India), flood mapping (Nepal) and dam's seasonal water level monitoring (Morocco) using recent sensors will present various application of surface water monitoring. The operational aspect will be demonstrated either by sensor properties (i.e. spatial resolution and bandwidth), data acquisition properties (i.e. multi sensor, return period and near real-time acquisition) but also with OBIA algorithms (i.e. fusion of multi sensors / multi resolution data and batch processes). In the first case of river meandering (India) we will address multi sensor and multi date satellite acquisition to monitor the river bed mobility within a floodplain using an ALOS dataset. It will demonstrate the possibility of an operational monitoring system that helps the geomorphologist in the analysis of fluvial dynamic and sediment budget for high energy rivers. In the second case of flood mapping (Nepal) we will address near real time Palsar data acquisition at high spatial resolution to monitor and to map a flood extension. This ALOS sensor takes benefit both from SAR and L band properties (i.e. atmospheric transparency, day/night acquisition, low sensibility to surface wind). It's a real achievement compared to optical imagery or even other high resolution SAR properties (i.e. acquisition swath, bandwidth and data price). These advantages meet the operational needs set by crisis management of hydrological disasters but also for the implementation of flood risk management plans. The last case of dam surface water monitoring (Morocco) will address an important issue of water resource management in countries affected by water scarcity. In such countries water users have to cope with over exploitation

  10. Petroleum pollutant degradation by surface water microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Malisa P; Jovancićević, Branimir S; Ilić, Mila; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2006-09-01

    It is well known that the composition of petroleum or some of its processing products changes in the environment mostly under the influence of microorganisms. A series of experiments was conducted in order to define the optimum conditions for an efficient biodegradation of petroleum pollutant, or bioremediation of different segments of the environment. The aim of these investigations was to show to what extent the hydrocarbons of a petroleum pollutant are degraded by microbial cultures which were isolated as dominant microorganisms from a surface water of a wastewater canal of an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant. Biodegradation experiments were conducted on one paraffinic, and one naphthenic type of petroleum during a three month period under aerobic conditions, varying the following parameters: Inorganic (Kp) or an organic medium (Bh) with or without exposition to light. Microorganisms were analyzed in a surface water sample from a canal (Pancevo, Serbia), into which wastewater from an oil refinery and a nitrogen plant is released. The consortia of microorganisms were isolated from the water sample (most abundant species: Phormidium foveolarum--filamentous Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae and Achanthes minutissima, diatoms, algae). The simulation experiments of biodegradation were conducted with the biomass suspension and crude oils Sirakovo (Sir, paraffinic type) and Velebit (Ve, naphthenic type). After a three month period, organic substance was extracted by means of chloroform. In the extracts, the content of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and fatty acids was determined (the group composition). n-Alkanes and isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes, pristane and phytane, in the aliphatic fractions, were analyzed using gas chromatography (GC). Total isoprenoid aliphatic alkanes and polycyclic alkanes of sterane and triterpane types were analyzed by GC-MS. Paraffinic type petroleums have a significant loss of saturated hydrocarbons. For naphthenic

  11. [Distribution of perfluorinated compounds in surface water of Shenzhen reservoir groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Xuan; Zhang, Hong; He, Long; Shen, Jin-Can; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yan-Ping

    2014-06-01

    In order to study the concentrations of 14 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in 25 surface water samples collected from 12 Shenzhen reservoirs in November of 2012 and January of 2013, high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was combined with solid phase extraction enrichment in this research. The results indicated that perfluorohexane sulfonate and long-chain (C > or = 11) PFCs were below the detection limit in all samples and perfluorooctane acid was the primary species. No significant difference in concentration was found between samples from the center of the reservoir and the outlet. Heavy precipitations diluted PFCs concentrations in surface water, but also led to PFOA input. PFCs concentrations in surface water of the reservoir were mainly affected by water inlet, source environment and geography. Although the water temperature had positive correlations with sigma PFCs concentration, the influence of heavy precipitations was stronger than that of water temperature.

  12. Presence of pesticides in surface water from four sub-basins in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Aparicio, Virginia C; Bárbaro, Sebastián; Portocarrero, Rocío; Jaime, Sebastián; Costa, José L

    2014-07-01

    Argentina has 31 million hectares given over to agriculture comprising 2.2% of the world's total area under cultivation (Stock Exchange of Rosario, Argentina). Despite the intensity of this agricultural activity, data on pesticide pollution in surface water are rather scarce. In this sense, the aim of this work is to determine the presence of pesticides in surface water of four agricultural sub-basins of Argentine. An environmental monitoring was carried out to determine the impact of twenty-nine pesticides used in agricultural activities on the surface water quality of agricultural areas within the San Vicente, Azul, Buenos Aires southeast and Mista stream sub-basins. The samples were analyzed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using OASIS HLB 60 mg cartridges and ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MSMS) that provided good analytical quality parameters. The southeast of Buenos Aires was the site with the highest frequency of pesticides detection, followed by Azul and San Vicente microbasins. The most detected pesticides, considering all surface water samples, were atrazine, tebuconazole and diethyltoluamide with maximum concentration levels of 1.4, 0.035, and 0.701 μg L(-1), respectively. The results obtained for all basins studied show the presence of residual pesticides in surface waters according the different agricultural activities developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Histone Proteoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Arnaudo, Anna M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-06-01

    Histones play important roles in chromatin, in the forms of various posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and sequence variants, which are called histone proteoforms. Investigating modifications and variants is an ongoing challenge. Previous methods are based on antibodies, and because they usually detect only one modification at a time, they are not suitable for studying the various combinations of modifications on histones. Fortunately, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a high-throughput technology for histone analysis and does not require prior knowledge about any modifications. From the data generated by mass spectrometers, both identification and quantification of modifications, as well as variants, can be obtained easily. On the basis of this information, the functions of histones in various cellular contexts can be revealed. Therefore, MS continues to play an important role in the study of histone proteoforms. In this review, we discuss the analysis strategies of MS, their applications on histones, and some key remaining challenges.

  15. Isotope ratio analysis by Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, J. M.; Chimiak, L. M.; Dallas, B.; Griep-Raming, J.; Juchelka, D.; Makarov, A.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2016-12-01

    Several technologies are being developed to examine the intramolecular isotopic structures of molecules (i.e., site-specific and multiple substitution), but various limitations in sample size and type or (for IRMS) resolution have so far prevented the creation of a truly general technique. We will discuss the initial findings of a technique based on Fourier transform mass spectrometry, using the Thermo Scientific Q Exactive GC — an instrument that contains an Orbitrap mass analyzer. Fourier transform mass spectrometry is marked by exceptionally high mass resolutions (the Orbitrap reaches M/∆M in the range 250,000-1M in the mass range of greatest interest, 50-200 amu). This allows for resolution of a large range of nearly isobaric interferences for isotopologues of volatile and semi-volatile compounds (i.e., involving isotopes of H, C, N, O and S). It also provides potential to solve very challenging mass resolution problems for isotopic analysis of other, heavier elements. Both internal and external experimental reproducibilities of isotope ratio analyses using the Orbitrap typically conform to shot-noise limits down to levels of 0.2 ‰ (1SE), and routinely in the range 0.5-1.0 ‰, with similar accuracy when standardized to concurrently run reference materials. Such measurements can be made without modifications to the ion optics of the Q Exactive GC, but do require specially designed sample introduction devices to permit sample/standard comparison and long integration times. The sensitivity of the Q Exactive GC permits analysis of sub-nanomolar samples and quantification of multiply-substituted species. The site-specific capability of this instrument arises from the fact that mass spectra of molecular analytes commonly contain diverse fragment ion species, each of which samples a specific sub-set of molecular sites. We will present applications of this technique to the biological and abiological chemistry of amino acids, forensic identification of

  16. Chemical characterization and dynamics of particulate combined amino acids in Pacific surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Ayumi; Tanoue, Eiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Particulate organic matter (POM) in surface water plays an essential role in maintaining marine ecosystem and is a complex mixture of living POM (organisms) and non-living POM (detritus). Transformation of organic constituents of organisms to detritus may be the most active part in the decomposition processes of organic matter in marine biogeochemistry. Distribution and chemical fractionation of particulate combined amino acids (PCAAs) in surface waters from Southern Ocean to tropical waters along a transect of 170°W were examined to clarify the transfer processes of organic constituents of organisms to detritus. The observational facts may be summarized as follows. 1) Degradation Index (DI) based on principal component analysis of amino acid composition of bulk PCAAs agreed with the traditional degradation indicators of bulk POM, i.e., PCAAs-carbon (C)/particulate organic carbon (POC), PCAAs-nitrogen (N)/particulate nitrogen (PN) and C/N. 2) PCAAs were distinguished into 3 fractions, i.e., Urea-soluble, Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-soluble and SDS/Urea-insoluble fractions, by means of solubility against reagents frequently used for protein extraction from biological samples. Proportions of PCAAs of the 3 fractions to bulk PCAAs were almost constant, although concentrations of the PCAAs of 3 fractions as well as bulk in seawater varied two orders of magnitude over the transect. 3) There was no significant difference among DI values of the 3 fractions, although molecular mass distributions of the Urea-soluble and SDS-soluble fractions determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were different. The results indicated that no one fraction was particularly susceptible to degradation and that there is a common mechanism for transferring and maintaining the similar chemical quality of bulk POM over the transect.

  17. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  18. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  19. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  20. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  1. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  2. Distribution of {sup 129}I in terrestrial surface water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xuegao [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Meng [College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Yi, Peng, E-mail: pengyi1915@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Aldahan, Ala [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Geology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Yu, Zhongbo [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China); Possnert, Göran [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Li [State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); College of Hydrology and Water Resources, Hohai University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-15

    The global distribution of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 in surface waters (lakes and rivers) is presented here and compared with the atmospheric deposition and distribution in surface marine waters. The results indicate relatively high concentrations in surface water systems in close vicinity of the anthropogenic release sources as well as in parts of Western Europe, North America and Central Asia. {sup 129}I level is generally higher in the terrestrial surface water of the Northern hemisphere compared to the southern hemisphere. The highest values of {sup 129}I appear around 50°N and 40°S in the northern and southern hemisphere, separately. Direct gaseous and marine atmospheric emissions are the most likely avenues for the transport of {sup 129}I from the sources to the terrestrial surface waters. To apply iodine-129 as process tracer in terrestrial surface water environment, more data are needed on {sup 129}I distribution patterns both locally and globally.

  3. A surface water flooding impact library for flood risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldridge Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for improved risk-based Surface Water Flooding (SWF warning systems is evident in EU directives and in the UK Government’s Pitt Review of the 2007 summer floods. This paper presents a novel approach for collating receptor and vulnerability datasets via the concept of an Impact Library, developed by the Health and Safety Laboratory as a depository of pre-calculated impact information on SWF risk for use in a real-time SWF Hazard Impact Model (HIM. This has potential benefits for the Flood Forecasting Centre (FFC as the organisation responsible for the issuing of flood guidance information for England and Wales. The SWF HIM takes a pixel-based approach to link probabilistic surface water runoff forecasts produced by CEH’s Grid-to-Grid hydrological model with Impact Library information to generate impact assessments. These are combined to estimate flood risk as a combination of impact severity and forecast likelihood, at 1km pixel level, and summarised for counties and local authorities. The SWF HIM takes advantage of recent advances in operational ensemble forecasting of rainfall by the Met Office and of SWF by the Environment Agency and CEH working together through the FFC. Results are presented for a case study event which affected the North East of England during 2012. The work has been developed through the UK’s Natural Hazards Partnership (NHP, a group of organisations gathered to provide information, research and analysis on natural hazards for civil contingencies, government and responders across the UK.

  4. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  5. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment.

  6. Effect of traditional gold mining to surface water quality in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Wilopo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many locations for traditional gold mining in Indonesia. One of these is in Murung Raya District, Central Kalimantan Province. Mining activities involving the application of traditional gold processing technology have a high potential to pollute the environment, especially surface water. Therefore, this study aims to determine the impact of gold mining and processing on surface water quality around the mine site. Based on the results of field surveys and laboratory analysis, our data shows that the concentration of mercury (Hg and Cyanide (CN has reached 0.3 mg/L and 1.9 mg/L, respectively, in surface water. These values exceed the drinking water quality standards of Indonesia and WHO. Many people who live in the mining area use surface water for daily purposes including drinking, cooking, bathing and washing. This scenario is very dangerous because the effect of surface water contamination on human health cannot be immediately recognized or diagnosed. In our opinion the dissemination of knowledge regarding the treatment of gold mining wastewater is urgently required so that the quality of wastewater can be improved before it is discharged into the environment

  7. Contribution to surface water contamination understanding by pesticides and pharmaceuticals, at a watershed scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Stéphanie; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2012-12-04

    This study aims at understanding the presence of regulated and emerging micropollutants, particularly pesticides and pharmaceuticals, in surface water, regarding spatial and temporal influences at a watershed scale. The study of relations between micropollutants and other water quality and hydroclimatic parameters was carried out from a statistical analysis on historical and experimental data of different sampling sites from the main watershed of Brittany, western France. The outcomes point out the influence of urban and rural areas of the watershed as well as the impact of seasons on contamination variations. This work contributes to health risk assessment related to surface water contamination by micropollutants. This approach is particularly interesting in the case of agricultural watersheds such as the one studied, where more than 80% of surface water is used to produce drinking water.

  8. Contribution to Surface Water Contamination Understanding by Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals, at a Watershed Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Piel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at understanding the presence of regulated and emerging micropollutants, particularly pesticides and pharmaceuticals, in surface water, regarding spatial and temporal influences at a watershed scale. The study of relations between micropollutants and other water quality and hydroclimatic parameters was carried out from a statistical analysis on historical and experimental data of different sampling sites from the main watershed of Brittany, western France. The outcomes point out the influence of urban and rural areas of the watershed as well as the impact of seasons on contamination variations. This work contributes to health risk assessment related to surface water contamination by micropollutants. This approach is particularly interesting in the case of agricultural watersheds such as the one studied, where more than 80% of surface water is used to produce drinking water.

  9. Field experiment on coalmine heat disaster governance using cold source from surface water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Pingye; Zhu Guolong; Liu Yuqing; Duan Mengmeng; Wu Junyin

    2014-01-01

    Regarding the lack of cold source for underground cooling systems from either mine inflow or return air, field experiments were taken in a high temperature deep coal mine with abundant cold source from surface water. Taking Sanhejian coal mine as an example, this paper introduced the technology scheme of heat disaster governance using surface water cold source. The paper presents the basics of this field experiment at the beginning, following by the design and site layout of the cooling system including the analysis and calculation of cold source. Numerical calculation method is also applied based on the operation parameters to simulate the influence to the surface river ecosystem. The results suggest that the temperature of surface water shall be lower than 34 ?C after heat exchange, and when more cooling capacities are needed in the future, increasing the water flow is more favorable than increasing the cooling range of water, which is better for the ecological environment protection.

  10. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  11. Extraordinarily Warm Northeast Pacific Surface Waters: 2014 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Freeland, H.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of sea surface temperatures (SST) from January 2014 revealed a massive region in the northeast Pacific with extraordinarily warm conditions, exceeding all anomalies over the last several decades. Profile data from both Argo and Line-P surveys supports the Reynolds SSTa analysis and further indicates that the anomaly was, and continues to be, confined to the upper ocean, above approximately 100 m depth. The anomaly has lasted for many months, exceeding 4 standard deviations above the multi-decadal mean, a feature that would not be expected more than once in several millennia. The "blob", as it is dubbed, drifted first off and then towards shore during the spring and fall of 2014 driven by, among other forces, the seasonal up and down-welling winds, respectively that occur along the west coast of North America. By November 2014, when winter down-welling winds became prevalent, the warm surface waters encroached all the way into Barkley Sound along western Vancouver Island, as measured by the continuous temperature measurements on the NEPTUNE ocean observatory of Ocean Networks Canada. The analysis includes some of the known dynamical variations which contributed to the formation of the blob, with an emphasis on mid to high latitude atmosphere-ocean conditions, avoiding the temptation to link the development processes occurring in the Gulf of Alaska in the winter of 2013 to equatorial phenomena.

  12. Determining water sources in the boundary layer from tall tower profiles of water vapor and surface water isotope ratios after a snowstorm in Colorado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Noone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The D/H isotope ratio is used to attribute boundary layer humidity changes to the set of contributing fluxes for a case following a snowstorm in which a snow pack of about 10 cm vanished. Profiles of H2O and CO2 mixing ratio, D/H isotope ratio, and several thermodynamic properties were measured from the surface to 300 m every 15 min during four winter days near Boulder, Colorado. Coeval analysis of the D/H ratios and CO2 concentrations find these two variables to be complementary with the former being sensitive to daytime surface fluxes and the latter particularly indicative of nocturnal surface sources. Together they capture evidence for strong vertical mixing during the day, weaker mixing by turbulent bursts and low level jets within the nocturnal stable boundary layer during the night, and frost formation in the morning. The profiles are generally not well described with a gradient mixing line analysis because D/H ratios of the end members (i.e., surface fluxes and the free troposphere evolve throughout the day which leads to large uncertainties in the estimate of the D/H ratio of surface water flux. A mass balance model is constructed for the snow pack, and constrained with observations to provide an optimal estimate of the partitioning of the surface water flux into contributions from sublimation, evaporation of melt water in the snow and evaporation from ponds. Results show that while vapor measurements are important in constraining surface fluxes, measurements of the source reservoirs (soil water, snow pack and standing liquid offer stronger constraint on the surface water balance. Measurements of surface water are therefore essential in developing observational programs that seek to use isotopic data for flux attribution.

  13. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, J. D.; Culling, J. R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used “sustainable” heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  14. Statistical robustness of machine-learning estimates for characterizing a groundwater-surface water system, Southland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, M. J.; Daughney, C.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a successful surface-groundwater management strategy depends on the quality of data provided for analysis. This study evaluates the statistical robustness when using a modified self-organizing map (MSOM) technique to estimate missing values for three hypersurface models: synoptic groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry, time-series of groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry, and mixed-survey (combination of groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry and lithologies) hydrostratigraphic unit data. These models of increasing complexity are developed and validated based on observations from the Southland region of New Zealand. In each case, the estimation method is sufficiently robust to cope with groundwater-surface water hydrochemistry vagaries due to sample size and extreme data insufficiency, even when >80% of the data are missing. The estimation of surface water hydrochemistry time series values enabled the evaluation of seasonal variation, and the imputation of lithologies facilitated the evaluation of hydrostratigraphic controls on groundwater-surface water interaction. The robust statistical results for groundwater-surface water models of increasing data complexity provide justification to apply the MSOM technique in other regions of New Zealand and abroad.

  15. Analysis of emerging contaminants in water and solid samples using high resolution mass spectrometry with a Q Exactive orbital ion trap and estrogenic activity with YES-assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comtois-Marotte, Simon; Chappuis, Thomas; Vo Duy, Sung; Gilbert, Nicolas; Lajeunesse, André; Taktek, Salma; Desrosiers, Mélanie; Veilleux, Éloïse; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Trace emerging contaminants (ECs) occur in both waste and surface waters that are rich in particulates that have been found to sorb several organic contaminants. An analytical method based on off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was developed for the detection and quantification of 31 ECs from surface water, wastewater, suspended particulate matter (SPM) as well as sediments. Lyophilized sediments and air-dried SPM were subjected to ultrasonic extraction. Water samples and extracts were then concentrated and cleaned-up by off-line SPE. Quantification was realized using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer in both full scan (FS) and MS(2) modes. These two modes were optimized and compared to determine which one was the most suitable for each matrix studied. Yeast estrogen screen assay (YES-assay) adapted from the direct measurement of estrogenic activity without sample extraction was tested on filtered wastewater samples. An endocrine disrupting effect was detected in all effluent samples analyzed with estradiol equivalent concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 720 ng eq E2 L(-1) for the WWTP-1 and 6.5-42 ng eq E2 L(-1) for the WWTP-2. The analytical methods were also applied on six samples of surface water, the corresponding SPM, the sediments and thirty-nine effluent samples from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) sampled over a period of five months (February to June 2014).

  16. Nutrient concentrations in surface water and groundwater, and nitrate source identification using stable isotope analysis, in the Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor watershed, New Jersey, 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieben, Christine M.; Baker, Ronald J.; Nicholson, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Five streams in the Barnegat Bay-Little Egg Harbor (BB-LEH) watershed in southern New Jersey were sampled for nutrient concentrations and stable isotope composition under base-flow and stormflow conditions, and during the growing and nongrowing seasons, to help quantify and identify sources of nutrient loading. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of total nitrogen, ammonia, nitrate plus nitrite, organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate, and for nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios. Concentrations of total nitrogen in the five streams appear to be related to land use, such that streams in subbasins characterized by extensive urban development (and historical agricultural land use)—North Branch Metedeconk and Toms Rivers—exhibited the highest total nitrogen concentrations (0.84–1.36 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in base flow). Base-flow total nitrogen concentrations in these two streams were dominated by nitrate; nitrate concentrations decreased during storm events as a result of dilution by storm runoff. The two streams in subbasins with the least development—Cedar Creek and Westecunk Creek—exhibited the lowest total nitrogen concentrations (0.16–0.26 mg/L in base flow), with organic nitrogen as the dominant species in both base flow and stormflow. A large proportion of these subbasins lies within forested parts of the Pinelands Area, indicating the likelihood of natural inputs of organic nitrogen to the streams that increase during periods of storm runoff. Base-flow total nitrogen concentrations in Mill Creek, in a moderately developed basin, were 0.43 to 0.62 mg/L and were dominated by ammonia, likely associated with leachate from a landfill located upstream. Total phosphorus and orthophosphate were not found at detectable concentrations in most of the surface-water samples, with the exception of samples collected from the North Branch Metedeconk River, where concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 0.09 mg/L for total phosphorus and 0

  17. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) for Water Year 2003 (WY 2003) (October I, 2002 to September 30, 2003) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at...

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2005 (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  19. Rocky Mountain Arsenal surface water management plan : water year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Surface Water Management Plan for Water Year (WY) 2006 (October 1, 2005 to September 30, 2006) is an assessment of the nonpotable water demands at the Rocky...

  20. Treatability of South African surface waters by enhanced coagulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-05

    Jun 5, 2013 ... The majority of South African inland surface water sources are compromised due to a ... minimising residual coagulant, minimising sludge production .... included as being indicative of the worst effects of indirect reuse.

  1. Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) Surface Water Intakes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a point feature dataset showing the locations of surface water intakes. These intake locations are part of the safe drinking water information system...

  2. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w

  3. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  4. 溴化衍生-三重四极杆气质联用法测定地表水中丙烯酰胺%Determination of Acrylamide in Surface Water by Brominating Derivation-Gas Chromatography Coupled with Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕康乐; 宋俊密

    2016-01-01

    Acrylamide in surface water was determined in the form of α,β-dibromo acrylamide by brominating derivatization-liquid/liquid extraction-gas chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.The linearity range was from 20.0 μg/L to 500 μg/L with the correlation coefficient 0.998, and the detection limit was 0.08μg/L.Average spiked recoveries in two levels of 0.300μg/L and 2.00μg/L were 87.5%and 92.2%, respectively.The relative standard deviations of 7 measurement results were 9.1% and 6.1%.The samples from Lanzhou section of the Yellow River and tap water of laboratory were detected, the target was not detected in both samples.%采用溴化衍生-液液萃取法处理地表水,用三重四极杆气相色谱质谱联用仪测定样品中α,β-二溴丙烯酰胺,再换算成丙烯酰胺的质量浓度,该方法在20.0μg/L~500μg/L范围内线性良好,相关系数r为0.998,方法检出限为0.08μg/L。实际水样2个质量浓度水平的平均加标回收率分别为87.5%和92.2%,7次测定结果的RSD分别为9.1%和6.1%。用该方法测定黄河兰州段的黄河水和实验室自来水,结果均未检出。

  5. The research of the contamination levels present in samples of precipitation and surface waters collected from the catchment area Fuglebekken (Hornsund, Svalbard Archipelago)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruman, Marek; Szopińska, Małgorzata; Kozak, Katarzyna; Lehmann, Sara; Polkowska, Żaneta

    2014-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are contaminants that may appear in polar regions. In present work surface water was collected from the main stream water in the Fuglebekken basin. The precipitationsamples was collected from the near area by Polish Polar Station in Hornsund. The present investigationreveals the results of the analysis of these samples for their total phenols, formaldehyde, TOC, PAHs and PCBs content. The presence in the basin (thousands of kilometers distant from industrial centers) of those compounds is testimony to the fact that these compounds are transported over vast distances with air masses and deposited in regions devoid of any human impact.

  6. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility... Water Act, as amended. (b) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a facility shall not cause...

  7. Simulation method for determining biodegradation in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeberl, P.; Guhl, W. [Henkel KGaA, Duesseldorf (Germany). Hauptabteilung Oekologie; Scholz, N. [OXENO GmbH, Marl (Germany); Taeger, K. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    OECD guidelines and EU directives on the biological testing of chemicals contain no methods able to simulate biodegradation in surface waters. The surface water simulation method presented in this paper is suitable for closing this gap. The species in the autochthonous biocoenosis used in the method form part of the food web in natural surface waters. The microbial degradation activity measured by the half-life is comparable with that in surface waters. The degrees of degradation measured in this surface water simulation method can be applied to natural surface waters. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die OECD- und EU-Richtlinien zur biologischen Pruefung von Chemikalien enthalten kein Verfahren, mit dem der biologische Abbau in Fliessgewaessern simuliert werden kann. Das in dieser Arbeit vorgestellte Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell ist geeignet, diese Luecke zu schliessen. Die Arten der autochthonen Biocoenose des Modells sind Glieder im Nahrungsnetz natuerlicher Fliessgewaesser. Die an der Halbwertszeit gemessene mikrobielle Abbauaktivitaet ist mit derjenigen in Fliessgewaessern vergleichbar. Die im Fliessgewaesser-Simulationsmodell gemessenen Abbaugrade sind auf natuerliche Fliessgewaesser uebertragbar. (orig.)

  8. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-03

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data.

  9. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geochemical samples by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Typically, quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is used to determine as many as 57 major, minor, and trace elements in aqueous geochemical samples, including natural surface water and groundwater, acid mine drainage water, and extracts or leachates from geological samples. The sample solution is aspirated into the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) which is an electrodeless discharge of ionized argon gas at a temperature of approximately 6,000 degrees Celsius. The elements in the sample solution are subsequently volatilized, atomized, and ionized by the ICP. The ions generated are then focused and introduced into a quadrupole mass filter which only allows one mass to reach the detector at a given moment in time. As the settings of the mass analyzer change, subsequent masses are allowed to impact the detector. Although the typical quadrupole ICP-MS system is a sequential scanning instrument (determining each mass separately), the scan speed of modern instruments is on the order of several thousand masses per second. Consequently, typical total sample analysis times of 2–3 minutes are readily achievable for up to 57 elements.

  10. Characterizing the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the karst aquifer of Fangshan, Beijing (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haibo; Wei, Jiahua; Wang, Rong; Xin, Baodong

    2016-12-01

    Correct understanding of groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction in karst systems is of greatest importance for managing the water resources. A typical karst region, Fangshan in northern China, was selected as a case study. Groundwater levels and hydrochemistry analyses, together with isotope data based on hydrogeological field investigations, were used to assess the GW-SW interaction. Chemistry data reveal that water type and the concentration of cations in the groundwater are consistent with those of the surface water. Stable isotope ratios of all samples are close to the local meteoric water line, and the 3H concentrations of surface water and groundwater samples are close to that of rainfall, so isotopes also confirm that karst groundwater is recharged by rainfall. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that rainfall leads to a rise in groundwater level with a lag time of 2 months and groundwater exploitation leads to a fall within 1 month. Spectral analysis also reveals that groundwater level, groundwater exploitation and rainfall have significantly similar response periods, indicating their possible inter-relationship. Furthermore, a multiple nonlinear regression model indicates that groundwater level can be negatively correlated with groundwater exploitation, and positively correlated with rainfall. The overall results revealed that groundwater level has a close correlation with groundwater exploitation and rainfall, and they are indicative of a close hydraulic connection and interaction between surface water and groundwater in this karst system.

  11. Characterizing the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the karst aquifer of Fangshan, Beijing (China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Haibo; Wei, Jiahua; Wang, Rong; Xin, Baodong

    2017-03-01

    Correct understanding of groundwater/surface-water (GW-SW) interaction in karst systems is of greatest importance for managing the water resources. A typical karst region, Fangshan in northern China, was selected as a case study. Groundwater levels and hydrochemistry analyses, together with isotope data based on hydrogeological field investigations, were used to assess the GW-SW interaction. Chemistry data reveal that water type and the concentration of cations in the groundwater are consistent with those of the surface water. Stable isotope ratios of all samples are close to the local meteoric water line, and the 3H concentrations of surface water and groundwater samples are close to that of rainfall, so isotopes also confirm that karst groundwater is recharged by rainfall. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that rainfall leads to a rise in groundwater level with a lag time of 2 months and groundwater exploitation leads to a fall within 1 month. Spectral analysis also reveals that groundwater level, groundwater exploitation and rainfall have significantly similar response periods, indicating their possible inter-relationship. Furthermore, a multiple nonlinear regression model indicates that groundwater level can be negatively correlated with groundwater exploitation, and positively correlated with rainfall. The overall results revealed that groundwater level has a close correlation with groundwater exploitation and rainfall, and they are indicative of a close hydraulic connection and interaction between surface water and groundwater in this karst system.

  12. PHREEQC模拟宝坻区地表水回灌雾迷山组地热井探析%Analysis on PHREEQC Simulating Surface Water Reinjection of Jxw Geothermal Wells in Baodi District, Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 夏雨波; 刘东林; 田光辉; 蔡芸; 宗振海

    2015-01-01

    Tianjin contains abundant low-temperature geothermal resources, but geothermal exploitation thermal storage pressure declined continually in recent years. It is imperative to exploring new reinjection methods for im-proving the sustainable utilization of geothermal resources. From the point of the hydrological geochemical as-pects, this paper analyzed the main iron composition changes and trend of scaling after surface water and geother-mal fluid mixing with different proportions. It used the example that Chaobai River reinjects Jxw geothermal well in Baodi District (BD-02 well), and used PHREEQC software to simulate the mixing action of different ion pro-portions. The results show that the main ion concentration is stable and had no effect on the water quality of the original geothermal fluid when the mixture ratio reached 1:1. When the water was mixed with geothermal fluids, carbonate minerals, iron bearing minerals, and the saturation index of asbestos and talc showed a decreasing trend, and there will not be a phenomenon of scaling. Reinjection can be stable for a long time.%天津市蕴藏着丰富的中低温地热资源,但是近年来地热集中开采区内热储压力持续下降,为了提高地热资源的可持续利用强度,对地热回灌方法的研究势在必行.本文从水文地球化学角度入手,分析了不同比例地表水与地热流体混合后流体主要离子组分的变化情况及结垢性,并以潮白河河水回灌宝坻区雾迷山组地热井(BD-02井)为例,采用PHREEQC软件对混合作用进行了不同比例模拟,结果显示混合比例达到1:1时,主要离子组分含量稳定,未对原地热流体水质造成影响.河水与地热流体混合时,碳酸盐矿物、含铁矿物、温石棉和滑石的饱和指数呈现降低趋势,不会出现结垢的现象,回灌能长期稳定进行.

  13. Multiple sources of boron in urban surface waters and groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenmueller, Elizabeth A., E-mail: eahasenm@wustl.edu; Criss, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies attribute abnormal boron (B) levels in streams and groundwaters to wastewater and fertilizer inputs. This study shows that municipal drinking water used for lawn irrigation contributes substantial non-point loads of B and other chemicals (S-species, Li, and Cu) to surface waters and shallow groundwaters in the St. Louis, Missouri, area. Background levels and potential B sources were characterized by analysis of lawn and street runoff, streams, rivers, springs, local rainfall, wastewater influent and effluent, and fertilizers. Urban surface waters and groundwaters are highly enriched in B (to 250 μg/L) compared to background levels found in rain and pristine, carbonate-hosted streams and springs (< 25 μg/L), but have similar concentrations (150 to 259 μg/L) compared to municipal drinking waters derived from the Missouri River. Other data including B/SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}−S and B/Li ratios confirm major contributions from this source. Moreover, sequential samples of runoff collected during storms show that B concentrations decrease with increased discharge, proving that elevated B levels are not primarily derived from combined sewer overflows (CSOs) during flooding. Instead, non-point source B exhibits complex behavior depending on land use. In urban settings B is rapidly mobilized from lawns during “first flush” events, likely representing surficial salt residues from drinking water used to irrigate lawns, and is also associated with the baseflow fraction, likely derived from the shallow groundwater reservoir that over time accumulates B from drinking water that percolates into the subsurface. The opposite occurs in small rural watersheds, where B is leached from soils by recent rainfall and covaries with the event water fraction. Highlights: ► Boron sources and loads differ between urban and rural watersheds. ► Wastewaters are not the major boron source in small St. Louis, MO watersheds. ► Municipal drinking water used for lawn

  14. Surface water quality assessment by environmetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioglu, Hülya; Boyacioglu, Hayal

    2007-08-01

    This environmetric study deals with the interpretation of river water monitoring data from the basin of the Buyuk Menderes River and its tributaries in Turkey. Eleven variables were measured to estimate water quality at 17 sampling sites. Factor analysis was applied to explain the correlations between the observations in terms of underlying factors. Results revealed that, water quality was strongly affected from agricultural uses. Cluster analysis was used to classify stations with similar properties and results distinguished three groups of stations. Water quality at downstream of the river was quite different from the other part. It is recommended to involve the environmetric data treatment as a substantial procedure in assessment of water quality data.

  15. Analysis of seasonal variation of water masses in East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jifeng; Yin, Baoshu; Zhang, Qilong; Yang, Dezhou; Xu, Zhenhua

    2014-07-01

    Seasonal variations of water masses in the East China Sea (ECS) and adjacent areas are investigated, based on historical data of temperature and salinity ( T-S). Dynamic and thermodynamic mechanisms that affect seasonal variations of some dominant water masses are discussed, with reference to meteorological data. In the ECS above depth 600 m, there are eight water masses in summer but only five in winter. Among these, Kuroshio Surface Water (KSW), Kuroshio Intermediate Water (KIW), ECS Surface Water (ECSSW), Continental Coastal Water (CCW), and Yellow Sea Surface Water (YSSW) exist throughout the year. Kuroshio Subsurface Water (KSSW), ECS Deep Water (ECSDW), and Yellow Sea Bottom Water (YSBW) are all seasonal water masses, occurring from May through October. The CCW, ECSSW and KSW all have significant seasonal variations, both in their horizontal and vertical extents and their T-S properties. Wind stress, the Kuroshio and its branch currents, and coastal currents are dynamic factors for seasonal variation in spatial extent of the CCW, KSW, and ECSSW, whereas sea surface heat and freshwater fluxes are thermodynamic factors for seasonal variations of T-S properties and thickness of these water masses. In addition, the CCW is affected by river runoff and ECSSW by the CCW and KSW.

  16. A biogeochemical transport model to simulate the attenuation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminant fluxes across the groundwater-surface water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Binning, Philip John; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons originating from point sources are amongst the most prevalent contaminants of ground water and surface water resources. Riparian zones may play an important role in the attenuation of contaminant concentrations when contaminant plumes flow from groundwater to surface water...... because of the occurrence of redox gradients, strongly reductive conditions and high biological activity. In order to meet the expectations of the EU Water Framework Directive, an evaluation of the impact of such plumes on surface water is needed. The aim of this work is to develop a groundwater transport...... number of geochemical processes, allows the simulation of soil geochemical transformations when microbial by-products are released to surface water, and the consideration of non-linear feedbacks on bacterial growth and pollutant transformations. Sensitivity analysis is performed through Monte Carlo...

  17. Surface-water quality-assurance plan for the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    This Surface-Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center (WAWSC) for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data. This plan serves as a guide to all WAWSC personnel involved in surface-water data activities, and changes as the needs and requirements of the WAWSC change. Regular updates to this plan represent an integral part of the quality-assurance process. In the WAWSC, direct oversight and responsibility by the hydrographer(s) assigned to a surface-water station, combined with team approaches in all work efforts, assure high-quality data, analyses, reviews, and reports for cooperating agencies and the public.

  18. Biological methods used to assess surface water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczerbiñska Natalia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the guidelines of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60 (WFD, both ecological and chemical statuses determine the assessment of surface waters. The profile of ecological status is based on the analysis of various biological components, and physicochemical and hydromorphological indicators complement this assessment. The aim of this article is to present the biological methods used in the assessment of water status with a special focus on bioassay, as well as to provide a review of methods of monitoring water status. Biological test methods include both biomonitoring and bioanalytics. Water biomonitoring is used to assess and forecast the status of water. These studies aim to collect data on water pollution and forecast its impact. Biomonitoring uses organisms which are characterized by particular vulnerability to contaminants. Bioindicator organisms are algae, fungi, bacteria, larval invertebrates, cyanobacteria, macroinvertebrates, and fish. Bioanalytics is based on the receptors of contaminants that can be biologically active substances. In bioanalytics, biosensors such as viruses, bacteria, antibodies, enzymes, and biotests are used to assess degrees of pollution.

  19. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Spectroscopic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, A M; Brough, S; Owers, M S; Bauer, A E; Gunawardhana, M L P; Cluver, M E; Colless, M; Foster, C; Lara-Lopez, M A; Roseboom, I; Sharp, R; Steele, O; Thomas, D; Baldry, I K; Brown, M J I; Liske, J; Norberg, P; Robotham, A S G; Bamford, S; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Drinkwater, M J; Loveday, J; Meyer, M; Peacock, J A; Tuffs, R; Agius, N; Alpaslan, M; Andrae, E; Cameron, E; Cole, S; Ching, J H Y; Christodoulou, L; Conselice, C; Croom, S; Cross, N J G; De Propris, R; Delhaize, J; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ellis, S; Frenk, C S; Graham, A; Grootes, M W; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Hill, D; Hoyle, B; Hudson, M; Jarvis, M; Johansson, J; Jones, D H; van Kampen, E; Kelvin, L; Kuijken, K; Lopez-Sanchez, A; Maddox, S; Madore, B; Maraston, C; McNaught-Roberts, T; Nichol, R C; Oliver, S; Parkinson, H; Penny, S; Phillipps, S; Pimbblet, K A; Ponman, T; Popescu, C C; Prescott, M; Proctor, R; Sadler, E M; Sansom, A E; Seibert, M; Staveley-Smith, L; Sutherland, W; Taylor, E; Van Waerbeke, L; Vazquez-Mata, J A; Warren, S; Wijesinghe, D B; Wild, V; Wilkins, S

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750

  20. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated.

  1. Active and Passive Remote Sensing Data Time Series for Flood Detection and Surface Water Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioresita, Filsa; Puissant, Anne; Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of environmental changes surface waters are undergoing changes in time and space. A better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of surface waters resources becomes essential to support sustainable policies and development activities. Especially because surface waters, are not only a vital sweet water resource, but can also pose hazards to human settlements and infrastructures through flooding. Floods are a highly frequent disaster in the world and can caused huge material losses. Detecting and mapping their spatial distribution is fundamental to ascertain damages and for relief efforts. Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is an effective way to monitor surface waters bodies over large areas since it provides excellent temporal coverage and, all-weather day-and-night imaging capabilities. However, emergent vegetation, trees, wind or flow turbulence can increase radar back-scatter returns and pose problems for the delineation of inundated areas. In such areas, passive remote sensing data can be used to identify vegetated areas and support the interpretation of SAR data. The availability of new Earth Observation products, for example Sentinel-1 (active) and Sentinel-2 (passive) imageries, with both high spatial and temporal resolution, have the potential to facilitate flood detection and monitoring of surface waters changes which are very dynamic in space and time. In this context, the research consists of two parts. In the first part, the objective is to propose generic and reproducible methodologies for the analysis of Sentinel-1 time series data for floods detection and surface waters mapping. The processing chain comprises a series of pre-processing steps and the statistical modeling of the pixel value distribution to produce probabilistic maps for the presence of surface waters. Images pre-processing for all Sentinel-1 images comprise the reduction SAR effect like orbit errors, speckle noise, and geometric effects. A modified

  2. Identification of perfluoroalkyl acid sources in Swiss surface waters with the help of the artificial sweetener acesulfame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.mueller@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gerecke, Andreas C. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Alder, Alfredo C. [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Uberlanstrasse 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbuehler, Konrad [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    Anthropogenic perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), especially the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are ubiquitously found in surface waters around the globe. Emissions from households, industries and also atmospheric transport/deposition are discussed as the possible sources. In this study, these sources are evaluated using Switzerland as the study area. Forty-four surface water locations in different rivers and an Alpine lake were investigated for 14 PFAAs, four precursors and acesulfame, an artificial sweetener used as a population marker. Concentrations of individual PFAAs were generally low, between 0.02 and 10 ng/L. Correlation analysis showed that some PFAAs concentrations correlated well with population and less with catchment area, indicating that emissions from population, i.e., from consumer products, is the most important source to surface waters in Switzerland. The correlation with the population marker acesulfame confirmed this observation but highlighted also a few elevated PFAA levels, some of which could be attributed to industrial emissions. - Highlights: > Consumer products are the most important source of PFAAs in Swiss surface waters. > Acesulfame proofs to be a good population marker in surface waters. > PFAA pattern analyses reveal specific industrial emissions. - The analysis of correlations between surface water concentrations of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and source parameters revealed that consumer products are the most important source for PFCs in Switzerland, whereas industry and atmospheric deposition make a minor contribution.

  3. Surface water pH variations and trends in China from 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yinhuan; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Xia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Pei; Zhu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    With economic development and the increase of energy consumption, surface water acidification has been a potential environmental concern in China. Here, we analyzed variations and trends in surface water pH of 73 sites from ten river basins in China from 2004 to 2014 with nonparametric Seasonal Kendall test method. Our analysis showed that the variations of surface water pH in China ranged from 6.5 to 9.0 in the past decade (2004-2014), which satisfied the water quality criteria in pH for protection of aquatic ecosystems in China (6.0-9.0) and USA (6.5-9.0). However, significant decreasing trends in surface water pH were found in 31 monitoring sites, which were mainly located in Haihe River, Taihu Lake and Yangtze River, while the pH value showed significant increasing trends in 22 sites, which mainly were located in Songhua River and Pearl River. Our results suggested the increased potential acidification of susceptible water bodies in China. Besides the control policy of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, the emissions of nitrous oxides (NOx) should also be reduced to protect the aquatic systems in China.

  4. The significant surface-water connectivity of "geographically isolated wetlands"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Mushet, David M.; Alexander, Laurie C.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Richter, Stephen; Walls, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the current literature, coupled with our collective research expertise, on surface-water connectivity of wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” (sensu Tiner Wetlands 23:494–516, 2003a) to critically assess the scientific foundation of grouping wetlands based on the singular condition of being surrounded by uplands. The most recent research on wetlands considered to be “geographically isolated” shows the difficulties in grouping an ecological resource that does not reliably indicate lack of surface water connectivity in order to meet legal, regulatory, or scientific needs. Additionally, the practice of identifying “geographically isolated wetlands” based on distance from a stream can result in gross overestimates of the number of wetlands lacking ecologically important surface-water connections. Our findings do not support use of the overly simplistic label of “geographically isolated wetlands”. Wetlands surrounded by uplands vary in function and surface-water connections based on wetland landscape setting, context, climate, and geographic region and should be evaluated as such. We found that the “geographically isolated” grouping does not reflect our understanding of the hydrologic variability of these wetlands and hence does not benefit conservation of the Nation’s diverse wetland resources. Therefore, we strongly discourage use of categorizations that provide overly simplistic views of surface-water connectivity of wetlands fully embedded in upland landscapes.

  5. Spatial and temporal analysis of mass movement using dendrochronology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.R.; Weiss, E.E.J.; Burrough, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Tree growth and inclination on sloping land is affected by mass movement. Suitable analysis of tree growth and tree form can therefore provide considerable information on mass movement activity. This paper reports a new, automated method for studying the temporal and spatial aspects of mass movemen

  6. Spatial and temporal analysis of mass movement using dendrochronology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, R.R.; Weiss, E.E.J.; Burrough, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Tree growth and inclination on sloping land is affected by mass movement. Suitable analysis of tree growth and tree form can therefore provide considerable information on mass movement activity. This paper reports a new, automated method for studying the temporal and spatial aspects of mass

  7. A framework model for investigating the export of phosphorus to surface waters in forested watersheds: Implications to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R M B; Sanches Fernandes, L F; Pereira, M G; Cortes, R M V; Pacheco, F A L

    2015-12-01

    The present study was developed in four sub-basins of rivers Cávado and Douro, located in the North of mainland Portugal. The goal was to identify main stressors as well as driving and attenuating processes responsible for the presence of phosphorus in masses of surface water in those catchments. To accomplish the goal, the basins were selected where a quality station was present at the outlet, the forest occupation was greater than 75% and the phosphorus concentrations have repeatedly exceeded the threshold for the good ecological status in the period 2000-2006. Further, in two basins the quality station was installed in a lotic (free-flow water) environment whereas in the other two was placed in a lentic (dammed water) environment. The ArcMap GIS-based software package was used for the spatial analysis of stressors and processes. The yields of phosphorus vary widely across the studied basins, from 0.2-30 kg·ha(-1)·yr(-1). The results point to post-fire soil erosion and hardwood clear cuttings as leading factors of phosphorus exports across the watersheds, with precipitation intensity being the key variable of erosion. However, yields can be attenuated by sediment deposition along the pathway from burned or managed areas to water masses. The observed high yields and concentrations of phosphorus in surface water encompass serious implications for water resources management in the basins, amplified in the lentic cases by potential release of phosphorus from lake sediments especially during the summer season. Therefore, a number of measures were proposed as regards wildfire combat, reduction of phosphorus exports after tree cuts, attenuation of soil erosion and improvement of riparian buffers, all with the purpose of preventing phosphorus concentrations to go beyond the regulatory good ecological status.

  8. Return of naturally sourced Pb to Atlantic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgestock, Luke; van de Flierdt, Tina; Rehkämper, Mark; Paul, Maxence; Middag, Rob; Milne, Angela; Lohan, Maeve C.; Baker, Alex R.; Chance, Rosie; Khondoker, Roulin; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Achterberg, Eric P.; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions completely overwhelmed natural marine lead (Pb) sources during the past century, predominantly due to leaded petrol usage. Here, based on Pb isotope measurements, we reassess the importance of natural and anthropogenic Pb sources to the tropical North Atlantic following the nearly complete global cessation of leaded petrol use. Significant proportions of up to 30-50% of natural Pb, derived from mineral dust, are observed in Atlantic surface waters, reflecting the success of the global effort to reduce anthropogenic Pb emissions. The observation of mineral dust derived Pb in surface waters is governed by the elevated atmospheric mineral dust concentration of the North African dust plume and the dominance of dry deposition for the atmospheric aerosol flux to surface waters. Given these specific regional conditions, emissions from anthropogenic activities will remain the dominant global marine Pb source, even in the absence of leaded petrol combustion.

  9. Conjunctive Surface Water and Groundwater Management under Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change can result in significant impacts on regional and global surface water and groundwater resources. Using groundwater as a complimentary source of water has provided an effective means to satisfy the ever-increasing water demands and deal with surface water shortages problems due to robust capability of groundwater in responding to climate change. Conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater is crucial for integrated water resources management. It is helpful to reduce vulnerabilities of water supply systems and mitigate the water supply stress in responding to climate change. Some critical challenges and perspectives are discussed to help decision/policy makers develop more effective management and adaptation strategies for conjunctive water resources use in facing climate change under complex uncertainties.

  10. The Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Alsdorf, Douglas; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Morrow, Rosemary; Mognard, Nelly; Vaze, Parag; Lafon, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A new space mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is being developed jointly by a collaborative effort of the international oceanographic and hydrological communities for making high-resolution measurement of the water elevation of both the ocean and land surface water to answer the questions about the oceanic submesoscale processes and the storage and discharge of land surface water. The key instrument payload would be a Ka-band radar interferometer capable of making high-resolution wide-swath altimetry measurement. This paper describes the proposed science objectives and requirements as well as the measurement approach of SWOT, which is baselined to be launched in 2019. SWOT would demonstrate this new approach to advancing both oceanography and land hydrology and set a standard for future altimetry missions.

  11. Georgia's Surface-Water Resources and Streamflow Monitoring Network, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Surface water provides 5 billion gallons per day, or 78 percent, of the total freshwater used (including thermoelectric) in Georgia (Fanning, 2003). Climate, geology, and landforms control the natural distribution of Georgia's water resources. Georgia is a 'headwaters' State, with most of the rivers beginning in northern Georgia and increasing in size downstream (see map at right for major watersheds). Surface water is the primary source of water in the northern one-half of the State, including the Atlanta metropolitan area, where limited ground-water resources are difficult to obtain. In Georgia, periodic droughts exacerbate competition for surface-water supplies. Many areas of Georgia also face a threat of flooding because of spring frontal thunderstorms and the potential for hurricanes from both the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. As the population of Georgia increases, these flood risks will increase with development in flood-risk zones, particularly in the coastal region.

  12. Occurrence of illicit drugs in surface waters in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiyang; Du, Peng; Xu, Zeqiong; Gao, Tingting; Li, Xiqing

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as a group of emerging contaminants. In this work, occurrence of common illicit drugs and their metabolites in Chinese surface waters was examined by collecting samples from 49 lakes and 4 major rivers across the country. Among the drugs examined, methamphetamine and ketamine were detected with highest frequencies and concentration levels, consistent with the fact that these are primary drugs of abuse in China. Detection frequencies and concentrations of other drugs were much lower than in European lakes and rivers reported in the literature. In most Chinese surface waters methamphetamine and ketamine were detected at concentrations of several ng L(-1) or less, but in some southern lakes and rivers, these two drugs were detected at much higher concentrations (up to several tens ng L(-1)). Greater occurrence of methamphetamine and ketamine in southern surface waters was attributed to greater abuse and more clandestine production of the two drugs in southern China.

  13. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar SULTAN; Kim DOWLING

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations(Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic(As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4),oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 μS/cm). The concen- trations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration ofNa(98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments.The As soil level is naturally high(linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 μg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values(>15 μg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings.Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters(lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface water chemistry

  14. Occurrence and risk assessment of free and conjugated hormones in surface water of the Santa Ana River

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study presents a sensitive analytical method using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the simultaneous monitoring of five estrogen conjugates, six estrogens and two progestagens in surface water of the Santa Ana River. Samples at ten representative sites along t...

  15. Rapid surface-water volume estimations in beaver ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karran, Daniel J.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Johnston, Carol A.; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Beaver ponds are surface-water features that are transient through space and time. Such qualities complicate the inclusion of beaver ponds in local and regional water balances, and in hydrological models, as reliable estimates of surface-water storage are difficult to acquire without time- and labour-intensive topographic surveys. A simpler approach to overcome this challenge is needed, given the abundance of the beaver ponds in North America, Eurasia, and southern South America. We investigated whether simple morphometric characteristics derived from readily available aerial imagery or quickly measured field attributes of beaver ponds can be used to approximate surface-water storage among the range of environmental settings in which beaver ponds are found. Studied were a total of 40 beaver ponds from four different sites in North and South America. The simplified volume-area-depth (V-A-h) approach, originally developed for prairie potholes, was tested. With only two measurements of pond depth and corresponding surface area, this method estimated surface-water storage in beaver ponds within 5 % on average. Beaver pond morphometry was characterized by a median basin coefficient of 0.91, and dam length and pond surface area were strongly correlated with beaver pond storage capacity, regardless of geographic setting. These attributes provide a means for coarsely estimating surface-water storage capacity in beaver ponds. Overall, this research demonstrates that reliable estimates of surface-water storage in beaver ponds only requires simple measurements derived from aerial imagery and/or brief visits to the field. Future research efforts should be directed at incorporating these simple methods into both broader beaver-related tools and catchment-scale hydrological models.

  16. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University; Mark, David [University at Buffalo (SUNY); Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  17. Global modeling of withdrawal, allocation and consumptive use of surface water and groundwater resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water withdrawal and consumptive water use have been increasing rapidly. To analyze the human perturbation on water resources consistently over a large scale, a number of macro-scale hydrological models (MHMs have been developed over the recent decades. However, few models consider the feedback between water availability and water demand, and even fewer models explicitly incorporate water allocation from surface water and groundwater resources. Here, we integrate a global water demand model into a global water balance model, and simulate water withdrawal and consumptive water use over the period 1979–2010, considering water allocation from surface water and groundwater resources and explicitly taking into account feedbacks between supply and demand, using two re-analysis products: ERA-Interim and MERRA. We implement an irrigation water scheme, which works dynamically with daily surface and soil water balance, and include a newly available extensive reservoir data set. Simulated surface water and groundwater withdrawal show generally good agreement with available reported national and sub-national statistics. The results show a consistent increase in both surface water and groundwater use worldwide, but groundwater use has been increasing more rapidly than surface water use since the 1990s. Human impacts on terrestrial water storage (TWS signals are evident, altering the seasonal and inter-annual variability. The alteration is particularly large over the heavily regulated basins such as the Colorado and the Columbia, and over the major irrigated basins such as the Mississippi, the Indus, and the Ganges. Including human water use generally improves the correlation of simulated TWS anomalies with those of the GRACE observations.

  18. Interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Nile River basin: isotopic and piezometric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Seifu; Abdalla, Osman; Sefelnasr, Ahmed; Tindimugaya, Callist; Mustafa, Osman

    2016-12-01

    Past discussions around water-resources management and development in the River Nile basin disregard groundwater resources from the equation. There is an increasing interest around factoring the groundwater resources as an integral part of the Nile Basin water resources. This is hampered by knowledge gap regarding the groundwater resources dynamics (recharge, storage, flow, quality, surface-water/groundwater interaction) at basin scale. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the state of surface-water/groundwater interaction from the headwater to the Nile Delta region. Piezometric and isotopic (δ18O, δ2H) evidence reveal that the Nile changes from a gaining stream in the headwater regions to mostly a loosing stream in the arid lowlands of Sudan and Egypt. Specific zones of Nile water leakage to the adjacent aquifers is mapped using the two sources of evidence. Up to 50% of the surface-water flow in the equatorial region of the Nile comes from groundwater as base flow. The evidence also shows that the natural direction and rate of surface-water/groundwater interaction is largely perturbed by human activities (diversion, dam construction) particularly downstream of the Aswan High Dam in Egypt. The decrease in discharge of the Nile River along its course is attributed to leakage to the aquifers as well as to evaporative water loss from the river channel. The surface-water/groundwater interaction occurring along the Nile River and its sensitivity to infrastructure development calls for management strategies that account groundwater as an integral part of the Nile Basin resources.

  19. Interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Nile River basin: isotopic and piezometric evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Seifu; Abdalla, Osman; Sefelnasr, Ahmed; Tindimugaya, Callist; Mustafa, Osman

    2017-05-01

    Past discussions around water-resources management and development in the River Nile basin disregard groundwater resources from the equation. There is an increasing interest around factoring the groundwater resources as an integral part of the Nile Basin water resources. This is hampered by knowledge gap regarding the groundwater resources dynamics (recharge, storage, flow, quality, surface-water/groundwater interaction) at basin scale. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the state of surface-water/groundwater interaction from the headwater to the Nile Delta region. Piezometric and isotopic (δ18O, δ2H) evidence reveal that the Nile changes from a gaining stream in the headwater regions to mostly a loosing stream in the arid lowlands of Sudan and Egypt. Specific zones of Nile water leakage to the adjacent aquifers is mapped using the two sources of evidence. Up to 50% of the surface-water flow in the equatorial region of the Nile comes from groundwater as base flow. The evidence also shows that the natural direction and rate of surface-water/groundwater interaction is largely perturbed by human activities (diversion, dam construction) particularly downstream of the Aswan High Dam in Egypt. The decrease in discharge of the Nile River along its course is attributed to leakage to the aquifers as well as to evaporative water loss from the river channel. The surface-water/groundwater interaction occurring along the Nile River and its sensitivity to infrastructure development calls for management strategies that account groundwater as an integral part of the Nile Basin resources.

  20. Surface Water Resources Response to Climate Changes in Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The response of surface water resources on climate changes was studied.[Method] By dint of monthly average temperature and precipitation in 45 meteorological stations in Jilin Province from 1960 to 2000,monthly runoff in 56 hydrological stations in Songhuajiang and Liaohe region,the surface runoff change and the response of surface water resources to climate change in 41 years were expounded.[Result] The runoff of Songliao region was limited during 1960s and 1970s.It began to increase slowly in ...

  1. Stormwater Priority Pollutants Versus Surface Water Quality Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Ledin, Anna; Baun, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Stormwater in urban areas comprises of a substantial part of the urban water cycle, dominating the flow in many small urban streams, and the pollution levels are sizeable. No stormwater quality criteria were found here and no European or national emission limit values exist. Stormwater pollutants...... however are present in levels exceeding most of the regulated surface water quality criteria and environmental quality standards. Therefore catchment characterisation is needed to chose suitable treatment prior to discharge into receiving surface waters, as the mixing may be insufficient in small streams....

  2. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales...

  3. Application of multivariate statistical approach to identify trace elements sources in surface waters: a case study of Kowalskie and Stare Miasto reservoirs, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepak, Marcin; Sojka, Mariusz

    2017-08-01

    The paper reports the results of measurements of trace elements concentrations in surface water samples collected at the lowland retention reservoirs of Stare Miasto and Kowalskie (Poland). The samples were collected once a month from October 2011 to November 2012. Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn were determined in water samples using the inductively coupled plasma with mass detection (ICP-QQQ). To assess the chemical composition of surface water, multivariate statistical methods of data analysis were used, viz. cluster analysis (CA), principal components analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis (DA). They made it possible to observe similarities and differences in the chemical composition of water in the points of water samples collection, to uncover hidden factors accounting for the structure of the data, and to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic sources on the content of trace elements in the water of retention reservoirs. The conducted statistical analyses made it possible to distinguish groups of trace elements allowing for the analysis of time and spatial variation of water in the studied reservoirs.

  4. Mass spectrometry for high-throughput metabolomics analysis of urine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelrazig, Salah M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (direct ESI-MS), by omitting the chromatographic step, has great potential for application as a high-throughput approach for untargeted urine metabolomics analysis compared to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The rapid development and technical innovations revealed in the field of ambient ionisation MS such as nanoelectrospray ionisation (nanoESI) chip-based infusion and liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA...

  5. Forensic analysis of explosions: Inverse calculation of the charge mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, M.M. van der; Wees, R.M.M. van; Brouwer, S.D.; Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der; Verreault, J.

    2015-01-01

    Forensic analysis of explosions consists of determining the point of origin, the explosive substance involved, and the charge mass. Within the EU fP7 project Hyperion, TNO developed the Inverse Explosion Analysis (TNO-IEA) tool to estïmate the charge mass and point of origin based on observed damage

  6. Effects of Dimethyl Sulfoxide on Surface Water near Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Pincus, Philip A; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-12-06

    Despite much effort to probe the properties of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution, the effects of DMSO on water, especially near plasma membrane surfaces, still remain elusive. By performing molecular dynamics simulations at varying DMSO concentrations (XDMSO), we study how DMSO affects structural and dynamical properties of water in the vicinity of phospholipid bilayers. As proposed by a number of experiments, our simulations confirm that DMSO induces dehydration from bilayer surfaces and disrupts the H-bond structure of water. However, DMSO-enhanced water diffusivity at solvent-bilayer interfaces, an intriguing discovery reported by a spin-label measurement, is not confirmed in our simulations. To resolve this discrepancy, we examine the location of the spin label (Tempo) relative to the solvent-bilayer interface. In accord with the evidence in the literature, our simulations, which explicitly model Tempo-phosphatidylcholine, find that the Tempo moiety is equilibrated at ∼8-10 Å below the bilayer surface. Furthermore, the DMSO-enhanced surface-water diffusion is confirmed only when water diffusion is analyzed around the Tempo moiety that is immersed below the bilayer surface, which implies that the experimentally detected signal of water using Tempo stems from the interior of bilayers, not from the interface. Our analysis finds that the increase of water diffusion below the bilayer surface is coupled to the increase of area per lipid with an increasing XDMSO(≲10mol%). Underscoring the hydrophobic nature of the Tempo moiety, our study calls for careful re-evaluation of the use of Tempo in measurements on lipid bilayer surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    faster surface water diffusivity. Another is the concurrent tightening of lipid packing that reduces passive, possibly unwanted, diffusion of ions and water across the bilayer.

  8. Use of chemical and isotopic tracers to characterize the interactions between ground water and surface water in mantled karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Coplen, T.B.; Bullen, T.D.; Hal, Davis J.

    1997-01-01

    In the mantled karst terrane of northern Florida, the water quality of the Upper Floridan aquifer is influenced by the degree of connectivity between the aquifer and the surface. Chemical and isotopic analyses [18O/16O (??18O), 2H/1H (??D), 13C/12C (??13C), tritium(3H), and strontium-87/strontium-86(87Sr/86Sr)]along with geochemical mass-balance modeling were used to identify the dominant hydrochemical processes that control the composition of ground water as it evolves downgradient in two systems. In one system, surface water enters the Upper Floridan aquifer through a sinkhole located in the Northern Highlands physiographic unit. In the other system, surface water enters the aquifer through a sinkhole lake (Lake Bradford) in the Woodville Karst Plain. Differences in the composition of water isotopes (??18O and ??D) in rainfall, ground water, and surface water were used to develop mixing models of surface water (leakage of water to the Upper Floridan aquifer from a sinkhole lake and a sinkhole) and ground water. Using mass-balance calculations, based on differences in ??18O and ??D, the proportion of lake water that mixed with meteoric water ranged from 7 to 86% in water from wells located in close proximity to Lake Bradford. In deeper parts of the Upper Floridan aquifer, water enriched in 18O and D from five of 12 sampled municipal wells indicated that recharge from a sinkhole (1 to 24%) and surface water with an evaporated isotopic signature (2 to 32%) was mixing with ground water. The solute isotopes, ??13C and 87Sr/86Sr, were used to test the sensitivity of binary and ternary mixing models, and to estimate the amount of mass transfer of carbon and other dissolved species in geochemical reactions. In ground water downgradient from Lake Bradford, the dominant processes controlling carbon cycling in ground water were dissolution of carbonate minerals, aerobic degradation of organic matter, and hydrolysis of silicate minerals. In the deeper parts of the Upper

  9. Spatial and Seasonal Variations of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon in Surface Water and Sediment in Pearl River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiandi; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Qiming; Lu, Gang

    2015-09-01

    A field study in the Pearl River Delta of China was conducted in order to describe to the spatial and seasonal variation of occurrence and concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in surface water and sediments. Petroleum hydrocarbons and isoprenoid alkanes were quantified by UV spectroscopy and gas chromatography with a mass selective detector. The concentrations of TPH ranged from 4.3 to 68.7 µg L(-1) in surface water, and from 66.6 to 1445 µg g(-1) in surface sediments. The ratios of pristine to phytane suggested that the main sources of TPH in the sediment were petroleum importation. The highest concentrations of TPH were present in the spring season. When compared with results from previous studies, it can be concluded that the Pearl River Delta was moderately polluted by TPH. No statistically significant correlations were observed between the concentrations of TPH in surface water and sediments.

  10. 1DTempPro V2: new features for inferring groundwater/surface-water exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franklin W.; Voytek, Emily B.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Healy, Richard W.; Briggs, Martin; Lane, Jr., John W.; Werkema, Dale

    2016-01-01

    A new version of the computer program 1DTempPro extends the original code to include new capabilities for (1) automated parameter estimation, (2) layer heterogeneity, and (3) time-varying specific discharge. The code serves as an interface to the U.S. Geological Survey model VS2DH and supports analysis of vertical one-dimensional temperature profiles under saturated flow conditions to assess groundwater/surface-water exchange and estimate hydraulic conductivity for cases where hydraulic head is known.

  11. Surface water and groundwater interaction on a hill island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rasmus Rumph; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Christensen, Steen

    – the hill islands – is relatively unknown. This study aims at providing new information about the rainfall-runoff processes in hill island landscapes where surface water and groundwater interaction is expected to have a dominant role and hill-slope processes not. Through stream flow measurements, field...

  12. Zearalenone occurrence in surface waters in central Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic secondary metabolite produced by certain fungi that commonly infest important cereal crops, such as corn and wheat. The ability of ZEN to move from contaminated crops to surface waters has been demonstrated previously. This article reports the development of a meth...

  13. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  14. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teklu, B.M.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Deneer, J.W.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small

  15. Riparian shrub buffers reduce surface water pollutant loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. A. Geyer; C. Barden; K. Mankin; D. Devlin

    2003-01-01

    Surface water resources in Kansas often contain concentrations of pesticides, nutrients, and sediments that are of concern to local citizens. The United States Geological Survey reported in 1999 that 97 percent of streams and 82 percent of lakes in Kansas would not fully support all uses as designated by state statutes (U.S. Geological Survey 1999). Bacteria and...

  16. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T.; van Staalduinen, M.A.; van der Sluijs, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expe

  17. Modelling the effects of surface water flood pulses on groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Flood pulses in wetlands steer ecosystem development directly through surface water processes and indirectly through the effects of the flood pulse on groundwater. Direct effects on ecosystems are exerted by e.g. inundation and deposition of sediments containing nutrients. Indirect effects include t

  18. Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary monitoring of faecal indicator organisms of surface water: A case study ... in Mvudi River used as a source of domestic water for people who live around it. ... of Water Affairs and Forestry of South Africa (DWAF) and the World Health ...

  19. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teklu, B.M.; Adriaanse, P.I.; Horst, ter M.M.S.; Deneer, J.W.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small

  20. Scaling analysis of meteorite shower mass distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Meibom, A.; Bohr, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    Meteorite showers are the remains of extraterrestrial objects which are captivated by the gravitational field of the Earth. We have analyzed the mass distribution of fragments from 16 meteorite showers for scaling. The distributions exhibit distinct scaling behavior over several orders of magnetude...

  1. Mass Spectral Analysis of PAMPRE Tholins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sarah; Adams, R.; Carrasco, N.; Djevahirdjian, L.; Pernot, P.; Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Szopa, C.; Thissen, R.; Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.

    2009-09-01

    The destruction of N2 and CH4 and subsequent complex chemical processes lead to the formation of organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere. To further the understanding of the formation and composition of these aerosols, laboratory experiments have been designed to produce aerosols under Titan atmospheric conditions. We have characterized tholins generated by the PAMPRE (Production d'Aérosols en Microgravité par Plasma REactif) experiment. The PAMPRE experiment uses capacitively coupled RF plasma discharge to initiate the chemistry between N2 and CH4 that leads to the production of solid particles (tholins). The tholins form and grow while levitated in the plasma, which minimizes any possible wall effects. Tholins were generated using 3 different N2/CH4 gas mixtures: 98/2, 95/5, 90/10. The tholins were characterized using the LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, which has a resolving power of 1.e5 at 400 amu and accuracy in exact mass determination of 2 ppm. Thousands of molecules have been identified ranging in mass from 50 to 800 amu. The spectra exhibit groups of peaks with a mass periodicity of 13.5, which provides insight into the chemical processes involved in tholin synthesis. The application of the knowledge gained from these experiments to the study of corresponding processes on Titan will be briefly discussed.

  2. Influence of building resolution on surface water inundation outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess water is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of all UK flood risk. This risk is predicted to increase due to future climatic changes resulting in an increasing magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain an understanding of the depth, extent and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although numerical models allow the simulation of surface water inundation in a particular region, the model parameters (e.g. roughness, hydraulic conductivity) and resolution of topographic data have been shown to exert a profound influence on the inundation outputs which often leads to an over- or under-estimation of flood depths and extent without the use of external validation data to calibrate model outputs. Although previous research has demonstrated that model outputs are highly sensitive to Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mesh resolution, with flood inundation over large and complex topographies often requiring mesh resolutions coarser than the structural features (e.g. buildings) present within the study catchment, the specific influence of building resolution on surface flowpaths and connectivity during a surface water flood event has not been investigated. In this study, a LiDAR-derived DEM and OS MasterMap buildings layer of the Loughborough University campus, UK, were rasterized into separate 1m, 5m and 10m resolution layers. These layers were combined to create a series of Digital Surface Models (DSM) with varying, mismatching building and DEM resolutions (e.g. 1m DEM resolution, 10m building resolution, etc.) to understand

  3. Occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surface waters near industrial hog operation spray fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, S M; Myers, K W; Heaney, C D; Larsen, J; Hall, D; Miller, M B; Stewart, J R

    2016-09-15

    Industrial hog operations (IHOs) have been identified as a source of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, few studies have investigated the presence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus in the environment near IHOs, specifically surface waters proximal to spray fields where IHO liquid lagoon waste is sprayed. Surface water samples (n=179) were collected over the course of approximately one year from nine locations in southeastern North Carolina and analyzed for the presence of presumptive MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA media. Culture-based, biochemical, and molecular tests, as well as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were used to confirm that isolates that grew on CHROMagar MRSA media were S. aureus. Confirmed S. aureus isolates were then tested for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and screened for molecular markers of MRSA (mecA, mecC) and livestock adaptation (absence of scn). A total of 12 confirmed MRSA were detected in 9 distinct water samples. Nine of 12 MRSA isolates were also multidrug-resistant (MDRSA [i.e., resistant to ≥3 antibiotic classes]). All MRSA were scn-positive and most (11/12) belonged to a staphylococcal protein A (spa) type t008, which is commonly associated with humans. Additionally, 12 confirmed S. aureus that were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) were recovered, 7 of which belonged to spa type t021 and were scn-negative (a marker of livestock-adaptation). This study demonstrated the presence of MSSA, MRSA, and MDRSA in surface waters adjacent to IHO lagoon waste spray fields in southeastern North Carolina. To our knowledge, this is the first report of waterborne S. aureus from surface waters proximal to IHOs.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site

  5. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN AN ARSENIC CONTAMINATED VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud C. Saikia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of ground water has occurred in various parts of the world, becoming a menace in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra basin (West Bengal and Assam in India and Bangladesh. Recently arsenic has been detected in Cachar and Karimganj districts of barak valley, Assam, bordering Bangladesh. In this area coli form contamination comprises the major constraint towards utilization of its otherwise ample surface water resources. The local water management exploited ground water sources using a centralized piped water delivery scheme without taking into account the geologically arsenic-prone nature of the sediments and aquifers in this area. Thus surface water was the suggestive alternative for drinking water in this area. The present study investigated surface water quality and availability in a village of Karimganj district, Assam, India contaminated with arsenic for identifying the potential problems of surface water quality maintenance so that with effective management safe drinking water could be provided. The study revealed that the area was rich in freshwater ecosystems which had all physico-chemical variables such as water temperature, pH, DO, total alkalinity, free CO2, heavy metals like lead, chromium and cadmium within WHO standards. In contrast, coli form bacteria count was found far beyond permissible limit in all the sources. Around 60% people of the village preferred ground water for drinking and only 6% were aware of arsenic related problems. The problem of bacterial contamination could be controlled by implementing some ameliorative measures so that people can safely use surface water. Inhabitants of the two districts should be given proper education regarding arsenic contamination and associated health risk. Effluents should be treated to acceptable levels and standards before discharging them into natural streams.

  6. Dynamic analysis and control of novel moving mass flight vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqing; Gao, Changsheng; Jing, Wuxing; Wei, Pengxin

    2017-02-01

    In terms of the moving mass control technology, the configuration of internal moving masses is a key challenge. In order to reduce the complexity of configuring these moving masses in a flight vehicle, a combination bank-to-turn control mode with the single moving mass and reaction jet is proposed in this paper. To investigate the dynamics and the potential of the control mechanism, an attitude dynamic model with single moving mass is generated. The dynamic analysis indicates that the control stability, control authority and dynamic behavior of the pitch channel are determined by the mass ratio of the moving mass to the system and the difference between the mass center of the moving mass and the mass center of the vehicle body. Interestingly, control authority increases proportionally with increasing mass ratio and also with decreasing the magnitude of the static margin. To deal with the coupling caused by the additional inertia moment which is generated by the motion of the moving mass, an adaptive control law by using dynamic inversion theory and the extended state observer is designed. Also, a compensator is designed for eliminating the influence of the servo actuator's dynamics on attitude of the flight vehicle. Finally, the simulation results validate the quality of the proposed adaptive controller which ensures a good performance in the novel configuration with internal moving mass.

  7. Protocol for quantitative tracing of surface water with synthetic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppen, J. W.; Bogaard, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Based on experiments we carried out in 2010 with various synthetic single stranded DNA markers with a size of 80 nucleotides (ssDNA; Foppen et al., 2011), we concluded that ssDNA can be used to carry out spatially distributed multi-tracer experiments in the environment. Main advantages are in principle unlimited amount of tracers, environmental friendly and tracer recovery at very high dilution rates (detection limit is very low). However, when ssDNA was injected in headwater streams, we found that at selected downstream locations, the total mass recovery was less than 100%. The exact reason for low mass recovery was unknown. In order to start identifying the cause of the loss of mass in these surface waters, and to increase our knowledge of the behaviour of synthetic ssDNA in the environment, we examined the effect of laboratory and field protocols working with artificial DNA by performing numerous batch experiments. Then, we carried out several field tests in different headwater streams in the Netherlands and in Luxembourg. The laboratory experiments consisted of a batch of water in a vessel with in the order of 10^10 ssDNA molecules injected into the batch. The total duration of each experiment was 10 hour, and, at regular time intervals, 100 µl samples were collected in a 1.5 ml Eppendorf vial for qPCR analyses. The waters we used ranged from milliQ water to river water with an Electrical Conductivity of around 400 μS/cm. The batch experiments were performed in different vessel types: polyethylene bottles, polypropylene copolymer bottles , and glass bottles. In addition, two filter types were tested: 1 µm pore size glass fibre filters and 0.2 µm pore size cellulose acetate filters. Lastly, stream bed sediment was added to the batch experiments to quantify interaction of the DNA with sediment. For each field experiment around 10^15 ssDNA molecules were injected, and water samples were collected 100 - 600 m downstream of the point of injection. Additionally

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of monolayer protected nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengjiang

    Monolayer protected nanoparticles (NPs) include an inorganic core and a monolayer of organic ligands. The wide variety of core materials and the tunable surface monolayers make NPs promising materials for numerous applications. Concerns related to unforeseen human health and environmental impacts of NPs have also been raised. In this thesis, new analytical methods based on mass spectrometry are developed to understand the fate, transport, and biodistributions of NPs in the complex biological systems. A laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) method has been developed to characterize the monolayers on NP surface. LDI-MS allows multiple NPs taken up by cells to be measured and quantified in a multiplexed fashion. The correlations between surface properties of NPs and cellular uptake have also been explored. LDI-MS is further coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantitatively measure monolayer stability of gold NPs (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), respectively, in live cells. This label-free approach allows correlating monolayer structure and particle size with NP stability in various cellular environments. Finally, uptake, distribution, accumulation, and excretion of NPs in higher order organisms, such as fish and plants, have been investigated to understand the environmental impact of nanomaterials. The results indicate that surface chemistry is a primary determinant. NPs with hydrophilic surfaces are substantially less toxic and present a lower degree of bioaccumulation, making these nanomaterials attractive for sustainable nanotechnology.

  9. Assessment of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate in surface water - Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunantha, Ganesan; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-08-15

    As an emerging class of environmentally persistent organic pollutants, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), particularly perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS); have been universally found in the environment. Wastewater and untreated effluents are likely the major causes for the accumulation of PFCs in surface water. There are very few reports on the contamination of PFCs in the developing countries, particularly in India. This study reports the quantitative analysis of PFOA and PFOS in Noyyal, Cauvery, and also lakes in and around Chennai, using Ultra-Fast liquid chromatograph. The concentration of PFOA and PFOS ranged from 4 to 93ng/L and 3 to 29ng/L, respectively. The concentration of PFOS was below detectable limit in Cauvery River. A reliable concentration of PFOA was recorded at all sites of River Cauvery (5ng/L). The present study could be useful for the assessment of future monitoring programs of PFOA and PFOS in the surface water.

  10. Monitoring surface water quality using social media in the context of citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hang; Hong, Yang; Long, Di; Jing, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Surface water quality monitoring (SWQM) provides essential information for water environmental protection. However, SWQM is costly and limited in terms of equipment and sites. The global popularity of social media and intelligent mobile devices with GPS and photography functions allows citizens to monitor surface water quality. This study aims to propose a method for SWQM using social media platforms. Specifically, a WeChat-based application platform is built to collect water quality reports from volunteers, which have been proven valuable for water quality monitoring. The methods for data screening and volunteer recruitment are discussed based on the collected reports. The proposed methods provide a framework for collecting water quality data from citizens and offer a primary foundation for big data analysis in future research.

  11. Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter in River Water by Conventional Methods and Direct Sample Analysis-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Garrido Reyes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissolved organic matter in surface waters is composed of fractions of different molecular weight and polarity, characteristics that determine their capacity for complexing different types of pollutants and their environmental impact. In this study, the dissolved organic matter in the surface water of the Bio-Bio River (Central Region of Chile was characterized chemically and spectroscopically after fractionating by molecular weight and polarity. The technique of direct sample analysis-time of flight-mass spectrometry (DSA-TOF-MS was used to obtain more information on the composition of dissolved organic matter. It is concluded that dissolved organic matter found in the water of the river from the site of minor human impact (Rucalhue has a predominantly natural origin, with a high content of aromatic carbon, in contrast to dissolved organic matter found in the waters of the sites that have higher human impact (Laja and Concepción, characterized by a greater molecular size and higher organic carbon content. These results are consistent with those obtained from DSA-TOF-MS, where higher correlation was observed between the mass spectrum of the standard commercial humic acid and dissolved organic matter found in the sectors of Laja and Concepción, unlike the spectrum mass of lignin which is more like dissolved organic matter found in the sector Rucalhue.

  12. Interpretation of Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MSMS) Spectra for Peptide Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to give a short introduction to peptide analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) and interpretation of fragment mass spectra. Through examples and guidelines we demonstrate how to understand and validate search results and how to perform de novo sequencing based on the often...... very complex fragmentation pattern obtained by tandem mass spectrometry (also referred to as MSMS). The focus is on simple rules for interpretation of MSMS spectra of tryptic as well as non-tryptic peptides....

  13. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguerra, F.; Albrechtsen, H.; Binning, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using data of a tracer experiment in a riparian zone. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a new biodegradable and strongly sorbed pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the method of Morris was employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results showed that the presence of an aquitard and its characteristics (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depth are the crucial factors affecting the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. Global sensitivity analysis results were compared with rank correlation statistics between pesticide concentrations and geological parameters derived from a comprehensive database of Danish drinking water wells. Aquitard thickness and well depth are the most critical parameters in both the model and observed data.

  14. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  15. Source Water Assessment for the Las Vegas Valley Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, S. P.; Piechota, T. C.

    2003-12-01

    The 1996 amendment to the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 created the Source Water Assessment Program (SWAP) with an objective to evaluate potential sources of contamination to drinking water intakes. The development of a Source Water Assessment Plan for Las Vegas Valley surface water runoff into Lake Mead is important since it will guide future work on source water protection of the main source of water. The first step was the identification of the watershed boundary and source water protection area. Two protection zones were delineated. Zone A extends 500 ft around water bodies, and Zone B extends 3000 ft from the boundaries of Zone A. These Zones extend upstream to the limits of dry weather flows in the storm channels within the Las Vegas Valley. After the protection areas were identified, the potential sources of contamination in the protection area were inventoried. Field work was conducted to identify possible sources of contamination. A GIS coverage obtained from local data sources was used to identify the septic tank locations. Finally, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits were obtained from the State of Nevada, and included in the inventory. After the inventory was completed, a level of risk was assigned to each potential contaminating activity (PCA). The contaminants of concern were grouped into five categories: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), synthetic organic compounds (SOCs), inorganic compounds (IOCs), microbiological, and radionuclides. The vulnerability of the water intake to each of the PCAs was assigned based on these five categories, and also on three other factors: the physical barrier effectiveness, the risk potential, and the time of travel. The vulnerability analysis shows that the PCAs with the highest vulnerability rating include septic systems, golf courses/parks, storm channels, gas stations, auto repair shops, construction, and the wastewater treatment plant discharges. Based on the current water quality

  16. Heavy metal contamination, sources, and pollution assessment of surface water in the Tianshan Mountains of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoyong, Zhang; Abuduwaili, Jilili; Fengqing, Jiang

    2015-02-01

    In order to gain insight into heavy metal contamination occurring in the surface water of the Tianshan Mountains in northwest China, we collected surface water samples from there, tested heavy metals Pb, Ni, Cd, Co, Hg, As, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Cr, and then we analyzed the data using typical analysis, multivariate statistical, and pollution index methods. Results showed that (1) the order of the average values of the ten kinds of heavy metals in all the water samples was as follows: Zn > Mn > Cu > Co > Ni > Pb > Cr > As > Hg > Cd. The maximum variation coefficients of Zn and Pb were 138.96 and 145.86 %, respectively, indicating that these heavy metal concentrations varied largely between different sampling locations. (2) Research showed the average concentrations of Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Zn, and Cr were all within the national surface water standard of class IV and those of As, Cu, Mn, and Cr were all within the range of the Drinking Water Guidelines from the WHO, indicating the surface water of the Tianshan Mountains is clean. (3) Multivariate statistical analysis showed that Cu, Cd, Mn, Hg, Zn, and Pb have close correlations, and they mainly came from artificial sources; while Ni, As, Co, Cu, and Cr mainly came from natural sources. The results of correlation analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis are consistent. (4) Pollution evaluation showed the values of comprehensive pollution index (WQI) of ten kinds of heavy metals in three sections were all lower than 2, suggesting the low levels of pollution, while the over-limit ratios of Pb and Zn in water samples of the middle Urumqi-Akesu section, As in the western Zhaosu-Tekesi section, and Pb, Hg, and Zn in the eastern Balikun-Yiwu section were all above 10 %. This research shows that recent economic development of the Tianshan Mountains has negatively influenced the heavy metal concentrations in the surface water, although the concentrations of the ten kinds of tested

  17. Total nitrogen concentrations in surface water of typical agro- and forest ecosystems in China, 2004-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Xu

    Full Text Available We assessed the total nitrogen (N concentrations of 28 still surface water (lake and pond, and 42 flowing surface water (river, monitoring sites under 29 typical terrestrial ecosystems of the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN using monitoring data collected between 2004 and 2009. The results showed that the median total N concentrations of still surface water were significantly higher in the agro- (1.5 mg · L(-1 and oasis agro- ecosystems (1.8 mg · L(-1 than in the forest ecosystems (1.0 mg · L(-1. This was also the case for flowing surface water, with total N concentrations of 2.4 mg · L(-1, 1.8 mg · L(-1 and 0.5 mg · L(-1 for the agro-, oasis agro- and forest ecosystems, respectively. In addition, more than 50% of the samples in agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems were seriously polluted (>1.0 mg · L(-1 by N. Spatial analysis showed that the total N concentrations in northern and northwestern regions were higher than those in the southern region for both still and flowing surface waters under agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems, with more than 50% of samples exceeding 1.0 mg · L(-1 (the Class III limit of the Chinese National Quality Standards for Surface Waters in surface water in the northern region. Nitrogen pollution in agro- ecosystems is mainly due to fertilizer applications, while the combination of fertilizer and irrigation exacerbates nitrogen pollution in oasis agro- ecosystems.

  18. Total Nitrogen Concentrations in Surface Water of Typical Agro- and Forest Ecosystems in China, 2004-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Xinyu; Xie, Juan; Yuan, Guofu; Tang, Xinzhai; Sun, Xiaomin; Yu, Guirui

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the total nitrogen (N) concentrations of 28 still surface water (lake and pond), and 42 flowing surface water (river), monitoring sites under 29 typical terrestrial ecosystems of the Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN) using monitoring data collected between 2004 and 2009. The results showed that the median total N concentrations of still surface water were significantly higher in the agro- (1.5 mg·L−1) and oasis agro- ecosystems (1.8 mg·L−1) than in the forest ecosystems (1.0 mg·L−1). This was also the case for flowing surface water, with total N concentrations of 2.4 mg·L−1, 1.8 mg·L−1 and 0.5 mg·L−1 for the agro-, oasis agro- and forest ecosystems, respectively. In addition, more than 50% of the samples in agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems were seriously polluted (>1.0 mg·L−1) by N. Spatial analysis showed that the total N concentrations in northern and northwestern regions were higher than those in the southern region for both still and flowing surface waters under agro- and oasis agro- ecosystems, with more than 50% of samples exceeding 1.0 mg·L−1 (the Class III limit of the Chinese National Quality Standards for Surface Waters) in surface water in the northern region. Nitrogen pollution in agro- ecosystems is mainly due to fertilizer applications, while the combination of fertilizer and irrigation exacerbates nitrogen pollution in oasis agro- ecosystems. PMID:24667701

  19. Analysis of Milk Oligosaccharides by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lauren D; Ruhaak, L Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) are a highly abundant constituent in human milk, and its protective and prebiotic properties have attracted considerable attention. HMOs have been shown to directly and indirectly benefit the overall health of the infant due to a number of functions including serving as a beneficial food for gut bacteria, block to pathogens, and aiding in brain development. Researchers are currently exploring whether these structures may act as possible disease and nutrition biomarkers. Because of this, rapid-throughput methods are desired to investigate biological activity in large patient sets. We have optimized a rapid-throughput protocol to analyze human milk oligosaccharides using micro-volumes of human breast milk for nutritional biomarkers. This method may additionally be applied to other biological fluid substrates such as plasma, urine, and feces. The protocol involves lipid separation via centrifugation, protein precipitation using ethanol, alditol reduction with sodium borohydride, and a final solid-phase extraction purification step using graphitized carbon cartridges. Samples are analyzed using HPLC-Chip/TOF-MS and data filtered on Agilent MassHunter using an in-house library. Individual structural identification is matched against a previously developed HMO library using accurate mass and retention time. Using this method will allow in-depth characterization and profiling of HMOs in large patient sets, and will ease the process of discovering significant nutritional biomarkers in human milk.

  20. Analysis on Status and Trend of Fecal Coliform Contamination of Surface Water Drinking Water Sources%地表水饮用水水源地粪大肠菌群污染现状及趋势分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱国良; 陈泓霖

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Hengyang city 3 centralized drinking water source in recent four years (2012-2015 years), the pollution status and pollution trend of fecal coliform in water was studied� For nearly four years, the water quality of the fecal coliform group in the concentration range, average, exceeded the number, exceeding the maximum multiple of the discussion and analysis, it is concluded that the water quality of the water quality of fecal coliform group pollution status and trend of pollution, to strengthen drinking water source water quality monitoring and supervision.%本文对衡阳市城区3个集中式生活饮用水水源地近四年(2012-2015年)来,水质中粪大肠菌群的污染状况及污染趋势进行了分析研究。对近四年来各水源地水质中粪大肠菌群的浓度范围、平均值、超标次数、最大超标倍数进行了讨论分析,得出了水源地水质中粪大肠菌群的污染现状及污染趋势,有利于加强饮用水水源地水质监测与监管。

  1. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Li; Juanjuan Han; Zhenpeng Wang; Jian'an Liu; Jinchao Wei; Shaoxiang Xiong; Zhenwen Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics tech...

  2. Fate factors and emission flux estimates for emerging contaminants in surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa T. Trinh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals, personal care products, hormones, and wastewater products are emerging environmental concerns for manifold reasons, including the potential of some compounds found in these products for endocrine disruption at a very low chronic exposure level. The environmental occurrences and sources of these contaminants in the water, soil, sediment and biota in European nations and the United States are well documented. This work reports a screening-level emission and fate assessment of thirty compounds, listed in the National Reconnaissance of the United States Geological Survey (USGS, 1999–2000 as the most frequently detected organic wastewater contaminants in U.S. streams and rivers. Estimations of the surface water fate factors were based on Level II and Level III multimedia fugacity models for a 1000 km2 model environment, the size of a typical county in the eastern United States. The compounds are categorized into three groups based upon the sensitivity of their predicted surface water fate factors to uncertainties in their physicochemical property values and the landscape parameters. The environmental fate factors, mass distributions, and loss pathways of all of the compounds are strongly affected by their assumed modes of entry into the environment. It is observed that for thirteen of the thirty organic wastewater contaminants most commonly detected in surface waters, conventional treatment strategies may be ineffective for their removal from wastewater effluents. The surface water fate factors predicted by the fugacity models were used in conjunction with the surface water concentrations measured in the USGS reconnaissance to obtain emission flux estimates for the compounds into U.S. streams and rivers. These include estimated fluxes of 6.8 × 10−5 to 0.30 kg/h km2 for the biomarker coprostanol; 1.7 × 10−5 to 6.5 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for the insect repellent N,N-diethyltoluamide; and 4.3 × 10−6 to 3.1 × 10−5 kg/h km2 for

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  4. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Structural Analysis of Marine Oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Lang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out.

  5. Applications of mass spectrometry to structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yinzhi; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Lili; Yu, Guangli

    2014-06-30

    Marine oligosaccharides have attracted increasing attention recently in developing potential drugs and biomaterials for their particular physical and chemical properties. However, the composition and sequence analysis of marine oligosaccharides are very challenging for their structural complexity and heterogeneity. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important technique for carbohydrate analysis by providing more detailed structural information, including molecular mass, sugar constituent, sequence, inter-residue linkage position and substitution pattern. This paper provides an overview of the structural analysis based on MS approaches in marine oligosaccharides, which are derived from some biologically important marine polysaccharides, including agaran, carrageenan, alginate, sulfated fucan, chitosan, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and GAG-like polysaccharides. Applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) are mainly presented and the general applications of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) are also outlined. Some technical challenges in the structural analysis of marine oligosaccharides by MS have also been pointed out.

  6. Practical aspects of tritium measurement in ground and surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitzsche, O. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik; Hebert, D. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1997-03-01

    Tritium measurements are a powerful tool in hydrological and hydrogeological investigations for detecting mean residence times of several water reservoirs. Due to the low tritium activities in precipitation, ground and surface waters a low level measurement is necessary. Therefore often the liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment of water is used. In this paper some practical aspects and problems of measurement are discussed and the problem of contamination in low level laboratories is shown. (orig.)

  7. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  8. Assessment of heavy metal river Ingulets surface water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Trokhymenko, Ganna G.; Tsyhanyuk, Nina V.

    2017-01-01

    The low efficiency of implemented targeted programs to reduce the anthropogenic impact on hydroecosystem and overcoming its negative consequences demand a search for the optimal evidence reasonable decisions to improve the quality of Ingul river water basin for different economic sectors of water resources and the required number and suitable quality. Methodical bases of such research must be based on a detailed and comprehensive study of the hydrochemical regime and surface water quality. Th...

  9. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklu, Berhan M; Adriaanse, Paulien I; Ter Horst, Mechteld M S; Deneer, John W; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small stream and for two types of small ponds. Seven selected pesticides were selected since they were estimated to bear the highest risk to humans on the basis of volume of use, application rate and acute and chronic human toxicity, assuming exposure as a result of the consumption of surface water. Potential ecotoxicological risks were not considered as a selection criterion at this stage. Estimates of exposure concentrations in surface water were established using modelling software also applied in the EU registration procedure (PRZM and TOXSWA). Input variables included physico-chemical properties, and data such as crop calendars, irrigation schedules, meteorological information and detailed application data which were specifically tailored to the Ethiopian situation. The results indicate that for all the pesticides investigated the acute human risk resulting from the consumption of surface water is low to negligible, whereas agricultural use of chlorothalonil, deltamethrin, endosulfan and malathion in some crops may result in medium to high risk to aquatic species. The predicted environmental concentration estimates are based on procedures similar to procedures used at the EU level and in the USA. Addition of aquatic macrophytes as an ecotoxicological endpoint may constitute a welcome future addition to the risk assessment procedure. Implementation of the methods used for risk characterization constitutes a good step forward in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia.

  10. Pesticide monitoring in surface water and groundwater using passive samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodes, V.; Grabic, R.

    2009-04-01

    Passive samplers as screening devices have been used within a czech national water quality monitoring network since 2002 (SPMD and DGT samplers for non polar substances and metals). The passive sampler monitoring of surface water was extended to polar substances, in 2005. Pesticide and pharmaceutical POCIS samplers have been exposed in surface water at 21 locations and analysed for polar pesticides, perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals. Pesticide POCIS samplers in groundwater were exposed at 5 locations and analysed for polar pesticides. The following active substances of plant protection products were analyzed in surface water and groundwater using LC/MS/MS: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D, Acetochlor, Alachlor, Atrazine, Atrazine_desethyl, Azoxystrobin, Bentazone, Bromacil, Bromoxynil, Carbofuran, Clopyralid, Cyanazin, Desmetryn, Diazinon, Dicamba, Dichlobenil, Dichlorprop, Dimethoat, Diuron, Ethofumesate, Fenarimol, Fenhexamid, Fipronil, Fluazifop-p-butyl, Hexazinone, Chlorbromuron, Chlorotoluron, Imazethapyr, Isoproturon, Kresoxim-methyl, Linuron, MCPA, MCPP, Metalaxyl, Metamitron, Methabenzthiazuron, Methamidophos, Methidathion, Metobromuron, Metolachlor, Metoxuron, Metribuzin, Monolinuron, Nicosulfuron, Phorate, Phosalone, Phosphamidon, Prometryn, Propiconazole, Propyzamide, Pyridate, Rimsulfuron, Simazine, Tebuconazole, Terbuthylazine, Terbutryn, Thifensulfuron-methyl, Thiophanate-methyl and Tri-allate. The POCIS samplers performed very well being able to provide better picture than grab samples. The results show that polar pesticides and also perfluorinated compounds, personal care products and pharmaceuticals as well occur in hydrosphere of the Czech republic. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of grant No. 2B06095 by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports.

  11. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    As of January 1, 1988, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 368 continuous streamflow, 12 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 38 gage height, 15 crest-stage partia 1-record, 4 periodic discharge through range, 32 floodhydrocjraph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record 45 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 83 periodic biological, 19 lake surveys, 160 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 33 periodic pesticide, 20 automatic sampler, 137 periodic minor elements, 125 periodic chemical-quality, 74 periodic physica1-organic, 24 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 21 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemicalquality or sediment stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surface-water stations.

  12. Studying surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Fallah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of water exchange in a region or area, which emphasizes the principle of conservation of matter in the water cycle, is called balance. Investigating their balance is the basis for managing the rivers’ water management, the results of which refer to the change rate in surface water supply and can efficiently be used in decision making and optimal use of water resources. The present study was carried out in order to investigate the surface water balance in Kurdistan province using GIS. In so doing, digital topographic maps, soil map of the area, and meteorological data retrieved from the regional stations were used to prepare layers of precipitation, evaporation and infiltration of rainwater into the soil. Discharge-arearegion comparative method was employed to measure the amount of runoff and base flow for each sub-basin in raster form saved per unit area which was subsequently overlapped based on balance equation, and the balance of the region was displayed in a graphical mode. The results indicated that more surface water is wasted in the southeast and central area of the province.

  13. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  14. Imaging Heat and Mass Transfer Processes Visualization and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Pradipta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Imaging Heat and Mass Transfer Processes: Visualization and Analysis applies Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques to complex heat and mass transfer processes. Several applications are considered where thermal and concentration fields play a central role. These include vortex shedding and suppression from stationary and oscillating bluff bodies such as cylinders, convection around crystals growing from solution, and buoyant jets. Many of these processes are unsteady and three dimensional. The interpretation and analysis of images recorded are discussed in the text.

  15. Voluntary Field Data Collection for Landscape Phenology and Surface Water Essential Climate Variable Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. W.; Hudson-Dunn, A.; Aquino, K.; Pasa, M.; Paez, F.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is developing techniques to monitor vegetation and surface water condition for improved resource management. Educational materials and data forms that allow volunteer Citizen Scientists to collect information on vegetation and surface water extent to enhance satellite and web camera data analyses (http://egsc.usgs.gov/shenandoah.html) have been developed, tested, and refined. Collection is focused on supplementing landscape phenology and surface water extent (SWE) essential climate variable (ECV) research. Low cost instrumentation, subject education, and measurement calibration techniques all have utility for multiple remote sensing and biophysical studies. Trials have been conducted with subjects ranging from elementary school-aged summer camp children to science major undergraduate and graduate students. Experiments were replicated in several project study areas in Virginia that are also phenology and SWE-ECV research sites. Analysis of volunteer responses and their narrative feedback have improved the ability to request and assess data from volunteers. Children ages 12 and over were able to provide reliable supplemental information for phenology and aquatic research. Finally, trial observation and subject feedback both confirmed that participation furthered volunteer interest in science.

  16. Dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd in the South China Sea surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Wenmian; Ji Weidong; Xu Kuncan

    2001-01-01

    A total of 106 surface water samples were collected in the South China Sea during two transects in June and December 1998. The samples were collected with strictly contamination free procedure and trace metals were measured by clean laboratory methods and GFAAS. The mean concentrations for the dissolved fractions are: Cu 0.100 μg/dm3, Pb 0.060 μg/dm3, Zn 0.086 μg/dm3, Cd 0.007 μg/dm3, which is close to the world open ocean's level. The spatial distribution of the trace heavy metals shows higher concentrations in offshore area and lower concentrations in the central in the South China Sea, and the concentrations decrease with the distance from the offshore, which suggests the existence of significant continental shelf input of the trace heavy metals. The correlationship among the elements is better in summer than that in winter. Cu is positively correlated with Cd in both seasons and it is also found for the first time that they are positively correlated with nutrients in the South China Sea surface waters which further indicate the biogeochemical cycle of these elements in the marine environment. The baseline value of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd in the South China Sea surface waters is obtained through statistical analysis.

  17. Spatial and temporal assessment of surface water quality in the Arka River, Akkar, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Claude; Nabbout, Rony; Kassouf, Amine

    2016-12-01

    Surface water quality monitoring constitutes a crucial and important step in any water quality management system. Twenty-three physicochemical and microbiological parameters were assessed in surface water samples collected from the Arka River located in the Akkar District, north of Lebanon. Eight sampling locations were considered along the river and seven sampling campaigns were performed in order to evaluate spatial and temporal influences. The extraction of relevant information from this relatively large data set was done using principal component analysis (PCA), being a very well established chemometric tool in this field. In a first step, extracted PCA loadings revealed the implication of several physicochemical parameters in the discriminations and trends highlighted by PCA scores, mainly due to soil leaching and seawater intrusion. However, further investigations showed the implication of organic and bacterial parameters in the discrimination of stations in the Akkar flatland. These discriminations probably refer to anthropogenic pollution coming from the agricultural area and the surrounding villages. Specific ultraviolet absorption (SUVA) indices confirmed these findings since values decreased for samples collected across the villages and the flatland, indicating an increase in anthropogenic dissolved organic matter. This study will hopefully help the national and local authorities to ameliorate the surface water quality management, enabling its proper use for irrigation purposes.

  18. Global Modeling of Withdrawal, Allocation and Consumptive Use of Surface Water and Groundwater Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y.; Wisser, D.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    To sustain growing food demand and increasing standard of living, global water withdrawal and consumptive water use have been increasing rapidly. To analyze the human perturbation on water resources consistently over large scales, a number of macro-scale hydrological models (MHMs) have been developed in recent decades. However, few models consider the interaction between terrestrial water fluxes, and human activities and associated water use, and even fewer models distinguish water use from surface water and groundwater resources. Here, we couple a global water demand model with a global hydrological model and dynamically simulate daily water withdrawal and consumptive water use over the period 1979-2010, using two re-analysis products: ERA-Interim and MERRA. We explicitly take into account the mutual feedback between supply and demand, and implement a newly developed water allocation scheme to distinguish surface water and groundwater use. Moreover, we include a new irrigation scheme, which works dynamically with a daily surface and soil water balance, and incorporate the newly available extensive global reservoir data set (GRanD). Simulated surface water and groundwater withdrawals generally show good agreement with reported national and sub-national statistics. The results show a consistent increase in both surface water and groundwater use worldwide, with a more rapid increase in groundwater use since the 1990s. Human impacts on terrestrial water storage (TWS) signals are evident, altering the seasonal and inter-annual variability. This alteration is particularly large over heavily regulated basins such as the Colorado and the Columbia, and over the major irrigated basins such as the Mississippi, the Indus, and the Ganges. Including human water use and associated reservoir operations generally improves the correlation of simulated TWS anomalies with those of the GRACE observations.

  19. The management of urban surface water flood risks: SUDS performance in flood reduction from extreme events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viavattene, C; Ellis, J B

    2013-01-01

    The need to improve the urban drainage network to meet recent urban growth and the redevelopment of old industrial and commercial areas provides an opportunity for managing urban surface water infrastructure in a more sustainable way. The use of sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) can reduce urban surface water flooding as well as the pollution impact of urban discharges on receiving waters. However, these techniques are not yet well known by many stakeholders involved in the decision-making process, or at least the evidence of their performance effectiveness may be doubted compared with more traditional engineering solutions often promoted by existing 1D/2D drainage models. The use of geographic information systems (GIS) in facilitating the inter-related risk analysis of sewer surface water overflows and urban flooding as well as in better communication with stakeholders is demonstrated in this paper. An innovative coupled 1D/2D urban sewer/overland flow model has been developed and tested in conjunction with a SUDS selection and location tool (SUDSLOC) to enable a robust management approach to surface water flood risks and to improve the resilience of the urban drainage infrastructure. The paper demonstrates the numerical and modelling basis of the integrated 1D/2D and SUDSLOC approach and the working assumptions and flexibility of the application together with some limitations and uncertainties. The role of the SUDSLOC modelling component in quantifying flow, and surcharge reduction benefits arising from the strategic selection and location of differing SUDS controls are also demonstrated for an extreme storm event scenario.

  20. Detecting changes in surface water area of Lake Kyoga sub-basin using remotely sensed imagery in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsubuga, F. W. N.; Botai, Joel O.; Olwoch, Jane M.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW; Kalumba, Ahmed M.; Tsela, Philemon; Adeola, Abiodun M.; Sentongo, Ausi A.; Mearns, Kevin F.

    2017-01-01

    Detection of changes in Earth surface features, for example lakes, is important for understanding the relationships between human and natural phenomena in order to manage better the increasingly scarce natural resources. This work presents a procedure of using modified normalised difference water index (MNDWI) to detect fluctuations of lake surface water area and relate it to a changing climate. The study used radiometrically and geometrically rectified Landsat images for 1986, 1995 and 2010 encompassing the Kyoga Basin lakes of Uganda, in order to investigate the changes in surface water area between the respective years. The standard precipitation index (SPI) and drought severity index (DSI) are applied to show the relationship between variability of surface water area and climate parameters. The present analysis reveals that surface water area fluctuation is linked to rainfall variability. In particular, Lake Kyoga sub-basin lakes experienced an increase in surface water area in 2010 compared to 1986. This work has important implications to water resources management for Lake Kyoga and could be vital to water resource managers across Ugandan lakes.

  1. Kepler Planet Masses and Eccentricities from TTV Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We conduct a uniform analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of 145 planets from 55 Kepler multiplanet systems to infer planet masses and eccentricities. Eighty of these planets do not have previously reported mass and eccentricity measurements. We employ two complementary methods to fit TTVs: Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations based on N-body integration and an analytic fitting approach. Mass measurements of 49 planets, including 12 without previously reported masses, meet our criterion for classification as robust. Using mass and radius measurements, we infer the masses of planets' gaseous envelopes for both our TTV sample as well as transiting planets with radial velocity observations. Insight from analytic TTV formulae allows us to partially circumvent degeneracies inherent to inferring eccentricities from TTV observations. We find that planet eccentricities are generally small, typically a few percent, but in many instances are non-zero.

  2. A Community Multi-Omics Approach towards the Assessment of Surface Water Quality in an Urban River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, David J.; Karpe, Avinash V.; Ahmed, Warish; Cook, Stephen; Morrison, Paul D.; Staley, Christopher; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Palombo, Enzo A.

    2017-01-01

    A multi-omics approach was applied to an urban river system (the Brisbane River (BR), Queensland, Australia) in order to investigate surface water quality and characterize the bacterial population with respect to water contaminants. To do this, bacterial metagenomic amplicon-sequencing using Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the V5–V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene and untargeted community metabolomics using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were utilized. The multi-omics data, in combination with fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) counts, trace metal concentrations (by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) and in-situ water quality measurements collected from various locations along the BR were then used to assess the health of the river ecosystem. Sites sampled represented the transition from less affected (upstream) to polluted (downstream) environments along the BR. Chemometric analysis of the combined datasets indicated a clear separation between the sampled environments. Burkholderiales and Cyanobacteria were common key factors for differentiation of pristine waters. Increased sugar alcohol and short-chain fatty acid production was observed by Actinomycetales and Rhodospirillaceae that are known to form biofilms in urban polluted and brackish waters. Results from this study indicate that a multi-omics approach enables a deep understanding of the health of an aquatic ecosystem, providing insight into the bacterial diversity present and the metabolic output of the population when exposed to environmental contaminants. PMID:28335448

  3. A Community Multi-Omics Approach towards the Assessment of Surface Water Quality in an Urban River System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Beale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A multi-omics approach was applied to an urban river system (the Brisbane River (BR, Queensland, Australia in order to investigate surface water quality and characterize the bacterial population with respect to water contaminants. To do this, bacterial metagenomic amplicon-sequencing using Illumina next-generation sequencing (NGS of the V5–V6 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene and untargeted community metabolomics using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS were utilized. The multi-omics data, in combination with fecal indicator bacteria (FIB counts, trace metal concentrations (by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and in-situ water quality measurements collected from various locations along the BR were then used to assess the health of the river ecosystem. Sites sampled represented the transition from less affected (upstream to polluted (downstream environments along the BR. Chemometric analysis of the combined datasets indicated a clear separation between the sampled environments. Burkholderiales and Cyanobacteria were common key factors for differentiation of pristine waters. Increased sugar alcohol and short-chain fatty acid production was observed by Actinomycetales and Rhodospirillaceae that are known to form biofilms in urban polluted and brackish waters. Results from this study indicate that a multi-omics approach enables a deep understanding of the health of an aquatic ecosystem, providing insight into the bacterial diversity present and the metabolic output of the population when exposed to environmental contaminants.

  4. Imbalance in Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions and its Relationship to the Coastal Zone Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Y. A.; Ozorovich, Y. R.; Salokhiddinov, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    We report here some efforts and results in studying the imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and processes of groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding creating hazards in the coastal zones. Hazards, hydrological and geophysical risk analysis related to imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and groundwater flooding have been to a large extent under-emphasized for coastal zone applications either due to economical limitations or underestimation of significance of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This is particularly true for tsunamis creating salt water intrusion to coastal aquifers, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models, and to increasing mineralization of potable water because of intensive water diversions and also the abundance of highly toxic pollutants (mainly pesticides) in water, air and food, which contribute to the deterioration of the coastal population's health. In the wake of pressing environmental and economic issues, it is of prime importance for the scientific community to shed light onto the great efforts by hydrologists and geophysicists to quantify conceptual uncertainties and to provide quality assurances of potential coastal zone hazard evaluation and prediction under conditions of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions. This paper proposes consideration of two case studies which are important and significant for future understanding of a concept of imbalance in groundwater-surface water interactions and development and essential for feasibility studies of hazards in the coastal zone. The territory of the Aral Sea Region in Central Asia is known as an ecological disaster coastal zone. It is now obvious that, in order to provide reasonable living conditions to the coastal zone population, it is first of all necessary to drastically improve the quality of the water dedicated to human needs. Due

  5. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    types were determined by use of the capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The performance of each method was assessed by using data on recoveries of compounds in fortified surface-water, wastewater, and reagent-water samples. These experiments (referred to as spike experiments) consist of fortifying (or spiking) samples with known amounts of target analytes. Surface-water-spike experiments were performed by using samples obtained from a stream in Colorado (unfiltered method) and a stream in New York (filtered method). Wastewater spike experiments for both the filtered and unfiltered methods were performed by using a treated wastewater obtained from a single wastewater treatment plant in New York. Surface water and wastewater spike experiments were fortified at both low and high concentrations and termed low- and high-level spikes, respectively. Reagent water spikes were assessed in three ways: (1) set spikes, (2) a low-concentration fortification experiment, and (3) a high-concentration fortification experiment. Set spike samples have been determined since 2009, and consist of analysis of fortified reagent water for target compounds included for each group of 10 to18 environmental samples analyzed at the NWQL. The low-concentration and high-concentration reagent spike experiments, by contrast, represent a one-time assessment of method performance. For each spike experiment, mean recoveries ranging from 60 to 130 percent indicate low bias, and relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than ( Of the compounds included in the filtered method, 21 had mean recoveries ranging from 63 to 129 percent for the low-level and high-level surface-water spikes, and had low ()132 percent]. For wastewater spikes, 24 of the compounds included in the filtered method had recoveries ranging from 61 to 130 percent for the low-level and high-level spikes. RSDs were 130 percent) or variable recoveries (RSDs >30 percent) for low-level wastewater spikes, or low recoveries ( Of

  6. Data Validation Package October 2016 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Sampling Period: October 10–12, 2016. This semiannual event includes sampling groundwater and surface water at the Monticello Disposal and Processing Sites. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated) and Program Directive MNT-2016-01. Samples were collected from 54 of 64 planned locations (16 of 17 former mill site wells, 15 of 18 downgradient wells, 7 of 9 downgradient permeable reactive barrier wells, 3 of 3 bedrock wells, 4 of 7 seeps and wetlands, and 9 of 10 surface water locations).

  7. Integrated analysis of rock mass deformation within shaft protective pillar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Warchala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the rock mass deformation resulting from mining in the vicinity of the shaft protection pillar. A methodology of deformation prediction is based on a deterministic method using Finite Element Method (FEM. The FEM solution is based on the knowledge of the geomechanical properties of the various geological formations, tectonic faults, types of mining systems, and the complexity of the behaviour of the rock mass. The analysis gave the stress and displacement fields in the rock mass. Results of the analysis will allow for design of an optimal mining system. The analysis is illustrated by an example of the shaft R-VIII Rudna Mine KGHM Polish Copper SA.

  8. Spatial-Temporal dynamics of surface water flooding and consequences for emergency services accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Ian; Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Bosher, Lee; Wilby, Rob; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas are increasingly susceptible to surface water flooding, with more intense precipitation and intensification of land development. Flooding has both direct impacts i.e. locations inundated with water, and indirect impacts i.e. transport networks, utility e.g. electricity/water services etc. The direct areas flooded evolve in space through the event, and are predicted by standard inundation models. However, the wider indirect impacts and the spatial-temporal patterns are less constrained and it is these that are needed to manage the impacts in real-time. This paper focusses on the Category One responders of the Fire and Rescue and Ambulance Services in the City of Leicester, East Midlands, UK. Leicester is ranked 16th out of 4215 settlements at risk of surface water flooding in the UK based upon the population at risk (15,200 people) (DEFRA, 2009). The analysis undertaken involved overlaying the flood extent with the Integrated Transport Network (ITN) data within a GIS framework. Then a simple transport routing algorithm was used to predict the travel time from specific nodes representing ambulance or fire stations to different parts of the city. Flood magnitudes with 1:20, 1:100 and 1:1000 return periods have been investigated. Under a scenario of no flooding, 100% of the city is accessible by the six fire stations in the city. However, in the 1 in 20 year surface water flood event the peak inundation results in 66.5% being accessible in the 10 minute permitted time and 6% is totally inaccessible. This falls to 40% and 13% respectively for the 1 in 100 year event. Maps show the area of the city that are accessible by two or more stations within the permitted response time, which shows these areas are the most resilient to surface water flooding. However, it isn't just the peak water depths at every location which impacts accessibility within the city but the spatial-temporal patterns of the inundation. The areas within the 10 minute response time expand

  9. Impact of river restoration on groundwater - surface water - interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Anne-Marie; Schirmer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Since the end of the 19th century, flood protection was increasingly based on the construction of impermeable dams and side walls (BWG, 2003). In spite of providing flood protection, these measures also limited the connectivity between the river and the land, restricted the area available for flooding, and hampered the natural flow dynamics of the river. Apart from the debilitating effect on riverine ecosystems due to loss of habitats, these measures also limited bank filtration, inhibited the infiltration of storm water, and affected groundwater-surface water-interactions. This in turn had a profound effect on ecosystem health, as a lack of groundwater-surface water interactions led to decreased cycling of pollutants and nutrients in the hyporheic zone and limited the moderation of the water temperature (EA, 2009). In recent decades, it has become apparent that further damages to riverine ecosystems must be prohibited, as the damages to ecology, economy and society surmount any benefits gained from exploiting them. Nowadays, the restoration of rivers is a globally accepted means to restore ecosystem functioning, protect water resources and amend flood protection (Andrea et al., 2012; Palmer et al., 2005; Wortley et al., 2013). In spite of huge efforts regarding the restoration of rivers over the last 30 years, the question of its effectiveness remains, as river restorations often reconstruct a naturally looking rather than a naturally functioning stream (EA, 2009). We therefore focussed our research on the effectiveness of river restorations, represented by the groundwater-surface water-interactions. Given a sufficiently high groundwater level, a lack of groundwater-surface water-interactions after restoration may indicate that the vertical connectivity in the stream was not fully restored. In order to investigate groundwater-surface water-interactions we determined the thermal signature on the stream bed and in +/- 40 cm depth by using Distributed Temperature

  10. Status of persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals in surface water of Arctic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Trace pollutants in the surface water of the Arctic region have been analyzed by the capillary gas chromatography with the micro-electron capture detector (GC- μECD), the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC- MS) and the inductively coupled plasmas-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Compared with previously reported studies, concentrations of OCPs in these regions are much lower than those in the last decades. The ratio of α-/γ-HCH indicates the different pesticide composition between these two regions and is the potential marker for the source of the OCPs. Many other OCPs with different residue patterns have also been found for the first time in the two regions. No heavy metal contaminant was found in the investigation regions.

  11. Numerical Analysis of a Blocking Mass Attenuating Wave Propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianzhong Wang; Xiongliang Yao; Qiangyong Wang; Shuai Lv

    2011-01-01

    Based on wave theory,blocking mass impeding propagation of flexural waves was analyzed with force excitation applied on a ship pedestal.The analysis model of a complex structure was developed by combining statistical energy analysis and the finite element method.Based on the hybrid FE-SEA method,the vibro-acoustic response of a complex structure was solved.Then,the sound radiation of a cylindrical shell model influenced by blocking mass was calculated in mid/high frequency.The result shows that blocking mass has an obvious effect on impeding propagation.The study provides a theoretical and experimental basis for application of the blocking mass to structure-borne sound propagation control.

  12. Nitrogen surface water retention in the Baltic Sea drainage basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stålnacke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we estimate the surface water retention of nitrogen (N in all the 117 drainage basins to the Baltic Sea with the use of a statistical model (MESAW for source apportionment of riverine loads of pollutants. Our results show that the MESAW model was able to estimate the N load at the river mouth of 88 Baltic Sea rivers, for which we had observed data, with a sufficient degree of precision and accuracy. The estimated retention parameters were also statistically significant. Our results show that around 380 000 t of N are annually retained in surface waters draining to the Baltic Sea. The total annual riverine load from the 117 basins to the Baltic Sea was estimated to 570 000 t of N, giving a total surface water N retention of around 40%. In terms of absolute retention values, three major river basins account for 50% of the total retention in the 117 basins; i.e. around 104 000 t of N is retained in Neva, 55 000 t in Vistula and 32 000 t in Oder. The largest retention was found in river basins with a high percentage of lakes as indicated by a strong relationship between N retention (% and share of lake area in the river drainage areas. For example in Göta älv, we estimated a total N retention of 72%, whereof 67% of the retention occurred in the lakes of that drainage area (Lake Vänern primarily. The obtained results will hopefully enable the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM to refine the nutrient load targets in the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP, as well as to better identify cost-efficient measures to reduce nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea.

  13. Analysis of chirality by femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Philipp; Urbasch, Gunter; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2012-09-01

    Recent progress in the field of chirality analysis employing laser ionization mass spectrometry is reviewed. Emphasis is given to femtosecond (fs) laser ionization work from the author's group. We begin by reviewing fundamental aspects of determining circular dichroism (CD) in fs-laser ionization mass spectrometry (fs-LIMS) discussing an example from the literature (resonant fs-LIMS of 3-methylcyclopentanone). Second, we present new data indicating CD in non-resonant fs-LIMS of propylene oxide.

  14. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R(2), RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  15. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R2, RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  16. Groundwater–surface water interactions in wetlands for integrated water resources management (preface)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Winter, T.C.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater–surface water interactions constitute an important link between wetlands and the surrounding catchment. Wetlands may develop in topographic lows where groundwater exfiltrates. This water has its functions for ecological processes within the wetland, while surface water outflow from

  17. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  18. Surface waters of Illinois River basin in Arkansas and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, L.L.

    1959-01-01

    flow during the 19-year base period, an impoundment at that site would have required a usable storage of 185,000 acre-ft to satisfy this demand during the drought years 1954-1956. The surface waters of the Illinois River basin are excellent quality being suitable for municipal, agriculture and most industrial uses. The average concentration of the dissolved mineral content is about 105 ppm (parts per million) and the hardness about 85 ppm. The water is slightly alkaline, having a range of pH values from 7.2 to 8.0. This report gives the estimated average discharge at gaging stations and approximations of average discharge at the State line for 3 sub-basins during the 19-year period October 1937 to September 1956, used as a base period in this report. Duration-of-flow data for various percentages of the time are shown for the period of observed record at the gaging stations; similar data are estimated for the selected base period. Storage requirements to sustain flow during the recent drought years are given for 3 stations. The streamflow records in the basin are presented on a monthly and annual basis through September 1957; provisional records for 3 stations are included through July 1958 for correlation purposes. Results of discharge measurements are given for miscellaneous sites where low-flow observations have been made. (available as photostat copy only)

  19. Assessment of surface-water quantity and quality, Eagle River watershed, Colorado, 1947-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cory A.; Moore, Jennifer L.; Richards, Rodney J.

    2011-01-01

    From the early mining days to the current tourism-based economy, the Eagle River watershed (ERW) in central Colorado has undergone a sequence of land-use changes that has affected the hydrology, habitat, and water quality of the area. In 2000, the USGS, in cooperation with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, Eagle County, Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, Colorado Department of Transportation, City of Aurora, Town of Eagle, Town of Gypsum, Town of Minturn, Town of Vail, Vail Resorts, City of Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs Utilities, and Denver Water, initiated a retrospective analysis of surface-water quantity and quality in the ERW.

  20. Characterization of Surface Water and Groundwater Quality in the Lower Tano River Basin Using Statistical and Isotopic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjah, Adwoba; Stenni, Barbara; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Dreossi, Giuliano; Tetteh Akiti, Thomas; Yidana, Sandow

    2017-04-01

    Adwoba Kua- Manza Edjaha, Barbara Stennib,c,Giuliano Dreossib, Giulio Cozzic, Clara Turetta c,T.T Akitid ,Sandow Yidanae a,eDepartment of Earth Science, University of Ghana Legon, Ghana West Africa bDepartment of Enviromental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, Ca Foscari University of Venice, Italy cInstitute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes, CNR, Venice, Italy dDepartment of Nuclear Application and Techniques, Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences University of Ghana Legon This research is part of a PhD research work "Hydrogeological Assessment of the Lower Tano river basin for sustainable economic usage, Ghana, West - Africa". In this study, the researcher investigated surface water and groundwater quality in the Lower Tano river basin. This assessment was based on some selected sampling sites associated with mining activities, and the development of oil and gas. Statistical approach was applied to characterize the quality of surface water and groundwater. Also, water stable isotopes, which is a natural tracer of the hydrological cycle was used to investigate the origin of groundwater recharge in the basin. The study revealed that Pb and Ni values of the surface water and groundwater samples exceeded the WHO standards for drinking water. In addition, water quality index (WQI), based on physicochemical parameters(EC, TDS, pH) and major ions(Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, HCO3-,NO3-, CL-, SO42-, K+) exhibited good quality water for 60% of the sampled surface water and groundwater. Other statistical techniques, such as Heavy metal pollution index (HPI), degree of contamination (Cd), and heavy metal evaluation index (HEI), based on trace element parameters in the water samples, reveal that 90% of the surface water and groundwater samples belong to high level of pollution. Principal component analysis (PCA) also suggests that the water quality in the basin is likely affected by rock - water interaction and anthropogenic activities (sea water intrusion). This

  1. The impact of land use on microbial surface water pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Christiane; Rechenburg, Andrea; Rind, Esther; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Our knowledge relating to water contamination from point and diffuse sources has increased in recent years and there have been many studies undertaken focusing on effluent from sewage plants or combined sewer overflows. However, there is still only a limited amount of microbial data on non-point sources leading to diffuse pollution of surface waters. In this study, the concentrations of several indicator micro-organisms and pathogens in the upper reaches of a river system were examined over a period of 16 months. In addition to bacteria, diffuse pollution caused by Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. was analysed. A single land use type predestined to cause high concentrations of all microbial parameters could not be identified. The influence of different land use types varies between microbial species. The microbial concentration in river water cannot be explained by stable non-point effluent concentrations from different land use types. There is variation in the ranking of the potential of different land use types resulting in surface water contamination with regard to minimum, median and maximum effects. These differences between median and maximum impact indicate that small-scale events like spreading manure substantially influence the general contamination potential of a land use type and may cause increasing micro-organism concentrations in the river water by mobilisation during the next rainfall event. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Index of surface-water stations in Texas, January 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Jack; Carrillo, E.R.; Buckner, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    As of January 1, 1987, the surface-water data-collection network in Texas included 376 continuous streamflow, 76 continuous or daily reservoir-content, 34 gage height, 16 crest-stage partial-record, 8 periodic discharge through range, 33 floodhydrograph partial-record, 9 flood-profile partial-record, 36 low-flow partial-record, 46 daily chemical-quality, 19 continuous-recording water-quality, 84 periodic biological, 17 lake surveys, 162 periodic organic and (or) nutrient, 3 periodic insecticide, 42 periodic pesticide, 19 automatic sampler, 141 periodic minor elements, 130 periodic chemical-quality, 78 periodic physical-organic, 22 continuous-recording three- or four-parameter water-quality, 34 periodic sediment, 22 continuous-recording temperature, and 30 national stream-quality accounting network stations. Plate 1 shows the location of surface-water streamflow or reservoir-content and chemical-quality or sediment'stations in Texas. Plate 2 shows the location of partial-record surfacewater stations.

  3. Global Occurrence and Emission of Rotaviruses to Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M. Kiulia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Group A rotaviruses (RV are the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children globally. Waterborne transmission of RV and the presence of RV in water sources are of major public health importance. In this paper, we present the Global Waterborne Pathogen model for RV (GloWPa-Rota model to estimate the global distribution of RV emissions to surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first model to do so. We review the literature to estimate three RV specific variables for the model: incidence, excretion rate and removal during wastewater treatment. We estimate total global RV emissions to be 2 × 1018 viral particles/grid/year, of which 87% is produced by the urban population. Hotspot regions with high RV emissions are urban areas in densely populated parts of the world, such as Bangladesh and Nigeria, while low emissions are found in rural areas in North Russia and the Australian desert. Even for industrialized regions with high population density and without tertiary treatment, such as the UK, substantial emissions are estimated. Modeling exercises like the one presented in this paper provide unique opportunities to further study these emissions to surface water, their sources and scenarios for improved management.

  4. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  5. Reducing phosphorus loading of surface water using iron-coated sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenenberg, J.E.; Chardon, W.J.; Koopmans, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus losses from agricultural soils is an important source of P in surface waters leading to surface water quality impairment. In addition to reducing P inputs, mitigation measures are needed to reduce P enrichment of surface waters. Because drainage of agricultural land by pipe drainage is an

  6. Using fluorescent dissolved organic matter to trace and distinguish the origin of Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Granskog, Mats A.; Bracher, Astrid; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Dodd, Paul A.; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2016-09-01

    Climate change affects the Arctic with regards to permafrost thaw, sea-ice melt, alterations to the freshwater budget and increased export of terrestrial material to the Arctic Ocean. The Fram and Davis Straits represent the major gateways connecting the Arctic and Atlantic. Oceanographic surveys were performed in the Fram and Davis Straits, and on the east Greenland Shelf (EGS), in late summer 2012/2013. Meteoric (fmw), sea-ice melt, Atlantic and Pacific water fractions were determined and the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) were characterized. In Fram Strait and EGS, a robust correlation between visible wavelength fluorescence and fmw was apparent, suggesting it as a reliable tracer of polar waters. However, a pattern was observed which linked the organic matter characteristics to the origin of polar waters. At depth in Davis Strait, visible wavelength FDOM was correlated to apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and traced deep-water DOM turnover. In surface waters FDOM characteristics could distinguish between surface waters from eastern (Atlantic + modified polar waters) and western (Canada-basin polar waters) Arctic sectors. The findings highlight the potential of designing in situ multi-channel DOM fluorometers to trace the freshwater origins and decipher water mass mixing dynamics in the region without laborious samples analyses.

  7. Surface waters as a sink and source of atmospheric gas phase ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, G Brooks; Foley, Laura; Carroll, Angela L; Roebuck, Jesse Alan; Guy, Amanda; Mead, Ralph N; Kieber, Robert J; Willey, Joan D; Skrabal, Stephen A; Felix, J David; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Helms, John R

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the first ethanol concentrations in fresh and estuarine waters and greatly expands the current data set for coastal ocean waters. Concentrations for 153 individual measurements of 11 freshwater sites ranged from 5 to 598 nM. Concentrations obtained for one estuarine transect ranged from 56 to 77 nM and levels in five coastal ocean depth profiles ranged from 81 to 334 nM. Variability in ethanol concentrations was high and appears to be driven primarily by photochemical and biological processes. 47 gas phase concentrations of ethanol were also obtained during this study to determine the surface water degree of saturation with respect to the atmosphere. Generally fresh and estuarine waters were undersaturated indicating they are not a source and may be a net sink for atmospheric ethanol in this region. Aqueous phase ethanol is likely converted rapidly to acetaldehyde in these aquatic ecosystems creating the undersaturated conditions resulting in this previously unrecognized sink for atmospheric ethanol. Coastal ocean waters may act as either a sink or source of atmospheric ethanol depending on the partial pressure of ethanol in the overlying air mass. Results from this study are significant because they suggest that surface waters may act as an important vector for the uptake of ethanol emitted into the atmosphere including ethanol from biofuel production and usage.

  8. A Systematic SO(10) Operator Analysis for Fermion Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, G; Dimopoulos, Savas K; Hall, L J; Starkman, G

    1994-01-01

    A new approach for deducing the theory of fermion masses at the scale of grand unification is proposed. Combining SO(10) grand unification, family symmetries and supersymmetry with a systematic operator analysis, the minimal set of fermion mass operators consistent with low energy data is determined. Exploiting the full power of SO(10) to relate up, down and charged lepton mass matrices, we obtain predictions for 7 of the mass and mixing parameters. The assumptions upon which the operator search and resulting predictions are based are stressed, together with a discussion of how the predictions are affected by a relaxation of some of the assumptions.The masses of the heaviest generation, $m_t,m_b$ and $m_\\tau$, are generated from a single renormalizable Yukawa interaction, while the lighter masses and the mixing angles are generated by non-renormalizable operators of the grand unified theory. The hierarchy of masses and mixing angles is thereby related to the ratio of grand to Planck scales, $M_G / M_P$. An ex...

  9. Rapid Analysis of Mass Distribution of Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Shielding Evaluation Toolset (RADSET) is a computer program that rapidly calculates the spatial distribution of mass of an arbitrary structure for use in ray-tracing analysis of the radiation-shielding properties of the structure. RADSET was written to be used in conjunction with unmodified commercial computer-aided design (CAD) software that provides access to data on the structure and generates selected three-dimensional-appearing views of the structure. RADSET obtains raw geometric, material, and mass data on the structure from the CAD software. From these data, RADSET calculates the distribution(s) of the masses of specific materials about any user-specified point(s). The results of these mass-distribution calculations are imported back into the CAD computing environment, wherein the radiation-shielding calculations are performed.

  10. Multiple Mass Analysis Using an Ion Trap Array (ITA) Mass Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses.

  11. Distribution, sources, and risk assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls in surface waters and sediments of rivers in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueping; Han, Jingchao; Bi, Chunjuan; Huang, Xing; Jia, Jinpu; Chen, Zhenlou

    2016-10-01

    The distribution, sources, and potential risks of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination in the rivers of Shanghai, China were investigated. Fourteen PCB congeners in surface waters and sediments, which were collected from 53 sampling sites, were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The total concentrations of PCBs in the dissolved phase, in particulates, and in sediments ranged from not detected (nd) to 34.8 ng•L‒1, from 0.76 to 39.71 ng•L‒1, and from 1.46 to 46.11 ng•g-1 (dry weight, dw), respectively. The corresponding WHO toxic equivalents (TEQs) of dioxinlike polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) ranged between nd-1135.63 pg TEQ•L-1, 0.02-605.94 pg TEQ•L-1, and 0.05-432.12 pg TEQ•g-1 dw, respectively. The penta-CBs, especially PCB 118 and PCB 105, were the dominant congeners in all samples. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) indicated that the PCBs were mainly influenced by a historical accumulation of commercial PCB products, the burning of house coal, and emissions from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and secondary metallurgy industries. The center of Shanghai was significantly affected by PCB contamination, followed by the industrial parklands and suburban towns, while the farmland of Chongming Island was the least affected area. Adverse biological and health effects would be likely in the central urban areas, industrial parks, and residential towns of Shanghai.

  12. Body mass index in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, M.A. van der; Dicke, H.C.; Uc, E.Y.; Kentin, Z.H.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.; Munneke, M.

    2012-01-01

    Prior work suggested that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than controls, but evidence is inconclusive. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis on BMI in PD. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl and Scopus to identify cohort studies on BMI in PD, published befo

  13. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  14. AMIDST: Analysis of MassIve Data STreams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masegosa, Andres; Martinez, Ana Maria; Borchani, Hanen

    2015-01-01

    The Analysis of MassIve Data STreams (AMIDST) Java toolbox provides a collection of scalable and parallel algorithms for inference and learning of hybrid Bayesian networks from data streams. The toolbox, available at http://amidst.github.io/toolbox/ under the Apache Software License version 2...

  15. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  16. On-Line Synthesis and Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Ryan M.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Raab, Shannon A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students learn how to use ESI to accelerate chemical synthesis and to couple it with on-line mass spectrometry for structural analysis. The Hantzsch synthesis of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines is a classic example of a one-pot reaction in which multiple intermediates can serve to indicate the progress of the reaction…

  17. New Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Lipid Analysis*

    OpenAIRE

    Robert C. Murphy; Gaskell, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful tool for the analysis of all lipids. Lipidomic analysis of biological systems using various approaches is now possible with a quantitative measurement of hundreds of lipid molecular species. Although availability of reference and internal standards lags behind the field, approaches using stable isotope-labeled derivative tagging permit precise determination of specific phospholipids in an experimental series. The use of reactivity of ozone has enabl...

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of surface water networks across a global biodiversity hotspot—implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, Mirela G.; Kininmonth, Stuart; Broich, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The concept of habitat networks represents an important tool for landscape conservation and management at regional scales. Previous studies simulated degradation of temporally fixed networks but few quantified the change in network connectivity from disintegration of key features that undergo naturally occurring spatiotemporal dynamics. This is particularly of concern for aquatic systems, which typically show high natural spatiotemporal variability. Here we focused on the Swan Coastal Plain, a bioregion that encompasses a global biodiversity hotspot in Australia with over 1500 water bodies of high biodiversity. Using graph theory, we conducted a temporal analysis of water body connectivity over 13 years of variable climate. We derived large networks of surface water bodies using Landsat data (1999-2011). We generated an ensemble of 278 potential networks at three dispersal distances approximating the maximum dispersal distance of different water dependent organisms. We assessed network connectivity through several network topology metrics and quantified the resilience of the network topology during wet and dry phases. We identified ‘stepping stone’ water bodies across time and compared our networks with theoretical network models with known properties. Results showed a highly dynamic seasonal pattern of variability in network topology metrics. A decline in connectivity over the 13 years was noted with potential negative consequences for species with limited dispersal capacity. The networks described here resemble theoretical scale-free models, also known as ‘rich get richer’ algorithm. The ‘stepping stone’ water bodies are located in the area around the Peel-Harvey Estuary, a Ramsar listed site, and some are located in a national park. Our results describe a powerful approach that can be implemented when assessing the connectivity for a particular organism with known dispersal distance. The approach of identifying the surface water bodies that act as

  19. Natural and artificial radioactivity in surface waters of the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujol, Ll.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A

    2000-11-01

    A radiological characterisation of surface waters of the Ebro river basin was carried out during November 1994. For this purpose, 75 water samples were collected from points distributed throughout the Ebro river basin. Analysis included gross alpha and gross beta activities, relevant natural radionuclides ({sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 234,238}U -uranium total-) and several artificial radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr and radiocaesium). Mean gross alpha and gross beta activities in surface waters of the river's main course were 0.095{+-}0.004 and 0.213{+-}0.012 Bq l{sup -1}, respectively. Mean activities of {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and uranium (total) were 0.132{+-}0.009, 0.0282{+-}0.0008 and 0.053{+-}0.006 Bq l{sup -1}, respectively. Regarding artificial radionuclides, the mean {sup 90}Sr activity was 6.6{+-}0.3 mBq l{sup -1}, {sup 3}H was detected in 8% of the samples, and radiocaesium was not detected in any sample. It is estimated that almost 100% of gross alpha and 97% of gross beta activities of surface waters in the Ebro river came from natural sources. Furthermore, results showed that the geological setting, large cities, agricultural areas and dams strongly influence the occurrence of natural radionuclides. Contamination from nuclear power plants located along the river was not detected. Finally, we estimated that the annual dose equivalent due to the hypothetical ingestion of Ebro river waters was 7.59 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}, which represented only 0.3% of the average annual effective dose attributable to natural background radiation in the area.

  20. Wind and sunlight shape microbial diversity in surface waters of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica A; Aylward, Frank O; Eppley, John M; Karl, David M; Church, Matthew J; DeLong, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    Few microbial time-series studies have been conducted in open ocean habitats having low seasonal variability such as the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), where surface waters experience comparatively mild seasonal variation. To better describe microbial seasonal variability in this habitat, we analyzed rRNA amplicon and shotgun metagenomic data over two years at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA. We postulated that this relatively stable habitat might reveal different environmental factors that influence planktonic microbial community diversity than those previously observed in more seasonally dynamic habitats. Unexpectedly, the data showed that microbial diversity at 25 m was positively correlated with average wind speed 3 to 10 days prior to sampling. In addition, microbial community composition at 25 m exhibited significant correlations with solar irradiance. Many bacterial groups whose relative abundances varied with solar radiation corresponded to taxa known to exhibit strong seasonality in other oceanic regions. Network co-correlation analysis of 25 m communities showed seasonal transitions in composition, and distinct successional cohorts of co-occurring phylogenetic groups. Similar network analyses of metagenomic data also indicated distinct seasonality in genes originating from cyanophage, and several bacterial clades including SAR116 and SAR324. At 500 m, microbial community diversity and composition did not vary significantly with any measured environmental parameters. The minimal seasonal variability in the NPSG facilitated detection of more subtle environmental influences, such as episodic wind variation, on surface water microbial diversity. Community composition in NPSG surface waters varied in response to solar irradiance, but less dramatically than reported in other ocean provinces. PMID:26645474

  1. Surface water - groundwater interactions at different spatial and temporal scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebök, Éva

    in lowland catchments, mainly exploring and assessing Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) which by detecting variability in temperatures at the Sediment-Water Interface (SWI) can indirectly map variability in groundwater discharge at several spatial and temporal scales. On the small-scale (...As there is a growing demand for the protection and optimal management of both the surface water and groundwater resources, the understanding of their exchange processes is of great importance. This PhD study aimed at describing the natural spatial and temporal variability of these interactions...... detected large spatial variability in SWI temperatures with scattered high-discharge sites in a stream and also in a lake where discharge fluxes were estimated by vertical temperature profiles and seepage meter measurements. On the kilometre scale DTS indicated less spatial variability in streambed...

  2. Groundwater surface water interaction study using natural isotopes tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Kim, Yong Chul; Cho, Soo Young; Lee, Kil Yong

    2015-04-01

    Tritium and stable isotopes are a component of the water molecule, they are the most conservative tracer for groundwater study. And also, radon is natural radioactive nuclide and well dissolved in groundwater. Therefore, these isotopes are used natural tracer for the study of surface water and groundwater interaction of water curtain greenhouse area. The study area used groundwater as a water curtain for warming tool of greenhouse during the winter, and is associated with issues of groundwater shortage while being subject to groundwater-river water interaction. During the winter time, these interactions were studied by using Rn-222, stable isotopes and H-3. These interaction was monitored in multi depth well and linear direction well of groundwater flow. And dam effect was also compared. Samples were collected monthly from October 2013 to April 2014. Radon and tritium were analyzed using Quantulus low background liquid scintillation counter and stable isotopes were analyzed using an IRIS (Isotope Ratio Infrared Spectroscopy ; L2120-i, Picarro). During the winter time, radon concentration was varied from 0.07 Bq/L to 8.9 Bq/L and different interaction was showed between dam. Surface water intrusion was severe at February and restored April when greenhouse warming was ended. The stable isotope results showed different trend with depth and ranged from -9.16 ‰ to -7.24 ‰ for δ 18O value, while the δD value was ranged from -57.86 ‰ to -50.98 ‰. The groundwater age as dated by H-3 was ranged 0.23 Bq/L - 0.59 Bq/L with an average value of 0.37 Bq/L.

  3. Surface-Water Conditions in Georgia, Water Year 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jaime A.; Landers, Mark N.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center-in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies-collected surface-water streamflow, water-quality, and ecological data during the 2005 Water Year (October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005). These data were compiled into layers of an interactive ArcReaderTM published map document (pmf). ArcReaderTM is a product of Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc (ESRI?). Datasets represented on the interactive map are * continuous daily mean streamflow * continuous daily mean water levels * continuous daily total precipitation * continuous daily water quality (water temperature, specific conductance dissolved oxygen, pH, and turbidity) * noncontinuous peak streamflow * miscellaneous streamflow measurements * lake or reservoir elevation * periodic surface-water quality * periodic ecological data * historical continuous daily mean streamflow discontinued prior to the 2005 water year The map interface provides the ability to identify a station in spatial reference to the political boundaries of the State of Georgia and other features-such as major streams, major roads, and other collection stations. Each station is hyperlinked to a station summary showing seasonal and annual stream characteristics for the current year and for the period of record. For continuous discharge stations, the station summary includes a one page graphical summary page containing five graphs, a station map, and a photograph of the station. The graphs provide a quick overview of the current and period-of-record hydrologic conditions of the station by providing a daily mean discharge graph for the water year, monthly statistics graph for the water year and period of record, an annual mean streamflow graph for the period of record, an annual minimum 7-day average streamflow graph for the period of record, and an annual peak streamflow graph for the period of record. Additionally, data can be accessed through the layer's link

  4. Groundwater recharge in suburban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam: effect of decreasing surface-water bodies and land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Hayashi, Takeshi; Do, An Thuan; Canh, Vu Duc; Nga, Tran Thi Viet; Funabiki, Ayako; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Over-exploited groundwater is expected to remain the predominant source of domestic water in suburban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. In order to evaluate the effect on groundwater recharge, of decreasing surface-water bodies and land-use change caused by urbanization, the relevant groundwater systems and recharge pathways must be characterized in detail. To this end, water levels and water quality were monitored for 3 years regarding groundwater and adjacent surface-water bodies, at two typical suburban sites in Hanoi. Stable isotope (δ18O, δD of water) analysis and hydrochemical analysis showed that the water from both aquifers and aquitards, including the groundwater obtained from both the monitoring wells and the neighboring household tubewells, was largely derived from evaporation-affected surface-water bodies (e.g., ponds, irrigated farmlands) rather than from rivers. The water-level monitoring results suggested distinct local-scale flow systems for both a Holocene unconfined aquifer (HUA) and Pleistocene confined aquifer (PCA). That is, in the case of the HUA, lateral recharge through the aquifer from neighboring ponds and/or irrigated farmlands appeared to be dominant, rather than recharge by vertical rainwater infiltration. In the case of the PCA, recharge by the above-lying HUA, through areas where the aquitard separating the two aquifers was relatively thin or nonexistent, was suggested. As the decrease in the local surface-water bodies will likely reduce the groundwater recharge, maintaining and enhancing this recharge (through preservation of the surface-water bodies) is considered as essential for the sustainable use of groundwater in the area.

  5. Formation and characteristics of biomimetic mineralo-organic particles in natural surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Young, David; Liu, Chien-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Young, John D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles exist in environmental water but the formation, characteristics and fate of such particles remain incompletely understood. We show here that surface water obtained from various sources (ocean, hot springs, and soil) produces mineralo-organic particles that gradually increase in size and number during incubation. Seawater produces mineralo-organic particles following several cycles of filtration and incubation, indicating that this water possesses high particle-seeding potential. Electron microscopy observations reveal round, bacteria-like mineral particles with diameters of 20 to 800 nm, which may coalesce and aggregate to form mineralized biofilm-like structures. Chemical analysis of the particles shows the presence of a wide range of chemical elements that form mixed mineral phases dominated by calcium and iron sulfates, silicon and aluminum oxides, sodium carbonate, and iron sulfide. Proteomic analysis indicates that the particles bind to proteins of bacterial, plant and animal origins. When observed under dark-field microscopy, mineral particles derived from soil-water show biomimetic morphologies, including large, round structures similar to cells undergoing division. These findings have important implications not only for the recognition of biosignatures and fossils of small microorganisms in the environment but also for the geochemical cycling of elements, ions and organic matter in surface water.

  6. Contrasting optical properties of surface waters across the Fram Strait and its potential biological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Alexey K.; Granskog, Mats A.; Stedmon, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    radiation (PAR, 400-700nm), but does result in notable differences in ultraviolet (UV) light penetration, with higher attenuation in the EGC. Future changes in the Arctic Ocean system will likely affect EGC through diminishing sea-ice cover and potentially increasing CDOM export due to increase in river......Underwater light regime is controlled by distribution and optical properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and particulate matter. The Fram Strait is a region where two contrasting water masses are found. Polar water in the East Greenland Current (EGC) and Atlantic water in the West...... Spitsbergen Current (WSC) differ with regards to temperature, salinity and optical properties. We present data on absorption properties of CDOM and particles across the Fram Strait (along 79° N), comparing Polar and Atlantic surface waters in September 2009 and 2010. CDOM absorption of Polar water in the EGC...

  7. Assessment of hyporheic zone, flood-plain, soil-gas, soil, and surface-water contamination at the Old Incinerator Area, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Falls, W. Fred; Caldwell, Andral W.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.; Landmeyer, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, Georgia, assessed the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, soil, and surface-water for contaminants at the Old Incinerator Area at Fort Gordon, from October 2009 to September 2010. The assessment included the detection of organic contaminants in the hyporheic zone, flood plain, soil gas, and surface water. In addition, the organic contaminant assessment included the analysis of explosives and chemical agents in selected areas. Inorganic contaminants were assessed in soil and surface-water samples. The assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to the U.S. Army at Fort Gordon pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Total petroleum hydrocarbons were detected above the method detection level in all 13 samplers deployed in the hyporheic zone and flood plain of an unnamed tributary to Spirit Creek. The combined concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene were detected at 3 of the 13 samplers. Other organic compounds detected in one sampler included octane and trichloroethylene. In the passive soil-gas survey, 28 of the 60 samplers detected total petroleum hydrocarbons above the method detection level. Additionally, 11 of the 60 samplers detected the combined masses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylene above the method detection level. Other compounds detected above the method detection level in the passive soil-gas survey included octane, trimethylbenzene, perchlorethylene, and chloroform. Subsequent to the passive soil-gas survey, six areas determined to have relatively high contaminant mass were selected, and soil-gas samplers were deployed, collected, and analyzed for explosives and chemical agents. No explosives or chemical agents were detected above

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of surface water pollution in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, Gert-Jan; Becker, Mathias; Nga, La Thi; Sebesvari, Zita; Renaud, Fabrice G

    2014-07-01

    Surface water pollution in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta (MD) could threaten human, animal and ecosystem health given the fact that this water source is intensively used for drinking, irrigation and domestic services. We therefore determined the levels of pollution by organic pollutants, salts, metals and microbial indicators by (bi)monthly monitoring of canals between November 2011 and July 2012 at 32 sampling locations, representing fresh and saline/brackish environments. The results were compared with national water quality guidelines, between the studied regions and with water quality data from main waterways. Key factors explaining the observed levels of pollution in surface water were identified through principal component analysis (PCA). Temporal variations due to tidal regime and seasonality were also assessed. Based on regression models, the spatial variability of five water quality parameters was visualized using GIS based maps. Results indicate that pH (max. 8.6), turbidity (max. 461 FTU), maximum concentrations of ammonium (14.7 mg L(-1)), arsenic (44.1 μg L(-1)), barium (157.5 μg L(-1)), chromium (84.7 μg L(-1)), mercury (45.5 μg L(-1)), manganese (1659.7 μg L(-1)), aluminum (14.5 mg L(-1)), iron (17.0 mg L(-1)) and the number of Escherichia coli (87,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) and total coliforms (2,500,000 CFU 100 mL(-1)) in canals exceed the thresholds set by Vietnamese quality guidelines for drinking and domestic purposes. The PCA showed that i) urbanization; ii) metal leaching from soils; iii) aquaculture; and iv) tidal regime explain 85% of the variance of surface water quality attributes. Significant differences in water quality were found due to daily tidal regime and as a result of seasonality. Surface water quality maps for dissolved oxygen, ammonium, ortho-phosphate, manganese and total coliforms were developed to highlight hot-spot areas of pollution. The results of this study can assist policy makers in developing water management strategies

  9. Characterizing the Interaction between Groundwater and Surface Water in the Boise River for Water Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, J.; Tan, K.; Portugais, B.

    2014-12-01

    Management of water resources has increasingly become aware of the importance of considering groundwater and surface water as an interconnected, single resource. Surface water is commonly hydraulically connected to groundwater, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. Such a conjunctive approach has often been left out of water-management considerations because of a lack of understanding of the processes occurring. The goal of this research is to increase the better understanding of the interaction between the surface water and groundwater using the study case of the Treasure Valley Aquifer and the Boise River in Idaho, framed on water sustainability. Water-budgets for the Treasure Valley for the calendar years 1996 and 2000 suggest that the Boise River lost to the shallow aquifer almost 20 Hm3 and 95 Hm3, respectively, along the Lucky Peak to Capitol Bridge reach. Groundwater discharge occurred into the Boise River, along the Capitol Bridge to Parma reach, at about 645 Hm3 and 653 Hm3for the calendar years 1996 and 2000, respectively (USBR). These figures highlight the importance of better understanding of the water flow because of disparity, which would impact groundwater management practices. There is a need of better understanding of the groundwater-surface water interface for predicting responses to natural and human-induced stresses. A groundwater flow model was developed to compute the rates and directions of groundwater movement through aquifer and confining units in the subsurface. The model also provides a representation of the interaction that occurs between the Boise River and the shallow aquifer in the Treasure Valley. Work in progress on the general flow pattern allows assessing of the connectivity between shallow aquifer and river for helping understanding the impacts of groundwater extraction. Quantifying the interaction between the two freshwater sources would be beneficial in proper water management decisions in order to optimize

  10. Monitoring of selected priority and emerging contaminants in the Guadalquivir River and other related surface waters in the province of Jaén, South East Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Molina, José; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The province of Jaén counts with four natural parks, numerous rivers, reservoirs and wetlands; moreover, it is probably the region with higher olive oil production in the world, which makes this zone a proper target to be studied based on the European Water Framework Directive 2000/60/CE. The aim of this survey is to monitor a total number of 373 compounds belonging to different families (pesticides, PAHs, nitrosamines, drugs of abuse, pharmaceuticals and life-style compounds) in surface waters located at different points of the province of Jaén. Among these compounds some priority organic substances (regulated by the EU Directive 2008/105/EC) and pollutants of emerging concern (not regulated yet) can be found. A liquid chromatography electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) method covering 340 compounds was developed and applied, together with a gas chromatography triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method which enabled the analysis of 63 organic contaminants (30 of these compounds are analyzed by LC-TOFMS as well). From April 2009 to November 2010 a total of 83 surface water samples were collected (rivers, reservoirs and wetlands). In this period numerous organic contaminants were detected, most of them at the ng L(-1) level. The most frequently priority substances found were chlorpyrifos ethyl, diuron and hexachlorobenzene. Within the other groups, the most frequently detected compounds were: terbuthylazine, oxyfluorfen, desethyl terbuthylazine, diphenylamine (pesticide family); fluorene, phenanthrene, pyrene (PAHs group), codeine, paracetamol (pharmaceuticals compounds) and caffeine, nicotine (life-style compounds). As is could be expected, the total concentration of emerging contaminants is distinctly larger than that of priority pollutants, highlighting the importance of continuing with the study of their presence, fate and effects in aquatic environments. However, concentration levels (at the ng per liter level) are low in

  11. Sensitivity analysis of GSI based mechanical characterization of rock mass

    CERN Document Server

    Ván, P

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the rock mechanical and rock engineering designs and calculations are frequently based on Geological Strength Index (GSI) method, because it is the only system that provides a complete set of mechanical properties for design purpose. Both the failure criteria and the deformation moduli of the rock mass can be calculated with GSI based equations, which consists of the disturbance factor, as well. The aim of this paper is the sensitivity analysis of GSI and disturbance factor dependent equations that characterize the mechanical properties of rock masses. The survey of the GSI system is not our purpose. The results show that the rock mass strength calculated by the Hoek-Brown failure criteria and both the Hoek-Diederichs and modified Hoek-Diederichs deformation moduli are highly sensitive to changes of both the GSI and the D factor, hence their exact determination is important for the rock engineering design.

  12. Fetus in fetu: molecular analysis of a fetiform mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, A; Corteville, J; Foglia, R P; Bliss, D P; Donis-Keller, H; Dowton, S B

    1993-09-01

    Fetus-in-fetu is a rare condition presenting as a calcified intra-abdominal mass in the newborn infant. Over 50 cases of fetus-in-fetu have been reported since 1800. Karyotype analysis in 8 cases and protein polymorphisms in 4 documented identical findings in the host and fetiform mass. We report a case of fetus-in-fetu in a newborn female including cytogenetic and molecular studies of both the host and mass. Genotypic information from 7 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays representing 4 chromosomes demonstrates heterozygous and identical alleles in the infant and fetus-in-fetu at all loci studied. A review of the literature is provided including a discussion regarding the impact of molecular data on present hypotheses of fetus-in-fetu pathogenesis.

  13. Rapid Screening of Carboxylic Acids from Waste and Surface Waters by ESI-MS/MS Using Barium Ion Chemistry and On-Line Membrane Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kyle D; Volmer, Dietrich A; Gill, Chris G; Krogh, Erik T

    2016-03-01

    Negative ion tandem mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids often yields only non-diagnostic ([M - H](-)) ions with limited selective fragmentation. However, carboxylates cationized with Ba(2+) have demonstrated efficient dissociation in positive ion mode, providing structurally diagnostic product ions. We report the application of barium adducts followed by collision induced dissociation (CID), to improve selectivity for rapid screening of carboxylic acids in complex aqueous samples. The quantitative MS/MS method presented utilizes common product ions of [M - H + Ba](+) precursor ions. The mechanism of product ion formation is investigated using isotopically labeled standards and a series of structurally related carboxylic acids. The results suggest that hydrogen atoms in the β and γ positions yield common product ions ([BaH](+) and [BaOH](+)). Furthermore, the diagnostic product ion at m/z 196 serves as a qualifying ion for carboxylate species. This methodology has been successfully used in conjunction with condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS), with barium acetate added directly to the methanol acceptor phase. The combination enables rapid screening of carboxylic acids directly from acidified water samples (wastewater effluent, spiked natural waters) using a capillary hollow fiber PDMS membrane immersion probe. We have applied this technique for the direct analysis of complex naphthenic acid mixtures spiked into natural surface waters using CP-MIMS. Selectivity at the ionization and tandem mass spectrometry level eliminate isobaric interferences from hydroxylated species present within the samples, which have been observed in negative electrospray ionization.

  14. Rapid Screening of Carboxylic Acids from Waste and Surface Waters by ESI-MS/MS Using Barium Ion Chemistry and On-Line Membrane Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kyle D.; Volmer, Dietrich A.; Gill, Chris G.; Krogh, Erik T.

    2016-03-01

    Negative ion tandem mass spectrometric analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids often yields only non-diagnostic ([M - H]-) ions with limited selective fragmentation. However, carboxylates cationized with Ba2+ have demonstrated efficient dissociation in positive ion mode, providing structurally diagnostic product ions. We report the application of barium adducts followed by collision induced dissociation (CID), to improve selectivity for rapid screening of carboxylic acids in complex aqueous samples. The quantitative MS/MS method presented utilizes common product ions of [M - H + Ba]+ precursor ions. The mechanism of product ion formation is investigated using isotopically labeled standards and a series of structurally related carboxylic acids. The results suggest that hydrogen atoms in the β and γ positions yield common product ions ([BaH]+ and [BaOH]+). Furthermore, the diagnostic product ion at m/z 196 serves as a qualifying ion for carboxylate species. This methodology has been successfully used in conjunction with condensed phase membrane introduction mass spectrometry (CP-MIMS), with barium acetate added directly to the methanol acceptor phase. The combination enables rapid screening of carboxylic acids directly from acidified water samples (wastewater effluent, spiked natural waters) using a capillary hollow fiber PDMS membrane immersion probe. We have applied this technique for the direct analysis of complex naphthenic acid mixtures spiked into natural surface waters using CP-MIMS. Selectivity at the ionization and tandem mass spectrometry level eliminate isobaric interferences from hydroxylated species present within the samples, which have been observed in negative electrospray ionization.

  15. Mapping the environmental risk potential on surface water of pesticide contamination in the Prosecco's vineyard terraced landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Patricia; Ferrarese, Francesco; Loddo, Donato; Eugenio Pappalardo, Salvatore; Varotto, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have been used to map vineyards and to evaluate slope and drainage systems. All the data and statistics analyses have been performed in GIS environment. The areas of surface water located within a buffer zone of 20 linear meters from vineyard perimeter were considered at risk of pesticide contamination, according to European guidelines and on-site experimental results about the pesticide drift effect. Preliminary results show that 26 ha of the total vineyards within the river basin can potentially affect surface water bodies, highlighting that 19,410 m of perimeter is within 20 m from water courses. Moreover, vineyard classification based on proximity analysis indicates that 6.8 ha are at very high potential risk (10 m).

  16. The role of large-scale atmospheric circulation in the formation of temperature anomalies in surface waters as illustrated by the northern part of the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkina, A. I.

    1975-01-01

    One important reason for thermal anomalies in the ocean is the dynamic action of anomalous wind systems that set masses of surface water in motion; predominant longitudinal transport of water and air leads to a significant redistribution of cold and warm waters. Heat exchange between the ocean and atmosphere plays an additional role in the formation of water temperature anomalies.

  17. Lacunarity and multifractal analysis of the large DLA mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Romo, Suemi; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    We show the methodology used to analyze fractal and mass-multifractal properties of very large Diffusion-Limited Aggregation (DLA) clusters with a maximum of 109 particles for 2D aggregates and 108 particles for 3D clusters, to support our main result; the scaling behavior obtained by our experimental results corresponds to the expected performance of monofractal objects. In order to estimate lacunarity measures for large DLA clusters, we develop a variant of the gliding-box algorithm which reduces the computer time needed to obtain experimental results. We show how our mass multifractal data have a tendency to present monofractal behavior for the mass distribution of the cases presented in this paper in the limit of very large clusters. Lacunarity analysis shows, provided we study small clusters mass distributions, data which might be interpreted as two different values of fractal dimensions while the cluster grows; however, this effect tends to vanish when the cluster size increases further, in such a way that monofractality is achieved. The outcomes of this paper lead us to conclude that the previously reported mass multifractality behavior (Vicsek et al., 1990 [13]) detected for DLA clusters is a consequence of finite size effects and floating point precision limitations and not an intrinsic feature of the phenomena, since the scaling behavior of our DLA clusters space corresponds to monofractal objects, being this situation remarkably noticeable in the limit of very large clusters.

  18. Uncertainties and re-analysis of glacier mass balance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zemp

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Glacier-wide mass balance has been measured for more than sixty years and is widely used as an indicator of climate change and to assess the glacier contribution to runoff and sea level rise. Until present, comprehensive uncertainty assessments have rarely been carried out and mass balance data have often been applied using rough error estimation or without error considerations. In this study, we propose a framework for re-analyzing glacier mass balance series including conceptual and statistical toolsets for assessment of random and systematic errors as well as for validation and calibration (if necessary of the glaciological with the geodetic balance results. We demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of the proposed scheme drawing on an analysis that comprises over 50 recording periods for a dozen glaciers and we make recommendations to investigators and users of glacier mass balance data. Reanalysis of glacier mass balance series needs to become a standard procedure for every monitoring programme to improve data quality and provide thorough uncertainty estimates.

  19. Temporal and spatial patterns of wetland extent influence variability of surface water connectivity in the Prairie Pothole Region, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoof, Melanie; Alexander, Laurie C.; Todd, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Context. Quantifying variability in landscape-scale surface water connectivity can help improve our understanding of the multiple effects of wetlands on downstream waterways. Objectives. We examined how wetland merging and the coalescence of wetlands with streams varied both spatially (among ecoregions) and interannually (from drought to deluge) across parts of the Prairie Pothole Region. Methods. Wetland extent was derived over a time series (1990-2011) using Landsat imagery. Changes in landscape-scale connectivity, generated by the physical coalescence of wetlands with other surface water features, were quantified by fusing static wetland and stream datasets with Landsat-derived wetland extent maps, and related to multiple wetness indices. The usage of Landsat allows for decadal-scale analysis, but limits the types of surface water connections that can be detected. Results. Wetland extent correlated positively with the merging of wetlands and wetlands with streams. Wetness conditions, as defined by drought indices and runoff, were positively correlated with wetland extent, but less consistently correlated with measures of surface water connectivity. The degree of wetland-wetland merging was found to depend less on total wetland area or density, and more on climate conditions, as well as the threshold for how wetland/upland was defined. In contrast, the merging of wetlands with streams was positively correlated with stream density, and inversely related to wetland density. Conclusions. Characterizing the degree of surface water connectivity within the Prairie Pothole Region in North America requires consideration of 1) climate-driven variation in wetness conditions and 2) within-region variation in wetland and stream spatial arrangements.

  20. An Analysis of Transducer Mass Loading Effect Inshaker Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Karle

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modal Analysis has been a developing science in the experimental evaluation of the dynamic properties of the structures. Frequency Response Function (FRF is one of the major steps in modal analysis. Measured frequency response functions (FRFs are used to extract modal parameters. It is also known that the accuracy and the reliability of various analyses using the measured FRFs depend strongly on the quality of measured data. It is well known that the quality of measured frequency response functions (FRFs is adversely affected by many factors, most significant sources being noise and systematic errors like mass loading effects of transducers. A transducer mounted on a vibrating system changes the dynamics of the structure due to the addition of extra mass and introduces errors into measured FRFs. One problem with this is the production of unrealistic results, which cause the measured resonant frequencies to be less than the correct values. These errors also lead to incorrect prediction of modal parameters. In many situations, the mass loading effect is ignored in the analytical and experimental process, based on a usual assumption that the transducer mass is negligible compared to that of the structure under test. However, when light-weighted structures are investigated, this effect can be significant.

  1. Genetic Profile of IS1004 among Environmental Vibrio cholerae Isolated from Surface Water Sources in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Bakhshi B

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and objective: Vibrio cholerae includes toxigenic and non-toxigenic serotypes. Non O1-non O139 serotypes are non toxigenic and do not have any role in cholera epidemics or pandemics all over the world. Different typing methods are widely used for molecular epidemiological investigations of clinical and environmental V. cholerae. The aim of this study is to investigate the genetic relatedness of environmental isolates of this bacterium using IS1004 profiling as an epidemiological marker. Materials and methods: Environmental samples collected from surface water sources in Tehran and cultured of TCBS agar after filtration. One single colony on TCBS was selected and cultured on BHI agar after which the cultures were used for biochemical diagnostic tests and serogroupings. DNA was isolated and used for PCR confirmation of V. cholerae isolates and wbeT gene. Genetic relatedness of isolates was determined using southern blot analysis. Results: From total 20 environmental V. cholerae identified in this study no wbeT gene was detected for the isolates. A total of 7 different banding patterns were obtained for the isolates while other 13 isolates identified as non-typeable by this method. Comparison with our previous studies indicated no identical pattern with clinical V. cholerae isolates. Conclusion: Differences in the banding pattern of IS1004 revealed a high heterogeneity among the isolates from surface water sources in Iran while these heterogenic isolates do not have any genetic relatedness with clinical isolates.

  2. Temporal aspects of surface water quality variation using robust statistical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adamu; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Ramli, Mohammad Firuz; Juahir, Hafizan

    2012-01-01

    Robust statistical tools were applied on the water quality datasets with the aim of determining the most significance parameters and their contribution towards temporal water quality variation. Surface water samples were collected from four different sampling points during dry and wet seasons and analyzed for their physicochemical constituents. Discriminant analysis (DA) provided better results with great discriminatory ability by using five parameters with (P < 0.05) for dry season affording more than 96% correct assignation and used five and six parameters for forward and backward stepwise in wet season data with P-value (P < 0.05) affording 68.20% and 82%, respectively. Partial correlation results revealed that there are strong (r(p) = 0.829) and moderate (r(p) = 0.614) relationships between five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and chemical oxygen demand (COD), total solids (TS) and dissolved solids (DS) controlling for the linear effect of nitrogen in the form of ammonia (NH(3)) and conductivity for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Multiple linear regression identified the contribution of each variable with significant values r = 0.988, R(2) = 0.976 and r = 0.970, R(2) = 0.942 (P < 0.05) for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Repeated measure t-test confirmed that the surface water quality varies significantly between the seasons with significant value P < 0.05.

  3. Using Iron-Manganese Co-Oxide Filter Film to Remove Ammonium from Surface Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An iron-manganese co-oxide filter film (MeOx has been proven to be a good catalyst for the chemical catalytic oxidation of ammonium in groundwater. Compared with groundwater, surface water is generally used more widely and has characteristics that make ammonium removal more difficult. In this study, MeOx was used to remove ammonium from surface water. It indicated that the average ammonium removal efficiency of MeOx was greater than 90%, even though the water quality changed dramatically and the water temperature was reduced to about 6–8 °C. Then, through inactivating microorganisms, it showed that the removal capability of MeOx included both biological (accounted for about 41.05% and chemical catalytic oxidation and chemical catalytic oxidation (accounted for about 58.95%. The investigation of the characterizations suggested that MeOx was formed by abiotic ways and the main elements on the surface of MeOx were distributed homogenously. The analysis of the catalytic oxidation process indicated that ammonia nitrogen may interact with MeOx as both ammonia molecules and ammonium ions and the active species of O2 were possibly •O and O2−.

  4. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  5. IMPROVING CYANOBACTERIA AND CYANOTOXIN MONITORING IN SURFACE WATERS FOR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria in fresh water can cause serious threats to drinking water supplies. Managing cyanobacterial blooms particularly at small drinking water treatment plants is challenging. Because large amount of cyanobacteria may cause clogging in the treatment process and various cyanotoxins are hard to remove, while they may cause severe health problems. There is lack of instructions of what cyanobacteria/toxin amount should trigger what kind of actions for drinking water management except for Microcystins. This demands a Cyanobacteria Management Tool (CMT to help regulators/operators to improve cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin monitoring in surface waters for drinking water supply. This project proposes a CMT tool, including selecting proper indicators for quick cyanobacteria monitoring and verifying quick analysis methods for cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin. This tool is suggested for raw water management regarding cyanobacteria monitoring in lakes, especially in boreal forest climate. In addition, it applies to regions that apply international WHO standards for water management. In Swedish context, drinking water producers which use raw water from lakes that experience cyanobacterial blooms, need to create a monitoring routine for cyanobacteria/cyanotoxin and to monitor beyond such as Anatoxins, Cylindrospermopsins and Saxitoxins. Using the proposed CMT tool will increase water safety at surface water treatment plants substantially by introducing three alerting points for actions. CMT design for each local condition should integrate adaptive monitoring program.

  6. Temporal Aspects of Surface Water Quality Variation Using Robust Statistical Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Robust statistical tools were applied on the water quality datasets with the aim of determining the most significance parameters and their contribution towards temporal water quality variation. Surface water samples were collected from four different sampling points during dry and wet seasons and analyzed for their physicochemical constituents. Discriminant analysis (DA provided better results with great discriminatory ability by using five parameters with (P<0.05 for dry season affording more than 96% correct assignation and used five and six parameters for forward and backward stepwise in wet season data with P-value (P<0.05 affording 68.20% and 82%, respectively. Partial correlation results revealed that there are strong (rp=0.829 and moderate (rp=0.614 relationships between five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5 and chemical oxygen demand (COD, total solids (TS and dissolved solids (DS controlling for the linear effect of nitrogen in the form of ammonia (NH3 and conductivity for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Multiple linear regression identified the contribution of each variable with significant values r = 0.988, R2 = 0.976 and r = 0.970, R2 = 0.942 (P<0.05 for dry and wet seasons, respectively. Repeated measure t-test confirmed that the surface water quality varies significantly between the seasons with significant value P<0.05.

  7. A statistical assessment of the impact of land uses on surface water quality indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeboonruang, Uma

    2012-06-30

    The release of wastewater from various land uses is threatening the quality of surface water. Different land uses pose varying degrees of danger to water resources. The hazardous extent of each activity depends on the amount and characteristics of the wastewater. The concept of the contamination potential index (CPI) of an activity is introduced and applied here. The index depends on the quantity of wastewater from a single source and on various chemicals in the waste whose concentrations are above allowable standards. The CPI concept and the land use impact assessment are applied to the surface water conditions in Nakhon Nayok Province in the central region of Thailand. The land uses considered in this study are residential area, industrial zone, in-season and off-season rice farming, and swine and poultry livestock. Multiple linear regression analysis determines the impact of the CPIs of these land uses on certain water quality characteristics, i.e., total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, phosphate, and chloride concentrations, using CPIs and previous water quality measurements. The models are further verified according to the current CPIs and measured concentrations. The results of the backward and forward modeling show that the land uses that affect water quality are off-season rice farming, raising poultry, and residential activity. They demonstrate that total dissolved solids and conductivity are reasonable parameters to apply in the land use assessment.

  8. Effect of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in surface water treatment: trace minerals and microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao, Gunaratna K

    2013-02-01

    The existing water treatment process often uses chemicals, which is of high health and environmental concern. The present study focused on the efficiency of microemulsion prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MIONs) and protein-functionalized nanoparticles (MOCP+ME-MIONs) in water treatment. Their influence on mineral ions and microorganisms present in the surface water from lake Brunnsviken and Örlången, Sweden were investigated. Ion analysis of water samples before and after treatment with nanoparticles was performed. Microbial content was analyzed by colony forming units (CFU/ml). The results impart that ME-MIONs could reduce the water turbidity even in low turbid water samples. Reduction of microbial content (98%) was observed at 37°C and more than 90% reduction was seen at RT and 30 °C when compared to untreated samples from lake Örlången. The investigated surface water treatment method with ME-MIONs was not significantly affecting the mineral ion composition, which implies their potential complement in the existing treatment process.

  9. Analysis of protein composition using multidimensional chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Andrew J; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-11-03

    Multidimensional liquid chromatography of peptides produced by protease digestion of complex protein mixtures followed by tandem mass spectrometry can be coupled with automated database searching to identify large numbers of proteins in complex samples. These methods avoid the limitations of gel electrophoresis and in-gel digestions by directly identifying protein mixtures in solution. One method used extensively is named Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT), where reversed-phase chromatography and strong cation-exchange chromatography are coupled directly in a microcapillary column. This column is then placed in line between an HPLC and a mass spectrometer for complex mixture analysis. MudPIT remains a powerful approach for analyzing complex mixtures like whole proteomes and protein complexes. MudPIT is used for quantitative proteomic analysis of complex mixtures to generate novel biological insights.

  10. Hydraulic "fracking": are surface water impacts an ecological concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, G Allen; Basu, Niladri; Ellis, Brian R; Kapo, Katherine E; Entrekin, Sally; Nadelhoffer, Knute

    2014-08-01

    Use of high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) in unconventional reservoirs to recover previously inaccessible oil and natural gas is rapidly expanding in North America and elsewhere. Although hydraulic fracturing has been practiced for decades, the advent of more technologically advanced horizontal drilling coupled with improved slickwater chemical formulations has allowed extensive natural gas and oil deposits to be recovered from shale formations. Millions of liters of local groundwaters are utilized to generate extensive fracture networks within these low-permeability reservoirs, allowing extraction of the trapped hydrocarbons. Although the technology is relatively standardized, the geographies and related policies and regulations guiding these operations vary markedly. Some ecosystems are more at risk from these operations than others because of either their sensitivities or the manner in which the HVHF operations are conducted. Generally, the closer geographical proximity of the susceptible ecosystem to a drilling site or a location of related industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated construction of roads, power grids, pipelines, well pads, and water-extraction systems along with increased truck traffic are common to virtually all HVHF operations. These operations may result in increased erosion and sedimentation, increased risk to aquatic ecosystems from chemical spills or runoff, habitat fragmentation, loss of stream riparian zones, altered biogeochemical cycling, and reduction of available surface and hyporheic water volumes because of withdrawal-induced lowering of local groundwater levels. The potential risks to surface waters from HVHF operations are similar in many ways to those resulting from agriculture, silviculture, mining, and urban development. Indeed, groundwater extraction associated with agriculture is perhaps a larger concern in the long term in some regions. Understanding the

  11. Groundwater - surface water interactions in the Ayeyarwady river delta, Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaoka, K.; Haruyama, S.; Kuzuha, Y.; Kay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is widely used as a water resource in the Ayeyarwady River delta. But, Groundwater has some chemical problem in part of the area. To use safety groundwater for health, it is important to make clear the actual conditions of physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater in this delta. Besides, Ayeyarwady River delta has remarkable wet and dry season. Surface water - groundwater interaction is also different in each season, and it is concerned that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater is affected by the flood and high waves through cyclone or monsoon. So, it is necessary to research a good aquifer distribution for sustainable groundwater resource supply. The purposes of this study are evaluate to seasonal change of groundwater - surface water interactions, and to investigate the more safety aquifer to reduce the healthy risk. Water samples are collected at 49 measurement points of river and groundwater, and are analyzed dissolved major ions and oxygen and hydro-stable isotope compositions. There are some groundwater flow systems and these water qualities are different in each depth. These showed that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater are closely related to climatological, geomorphogical, geological and land use conditions. At the upper Alluvium, groundwater quality changes to lower concentration in wet season, so Ayeyarwady River water is main recharge water at this layer in the wet season. Besides, in the dry season, water quality is high concentration by artificial activities. Shallower groundwater is affected by land surface conditions such as the river water and land use in this layer. At lower Alluvium, Arakan and Pegu mountains are main recharge area of good water quality aquifers. Oxygen18 value showed a little affected by river water infiltration in the wet season, but keep stable good water quality through the both seasons. In the wet season, the same groundwater exists and water quality changes through

  12. Chloride in Groundwater and Surface Water in Areas Underlain by the Glacial Aquifer System, Northern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, John R.; Lorenz, David L.; Arntson, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    A study of chloride in groundwater and surface water was conducted for the glacial aquifer system of the northern United States in forested, agricultural, and urban areas by analyzing data collected for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program from 1991 to 2004. Groundwater-quality data from a sampling of 1,329 wells in 19 states were analyzed. Chloride concentrations were greater than the secondary maximum contaminant level established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of 250 milligrams per liter in 2.5 percent of samples from 797 shallow monitoring wells and in 1.7 percent of samples from 532 drinking-water supply wells. Water samples from shallow monitoring wells in urban areas had the largest concentration of chloride, followed by water samples from agricultural and forested areas (medians of 46, 12, and 2.9 milligrams per liter, respectively). An analysis of chloride:bromide ratios, by mass, and chloride concentrations compared to binary mixing curves for dilute groundwater, halite, sewage and animal waste, potassium chloride fertilizer, basin brines, seawater, and landfill leachate in samples from monitoring wells indicated multiple sources of chloride in samples from wells in urban areas and agricultural areas. Water from shallow monitoring wells in urban areas had the largest chloride:bromide ratio, and samples with chloride:bromide ratios greater than 1,000 and chloride concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per liter were dominated by halite; however, the samples commonly contained mixtures that indicated input from sewage or animal waste. Chloride:bromide ratios were significantly larger in samples from public-supply drinking-water wells than from private drinking-water wells, and ratios were significantly larger in all drinking-water wells in eastern and central regions of the glacial aquifer system than in west-central and western regions of the glacial aquifer system. Surface-water-quality data collected regularly during varying

  13. Variable mass pendulum behaviour processed by wavelet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccamo, M. T.; Magazù, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present work highlights how, in order to characterize the motion of a variable mass pendulum, wavelet analysis can be an effective tool in furnishing information on the time evolution of the oscillation spectral content. In particular, the wavelet transform is applied to process the motion of a hung funnel that loses fine sand at an exponential rate; it is shown how, in contrast to the Fourier transform which furnishes only an average frequency value for the motion, the wavelet approach makes it possible to perform a joint time-frequency analysis. The work is addressed at undergraduate and graduate students.

  14. Scattering of oblique surface water waves by thin vertical barrier over undulating bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2017-06-01

    The present study deals with the scattering of oblique surface water waves by small undulation on the bottom in the presence of a thin vertical barrier. Here, three different configurations of vertical barriers are investigated. Perturbation analysis is employed to determine the physical quantities, namely, the reflection and transmission coefficients. In this analysis, many different Boundary Value Problems (BVPs) are obtained out of which the first two bvps are considered. The zeroth order bvp is solved with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method. The first order reflection and transmission coefficients are derived in terms of the integrals by the method of the Green's integral theorem. The variation of these coefficients is plotted and analyzed for different physical parameters. Furthermore, the energy balance relation, an important relation in the study of water wave scattering, is derived and checked for assuring the correctness of the numerical results for the present problem.

  15. Quantifying Organic Matter in Surface Waters of the United States and Delivery to the Coastal Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E. W.; Alexander, R. B.; Smith, R. A.; Shih, J.

    2012-12-01

    Organic carbon (OC) is a critical water quality characteristic in surface waters. It is an important component of the energy balance and food chains in freshwater and estuarine aquatic ecosystems, is significant in the mobilization and transport of contaminants along flow paths, and is associated with the formation of known carcinogens in drinking water supplies. The importance of OC dynamics on water quality has been recognized, but challenges remain in quantitatively addressing processes controlling OC fluxes over broad spatial scales in a hydrological context, and considering upstream-downstream linkages along flow paths. Here, we: 1) quantified lateral OC fluxes in rivers, streams, and reservoirs across the nation from headwaters to the coasts; 2) partitioned how much organic carbon that is stored in lakes, rivers and streams comes from allochthonous sources (produced in the terrestrial landscape) versus autochthonous sources (produced in-stream by primary production); 3) estimated the delivery of dissolved and total forms of organic carbon to coastal estuaries and embayments; and 4) considered seasonal factors affecting the temporal variation in OC responses. To accomplish this, we developed national-scale models of organic carbon in U.S. surface waters using the spatially referenced regression on watersheds (SPARROW) technique. The modeling approach uses mechanistic formulations, imposes mass balance constraints, and provides a formal parameter estimation structure to statistically estimate sources and fate of OC in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We calibrated and evaluated the model with statistical estimates of OC loads that were observed at a network of monitoring stations across the nation, and further explored factors controlling seasonal dynamics of OC based on these long term monitoring data. Our results illustrate spatial patterns and magnitudes OC loadings in rivers, highlighting hot spots and suggesting origins of the OC to each location

  16. Equations of atrazine transfer from agricultural land to surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, C.

    1995-08-01

    As atrazine, the most widely used herbicide in agriculture, makes problems for water supply, the Cemagref study its transfer from lands to surface water. On a small basin of central Brittany, soil and water contents of atrazine have been monitored from 1991 to 1994. Data show that atrazine content of the top layer of soil decreases slowly after spreading. Degradation works more than leaching for this decrease. There is always atrazine in the water of the stream at the outlet of the basin. The concentration of atrazine in water increase sharply in every flood and then decrease slowly. The maximum level of concentration in each flood is very well correlated with the ratio of maximum discharge to the base flow. It means that quick superficial flow of water is the most contaminated water. It brings most of the total flow of atrazine which can be measured in the stream. However, this flow represent only a very small part of the spread atrazine on the basin: less than 1%.

  17. The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

    2014-01-01

    The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

  18. Spring and surface water quality of the Cyprus ophiolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of surface, spring and borehole waters associated with the ophiolite rocks of Cyprus shows five broad water types (1 Mg-HCO3, (2 Na-SO4-Cl-HCO3, (3 Na-Ca-Cl-SO4-OH-CO3, (4 Na-Cl-SO4 and (5 Ca-SO4. The waters represent a progression in chemical reactivity from surface waters that evolve within a groundwater setting due to hydrolysis of the basic/ultrabasic rock as modified by CO2-weathering. An increase in salinity is also observed which is due to mixing with a saline end-member (modified sea-water and dissolution of gypsum/anhydrite. In some cases, the waters have pH values greater than 11. Such high values are associated with low temperature serpentinisation reactions. The system is a net sink for CO2. This feature is related not only to the hydrolysis of the primary minerals in the rock, but also to CaCO3 or Ca-Mg-CO3 solubility controls. Under hyperalkaline conditions, virtually all the carbon dioxide is lost from the water due to the sufficiently high calcium levels and carbonate buffering is then insignificant. Calcium sulphate solubility controls may also be operative when calcium and sulphate concentrations are particularly high. Keywords: Cyprus, Troodos, ophiolite, serpentinisation, spring, stream, water quality, bromide, iodine, boron, trace elements, hyperalkaline.

  19. A Novel Energy efficient Surface water Wireless Sensor Network Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Meenakshi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining the energy of sensors in Wireless Sensor Network (WSN is important in critical applications. It has been a challenge to design wireless sensor networks to enable applications for oceanographicdata collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration, disaster prevention, assisted navigation and tactical surveillance applications. WSN consists of sensor nodes which sense the physical parameters such as temperature, humidity, pressure and light etc and send them to a fusion center namely Base Station (BS from where one can get the value of physical parameters at any time. Requirement of monitoring the environment might be anywhere, like middle of the sea or under the earth where man cannot go often to recharge the batterieswhich supplies the sensing device, transceiver and memory unit in the sensor node. So the usage of the battery power must be judicious in WSN. Earlier attempts have been made to prolong the network lifetime, but still it is a challenging task. In this paper we propose a Novel Energy efficient Surface water Wireless Sensor Network Algorithm (NES-WSN to optimize the energy consumption by WSN. The present work concentrates on energy saving of sensor nodes when they are deployed in the surface of the sea water. Whenever the sea surface temperature increases there will be a power loss which is reduced by clustering the nodes and by transferring data through multihop routing. Experimental results show that due to increase in temperature there is a definite power loss and it can be minimized by using NES-WSN algorithm definitely.

  20. Pre-coagulation for microfiltration of an upland surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkarainen, A T; Judd, S J; Jokela, J; Gillberg, L

    2004-01-01

    The effect of different coagulants on cake formation and hydraulic resistance in membrane filtration of strongly coloured (SUVA> or =4.8) upland surface water has been studied at bench-scale under constant pressure conditions. Coagulants used were aluminium sulphate, polyaluminium chloride, ferric chloride and ferric sulphate. Optimisation of coagulation parameters was carried by conventional jar testing. The R'c (specific cake resistance in m(-2)) values were determined for all coagulants over a range of coagulant doses and slow mixing flocculation periods. Experiments indicated slight differences in cake formation trends between ferric- and aluminium-based coagulants and chloride and sulphate counterions, but that the range of measured R'c values was small (0.9 and 2.6 x 10(18) m(-2)) over the range of doses studied. Greater than 99% UV(254) removal was achieved with every coagulant, whereas dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal ranged from 78% to 88%. Optimisation of the pre-coagulation-membrane filtration process suggests ferric chloride to be slightly superior for the feedwater matrix studied on the basis of DOC removal, whereas ferric sulphate gave slightly lower filter cake specific resistance values.

  1. Characterizing interactions between surface water and groundwater in the Jialu River basin using major ion chemistry and stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Jialu River, a secondary tributary of the Huaihe River, has been severely contaminated for the major contaminant sources, such as a number of untreated or lightly treated sewage wastes in some cities. Groundwater along the river is not an isolated component of the hydrologic system, but instead connected with the surface water. This study aims to characterize the relationships between surface water (e.g. reservoirs, lakes and rivers and groundwater near the river in the shallow Quaternary aquifer. The concentration of Cl in North Zhengzhou City increased prominently due to the discharge of a large amount of domestic water. Nitrate and potassium show maximum concentrations in groundwater in Fugou County. These high levels can be attributed to the use of a large quantity of fertilizer over this region. The regional well had water with a constant stable isotopic signature, which illustrates that the groundwater never or rarely receive recharge from surface water. However, the groundwater of transitional well (location SY3 seemed to be recharged by river water via bank infiltration in September 2010. Fractional contributions of river water to the groundwater were calculated based on isotopic and chemical data using a mass-balance approach. Results show that the groundwater was approximately composed of 60–70% river water. These findings would be useful for a better understanding of hydrogeological processes at the river-aquifer interface and ultimately benefit water management in the future.

  2. Perfluorinated chemicals in surface waters and sediments from northwest Georgia, USA, and their bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, Peter J.; Washington, John W.; Hassan, Sayed M.; Jenkins, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed in northwest Georgia, USA, to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sediments were also used in 28-d exposures with the aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, to assess PFC bioaccumulation. Concentrations of PFCs in surface waters and sediments increased significantly below a land-application site (LAS) of municipal/industrial wastewater and were further elevated by unknown sources downstream. Perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) with eight or fewer carbons were the most prominent in surface waters. Those with 10 or more carbons predominated sediment and tissue samples. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was the major homolog in contaminated sediments and tissues. This pattern among sediment PFC concentrations was consistent among sites and reflected homolog concentrations emanating from the LAS. Concentrations of PFCs in oligochaete tissues revealed patterns similar to those observed in the respective sediments. The tendency to bioaccumulate increased with PFCA chain length and the presence of the sulfonate moiety. Biota-sediment accumulation factors indicated that short-chain PFCAs with fewer than seven carbons may be environmentally benign alternatives in aquatic ecosystems; however, sulfonates with four to seven carbons may be as likely to bioaccumulate as PFOS.

  3. Groundwater and surface-water interactions and impacts of human activities in the Hailiutu catchment, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Yangxiao; Wenninger, Jochen; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Wang, Xusheng; Wan, Li

    2017-02-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water have been significantly affected by human activities in the semi-arid Hailiutu catchment, northwest China. Several methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal interactions between groundwater and surface water. Isotopic and chemical analyses of water samples determined that groundwater discharges to the Hailiutu River, and mass balance equations were employed to estimate groundwater seepage rates along the river using chemical profiles. The hydrograph separation method was used to estimate temporal variations of groundwater discharges to the river. A numerical groundwater model was constructed to simulate groundwater discharges along the river and to analyze effects of water use in the catchment. The simulated seepage rates along the river compare reasonably well with the seepage estimates derived from a chemical profile in 2012. The impacts of human activities (river-water diversion and groundwater abstraction) on the river discharge were analyzed by calculating the differences between the simulated natural groundwater discharge and the measured river discharge. Water use associated with the Hailiutu River increased from 1986 to 1991, reached its highest level from 1992 to 2000, and decreased from 2001 onwards. The reduction of river discharge might have negative impacts on the riparian ecosystem and the water availability for downstream users. The interactions between groundwater and surface water as well as the consequences of human activities should be taken into account when implementing sustainable water resources management in the Hailiutu catchment.

  4. Groundwater and surface-water interactions and impacts of human activities in the Hailiutu catchment, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Yangxiao; Wenninger, Jochen; Uhlenbrook, Stefan; Wang, Xusheng; Wan, Li

    2017-08-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water have been significantly affected by human activities in the semi-arid Hailiutu catchment, northwest China. Several methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal interactions between groundwater and surface water. Isotopic and chemical analyses of water samples determined that groundwater discharges to the Hailiutu River, and mass balance equations were employed to estimate groundwater seepage rates along the river using chemical profiles. The hydrograph separation method was used to estimate temporal variations of groundwater discharges to the river. A numerical groundwater model was constructed to simulate groundwater discharges along the river and to analyze effects of water use in the catchment. The simulated seepage rates along the river compare reasonably well with the seepage estimates derived from a chemical profile in 2012. The impacts of human activities (river-water diversion and groundwater abstraction) on the river discharge were analyzed by calculating the differences between the simulated natural groundwater discharge and the measured river discharge. Water use associated with the Hailiutu River increased from 1986 to 1991, reached its highest level from 1992 to 2000, and decreased from 2001 onwards. The reduction of river discharge might have negative impacts on the riparian ecosystem and the water availability for downstream users. The interactions between groundwater and surface water as well as the consequences of human activities should be taken into account when implementing sustainable water resources management in the Hailiutu catchment.

  5. Lithium content in potable water, surface water, ground water, and mineral water on the territory of Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kostik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine lithium concentration in potable water, surface water, ground, and mineral water on the territory of the Republic of Macedonia. Water samples were collected from water bodies such as multiple public water supply systems located in 13 cities, wells boreholes located in 12 areas, lakes and rivers located in three different areas. Determination of lithium concentration in potable water, surface water was performed by the technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, while in ground water samples from wells boreholes and mineral waters with the technique of ion chromatography. The research shows that lithium concentration in potable water ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 μg/L; in surface water from 0.5 to 15.0 μg/L; ground water from wells boreholes from 16.0 to 49.1 μg/L and mineral water from 125.2 to 484.9 μg/L. Obtained values are in accordance with the relevant international values for the lithium content in water.

  6. Analysis of fluticasone propionate in induced sputum by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, John B; Taylor, Robert L; Kita, Hirohito; Singh, Ravinder J

    2011-01-01

    Although evaluation of induced sputum has shown promise as a marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatic subjects, most studies, to date, do not adequately address the potential effect that inhaled corticosteroids may have on sputum eosinophilia. This study was designed to prospectively evaluate analysis of fluticasone propionate (FP) in whole sputum by mass spectrometry as a tool to determine recent administration of inhaled FP. Induced sputum of nonsmoking asthmatic subjects was prospectively analyzed 16-24 hours after witnessed administration of orally inhaled FP. FP was extracted from whole sputum via an acetonitrile protein precipitation followed by methylene chloride liquid extraction of the supernatant (AB 4000; AB Sciex). A portion of the reconstituted sample was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quad tandem mass spectrometer. Results were compared with those from nonsmoking asthmatic subjects not receiving inhaled FP. Twenty-two asthmatic subjects on FP and 9 asthmatic subjects without FP underwent sputum induction 16-24 hours following witnessed administration of FP. Sufficient sputum for analysis was obtained from 30 of 31 subjects. FP was detected in 22 of 22 asthmatic subjects receiving FP (range, 29-133,000 pg/mL) and was undetectable in 8 of 8 subjects not receiving FP. The sensitivity and specificity of tandem mass spectrometry's ability to detect FP in sputum was 100% and 100%, respectively. Analysis of FP in induced sputum is a reliable method to verify recent administration of inhaled FP. Induced asthmatic sputum from one induction may be used to concomitantly assess sputum eosinophilia as well as recent administration of FP.

  7. Transition of Iodine Analysis to Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watrous, Matthew George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adamic, Mary Louise [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, John Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baeck, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fox, R. V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hahn, P. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jenson, D. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lister, T. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the project, New Paradigms for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Raising the Scientific Profile and Improved Performance for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), is to ensure that the ongoing isotope ratio determination capability within the U.S. Department of Energy complex is the world’s best for application to nonproliferation. This report spells out the progress of Task 4, Transition of TIMS to AMS for Iodine Analysis, of the larger project. The subtasks under Task 4 and the accomplishments throughout the three year project life cycle are presented in this report. Progress was made in optimization of chemical extraction, determination of a detection limit for 127Iodine, production of standard materials for AMS analysis quality assurance, facilitation of knowledge exchange with respect to analyzing iodine on an AMS, cross comparison with a world-leading AMS laboratory, supercritical fluid extraction of iodine for AMS analysis and electrodeposition of seawater as a direct method of preparation for iodine analysis by AMS--all with the goal of minimizing the time required to stand up an AMS capability for iodine analysis of exposed air filters at INL. An effective extraction method has been developed and demonstrated for iodine analysis of exposed air filters. Innovative techniques to accomplish the cathode preparation for AMS analysis were developed and demonstrated and published. The known gap of a lack of available materials for reference standards in the analysis of iodine by AMS was filled by the preparation of homogenous materials that were calibrated against NIST materials. A minimum limit on the amount of abundant isotope in a sample was determined for AMS analysis. The knowledge exchange occurred with fantastic success. Scientists engaged the international AMS community at conferences, as well as in their laboratories for collaborative work. The supercritical fluid extraction work has positive

  8. Diazotroph diversity in the sea ice, melt ponds and surface waters of the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; Rapp, Josephine Z.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Krumpen, Thomas; Jonathan P Zehr; Boetius, Antje

    2016-01-01

    The Eurasian basin of the Central Arctic Ocean is nitrogen limited, but little is known about the presence and role of nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Recent studies have indicated the occurrence of diazotrophs in Arctic coastal waters potentially of riverine origin. Here, we investigated the presence of diazotrophs in ice and surface waters of the Central Arctic Ocean in the summer of 2012. We identified diverse communities of putative diazotrophs through targeted analysis of the nifH gene, which ...

  9. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  10. Characterizing interactions between surface water and groundwater in the Jialu River basin using major ion chemistry and stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jialu River, a secondary tributary of the Huaihe River, has been severely contaminated from major contaminant sources, such as a number of untreated or lightly treated sewage waste in some cities. Groundwater along the river is not an isolated component of the hydrologic system, but is instead connected with the surface water. This study aims to investigate temporal and spatial variations in water chemistry affected by humans and to characterize the relationships between surface water (e.g. reservoirs, lakes and rivers and groundwater near the river in the shallow Quaternary aquifer. Concentration of Cl in north Zhengzhou City increased prominently due to the discharge of a large amount of domestic water. Nitrate and potassium show maximum concentrations in groundwater in Fugou County. These high levels can be attributed to the use of a large quantity of fertilizer over this region. Most surface water appeared to be continuously recharged from the surrounding groundwater (regional wells based on comparison surface water with groundwater levels, stable-isotopes and major ion signatures. However, the groundwater of a transitional well (location SY3 seemed to be recharged by river water via bank infiltration in September 2010. Fractional contributions of river water to the groundwater were calculated based on isotopic and chemical data using a mass-balance approach. Results show that the groundwater was approximately composed of 60–70% river water. These findings should be useful for a better understanding of hydrogeological processes at the river-aquifer interface and ultimately benefit water management in the future.

  11. How important are biogeochemical hotspots at aquifer-river interfaces for surface water and groundwater quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, S.; Blume, T.; Weatherill, J.; Munz, M.; Tecklenburg, C.; Angermann, L.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2012-04-01

    The mixing of groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) can have substantial impact on the transformation of solutes transported between aquifer and river. The assessment of biogeochemical cycling at reactivity hotspots as the aquifer-river interface and its implications for GW and SW quality require detailed understanding of the complex patterns of GW-SW exchange fluxes and residence time distributions in particular under changing climatic and landuse conditions. This study presents combined experimental and model-based investigations of the physical drivers and chemical controls of nutrient transport and transformation at the aquifer-river interfaces of two upland and lowland UK rivers. It combines the application of in-stream geophysical exploration techniques, multi-level mini-piezometer networks, active and passive heat tracing methods (including fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing - FO-DTS) for identifying hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions with multi-scale approaches of hyporheic pore-water sampling and reactive tracers for analysing the patterns of streambed redox conditions and chemical transformation rates. The analysis of hyporheic pore water from nested multi-level mini piezometers and passive gel probe samplers revealed significant spatial variability in streambed redox conditions and concentration changes of nitrogen species, dissolved oxygen and bio-available organic carbon. Hot spots of increased nitrate attenuation were identified beneath semi-confining peat lenses in the streambed of the investigated lowland river. The intensity of concentration changes underneath the confining peat pockets correlated with the state of anoxia in the pore water as well as the supply of organic carbon and hyporheic residence times. In contrast, at locations where flow inhibiting peat layers were absent or disrupted - fast exchange between aquifer and river caused a break-through of nitrate without significant concentration changes along

  12. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  13. Nonlinear Pressure Wave Analysis by Concentrated Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kondou, Takahiro; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro

    A pressure wave propagating in a tube often changes to a shock wave because of the nonlinear effect of fluid. Analyzing this phenomenon by the finite difference method requires high computational cost. To lessen the computational cost, a concentrated mass model is proposed. This model consists of masses, connecting nonlinear springs, connecting dampers, and base support dampers. The characteristic of a connecting nonlinear spring is derived from the adiabatic change of fluid, and the equivalent mass and equivalent damping coefficient of the base support damper are derived from the equation of motion of fluid in a cylindrical tube. Pressure waves generated in a hydraulic oil tube, a sound tube and a plane-wave tube are analyzed numerically by the proposed model to confirm the validity of the model. All numerical computational results agree very well with the experimental results carried out by Okamura, Saenger and Kamakura. Especially, the numerical analysis reproduces the phenomena that a pressure wave with large amplitude propagating in a sound tube or in a plane tube changes to a shock wave. Therefore, it is concluded that the proposed model is valid for the numerical analysis of nonlinear pressure wave problem.

  14. Recent directions of electrospray mass spectrometry for elemental speciation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumloeffel, Dirk [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour/CNRS UMR 5254, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement/IPREM, Pau (France); Tholey, Andreas [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Institute for Experimental Medicine - Div. Systematic Proteome Research, Kiel (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    A brief survey is given of the last 2 years' literature on electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for speciation analysis. As observed for many years, the main recent applications in this field concern arsenic and selenium species, especially in studies encompassing combined use of molecular and element mass spectrometry. A further application field is the stoichiometric characterization of metal complexes by ESI-MS, which in some studies was assisted by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A few examples are presented to illustrate arsenic species involved in metabolic pathways, sulfur species in oils and bitumen, and aluminum complexes. On the basis of this review, we also give an outlook of expected future developments and trends in this research field. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of Protein O-GlcNAcylation by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junfeng; Hart, Gerald W

    2017-02-02

    O-linked β-D-N-acetyl glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) addition (O-GlcNAcylation), a post-translational modification of serine/threonine residues of proteins, is involved in diverse cellular metabolic and signaling pathways. Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation underlies the initiation and progression of multiple chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Numerous methods have been developed for the analysis of protein O-GlcNAcylation, but instead of discussing the classical biochemical techniques, this unit covers O-GlcNAc characterization by combining several enrichment methods and mass spectrometry detection techniques [including collision-induced dissociation (CID), higher energy collision dissociation (HCD), and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry]. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Metabolome analysis - mass spectrometry and microbial primary metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer-Pedersen, Jesper Juul

    2008-01-01

    that are highly sensitive and specific, and to undertake this challenge mass spectrometry (MS) is among the best candidates. Along with analysis of the metabolome the research area of metabolomics has evolved. Metabolomics combines metabolite profiles, data mining and biochemistry and aims at understanding...... the interplay between metabolites. In this thesis, different topics have been addressed and discussed with the aim of advancing metabolomics to explore the concept in a physiological context. The metabolome comprises a wide variety of chemical compounds that act differently upon sample preparation...... glucose, galactose or ethanol, and metabolic footprinting by mass spectrometry was used to study the influence of carbon source on the extracellular metabolites. The results showed that footprints clustered according to the carbon source. Advances in technologies for analytical chemistry have mediated...

  17. ICR SS protozoan data site-by-site: a picture of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in U.S. surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongerth, Jerry E

    2013-09-17

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Information Collection Rule Supplemental Survey (ICR SS) required analysis of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in 10 L surface water samples twice a week for a year by USEPA Method 1623 at 80 representative U.S. public water systems (PWS). The resulting data are examined site-by-site in relation to objectives of the Federal drinking water regulation, The Long-Term (2) Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2), currently under formal 6-year review by the USEPA. The data describe Cryptosporidium and Giardia in watersheds nation-wide over a single annual cycle. Due to limited recovery efficiency measurement results are not fully quantified. In the required sample volumes of 10 L no Cryptosporidium were found in 86% of samples and no Giardia were found in 67% of samples. Yet, organisms were found in enough samples at 34 of 80 sites to detail a specrtum of occurrence and variability for both organisms. The data are shown to describe indivudual site risk essential for guidance of watershed and water treatment management by PWSs. The span of median occurrence for both organisms was about 2 orders of magnitude above the limit of detection (LD), ca. 0.05 raw no's/L for Cryptosporidium and ca. 0.10 raw no's/L for Giardia. Data analysis illustrates key features of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in surface water: presence is continuous not intermittent; zeros indicate presence below the LD; occurrence level and variations depend on watershed sources; risk depends on both magnitude and variability of concentration; accurate estimation of risk requires routine measurement of recovery efficiency and calculation of concentration. The data and analysis illustrate features of Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurrence in surface water relevant to their effective regulation for public health protection.

  18. Intact MicroRNA Analysis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullolli, Majlinda; Knouf, Emily; Arampatzidou, Maria; Tewari, Muneesh; Pitteri, Sharon J.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and play key roles in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes and in disease. New tools to analyze miRNAs will add understanding of the physiological origins and biological functions of this class of molecules. In this study, we investigate the utility of high resolution mass spectrometry for the analysis of miRNAs through proof-of-concept experiments. We demonstrate the ability of mass spectrometry to resolve and separate miRNAs and corresponding 3' variants in mixtures. The mass accuracy of the monoisotopic deprotonated peaks from various miRNAs is in the low ppm range. We compare fragmentation of miRNA by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) which yields similar sequence coverage from both methods but additional fragmentation by HCD versus CID. We measure the linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation of miRNA loaded onto a C18 column. Lastly, we explore the use of data-dependent acquisition of MS/MS spectra of miRNA during online LC-MS and demonstrate that multiple charge states can be fragmented, yielding nearly full sequence coverage of miRNA on a chromatographic time scale. We conclude that high resolution mass spectrometry allows the separation and measurement of miRNAs in mixtures and a standard LC-MS setup can be adapted for online analysis of these molecules.

  19. Persistent organic pollutants in China's surface water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J

    2017-02-15

    Following recent rapid industrialization, China is now one of the largest producers and consumers of organic chemicals in the world. This is compounded by variable regulatory oversight with respect to storage, use and waste management of these chemicals and their byproducts. This review synthesizes the data on the distribution of selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in waters in China. Surface water heavily polluted with POPs is distributed in the Yangtze River Estuary, Pearl River Delta, Minjiang River Estuary, Jiulongjiang Estuary, Daya Bay, Taihu Lake, and the waterways of Zhejiang Province, where concentrations of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) frequently exceed both international and Chinese guideline values. These areas are mainly distributed along the southeast coast of China, within or downstream of major manufacturing districts, intensive agricultural basins, and other industrial centers. A comparison of the levels of OCPs in the aquatic environment of China with other indicative regions worldwide shows comparable levels of pollution (overall range from below detection limit (BDL) to 5104.8ng/L and regional means from 2.9-929.6ng/L). PAHs and PCBs pollution appear to be particularly serious in China (PAHs overall ranging from BDL to 474,000ng/L with regional means from 15.1-72,400ng/L; PCBs from BDL to 3161ng/L with regional means ranging from 0.2-985.2ng/L). There is as yet limited evidence of serious perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) pollution. We discuss major sources and processes responsible for high POP occurrence using a range of measures (including diagnostic ratios of different compounds), regulatory oversight and policy gaps in the control of POPs in China, and potential long-term health and ecological effects. We argue that water quality guidelines, pollution control measures and cleanup strategies for POPs in China should be

  20. Hydrological Response to ~30 years of Agricultural Surface Water Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst human practices, agricultural surface-water management systems represent some of the largest integrated engineering works that shaped floodplains during history, directly or indirectly affecting the landscape. As a result of changes in agricultural practices and land use, many drainage networks have changed producing a greater exposure to flooding with a broad range of impacts on society, also because of climate inputs coupling with the human drivers. This research focuses on three main questions: which kind of land use changes related to the agricultural practices have been observed in the most recent years (~30 years? How does the influence on the watershed response to land use and land cover changes depend on the rainfall event characteristics and soil conditions, and what is their related significance? The investigation presented in this work includes modelling the water infiltration due to the soil properties and analysing the distributed water storage offered by the agricultural drainage system in a study area in Veneto (north-eastern Italy. The results show that economic changes control the development of agro-industrial landscapes, with effects on the hydrological response. Key elements that can enhance or reduce differences are the antecedent soil conditions and the climate characteristics. Criticalities should be expected for intense and irregular rainfall events, and for events that recurrently happen. Agricultural areas might be perceived to be of low priority when it comes to public funding of flood protection, compared to the priority given to urban ones. These outcomes highlight the importance of understanding how agricultural practices can be the driver of or can be used to avoid, or at least mitigate, flooding. The proposed methods can be valuable tools in evaluating the costs and benefits of the management of water in agriculture to inform better policy decision-making.

  1. Urban surface water pollution problems arising from misconnections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revitt, D Michael; Ellis, J Bryan

    2016-05-01

    The impacts of misconnections on the organic and nutrient loadings to surface waters are assessed using specific household appliance data for two urban sub-catchments located in the London metropolitan region and the city of Swansea. Potential loadings of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), soluble reactive phosphorus (PO4-P) and ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4-N) due to misconnections are calculated for three different scenarios based on the measured daily flows from specific appliances and either measured daily pollutant concentrations or average pollutant concentrations for relevant greywater and black water sources obtained from an extensive review of the literature. Downstream receiving water concentrations, together with the associated uncertainties, are predicted from derived misconnection discharge concentrations and compared to existing freshwater standards for comparable river types. Consideration of dilution ratios indicates that these would need to be of the order of 50-100:1 to maintain high water quality with respect to BOD and NH4-N following typical misconnection discharges but only poor quality for PO4-P is likely to be achievable. The main pollutant loading contributions to misconnections arise from toilets (NH4-N and BOD), kitchen sinks (BOD and PO4-P) washing machines (PO4-P and BOD) and, to a lesser extent, dishwashers (PO4-P). By completely eliminating toilet misconnections and ensuring misconnections from all other appliances do not exceed 2%, the potential pollution problems due to BOD and NH4-N discharges would be alleviated but this would not be the case for PO4-P. In the event of a treatment option being preferred to solve the misconnection problem, it is shown that for an area the size of metropolitan Greater London, a sewage treatment plant with a Population Equivalent value approaching 900,000 would be required to efficiently remove BOD and NH4-N to safely dischargeable levels but such a plant is unlikely to have the capacity to deal

  2. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  3. Simulation of soluble waste transport and buildup in surface waters using tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Soluble tracers can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of soluble wastes that might have been introduced or are planned for introduction into surface waters. Measured tracer-response curves produced from the injection of a known quantity of soluble tracer can be used in conjunction with the superposition principle to simulate potential waste buildup in streams, lakes, and estuaries. Such information is particularly valuable to environmental and water-resource planners in determining the effects of proposed waste discharges. The theory, techniques, analysis, and presentation of results of tracer-waste simulation tests in rivers, lakes, and estuaries are described. This manual builds on other manuals dealing with dye tracing by emphasizing the expanded use of data from time-of-travel studies.

  4. Requiring pollutant discharge permits for pesticide applications that deposit residues in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centner, Terence; Eberhart, Nicholas

    2014-05-08

    Agricultural producers and public health authorities apply pesticides to control pests that damage crops and carry diseases. Due to the toxic nature of most pesticides, they are regulated by governments. Regulatory provisions require pesticides to be registered and restrictions operate to safeguard human health and the environment. Yet pesticides used near surface waters pose dangers to non-target species and drinking water supplies leading some governments to regulate discharges of pesticides under pollution discharge permits. The dual registration and discharge permitting provisions are burdensome. In the United States, agricultural interest groups are advancing new legislation that would exempt pesticide residues from water permitting requirements. An analysis of the dangers posed by pesticide residues in drinking water leads to a conclusion that both pesticide registration and pollutant discharge permitting provisions are needed to protect human health and aquatic species.

  5. Requiring Pollutant Discharge Permits for Pesticide Applications that Deposit Residues in Surface Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Centner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural producers and public health authorities apply pesticides to control pests that damage crops and carry diseases. Due to the toxic nature of most pesticides, they are regulated by governments. Regulatory provisions require pesticides to be registered and restrictions operate to safeguard human health and the environment. Yet pesticides used near surface waters pose dangers to non-target species and drinking water supplies leading some governments to regulate discharges of pesticides under pollution discharge permits. The dual registration and discharge permitting provisions are burdensome. In the United States, agricultural interest groups are advancing new legislation that would exempt pesticide residues from water permitting requirements. An analysis of the dangers posed by pesticide residues in drinking water leads to a conclusion that both pesticide registration and pollutant discharge permitting provisions are needed to protect human health and aquatic species.

  6. A hierarchical approach on groundwater-surface water interaction in wetlands along the upper Biebrza River, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Anibas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As recognized in the European Water Framework Directive, groundwater-dependent wetlands and their diverse ecosystems have important functions which need to be protected. The vegetation in such habitats is often dependent on quality, quantity and patterns of river discharge and groundwater-surface water interaction on a local or reach scale. Since groundwater-surface water exchange studies on natural rivers and wetlands with organic soils are scarce, more functional analysis is needed. To this end we combined different field methods including piezometer nests, temperature as tracer and seepage meter measurements. Some of these measurements were used as inputs and/or as validation for the numerical 1-D heat transport model STRIVE. In transient mode the model was used to calculate spatially distributed vertical exchange fluxes from temperature profiles measured at the upper Biebrza River in Poland over a period of nine months. Time series of estimated fluxes and hydraulic head gradients in the hyporheic zone were used to estimate the temporal variability of groundwater-surface water exchange.

    This paper presents a hierarchical approach for quantifying and interpreting groundwater-surface water interaction in space and time. The results for the upper Biebrza show predominantly upward water fluxes, sections of recharge, however, exist along the reach. The fluxes depend more on hydraulic gradients than on riverbed conductivity. This indicates that the fluvio-plain scale is required for interpreting the exchange fluxes, which are estimated on a local scale. The paper shows that a conceptual framework is necessary for understanding the groundwater-surface water interaction processes, where the exchange fluxes are influenced by local factors like the composition of the riverbed and the position of the measurement on a local scale, and by regional factors like the hydrogeology and topography on a fluvio-plain scale. The hierarchical methodology

  7. Understanding the Impact of Intensive Horticulture Land-Use Practices on Surface Water Quality in Central Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith K. Muriithi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid expansion of commercial horticulture production and related activities contribute to declining surface water quality. The study sought to understand the impacts on select rivers in Laikipia and Meru, production hotspots. The specific aims were (1 to identify prevailing surface water quality by examining variations of 14 physico-chemical parameters, and (2 to categorize measured surface water quality parameters into land use types highlighting potential pollutant source processes. Water samples were collected in July and August 2013 along 14 rivers in the study area. The data were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA and discriminant analysis (DA. Principal components (PCs explained 70% of the observed total variability of water quality, indicating a prevalence of heavy metal traces (cadmium, phosphate, and zinc. These were linked to the rigorous use of phosphate fertilizers and copper-based agrochemicals in intensive farming. DA provided four significant (p < 0.05 discriminant functions, with 89.5% correct assignment enabling the association of land use with observed water quality. Concentrations of dissolved solids, electro-conductivity, and salinity spiked at locations with intensive small-scale and large-scale horticulture. Understanding the impacts of intensive commercial horticulture and land use practices on water quality is critical to formulating ecologically sound watershed management and pollution abatement plans.

  8. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Enteroviruses in Korean Surface Water by Using Integrated Cell Culture Multiplex RT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GYUCHEOL LEE; CHANHEE LEE; CHANSEUNG PARK; SANGGI JEONG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify waterborne enteric viruses in Korean surface water. Methods Integrated cell culture(ICC)-multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was simultaneously designed to detect coxsackieviruses (CV), polioviruses (PV), and reoviruses (RV). ICC-multiplex RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis were conducted using 21 total culturable virus assay (TCVA)-positive sample-inoculated cell cultures. Results CV and RV were detected in 9 samples each, and 3 samples were positive for both CV and RV. PV was not etected in any sample. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the VPl gene sequences revealed that CV types B2 and B4 redominated in Korean surface water, and the nucleotide sequences of CV type B2 were clustered with those of CVs isolated from China and Japan. The results suggested that the evolution of these viruses occurred in a region-specific manner. Conclusion CV and RV are detectable in Korean surface water, with a predominance of CV type B2, and the evolution of CV type B2 occur in a region-specific manner.

  9. Analysis On Classification Techniques In Mammographic Mass Data Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. K. K. Kavitha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Data mining, the extraction of hidden information from large databases, is to predict future trends and behaviors, allowing businesses to make proactive, knowledge-driven decisions. Data-Mining classification techniques deals with determining to which group each data instances are associated with. It can deal with a wide variety of data so that large amount of data can be involved in processing. This paper deals with analysis on various data mining classification techniques such as Decision Tree Induction, Naïve Bayes , k-Nearest Neighbour (KNN classifiers in mammographic mass dataset.

  10. Data Validation Package April 2016 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal and Processing Sites August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This semiannual event includes sampling groundwater and surface water at the Monticello Disposal and Processing Sites. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated) and Program Directive MNT-2016-01. Complete sample sets were collected from 42 of 48 planned locations (9 of 9 former mill site wells, 13 of 13 downgradient wells, 7 of 9 downgradient permeable reactive barrier wells, 4 of 7 seeps and wetlands, and 9 of 10 surface water locations). Planned monitoring locations are shown in Attachment 1, Sampling and Analysis Work Order. Locations R6-M3, SW00-01, Seep 1, Seep 2, and Seep 5 were not sampled due to insufficient water availability. A partial sample was collected at location R4-M3 due to insufficient water. All samples from the permeable reactive barrier wells were filtered as specified in the program directive. Duplicate samples were collected from surface water location Sorenson and from monitoring wells 92-07 and RlO-Ml. Water levels were measured at all sampled wells and an additional set of wells. See Attachment2, Trip Report for additional details. The contaminants of concern (COCs) for the Monticello sites are arsenic, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate+ nitrite as nitrogen (nitrate+ nitrite as N), selenium, uranium, and vanadium. Locations with COCs that exceeded remediation goals are listed in Table 1 and Table 2. Time-concentration graphs of the COCs for all groundwater and surface water locations are included in Attachment 3, Data Presentation. An assessment of anomalous data is included in Attachment 4.

  11. Environmental proteomics – what proteins from soil and surface water can tell us: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schulze

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not much been applied in environmental research because it was thought that free proteins would not be sufficiently stable in the environments. Based on recent observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolve organic carbon, this article gives an overview about the possible use of proteomic methods in ecology and environmental sciences. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1 the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the DOC pool, and (2 identification of the origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper methods of mass spectrometry based proteomics were applied to identify proteins from DOC and water samples from different environments. It is demonstrated, that environmental proteomics is capable to distinguish the active set of organisms of different horizons of soils, and from various sources of surface water. Currently the limitation is given by the present knowledge of the genome of soil organisms. In addition, environmental proteomics allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific enzymes. Taking laccases as an example, it is shown that this enzyme is excreted into soils by a whole range of organisms from different phylogenetic groups. Further applications, such as in pollution reseach are conceivable. In summary, environmental proteomcis opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  12. Environmental proteomics what proteins from soil and surface water can tell us: a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W.

    2004-07-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely used to study cellular processes in model organisms. However, it has not much been applied in environmental research because it was thought that free proteins would not be sufficiently stable in the environments. Based on recent observations that protein can readily be detected as a component of dissolve organic carbon, this article gives an overview about the possible use of proteomic methods in ecology and environmental sciences. At this stage, there are two areas of interest: (1) the identification of phylogenetic groups contributing to the DOC pool, and (2) identification of the origin of specific enzymes that are important for ecosystem processes. In this paper methods of mass spectrometry based proteomics were applied to identify proteins from DOC and water samples from different environments. It is demonstrated, that environmental proteomics is capable to distinguish the active set of organisms of different horizons of soils, and from various sources of surface water. Currently the limitation is given by the present knowledge of the genome of soil organisms. In addition, environmental proteomics allows to relate protein presence to biogeochemical processes, and to identify the source organisms for specific enzymes. Taking laccases as an example, it is shown that this enzyme is excreted into soils by a whole range of organisms from different phylogenetic groups. Further applications, such as in pollution reseach are conceivable. In summary, environmental proteomcis opens a new area of research between the fields of microbiology and biogeochemistry.

  13. Sources of strong copper-binding ligands in Antarctic Peninsula surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Randelle M.; Barbeau, Katherine A.; Buck, Kristen N.

    2013-06-01

    Copper-binding organic ligands were measured during austral winter in surface waters around the Antarctic Peninsula using competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with multiple analytical windows. Samples were collected from four distinct water masses including the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front, Bransfield Strait, and the shelf region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Strong copper-binding organic ligands were detected in each water mass. The strongest copper-binding ligands were detected at the highest competition strength in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, with an average conditional stability constant of logKCuL,Cucond=16.00±0.82. The weakest ligands were found at the lowest competition strength in the shelf region with logKCuL,Cucond=12.68±0.48. No ligands with stability constants less than logKCuL,Cucond=13.5 were detected in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at any competition strength, suggesting a shelf source of weaker copper-binding ligands. Free, hydrated copper ion concentrations, the biologically available form of dissolved copper, were less than 10-14 M in all samples, approaching levels that may be limiting for some types of inducible iron acquisition.

  14. Rapid analysis of trace pollutants using laser mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Organic pollution has been gaining more and more attention.Yet,at present the determination of virtually all of them,including polycyclic aromatic carbons (PAHs),the largest single class of chemical carcinogens known today,is made via pre-purification and pre-concentration.The major problems are complexity and time-consuming,thus,no ideal real-time on-line monitoring can be done.Laser mass spectrometry combines UV spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) through resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI).It is characteristic of high sensitivity,high selectivity and rapidity.In this paper,after its principles,a small mobile laser mass spectrometer,in which a mini-excimer (KrF,248 nm) laser was used,is introduced.Real-time analysis of vehicle exhaust gas was made using this instrument,and the results showed some advantages over traditional methods:multicomponent detection,including benzene,toluene,xylene,C3-benzene,naphthalene,and methyl-naphthalene; high sensitivity (100 ppb);high time-resolution (0.1 s);and no need for pre-purification or pre-concentration of samples.

  15. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: Estimating galaxy group masses via caustic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee S; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Merson, Alexander; Nichol, Robert C; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We have generated complementary halo mass estimates for all groups in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Galaxy Group Catalogue (GAMA G3Cv1) using a modified caustic mass estimation algorithm, originally developed by Diaferio & Geller (1997). We calibrate the algorithm by applying it on a series of 9 GAMA mock galaxy light cones and investigate the effects of using different definitions for group centre and size. We select the set of parameters that provide median-unbiased mass estimates when tested on mocks, and generate mass estimates for the real group catalogue. We find that on average, the caustic mass estimates agree with dynamical mass estimates within a factor of 2 in 90.8 +/- 6.1% groups and compares equally well to velocity dispersion based mass estimates for both high and low multiplicity groups over the full range of masses probed by the G3Cv1.

  16. Recharging California's Groundwater: Crop Suitability and Surface Water Availability for Agricultural Groundwater Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Kocis, T. N.; Brown, A.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater banking, the intentional recharge of groundwater from surface water for storage and recovery, is an important conjunctive use strategy for water management in California (CA). A largely unexplored approach to groundwater banking, agricultural groundwater banking (ag-GB), utilizes flood flows and agricultural lands (alfalfa/pasture) for recharging groundwater. Understanding soil suitability for ag-GB, crop health and flooding tolerance, leaching of soil nitrate and salts, the availability of surface water for recharge, and the economic costs and benefits of ag-GB is fundamental to assessing the feasibility of local-scale implementation of ag-GB. The study presented here considers both the availability of excess streamflow (e.g., the magnitude, frequency, timing, and duration of winter flood flow) for ag-GB and the risks and benefits associated with using alfalfa fields as spreading grounds for ag-GB. The availability of surface water for winter (Nov to Apr) ag-GB were estimated based on daily streamflow records for 93 stream gauges within the Central Valley, CA. Analysis focused on high-magnitude (>90thpercentile) flows because most lower flows are likely legally allocated in CA. Results based >50 years of data indicate that an average winter/spring (Nov. - Apr.) in the Sacramento River Basin could provide 7 million acre-feet (AF) (8.6 km3) of water for ag-GB from flows above the 90th percentile. These flows originate from few storm events (5-7 events) and occur on average for 25-30 days between November and April. Wintertime on-farm recharge experiments were conducted on a 9-yr old, 15-acre alfalfa field in the Scott Valley, CA, where 135 AF and 107 AF of water were recharged during the winters of 2015 and 2016, respectively. Biomass data collected indicates that pulsed application of 6-10 ft of water on dormant alfalfa results in minimal yield loss (0.5 ton/acre reduction), short-duration saturated conditions in the root-zone, and high recharge

  17. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in s

  18. Integrated modeling of groundwater–surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemeijer, J.C.; Velde, van der Y.; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, van F.C.; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater–surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely av

  19. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M.; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Boer, de Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; Pelt, Van Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water

  20. Conductivity as an indicator of surface water quality in the proximity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-05

    Oct 5, 2015 ... Conductivity as an indicator of surface water quality in the ... FeCr smelting did not significantly impact surface water quality, but that surface run-off and/or ..... farming-management/soil-water/salinity/measuring-the-salinity-.

  1. Description of the surface water filtration and ozone treatment system at the Northeast Fishery Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    A water filtration and ozone disinfection system was installed at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Northeast Fishery Center in Lamar, Pennsylvania to treat a surface water supply that is used to culture sensitive and endangered fish. The treatment system first passes the surface water through dr...

  2. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M.; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Boer, de Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; Pelt, Van Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water contam

  3. Potential Environmental Factors Affecting Oil-Degrading Bacterial Populations in Deep and Surface Waters of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiqing; Bacosa, Hernando P.; Liu, Zhanfei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding bacterial community dynamics as a result of an oil spill is important for predicting the fate of oil released to the environment and developing bioremediation strategies in the Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the roles of temperature, water chemistry (nutrients), and initial bacterial community in selecting oil degraders through a series of incubation experiments. Surface (2 m) and bottom (1537 m) waters, collected near the Deepwater Horizon site, were amended with 200 ppm light Louisiana sweet crude oil and bacterial inoculums from surface or bottom water, and incubated at 4 or 24°C for 50 days. Bacterial community and residual oil were analyzed by pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. The results showed that temperature played a key role in selecting oil-degrading bacteria. Incubation at 4°C favored the development of Cycloclasticus, Pseudoalteromonas, Sulfitobacter, and Reinekea, while 24°C incubations enhanced Oleibacter, Thalassobius, Phaeobacter, and Roseobacter. Water chemistry and the initial community also had potential roles in the development of hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities. Pseudoalteromonas, Oleibacter, and Winogradskyella developed well in the nutrient-enriched bottom water, while Reinekea and Thalassobius were favored by low-nutrient surface water. We revealed that the combination of 4°C, crude oil and bottom inoculum was a key factor for the growth of Cycloclasticus, while the combination of surface inoculum and bottom water chemistry was important for the growth of Pseudoalteromonas. Moreover, regardless of the source of inoculum, bottom water at 24°C was a favorable condition for Oleibacter. Redundancy analysis further showed that temperature and initial community explained 57 and 19% of the variation observed, while oil and water chemistry contributed 14 and 10%, respectively. Overall, this study revealed the relative roles of temperature, water

  4. Renormalization group analysis of the gluon mass equation

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, A C; Papavassiliou, J

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we carry out a systematic study of the renormalization properties of the integral equation that determines the momentum evolution of the effective gluon mass. A detailed, all-order analysis of the complete kernel appearing in this particular equation reveals that the renormalization procedure may be accomplished through the sole use of ingredients known from the standard perturbative treatment of the theory, with no additional assumptions. However, the subtle interplay of terms operating at the level of the exact equation gets distorted by the approximations usually employed when evaluating the aforementioned kernel. This fact is reflected in the form of the obtained solutions, whose deviations from the correct behavior are best quantified by resorting to appropriately defined renormalization-group invariant quantities. This analysis, in turn, provides a solid guiding principle for improving the form of the kernel, and furnishes a well-defined criterion for discriminating between various p...

  5. Extraction, chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods for lipid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sumitra; Nie, Ben; Arnold, Robert D; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-05-01

    Lipids make up a diverse subset of biomolecules that are responsible for mediating a variety of structural and functional properties as well as modulating cellular functions such as trafficking, regulation of membrane proteins and subcellular compartmentalization. In particular, phospholipids are the main constituents of biological membranes and play major roles in cellular processes like transmembrane signaling and structural dynamics. The chemical and structural variety of lipids makes analysis using a single experimental approach quite challenging. Research in the field relies on the use of multiple techniques to detect and quantify components of cellular lipidomes as well as determine structural features and cellular organization. Understanding these features can allow researchers to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms by which lipid-lipid and/or lipid-protein interactions take place within the conditions of study. Herein, we provide an overview of essential methods for the examination of lipids, including extraction methods, chromatographic techniques and approaches for mass spectrometric analysis.

  6. Factorial Analysis of Mass Media Influence on Academic Sports Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benar Noshin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Main objective of this research was factorial analysis of mass media influence on academic sports development. Material: Methodology of the research was descriptive- correlation. Population of the research was composed of all referees, coaches and athletes participating in students' sports Olympiad of Iran Payam e Noor Universities in year 2014. Statistical sample of research was chosen randomly and consisted of 176 persons. Data gathering tool was a researcher made questionnaire; its superficial and content validity was approved by academic professors and media experts; also the stability of research tool was reported to be at an acceptable level. SPSS 23 software was used to analyze research data and also AMOS 24 software was used to analyze structure validity. Results: Findings showed there is a significant difference between current situation and desirable situation in all research dimensions. Also, factorial analysis of all research variables showed improvement of coaches' technical performance (0.86, improvement of referees' technical performance (0.85, and promotion of academic sport managers' awareness (0.83 respectively are mostly influenced by mass media. Conclusion : It should be kept in mind that academic sports development is one of the factors of the entire country sports development. Hence, it is crucial to attend to different dimensions of student sport's aspects such as human, financial, planning and etc., especially in championship area to be able to further macro objectives of country's sports development. Considering current conditions, mass media should have a new perspective on academic sports in order to be able to attend to their responsibilities to further the excellence of country's sports.

  7. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  8. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry analysis in petrochronology: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of petrochronology is to extract information about the rates and conditions at which rocks and magmas are transported through the Earth’s crust. Garnering this information from the rock record greatly benefits from integrating textural and compositional data with radiometric dating of accessory minerals. Length scales of crystal growth and diffusive transport in accessory minerals under realistic geologic conditions are typically in the range of 1–10’s of μm, and in some cases even substantially smaller, with zircon having among the lowest diffusion coefficients at a given temperature (e.g., Cherniak and Watson 2003). Intrinsic to the compartmentalization of geochemical and geochronologic information from intra-crystal domains is the requirement to determine accessory mineral compositions using techniques that sample at commensurate spatial scales so as to not convolute the geologic signals that are recorded within crystals, as may be the case with single grain or large grain fragment analysis by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS; e.g., Schaltegger and Davies 2017, this volume; Schoene and Baxter 2017, this volume). Small crystals can also be difficult to extract by mineral separation techniques traditionally used in geochronology, which also lead to a loss of petrographic context. Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry, that is SIMS performed with an ion microprobe, is an analytical technique ideally suited to meet the high spatial resolution analysis requirements that are critical for petrochronology (Table 1).

  9. Effect of land-applied biosolids on surface-water nutrient yields and groundwater quality in Orange County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; McSwain, Kristen Bukowski; Harden, Stephen L.; Gurley, Laura N.; Rogers, Shane W.

    2015-01-01

    Land application of municipal wastewater biosolids is the most common method of biosolids management used in North Carolina and the United States. Biosolids have characteristics that may be beneficial to soil and plants. Land application can take advantage of these beneficial qualities, whereas disposal in landfills or incineration poses no beneficial use of the waste. Some independent studies and laboratory analysis, however, have shown that land-applied biosolids can pose a threat to human health and surface-water and groundwater quality. The effect of municipal biosolids applied to agriculture fields is largely unknown in relation to the delivery of nutrients, bacteria, metals, and contaminants of emerging concern to surface-water and groundwater resources. Therefore, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (NCDENR) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) through the 319 Nonpoint Source Program to better understand the transport of nutrients and bacteria from biosolids application fields to groundwater and surface water and to provide a scientific basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the current regulations.

  10. Climatic driven variability of surface water energy potential and implications for future hydroelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worman, A. L. E.; Lindstrom, G.

    2014-12-01

    An average year the production in Norway and Sweden is around 190 TWh and these two countries stand for about 70% of the hydropower energy stored in the available reservoirs of Europe. There are large challenges for the future use of this regulatory capacity with regard to balancing the electricity production in Europe under climate variability, compliance to water management plans under the Water Framework Directive and to the shifts to more renewable, but intermittent, energy sources required by the Renewable Energy Directive. A main aim of this project is to describe the variation over time of hydrological fluxes across Scandinavia in terms of their energy properties and to link that information to climatic factors and the regulation of hydroelectricty. Along these lines we explored daily data of digitalized hydro-climatological data from 1961, which were used to calibrate the HBV-model for 1001 watersheds in Sweden and the energy potential has been estimated as an average for that period (Figure below). These tentative results show that the surface water energy potential constitutes about one per mille of the latent heat flux due to evapotranspiration and it is, therefore, very sensitive to any fluctuation in the energy quantities of the hydrometeorological system. Tentative analysis suggests that the energy availability of surface water in Sweden exhibits significant decadal long fluctuations from 115 TWh/year up to 180 TWh/year, which follow several different time scales and periodicities, ranging from century-long trends to fluctuations occurring on time scales of a decade and shorter. In addition, recent investigations show that land-use changes and hydropower regulation has caused significant changes in the annual runoff periodicity in Swedish rivers during the 20th century. Those changes in the annual periodicities are caused by structural alterations in river basins affected by intense agriculture and hydropower regulation.

  11. Characterization of an organic acid analog model in Adirondack, New York, surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraei, H.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Natural waters include a variety of organic matter that differs in composition and functional groups. Dissolved organic matter is important but difficult to characterize acidic and metal binding (e.g., Al) functional groups in chemical equilibrium models. In this study data from Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate an organic acid analog model in order to quantify the influence of organic acids on surface water chemistry. The study sites in the Adirondack region of New York have diverse levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), used as a surrogate for organic acids. DOC in 55 Adirondack surface waters varies from 180 μmol C/l (in Little Echo Pond) to 1263 μmol C/l (in Sunday Pond). To reduce the variability inherited in the large raw data set, suite of mean observations was constructed by grouping and averaging measured data into pH intervals of 0.05 pH units from pH 4.15 to 7.3. A chemical equilibrium model, which includes major solutes in natural waters, was linked to an optimization algorithm (genetic algorithm) to calibrate a triprotic organic analog model which includes proton and aluminum binding by adjusting the dissociation constants and site density of DOC. The object of fitting procedure was to simultaneously minimize the discrepancy between observed and simulated pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), organic monomeric aluminum and inorganic monomeric aluminum. A sensitivity analysis on calibrated values indicate that the speciation of the modeled solutes are most responsive to the dissociation constant of AlOrg= Al3+ + Org3- reaction (Org3- represents organic anion), the site density of DOC and the second H+ dissociation constant of the triprotic organic analog (i.e. H2Org- = 2H+ + Org3- reaction).

  12. Long-term sodium and chloride surface water exports from the Dallas/Fort Worth region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, M K; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A

    2011-07-15

    Sodium and chloride in surface water are typically related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water sources and the subsequent salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on sodium and chloride concentrations has been found to occur in warmer climates. This study investigated long-term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the humid subtropical Dallas-Fort Worth region. We compared exports to characteristics of urbanization: urban land cover, impervious surface area, and calculated contributions from wastewater discharges. Long-term data (1980-2008) were obtained from five USGS gages located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalized for time and the watershed area. Grab samples were collected from June 2009 to May 2010 and sodium and chloride concentrations quantified. Our results show a strong positive relationship between the mean annual sodium and chloride exports from each watershed and the percent urban land cover and impervious surface area. Long-term increases in sodium and chloride fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percentage of urban land cover. The single largest contributor was wastewater effluent that was estimated to contribute approximately half of the total loads in the three urbanized watersheds. Atmospheric deposition and deicing salts accounted for small amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. The source of the remaining salt load is still unknown and may be a combination of non-point sources. Estimates of urban salt exports were similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts.

  13. Data Validation Package October 2015 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Monticello, Utah, Processing Site January 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Jason [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management; Smith, Fred [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Sampling Period: October 12–14, 2015. This semiannual event includes sampling groundwater and surface water at the Monticello Mill Tailings Site. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in the 2004 Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Post-Record of Decision Monitoring Plan, Draft Final and Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). Samples were collected from 52 of 61 planned locations (15 of 17 former mill site wells, 17 of 18 downgradient wells, 9 of 9 downgradient permeable reactive barrier wells, 2 of 7 seeps and wetlands, and 9 of 10 surface water locations). Locations MW00-07, Seep 1, Seep 2, Seep 3, Seep 5, Seep 6, SW00-01, T01-13, and T01-19 were not sampled because of insufficient water availability. All samples were filtered as specified in the monitoring plan. Duplicate samples were collected from surface water location W3-04 and from monitoring wells 82-08, 92-09, and 92-10. Water levels were measured at all but one sampled well and an additional set of wells. The contaminants of concern (COCs) for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site are arsenic, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate + nitrite as nitrogen (nitrate + nitrite as N), selenium, uranium, and vanadium. Time-concentration graphs of the COCs for all groundwater and surface water locations are included in this report. Locations with COCs that exceeded remediation goals are listed.

  14. Geochemistry of surface water in alpine catchments in central Colorado, USA: Resolving host-rock effects at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanty, R.B.; Verplanck, P.L.; San, Juan C.A.; Church, S.E.; Schmidt, T.S.; Fey, D.L.; deWitt, E.H.; Klein, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    The US Geological Survey is conducting a study of surface-water quality in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado, an area of approximately 55,000 km2. Using new and existing geologic maps, the more than 200 rock formations represented in the area were arranged into 17 groups based on lithologic similarity. The dominant regional geologic feature affecting water quality in central Colorado is the Colorado mineral belt (CMB), a NE-trending zone hosting many polymetallic vein or replacement deposits, and porphyry Mo deposits, many of which have been mined historically. The influence of the CMB is seen in lower surface-water pH (100 mg/L) and chalcophile metals such as Cu (>10 ??g/L), Zn (>100 ??g/L), and Cd (>1 ??g/L) relative to surface water outside the CMB. Not all streams within the CMB have been affected by mineralization, as there are numerous catchments within the CMB that have no mineralization or alteration exposed at the surface. At the regional-scale, and away from sites affected by mineralization, hydrothermal alteration, or mining, the effects of lithology on water quality can be distinguished using geochemical reaction modeling and principal components analysis. At local scales (100 s of km2), effects of individual rock units on water chemistry are subtle but discernible, as shown by variations in concentrations of major lithophile elements or ratios between them. These results demonstrate the usefulness of regional geochemical sampling of surface waters and process-based interpretations incorporating geologic and geochemical understanding to establish geochemical baselines.

  15. The study of contamination of discharged runoff from surface water disposal channels of Bushehr city in 2012-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaheid Noroozi-Karbasdehi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In coastal cities, wastewater discharge into the sea is one of the options for sewage disposal that in case of non-compliance with health standards  in wastewater disposal will be led to the spread of infection and disease. On the other hand, water resources preservation and using them efficiently are the principles of sustainable development of each country. This study was aimed to investigate the contamination of discharged runoff from the surface water disposal channels of Bushehr city in 2012 - 13. Materials and Methods: In this study, Sampling was conducted by composite sampling method from output of the five main surface water disposal channels leading to the Persian Gulf located in the coastal region of Bushehr city during two seasons including wet (winter and dry (summer in 2012- 13. Then, experimental tests of BOD5, total coliform and fecal coliform were done on any of the 96 samples according to the standard method. Results: Analysis of the data showed that the BOD5, total coliform and fecal coliform of effluent runoff of the channels were more than the national standard output of disposal wastewaters into the surface waters, and the highest and lowest amount of BOD5 which obtained were 160 mg/L and 28 mg/L, respectively. Conclusion: considering the fact that discharged runoff from surface water disposal channels link from shoreline to sea in close distance and they often are as natural swimming sites and even fishing sites of Bushehr city, and also according to high level of organic and bacterial load of these channels, it is urgently required to be considered by the authorities.

  16. Critical comparison of mass analyzers for forensic hair analysis by ambient ionizations mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duvivier, W.F.; Beek, van T.A.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale
    Recently, several direct and/or ambient mass spectrometry (MS) approaches have been suggested for drugs of abuse imaging in hair. The use of mass spectrometers with insufficient selectivity could result in false-positive measurements due to isobaric interferences. Different mass analyz

  17. Effects of farmhouse hotel and paper mill effluents on bacterial community structures in sediment and surface water of Nanxi River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen

    2014-11-01

    The pyrosequencing technique was used to evaluate bacterial community structures in sediment and surface water samples taken from Nanxi River receiving effluents from a paper mill and a farmhouse hotel, respectively. For each sample, 4,610 effective bacterial sequences were selected and used to do the analysis of diversity and abundance, respectively. Bacterial phylotype richness in the sediment sample without effluent input was higher than the other samples, and the surface water sample with addition of effluent from the paper mill contained the least richness. Effluents from both the paper mill and farmhouse hotel have a potential to reduce the bacterial diversity and abundance in the sediment and surface water, especially it is more significant in the sediment. The effect of the paper mill effluent on the sediment and surface water bacterial communities was more serious than that of the farmhouse hotel effluent. Characterization of microbial community structures in the sediment and surface water from two tributaries of the downstream river indicated that various effluents from the paper mill and farmhouse hotel have the similar potential to decrease the natural variability in riverine microbial ecosystems.

  18. Impact of human activities on the physico-chemical quality of surface water and groundwater in the north of Marrakech (Morocco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufline, Rachid; Hakkou, Rachid; Hanich, Lahoucine; Boularbah, Ali

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of three sources of pollution (landfill leachate, wastewater and mining activities) on the physico-chemical characteristics of surface water and groundwater in the northern region of Marrakech (Morocco). Numerous groundwater samples and surface water (Tensift River) samples were collected during the dry season and analysed. The groundwater samples had a high conductivity, which varied between 0.95 and 7.40 mS/cm; the conductivity of the surface water samples varied between 1.31 and 15.84 mS/cm. pH varied between 6.64 and 8.10 for groundwater and between 6.70 and 8.40 for surface water. The results showed that groundwater and surface water had a degraded quality in the region. Principal component analysis (PCA) enabled identification of the impact of pollution sources by combining the upstream and the downstream points. These results also showed that, in the study area, the effect of wastewater and the mine were dominated those of the landfill.

  19. Discrimination analysis of mass spectrometry proteomics for ovarian cancer detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun HONG; Xiao-dan WANG; David SHEN; Su ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:A discrimination analysis has been explored for the probabilistic classifica-tion of healthy versus ovarian cancer serum samples using proteomics data from mass spectrometry (MS).Methods:The method employs data normalization,clustering,and a linear discriminant analysis on surface-enhanced laser desorp-tion ionization (SELDI) time-of-flight MS data.The probabilistic classification method computes the optimal linear discriminant using the complex human blood serum SELDI spectra.Cross-validation and training/testing data-split experi-ments are conducted to verify the optimal discriminant and demonstrate the accu-racy and robustness of the method.Results:The cluster discrimination method achieves excellent performance.The sensitivity,specificity,and positive predic-tive values are above 97% on ovarian cancer.The protein fraction peaks,which significantly contribute to the classification,can be available from the analysis process.Conclusion:The discrimination analysis helps the molecular identities of differentially expressed proteins and peptides between the healthy and ovarian patients.

  20. Tetrachlorofluorescein TInsP as a Substrate Analog Probe for Measuring Phytase Activity in Surface Water: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Duane F; Harich, Kim

    2013-01-01

    An innovative approach for measuring phytase activity (PA) in surface water is presented. A substrate analog of -inositol hexakis(dihydrogen) phosphate (InsP), commonly referred to as phytic acid, 1--5--(1-oxo-1-(2' ,4,7,7' -tetrachloro-3',6'-dihydroxy-3-oxo-3H-spiro[isobenzofuran-1,9'-xanthen]-6-yl)-5,8,11-trioxa-2-azatridecan-13-yl)-inositol 1,2,3,4,6-pentakis--(dihydrogen) phosphate, referred to as tetrachlorofluorescein (TET) tethered (T)InsP, has been developed that can be used to monitor the (phytase-catalyzed) phosphate ester bond-cleavage reaction. Test phytases, (wheat [4-] and [3-] phytase) sequentially remove phosphate groups from TET TInsP, producing dephosphorylated probe species that were readily separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Because dephosphorylated probe species retain the TET group, highly sensitive quantification could be achieved using fluorescence detection (excitation/emission ' = 245/540 nm). Calibration curves for TET TInsP, which could be used as a standard for quantifying all probe species, were linear ( > 0.999) over the range of concentrations tested. Phytase-generated dephosphorylated probe species were characterized or identified using RP-HPLC with mass spectrometry. Results of mass spectrometry analysis show that the RP-HPLC system was capable of distinguishing between dephosphorylated probe species at the regioisomeric level. The TET TInsP molecular probe was used to successfully measure PA in pond water. We found that the PA associated with the particulate plus water-soluble fraction was greater than that observed for the water-soluble fraction alone. Moreover, it appeared that 4- and 3-phytase were active in pond water based on an analysis of the chromatographic profile (i.e., elution sequence) of dephosphorylated probe species produced. The advent of a fluorescent substrate analog of InsP affords environmental scientists with the means to unambiguously quantify an extremely small

  1. Nuclear Mass Visualization and Analysis at nuclearmasses.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael S.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Kondev, Filip G.

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear masses play an important role in a wide variety of studies, motivating a tremendous surge in new precision mass measurements and global mass models. To handle this information, and to address inadequacies of existing text-based disseminations of nuclear masses, we have built a suite of codes-online at nuclearmasses.org-to manage, visualize, access, manipulate, share, compare, and analyze nuclear mass datasets. The services at this site are described, along with plans for future development.

  2. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  3. Analysis of ultrafiltration and mass transfer in a bioartificial pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffrin, M Y; Reach, G; Notelet, D

    1988-02-01

    A bioartificial pancreas is an implantable device which contains insulin secreting cells (Langerhans islets), separated from the circulating blood by a semi-permeable membrane to avoid rejection. This paper describes the operation of such a device and evaluates the respective contributions of diffusion and ultrafiltration to the glucose and insulin mass transfer. It is shown that the pressure drop along the blood channel produces across the first half of the channel an ultrafiltration flux toward the islet compartment followed in the second half by an equal flux in reverse direction from islets to blood. The mass transfer analysis is carried out for an optimal geometry in which a U-shaped blood channel surrounds closely a very thin islet compartment formed by a folded flat membrane. A complete model of insulin release by this device is developed and is compared with in vitro data obtained with rats islets. Satisfactory kinetics is achieved with a polyacrylonitrile membrane used in hemodialysis. But the model shows that the membrane hydraulic permeability should be increased by a factor of 10 to significantly improve the performance.

  4. The role of atmospheric precipitation in introducing contaminants to the surface waters of the Fuglebekken catchment, Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kozak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the Svalbard Archipelago is located at a high latitude, far from potential contaminant sources, it is not free from anthropogenic impact. Towards the Fuglebekken catchment, in the southern part of Spitsbergen, north of Hornsund fjord, contaminants can be transported from mainland pollution sources. In the precipitation and surface water collected in the catchment, the following elements were detected and quantified: Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Cs, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn. Additionally, pH, electrical conductivity and total organic carbon (TOC were determined in those samples. The acidic reaction of precipitation waters was identified as an important factor intensifying the metal migration in this Arctic tundra environment. The air mass trajectory, surprisingly, explained the variability of only a small fraction of trace elements in precipitation water. The air mass origin area was correlated only with the concentrations of As, V and Cr. Wind directions were helpful in explaining the variability of Mn, U and Ba concentrations (east–north-easterly wind and the contents of B, As, Rb, Se, Sr and Li in precipitation (south-westerly wind, which may indicate the local geological source of those. Atmospheric deposition was found to play a key role in the transport of contaminants into the Fuglebekken catchment; however, the surface water composition was modified by its pH and TOC content.

  5. Quantification of long-term wastewater fluxes at the surface water/groundwater-interface: An integrative model perspective using stable isotopes and acesulfame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, I., E-mail: i.engelhardt@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); Barth, J.A.C. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bol, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Schulz, M.; Ternes, T.A. [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) (Germany); Schüth, C. [Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); van Geldern, R. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zones over long-term periods was investigated. The transport behavior of acesulfame was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O or δ{sup 2}H). A calibrated model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5 months in a stream and groundwater. The spatial distribution of fresh water within the groundwater resulting from surface water infiltration was estimated by computing groundwater ages and compared with the predicted acesulfame plume obtained after 153 day simulation time. Both, surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes, were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water–groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed the wastewater-related surface water volumes that still remained in the hyporheic zone under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, which developed after periods of stagnating hydraulic exchange, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone. If slow seepage velocities prevail a proportion of acesulfame might be stored in smaller pores, while when released under fast flowing water conditions it will travel further downstream with the groundwater flow direction. Therefore, under such conditions acesulfame can be a less-ideal tracer in the hyporheic and riparian zones and additional monitoring with other environmental tracers such as water stable isotopes is highly recommended

  6. Capillary electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analysis of a polydisperse fluorosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarah, Suhair Yousif; Sjödahl, Johan; Woldegiorgis, Andreas; Emmer, Asa

    2005-02-01

    A fluorosurfactant has been studied using capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The fluorosurfactant, FC134, can be used as a buffer additive in capillary electrophoresis in order to decrease wall adsorption of proteins and in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. However, it has been discovered that this fluorosurfactant is polydisperse, thus containing substances with different lengths and structures. In this work, the fluorosurfactant sample components were separated by capillary electrophoresis. An uncoated as well as a poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated capillary were used with running electrolytes containing methanol and acetic acid. Following the capillary electrophoretic separation, fractions were collected for further analysis by MALDI-MS. Non-fractionated samples were also analyzed both by MALDI-MS and by ESI-MS.

  7. Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

    important physiological functions, such as stomata aperture, cell elongation, or cellular pH regulation. It is known that the activity of plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. Therefore, we first investigated the phosphorylation profile of plant H+-ATPase by enriching...... the phosphopeptides with optimized TiO2 and IMAC enrichment methods prior to MS analysis. We further investigated the global phosphorylation profile of the whole plant plasma membrane proteins using the combination of our recently established phosphopeptide enrichment method, Calcium phosphate precipitation......  Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...

  8. Renormalization group analysis of the gluon mass equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2014-04-01

    We carry out a systematic study of the renormalization properties of the integral equation that determines the momentum evolution of the effective gluon mass in pure Yang-Mills theory, without quark effects taken into account. A detailed, all-order analysis of the complete kernel appearing in this particular equation, derived in the Landau gauge, reveals that the renormalization procedure may be accomplished through the sole use of ingredients known from the standard perturbative treatment of the theory, with no additional assumptions. However, the subtle interplay of terms operating at the level of the exact equation gets distorted by the approximations usually employed when evaluating the aforementioned kernel. This fact is reflected in the form of the obtained solutions, for which the deviations from the correct behavior are best quantified by resorting to appropriately defined renormalization-group invariant quantities. This analysis, in turn, provides a solid guiding principle for improving the form of the kernel, and furnishes a well-defined criterion for discriminating between various possibilities. Certain renormalization-group inspired Ansätze for the kernel are then proposed, and their numerical implications are explored in detail. One of the solutions obtained fulfills the theoretical expectations to a high degree of accuracy, yielding a gluon mass that is positive definite throughout the entire range of physical momenta, and displays in the ultraviolet the so-called "power-law" running, in agreement with standard arguments based on the operator product expansion. Some of the technical difficulties thwarting a more rigorous determination of the kernel are discussed, and possible future directions are briefly mentioned.

  9. Analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum fractions using gas chromatography, mass spectrometry and mass fragmentrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubelka, V.

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectrometry in combination with gas chrom. used to analyze hydrocarbon mixtures results in qualit. and semi-quant. data regarding composition of the analyzed mixture. Use of mass fragmentrography during chromatographic separation will allow simultaneous recording of changes in intensity of characteristic ions and thus determine the retention index, for this substance. Combining mass spectre and retention index, it is possible to identify the given subst. or limit the number of possible combinations.

  10. Improved detection of multiple environmental antibiotics through an optimized sample extraction strategy in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xinzhu; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C; Li, Xu; Zhou, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    A solid-phase extraction/liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/multi-stage mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was optimized in this study for sensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple antibiotics in urban surface waters and soils. Among the seven classes of tested antibiotics, extraction efficiencies of macrolides, lincosamide, chloramphenicol, and polyether antibiotics were significantly improved under optimized sample extraction pH. Instead of only using acidic extraction in many existing studies, the results indicated that antibiotics with low pK a values (antibiotics with high pK a values (>7) were extracted more efficiently under neutral conditions. The effects of pH were more obvious on polar compounds than those on non-polar compounds. Optimization of extraction pH resulted in significantly improved sample recovery and better detection limits. Compared with reported values in the literature, the average reduction of minimal detection limits obtained in this study was 87.6% in surface waters (0.06-2.28 ng/L) and 67.1% in soils (0.01-18.16 ng/g dry wt). This method was subsequently applied to detect antibiotics in environmental samples in a heavily populated urban city, and macrolides, sulfonamides, and lincomycin were frequently detected. Antibiotics with highest detected concentrations were sulfamethazine (82.5 ng/L) in surface waters and erythromycin (6.6 ng/g dry wt) in soils. The optimized sample extraction strategy can be used to improve the detection of a variety of antibiotics in environmental surface waters and soils.

  11. Iodine isotopes species fingerprinting environmental conditions in surface water along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peng; Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Yi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations and species of iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) provide vital information about iodine geochemistry, environmental conditions and water masses exchange in oceans. Despite extensive investigations of anthropogenic 129I in the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, concentrations of the isotope in the Atlantic Ocean are, however, still unknown. We here present first data on 129I and 127I, and their species (iodide and iodate) in surface water transect along the northeastern Atlantic between 30° and 50°N. The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both 127I and 129I. Despite the rather constant ratios of 127I−/127IO3−, the 129I−/129IO3− values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time. These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic 129I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer. PMID:24284916

  12. Upgrading coagulation with hollow-fibre nanofiltration for improved organic matter removal during surface water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Stephan J; Lavonen, Elin; Keucken, Alexander; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Spanjer, Tom; Persson, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Rising organic matter concentrations in surface waters in many Nordic countries require current drinking water treatment processes to be adapted. Accordingly, the use of a novel nanofiltration (NF) membrane was studied during a nine month period in pilot scale at a large drinking water treatment plant in Stockholm, Sweden. A chemically resistant hollow-fibre NF membrane was fed with full scale process water from a rapid sand filter after aluminum sulfate coagulation. The combined coagulation and NF process removed more than 90% of the incoming lake water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (8.7 mg C L(-1)), and 96% of the absorbance at 254 nm (A254) (0.28 cm(-1) incoming absorbance). Including granulated active carbon GAC) filter, the complete pilot plant treatment process we observed decreases in DOC concentration (8.7-0.5 mg C L(-1)), SUVA (3.1-1.7 mg(-1) L m(-1)), and the average nominal molecular mass (670-440 Da). Meanwhile, water hardness was practically unaffected (iron concentrations were low (samples. Given the recommended limit of 4 mg L(-1) for chemical oxygen demand (COD) for Swedish drinking water, coagulation will need to be supplemented with one or more treatment steps irrespective whether climate change will lead to drier or wetter conditions in order to maintain sufficient DOC removal with the current increasing concentrations in raw waters.

  13. Forecasting the effects of EU policy measures on the nitrate pollution of groundwater and surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, R.; Kreins, P.; Tetzlaff, B.; Wendland, F.

    2009-04-01

    reactive nitrate transport in the soil-groundwater system. Nitrogen transport by groundwater runoff, surface runoff, drainage runoff and natural interflow is considered. In a first step the model is used to analyze the present situation using N surpluses from agriculture for the year 2003. In many region of the Weser basin, particularly in the northwestern part which is characterized by high livestock densities, predicted nitrate concentrations in percolation water exceed the EU groundwater quality standard of 50 mg/L by far. In parallel, high nitrogen outputs to surface waters via the different pathways are predicted for these areas. The regional importance of a specific outtake pathway for nitrogen, however, may vary significantly depending on the individual site characteristics. Based on the results of the analysis of the present situation regionally adapted and hence effective agri-environmental reduction measures need to be derived and implemented to improve groundwater and surface water quality by 2015. These measures include both single measures and combination of measures, which will be analyzed with regard to their impact on the regional quality of percolation water and on their impacts on the regional agricultural income. In this context it is very important to distinguish between the effects of measures, which have already been implemented by current agricultural policy and measures which have to be additionally implemented to meet the environmental targets of the EU Water Framework Directive. For this purpose a baseline scenario is developed, which projects the effects of modified general conditions of the agricultural sector on the nitrogen surpluses to the year 2015. In this baseline scenario the effects of the common agricultural policy (CAP) of the EU, already implemented agri-environmental measures of the Federal States and the expected developments of agriculture are considered. According to this scenario the nitrogen surpluses for agricultural areas can

  14. Quality characterization and pollution source identification of surface water using multivariate statistical techniques, Nalagarh Valley, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herojeet, Rajkumar; Rishi, Madhuri S.; Lata, Renu; Dolma, Konchok

    2017-09-01

    Sirsa River flows through the central part of the Nalagarh valley, belongs to the rapid industrial belt of Baddi, Barotiwala and Nalagarh (BBN). The appraisal of surface water quality to ascertain its utility in such ecologically sensitive areas is need of the hour. The present study envisages the application of multivariate analysis, water utility class and conventional graphical representation to reveal the hidden factor responsible for deterioration of water quality and determine the hydrochemical facies and its evolution processes of water types in Nalagarh valley, India. The quality assessment is made by estimating pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), total hardness, major ions (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3 -, Cl-, SO4 2-, NO3 - and PO4 3-), dissolved oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand (BOD) and total coliform (TC) to determine its suitability for drinking and domestic purposes. The parameters like pH, TDS, TH, Ca2+, HCO3 -, Cl-, SO4 2-, NO3 - are within the desirable limit as per Bureau of Indian Standards (Indian Standard Drinking Water Specification (Second Edition) IS:10500. Indian Standard Institute, New Delhi, pp 1-18, 2012). Mg2+, Na+ and K+ ions for pre monsoon and EC during pre and post monsoon at few sites and approx 40% samples of BOD and TC for both seasons exceeds the permissible limits indicate organic contamination from human activities. Water quality classification for designated use indicates that maximum surface water samples are not suitable for drinking water source without conventional treatment. The result of piper trillinear and Chadha's diagram classified majority of surface water samples for both seasons fall in the fields of Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3 - water type indicating temporary hardness. PCA and CA reveal that the surface water chemistry is influenced by natural factors such as weathering of minerals, ion exchange processes and anthropogenic factors. Thus, the present paper illustrates the importance of

  15. Spatial pattern of hormone and antibiotic concentrations in surface waters in Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaicunas, R.; Inamdar, S. P.; Dutta, S.; Aga, D.; Zimmerman, L. R.

    2011-12-01

    Water quality surveys of the U.S. have confirmed the presence of hormones and antibiotics in some surface waters. Although the reported concentrations of these substances are extremely low, there is substantial concern about their effect on aquatic species. For example, chronic exposure to estradiol (E2β) concentrations as low as 40 ng/L have been shown to cause endocrine disruption in fish. Furthermore, there is potential for contaminants to enter our drinking supply. Significant sources of hormones and antibiotics include discharge from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and wastewater treatment plants as well as runoff from agricultural land receiving application of animal manure. Since Sussex County, Delaware is one of the leading poultry producing counties in the nation, and many farmers in the state use poultry litter as fertilizer for their crops, it is critical to study the concentrations of contaminants in surface waters. Fifty surface water (streams, lakes, and ponds) sampling locations throughout the state of Delaware were chosen based on DNREC (Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control) data. Locations with the highest nitrogen and phosphorus levels were assumed to be associated with agriculture and wastewater sources and therefore were likely to be contaminated with hormones and antibiotics. The first set of sampling occurred in April representing high-flow conditions, and the second set will occur in September representing low-flow conditions. Water samples will be screened through the cost-effective enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method followed by more rigorous analyses of selected samples using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). ELISA screening includes estradiol (E2β), sulfamethazine and triclosan, while LC/MS/MS will quantify both free and conjugated forms of estrone (E1), estradiol (E2β), estriol (E3), as well as selected sulfa and tetracycline antibiotics. Initial ELISA results

  16. Linking in Vitro Effects and Detected Organic Micropollutants in Surface Water Using Mixture-Toxicity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Brack, Werner; Creusot, Nicolas; Denison, Michael S; Deutschmann, Björn; Hilscherová, Klára; Hollert, Henner; Krauss, Martin; Novák, Jiří; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Serra, Helene; Shao, Ying; Escher, Beate I

    2015-12-15

    Surface water can contain countless organic micropollutants, and targeted chemical analysis alone may only detect a small fraction of the chemicals present. Consequently, bioanalytical tools can be applied complementary to chemical analysis to detect the effects of complex chemical mixtures. In this study, bioassays indicative of activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), adaptive stress responses to oxidative stress (Nrf2), genotoxicity (p53) and inflammation (NF-κB) and the fish embryo toxicity test were applied along with chemical analysis to water extracts from the Danube River. Mixture-toxicity modeling was applied to determine the contribution of detected chemicals to the biological effect. Effect concentrations for between 0 to 13 detected chemicals could be found in the literature for the different bioassays. Detected chemicals explained less than 0.2% of the biological effect in the PXR activation, adaptive stress response, and fish embryo toxicity assays, while five chemicals explained up to 80% of ER activation, and three chemicals explained up to 71% of AhR activation. This study highlights the importance of fingerprinting the effects of detected chemicals.

  17. Multivariate statistical techniques for the assessment of seasonal variations in surface water quality of pasture ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajorlo, Majid; Abdullah, Ramdzani B; Yusoff, Mohd Kamil; Halim, Ridzwan Abd; Hanif, Ahmad Husni Mohd; Willms, Walter D; Ebrahimian, Mahboubeh

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the applicability of multivariate statistical techniques including cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and factor analysis (FA) for the assessment of seasonal variations in the surface water quality of tropical pastures. The study was carried out in the TPU catchment, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The dataset consisted of 1-year monitoring of 14 parameters at six sampling sites. The CA yielded two groups of similarity between the sampling sites, i.e., less polluted (LP) and moderately polluted (MP) at temporal scale. Fecal coliform (FC), NO3, DO, and pH were significantly related to the stream grouping in the dry season, whereas NH3, BOD, Escherichia coli, and FC were significantly related to the stream grouping in the rainy season. The best predictors for distinguishing clusters in temporal scale were FC, NH3, and E. coli, respectively. FC, E. coli, and BOD with strong positive loadings were introduced as the first varifactors in the dry season which indicates the biological source of variability. EC with a strong positive loading and DO with a strong negative loading were introduced as the first varifactors in the rainy season, which represents the physiochemical source of variability. Multivariate statistical techniques were effective analytical techniques for classification and processing of large datasets of water quality and the identification of major sources of water pollution in tropical pastures.

  18. Body mass index in Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marck, Marjolein A; Dicke, Heleen C; Uc, Ergun Y; Kentin, Zippora H A; Borm, George F; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Munneke, Marten

    2012-03-01

    Prior work suggested that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than controls, but evidence is inconclusive. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis on BMI in PD. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl and Scopus to identify cohort studies on BMI in PD, published before February 2011. Studies that reported mean BMI for PD patients and healthy controls were eligible. Twelve studies were included, with a total of 871 patients and 736 controls (in three studies controls consisted of subjects from other published studies). Our primary aim was to assess differences in BMI between patients and controls; this was analyzed with random effects meta-analysis. Our secondary aim was to evaluate the relation with disease severity (Hoehn and Yahr stage) and disease duration, using random effects meta-regression. PD patients had a significantly lower BMI than controls (overall effect 1.73, 95% CI 1.11-2.35, Pnutritional status should be part of PD management.

  19. Proteogenomic analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis using high resolution mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthys Gerhardus Potgieter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBiochemical evidence is vital for accurate genome annotation. The integration of experimental data collected at the proteome level using high resolution mass spectrometry allows for improvements in genome annotation by providing evidence for novel gene models, while validating or modifying others. Here we report the results of a proteogenomic analysis of a reference strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis (mc2155, a fast growing model organism for the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the causative agent for Tuberculosis. By integrating high throughput LC/MS/MS proteomic data with genomic six frame translation and ab initio gene prediction databases, a total of 2887 ORFs were identified, including 2810 ORFs annotated to a Reference protein, and 63 ORFs not previously annotated to a Reference protein. Further, the translational start site (TSS was validated for 558 Reference proteome gene models, while upstream translational evidence was identified for 81. In addition, N-terminus derived peptide identifications allowed for downstream TSS modification of a further 24 gene models. We validated the existence of 6 previously described interrupted coding sequences at the peptide level, and provide evidence for 4 novel frameshift positions. Analysis of peptide posterior error probability (PEP scores indicates high-confidence novel peptide identifications and shows that the genome of M. smegmatis mc2155 is not yet fully annotated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003500.

  20. Neck masses: diagnostic analysis of 630 cases in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikci, H H; Gurdal, M M; Ozkul, M H; Karakas, M; Uvacin, O; Kara, N; Alp, A; Ozbay, I

    2013-11-01

    Neck masses can be classified into three main categories: congenital, inflammatory and neoplastic. Our aim was to determine the distribution of diagnosis in patients who were followed-up for a neck mass and had undergone surgery for diagnostic indications. Six hundred and thirty cases referred to the Otorhinolaryngology and Head Neck Surgery Department of Haseki Research and Training Hospital between January 2005 and February 2012 with a neck mass who underwent excisional or incisional biopsy to establish a histopathologic diagnosis were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with a diagnosis of upper aerodigestive tract malignancy were excluded from the study. As well as the patients with thyroid masses were excluded. Only unknown primary neck masses were included in the study. The neck masses were categorized as inflammatory (33.49 %), congenital (18.9 %) or neoplastic (47.6 %). Neoplastic masses were either benign (51 %) or malignant (49 %) tumors. The most common causes were tuberculous lymphadenitis (40.28 %) among inflammatory masses, thyroglossal duct cysts (32.77 %) among congenital masses, pleomorphic adenoma (22.33 %) among benign neoplastic masses, and lymphoma (20 %) among malignant neoplastic masses. The most common types of mass were congenital in the 0-20 year age group, benign neoplastic in 21-40-year-old and malignant neoplastic in the >40-year group. Any neck mass, especially in an elderly patient, should be managed with caution as a considerable proportion may be malignant. In children and adolescents, a neck mass requiring surgery is most likely to be congenital. Tuberculosis should be considered as a cause of a neck mass due to a long-term inflammatory process in a developing country.

  1. Surface water, groundwater and unified 3D-crack network as a triple coupling dynamic system for a river watershed functioning - manifestation in catastrophic floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Tulenev, Nikita; Trifonov, Dmitriy; Arakelian, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    1. Surface water and groundwater interaction model under conditions of huge level of precipitation in catastrophic floods and mudflows for mountain river watershed is introduced. Seismic processes and volcanic activity impact on the formation of disastrous floods due to dramatic change of the pressure field in groundwater horizons, is under discussion for such a triple coupling system, i.e. surface water - groundwater - crack network. Under the conception we analyze recent (2013) catastrophic water events: the catastrophic floods in Western Europe (May-June, 2013), in the Amur river basin, Russia/China (Aug.-Sept, 2013) and in Colorado, USA (Sept. 12-15,2013). In addition, a separate analysis is carried out for debris event in the Krimsk-city, Caucasus (Krasnodar) region, Russia (July 06-07, 2012). 2. There is a group of problems determined by dramatic discrepancies in water mass balance and other vital parameters, on the one hand, by estimation for different types of atmospheric precipitation (both torrential rain and continuous precipitations) and, on the other hand, for observable natural water events (i.e. catastrophic floods and/or mudflows/debris) on concrete territory. Analysis of many facts result in conclusion that we have the hard comparable/coincidence parameters under traditional conception for discussed events as an isolated/closed (river + rain) runoff-system. In contrast, the reasonable point of view does exist if we take into account the contribution of extra water source, which should be localized in river channel, i.e. functioning of open [(river + rain) + groundwater] flow-system has a principal meaning to understand the events occurrence. 3. The analysis and modeling for the events are carried out by us taking into account the following databases: (i) groundwater map dislocation, it resources and flow balance in studied areas, especially near the land surface being unstable in hydrological sense by many reasons, as well due to heavy rain

  2. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdian, David C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  3. Location of diversions from the surface-water network of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the name and location for the diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central...

  4. Quantifying the impact of climate change on enteric waterborne pathogen concentrations in surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, N.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change, among other factors, will impact waterborne pathogen concentrations in surface water worldwide, possibly increasing the risk of diseases caused by these pathogens. So far, the impacts are only determined qualitatively and thorough quantitative estimates of future pathogen concentrati

  5. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  6. Monthly Diversions from the Surface-Water Network of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  7. Grid cells used for Surface-Water Network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the segment and reaches for the surface-water network by model cell for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley...

  8. Monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  9. GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION, REDOX ZONATION, AND CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AT A GROUNDWATER/SURFACE WATER INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three transects along a groundwater/surface water interface were characterized for spatial distributions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and geochemical conditions to evaluate the natural bioremediation potential of this environmental system. Partly on the basis of ground p...

  10. Point source nutrient discharges to surface water in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of total nitrogen and total phosphorus discharged to surface waters in...

  11. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  12. Cell-based Metabolomics for Assessing Chemical Exposure and Toxicity of Environmental Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals/fish to monitor/assess contaminant exposu...

  13. Surface-Water Network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an approximate...

  14. Seasonal and spatial variations of glyphosate residues in surface waters of El Crespo stream, Buenos Aires province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Debora; Okada, Elena; Aparicio, Virginia; Menone, Mirta; Costa, Jose Luis

    2017-04-01

    El Crespo stream is located inside a small watershed (52,000 Ha) which is only influenced by farming activities without urban or industrial impact. The watershed can be divided in two areas, the southern area (upstream), mainly composed of intensive crops and the northern area (downstream) used only for extensive livestock. In this sense, "El Crespo" stream in an optimal site for monitoring screening of pesticide residues. The objective of this work was to determine the seasonal and spatial variations of glyphosate (GLY), in surface waters of "El Crespo" stream. We hypothesized that in surface waters of "El Crespo" stream the levels of GLY vary depending of the season and rainfall events. The water sampling was carried out from October to June (2014-2015) in two sites: upstream (US) and downstream (DS), before and after rain events. The water samples were collected by triplicate in 1 L polypropylene bottles and stored at -20°C until analysis. GLY was extracted from unfiltered water samples with a buffer solution (100 mM Na2B4O7•10H2O/100 mM K3PO4, pH=9) and derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate (1 mg/mL in acetonitrile). Afterwards samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS/MS). The detection limit (LD) was 0.1 μg/L and the quantification limit (QL) was 0.5 μg/L. The rainfall regime was obtained from the database of INTA Balcarce. GLY was detected in 92.3% of the analyzed samples. In the US site, were GLY is regularly applied, the highest GLY concentration was registered in October (2.15 ± 0.16 μg/L); from November to June, the GLY levels decreased from 1.97 ± 0.17 μg/L to

  15. Groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and processes affecting loads of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, L. Rick; Ortiz, Roderick F.; Brown, Christopher R.; Watts, Kenneth R.

    2016-11-28

    In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas River Basin Regional Resource Planning Group, initiated a study of groundwater and surface-water interaction, water quality, and loading of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium to Fountain Creek near Pueblo, Colorado, to improve understanding of sources and processes affecting loading of these constituents to streams in the Arkansas River Basin. Fourteen monitoring wells were installed in a series of three transects across Fountain Creek near Pueblo, and temporary streamgages were established at each transect to facilitate data collection for the study. Groundwat