WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface-water flow velocities

  1. Technical Note: Surface water velocity observations from a camera: a case study on the Tiber River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tauro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring surface water velocity during flood events is a challenging task. Techniques based on deploying instruments in the flow are often unfeasible due to high velocity and abundant sediment transport. A low-cost and versatile technology that provides continuous and automatic observations is still not available. LSPIV (large scale particle imaging velocimetry is a promising approach to tackle these issues. Such technique consists of developing surface water velocity maps analyzing video frame sequences recorded with a camera. In this technical brief, we implement a novel LSPIV experimental apparatus to observe a flood event in the Tiber river at a cross-section located in the center of Rome, Italy. We illustrate results from three tests performed during the hydrograph flood peak and recession limb for different illumination and weather conditions. The obtained surface velocity maps are compared to the rating curve velocity and to benchmark velocity values. Experimental findings confirm the potential of the proposed LSPIV implementation in aiding research in natural flow monitoring.

  2. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    irregularities. The so-called pumping model provided good estimates of the storage in the hyporheic zone under different stream discharges and stream flow conditions along streams. Evaluations Hobøl River, Norway, and Säva Brook, Sweden, at two occasions in both stream indicate that the relative residence time in the hyporheic zone is linearly proportional to the squared Froude Number. The residence time is scaled with water depth and hydraulic conductivity of the bed. The effect of such transient storage in e.g. the hyporheic zone gives rise to a tailing, but the breakthrough curve become increasingly symmetrical with Damköhler number. Such a symmetrical breakthrough can be erroneously taken as an effect of in-stream dispersion, even though this similarity is merely due to the physical analogy of various advection velocities over the transport cross-section, differential advection.

  3. A fully coupled depth-integrated model for surface water and groundwater flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyi; Yuan, Dekui; Lin, Binliang; Teo, Fang-Yenn

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the development of a fully coupled surface water and groundwater flow model. The governing equations of the model are derived based on a control volume approach, with the velocity profiles of the two types of flows being both taken into consideration. The surface water and groundwater flows are both modelled based on the unified equations and the water exchange and interaction between the two types of flows can be taken into account. The model can be used to simulate the surface water and groundwater flows simultaneously with the same numerical scheme without other effort being needed to link them. The model is not only suitable for the porous medium consisting of fine sediments, but also for coarse sediments and crushed rocks by adding a quadratic friction term. Benchmark tests are conducted to validate the model. The model predictions agree well with the data.

  4. Influence of filtration velocity on DON variation in BAF for micropolluted surface water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng-Fei; Chen, You-Peng; Kang, Jia; Gao, Xu; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Biological aerated filters (BAFs) are widely used for the treatment of micropolluted surface water. However, the biological process produces dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which, as precursors of nitrogenous disinfection by-products, pose potential threats to drinking water safety. Therefore, to control DON in BAF effluent, it is necessary to study the influence of BAF operation parameters on DON production. In this study, the influence of filtration velocity in a BAF on DON production was investigated. Under different filtration velocity (0.5, 2, and 4 m/h) conditions, profiles of DON concentrations along the media layer were measured. The profile at a filtration velocity of 0.5 m/h showed a decreasing trend, and the ones under filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h fluctuated in a small range (from 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L). Moreover, the relatively high filtration velocities of 2 and 4 m/h resulted in a lower level of DON concentration. Additionally, 3D excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize DON. It is found that the patterns of DON at a relatively high filtration velocity condition (4 m/h) were obviously different from the ones under low filtration velocity conditions (0.5 and 2 m/h).

  5. Scaling up ecohydrological processes: role of surface water flow in water-limited landscapes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popp, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available microscale processes like ecohydrological feedback mechanisms and spatial exchange like surface water flow, the authors derive transition probabilities from a fine-scale simulation model. They applied two versions of the landscape model, one that includes...

  6. The importance of base flow in sustaining surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Buto, Susan G.; Susong, David D.; Rumsey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado River has been identified as the most overallocated river in the world. Considering predicted future imbalances between water supply and demand and the growing recognition that base flow (a proxy for groundwater discharge to streams) is critical for sustaining flow in streams and rivers, there is a need to develop methods to better quantify present-day base flow across large regions. We adapted and applied the spatially referenced regression on watershed attributes (SPARROW) water quality model to assess the spatial distribution of base flow, the fraction of streamflow supported by base flow, and estimates of and potential processes contributing to the amount of base flow that is lost during in-stream transport in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). On average, 56% of the streamflow in the UCRB originated as base flow, and precipitation was identified as the dominant driver of spatial variability in base flow at the scale of the UCRB, with the majority of base flow discharge to streams occurring in upper elevation watersheds. The model estimates an average of 1.8 × 1010 m3/yr of base flow in the UCRB; greater than 80% of which is lost during in-stream transport to the Lower Colorado River Basin via processes including evapotranspiration and water diversion for irrigation. Our results indicate that surface waters in the Colorado River Basin are dependent on base flow, and that management approaches that consider groundwater and surface water as a joint resource will be needed to effectively manage current and future water resources in the Basin.

  7. An experimental study on the characteristics of wind-driven surface water film flows by using a multi-transducer ultrasonic pulse-echo technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Wen-Li; Bond, Leonard J.; Hu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of surface water film flows driven by boundary layer winds over a test plate in order to elucidate the underlying physics pertinent to dynamic water runback processes over ice accreting surfaces of aircraft wings. A multi-transducer ultrasonic pulse-echo (MTUPE) technique was developed and applied to achieve non-intrusive measurements of water film thickness as a function of time and space to quantify the transient behaviors of wind-driven surface water film flows. The effects of key controlling parameters, including freestream velocity of the airflow and flow rate of the water film, on the dynamics of the surface water runback process were examined in great details based on the quantitative MTUPE measurements. While the thickness of the wind-driven surface water film was found to decrease rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, various surface wave structures were also found to be generated at the air/water interface as the surface water runs back. The evolution of the surface wave structures, in the terms of wave shape, frequency and propagation velocity of the surface waves, and instability modes (i.e., well-organized 2-D waves vs. 3-D complex irregular waves), was found to change significantly as the airflow velocity increases. Such temporally synchronized and spatially resolved measurements are believed to be very helpful to elucidate the underlying physics for improved understanding of the dynamics of water runback process pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena.

  8. Relative significance of microtopography and vegetation as controls on surface water flow on a low-gradient floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungyill; Harvey, Judson W.

    2014-01-01

    Surface water flow controls water velocities, water depths, and residence times, and influences sediment and nutrient transport and other ecological processes in shallow aquatic systems. Flow through wetlands is substantially influenced by drag on vegetation stems but is also affected by microtopography. Our goal was to use microtopography data directly in a widely used wetland model while retaining the advantages of the model’s one-dimensional structure. The base simulation with no explicit treatment of microtopography only performed well for a period of high water when vegetation dominated flow resistance. Extended simulations using microtopography can improve the fit to low-water conditions substantially. The best fit simulation had a flow conductance parameter that decreased in value by 70 % during dry season such that mcrotopographic features blocked 40 % of the cross sectional width for flow. Modeled surface water became ponded and flow ceased when 85 % of the cross sectional width became blocked by microtopographic features. We conclude that vegetation drag dominates wetland flow resistance at higher water levels and microtopography dominates at low water levels with the threshold delineated by the top of microtopographic features. Our results support the practicality of predicting flow on floodplains using relatively easily measured physical and biological variables.

  9. Mathematical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and salinity interactions in the coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are the most densely-populated areas in the world. Consequently water demand is high, posing great pressure on fresh water resources. Climatic change and its direct impacts on meteorological variables (e.g. precipitation) and indirect impact on sea level rise, as well as anthropogenic pressures (e.g. groundwater abstraction), are strong drivers causing groundwater salinisation and subsequently affecting coastal wetlands salinity with adverse effects on the corresponding ecosystems. Coastal zones are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes and variable-density flow conditions. Simulation of sea level rise and tidal effects on aquifer salinisation and accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades several computer codes have been developed to simulate coupled surface and groundwater flow. In these numerical models surface water flow is usually described by the 1-D Saint Venant equations (e.g. Swain and Wexler, 1996) or the 2D shallow water equations (e.g. Liang et al., 2007). Further simplified equations, such as the diffusion and kinematic wave approximations to the Saint Venant equations, are also employed for the description of 2D overland flow and 1D stream flow (e.g. Gunduz and Aral, 2005). However, for coastal bays, estuaries and wetlands it is often desirable to solve the 3D shallow water equations to simulate surface water flow. This is the case e.g. for wind-driven flows or density-stratified flows. Furthermore, most integrated models are based on the assumption of constant fluid density and therefore their applicability to coastal regions is questionable. Thus, most of the existing codes are not well-suited to represent surface water-groundwater interactions in coastal areas. To this end, the 3D integrated

  10. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grift, van der B.; Rozemeijer, J.C.; Griffioen, J.; Velde, van der Y.

    2014-01-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and 5 P immobilization along the flow-path fro

  11. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from

  12. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surface water and groundwater are integral components of the hydrologic continuum and the interaction between them affects both their quantity and quality. However, surface water and groundwater are often considered as two separate systems and are analysed independently. This separation is partly due to the different time scales, which apply in surface water and groundwater flows and partly due to the difficulties in measuring and modelling their interactions (Winter et al., 1998). Coastal areas in particular are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes. Accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands, for example, requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades a large number of mathematical models and field methods have been developed in order to quantify the interaction between groundwater and hydraulically connected surface water bodies. Field studies may provide the best data (Hughes, 1995) but are usually expensive and involve too many parameters. In addition, the interpretation of field measurements and linking with modelling tools often proves to be difficult. In contrast, experimental studies are less expensive and provide controlled data. However, experimental studies of surface water-groundwater interaction are less frequently encountered in the literature than filed studies (e.g. Ebrahimi et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012; Sparks et al., 2013). To this end, an experimental model has been constructed at the Hyder Hydraulics Laboratory at Cardiff University to enable measurements to be made of groundwater transport through a sand embankment between a tidal water body such as an estuary and a non-tidal water body such as a wetland. The transport behaviour of a conservative tracer was studied for a constant water level on the wetland side of the embankment, while running a

  13. Transient flow between aquifers and surface water: analytically derived field-scale hydraulic heads and fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. de Rooij

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing importance of catchment-scale and basin-scale models of the hydrological cycle makes it desirable to have a simple, yet physically realistic model for lateral subsurface water flow. As a first building block towards such a model, analytical solutions are presented for horizontal groundwater flow to surface waters held at prescribed water levels for aquifers with parallel and radial flow. The solutions are valid for a wide array of initial and boundary conditions and additions or withdrawals of water, and can handle discharge into as well as lateral infiltration from the surface water. Expressions for the average hydraulic head, the flux to or from the surface water, and the aquifer-scale hydraulic conductivity are developed to provide output at the scale of the modelled system rather than just point-scale values. The upscaled conductivity is time-variant. It does not depend on the magnitude of the flux but is determined by medium properties as well as the external forcings that drive the flow. For the systems studied, with lateral travel distances not exceeding 10 m, the circular aquifers respond very differently from the infinite-strip aquifers. The modelled fluxes are sensitive to the magnitude of the storage coefficient. For phreatic aquifers a value of 0.2 is argued to be representative, but considerable variations are likely. The effect of varying distributions over the day of recharge damps out rapidly; a soil water model that can provide accurate daily totals is preferable over a less accurate model hat correctly estimates the timing of recharge peaks.

  14. Hydroecological factors governing surface water flow on a low-gradient floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Noe, Gregory B.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Nowacki, Daniel; ,

    2009-01-01

    "Interrelationships between hydrology and aquatic ecosystems are better understood in streams and rivers compared to their surrounding floodplains. Our goal was to characterize the hydrology of the Everglades ridge and slough floodplain ecosystem, which is valued for the comparatively high biodiversity and connectivity of its parallel-drainage features but which has been degraded over the past century in response to flow reductions associated with flood control. We measured flow velocity, water depth, and wind velocity

  15. Estimates of Median Flows for Streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    The Kansas State Legislature, by enacting Kansas Statute KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., mandated the criteria for determining which Kansas stream segments would be subject to classification by the State. One criterion for the selection as a classified stream segment is based on the statistic of median flow being equal to or greater than 1 cubic foot per second. As specified by KSA 82a?2001 et. seq., median flows were determined from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging-station data by using the most-recent 10 years of gaged data (KSA) for each streamflow-gaging station. Median flows also were determined by using gaged data from the entire period of record (all-available hydrology, AAH). Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating median flows for uncontrolled stream segments. The drainage area of the gaging stations on uncontrolled stream segments used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. A logarithmic transformation of the data was needed to develop the best linear relation for computing median flows. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. Tobit analyses of KSA data yielded a model standard error of prediction of 0.285 logarithmic units, and the best equations using Tobit analyses of AAH data had a model standard error of prediction of 0.250 logarithmic units. These regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute median flows for the uncontrolled stream segments on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Measured median flows from gaging stations were incorporated into the regression-estimated median flows along the stream segments where available. The segments that were uncontrolled were interpolated using gaged data weighted according to the drainage area and the bias between the

  16. Decorrelation-based blood flow velocity estimation: effect of spread of flow velocity, linear flow velocity gradients, and parabolic flow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupotti, F.A.; Steen, A.F.W. van der; Mastik, F.; Korte, C.L. de

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, a new method to measure transverse blood flow, based on the decorrelation of the radio frequency (RF) signals has been developed. In this paper, we investigated the influence of nonuniform flow on the velocity estimation. The decorrelation characteristics of transverse blood flow us

  17. Application of a fully-integrated groundwater-surface water flow model in municipal asset management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, L. K.; Unger, A.; Jones, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Access to affordable potable water is critical in the development and maintenance of urban centres. Given that water is a public good in Canada, all funds related to operation and maintenance of the drinking water and wastewater networks must come from consumers. An asset management system can be put in place by municipalities to more efficiently manage their water and wastewater distribution system to ensure proper use of these funds. The system works at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels, thus ensuring optimal scheduling of operation and maintenance activities, as well as prediction of future water demand scenarios. At the operational level, a fully integrated model is used to simulate the groundwater-surface water interaction of the Laurel Creek Watershed, of which 80% is urbanized by the City of Waterloo. Canadian municipalities typically lose 13% of their potable water through leaks in watermains and sanitary sewers, and sanitary sewers often generate substantial inflows from fractures in pipe walls. The City of Waterloo sanitary sewers carry an additional 10,000 cubic meters of water to wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, watermain and sanitary sewers present a significant impact on the groundwater-surface water interaction, as well as the affordability of the drinking water and wastewater networks as a whole. To determine areas of concern within the network, the integrated groundwater-surface water model also simulates flow through the City of Waterloo's watermain and sanitary sewer networks. The final model will be used to assess the interaction between measured losses of water from the City of Waterloo's watermain system, infiltration into the sanitary sewer system adjacent to the watermains, and the response of the groundwater system to deteriorated sanitary sewers or to pipes that have been recently renovated. This will ultimately contribute to the City of Waterloo's municipal asset management plan.

  18. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. van der Grift

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater to surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we investigated Fe(II oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than one week before complete oxidation of Fe(II is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilisation of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II oxidation proces which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II is competly depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III-phosphates at redox gradients

  19. Mean Velocity Estimation of Viscous Debris Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjuan Yang; Fangqiang Wei; Kaiheng Hu

    2014-01-01

    The mean velocity estimation of debris flows, especially viscous debris flows, is an impor-tant part in the debris flow dynamics research and in the design of control structures. In this study, theoretical equations for computing debris flow velocity with the one-phase flow assumption were re-viewed and used to analyze field data of viscous debris flows. Results show that the viscous debris flow is difficult to be classified as a Newtonian laminar flow, a Newtonian turbulent flow, a Bingham fluid, or a dilatant fluid in the strict sense. However, we can establish empirical formulas to compute its mean velocity following equations for Newtonian turbulent flows, because most viscous debris flows are tur-bulent. Factors that potentially influence debris flow velocity were chosen according to two-phase flow theories. Through correlation analysis and data fitting, two empirical formulas were proposed. In the first one, velocity is expressed as a function of clay content, flow depth and channel slope. In the second one, a coefficient representing the grain size nonuniformity is used instead of clay content. Both formu-las can give reasonable estimate of the mean velocity of the viscous debris flow.

  20. A new capture fraction method to map how pumpage affects surface water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, S.A.; Reeves, H.W.; Dickinson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    All groundwater pumped is balanced by removal of water somewhere, initially from storage in the aquifer and later from capture in the form of increase in recharge and decrease in discharge. Capture that results in a loss of water in streams, rivers, and wetlands now is a concern in many parts of the United States. Hydrologists commonly use analytical and numerical approaches to study temporal variations in sources of water to wells for select points of interest. Much can be learned about coupled surface/groundwater systems, however, by looking at the spatial distribution of theoretical capture for select times of interest. Development of maps of capture requires (1) a reasonably well-constructed transient or steady state model of an aquifer with head-dependent flow boundaries representing surface water features or evapotranspiration and (2) an automated procedure to run the model repeatedly and extract results, each time with a well in a different location. This paper presents new methods for simulating and mapping capture using three-dimensional groundwater flow models and presents examples from Arizona, Oregon, and Michigan. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  1. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  2. Simulating river flow velocity on global scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schulze

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity in rivers has a major impact on residence time of water and thus on high and low water as well as on water quality. For global scale hydrological modeling only very limited information is available for simulating flow velocity. Based on the Manning-Strickler equation, a simple algorithm to model temporally and spatially variable flow velocity was developed with the objective of improving flow routing in the global hydrological model of WaterGAP. An extensive data set of flow velocity measurements in US rivers was used to test and to validate the algorithm before integrating it into WaterGAP. In this test, flow velocity was calculated based on measured discharge and compared to measured velocity. Results show that flow velocity can be modeled satisfactorily at selected river cross sections. It turned out that it is quite sensitive to river roughness, and the results can be optimized by tuning this parameter. After the validation of the approach, the tested flow velocity algorithm has been implemented into the WaterGAP model. A final validation of its effects on the model results is currently performed.

  3. Refinement of turbulent flow velocity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Bryanskaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic laws of Prandtl semi-empirical turbulence theory were analyzed in the article. It was shown, that the Prandtl – Nikuradse logarithmic distribution of velocities are not strictly universal. The change of the first and second turbulence constants was analyzed on the basis of experimental data of I. Nikuradse. The logarithmic velocity profiles for smooth and rough pipes have been transformed. A united velocity logarithmic profile for flows in pipes, appropriate for any rate of hydraulic resistance was received. A more precise, consistent with the resistance laws, description of the kinematic structure of the flow with varying parameters of the velocity profiles was set. It was shown that the position of the average velocity point for the flow in pipe remained constant when the parameters of the velocity profile changed.

  4. Flow Alteration and Chemical Reduction: Air Stripping to Lessen Subsurface Discharges of Mercury to Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. C.; Bogle, M.; Liang, L.; Miller, C. L.; Peterson, M.; Southworth, G. R.; Spalding, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury concentrations in groundwater, surface water, and biota near an industrial facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee remain high some 50 years after the original major releases from the facility to the environment. Since the mid-1980s, various remedial and abatement actions have been implemented at the facility, including re-routing water flows, armoring contaminated stream banks, relining or cleanout of facility storm drains, and activated charcoal treatment of groundwater and sump discharges. These actions were taken to reduce inorganic mercury inputs from the facility to the stream; a strategy that assumes limiting the inorganic mercury precursor will reduce Hg methylation and its subsequent bioaccumulation. To date, such actions have reduced mercury loading from the site by approximately 90% from levels typical of the mid 1980's, but waterborne mercury at the facility boundary remains roughly 100 times the typical local background concentration and methylmercury accumulation in aquatic biota exceed standards for safe consumption by humans and wildlife. In 2008 and 2009, a series of investigations was initiated to explore innovative approaches to further control mercury concentrations in stream water. Efforts in this study focused on decreasing waterborne inorganic mercury inputs from two sources. The first, a highly localized source, is the discharge point of the enclosed stormdrain network whereas the second is a more diffuse short reach of stream where metallic Hg in streambed sediments generates a continued input of dissolved Hg to the overlying water. Moving a clean water flow management discharge point to a position downstream of the contaminated reach reduced mercury loading from the streambed source by 75% - 100%, likely by minimizing resuspension of Hg-rich fine particulates and changing characteristic hyporheic flow path length and residence time. Mercury in the stormdrain discharge exists as highly reactive dissolved Hg(II) due to residual chlorine in

  5. VELOCITY PROFILES OF TURBULENT OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dianchang; WANG Xingkui; YU Mingzhong; LI Danxun

    2001-01-01

    The log-law and the wake law of velocity profile for open channel flows are discussed and compared in this paper. Experimental data from eight sources are used to verify the velocity distribution models.The effect of bed level on the velocity profile is analyzed. A formula to calculate the maximum velocity is proposed. In the region of y <δm , the velocity profile approximately follows the log-law. For the region of y >δm , the effect of the aspect ratio is considered. A new velocity profile model on the basis of log-law that can unify all of the hydraulic bed roughness is presented.

  6. Documentation of the Santa Clara Valley regional ground-water/surface-water flow model, Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R.T.; Li, Zhen; Faunt, C.C.

    2004-01-01

    The Santa Clara Valley is a long, narrow trough extending about 35 miles southeast from the southern end of San Francisco Bay where the regional alluvial-aquifer system has been a major source of water. Intensive agricultural and urban development throughout the 20th century and related ground-water development resulted in ground-water-level declines of more than 200 feet and land subsidence of as much as 12.7 feet between the early 1900s and the mid-1960s. Since the 1960s, Santa Clara Valley Water District has imported surface water to meet growing demands and reduce dependence on ground-water supplies. This importation of water has resulted in a sustained recovery of the ground-water flow system. To help support effective management of the ground-water resources, a regional ground-water/surface-water flow model was developed. This model simulates the flow of ground water and surface water, changes in ground-water storage, and related effects such as land subsidence. A numerical ground-water/surface-water flow model of the Santa Clara Valley subbasin of the Santa Clara Valley was developed as part of a cooperative investigation with the Santa Clara Valley Water District. The model better defines the geohydrologic framework of the regional flow system and better delineates the supply and demand components that affect the inflows to and outflows from the regional ground-water flow system. Development of the model includes revisions to the previous ground-water flow model that upgraded the temporal and spatial discretization, added source-specific inflows and outflows, simulated additional flow features such as land subsidence and multi-aquifer wellbore flow, and extended the period of simulation through September 1999. The transient-state model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water data for the period 197099 and to historical subsidence for the period 198399. The regional ground-water flow system consists of multiple aquifers that are grouped

  7. Management of surface water and groundwater withdrawals to maintain environmental stream flows in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Howard W.; Seelbach, Paul W.; Nicholas, James R.; Hamilton, David A.; Potter, Kenneth W.; Frevert, Donald K.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the State of Michigan enacted legislation requiring that new or increased high-capacity withdrawals (greater than 100,000 gallons per day) from either surface water or groundwater be reviewed to prevent Adverse Resource Impacts (ARI). Science- based guidance was sought in defining how groundwater or surface-water withdrawals affect streamflow and in quantifying the relation between reduced streamflow and changes in stream ecology. The implementation of the legislation led to a risk-based system based on a gradient of risk, ecological response curves, and estimation of groundwater-surface water interaction. All Michigan streams are included in the legislation, and, accordingly, all Michigan streams were classified into management types defined by size of watershed, stream-water temperature, and predicted fish assemblages. Different streamflow removal percentages define risk-based thresholds allowed for each type. These removal percentages were informed by ecological response curves of characteristic fish populations and finalized through a legislative workgroup process. The assessment process includes an on-line screening tool that may be used to evaluate new or increased withdrawals against the risk-based zones and allows withdrawals that are not likely to cause an ARI to proceed to water-use registration. The system is designed to consider cumulative impacts of high-capacity withdrawals and to promote user involvement in water resource management by the establishment of water-user committees as cumulative withdrawals indicate greater potential for ARI in the watershed.

  8. CONCENTRATION AND VELOCITY OF DEBRIS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangjun FEI; Peng CUI; Yong LI

    2002-01-01

    Debris flows in nature generally fall into three groups distinct in their grain composition: water-stone flow,or sub-viscous debris flow,dominated by coarse grains; muddy flow,dominated by fine grains;and viscous debris flow composed of grains in large range. Liquid-phase velocity and sedimentary delivery resistance of sub-viscous debris flow have been discussed based on the composition characters of sub-and high-viscous debris flows. It is revealed that the presence of fine grains plays a vital role in affecting resistance and average velocity,particularly when the volume fraction of grains in the flow is relatively high,i.e. Sv > 0.45. Grain-size distribution of viscous debris flow is characterized by a bimodal curve,which explains the properties like high density and low resistance gradient of debris flows. A calculation formula is finally put forward,which has to some extent overcome locality limits and achieved a good agreement with the field observations of debris flows in Southwest China.

  9. Integrated modeling of groundwater-surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field: The importance of directly measured flow route contributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemeijer, J.C.; Velde, Y. van der; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, F.C. van; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely av

  10. Simulation of groundwater flow and interaction of groundwater and surface water on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.; Fienen, Michael N.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa and Indian Health Service are interested in improving the understanding of groundwater flow and groundwater/surface-water interaction on the Lac du Flambeau Reservation (Reservation) in southwest Vilas County and southeast Iron County, Wisconsin, with particular interest in an understanding of the potential for contamination of groundwater supply wells and the fate of wastewater that is infiltrated from treatment lagoons on the Reservation. This report describes the construction, calibration, and application of a regional groundwater flow model used to simulate the shallow groundwater flow system of the Reservation and water-quality results for groundwater and surface-water samples collected near a system of waste-water-treatment lagoons. Groundwater flows through a permeable glacial aquifer that ranges in thickness from 60 to more than 200 feet (ft). Seepage and drainage lakes are common in the area and influence groundwater flow patterns on the Reservation. A two-dimensional, steady-state analytic element groundwater flow model was constructed using the program GFLOW. The model was calibrated by matching target water levels and stream base flows through the use of the parameter-estimation program, PEST. Simulated results illustrate that groundwater flow within most of the Reservation is toward the Bear River and the chain of lakes that feed the Bear River. Results of analyses of groundwater and surface-water samples collected downgradient from the wastewater infiltration lagoons show elevated levels of ammonia and dissolved phosphorus. In addition, wastewater indicator chemicals detected in three downgradient wells and a small downgradient stream indicate that infiltrated wastewater is moving southwest of the lagoons toward Moss Lake. Potential effects of extended wet and dry periods (within historical ranges) were evaluated by adjusting precipitation and groundwater recharge in the model and comparing the

  11. Documentation of the Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process for modeling surface-water flow with the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin L.; White, Jeremy T.

    2012-01-01

    A flexible Surface-Water Routing (SWR1) Process that solves the continuity equation for one-dimensional and two-dimensional surface-water flow routing has been developed for the U.S. Geological Survey three-dimensional groundwater model, MODFLOW-2005. Simple level- and tilted-pool reservoir routing and a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations have been implemented. Both methods can be implemented in the same model and the solution method can be simplified to represent constant-stage elements that are functionally equivalent to the standard MODFLOW River or Drain Package boundary conditions. A generic approach has been used to represent surface-water features (reaches) and allows implementation of a variety of geometric forms. One-dimensional geometric forms include rectangular, trapezoidal, and irregular cross section reaches to simulate one-dimensional surface-water features, such as canals and streams. Two-dimensional geometric forms include reaches defined using specified stage-volume-area-perimeter (SVAP) tables and reaches covering entire finite-difference grid cells to simulate two-dimensional surface-water features, such as wetlands and lakes. Specified SVAP tables can be used to represent reaches that are smaller than the finite-difference grid cell (for example, isolated lakes), or reaches that cannot be represented accurately using the defined top of the model. Specified lateral flows (which can represent point and distributed flows) and stage-dependent rainfall and evaporation can be applied to each reach. The SWR1 Process can be used with the MODFLOW Unsaturated Zone Flow (UZF1) Package to permit dynamic simulation of runoff from the land surface to specified reaches. Surface-water/groundwater interactions in the SWR1 Process are mathematically defined to be a function of the difference between simulated stages and groundwater levels, and the specific form of the reach conductance equation used in each reach. Conductance can be

  12. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Four evening events and one morning event of joint EISCAT/STARE observations during ~22h are considered and the differences between observed STARE line-of-sight (l-o-s velocities and EISCAT electron drift velocities projected onto the STARE beams are studied. We demonstrate that the double-pulse technique, which is currently in use in the STARE routine data handling, typically underestimates the true phase velocity as inferred from the multi-pulse STARE data. We show that the STARE velocities are persistently smaller (1.5–2 times than the EISCAT velocities, even for the multi-pulse data. The effect seems to be more pronounced in the evening sector when the Finland radar observes at large flow angles. We evaluate the performance of the ion-acoustic approach (IAA, Nielsen and Schlegel, 1985 and the off-orthogonal fluid approach (OOFA, Uspensky et al., 2003 techniques to predict the true electron drift velocity for the base event of 12 February 1999. The IAA technique predicts the convection reasonably well for enhanced flows of >~1000m/s, but not so well for slower ones. By considering the EISCAT N(h profiles, we derive the effective aspect angle and effective altitude of backscatter, and use this information for application of the OOFA technique. We demonstrate that the OOFA predictions for the base event are superior over the IAA predictions and thus, we confirm that OOFA predicts the electron velocities reasonably well in the evening sector, in addition to the morning sector, as concluded by Uspensky et al. (2003. To check how "robust" the OOFA model is and how successful it is for convection estimates without the EISCAT support, we analysed three additional evening events and one additional morning event for which information on N(h profiles was intentionally ignored. By accepting the mean STARE/EISCAT velocity ratio of 0.55 and the mean azimuth rotation of 9° (derived for the basic event, we show that the OOFA performs

  13. Plasma flow velocity measurements using a modulated Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Plasma Research Lab.; Meijer, F.G. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica `Rijnhuizen`, Association Euratom-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)]|[Physics Faculty, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-03-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of flow velocity reconstruction using passive spectroscopic techniques. We report some preliminary measurements of the toroidal flow velocity of hydrogen atoms in the RTP tokamak using a phase modulated Michelson interferometer. (orig.) 1 refs.

  14. Nutrient sampling slam: high resolution surface-water sampling in streams reveals patterns in groundwater chemistry and flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater–surface water interface (GSWI), consisting of shallow groundwater adjacent to stream channels, is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for other solutes, and a target for restoration activities. Characterizing groundwater-surface water intera...

  15. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... agrees with the spectral flow angle. The vector velocity estimates agrees with the spectral estimates at PS and ED. From preliminary data it is concluded that vector flow angle estimation can replace the operator-dependent angle correction used for spectral velocity estimation....... estimation and spectral estimates is presented. The variation of the blood flow angle and the effect on the velocity estimate is investigated. The right common carotid arteries of three healthy volunteers were scanned. Real-time spectral and vector flow data were obtained simultaneously from one range gate...

  16. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  17. Sub meso scale phytoplankton distribution in the north east Atlantic surface waters determined with an automated flow cytometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thyssen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton cells in the size range ~1–50 μm were analysed in surface waters using an automated flow cytometer, the Cytosub (http://www.cytobuoy.com, from the Azores to the French Brittany during spring 2007. The Cytosub records the pulse shape of the optical signals generated by phytoplankton cells when intercepted by the laser beam. A total of 6 distinct optical groups were resolved during the whole transect, and the high frequency sampling (15 min provided evidence for the cellular cycle (based on cyclic changes in cell size and fluorescence and distribution changes linked to the different water characteristics crossed in the north east Atlantic provinces. Nutrient concentrations and mixed layer depth varied from west to east, with a decrease in the mixed layer depth and high nutrient concentrations in the middle of the transect as well as near the French coast. Data provided a link between the sub meso scale processes and phytoplankton patchiness, some abundance variations due to the cellular cycle can be pointed out. The high frequency spatial sampling encompasses temporal variations of the phytoplankton abundance, offering a better insight into phytoplankton distribution.

  18. MHD three-dimensional flow of nanofluid with velocity slip and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Kutbi, Marwan A.

    2015-12-01

    An analysis has been carried out for the three dimensional flow of viscous nanofluid in the presence of partial slip and thermal radiation effects. The flow is induced by a permeable stretching surface. Water is treated as a base fluid and alumina as a nanoparticle. Fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of applied magnetic field. Entire different concept of nonlinear thermal radiation is utilized in the heat transfer process. Different from the previous literature, the nonlinear system for temperature distribution is solved and analyzed. Appropriate transformations reduce the nonlinear partial differential system to ordinary differential system. Convergent series solutions are computed for the velocity and temperature. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and examined. It is concluded that heat transfer rate increases when temperature and radiation parameters are increased.

  19. Daily rhythm of cerebral blood flow velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spielman Arthur J

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CBFV (cerebral blood flow velocity is lower in the morning than in the afternoon and evening. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the time of day changes in CBFV: 1 CBFV changes are due to sleep-associated processes or 2 time of day changes in CBFV are due to an endogenous circadian rhythm independent of sleep. The aim of this study was to examine CBFV over 30 hours of sustained wakefulness to determine whether CBFV exhibits fluctuations associated with time of day. Methods Eleven subjects underwent a modified constant routine protocol. CBFV from the middle cerebral artery was monitored by chronic recording of Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasonography. Other variables included core body temperature (CBT, end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2, blood pressure, and heart rate. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO served as a measure of endogenous circadian phase position. Results A non-linear multiple regression, cosine fit analysis revealed that both the CBT and CBFV rhythm fit a 24 hour rhythm (R2 = 0.62 and R2 = 0.68, respectively. Circadian phase position of CBT occurred at 6:05 am while CBFV occurred at 12:02 pm, revealing a six hour, or 90 degree difference between these two rhythms (t = 4.9, df = 10, p Conclusion In conclusion, time of day variations in CBFV have an approximately 24 hour rhythm under constant conditions, suggesting regulation by a circadian oscillator. The 90 degree-phase angle difference between the CBT and CBFV rhythms may help explain previous findings of lower CBFV values in the morning. The phase difference occurs at a time period during which cognitive performance decrements have been observed and when both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events occur more frequently. The mechanisms underlying this phase angle difference require further exploration.

  20. Plasma flow velocity measurements using a modulated Michelson interferometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, J.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of flow velocity reconstruction using passive spectroscopic techniques. We report some preliminary measurements of the toroidal flow velocity of hydrogen atoms in the RTP tokamak using a phase modulated Michelson interferometer. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science S.A.

  1. Determination of small-scale flow directions and velocities in the hyporheic interstitial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermann, L.; Fleckenstein, J.; Nützmann, G.; Lewandowski, J.

    2009-04-01

    The hyporheic interstitial is a hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface between surface water and groundwater. Depending on the hydraulic boundary conditions and the connectivity with the adjacent aquifer, infiltrating and exfiltrating water pass through it. In addition to those larger scale flow patterns flow at the centimetre scale is influenced by streambed morphology, such as pool-ripple sequences, boulders and woody debris, and the hydrodynamics in the flowing water resulting in a very heterogeneous pattern of flow in the shallow sediment. Patterns of exchange at this scale control the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the sediments and are in turn crucial for biogeochemical turnover. To investigate flow velocity and flow direction in the hyporheic interstitial in situ, a method employing heat as a tracer was developed. The method was tested in a low gradient stream (mean slope of 1.8 0/00), with sandy streambed in Brandenburg, Germany (river Schlaube). The movement of a heat pulse emitted by a small point source is detected by temperature sensors attached to four rods (four sensors on each rod) that are vertically driven into the sediment in a concentric circle with a radius of 3 to 4.5 cm around the heat source. The resulting breakthrough-curves give evidence of flow velocities and flow directions in three dimensions, accounting for the local heterogeneities of the sediment. Patterns of flow direction were found to be quite heterogeneous even on small scales of a few decimetres. Interestingly at several locations flow in the sediment was directed opposite to surface flow. Measured flow velocities of up to 1.75 cm min-1 are several orders of magnitude larger than values previously reported in the literature. As this method is non-destructive it allows repetition of measurements and long-term investigations to assess the variability in time. Furthermore it is well suited for a combined application with sampling devices such as pore water

  2. Effect of multi-velocity-difference in traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mo Ye-Liu; He Hong-Di; Xue Yu; Shi Wei; Lu Wei-Zhen

    2008-01-01

    Based on the optimal velocity models, an extended model is proposed, in which multi-velocity-difference ahead is taken into consideration. The damping effect of the multi-velocity-difference ahead has been investigated by means of analytical and numerical methods. Results indicate that the multi-velocity-difference leads to the enhancement of stability of traffic flow, suppression of the emergence of traffic jamming, and reduction of the energy consumption.

  3. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands))

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Simulation of the Regional Ground-Water-Flow System and Ground-Water/Surface-Water Interaction in the Rock River Basin, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckem, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    A regional, two-dimensional, areal ground-water-flow model was developed to simulate the ground-water-flow system and ground-water/surface-water interaction in the Rock River Basin. The model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Rock River Coalition. The objectives of the regional model were to improve understanding of the ground-water-flow system and to develop a tool suitable for evaluating the effects of potential regional water-management programs. The computer code GFLOW was used because of the ease with which the model can simulate ground-water/surface-water interactions, provide a framework for simulating regional ground-water-flow systems, and be refined in a stepwise fashion to incorporate new data and simulate ground-water-flow patterns at multiple scales. The ground-water-flow model described in this report simulates the major hydrogeologic features of the modeled area, including bedrock and surficial aquifers, ground-water/surface-water interactions, and ground-water withdrawals from high-capacity wells. The steady-state model treats the ground-water-flow system as a single layer with hydraulic conductivity and base elevation zones that reflect the distribution of lithologic groups above the Precambrian bedrock and a regionally significant confining unit, the Maquoketa Formation. In the eastern part of the Basin where the shale-rich Maquoketa Formation is present, deep ground-water flow in the sandstone aquifer below the Maquoketa Formation was not simulated directly, but flow into this aquifer was incorporated into the GFLOW model from previous work in southeastern Wisconsin. Recharge was constrained primarily by stream base-flow estimates and was applied uniformly within zones guided by regional infiltration estimates for soils. The model includes average ground-water withdrawals from 1997 to 2006 for municipal wells and from 1997 to 2005 for high-capacity irrigation, industrial, and commercial wells. In addition

  5. Dynamic Attribution of Global Water Demand to Surface Water and Groundwater Resources: Effects of Abstractions and Return Flows on River Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshi; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As human water demand is increasing worldwide, groundwater is abstracted at rates that exceed groundwater recharge in many areas, resulting in depletion of existing groundwater stocks. Most studies, that focus on human water consumption and water stress indicate a gap between water demand and availability. However, between studies very different assumptions are made on how water abstraction is divided between surface water, groundwater, and other resources. Moreover, simplified assumptions are used of the interactions between groundwater and surface water. Here, we simulate at the global scale, the dynamic attribution of total water demand to surface water and groundwater resources, based on actual water availability and accounting for return flows and surface water- groundwater interactions. The global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB is used to simulate water storages, abstractions, and return flows for the model period 1960-2010, with a daily time step at 0.5° x 0.5° spatial resolution. Total water demand is defined as requirements for irrigation, industry, and domestic use. Water abstractions are variably taken from surface water and groundwater resources depending on availability of both resources. Return flows of non-consumed abstracted water contribute to a single source; those of irrigation recharging groundwater, those of industry and domestic use discharging to surface waters. Groundwater abstractions are taken from renewable groundwater, or when exceeding recharge from an alternative unlimited resource. This resource consists of non-renewable groundwater, or non-local water, the former being an estimate of groundwater depletion. Results show that worldwide the effect of water abstractions is evident, especially on the magnitude and frequency of low flows when the contribution of groundwater through baseflow is substantial. River regimes are minimally affected by abstractions in industrial regions because of the high return flows. In irrigated regions the

  6. MHD three-dimensional flow of nanofluid with velocity slip and nonlinear thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, Tasawar [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Imtiaz, Maria, E-mail: mi_qau@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Alsaedi, Ahmed; Kutbi, Marwan A. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-12-15

    An analysis has been carried out for the three dimensional flow of viscous nanofluid in the presence of partial slip and thermal radiation effects. The flow is induced by a permeable stretching surface. Water is treated as a base fluid and alumina as a nanoparticle. Fluid is electrically conducting in the presence of applied magnetic field. Entire different concept of nonlinear thermal radiation is utilized in the heat transfer process. Different from the previous literature, the nonlinear system for temperature distribution is solved and analyzed. Appropriate transformations reduce the nonlinear partial differential system to ordinary differential system. Convergent series solutions are computed for the velocity and temperature. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and examined. It is concluded that heat transfer rate increases when temperature and radiation parameters are increased. - Highlights: • Three-dimensional nanofluid flow with partial slip and nonlinear thermal radiation is studied. • Increasing values of velocity slip parameter decrease the velocity profiles. • The temperature increases via larger nanoparticle volume fraction. • Surface temperature gradient increases for higher temperature and radiation parameters.

  7. Analysis on Velocity Characteristics of Cavitation Flow Around Hydrofoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-bin; LIU Shu-yan; WANG Guo-yu; ZHANG Bo; ZHANG Min-di

    2010-01-01

    The time-averaged velocity distributions in flows around a hydronautics hydrofoil were measured by using a digit-al particle image velocimeter (DPIV) system. The results show that the velocity distribution in the whole flow field depends on the development of cavitation structures with the decreasing of cavitation number. The high-fluctuation region with lower velocity relates to the cavitation area. The lowest velocity distribution in the cavity core becomes more uniform, and its in-fluence becomes smaller gradually as moving to downstream. The main-stream velocity distribution is even, then fluctuate and even at last. In the supercavitation stage, the fluid velocity in the cavitation region, corresponding to the front of the hydrofoil's suction surface, has a distribution close to the main stream, while the fluid velocity in other cavitation area is lower.

  8. The Importance of Velocity Acceleration to Flow-Mediated Dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Stoner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The validity of the flow-mediated dilation test has been questioned due to the lack of normalization to the primary stimulus, shear stress. Shear stress can be calculated using Poiseuille's law. However, little attention has been given to the most appropriate blood velocity parameter(s for calculating shear stress. The pulsatile nature of blood flow exposes the endothelial cells to two distinct shear stimuli during the cardiac cycle: a large rate of change in shear at the onset of flow (velocity acceleration, followed by a steady component. The parameter typically entered into the Poiseuille's law equation to determine shear stress is time-averaged blood velocity, with no regard for flow pulsatility. This paper will discuss (1 the limitations of using Posieuille's law to estimate shear stress and (2 the importance of the velocity profile—with emphasis on velocity acceleration—to endothelial function and vascular tone.

  9. A study of methods to estimate debris flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flow velocities are commonly back-calculated from superelevation events which require subjective estimates of radii of curvature of bends in the debris flow channel or predicted using flow equations that require the selection of appropriate rheological models and material property inputs. This research investigated difficulties associated with the use of these conventional velocity estimation methods. Radii of curvature estimates were found to vary with the extent of the channel investigated and with the scale of the media used, and back-calculated velocities varied among different investigated locations along a channel. Distinct populations of Bingham properties were found to exist between those measured by laboratory tests and those back-calculated from field data; thus, laboratory-obtained values would not be representative of field-scale debris flow behavior. To avoid these difficulties with conventional methods, a new preliminary velocity estimation method is presented that statistically relates flow velocity to the channel slope and the flow depth. This method presents ranges of reasonable velocity predictions based on 30 previously measured velocities. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Nitrate Loads and Concentrations in Surface-Water Base Flow and Shallow Groundwater for Selected Basins in the United States, Water Years 1990-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Norman E.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.; Franke, O. Lehn; Wolock, David M.

    2010-01-01

    nutrient management practices designed to reduce nutrient transport to streams by runoff. Conversely, sites with potential for shallow or deep groundwater contribution (some combination of permeable soils or permeable bedrock) had significantly greater contributions of nitrate from base flow. Effective nutrient management strategies would consider groundwater nitrate contributions in these areas. Mean annual base-flow nitrate concentrations were compared to shallow-groundwater nitrate concentrations for 27 sites. Concentrations in groundwater tended to be greater than base-flow concentrations for this group of sites. Sites where groundwater concentrations were much greater than base-flow concentrations were found in areas of high infiltration and oxic groundwater conditions. The lack of correspondingly high concentrations in the base flow of the paired surface-water sites may have multiple causes. In some settings, there has not been sufficient time for enough high-nitrate shallow groundwater to migrate to the nearby stream. In these cases, the stream nitrate concentrations lag behind those in the shallow groundwater, and concentrations may increase in the future as more high-nitrate groundwater reaches the stream. Alternatively, some of these sites may have processes that rapidly remove nitrate as water moves from the aquifer into the stream channel. Partitioning streamflow and nitrate load between the quick-flow and base-flow portions of the hydrograph coupled with relative scales of soil permeability can infer the importance of surface water compared to groundwater nitrate sources. Study of the relation of nitrate concentrations to base-flow index and the comparison of groundwater nitrate concentrations to stream nitrate concentrations during times when base-flow index is high can provide evidence of potential nitrate transport mechanisms. Accounting for the surface-water and groundwater contributions of nitrate is crucial to effective management and remediat

  11. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  12. Velocity envelope of vector flow estimation with spatial quadrature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Richard F.; Anderson, Martin E.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of two studies investigating the optimal aperture configuration for maximized lateral blood flow velocity estimation using Heterodyned Spatial Quadrature. Our objective was to determine the maximum velocities that can be estimated at Doppler angles of 90 degrees and 60 degrees with a bias of less than 5% for both uniform scatterer motion in a tissue-mimicking phantom and blood-mimicking fluid circulated through a wall-less vessel flow phantom. Constant flow rates ranging from 3.0 to 18.0 ml/sec were applied in the flow phantom, producing expected peak velocities of 15.0 to 89.8 cm/sec under laminar flow conditions. Velocity estimates were obtained at each flow rate using 256 trials, with each trial consisting of an ensemble of 32 vectors. For an f/1 receive geometry with bi-lobed Hamming apodization, all peak flow velocities tested were estimated to within 5% of their expected values for both 90 degree and 60 degree Doppler angles. An f/2 receive geometry featuring bi-lobed Blackman apodization generally provided accurate lateral velocity estimates up to 71.9 cm/sec for a Doppler angle of 90 degrees, and accurate lateral component estimates up to 50.1 cm/sec for a 60 degree Doppler angle. The implications of these findings will be discussed.

  13. Real gas flows with high velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Lunev, Vladimir V

    2009-01-01

    Gasdynamic Model and Equations Outline of the Gasdynamic Model Basic Equations and Postulates Equations of State Kinetic Theory Second Law of Thermodynamics Speed of Sound Integral Equations of Motion Kinematics of Fluid Media Differential Equations of Gasdynamics Rheological Model Initial and Boundary Conditions Similarity and Modeling in Gasdynamics Euler Equations Navier-Stokes Equations Turbulent Flows Viscous and Inviscid Flow Models Inviscid Gasdynamics Stream Function, Potential,

  14. Volume Flow in Arteriovenous Fistulas Using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev......, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow...

  15. Volume Flow in Arteriovenous Fistulas Using Vector Velocity Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes;

    2014-01-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev......, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow...

  16. Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Diagnostic for Reacting Flows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A diagnostic technique is proposed for measuring temperature and velocity simultaneously in a high temperature reacting flow for aiding research in propulsion. The...

  17. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, S.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as funct

  18. Measurement of gas flow velocities by laser-induced gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmerling, B.; Stampanoni-Panariello, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kozlov, A.D.N. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-08-01

    Time resolved light scattering from laser-induced electrostrictive gratings was used for the determination of flow velocities in air at room temperature. By measuring the velocity profile across the width of a slit nozzle we demonstrated the high spatial resolution (about 200 mm) of this novel technique. (author) 3 figs., 1 ref.

  19. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as functions of distance from the cylinder walls and find that both follow a logarithmic profile, with downwards-bending curvature corrections, which are more pronounced for the angular velocity profile as compared to the axial velocity profile, and which strongly increase with decreasing ratio $\\eta$ between inner and outer cylinder radius. In contrast, the azimuthal velocity does not follow a log-law. We then compare the angular and azimuthal velocity profiles with the recently measured profiles in the ultimate state of (very) large Taylor numbers. Though the {\\em qualitative} trends are the same -- down-bending for large wall distances and (properly shifted and non-dimensionalized) angular velocity profile $\\omega^+(r)$...

  20. Estimation of flow velocity for a debris flow via the two-phase fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-phase fluid model is applied in this study to calculate the steady velocity of a debris flow along a channel bed. By using the momentum equations of the solid and liquid phases in the debris flow together with an empirical formula to describe the interaction between two phases, the steady velocities of the solid and liquid phases are obtained theoretically. The comparison of those velocities obtained by the proposed method with the observed velocities of two real-world debris flows shows that the proposed method can estimate accurately the velocity for a debris flow.

  1. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  2. Ultrasonic Doppler Velocity Profiler for Fluid Flow

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method, first developed in medical engineering, is now widely used in clinical settings. The fluid mechanical basis of UVP was established in investigations by the author and his colleagues with work demonstrating that UVP is a powerful new tool in experimental fluid mechanics. There are diverse examples, ranging from problems in fundamental fluid dynamics to applied problems in mechanical, chemical, nuclear, and environmental engineering. In all these problems, the methodological principle in fluid mechanics was converted from point measurements to spatio-temporal measurements along a line. This book is the first monograph on UVP that offers comprehensive information about the method, its principles, its practice, and applied examples, and which serves both current and new users. Current users can confirm that their application configurations are correct, which will help them to improve the configurations so as to make them more efficient and effective. New users will be...

  3. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  4. Fluorescent beeswax for surface flow velocity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, S.; Tauro, F.; Petroselli, A.; Mocio, G.; Capocci, I.; Rapiti, E.; Rapiti, R.; Cipollari, G.; Porfiri, M.

    2012-12-01

    Watershed surface processes control downstream runoff phenomena, waste and pollutant diffusion, erosion mechanics, and sediment transport. A quantitative understanding of the flow physics is currently limited by the lack of effective tracing techniques suitable for basin-scale observations. More specifically, field experiments require environmentally resilient, non-invasive, and low cost measurement systems that can potentially operate in remotely-controlled or unmanned conditions. Traditional tracing methodologies are largely not capable to cope with extreme in-situ conditions, including practical logistic challenges as well as inherent flow complexity. Specifically, most of available technologies need physical sampling to estimate the tracer concentration and do not allow for continuous-time measurements. In addition, commonly used tracers, such as isotopes, dyes, and chemicals, are not directly applicable to monitor surface hillslope processes and large-scale microchannel networks due to elaborate detection processes and dispersion issues. In this context, the feasibility of using buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in natural water flows is investigated. Specifically, a novel fabrication methodology is designed to manufacture particles from natural beeswax and a highly diluted solution of a nontoxic fluorescent red dye. The fabrication procedure allows for adjusting the size of the particles from tens of microns up to a few millimeters and their density from positively to negatively-buoyant with respect to water. An array of experimental techniques is employed to conduct a thorough characterization of the fluorescence and morphology of the tracers. In addition, ad-hoc experiments are designed to assess the fluorescence response due to Ultra Violet (UV) exposure and thermal processes. Proof-of-concept laboratory analysis are conducted to illustrate the integration of the novel particle tracers in existing tracing methods for surface flow

  5. Maximum Likelihood Blood Velocity Estimator Incorporating Properties of Flow Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaikjer, Malene; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    The aspect of correlation among the blood velocities in time and space has not received much attention in previous blood velocity estimators. The theory of fluid mechanics predicts this property of the blood flow. Additionally, most estimators based on a cross-correlation analysis are limited...... of simulated and in vivo data from the carotid artery. The estimator is meant for two-dimensional (2-D) color flow imaging. The resulting mathematical relation for the estimator consists of two terms. The first term performs a cross-correlation analysis on the signal segment in the radio frequency (RF......)-data under investigation. The flow physic properties are exploited in the second term, as the range of velocity values investigated in the cross-correlation analysis are compared to the velocity estimates in the temporal and spatial neighborhood of the signal segment under investigation. The new estimator...

  6. Conventional Point-Velocity Records and Surface Velocity Observations for Estimating High Flow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Corato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity measurements using point-velocity meters are normally obtained by sampling one, two or three velocity points per vertical profile. During high floods their use is inhibited due to the difficulty of sampling in lower portions of the flow area. Nevertheless, the application of standard methods allows estimation of a parameter, α, which depends on the energy slope and the Manning roughness coefficient. During high floods, monitoring of velocity can be accomplished by sampling the maximum velocity, umax, only, which can be used to estimate the mean flow velocity, um, by applying the linear entropy relationship depending on the parameter, M, estimated on the basis of historical observed pairs (um, umax. In this context, this work attempts to analyze if a correlation between α and M holds, so that the monitoring for high flows can be addressed by exploiting information from standard methods. A methodology is proposed to estimate M from α, by coupling the “historical” information derived by standard methods, and “new” information from the measurement of umax surmised at later times. Results from four gauged river sites of different hydraulic and geometric characteristics have shown the robust estimation of M based on α.

  7. Optical flow based velocity estimation for mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuzhi; Zhao, Guanrong; Jia, Songmin; Qin, Baoling; Yang, Ailin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an optical flow based novel technique to perceive the instant motion velocity of mobile robots. The primary focus of this study is to determine the robot's ego-motion using displacement field in temporally consecutive image pairs. In contrast to most previous approaches for estimating velocity, we employ a polynomial expansion based dense optical flow approach and propose a quadratic model based RANSAC refinement of flow fields to render our method more robust with respect to noise and outliers. Accordingly, techniques for geometrical transformation and interpretation of the inter-frame motion are presented. Advantages of our proposal are validated by real experimental results conducted on Pioneer robot.

  8. Carbon film deposition from high velocity rarefied flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, A.K., E-mail: rebrov@itp.nsc.ru; Emelyanov, A.A.; Yudin, I.B.

    2015-01-30

    The presented study is based on the idea of the activation of a gas-precursor high velocity flow by hot wire. The wire forms the channel for flow before expansion to substrate. The construction allows change of the specific flow rate, velocity, composition and temperature of a gas mixture by studying the film synthesis in conditions from free molecular to continuum flow at velocities from hundreds to thousands of m/s. At a high pressure, the film has typical and unusual hexagonal incorporations for diamond tetragonal particles. Raman spectrum with the pronounced diamond peak is typical for diamond-like film. X-ray diffraction points in the presence of lonsdaleite. Conditions of deposition were simulated by Monte Carlo method. Collisions with hot surfaces and chemical transformations were taken into consideration as well.

  9. Is flow velocity a significant parameter in flood damage modelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kreibich

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow velocity is generally presumed to influence flood damage. However, this influence is hardly quantified and virtually no damage models take it into account. Therefore, the influences of flow velocity, water depth and combinations of these two impact parameters on various types of flood damage were investigated in five communities affected by the Elbe catchment flood in Germany in 2002. 2-D hydraulic models with high to medium spatial resolutions were used to calculate the impact parameters at the sites in which damage occurred. A significant influence of flow velocity on structural damage, particularly on roads, could be shown in contrast to a minor influence on monetary losses and business interruption. Forecasts of structural damage to road infrastructure should be based on flow velocity alone. The energy head is suggested as a suitable flood impact parameter for reliable forecasting of structural damage to residential buildings above a critical impact level of 2 m of energy head or water depth. However, general consideration of flow velocity in flood damage modelling, particularly for estimating monetary loss, cannot be recommended.

  10. Structure of the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumir, Alain

    2017-07-01

    The expected universality of small-scale properties of turbulent flows implies isotropic properties of the velocity gradient tensor in the very large Reynolds number limit. Using direct numerical simulations, we determine the tensors formed by n =2 and 3 velocity gradients at a single point in turbulent homogeneous shear flows and in the log-layer of a turbulent channel flow, and we characterize the departure of these tensors from the corresponding isotropic prediction. Specifically, we separate the even components of the tensors, invariant under reflexion with respect to all axes, from the odd ones, which identically vanish in the absence of shear. Our results indicate that the largest deviation from isotropy comes from the odd component of the third velocity gradient correlation function, especially from the third moment of the derivative along the normal direction of the streamwise velocity component. At the Reynolds numbers considered (Reλ≈140 ), we observe that these second- and third-order correlation functions are significantly larger in turbulent channel flows than in homogeneous shear flow. Overall, our work demonstrates that a mean shear leads to relatively simple structure of the velocity gradient tensor. How isotropy is restored in the very large Reynolds limit remains to be understood.

  11. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  12. Measuring surface flow velocity with smartphones: potential for citizen observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Steven V.; Chen, Zichong; Brauchli, Tristan; Huwald, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Stream flow velocity is an important variable for discharge estimation and research on sediment dynamics. Given the influence of the latter on rating curves (stage-discharge relations), and the relative scarcity of direct streamflow measurements, surface velocity measurements can offer important information for, e.g., flood warning, hydropower, and hydrological science and engineering in general. With the growing amount of sensing and computing power in the hands of more outdoorsy individuals, and the advances in image processing techniques, there is now a tremendous potential to obtain hydrologically relevant data from motivated citizens. This is the main focus of the interdisciplinary "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water. In this subproject, we investigate the feasibility of stream flow surface velocity measurements from movie clips taken by (smartphone-) cameras. First results from movie-clip derived velocity information will be shown and compared to reference measurements.

  13. Velocity profiles of turbidity currents flowing over a flat bed

    OpenAIRE

    Kikura, H.; Murakawa, H.; Tasaka, Y.; Chamoun, Sabine; De Cesare, Giovanni; Schleiss, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Turbidity currents are the main source of suspended sediment transport in reservoirs and thus one of the main causes of sedimentation. One of the techniques used to avoid reservoir sedimentation is through venting of turbidity currents. In the framework of a research work on venting, velocity measurements of turbidity currents flowing on a flat bed are carried out using Ultrasonic Velocity Profilers (UVP). Five profilers of 4 MHz placed at different positions in an experimental flume provide ...

  14. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion.

  15. Effect of flow discharge and median grain size on mean flow velocity under overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Sterk, G.; Seeger, M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryPrecise estimation of mean flow velocity (Umean) is imperative for accurate prediction of hydrographs and sediment yield. For overland flow, Umean is normally estimated by multiplying the dye or salt based velocity measurement with a correction factor (α). A wide range of correction factors is available in the literature, all of which were derived under different experimental conditions. The selection of a suitable α has become a main challenge for accurate mean flow calculations. This study aimed to assess the variability of α with grain size (D50) and slope (S), and to evaluate the dependency of Umean on flow rate (Q), D50 and S by regression analysis. Flume experiments were performed at Q varying from 33 to 1033 × 10-6 m3 s-1, S ranging from 3° to 10°, and D50 ranging from 0.233 to 1.022 mm. Flow velocities were measured directly with the dye tracing technique (Udye), and derived indirectly from flow depth measurements (Udepth). The Udepth measurements were considered as Umean. The derived α (Udepth/Udye) values did not remain constant with sediment size and increase significantly with the increase of D50. The mean α values for 0.230, 0.536, 0.719 and 1.022 mm sands were 0.44, 0.77, 0.82 and 0.82, respectively. Hence, due to the substantial variation of α with D50, no absolute α value is applicable to all hydraulic and sedimentary conditions. However, mean α values for 0.230, 0.536 and 0.719 mm sands were found comparable with α values available in the literature for similar grain sizes. The influence of Q, S, and D50 on Umean was studied by regression analysis. Regression analysis depicted the significant influence of Q and D50 on Umean, while the effect of slope was found to be non-significant. Comparison of the derived regression equation with five literature datasets showed that the model can predict mean flow velocities in overland flow at a reasonable accuracy as long as the mean velocity is below 0.4 m s-1. At higher velocities the

  16. The Effect of the Relative Velocity on Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Yu; DONG Li-Yun; YUAN Yi-Wu; DAI Shi-Qiang

    2002-01-01

    The optimal velocity model of traffc is extended to take the relative velocity into account. The traffcbehavior is investigated numerically and analytically with this model. It is shown that the car interaction with therelative velocity can effect the stability of the traffic flow and raise critical density. The jamming transition between thefreely moving and jamming phases is investigated with the linear stability analysis and nonlinear perturbation methods.The traffic jam is described by the kink solution of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. The theoretical result isin good agreement with the simulation.

  17. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  18. Analytic expression for poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, M. [College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Narashino 275-8576 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The poloidal flow velocity in the banana regime is calculated by improving the l = 1 approximation for the Fokker-Planck collision operator [M. Taguchi, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 1897 (1988)]. The obtained analytic expression for this flow, which can be used for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, agrees quite well with the recently calculated numerical results by Parker and Catto [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 085011 (2012)] in the full range of aspect ratio.

  19. Intermittency and velocity fluctuations in hopper flows prone to clogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. C.; Durian, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally the dynamics of granular media in a discharging hopper. In such flows, there often appears to be a critical outlet size Dc such that the flow never clogs for D >Dc . We report on the time-averaged velocity distributions, as well as temporal intermittency in the ensemble-averaged velocity of grains in a viewing window, for both D Dc , near and far from the outlet. We characterize the velocity distributions by the standard deviation and the skewness of the distribution of vertical velocities. We propose a measure for intermittency based on the two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov DKS statistic for the velocity distributions as a function of time. We find that there is no discontinuity or kink in these various measures as a function of hole size. This result supports the proposition that there is no well-defined Dc and that clogging is always possible. Furthermore, the intermittency time scale of the flow is set by the speed of the grains at the hopper exit. This latter finding is consistent with a model of clogging as the independent sampling for stable configurations at the exit with a rate set by the exiting grain speed [C. C. Thomas and D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 178001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.178001].

  20. Estimating Stream Surface Flow Velocities from Video Clips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, S. V.; Brauchli, T.; Chen, Z.; Huwald, H.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring surface flow velocities in streams can provide important information on discharge. This information is independent of water level, the most commonly used proxy for discharge and therefore has significant potential to reduce uncertainties. Advances in cheap and commonly used imaging devices (e.g. smartphone cameras) and image processing techniques offer new opportunities to get velocity information. Short video clips of streams can be used in combination with optical flow algorithms to get proxies for stream surface velocities. Here some initial results are presented and the main challenges are discussed, especially in view of using these techniques in a citizen science context (specifically the "WeSenseIt" project, a citizen observatory of water), where we try to minimize the need for site preparation and additional equipment needed to take measurements.

  1. Velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyapin, Yannick; Gisclon, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    In the present study we investigate analytically the process of velocity and energy relaxation in two-phase flows. We begin our exposition by considering the so-called six equations two-phase model [Ishii1975, Rovarch2006]. This model assumes each phase to possess its own velocity and energy variables. Despite recent advances, the six equations model remains computationally expensive for many practical applications. Moreover, its advection operator may be non-hyperbolic which poses additional theoretical difficulties to construct robust numerical schemes |Ghidaglia et al, 2001]. In order to simplify this system, we complete momentum and energy conservation equations by relaxation terms. When relaxation characteristic time tends to zero, velocities and energies are constrained to tend to common values for both phases. As a result, we obtain a simple two-phase model which was recently proposed for simulation of violent aerated flows [Dias et al, 2010]. The preservation of invariant regions and incompressible li...

  2. Doppler flow velocity waveforms in the fetal cardiac outflow tract: Reproducibility of waveform recording and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A.L. Groenenberg (Irene); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Reproducibility of flow velocity waveform recording and analysis was studied at fetal cardiac level (ductus arteriosus, pulmonary artery and ascending aorta) in 42 normal pregnancies. The flow velocity parameters studied were the peak systolic velocity (PSV),

  3. Shear Profiles and Velocity Distribution in Dense Shear Granular Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Deng-Ming; ZHOU You-He

    2009-01-01

    We perform DEM simulations to investigate the influence of the packing fraction γ on the,shape of mean tan-gential velocity profile in a 2D annular dense shear granular flow. There is a critical packing fraction γc. For γ < γc, the mean tangential velocity profile shows a roughly exponential decay from the shearing boundary and is almost invariant to the imposed shear rate. However, for γ γc, the tangential velocity profile exhibits a rate-dependence feature and changes from linear to nonlinear gradually with the increasing shear rate. Fhrther-more, the distributions of normalized tangential velocities at different positions along radial direction exhibit the Gaussian or the composite Gaussian distributing features.

  4. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  5. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  6. Critical transport velocity in two-phase, horizontal pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerville, D. (U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (US))

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports on the suspension of solid particles or entrainment of liquid droplets in two- phase flow. Theoretical and empirical relationships have been derived for both instances without any consideration to the similarities between the two. However, a general relation for two-phase flow is desirable since there are systems that cannot be readily defined due to the dual (solid/liquid) nature of the transported material, such as colloids, pulp, slurries, and sludge. Using turbulence theory, one general equation can be derived to predict critical transport velocities for two-phase horizontal flow.

  7. Quantitative measurement of high flow velocities by a spin echo MR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Yigun (First Military Medical Coll., Quangzhou, FJ (China)); Kojima, Akihiro; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Sakamoto, Yuji; Ueno, Sukeyoshi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Higashida, Yoshiharu

    A new method of flow measurement using a spin echo (SE) technique has been developed on the basis of the flow effect that at high velocities signal intensity decreases linearly with increasing flow velocity. Flow velocity is calculated from the signal intensity ratio of the flowing material in two images with the same imaging parameters but different echo times. The linear relationship between the signal intensity and flow velocity was examined with a steady flow phantom. When assessed with steady flows in the phantom, flow velocities calculated by this method were in good agreement with velocities measured by a flow meter. This method was used with ECG gating to measure the blood flow of the right common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer. The measured peak flow velocity and the pattern of flow velocities during systole correlated well with the results obtained by Doppler ultrasound. (author).

  8. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  9. Choice of velocity variables for complex flow computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of adopting the velocity components as dependent velocity variables for the Navier-Stokes flow computations is investigated. The viewpoint advocated is that a numerical algorithm should preferably honor both the physical conservation law in differential form and the geometric conservation law in discrete form. With the use of Cartesian velocity vector, the momentum equations in curvilinear coordinates can retain the full conservation-law form and satisfy the physical conservation laws. With the curvilinear velocity components, source terms appear in differential equations and hence the full conservation law form can not be retained. In discrete expressions, algorithms based on the Cartesian components can satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for convection terms but not for viscous terms; those based on the curvilinear components, on the other hand, cannot satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for either convection or viscous terms. Several flow solutions for domain with 90 and 360 degree turnings are presented to illustrate the issues of using the Cartesian velocity components and the staggered grid arrangement.

  10. Uncertainty in surface water flood risk modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J. B.; Martin, D. N.; Roberts, E.; Domuah, R.

    2009-04-01

    Two thirds of the flooding that occurred in the UK during summer 2007 was as a result of surface water (otherwise known as ‘pluvial') rather than river or coastal flooding. In response, the Environment Agency and Interim Pitt Reviews have highlighted the need for surface water risk mapping and warning tools to identify, and prepare for, flooding induced by heavy rainfall events. This need is compounded by the likely increase in rainfall intensities due to climate change. The Association of British Insurers has called for the Environment Agency to commission nationwide flood risk maps showing the relative risk of flooding from all sources. At the wider European scale, the recently-published EC Directive on the assessment and management of flood risks will require Member States to evaluate, map and model flood risk from a variety of sources. As such, there is now a clear and immediate requirement for the development of techniques for assessing and managing surface water flood risk across large areas. This paper describes an approach for integrating rainfall, drainage network and high-resolution topographic data using Flowroute™, a high-resolution flood mapping and modelling platform, to produce deterministic surface water flood risk maps. Information is provided from UK case studies to enable assessment and validation of modelled results using historical flood information and insurance claims data. Flowroute was co-developed with flood scientists at Cambridge University specifically to simulate river dynamics and floodplain inundation in complex, congested urban areas in a highly computationally efficient manner. It utilises high-resolution topographic information to route flows around individual buildings so as to enable the prediction of flood depths, extents, durations and velocities. As such, the model forms an ideal platform for the development of surface water flood risk modelling and mapping capabilities. The 2-dimensional component of Flowroute employs

  11. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  12. Data adaptive estimation of transversal blood flow velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirnia, E.; Jakobsson, A.; Gudmundson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The examination of blood flow inside the body may yield important information about vascular anomalies, such as possible indications of, for example, stenosis. Current Medical ultrasound systems suffer from only allowing for measuring the blood flow velocity along the direction of irradiation......, posing natural difficulties due to the complex behaviour of blood flow, and due to the natural orientation of most blood vessels. Recently, a transversal modulation scheme was introduced to induce also an oscillation along the transversal direction, thereby allowing for the measurement of also...... the transversal blood flow. In this paper, we propose a novel data-adaptive blood flow estimator exploiting this modulation scheme. Using realistic Field II simulations, the proposed estimator is shown to achieve a notable performance improvement as compared to current state-of-the-art techniques....

  13. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M;

    1990-01-01

    An interleaved pseudocinematographic FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence with additional pulsed gradients for flow encoding was used to quantify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocities and CSF production. Flow-dependent phase information was obtained by subtracting two differently encoded phase...

  14. Electromagnetic inertia, reactive energy and energy flow velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Gerald, E-mail: kaiser@wavelets.com [Center for Signals and Waves, Austin, TX (United States)

    2011-08-26

    In a recent paper titled 'Coherent electromagnetic wavelets and their twisting null congruences', I defined the local inertia density I(x,t), reactive energy density R(x,t) and energy flow velocity v(x,t) of an electromagnetic field. These are the field equivalents of the mass, rest energy and velocity of a relativistic particle. Thus, R=Ic{sup 2} is Lorentz-invariant and |v|{<=}c, with equality if and only if R=0. The exceptional fields with |v|=c were called coherent because their energy moves in complete harmony with the field, leaving no inertia or reactive energy behind. Generic electromagnetic fields become coherent only in the far zone. Elsewhere, their energy flows at speeds v(x,t)flow in several common systems: a time-harmonic electric dipole field, a time-dependent electric dipole field and a standing plane wave. For these fields, the energy current (Poynting vector) is too weak to carry all of the energy, thus leaving reactive energy in its wake. For the time-dependent dipole field, we find that the energy can flow both transversally and inward, back to the source. Neither of these phenomena show up in the usual computation of the energy transport velocity which considers only averages over one period in the time-harmonic case.

  15. Formation of gullies on Mars: link to recent climate history and insolation microenvironments implicate surface water flow origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W; Marchant, David R; Kreslavsky, Mikhail A

    2008-09-09

    Features seen in portions of a typical midlatitude Martian impact crater show that gully formation follows a geologically recent period of midlatitude glaciation. Geological evidence indicates that, in the relatively recent past, sufficient snow and ice accumulated on the pole-facing crater wall to cause glacial flow and filling of the crater floor with debris-covered glaciers. As glaciation waned, debris-covered glaciers ceased flowing, accumulation zones lost ice, and newly exposed wall alcoves continued as the location for limited snow/frost deposition, entrapment, and preservation. Analysis of the insolation geometry of this pole-facing crater wall, and similar occurrences in other craters at these latitudes on Mars, shows that they are uniquely favored for accumulation of snow and ice, and a relatively more rapid exposure to warmer summer temperatures. We show that, after the last glaciation, melting of residual snow and ice in alcoves could have formed the fluvial channels and sedimentary fans of the gullies. Recent modeling shows that top-down melting can occur in these microenvironments under conditions similar to those currently observed on Mars, if small amounts of snow or frost accumulate in alcoves and channels. Accumulation and melting is even more favored in the somewhat wetter, relatively recent geological past of Mars, after the period of active glaciation.

  16. Three Kinds of Velocity Structure Function in Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; JIANG Nan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the local multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, we elucidate the essential difference between the real turbulent field with a finite Reynolds number and the Kolmogorov fully developed random field. The motion of fluid particles in the real turbulent field is not fully random. There exist multi-scale structures due to the effect of viscosity. Actually the movements of fluid particles in the turbulent field are restricted by such eddy structures. Furthermore, concept of the locally averaged velocity structure function is put forward to describe the relative strain distortion of two adjacent turbulent eddy structures at a certain scale. The time sequence of the longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer has been elaborately measured by the constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 in a wind tunnel. The experiment proves that the locally averaged velocity structure function is in agreement with the wavelet-coefficient structure function.

  17. Curvature effects on the velocity profile in turbulent pipe flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    Prandtl and von Kármán have developed the famous log-law for the mean velocity profile for turbulent flow over a plate. The log-law has also been applied to turbulent pipe flow, though the wall surface is curved (in span-wise direction) and has finite diameter. Here we discuss the theoretical framework, based on the Navier-Stokes equations, with which one can describe curvature effects and also the well-known finite-size effects in the turbulent mean-velocity profile. When comparing with experimental data we confirm that the turbulent eddy viscosity must contain both curvature and finite-size contributions and that the usual ansatz for the turbulent eddy viscosity as being linear in the wall distance is insufficient, both for small and large wall distances. We analyze the experimental velocity profile in terms of an r-dependent generalized turbulent viscosity [Formula: see text] (with [Formula: see text] being the wall distance, a pipe radius, u * shear stress velocity, and g([Formula: see text]/a) the nondimensionalized viscosity), which reflects the radially strongly varying radial eddy transport of the axial velocity. After the near wall linear viscous sublayer, which soon sees the pipe wall's curvature, a strong transport (eddy) activity steepens the profile considerably, leading to a maximum in g([Formula: see text]/a) at about half radius, then decreasing again towards the pipe center. This reflects the smaller eddy transport effect near the pipe's center, where even in strongly turbulent flow (the so-called "ultimate state") the profile remains parabolic. The turbulent viscous transport is strongest were the deviations of the profile from parabolic are strongest, and this happens in the range around half radius.

  18. Using thermal tracers to estimate flow velocities of shallow flows: laboratory and field experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Rui L.P. de

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of shallow flows is important for hydraulics, hydrology and water resources management. The objective of this paper is to discuss a technique for shallow flow and overland flow velocity estimation that uses infrared thermography. Laboratory flumes and different bare, vegetated and paved field surfaces were used to test the technique. Results show that shallow flow surface velocities estimated using thermal tracers and infrared technology are similar to estimates obtained using the Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter; similar results were also obtained for overland flow velocity estimates using thermography, here comparing with the dye tracer technique. The thermographic approach revealed some potential as a flow visualization technique, and leaves space for future studies and research.

  19. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    a focal response but depended did not demonstrate a focal response but depended on the muscle mass involved during exercise. The data demonstrate a significant increase in Vmean for the artery supplying the cortical projection of the exercising limb. Insignificant and marginally significant increases......Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise after...... assessment of the carbon dioxide reactivity for both arteries. Right hand contractions provoked an elevation in left MCA Vmean [19% (12-28); P increased by 23% (11-37; P

  20. Improved technique for blood flow velocity measurement using Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares Oliveira, Eduardo J.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.

    2002-04-01

    The Doppler velocimeter developed allows to determine the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the velocity vector of the flow, and to calculate the precise blood flow in a vessel. Four piezoelectric transducers constitute the Doppler velocimeter. Three of these transducers are positioned to form an equilateral triangle (base of a pyramid). When these transducers move simultaneously, backward or forward from the initial position, the emitted ultrasonic beams focalize on a position (peak of the pyramid) closer or farther from the transducers faces, according to the depth of the vessel where we intend to measure de flow. The angle between the transducers allows adjusting the height of this pyramid and the position of the focus (where the three beams meet). A forth transducer is used to determine the diameter of the vessel and monitor the position of the Doppler velocimeter relative to the vessel. Simulation results showed that with this technique is possible to accomplish precise measurement of blood flow.

  1. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  2. Mitral flow propagation velocity in non-sedated healthy cats

    OpenAIRE

    SILVA, A.C.; R.A.L. Muzzi; G. Oberlender; L.A.L. Muzzi; M.R. Coelho; R.B. Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Mitral flow propagation velocity (Vp) is an index used to evaluate the left ventricular diastolic function. Its influence on human and small animal cardiopathies has been studied; however there are few reports evaluating this variable in domestic felines. In addition, there is a lack of studies in non-sedated healthy cats. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish values for Vp and its correlation with other echocardiographic indexes in non-sedated healthy cats in order to provide...

  3. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  4. Surface Water & Surface Drainage

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set contains boundaries for all surface water and surface drainage for the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital data structure digitized from a...

  5. GSFLOW - Coupled Ground-Water and Surface-Water Flow Model Based on the Integration of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW-2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Regan, R. Steven; Prudic, David E.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    The need to assess the effects of variability in climate, biota, geology, and human activities on water availability and flow requires the development of models that couple two or more components of the hydrologic cycle. An integrated hydrologic model called GSFLOW (Ground-water and Surface-water FLOW) was developed to simulate coupled ground-water and surface-water resources. The new model is based on the integration of the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and the U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-Water Flow Model (MODFLOW). Additional model components were developed, and existing components were modified, to facilitate integration of the models. Methods were developed to route flow among the PRMS Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) and between the HRUs and the MODFLOW finite-difference cells. This report describes the organization, concepts, design, and mathematical formulation of all GSFLOW model components. An important aspect of the integrated model design is its ability to conserve water mass and to provide comprehensive water budgets for a location of interest. This report includes descriptions of how water budgets are calculated for the integrated model and for individual model components. GSFLOW provides a robust modeling system for simulating flow through the hydrologic cycle, while allowing for future enhancements to incorporate other simulation techniques.

  6. Modeling surface water dynamics in the Amazon Basin using MOSART-Inundation v1.0: impacts of geomorphological parameters and river flow representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xiangyu; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Getirana, Augusto; Papa, Fabrice; Hess, Laura L.

    2017-03-23

    Surface water dynamics play an important role in water, energy and carbon cycles of the Amazon Basin. A macro-scale inundation scheme was integrated with a surface-water transport model and the extended model was applied in this vast basin. We addressed the challenges of improving basin-wide geomorphological parameters and river flow representation for large-scale applications. Vegetation-caused biases embedded in the HydroSHEDS DEM data were alleviated by using a vegetation height map of about 1-km resolution and a land cover dataset of about 90-m resolution. The average elevation deduction from the DEM correction was about 13.2 m for the entire basin. Basin-wide empirical formulae for channel cross-sectional geometry were adjusted based on local information for the major portion of the basin, which could significantly reduce the cross-sectional area for the channels of some subregions. The Manning roughness coefficient of the channel varied with the channel depth to reflect the general rule that the relative importance of riverbed resistance in river flow declined with the increase of river size. The entire basin was discretized into 5395 subbasins (with an average area of 1091.7 km2), which were used as computation units. The model was driven by runoff estimates of 14 years (1994 – 2007) generated by the ISBA land surface model. The simulated results were evaluated against in situ streamflow records, and remotely sensed Envisat altimetry data and GIEMS inundation data. The hydrographs were reproduced fairly well for the majority of 13 major stream gauges. For the 11 subbasins containing or close to 11 of the 13 gauges, the timing of river stage fluctuations was captured; for most of the 11 subbasins, the magnitude of river stage fluctuations was represented well. The inundation estimates were comparable to the GIEMS observations. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that refining floodplain topography, channel morphology and Manning roughness coefficients, as

  7. Elution Is a Critical Step for Recovering Human Adenovirus 40 from Tap Water and Surface Water by Cross-Flow Ultrafiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hang; Xagoraraki, Irene; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper examines the recovery of the enteric adenovirus human adenovirus 40 (HAdV 40) by cross-flow ultrafiltration and interprets recovery values in terms of physicochemical interactions of virions during sample concentration. Prior to ultrafiltration, membranes were either blocked by exposure to calf serum (CS) or coated with a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). HAdV 40 is a hydrophobic virus with a point of zero charge between pH 4.0 and pH 4.3. In accordance with predictions from the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, the preelution recovery of HAdV (rpre) from deionized water was higher with PEM-coated membranes (rprePEM = 74.8% ± 9.7%) than with CS-blocked membranes (rpreCS = 54.1% ± 6.2%). With either membrane type, the total virion recovery after elution (rpost) was high for both deionized water (rpostPEM = 99.5% ± 6.6% and rpostCS = 98.8% ± 7.7%) and tap water (rpostPEM = 89% ± 15% and rpostCS = 93.7% ± 6.9%). The nearly 100% recoveries suggest that the polyanion (sodium polyphosphate) and surfactant (Tween 80) in the eluent disrupt electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the virion and the membrane. Addition of EDTA to the eluent greatly improved the elution efficacy (rpostCS = 88.6% ± 4.3% and rpostPEM = 87.0% ± 6.9%) with surface water, even when the organic carbon concentration in the water was high (9.4 ± 0.1 mg/liter). EDTA likely disrupts cation bridging between virions and particles in the feed water matrix or the fouling layer on the membrane surface. For complex water matrices, the eluent composition is the most important factor for achieving high virion recovery. IMPORTANCE Herein we present the results of a comprehensive physicochemical characterization of HAdV 40, an important human pathogen. The data on HAdV 40 surface properties enabled rigorous modeling to gain an understanding of the energetics of virion-virion and virion-filter interactions. Cross-flow filtration for concentration and recovery

  8. Numerical Investigation of Developing Velocity Distributions in Open Channel Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The velocity profiles in open channel flows start developing after entering into the channel for quite some length. All types of laboratory experiments for open channel flows are carried out in the fully developed flow regions which exist at some length downstream the inlet. In this research work an attempt has been made to investigate the impact of roughness and slope of the channel bed on the length required for establishment of fully developed flow in an open channel. A range of different roughness values along with various slopes were considered for this purpose. It was observed that an increase in roughness results in reduction of development length; and development length reduces drastically when roughness reaches to the range normally encountered in open channel flows with emergent vegetation or natural river flows. However, it was observed that the change of slope did not have any noticeable effect on development length. This work suggests that CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics technique can be used for getting a reliable development length before performing an experimental work

  9. Reconstruction of velocity profiles in axisymmetric and asymmetric flows using an electromagnetic flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, László E.; Lucas, Gary P.; Meng, Yiqing

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method that was developed formerly for the reconstruction of velocity profiles in asymmetric flows is improved to be applicable for both axisymmetric and asymmetric flows. The method is implemented in Matlab, and predicts the velocity profile from measured electrical potential distributions obtained around the boundary of a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM). Potential distributions are measured in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields, and the velocity is assumed as a sum of axisymmetric and polynomial components. The procedure requires three steps. First, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a uniform magnetic field. Since the direction of polynomial components of order greater than two in the plane of the pipe cross section is not unique multiple solutions exist, therefore all possible polynomial velocity profiles are determined. Then, the DFT is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a specific non-uniform magnetic field, and used to calculate the exponent in a power-law representation of the axisymmetric component. Finally, the potential distribution in the non-uniform magnetic field is calculated for all of the possible velocity profile solutions using weight values, and the velocity profile with the calculated potential distribution which is closest to the measured one provides the optimum solution. The method is validated by reconstructing two quartic velocity profiles, one of which includes an axisymmetric component. The potential distributions are obtained from simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics where a model of the EMFM is constructed. The reconstructed velocity profiles show satisfactory agreement with the input velocity profiles. The main benefits of the method described in this paper are that it provides a velocity distribution in the circular cross section of a pipe as an analytical function of the spatial coordinates which is suitable for both

  10. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    been acquired using a commercial implementation of the method (BK Medical ProFocus Ultraview scanner). A range of other methods are also presented. This includes synthetic aperture imaging using either spherical or plane waves with velocity estimation performed with directional beamforming or speckle...... tracking. The key advantages of these techniques are very fast imaging that can attain an order of magnitude higher precision than conventional methods. SA flow imaging was implemented on the experimental scanner RASMUS using an 8-emission spherical emission sequence and reception of 64 channels on a BK...

  11. Estimating stem-scale mixing coefficients in low velocity flows

    OpenAIRE

    Sonnenwald, F.C.; Guymer, I.; Marchant, A; WILSON, N.; M. Golzar; Stovin, V

    2016-01-01

    Stormwater ponds are SuDS devices intended to moderate the negative environmental impacts\\ud of stormwater run-off. A current, joint, research programme is investigating the effects of heterogeneous vegetation\\ud distributions in stormwater ponds and developing CFD techniques to simulate 3D solute transport processes\\ud in low velocity flows. The aim of the project is to generate a unique dataset that describes the influence of different\\ud types and configurations of vegetation on the pond’s...

  12. Surface-water surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  13. Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

  14. Water quality and quantity and simulated surface-water and groundwater flow in the Laurel Hill Creek Basin, southwestern Pennsylvania, 1991–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.; Risser, Dennis W.; Eicholtz, Lee W.; Hoffman, Scott A.

    2017-07-10

    Laurel Hill Creek is considered one of the most pristine waterways in southwestern Pennsylvania and has high recreational value as a high-quality cold-water fishery; however, the upper parts of the basin have documented water-quality impairments. Groundwater and surface water are withdrawn for public water supply and the basin has been identified as a Critical Water Planning Area (CWPA) under the State Water Plan. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Somerset County Conservation District, collected data and developed modeling tools to support the assessment of water-quality and water-quantity issues for a basin designated as a CWPA. Streams, springs, and groundwater wells were sampled for water quality in 2007. Streamflows were measured concurrent with water-quality sampling at main-stem sites on Laurel Hill Creek and tributaries in 2007. Stream temperatures were monitored continuously at five main-stem sites from 2007 to 2010. Water usage in the basin was summarized for 2003 and 2009 and a Water-Analysis Screening Tool (WAST) developed for the Pennsylvania State Water Plan was implemented to determine whether the water use in the basin exceeded the “safe yield” or “the amount of water that can be withdrawn from a water resource over a period of time without impairing the long-term utility of a water resource.” A groundwater and surface-water flow (GSFLOW) model was developed for Laurel Hill Creek and calibrated to the measured daily streamflow from 1991 to 2007 for the streamflow-gaging station near the outlet of the basin at Ursina, Pa. The CWPA designation requires an assessment of current and future water use. The calibrated GSFLOW model can be used to assess the hydrologic effects of future changes in water use and land use in the basin.Analyses of samples collected for surface-water quality during base-flow conditions indicate that the highest nutrient concentrations in the main stem of Laurel Hill Creek were at sites in the

  15. Ultrasonic 3-D vector flow method for quantitative in vivo peak velocity and flow rate estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed;

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical ultrasound systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the Transverse Oscillation (TO) method, a 32 x 32 element matrix array, and the experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS...... is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames per second in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross sectional image plane....... The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom (ø = 8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow...

  16. Velocity kinematic relations in a turbulent flow past a grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Alex; Gurka, Roi; Kopp, Gregory; Sarathi, Partha; Tsinober, Arkady

    2009-11-01

    We present velocity kinematic relations, involving average and difference of the longitudinal velocity component of the two points at distance r: u+= u(x+r) + u(x) and u-= u(x+r)-u(x), obtained using PIV measurements in a turbulent flow of water past a grid. The present study follows recent numerical and experimental studies, that demonstrated analytical and empirical evidence of the relations, their validity and it emphasizes the physical meaning of the relations. The relations that contain both the large (u+) and small (u-) scale quantities emphasize the non-local aspects of turbulent flows. For example, the pure kinematic relation of Hosokawa in conjunction with the the Kolmogorov 4/5 law leading to the = r/30 shows that the that the large and small scale quantities are correlated contrary to what is suggested by the commonly used sweeping decorrelation hypothesis. Some relations are purely kinematic and some are dynamic, i.e. involving , like the Kolmogorov 4/5 law. The most important aspect is that pure kinematic relations that emphasize the non-local effects, become dynamically significant. Furthermore, we suggest that many of these relations could be used for validation of experimental results.

  17. Hemodynamic Correlates of Late Systolic Flow Velocity Augmentation in the Carotid Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regi...

  18. Quantitative flow and velocity measurements of pulsatile blood flow with 4D-DSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Gabe; Hoffman, Carson; Schafer, Sebastian; Mistretta, Charles A.; Strother, Charles M.

    2017-03-01

    Time resolved 3D angiographic data from 4D DSA provides a unique environment to explore physical properties of blood flow. Utilizing the pulsatility of the contrast waveform, the Fourier components can be used to track the waveform motion through vessels. Areas of strong pulsatility are determined through the FFT power spectrum. Using this method, we find an accuracy from 4D-DSA flow measurements within 7.6% and 6.8% RMSE of ICA PCVIPR and phantom flow probe validation measurements, respectively. The availability of velocity and flow information with fast acquisition could provide a more quantitative approach to treatment planning and evaluation in interventional radiology.

  19. Development and application of a groundwater/surface-water flow model using MODFLOW-NWT for the Upper Fox River Basin, southeastern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, D.T.; Fienen, M.N.; Kennedy, J.L.; Buchwald, C.A.; Greenwood, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Fox River is a 199-mile-long tributary to the Illinois River within the Mississippi River Basin in the states of Wisconsin and Illinois. For the purposes of this study the Upper Fox River Basin is defined as the topographic basin that extends from the upstream boundary of the Fox River Basin to a large wetland complex in south-central Waukesha County called the Vernon Marsh. The objectives for the study are to (1) develop a baseline study of groundwater conditions and groundwater/surface-water interactions in the shallow aquifer system of the Upper Fox River Basin, (2) develop a tool for evaluating possible alternative water-supply options for communities in Waukesha County, and (3) contribute to the methodology of groundwater-flow modeling by applying the recently published U.S. Geological Survey MODFLOW-NWT computer code, (a Newton formulation of MODFLOW-2005 intended for solving difficulties involving drying and rewetting nonlinearities of the unconfined groundwater-flow equation) to overcome computational problems connected with fine-scaled simulation of shallow aquifer systems by means of thin model layers. To simulate groundwater conditions, a MODFLOW grid is constructed with thin layers and small cell dimensions (125 feet per side). This nonlinear unconfined problem incorporates the streamflow/lake (SFR/LAK) packages to represent groundwater/surface-water interactions, which yields an unstable solution sensitive to initial conditions when solved using the Picard-based preconditioned-gradient (PCG2) solver. A particular problem is the presence of many isolated wet water-table cells over dry cells, causing the simulated water table to assume unrealistically high values. Attempts to work around the problem by converting to confined conditions or converting active to inactive cells introduce unacceptable bias. Application of MODFLOW-NWT overcomes numerical problem by smoothing the transition from wet to dry cells and keeps all cells active. The simulation is

  20. Quantification of surface water and groundwater flows to open- and closed-basin lakes in a headwaters watershed using a descriptive oxygen stable isotope model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stets, Edward G.; Winter, T. C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of hydrologic fluxes in lakes is important to resource management and for placing hydrologic solute flux in an appropriate biogeochemical context. Water stable isotopes can be used to describe water movements, but they are typically only effective in lakes with long water residence times. We developed a descriptive time series model of lake surface water oxygen-18 stable isotope signature (δL) that was equally useful in open- and closed-basin lakes with very different hydrologic residence times. The model was applied to six lakes, including two closed-basin lakes and four lakes arranged in a chain connected by a river, located in a headwaters watershed. Groundwater discharge was calculated by manual optimization, and other hydrologic flows were constrained by measured values including precipitation, evaporation, and streamflow at several stream gages. Modeled and observed δL were highly correlated in all lakes (r = 0.84–0.98), suggesting that the model adequately described δL in these lakes. Average modeled stream discharge at two points along the river, 16,000 and 11,800 m3 d−1, compares favorably with synoptic measurement of stream discharge at these sites, 17,600 and 13,700 m3 d−1, respectively. Water yields in this watershed were much higher, 0.23–0.45 m, than water yields calculated from gaged streamflow in regional rivers, approximately 0.10 m, suggesting that regional groundwater discharge supports water flux through these headwaters lakes. Sensitivity and robustness analyses also emphasized the importance of considering hydrologic residence time when designing a sampling protocol for stable isotope use in lake hydrology studies.

  1. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  2. Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve Assessed by Transthoracic Doppler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Marie M; Peña, Adam; Mygind, Naja D

    2016-01-01

    the feasibility and factors associated with the quality of CFVR obtained in a large prospective study of women suspected of having microvascular disease. METHODS: Women with angina-like chest pain and no obstructive coronary artery disease on coronary angiography (stenosis) were consecutively examined......BACKGROUND: Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) measured by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a noninvasive measure of microvascular function, but it has not achieved widespread use, mainly because of concerns of validity and feasibility. The aim of this study was to describe...... by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography of the left anterior descending coronary artery to measure CFVR (n = 947). Quality was evaluated on the basis of (1) identification of the left anterior descending coronary artery, (2) maintained probe position throughout the examination, (3) visibility and configuration...

  3. Simulation of ground-water/surface-water flow in the Santa Clara-Calleguas ground-water basin, Ventura County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Randall T.; Martin, Peter; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2003-01-01

    the compilation of geographic, geologic, and hydrologic data and estimation of hydraulic properties and flows. The model was calibrated to historical surface-water and ground-water flow for the period 1891-1993. Sources of water to the regional ground-water flow system are natural and artificial recharge, coastal landward flow from the ocean (seawater intrusion), storage in the coarse-grained beds, and water from compaction of fine-grained beds (aquitards). Inflows used in the regional flow model simulation include streamflows routed through the major rivers and tributaries; infiltration of mountain-front runoff and infiltration of precipitation on bedrock outcrops and on valley floors; and artificial ground-water recharge of diverted streamflow, irrigation return flow, and treated sewage effluent. Most natural recharge occurs through infiltration (losses) of streamflow within the major rivers and tributaries and the numerous arroyos that drain the mountain fronts of the basin. Total simulated natural recharge was about 114,100 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) for 1984-93: 27,800 acre-ft/yr of mountain-front and bedrock recharge, 24,100 acre-ft/yr of valley-floor recharge, and 62,200 acre-ft/yr of net streamflow recharge. Artificial recharge (spreading of diverted streamflow, irrigation return, and sewage effluent) is a major source of ground-water replenishment. During the 1984-93 simulation period, the average rate of artificial recharge at the spreading grounds was about 54,400 acre-ft/yr, 13 percent less than the simulated natural recharge rate for streamflow infiltration within the major rivers and tributaries. Estimated recharge from infiltration of irrigation return flow on the valley floors averaged about 51,000 acre-ft/yr, and treated sewage effluent averaged about 9,000 acre-ft/yr. Artificial recharge as streamflow diversion to the spreading grounds has occurred since 1929, and treated-sewage effluent has been discharged to stream channels since 1930. Under

  4. Optical Flow Cell for Measuring Size, Velocity and Composition of Flowing Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammer-ul Hassan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Here an optical flow cell with two light paths is reported that can accurately quantify the size and velocity of droplets flowing through a microchannel. The flow cell can measure the time taken for droplets to pass between and through two conjoined light paths, and thereby is capable of measuring the velocities (0.2–5.45 mm/s and sizes of droplets (length > 0.8 mm. The composition of the droplet can also be accurately quantified via optical absorption measurements. The device has a small footprint and uses low-powered, low-cost components, which make it ideally suited for use in field-deployable and portable analytical devices.

  5. Arc Conductance and Flow Velocity Affected by Transient Recovery Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Reo; Ishikawa, Yuya; Ono, Seisui; Sato, Ken; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the stable supply of electric power is indispensable. The GCB (Gas Circuit Breaker) can prevent the spread of the fault current. However, it should have the reliability more. Therefore the GCB has been researched for performance improvement of the arc interruption of abnormal fault current without the fail. Therefore, it is important to prevent the breakdown such as the re-ignition and thermal re-ignition of arc after the arc interruption. It is necessary to reduce the arc conductance in order to prevent the re-ignition of arc. The arc conductance is derived from the temperature distribution and the volume of the arc. The temperature distribution of the arc is formed by convection. In this research, the arc conductance and flow velocity affected by transient recovery voltage are elucidated. The flow rate and temperature distribution of the arc is calculated with changing transient recovery voltage. In addition, the arc conductance is calculated in order to know the extinguish arc ability. As a result, when the transient recovery voltage increases, the probability of re-ignition increases. Therefore, the arc temperature and the arc conductance were increased.

  6. The Compressible Flow Past Various Plane Profiles Near Sonic Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethert, B.; Kawalki, K. H.

    1949-01-01

    In an earlier report UM No.1117 by Gothert,the single-source method was applied to the compressible flow around circles, ellipses, lunes, and around an elongated body of revolution at different Mach numbers and the results compared as far as possible with the calculations by Lamla ad Busemann. Essentially, it was found that with favorable source arrangement the single-source method is in good agreement with the calculations of the same degree of approximation by.Lamla and Busemann. Near sonic velocity the number of steps must be increased considerably in order to sufficiently approximate the adiabatic curve. After exceeding a certain Mach number where local supersonic fields occur already, it was no longer possible, in spite of the substantially increased number of steps, to obtain a systematic solution because the calculation diverged. This result,was interpreted to mean that above this point of divergence the symmetrical type of flow ceases to exist and changes into the unsymmetrical type characterized by compressibility shocks.

  7. Real-time planar flow velocity measurements using an optical flow algorithm implemented on GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Gautier, N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a high speed implementation of an optical flow algorithm which computes planar velocity fields in an experimental flow. Real-time computation of the flow velocity field allows the experimentalist to have instantaneous access to quantitative features of the flow. This can be very useful in many situations: fast evaluation of the performances and characteristics of a new setup, design optimization, easier and faster parametric studies, etc. It can also be a valuable measurement tool for closed-loop flow control experiments where fast estimation of the state of the flow is needed. The algorithm is implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The accuracy of the computation is shown. Computation speed and scalability are highlighted along with guidelines for further improvements. The system architecture is flexible, scalable and can be adapted on the fly in order to process higher resolutions or achieve higher precision. The set-up is applied on a Backward-Facing Step (BFS) flow in a hydro...

  8. Space-time correlations of fluctuating velocities in turbulent shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; He, Guo-Wei

    2009-04-01

    Space-time correlations or Eulerian two-point two-time correlations of fluctuating velocities are analytically and numerically investigated in turbulent shear flows. An elliptic model for the space-time correlations in the inertial range is developed from the similarity assumptions on the isocorrelation contours: they share a uniform preference direction and a constant aspect ratio. The similarity assumptions are justified using the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses and verified using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flows. The model relates the space-time correlations to the space correlations via the convection and sweeping characteristic velocities. The analytical expressions for the convection and sweeping velocities are derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous turbulent shear flows, where the convection velocity is represented by the mean velocity and the sweeping velocity is the sum of the random sweeping velocity and the shear-induced velocity. This suggests that unlike Taylor's model where the convection velocity is dominating and Kraichnan and Tennekes' model where the random sweeping velocity is dominating, the decorrelation time scales of the space-time correlations in turbulent shear flows are determined by the convection velocity, the random sweeping velocity, and the shear-induced velocity. This model predicts a universal form of the space-time correlations with the two characteristic velocities. The DNS of turbulent channel flows supports the prediction: the correlation functions exhibit a fair good collapse, when plotted against the normalized space and time separations defined by the elliptic model.

  9. Echocardiographic determinants of mitral early flow propagation velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Paolo; Grimaldi, Antonio; Alimento, Marina; Berna, Giovanni; Guazzi, Maurizio D

    2002-09-15

    Transmitral color Doppler early diastolic flow propagation velocity (Vp) has been correlated with the left ventricular (LV) relaxation time constant tau in dilated cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the independent influence of LV systolic function and geometry, and of LV relaxation, on Vp in an unselected outpatient population. We studied 30 normal subjects and 130 patients (hypertensive LV hypertrophy, aortic valve stenosis or prosthesis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, dilated cardiomyopathy, aortic or mitral valve regurgitation). In all, we noninvasively measured LV geometry, mass, systolic function, wall motion dyssynergy, and diastolic function (abnormal relaxation or restrictive LV Doppler filling patterns). The Vp was similar in normal subjects and in patients (51 +/- 14 vs 53 +/- 25 cm/s). In normal subjects, the determinants of Vp at multiple regression analysis were isovolumic relaxation time, 2-dimensional cardiac index, and mitral E-wave velocity-time integral. In all, the main determinants were LV ejection fraction, percent of segmental wall dyssynergy, and isovolumic relaxation time and age. The Vp was highest in hypertrophic (75 +/- 25 cm/s, p <0.05 vs normal subjects) and lowest in dilated (35 +/- 13 cm/s, p = NS) cardiomyopathy. During multivariate analysis of variance, percent of wall dyssynergy (but not diffuse LV hypokinesia) independently reduced Vp (p = 0.02). The latter was not influenced by the LV filling pattern. Thus, in an unselected clinical population, prolonged relaxation per se does not influence Vp if LV systolic dysfunction and/or wall dyssynergy is absent-the latter factors are important independent determinants of Vp, which is determined by multiple factors.

  10. A Reconstruction Method of Blood Flow Velocity in Left Ventricle Using Color Flow Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseong Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex flow imaging is a relatively new medical imaging method for the dynamic visualization of intracardiac blood flow, a potentially useful index of cardiac dysfunction. A reconstruction method is proposed here to quantify the distribution of blood flow velocity fields inside the left ventricle from color flow images compiled from ultrasound measurements. In this paper, a 2D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with a mass source term is proposed to utilize the measurable color flow ultrasound data in a plane along with the moving boundary condition. The proposed model reflects out-of-plane blood flows on the imaging plane through the mass source term. The boundary conditions to solve the system of equations are derived from the dimensions of the ventricle extracted from 2D echocardiography data. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated numerically using synthetic flow data acquired from simulating left ventricle flows. The numerical simulations show the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed method of reconstructing the intracardiac flow fields. Of particular note is the finding that the mass source term in the proposed model improves the reconstruction performance.

  11. A Study of A Flow through Small Apertures(2nd Report, Experiments on The Velocity Field)

    OpenAIRE

    福冨, 清; 長谷川, 富市; 中野, 裕二; 鳴海, 敬倫; Hasegawa, Tomiichi; Narumi, Takatsune

    1987-01-01

    The velocity field of an inlet and outlet flow through small orifices was experimentally examined. The velocity along the center line near the orifices was measured with a laser doppler anemometer, stream lines in the whole flow region were photographed, and the following points were clarified : (1) The center line velocities of liquid paraffin agree with the theoretical value of Stokes flow in the region of Reynolds numbers below 10. (2) With distilled water, a diverging angle of the issuing...

  12. Mitral flow propagation velocity in non-sedated healthy cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitral flow propagation velocity (Vp is an index used to evaluate the left ventricular diastolic function. Its influence on human and small animal cardiopathies has been studied; however there are few reports evaluating this variable in domestic felines. In addition, there is a lack of studies in non-sedated healthy cats. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish values for Vp and its correlation with other echocardiographic indexes in non-sedated healthy cats in order to provide new perspectives related to diastolic function in this species. Twenty-six clinically healthy cats were submitted to echocardiography to assess the animals' cardiac conditions. Variables such as age, heart rate (HR, body surface area (BSA, initial (E mitral and late (A mitral ventricular filling waves, isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT and E/IVRT relation were correlated to Vp. No proven relation between any of these variables and Vp was observed in this present study, except for HR and BSA. In the variability analysis, higher values were verified for inter-observer analysis. This study concludes that Vp proved to be an useful index for estimating left ventricular relaxation in non-sedated healthy domestic cats and provides reference ranges for this variable.

  13. Percolation velocity dependence on local concentration in bidisperse granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan P.; Xiao, Hongyi; Deng, Zhekai; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    The percolation velocity, up, of granular material in size or density bidisperse mixtures depends on the local concentration, particle size ratio, particle density ratio, and shear rate, γ ˙. Discrete element method computational results were obtained for bounded heap flows with size ratios between 1 and 3 and for density ratios between 1 and 4. The results indicate that small particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by large particles than large particles percolate upward when surrounded by small particles, as was recently observed in shear-box experiments. Likewise, heavy particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by light particles than light particles percolate upward when surrounded by heavy particles. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration results in larger percolation flux magnitudes at high concentrations of large (or light) particles compared to high concentrations of small (or heavy) particles, while local volumetric flux is conserved. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration can be incorporated into a continuum model, but the impact on global segregation patterns is usually minimal. Partially funded by Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant No. CBET-1511450.

  14. Effect of labetalol on cerebral blood flow and middle cerebral arterial flow velocity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Schierbeck, Jens; Howardy, P;

    1991-01-01

    in normotensive subjects. Neither does it affect CO2 reactivity. The uniform results obtained with the two methods suggest TCD as a usable alternative to conventional CBF technique in the assessment of cerebral vasoactivity of various drugs in subjects with a normal cerebral circulation.......The effect of labetalol, a combined alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, on the cerebral circulation was investigated in 7 normotensive subjects. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with the intravenous 133Xe method and mean flow velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery was determined...

  15. Scaling of peak flows with constant flow velocity in random self-similar networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, R.; Gupta, V. K.; Troutman, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    A methodology is presented to understand the role of the statistical self-similar topology of real river networks on scaling, or power law, in peak flows for rainfall-runoff events. We created Monte Carlo generated sets of ensembles of 1000 random self-similar networks (RSNs) with geometrically distributed interior and exterior generators having parameters pi and pe, respectively. The parameter values were chosen to replicate the observed topology of real river networks. We calculated flow hydrographs in each of these networks by numerically solving the link-based mass and momentum conservation equation under the assumption of constant flow velocity. From these simulated RSNs and hydrographs, the scaling exponents β and φ characterizing power laws with respect to drainage area, and corresponding to the width functions and flow hydrographs respectively, were estimated. We found that, in general, φ > β, which supports a similar finding first reported for simulations in the river network of the Walnut Gulch basin, Arizona. Theoretical estimation of β and φ in RSNs is a complex open problem. Therefore, using results for a simpler problem associated with the expected width function and expected hydrograph for an ensemble of RSNs, we give heuristic arguments for theoretical derivations of the scaling exponents β(E) and φ(E) that depend on the Horton ratios for stream lengths and areas. These ratios in turn have a known dependence on the parameters of the geometric distributions of RSN generators. Good agreement was found between the analytically conjectured values of β(E) and φ(E) and the values estimated by the simulated ensembles of RSNs and hydrographs. The independence of the scaling exponents φ(E) and φ with respect to the value of flow velocity and runoff intensity implies an interesting connection between unit hydrograph theory and flow dynamics. Our results provide a reference framework to study scaling exponents under more complex scenarios of flow

  16. Effects of friction massage of the popliteal fossa on blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Koji; Mizukami, Masafumi; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Endo, Yusuke; Takata, Yuichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshio, Masaharu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Friction massage (friction) of the popliteal fossa is provided for the purpose of relieving pain related to circulatory disorders by improving venous flow in the lower legs. The purpose of this study is to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow based on measuring the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein before and after providing friction to the patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy male university students participated in the study. The Doppler ultrasonography (DU) was used to measure the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein, in order to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow by comparing the measured values before and after a friction massage. [Results] The result of comparing the blood flow velocity before and after providing friction showed that there was a significant increase after friction. [Conclusion] This study proved that friction to the popliteal fossa is effectively enhances venous flow by increasing the blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein.

  17. Velocity bias induced by flow patterns around ADCPs and associated deployment platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity measurements near the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) are important for mapping surface currents, measuring velocity and discharge in shallow streams, and providing accurate estimates of discharge in the top unmeasured portion of the water column. Improvements to ADCP performance permit measurement of velocities much closer (5 cm) to the transducer than has been possible in the past (25 cm). Velocity profiles collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with a 1200 kHz Rio Grande Zedhead ADCP in 2002 showed a negative bias in measured velocities near the transducers. On the basis of these results, the USGS initiated a study combining field, laboratory, and numerical modeling data to assess the effect of flow patterns caused by flow around the ADCP and deployment platforms on velocities measured near the transducers. This ongoing study has shown that the negative bias observed in the field is due to the flow pattern around the ADCP. The flow pattern around an ADCP violates the basic assumption of flow homogeneity required for an accurate three-dimensional velocity solution. Results, to date (2014), have indicated velocity biases within the measurable profile, due to flow disturbance, for the TRDI 1200 kHz Rio Grande Zedhead and the SonTek RiverSurveyor M9 ADCPs. The flow speed past the ADCP, the mount and the deployment platform have also been shown to play an important role in the magnitude and extent of the velocity bias.

  18. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  19. A Raman anemometer for component-selective velocity measurements of particles in a flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florisson, O.; Mul, de F.F.M.; Winter, de H.G.

    1981-01-01

    An anemometer for the measurement of the velocity of particles of different components in a flow, separate and apart from that of the flow itself, is described. As a component-selective mechanism Raman scattering is used. The velocity is measured by relating the autocorrelated scattering signal to t

  20. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  1. Isolation of ATP from a yeast fermentation broth using a cryogel column at high flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chen; Shen, Shaochuan; Yun, Junxian; Wang, Lianghua; Yao, Kejian; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2008-12-01

    This communication presents an effective method for isolating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from a yeast fermentation broth using an anion-exchange supermacroporous cryogel column at high flow velocities. The breakthrough and elution behaviors of pure ATP in the cryogel bed were investigated at flow velocities of 2, 5, and 10 cm/min and the ATP binding capacities were determined. Then the ATP-containing yeast fermentation broth was employed as the test feedstock and various chromatographic runs were conducted to isolate ATP by the cryogel at different high flow velocities. The ATP samples obtained were analyzed quantitatively by HPLC. The results showed that even at a flow velocity of 5 or 10 cm/min, a product purity of 97.4 or 98.0% can be achieved, illustrating the potential of the present method for separation of high-purity ATP directly from fermentation feedstock at high flow velocities.

  2. A dual-phantom system for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models under steady flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, James R; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    A dual-phantom system is developed for validation of velocity measurements in stenosis models. Pairs of phantoms with identical geometry and flow conditions are manufactured, one for ultrasound and one for particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV model is made from silicone rubber, and a new PIV fluid is made that matches the refractive index of 1.41 of silicone. Dynamic scaling was performed to correct for the increased viscosity of the PIV fluid compared with that of the ultrasound blood mimic. The degree of stenosis in the models pairs agreed to less than 1%. The velocities in the laminar flow region up to the peak velocity location agreed to within 15%, and the difference could be explained by errors in ultrasound velocity estimation. At low flow rates and in mild stenoses, good agreement was observed in the distal flow fields, excepting the maximum velocities. At high flow rates, there was considerable difference in velocities in the poststenosis flow field (maximum centreline differences of 30%), which would seem to represent real differences in hydrodynamic behavior between the two models. Sources of error included: variation of viscosity because of temperature (random error, which could account for differences of up to 7%); ultrasound velocity estimation errors (systematic errors); and geometry effects in each model, particularly because of imperfect connectors and corners (systematic errors, potentially affecting the inlet length and flow stability). The current system is best placed to investigate measurement errors in the laminar flow region rather than the poststenosis turbulent flow region.

  3. Calculating the respiratory flow velocity fluctuations in pericardial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniorakis, Eftychios; Arvanitakis, Spyridon; Zarreas, Elias; Barlagiannis, Dimitris; Skandalakis, Nikos; Karidis, Constantinos

    2010-11-01

    An excessive respiratory fluctuation (RTFV) in transmitral early diastolic velocity E is a pivotal Doppler echocardiographic sign of haemodynamic compromise, in constrictive pericardial diseases. RTFV is expressed as a percentage and 25% is considered a threshold value. Unfortunately there is no unanimity in calculating RTFV. Sometimes it is expressed as a percentage of expiratory E velocity, while others of inspiratory E velocity. This disparity has led to gross misinterpretations in medical literature. Here we emphasize the importance of a rational procedure calculating RTFV and we propose the appropriate mathematical model.

  4. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  5. Influence of slip velocity in Herschel-Bulkley fluid flow between parallel plates - A mathematical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, D. S. [Universiti Teknologi Brunei, Bandar Seri Begawan (Brunei Darussalam); Lee, U Sik [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    This theoretical study investigates three types of basic flows of viscous incompressible Herschel-Bulkley fluid such as (i) plane Couette flow, (ii) Poiseuille flow and (iii) generalized Couette flow with slip velocity at the boundary. The analytic solutions to the nonlinear boundary value problems have been obtained. The effects of various physical parameters on the velocity, flow rate, wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow are analyzed through appropriate graphs. It is observed that in plane Poiseuille flow and generalized Couette flow, the velocity and flow rate of the fluid increase considerably with the increase of the slip parameter, power law index, pressure gradient. The fluid velocity is significantly higher in plane Poiseuille flow than in plane Couette flow. The wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow decrease considerably with the increase of the power law index and increase significantly with the increase of the yield stress of the fluid. The wall shear stress and frictional resistance to flow are considerably higher in plane Poiseuille flow than in generalized Couette flow.

  6. Imaging water velocity and volume fraction distributions in water continuous multiphase flows using inductive flow tomography and electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yiqing; Lucas, Gary P.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an inductive flow tomography (IFT) system, employing a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM) and novel reconstruction techniques, for measuring the local water velocity distribution in water continuous single and multiphase flows. A series of experiments were carried out in vertical-upward and upward-inclined single phase water flows and ‘water continuous’ gas-water and oil-gas-water flows in which the velocity profiles ranged from axisymmetric (single phase and vertical-upward multiphase flows) to highly asymmetric (upward-inclined multiphase flows). Using potential difference measurements obtained from the electrode array of the EMFM, local axial velocity distributions of the continuous water phase were reconstructed using two different IFT reconstruction algorithms denoted RT#1, which assumes that the overall water velocity profile comprises the sum of a series of polynomial velocity components, and RT#2, which is similar to RT#1 but which assumes that the zero’th order velocity component may be replaced by an axisymmetric ‘power law’ velocity distribution. During each experiment, measurement of the local water volume fraction distribution was also made using the well-established technique of electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By integrating the product of the local axial water velocity and the local water volume fraction in the cross section an estimate of the water volumetric flow rate was made which was compared with a reference measurement of the water volumetric flow rate. In vertical upward flows RT#2 was found to give rise to water velocity profiles which are consistent with the previous literature although the profiles obtained in the multiphase flows had relatively higher central velocity peaks than was observed for the single phase profiles. This observation was almost certainly a result of the transfer of axial momentum from the less dense dispersed phases to the water

  7. RESEARCH ON METHOD TO CALCULATE VELOCITIES OF SOLID PHASE AND LIQUID PHASE IN DEBRIS FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Velocities of solid phase and liquid phase in debris flow are one key problem to research on impact and abrasion mechanism of banks and control structures under action of debris flow. Debris flow was simplified as two-phase liquid composed of solid phase with the same diameter particles and liquid phase with the same mechanical features. Assume debris flow was one-dimension two-phase liquid moving to one direction,then general equations of velocities of solid phase and liquid phase were founded in twophase theory. Methods to calculate average pressures, volume forces and surface forces of debris flow control volume were established. Specially, surface forces were ascertained using Bingham's rheology equation of liquid phase and Bagnold's testing results about interaction between particles of solid phase. Proportional coefficient of velocities between liquid phase and solid phase was put forward, meanwhile, divergent coefficient between theoretical velocity and real velocity of solid phase was provided too. To state succinctly before, method to calculate velocities of solid phase and liquid phase was obtained through solution to general equations. The method is suitable for both viscous debris flow and thin debris flow. Additionally, velocities every phase can be identified through analyzing deposits in-situ after occurring of debris flow. It is obvious from engineering case the result in the method is consistent to that in real-time field observation.

  8. Scaling of peak flows with constant flow velocity in random self-similar networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mantilla

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A methodology is presented to understand the role of the statistical self-similar topology of real river networks on scaling, or power law, in peak flows for rainfall-runoff events. We created Monte Carlo generated sets of ensembles of 1000 random self-similar networks (RSNs with geometrically distributed interior and exterior generators having parameters pi and pe, respectively. The parameter values were chosen to replicate the observed topology of real river networks. We calculated flow hydrographs in each of these networks by numerically solving the link-based mass and momentum conservation equation under the assumption of constant flow velocity. From these simulated RSNs and hydrographs, the scaling exponents β and φ characterizing power laws with respect to drainage area, and corresponding to the width functions and flow hydrographs respectively, were estimated. We found that, in general, φ > β, which supports a similar finding first reported for simulations in the river network of the Walnut Gulch basin, Arizona. Theoretical estimation of β and φ in RSNs is a complex open problem. Therefore, using results for a simpler problem associated with the expected width function and expected hydrograph for an ensemble of RSNs, we give heuristic arguments for theoretical derivations of the scaling exponents β(E and φ(E that depend on the Horton ratios for stream lengths and areas. These ratios in turn have a known dependence on the parameters of the geometric distributions of RSN generators. Good agreement was found between the analytically conjectured values of β(E and φ(E and the values estimated by the simulated ensembles of RSNs and hydrographs. The independence of the scaling exponents φ(E and φ with respect to the value of flow velocity and runoff intensity implies an interesting connection between unit

  9. GAS-SOLIDS FLOW BEHAVIOR WITH A GAS VELOCITY CLOSE TO ZERO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.; Zhang; J.-X.; Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In a 9.3 m high and 0.10 m i.d. gas-solids downflow fluidized bed (downer), the radial and axial distributions of the local solids holdups and particle velocities along the downer column were measured with the superficial gas velocity set to zero. A unique gas-solids flow structure was found in the downer system with zero gas velocity, which is completely different from that under conditions with higher gas velocities, in terms of its radial and axial flow structures as well as its micro flow structure. The gas-solids flow pattern under zero gas velocity conditions, together with that under low gas velocity conditions, can be considered as a special regime which differs from that under higher gas velocity conditions. According to the hydrodynamic properties of the two regimes, they can be named the "dense annulus" regime for the flow pattern under zero or low gas velocity conditions and the "dense core" regime for that under higher gas velocity conditions.

  10. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  11. Intermittent Lagrangian velocities and accelerations in three-dimensional porous medium flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M; Morales, V L; Willmann, M; Dentz, M

    2015-07-01

    Intermittency of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration is a key to understanding transport in complex systems ranging from fluid turbulence to flow in porous media. High-resolution optical particle tracking in a three-dimensional (3D) porous medium provides detailed 3D information on Lagrangian velocities and accelerations. We find sharp transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity, superlinear evolution of particle dispersion, and double-peak behavior in the propagators. The velocity distribution is quantified in terms of pore geometry and flow connectivity, which forms the basis for a continuous-time random-walk model that sheds light on the observed Lagrangian flow and transport behaviors.

  12. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  13. Velocity profile of turbulent sediment-laden flows in open-channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyu Zhong n; Lei Zhang; Baosheng Wu; Yongqiang Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a study was carried out on the velocity profile of sediment-laden flows in open channels using a two-phase mixture model for two-phase flows. The governing equations for water-sediment mixtures were derived based on the two-fluid equations for solid–liquid two-phase flows. The drift velocity, a key variable involved in the two-phase mixture equations, was derived from the equation of momentum conservation for the solid phase. The drift velocity shows that the inertia of flow, particle turbulence, and collisions effect contribute to the dispersion of the sediment particles in turbulent flows. Using the two-phase mixture equation, the vertical velocity profile of open channel flows was obtained. Further analysis indicated that the distribution of the velocity over depth of water-sediment mixtures, composed of two different phases, is significantly affected by the turbulence of water-sediment mixtures and the density stratification. However, the velocity distribution is also affected by other factors including collisions between particles and particle turbulence as a basic feature of two-phase flows where interphase interactions inevitably mark their influence on the velocity distribution. Comparisons of this approach with observations for a wide range of experimental conditions are presented in this paper, which show that this approach agrees well with the experiments.

  14. A method of calibrating wind velocity sensors with a modified gas flow calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was described for calibrating air velocity sensors in the exhaust flow of a gas flow calibrator. The average velocity in the test section located at the calibrator exhaust was verified from the mass flow rate accurately measured by the calibrator's precision sonic nozzles. Air at elevated pressures flowed through a series of screens, diameter changes, and flow straighteners, resulting in a smooth flow through the open test section. The modified system generated air velocities of 2 to 90 meters per second with an uncertainty of about two percent for speeds below 15 meters per second and four percent for the higher speeds. Wind tunnel data correlated well with that taken in the flow calibrator.

  15. SONIC SPEED AND SHOCK WAVE IN HIGH VELOCITY AERATED FLOWS FROM HIGH HEAD DISCHARGE STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhi-yong

    2003-01-01

    The compressible characteristics in aerated flows at the high velocity of about 50m/s were analyzed. Based on the theory of compressible the relations between the sonic speed and shock wave in high-velocity aerated flow were theoretically deduced. And comparisons with measured data were made. The theoretical and experimental results show the sonic speed in aerated flow is merely of the order of several-dozen meters per second, and its minimum value is only 20m/s, which is far much less than that in water or air alone. So high subsonic flow, supersonic flow and transonic flow as well as compression wave, shock wave and expansion wave similarly to aerodnamics may be produced in high velocity aerated flow at the speed of the order of 50m/s. Hence the influences of these compressible characteristics on high head discharge structures can not be neglected, especially on super high dams over 200m high.

  16. Point and planar LIF for velocity-concentration correlations in a jet in cross flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Özcan, Oktay; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2002-01-01

    (LDA). The flow considered is the mixing of a jet in a fully developed cross flow in a square duct with a width of 10 jet diameters. Both a laminar flow case, Re=675, and a turbulent flow case, Re=33750, are presented . For both flows, the ratio jet-to-duct mean velocities was R=3.3. Result of mean...... velocities, mean concentration and Reynolds fluxes in the symmetry plane of the jet are presented for PIV and PLIF measurements. The LIF measurements performed with the LDA equipment was in general in good agreement with the PIV/PLIF measurements. The cross sections selected for comparison are challenging...

  17. Pressure and velocity dependence of flow-type cavitation erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available of underpressure expands for the higher velocity vOz. Thus cavitation bubbles leave this region farther downstream and the erosion zone shifts down- stream. At the same time, cavitation damage will in- crease because of the larger...

  18. Localized measurement of longitudinal and transverse flow velocities in colloidal suspensions using optical coherence tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, N.; Van Leeuwen, T.G.; Kalkman, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on localized measurement of the longitudinal and transverse flow velocities in a colloidal suspension using optical coherence tomography. We present a model for the path-length resolved autocorrelation function including diffusion and flow, which we experimentally verify. For flow that is

  19. In Vivo Three-Dimensional Velocity Vector Imaging and Volumetric Flow Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2013-01-01

    scanner SARUS. Measurements are conducted on a carotid artery flow phantom from Danish Phantom Design, and 20 frames are acquired with a constant flow rate of 16.7±0.17 mL/s provided by a Shelley Medical Imaging Technologies CompuFlow 1000 system. The peak velocity magnitude in the vessel is found...

  20. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetian, Emil [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Aguilar, Guillermo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J [Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux. (note)

  1. Scaling of Peak Flows with Constant Flow Velocity in Random Self-Similar Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, R.; Gupta, V. K.; Troutman, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a methodology to understand the role of the statistical self-similar topology of real river networks on flow hydrographs for rainfall-runoff events. Monte Carlo generated ensembles of 1000 Random Self-similar Networks (RSNs) with geometrically distributed interior and exterior generators are created. We show how these networks emulate the statistical self-similarity present in real networks by presenting results for 30 river networks in the continental USA. Hydrographs for every link in each of these networks are obtained by numerically solving the link-based mass and momentum conservation equation under the assumption of constant flow velocity. From these simulated hydrographs for an ensemble of RSNs, the scaling parameters for the peak of the width function (β) and the hydrograph peak flow (φ) are estimated. It was found that φ > β, which supports a similar finding first reported for the Walnut Gulch basin, Arizona, and that is qualitatively different from previous results on idealized river networks (e.g. Peano Network, Mandelbrot- Viscek Network). Scaling of peak flows for individual rainfall runoff events is a new area of research that offers a path to physically understand regional scaling of flood quantiles. It addresses an important open problem in river network hydrology through studying the statistics of ensembles of multiple events in RSNs. In addition, our methodology provides a reference framework to study scaling exponents and intercepts under more complex scenarios of flow dynamics and runoff generation processes using ensembles of RSNs. Preliminary examples of such scenarios will also be given.

  2. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  3. Galaxy Cluster Bulk Flows and Collision Velocities in QUMOND

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Harley; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G W

    2013-01-01

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {\\Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain about 1000 km/s by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {\\Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {\\Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for 'pink elephants' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  4. Outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flow over gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert L.; Fox, James F.

    2017-06-01

    The theoretical basis for outer region scaling using the freestream velocity for nonuniform open channel flows over gravel is derived and tested for the first time. Owing to the gradual expansion of the flow within the nonuniform case presented, it is hypothesized that the flow can be defined as an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer using the asymptotic invariance principle. The hypothesis is supported using similarity analysis to derive a solution, followed by further testing with experimental datasets. For the latter, 38 newly collected experimental velocity profiles across three nonuniform flows over gravel in a hydraulic flume are tested as are 43 velocity profiles previously published in seven peer-reviewed journal papers that focused on fluid mechanics of nonuniform open channel over gravel. The findings support the nonuniform flows as equilibrium defined by the asymptotic invariance principle, which is reflective of the consistency of the turbulent structure's form and function within the expanding flow. However, roughness impacts the flow structure when comparing across the published experimental datasets. As a secondary objective, we show how previously published mixed scales can be used to assist with freestream velocity scaling of the velocity deficit and thus empirically account for the roughness effects that extend into the outer region of the flow. One broader finding of this study is providing the theoretical context to relax the use of the elusive friction velocity when scaling nonuniform flows in gravel bed rivers; and instead to apply the freestream velocity. A second broader finding highlighted by our results is that scaling of nonuniform flow in gravel bed rivers is still not fully resolved theoretically since mixed scaling relies to some degree on empiricism. As researchers resolve the form and function of macroturbulence in the outer region, we hope to see the closing of this research gap.

  5. Lagrangian velocity and acceleration correlations of large inertial particles in a closed turbulent flow

    CERN Document Server

    Machicoane, Nathanaël

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the response of large inertial particle to turbulent fluctuations in a inhomogeneous and anisotropic flow. We conduct a Lagrangian study using particles both heavier and lighter than the surrounding fluid, and whose diameters are comparable to the flow integral scale. Both velocity and acceleration correlation functions are analyzed to compute the Lagrangian integral time and the acceleration time scale of such particles. The knowledge of how size and density affect these time scales is crucial in understanding partical dynamics and may permit stochastic process modelization using two-time models (for instance Saw-ford's). As particles are tracked over long times in the quasi totality of a closed flow, the mean flow influences their behaviour and also biases the velocity time statistics, in particular the velocity correlation functions. By using a method that allows for the computation of turbulent velocity trajectories, we can obtain unbiased Lagrangian integral time. This is particularly usef...

  6. Stationary bottom generated velocity fluctuations in one-dimensional open channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Bartele

    1993-01-01

    Statistical characteristics are calculated for stationary velocity fluctuations in a one-dimensional open channel flow with a given vertical velocity profile and with one-dimensional irregular bottom waves, characterized by a spectral density function. The calculations are based on an approximate ca

  7. Fetal atrioventricular and outflow tract flow velocity waveforms during conducted and blocked supraventricular extrasystoles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. van der Mooren (K.); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); Th. Stijnen (Theo)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractMaximum flow velocity waveforms at atrioventricular and outflow tract level were studied cross‐sectionally in 19 human fetuses with conducted and/or blocked supraventricular extrasystoles ranging from 25 to 38 weeks of gestation. At outflow tract level, peak systolic velocity and acceler

  8. Influence of aeration and initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-ru WEI; Jun DENG; Bin LIU

    2013-01-01

    With the development of ski-jump energy dissipation for high and large discharge among the hydraulic projects,the effects of characteristics of water flow on energy dissipation are increasingly important.In the present study,the effects of aeration and the initial water thickness on axial velocity attenuation of jet flow were analyzed,using variance analysis and numerical calculated methods.From the analysis of test data,both of the air concentration and initial water thickness are sensitive factors for the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow along the axial way,and there is no significant interaction effect between the aeration and initial water thickness.Aeration has a more significant effect on the axial velocity attenuation of jet flow.Decreasing the initial water thickness of jet flow can reduce the length of jet core,and make the initial position of axial velocity attenuation closer to the nozzle exit.The numerical calculation results show that aeration can contribute to the enhancement of entrainment ability of jet flow,which may improve the interaction between jet flow and surroundings.For ski-jump energy dissipation among the hydraulic projects,combining aeration with decreasing initial water thickness of jet flow is an effective way to enhance the rate of axial velocity attenuation.

  9. Flow Scales of Influence on the Settling Velocities of Particles with Varying Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Corrine N.; Merchant, Wilmot; Jendrassak, Marek; Limpasuvan, Varavut; Gurka, Roi; Hackett, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    The settling velocities of natural, synthetic, and industrial particles were measured in a grid turbulence facility using optical measurement techniques. Particle image velocimetry and 2D particle tracking were used to measure the instantaneous velocities of the flow and the particles’ trajectories simultaneously. We find that for particles examined in this study (Rep = 0.4–123), settling velocity is either enhanced or unchanged relative to stagnant flow for the range of investigated turbulence conditions. The smallest particles’ normalized settling velocities exhibited the most consistent trends when plotted versus the Kolmogorov-based Stokes numbers suggesting that the dissipative scales influence their dynamics. In contrast, the mid-sized particles were better characterized with a Stokes number based on the integral time scale. The largest particles were largely unaffected by the flow conditions. Using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), the flow pattern scales are compared to particle trajectory curvature to complement results obtained through dimensional analysis using Stokes numbers. The smallest particles are found to have trajectories with curvatures of similar scale as the small flow scales (higher POD modes) whilst mid-sized particle trajectories had curvatures that were similar to the larger flow patterns (lower POD modes). The curvature trajectories of the largest particles did not correspond to any particular flow pattern scale suggesting that their trajectories were more random. These results provide experimental evidence of the “fast tracking” theory of settling velocity enhancement in turbulence and demonstrate that particles align themselves with flow scales in proportion to their size. PMID:27513958

  10. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping of 3D cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in hydrocephalus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, St. Poelten (Austria); Brenneis, Christian [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurology, St. Poelten (Austria); Ungersboeck, Karl [Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Department of Neurosurgery, St. Poelten (Austria); Riet, Wilma van der [European MRI Consultancy (EMRIC), Strasbourg (France); Buchfelder, Michael; Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    To investigate the detectability of CSF flow alterations in the ventricular system of patients with hydrocephalus using time-resolved 3D MR velocity mapping. MR velocity mapping was performed in 21 consecutive hydrocephalus patients and 21 age-matched volunteers using a 3D phase-contrast (PC) sequence. Velocity vectors and particle path lines were calculated for visualisation of flow dynamics. CSF flow was classified as ''hypomotile flow'' if it showed attenuated dynamics and as ''hypermotile flow'' if it showed increased dynamics compared with volunteers. Diagnostic efficacy was compared with routine 2D cine PC-MRI. Seven patients showed hypomotile CSF flow: six had non-communicating hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. One showed oscillating flow between the lateral ventricles after craniotomy for intracranial haemorrhage. Seven patients showed normal flow: six had hydrocephalus ex vacuo due to brain atrophy. One patient who underwent ventriculostomy 10 years ago showed a flow path through the opening. Seven patients showed hypermotile flow: three had normal pressure hydrocephalus, three had dementia, and in one the diagnosis remained unclear. The diagnostic efficacy of velocity mapping was significantly higher except for that of aqueductal stenosis. Our approach may be useful for diagnosis, therapy planning, and follow-up of different kinds of hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  11. The influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffel, Bernd; Širok, Brane; Dular, Matevž

    2015-01-01

    A study of the influence of the gas content of water and the flow velocity on cavitation erosion aggressiveness was performed. A cavitation tunnel with a single hydrofoil was used for the experiments. While the cavitation number andthe mean flow velocity remained constant throughout the tests, the gas content of the water was changed in steps from low (approximately 1%) to high (4 %). The gas content of the water was adjusted with a bubble generator. In addition tests at a constant cavitation...

  12. Measuring two-dimensional components of a flow velocity vector using a hot-wire probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2007-08-01

    The article presents a single-hot-wire probe adapted to detect the direction of flow velocity. The modification consists of the introduction of a third support which allows to measure voltage at the central point of the wire. The sign of voltage difference DeltaU between both parts of the wire is the measure of the direction of flow velocity in a system of coordinates associated with the probe.

  13. Simple Model for Simulating Characteristics of River Flow Velocity in Large Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husin Alatas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a simple computer based phenomenological model to simulate the characteristics of river flow velocity in large scale. We use shuttle radar tomography mission based digital elevation model in grid form to define the terrain of catchment area. The model relies on mass-momentum conservation law and modified equation of motion of falling body in inclined plane. We assume inelastic collision occurs at every junction of two river branches to describe the dynamics of merged flow velocity.

  14. Velocity kinematic relations in decaying turbulent flow past a grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, R.; Kopp, G.; Liberzon, A.; Sarathi, P.; Tsinober, A.

    Three recent publications1-3 stressed out that some kinematic relations of velocity increments Δ u_i = u_i (x + r) - u_i (x) comprise a manifestation of nonlocal effects, e.g. large and small scale quantities are correlated. This feature invalidates the so-called random sweeping hypothesis that large and small scales are statistically independent. It is noteworthy that, pure kinematic relations that emphasize the non-local effects thereby become dynamically significant. Some kinematic relations could be used for the validation of experimental results.

  15. Cup anemometer calibration: effect of flow velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccato, A.; Spazzini, P. G.; Malvano, R.

    2011-10-01

    The effects of different working conditions and specifically of different velocity profiles on the output of a commercial cup anemometer were analysed experimentally. A simple mathematical model is also presented and provides results in line with the experiments. Results show that a cup anemometer with certain geometrical features can be calibrated through a rotating drag rig by correcting for the bias on the instrument output. The increase in uncertainty caused by this systematic correction was evaluated and applied to the results. The correction was validated by checking the compatibility of calibrations of a cup anemometer at the rotating rig and in a wind tunnel.

  16. Section 11: Surface Water Pathway - Likelihood of Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface water releases can include the threat to targets from overland flow of hazardous substances and from flooding or the threat from the release of hazardous substances to ground water and the subsequent discharge of contaminated ground w

  17. FORMULAE FOR AVERAGE VELOCITY OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE OF NON-DARCY'S FLOW THROUGH A SINGLE FRACTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Jia-zhong; Wang Jia-quan; Li Ru-zhong; Liu Yong

    2003-01-01

    The formulae for average velocity of groundwater flow in a single fracture were derived based on the characteristics of fracture properties and hydraulic methods. The results show that the average velocity is proportional to the square root of the hydraulic gradient. In order to verify the results, a laboratory model was established, and the experimental data were analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the relation between the average velocity and hydraulic gradient is nonlinear, and can be fitted with power functions. And for both the unconfined and confined flows, the value of the exponent of power functions are close to 0.5. Thus the experimental results agree well with those from the theoretical analysis. By comparing the calculated and measured values of the average velocity under the same conditions, the formulae presented herein are more effective than the traditional formula based on Darcy's Law. These results provide the evidences of non-Darcy's flow in single fracture.

  18. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  19. Wind-induced flow velocity effects on nutrient concentrations at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Abdul; Li, Yiping; Du, Wei; Wang, Jianwei; Gao, Xiaomeng; Wang, Wencai; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-07-01

    Shallow lakes are highly sensitive to respond internal nutrient loading due to wind-induced flow velocity effects. Wind-induced flow velocity effects on nutrient suspension were investigated at a long narrow bay of large shallow Lake Taihu, the third largest freshwater lake in China. Wind-induced reverse/compensation flow and consistent flow field probabilities at vertical column of the water were measured. The probabilities between the wind field and the flow velocities provided a strong correlation at the surface (80.6%) and the bottom (65.1%) layers of water profile. Vertical flow velocity profile analysis provided the evidence of delay response time to wind field at the bottom layer of lake water. Strong wind field generated by the west (W) and west-north-west (WNW) winds produced displaced water movements in opposite directions to the prevailing flow field. An exponential correlation was observed between the current velocities of the surface and the bottom layers while considering wind speed as a control factor. A linear model was developed to correlate the wind field-induced flow velocity impacts on nutrient concentration at the surface and bottom layers. Results showed that dominant wind directions (ENE, E, and ESE) had a maximum nutrient resuspension contribution (nutrient resuspension potential) of 34.7 and 43.6% at the surface and the bottom profile layers, respectively. Total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) average concentrations were 6.38, 1.5, and 0.03 mg/L during our field experiment at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu. Overall, wind-induced low-to-moderate hydrodynamic disturbances contributed more in nutrient resuspension at Eastern Bay of Lake Taihu. The present study can be used to understand the linkage between wind-induced flow velocities and nutrient concentrations for shallow lakes (with uniform morphology and deep margins) water quality management and to develop further models.

  20. The Terminal Velocity of a Bubble in an Oscillating Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L. A.; Kraynik, A. M.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    A bubble in an acoustic field experiences a net "Bjerknes" force from the nonlinear coupling of its radial oscillations with the oscillating buoyancy force. It is typically assumed that the bubble's net terminal velocity can be found by considering a spherical bubble with the imposed "Bjerknes stresses". We have analyzed the motion of such a bubble using a rigorous perturbation approach and found that one must include a term involving an effective mass flux through the bubble that arises from the time average of the second-order nonlinear terms in the kinematic boundary condition. The importance of this term is governed by the dimensionless parameter α=R^2φ / R^2φ ν . - ν, where R is the bubble radius, φ is the driving frequency, and ν is the liquid kinematic viscosity. If α is large, this term is unimportant, but if α is small, this term is the dominant factor in determining the terminal velocity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALP is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  2. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  3. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  4. Axial and radial velocities in the creeping flow in a pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuykov Andrey L'vovich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to analytical study of transformation fields of axial and radial velocities in uneven steady creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid in the initial portion of the cylindrical channel. It is shown that the velocity field of the flow is two-dimensional and determined by the stream function. The article is a continuation of a series of papers, where normalized analytic functions of radial axial distributions in uneven steady creeping flow in a cylindrical tube with azimuthal vorticity and stream function were obtained. There is Poiseuille profile for the axial velocity in the uniform motion of a fluid at an infinite distance from the entrance of the pipe (at x = ∞, here taken equal to zero radial velocity. There is uniform distribution of the axial velocity in the cross section at the tube inlet at x = 0, at which the axial velocity is constant along the current radius. Due to the axial symmetry of the flow on the axis of the pipe (at r = 0, the radial velocities and the partial derivative of the axial velocity along the radius, corresponding to the condition of the soft function extremum, are equal to zero. The authors stated vanishing of the velocity of the fluid on the walls of the pipe (at r = R , where R - radius of the tube due to its viscous sticking and tightness of the walls. The condition of conservation of volume flow along the tube was also accepted. All the solutions are obtained in the form of the Fourier - Bessel. It is shown that the hydraulic losses at uniform creeping flow of a Newtonian fluid correspond to Poiseuille - Hagen formula.

  5. Directional velocity estimation using focusing along the flow direction - I: Theory and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    using 8 pulse-echo lines and stationary echo canceling. Pulsatile flow in the femoral artery was also simulated using Womersley's flow model. A purely transverse flow profile could be obtained with a relative standard deviation of less than 10% over the whole cardiac cycle using 8 pulse emissions......A new method for directional velocity estimation is presented. The method uses beamformation along the flow direction to generate data in which the correct velocity magnitude can be directly estimated from the shift in position of the received consecutive signals. The shift is found by cross...... velocity of 0.5 m/s is simulated for different beam-to-flow angles and for different emit foci. At 45degrees the relative standard deviation over the profile is 1.6% for a transmit focus at 40 mm. At 90degrees the approach gave a relative standard deviation of 6.6% with a transmit focus of 80 mm, when...

  6. Smart Laser Interferometer with Electrically Tunable Lenses for Flow Velocity Measurements through Disturbing Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen W. Czarske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric velocity measurements are of great importance at flow investigations. However, the laser beams can be distorted at the interfaces between optical media of different refractive indices. Temporal fluctuations of these distortions will cause a deterioration of the laser interferometer signals. We have harnessed the power of programmable photonics devices to eliminate this signal deterioration. Non-invasive flow velocity measurements through a rapidly fluctuating media interface with large strokes of about 100 microns are presented. Our work represents a paradigm shift for interferometric velocity measurement techniques from using static to dynamic optical elements.

  7. Project Proposal : Assessment of the Impact of Road Construction and Other Improvements on Surface Water Flow at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Road construction has altered land surface topography on the St. Vincent Island, affecting the natural flow of water. The affects of this construction will need to...

  8. Fluorescence photobleaching to evaluate flow velocity and hydrodynamic dispersion in nanoslits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Amandine; Bodiguel, Hugues

    2012-05-01

    Velocity measurement is a key issue when studying flows below the micron scale, due to the lack of sensitivity of conventional detection techniques. We present an approach based on fluorescence photobleaching to evaluate flow velocity at the nanoscale by direct visualization. Solutions containing a fluorescent dye are injected into nanoslits. A photobleached line, created through laser beam illumination, moves through the channel due to the fluid flow. The velocity and effective diffusion coefficient are calculated from the temporal data of the line position and width respectively. The measurable velocity range is only limited by the diffusion rate of the fluorescent dye for low velocities and by the apparition of Taylor dispersion for high velocities. By controlling the pressure drop and measuring the velocity, we determine the fluid viscosity. The photobleached line spreads in time due to molecular diffusion and Taylor hydrodynamic dispersion. By taking into account the finite spatial and temporal extensions of the bleaching under flow, we determine the effective diffusion coefficient, which we find to be in good agreement with the expression of the two dimensional Taylor-Aris dispersion coefficient. Finally we analyze and discuss the role of the finite width of the rectangular slit on hydrodynamic dispersion.

  9. Turbulence of non-uniform open channel flows and mean velocity scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R.; Fox, J.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulence and mean velocity distributions are well studied for uniform flows, however fully turbulent non-uniform open channel flows over rough gravel beds are an understudied class of realistic flows with significant geomorphologic importance. The two-fold objectives of this study are to investigate the effects of flow deceleration on multi-layer turbulence and determine velocity scales that produce self-similar profiles using turbulent boundary layer theory. Turbulence statistics were calculated from data collected using a three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocimeter in backwater region produced by placing cylindrical obstruction downstream of measuring location. Results indicate inner turbulent processes are set according to shear velocity while outer layer of turbulence is not. Mean streamwise velocity profiles of 101 published datasets including 2211 data points from non-uniform decelerating rivers and laboratory flumes are scaled using inner, outer and 2 mixed methods. Theoretical arguments indicate the outer velocity scale determined from the AIP definition of equilibrium provides a more appropriate scaling for the velocity deficit of non-uniform open channel flows than inner scaling determined from Clauser equilibrium. Scaling results of mean profiles show outer scaling collapses data better than inner scaling. Mixed scaling approaches, which account for upstream conditions and the effect of bed roughness felt throughout the flow, provide a better scaling choice for this class of flows than either inner or outer scales alone. Results of this analysis provide insight on the behavior of turbulence in decelerating fully turbulent open channel flow over a rough gravel bed and provides a scaling useful for predicting velocity distributions.

  10. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen's work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille's solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  11. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, J. Christopher [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen`s work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille`s solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  12. Polynomial regularization for robust MRI-based estimation of blood flow velocities and pressure gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Ley, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Unterhinninghofen, Roland

    2011-01-01

    In cardiovascular diagnostics, phase-contrast MRI is a valuable technique for measuring blood flow velocities and computing blood pressure values. Unfortunately, both velocity and pressure data typically suffer from the strong image noise of velocity-encoded MRI. In the past, separate approaches of regularization with physical a-priori knowledge and data representation with continuous functions have been proposed to overcome these drawbacks. In this article, we investigate polynomial regularization as an exemplary specification of combining these two techniques. We perform time-resolved three-dimensional velocity measurements and pressure gradient computations on MRI acquisitions of steady flow in a physical phantom. Results based on the higher quality temporal mean data are used as a reference. Thereby, we investigate the performance of our approach of polynomial regularization, which reduces the root mean squared errors to the reference data by 45% for velocities and 60% for pressure gradients.

  13. Directional velocity estimation using focusing along the flow direction II: Experimental investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Bjerngaard, R.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for directional velocity estimation is investigated through a number of flow rig measurements. The method uses beamformation along the flow direction to generate data, where the correct velocity magnitude can directly be estimated from the shift in position of the received consecutive...... signals. The shift is found by cross-correlating the beamformed lines. The approach can find the velocity in any direction, including transverse to the traditionally emitted ultrasound beam. The method is investigated using a flow rig with a peak velocity of 0.15 m/s. A 7-MHz linear array transducer...... is used together with a dedicated sampling system to acquire signals from 64 transducer elements simultaneously. A technique for obtaining 128-element data using multiplexing is also presented. The data is beamformed off-line on a PC. A relative standard deviation of 1.4% can be obtained for a beam...

  14. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  15. Measurement of gas flow velocity: anemometer with a vibrating hot wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    I propose a new method to measure velocity of a gas flow, which utilizes the time derivative of the voltage observed on a vibrating hot-wire sensor. The wire vibrates with an amplitude a and a frequency f, and is kept perpendicular to the gas flow direction in the plane containing the flow velocity vector v(g). When the parameters of vibrations are tuned, the number of zeros per vibration period of the hot-wire voltage function changes. I demonstrate that at the point of change, the unknown gas velocity is directly expressed by the parameters of vibrations v(g)=2pifa. Therefore, the velocity can be measured without any prior calibration of the hot-wire speed-voltage curve and the method can be used for gases of slowly changing temperature or composition.

  16. Water velocity and the nature of critical flow in large rapids on the Colorado River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magirl, C.S.; Gartner, J.W.; Smart, G.M.; Webb, R.H.

    2009-01-01

     Rapids are an integral part of bedrock-controlled rivers, influencing aquatic ecology, geomorphology, and recreational value. Flow measurements in rapids and high-gradient rivers are uncommon because of technical difficulties associated with positioning and operating sufficiently robust instruments. In the current study, detailed velocity, water surface, and bathymetric data were collected within rapids on the Colorado River in eastern Utah. With the water surface survey, it was found that shoreline-based water surface surveys may misrepresent the water surface slope along the centerline of a rapid. Flow velocities were measured with an ADCP and an electronic pitot-static tube. Integrating multiple measurements, the ADCP returned velocity data from the entire water column, even in sections of high water velocity. The maximum mean velocity measured with the ADCP was 3.7 m/s. The pitot-static tube, while capable of only point measurements, quantified velocity 0.39 m below the surface. The maximum mean velocity measured with the pitot tube was 5.2 m/s, with instantaneous velocities up to 6.5 m/s. Analysis of the data showed that flow was subcritical throughout all measured rapids with a maximum measured Froude number of 0.7 in the largest measured rapids. Froude numbers were highest at the entrance of a given rapid, then decreased below the first breaking waves. In the absence of detailed bathymetric and velocity data, the Froude number in the fastest-flowing section of a rapid was estimated from near-surface velocity and depth soundings alone.

  17. Development and testing of a novel single-wire sensor for wide range flow velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salaymeh, A.; Durst, F.

    2004-05-01

    Thermal flow sensors with a wide dynamic range, e.g. 1:1000 and more, are currently not available in spite of the great demand for such sensors in practical fluid flow measurements. The present paper introduces a sensor of this kind. The new sensor is mechanically the same as the 'sending' wire of the two-wire thermal flow sensor described by Durst et al, but it is excited by discrete, widely separated, square waves of electrical current rather than a continuous sinusoidal current. The nominal 'output' of the new sensor is the increase in wire temperature so that an integral of the resistance over the pulse length can be used for measurements. This 'output' is a function of the time constant ('thermal inertia') of the heated wire and thus also of the velocity of flow. The time constant decreases as the flow velocity increases, while the heat transfer increases. At very low flow velocities the response is determined almost entirely by the time constant of the wire while at high velocities the device acts almost like a 'constant current' hot-wire anemometer. That is, the effect of thermal inertia augments the output signal of the basic hot wire, thus increasing the flow rate range/sensitivity of the device, especially at the low-velocity end, above than that of a simple hot-wire flowmeter. The sensor described here was developed for slowly changing unidirectional flows, and uses one wire of 12.5 µm diameter. It is excited at 30 Hz frequency and its usable flow velocity range is 0.01-25 m s-1.

  18. Velocity Distribution in the Flow from a Wall-Mounted Diffuser in Rooms with Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The paper describes experiments with wall-mounted air terminal devices. The airflow from an air terminal device will influence the thermal comfort of the occupants and it is therefore important to develop an expression for this flow. The velocity at the floor is influenced by the flow rate to the...

  19. Cerebral blood flow velocity changes during upright positioning in bed after acute stroke : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, Marcel J; Elting, Jan Willem; Stewart, Roy; De Keyser, Jacques; Kremer, Berry; Vroomen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: National guidelines recommend mobilisation in bed as early as possible after acute stroke. Little is known about the influence of upright positioning on real-time cerebral flow variables in patients with stroke. We aimed to assess whether cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) changes signi

  20. Trace projection transformation: a new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  1. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  2. Micro-particle image velocimetry for velocity profile measurements of micro blood flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Katie L; Fenech, Marianne

    2013-04-25

    Micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV) is used to visualize paired images of micro particles seeded in blood flows. The images are cross-correlated to give an accurate velocity profile. A protocol is presented for μPIV measurements of blood flows in microchannels. At the scale of the microcirculation, blood cannot be considered a homogeneous fluid, as it is a suspension of flexible particles suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. Shear rate, maximum velocity, velocity profile shape, and flow rate can be derived from these measurements. Several key parameters such as focal depth, particle concentration, and system compliance, are presented in order to ensure accurate, useful data along with examples and representative results for various hematocrits and flow conditions.

  3. PRESSURE-VELOCITY JOINT MEASUREMENTS OF A WALL-BOUNDED TURBULENT SHEAR FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-zheng; KE Feng; WANG Wei-zhe; CAO Zhao-min

    2006-01-01

    The unsteady behavior of the large-scale vortical structures buried in a wall-bounded turbulent shear layer flow was extensively investigated using pressure-velocity joint measurements. The wall pressure fluctuations and flow field velocity fluctuations were measured simultaneously by using a microphone and an X-type hotwire, respectively. The spatially and temporally strong coupling between the convecting flow structures and the wall pressure fluctuations were meticulously investigated in terms of the continuous wavelet transform, cross-correlation and coherence of the wall pressure and flow field. The characteristics of the large-scale vortical structures, e.g., the shedding frequency, averaged convection velocity, convective motion, and structure pattern were revealed.

  4. [The assessment of flow velocity in carotid and intracranial arteries in three different age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebudek, S

    1998-01-01

    In this report we assess the systolic maximal flow velocity in carotid and intracranial arteries in 191 subjects with no history of cerebral vascular disease in 3 age groups: 20-40 years (1 group), 41-60 years (2 group), and above 60 years (3 group). The subjects were assessed using Sonomed Transcranial Doppler Spectrograph according to generally accepted principles. The purpose of the study was to establish the mean value of maximal flow velocity in each particular artery in three age groups, and to observe the changes in this parameter with age. The results were analyzed using statistical methods and a significant decrease in blood flow, Vmax, was found in all investigated arteries. A mean decrease of 8.02% in flow velocity Vmax was found, when comparing groups 2 and 1, and difference 15.99% comparing 3 and 1.

  5. The influence of bus stop on traffic flow with velocity-difference-separation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Pengjun; Wang, Wei; Ge, Hongxia

    2016-06-01

    Based on velocity-difference-separation model, the mixed traffic flow on two-lane road is investigated. For a fixed road length, the influence of bus and bus stops on traffic flow is studied with the increasing traffic density. Compared with the result without bus stops given by Li et al., a new traffic state is found, which is valuable for studying the impacts of public transport on urban traffic flow.

  6. Intracycle Angular Velocity Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have numerous features that make them attractive for wind and marine renewable energy. To maximize power output, the turbine blade kinematics may be controlled during the course of the blade revolution, thus optimizing the unsteady fluid dynamic forces. Dynamically pitching the blades, similar to blade control in a helicopter, is an established method. However, this technique adds undesirable mechanical complexity to the turbine, increasing cost and reducing durability. Here we introduce a novel alternative requiring no additional moving parts: we optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of blade position resulting in motion (including changes in the effective angle of attack) that is precisely timed to exploit unsteady fluid effects. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 79% increase in power output over industry standard control methods. Analysis of the fluid forcing and blade kinematics show that maximal power is ach...

  7. Retinal blood flow velocity in patients with active uveitis using the retinal function imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xing; Kedhar Sanjay; Bhoomibunchoo Chavakij

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest a link between macular edema and retinal blood flow velocity (RBFV).The effects of inflammation in the retinal blood vessels are not clearly understood.We want to evaluate the differences in retinal blood flow velocities of patients with active uveitis and healthy controls using the retinal function imager (RFI)and determine the correlation between retinal blood flow veiocity and central macular thickness in uveitis patients.Methods Twenty-eight eyes of 24 patients with active anterior uveitis and 51 eyes of 51 normal control subjects were enrolled.Retinal blood flow velocities evaluated by RFI and central macular thickness evaluated by optical coherence tomography (SLO-OCT) were obtained.Differences among the groups were assessed using Stata statistical software.Results Ten eyes had uveitic cystoid macular edema (CME).Median (first quartile,third quartile) venous velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 2.09 (1.92,2.44),2.64 (2.32,2.86),and 2.82 (2.39,3.53) mm/s respectively.Median (first and quartile) arterial velocity for uveitic eyes with CME,uveitic eyes without CME,and controls were 3.79 (3.61,4.09),3.46 (2.86,4.12),and 3.93 (3.35,4.65) mm/s.Uveitic eyes with CME had significantly lower venous velocity than controls (P=0.044).There was a strong linear relationship between venous velocity and central retinal thickness (P=-0.007).Conclusions Retinal venous velocities were significantly decreased in eyes with uveitic CME relative to controls.Decreased venous velocity was correlated with increased central retinal thickness in uveitic eyes.

  8. Direct velocity measurement and enhanced mixing in laminar flows over ultrahydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jia

    2005-11-01

    A series of experiment are presented studying the kinematics of water flowing over drag-reducing ultrahydrophobic surfaces. The surfaces are fabricated from silicon wafers using photolithography and are designed to incorporate patterns of microridges with precise spacing and alignment. These surfaces are reacted with an organosilane to achieve high hydrophobicity. Microridges with different widths, spacing and alignments are tested in a microchannel flow cell with rectangular cross-section. The velocity profile across the microchannel is measured with micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) capable of resolving the flow down to length scales well below the size of the surface features. A maximum slip velocity of >60% of the average velocity in the flow is observed at the center of the air-water interface supported between these hydrophobic microridges, and the no-slip boundary condition is found at the hydrophobic microridges. The μ-PIV measurements demonstrate that slip along the shear-free air-water interface supported between the hydrophobic micron-sized ridges is the primary mechanism responsible for the drag reduction. The experiment velocity and pressure drop measurement are compared with the prediction of numerical simulation and an analytical model. By aligning the hydrophobic microridges at an acute angle to the flow direction a secondary flow is produced which can significantly enhance mixing in this laminar flow.

  9. Statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Small scale clustering of inertial particles and relative velocity of particle pairs have been fully characterized for statistically steady homogeneous isotropic flows. Depending on the particle Stokes relaxation time, the spatial distribution of the disperse phase results in a multi-scale manifold characterized by local particle concentration and voids and, because of finite inertia, the two nearby particles have high probability to exhibit large relative velocities. Both effects might explain the speed-up of particle collision rate in turbulent flows. Recently it has been shown that the large scale geometry of the flow plays a crucial role in organizing small scale particle clusters. For instance, a mean shear preferentially orients particle patterns. In this case, depending on the Stokes time, anisotropic clustering may occur even in the inertial range of scales where the turbulent fluctuations which drive the particles have already recovered isotropy. Here we consider the statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow, the prototypical flow which manifests anisotropic clustering at small scales. We show that the mean shear, by imprinting anisotropy on the large scale velocity fluctuations, dramatically affects the particle relative velocity distribution even in the range of small scales where the anisotropic mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy production are sub-dominant with respect to the inertial energy transfer which drives the carrier fluid velocity towards isotropy. We find that the particles’ populations which manifest strong anisotropy in their relative velocities are the same which exhibit small scale clustering. In contrast to any Kolmogorov-like picture of turbulent transport these phenomena may persist even below the smallest dissipative scales where the residual level of anisotropy may eventually blow-up. The observed anisotropy of particle relative velocity and spatial configuration is suggested to influence the

  10. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  11. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  12. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  13. Evaluation of multiple tracer methods to estimate low groundwater flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, Paul W; Arnold, Bill W

    2017-04-01

    Four different tracer methods were used to estimate groundwater flow velocity at a multiple-well site in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: (1) two single-well tracer tests with different rest or "shut-in" periods, (2) a cross-hole tracer test with an extended flow interruption, (3) a comparison of two tracer decay curves in an injection borehole with and without pumping of a downgradient well, and (4) a natural-gradient tracer test. Such tracer methods are potentially very useful for estimating groundwater velocities when hydraulic gradients are flat (and hence uncertain) and also when water level and hydraulic conductivity data are sparse, both of which were the case at this test location. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the first three methods for their ability to provide reasonable estimates of relatively low groundwater flow velocities in such low-hydraulic-gradient environments. The natural-gradient method is generally considered to be the most robust and direct method, so it was used to provide a "ground truth" velocity estimate. However, this method usually requires several wells, so it is often not practical in systems with large depths to groundwater and correspondingly high well installation costs. The fact that a successful natural gradient test was conducted at the test location offered a unique opportunity to compare the flow velocity estimates obtained by the more easily deployed and lower risk methods with the ground-truth natural-gradient method. The groundwater flow velocity estimates from the four methods agreed very well with each other, suggesting that the first three methods all provided reasonably good estimates of groundwater flow velocity at the site. The advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, as well as some of the uncertainties associated with them are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Highly spatially resolved velocity measurements of a turbulent channel flow by a fiber-optic heterodyne laser-Doppler velocity-profile sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, K.; Pfister, T.; Buettner, L.; Czarske, J. [Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Chair for Measurement and Testing Techniques, Dresden (Germany); Mueller, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig (PTB), Department 1.4 Gas Flow, Braunschweig (Germany); Becker, S.; Lienhart, H.; Durst, F. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics (LSTM), Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Velocity measurements with a high spatial resolution are important in turbulent flow research. In this paper, we report on the development of a new fiber-optic laser-Doppler velocity-profile sensor exhibiting a spatial resolution of up to 5 {mu}m and its application to turbulent boundary layers. The sensor developed in the present work employs a frequency-division-multiplexing technique in order to separate two measurement signals from the two fringe systems. Velocity measurements close to zero at the solid wall were realized using heterodyne technique. The use of fiber optics improved a robustness of the sensor. The measurement accuracy of the sensor was experimentally investigated with respect to the spatial resolution and velocity. Universal velocity profile of a turbulent flow was obtained in a fully developed channel flow. Mean and fluctuating velocity are presented with a high spatial resolution. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of the surface-water sampling design in the Western Lake Michigan Drainages in relation to environmental factors affecting water quality at base flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Dale M.

    1998-01-01

    Eight stream sites (Fixed Sites) were chosen to describe the variability in the water quality of the Western Lake Michigan Drainages (WMIC) Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment program. These sites were chosen in areas (Relatively Homogeneous Units) dominated by unique combinations of the environmental factors thought to be most important in influencing water quality; namely, land use, surficial deposits, and bedrock type. A study was designed to determine (1) the applicability of streamflow, nutrient, and suspended sediment data regularly collected at these eight sites describing the variability in these characteristics throughout the Study Unit during base-flow conditions and (2) the applicability of the interpretive results made from data collected at these few sites to streams throughout the Study Unit. This was done by sampling the Fixed Sites and an additional 83 sites in Relatively Homogeneous Units throughout the Study Unit during summer base-flow conditions.

  16. Microgravity flame spread over thick solids in low velocity opposed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Zhu, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Motivated primarily by fire safety of spacecraft, a renewed interest in microgravity flame spread over solid materials has arisen. With few exceptions, however, research on microgravity flame spread has been focused on thermally thin fuels due to the constraint on available test time. In this study, two sets of experiments are conducted to examine the flame spread and extinction behavior over thick PMMA in simulated and actual microgravity environments. The low-gravity flame spread environment is produced by a narrow channel apparatus in normal gravity. Extinction limits using flow velocity and oxygen concentration as coordinates are presented, and flame spread rates are determined as a function of the velocity and oxygen concentration of the gas flow. The microgravity experiments are also performed with varying low-velocity flow and varying ambient oxygen concentration. The important observations include flame behavior and appearance as a function of oxygen concentration and flow velocity, temperature variation in gas and solid phases, and flame spread rate. A comparison between simulated and actual microgravity data is made, and general agreement is found. Based on the experimental observations, mechanisms for flame spread and extinction in low velocity opposed flows are discussed.

  17. Laboratory model study of the effect of aeration on axial velocity attenuation of turbulent jet flows in plunge pool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 张法星; 田忠; 许唯临; 刘斌; 卫望汝

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory model experiment, the velocities of the jet flow along the axis are measured, using the CQY−Z8a velocity-meter. The velocity attenuations of the jet flow along the axis under different conditions are studied. The effects of the aeration concentration, the initial jet velocity at the entry and the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation of the jet flow are analyzed. It is seen that the velocity attenuation of the jet flow along the axis sees a regular variation. It is demonstrated by the test results that under the experimental conditions, the velocity along the axis decreases linearly. The higher the air concentration is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. The absolute value of the slopeK increases with the rise of the air concentration. The relationship can be defined as=a+bKACK. The coefficientA is 0.03 under the experimental conditions. With the low air concentration of the jet flow, the thinner the jet flow is, the faster the velocity will be decayed. With the increase of the air concentra- tion, the influence of the thickness of the jet flow on the velocity attenuation is reduced. When the air concentration is increased to a certain value, the thickness of the jet flow may not have any influence on the velocity attenuation. The initial jet velocity itself at the entry has no influence on the variation of the velocity attenuation as the curves of the velocity attenuation at different velocities at the entry are practically parallel, even coinciding one with another. Therefore, improving the air concentration of the jet flow and disper- sing the jet flow in the plunge pool could reduce the influence of the jet flow on the scour.

  18. Planar Velocity Distribution of Viscous Debris Flow at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China: A Field Measurement Using Two Radar Velocimeters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xudong; WANG Guangqian; KANG Zhicheng; FEI Xiangjun

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flow were analyzed using the measured data at Jiangjia Ravine, Yunnan, China. The velocity data were measured through using two radar velocimeters. The cross-sectional mean velocities were calculated and used to examine Kang et al's (2004) relationship, which was established for converting the flow velocity at river centerline measured by a radar velocimeter into the mean velocity based on the stop-watch method. The velocity coefficient, K, defined by the ratio of the mean velocity to the maximum velocity, ranges from 0.2 to 0.6. Kang et al's (2004) relationship was found being inapplicable to flows with K smaller than 0.43. This paper contributes to show the complexity of the planar velocity distribution of viscous debris flows and the applicability of Kang et al's relationship.

  19. Simulation and assessment of groundwater flow and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2003 through 2013: Chapter B of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Perry M.; Roth, Jason L.; Trost, Jared J.; Christenson, Catherine A.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Erickson, Melinda L.

    2017-09-05

    Water levels during 2003 through 2013 were less than mean water levels for the period 1925–2013 for several lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area in Minnesota. Previous periods of low lake-water levels generally were correlated with periods with less than mean precipitation. Increases in groundwater withdrawals and land-use changes have brought into question whether or not recent (2003–13) lake-water-level declines are solely caused by decreases in precipitation. A thorough understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges was needed to assess the effect of water-management decisions on lake-water levels. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and the Minnesota Department of Health, developed and calibrated a three-dimensional, steady-state groundwater-flow model representing 2003–13 mean hydrologic conditions to assess groundwater and lake-water exchanges, and the effects of groundwater withdrawals and precipitation on water levels of 96 lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area.Lake-water budgets for the calibrated groundwater-flow model indicated that groundwater is flowing into lakes in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area and lakes are providing water to underlying aquifers. Lake-water outflow to the simulated groundwater system was a major outflow component for Big Marine Lake, Lake Elmo, Snail Lake, and White Bear Lake, accounting for 45 to 64 percent of the total outflows from the lakes. Evaporation and transpiration from the lake surface ranged from 19 to 52 percent of the total outflow from the four lakes. Groundwater withdrawals and precipitation were varied from the 2003‒13 mean values used in the calibrated model (30-percent changes in groundwater withdrawals and 5-percent changes in precipitation) for hypothetical scenarios to assess the effects of groundwater withdrawals and precipitation on water budgets and levels in Big Marine Lake, Snail Lake

  20. Simulation of groundwater flow and the interaction of groundwater and surface water in the Willamette Basin and Central Willamette subbasin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Nora B.; Burns, Erick R.; Conlon, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Full appropriation of tributary streamflow during summer, a growing population, and agricultural needs are increasing the demand for groundwater in the Willamette Basin. Greater groundwater use could diminish streamflow and create seasonal and long-term declines in groundwater levels. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD) cooperated in a study to develop a conceptual and quantitative understanding of the groundwater-flow system of the Willamette Basin with an emphasis on the Central Willamette subbasin. This final report from the cooperative study describes numerical models of the regional and local groundwater-flow systems and evaluates the effects of pumping on groundwater and surface‑water resources. The models described in this report can be used to evaluate spatial and temporal effects of pumping on groundwater, base flow, and stream capture. The regional model covers about 6,700 square miles of the 12,000-square mile Willamette and Sandy River drainage basins in northwestern Oregon—referred to as the Willamette Basin in this report. The Willamette Basin is a topographic and structural trough that lies between the Coast Range and the Cascade Range and is divided into five sedimentary subbasins underlain and separated by basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Columbia River basalt) that crop out as local uplands. From north to south, these five subbasins are the Portland subbasin, the Tualatin subbasin, the Central Willamette subbasin, the Stayton subbasin, and the Southern Willamette subbasin. Recharge in the Willamette Basin is primarily from precipitation in the uplands of the Cascade Range, Coast Range, and western Cascades areas. Groundwater moves downward and laterally through sedimentary or basalt units until it discharges locally to wells, evapotranspiration, or streams. Mean annual groundwater withdrawal for water years 1995 and 1996 was about 400 cubic feet per second; irrigation withdrawals

  1. A pulsed wire probe for the measurement of velocity and flow direction in slowly moving air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D E; Parker, K H; Snyder, B

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the theory and operation of a pulsed-probe anemometer designed to measure steady three-dimensional velocity fields typical of pulmonary tracheo-bronchial airflows. Local velocities are determined by measuring the transport time and orientation of a thermal pulse initiated at an upstream wire and sensed at a downstream wire. The transport time is a reproducible function of velocity and the probe wire spacing, as verified by a theoretical model of convective heat transfer. When calibrated the anemometer yields measurements of velocity accurate to +/- 5 percent and resolves flow direction to within 1 deg at airspeeds greater than or equal to 10 cm/s. Spatial resolution is +/- 0.5 mm. Measured flow patterns typical of curved circular pipes are included as examples of its application.

  2. Numerical Analysis of the Turbine 99 Draft Tube Flow Field Provoked by Redesigned Inlet Velocity Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, S.; Reggio, M.; Guibault, F.; Castro, L.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, several investigations on hydraulic turbine draft tube performance have shown that the hydrodynamic flow field at the runner outlet determines the diffuser efficiency affecting the overall performance of the turbine. This flow field, for which the principal characteristics are the flow rate and the inlet swirling flow intensity, is mostly developed on turbines designed for low head (high specific velocity) and operated away from their best efficiency point. To identify factors of the flow field responsible for loosing draft- tube efficiency, the correlations between the flow pattern along the diffuser and both swirl intensity and flow rate have been examined. An analytical representation of inlet flow field has been manipulated by a Multi Island Genetic Algorithm through the automatic coupling of multidisciplinary commercial software systems in order to obtain redesigned inlet velocity profiles. This loop allowed determining the profile for which the minimum energy loss factor was reached. With different flow field patterns obtained during the optimization process it was possible to undertake a qualitative and quantitative analysis which has helped to understand how to suppress or at least mitigate undesirable draft tube flow characteristics. The direct correlation between the runner blade design and the kinematics of the swirl at the draft tube inlet should suppose the perfect coupling at the runner-draft tube interface without compromising the overall flow stability of the machine.

  3. Multifractal Description of Simulated Flow Velocity in Idealised Porous Media by Using the Sandbox Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hornero, Francisco J.; Ariza-Villaverde, Ana B.; de Ravé, Eduardo Gutiérrez

    2013-03-01

    The spatial description of flows in porous media is a main issue due to their influence on processes that take place inside. In addition to descriptive statistics, the multifractal analysis based on the Box-Counting fixed-size method has been used during last decade to study some porous media features. However, this method gives emphasis to domain regions containing few data points that spark the biased assessment of generalized fractal dimensions for negative moment orders. This circumstance is relevant when describing the flow velocity field in idealised three-dimensional porous media. The application of the Sandbox method is explored in this work as an alternative to the Box-Counting procedure for analyzing flow velocity magnitude simulated with the lattice model approach for six media with different porosities. According to the results, simulated flows have multiscaling behaviour. The multifractal spectra obtained with the Sandbox method reveal more heterogeneity as well as the presence of some extreme values in the distribution of high flow velocity magnitudes as porosity decreases. This situation is not so evident for the multifractal spectra estimated with the Box-Counting method. As a consequence, the description of the influence of porous media structure on flow velocity distribution provided by the Sandbox method improves the results obtained with the Box-Counting procedure.

  4. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  5. Impact of flow velocity on the dynamic behaviour of biofilm bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yung-Pin

    2005-01-01

    The impact of flow velocity (FV) on the growth dynamics of biofilms and bulk water heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria in drinking water distribution systems was quantified and modeled by combining a logistic growth model with mass balance equations. The dynamic variations in the specific growth and release rates of biofilm bacteria were also quantified. The experimental results showed that the maximum biofilm biomass did not change when flow velocity was increased from 20 to 40 cm s(-1), but was significantly affected when flow velocity was further increased to 60 cm s(-1). Although the concentration of biofilm bacteria was substantially reduced by the higher shear stress, the concentration of bacteria in the bulk fluid was slightly increased. From this it is estimated that the specific growth rate and specific release rate of biofilm bacteria had doubled. The specific release (detachment) rate was dependent on the specific growth rate of the biofilm bacteria.

  6. Measurement of velocity profiles of nanofluids in laminar channel flow using Particle Image Velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Arun K.; Kulkarni, Parimal P.; Singh, R.K.; Verma, Pumendra [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (India). Reactor Engineering Div.; Gandhi, Mayur [University Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2014-06-15

    The objective of the paper is to measure the velocity profiles of water based nanofluids for flow through channels in order to understand whether the nanofluids behave Newtonian. For this purpose, experiments were carried for flow through a rectangular channel in laminar regime. Four different nanofluids were used, i.e. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CuO, TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} with base fluid as water. Experiments were conducted at low concentration of these particles. The velocity profiles were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry. The results indicate that the velocity profiles are similar for all the fluids indicating the flows to be Newtonian. (orig.)

  7. Influence of Optic-Flow Information Beyond the Velocity Field on the Active Control of Heading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined both the sufficiency of the optic-flow velocity field and the influence of optic-flow information beyond the velocity field on the active control of heading. The display simulated a vehicle traveling on a circular path through a random-dot 3D cloud under a static or a dynamic scene in which dots were periodically redrawn to remove information beyond a velocity field. Participants used a joystick, under either velocity and acceleration control dynamics, to steer and align the vehicle orientation with their perceived heading while experiencing random perturbations to the vehicle orientation. Frequency response (Bode plots show reasonably good performance under both display conditions with a decrease in gain and an increase in phase lag for the dynamic scene for both control dynamics. The performance data were then fit by a Crossover Model to identify reaction time and lead time constant to determine how much participants anticipated future heading to generate lead control. Reaction time was longer and lead time constant was smaller for the dynamic than the static scene for both control dynamics. We conclude that the velocity field alone is sufficient to support closed-loop heading control, but optic-flow information beyond the velocity field improves visuomotor performance in self-motion control.

  8. Traffic Flow by Cellular Automata: the Effect of Maximal Car Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Makowiecki, D S; Makowiec, Danuta; Miklaszewski, Wieslaw

    2005-01-01

    Effects of large value assigned to the maximal car velocity on the fundamental diagrams in the Nagel-Schreckenberg model are studied by extended simulations. The function relating the flow in the congested traffic phase with the car density and deceleration probability is found numerically. Properties of the region of critical changes, so-called jamming transition parameters, are described in details. The basic model, modified by the assumption that for each car an individual velocity limit is assigned, is investigated in the aim to find the best supplementary rule allowing the jammed traffic to move with velocity larger than the slowest driving vehicle.

  9. Mechanism and control of convective heat transfer-- Coordination of velocity and heat flow fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A second look has been given at the mechanism of convective heat transfer based on the analogy between convection and conduction with heat sources. The strength of convective heat transfer depends not only on the fluid velocity and fluid properties, but also on the coordination of fluid velocity and heat flow fields. Hence, based on the included angle of velocity and temperature gradient vectors, the presence of fluid motion may enhance or reduce heat transfer. With this concept, the known heat transfer phenomena may be understood in a deeper way. More important is that some novel approaches of heat transfer control can be developed.

  10. ADP-flow velocity profile to interpret hydromorphological features of China's Yangtze Three-Gorges valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing; CHEN Zhongyuan; XU Kaiqin; WEI Taoyuan; LI Maotian; WANG Zhanghua; Masataka Watanabe

    2005-01-01

    In late May and early June, 2002, a field investigation was conducted along the Three-Gorges valley of the upper Yangtze catchment by ADP (Acoustic Doppler Profile SONTEK-500). Data obtained when surveying were accompanied with discharge of 1000 m) and shallower water depth (50 m) and U-shaped river-channel morphology. Mapping the river cross-section area at those sites can determine that smaller cross-section area accelerates the flow velocity. From Wanxian to Fengjie, the average flow velocity ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 m/s is in-phase with the water depth. The high-flow velocity is associated with narrower river-channel, where V-shaped gorges valley occurs with small cross-section area. Further downstream from Fengjie to Zigui, the low flow velocity is linked to deep river channel characterized by W-shaped valley morphology of large cross-section area, in general. The average flow velocity is 2.5―3.5 m/s, and maximum can reach 6.0 m/s near Wu-Gorge. Our survey had also detected a slow-flow velocity (mostly 100 m; maximum) in the gorges valley (30―40 m below the present mean sea level). This contrasts to the relative shallow water river-channel above Fengjie, i.e. 20―30 m in general and 50―60 m, maximum at gorges site. The present ADP investigation displays the hydromorphological feature in the Three-Gorges valley, and most importantly, it accumulates invaluable dataset for the post-dam study in the near future.

  11. Numerical simulation of bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling under velocity and temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahreini, Mohammad, E-mail: m.bahreini1990@gmail.com; Ramiar, Abas, E-mail: aramiar@nit.ac.ir; Ranjbar, Ali Akbar, E-mail: ranjbar@nit.ac.ir

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Condensing bubble is numerically investigated using VOF model in OpenFOAM package. • Bubble mass reduces as it goes through condensation and achieves higher velocities. • At a certain time the slope of changing bubble diameter with time, varies suddenly. • Larger bubbles experience more lateral migration to higher velocity regions. • Bubbles migrate back to a lower velocity region for higher liquid subcooling rates. - Abstract: In this paper, numerical simulation of the bubble condensation in the subcooled boiling flow is performed. The interface between two-phase is tracked via the volume of fluid (VOF) method with continuous surface force (CSF) model, implemented in the open source OpenFOAM CFD package. In order to simulate the condensing bubble with the OpenFOAM code, the original energy equation and mass transfer model for phase change have been modified and a new solver is developed. The Newtonian flow is solved using the finite volume scheme based on the pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) algorithm. Comparison of the simulation results with previous experimental data revealed that the model predicted well the behavior of the actual condensing bubble. The bubble lifetime is almost proportional to bubble initial size and is prolonged by increasing the system pressure. In addition, the initial bubble size, subcooling of liquid and velocity gradient play an important role in the bubble deformation behavior. Velocity gradient makes the bubble move to the higher velocity region and the subcooling rate makes it to move back to the lower velocity region.

  12. One-dimensional velocity profiles in open-channel flow with intense transport of coarse sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrostlík Štěpán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with laboratory experiments in open-channel flows with intense transport of model sediment (coarse plastic particles in our new tilting flume. The major objectives of the paper are: 1. to discuss applied measuring methods, 2. to analyze measured velocity profiles. Ad 1. A profile of the longitudinal component of local velocity was measured across the vertical axis of symmetry of a flume cross section using three independent measuring methods (Prandtl tube, Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler, Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler. Due to strong stratification of the flow in the flume, parts of the profile are measured in regions of very different local concentrations of sediment (from virtually zero concentration to the maximum concentration of bed packing. This makes measurements complicated, particularly for ultrasonic measuring techniques. Profiles measured using the different techniques are evaluated and mutually compared. Ad 2. The layered character of the flow causes that shapes of velocity profiles tend to be different in the transport layer (rich on transported particles above the bed and in the solids-free region between the top of the transport layer and the water surface. Shapes of the profiles are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the logarithmic profile in the solids-free region of the flow cross section. The profile can be handled using the law of the hydraulically-rough wall. In the law, the eroded top of the bed with the transport layer is supposed to be the rough boundary and appropriate values are sought for its variables.

  13. Simulating groundwater-surface water interactions in the Canadian Prairies using a coupled land-atmosphere model (ParFlow-CLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Canadian prairies are cold and dry. Surface depressions are ubiquitous, and contain permanent or ephemeral ponds. The ponds are filled by snowmelt and precipitation on the ponds and lose a significant portion of their water to evaporation, but also, depending on their landscape position, may spill to other ponds or channels, recharge groundwater, or received groundwater discharge. Since precipitation and actual evaporation are closely balanced, the pond water balances are very sensitive to change in climate, and the prairies in general have been subject to damaging floods and droughts, in particular in the last decade or two. A 2.25 km2 field site at St Denis, central Saskatchewan, contains over 100 ponds, some permanent, some ephemeral, some saline, some fresh, some recharging groundwater, some receiving groundwater discharge. The site has been extensively studied for almost 50 years, with about one decade of continuous meteorological data, and three years of detailed pond level, soil moisture and temperature, and groundwater data. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of PARFLOW-CLM (a coupled land-atmosphere model) in simulating the pond-groundwater interactions at this site. Our conceptual model of the site includes soil properties that are progressively weathered with depth, and we implement this in a simplified dual permeability mathematical model of the soil hydraulic properties, whereby storage is dominated by the matrix and flow is dominated by macropores. The model performance was surprisingly good, doing quite a good job of capturing the observed groundwater and pond level dynamics. The soil freezing regime is also captured reasonably well, though the timing and pattern of the zero degree isotherm during soil thaw, which is critically important for runoff generation processes, was not captured as well. The model provides credible insights into the spatial patterns of evapotranspiration, and the seasonal dynamics of subsurface

  14. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity of the ...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  15. MECHANISM AND PREDICTION OF MATERIAL ABRASION IN HIGH-VELOCITY SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xi-bin; YUAN Yin-zhong

    2006-01-01

    The wall surface of material is prone to silt abrasion by high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The silt abrasion is different form cavitation erosion. In this article, the characteristics of silt abrasion were discussed. The mechanism of silt abrasion was analyzed and the formation and development of ripple shape on wall surface of material were explained thereafter. Based on turbulence theory and test data, some formulas were derived for predicting the abrasion rate of concrete wall surface in high-velocity sediment-laden flow. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Fiber optic flow velocity sensor based on an in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai

    2008-04-01

    A novel fiber optic flow velocity sensor based on a twin-core fiber Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. The sensor only is a segment of twin-core fiber acting as cylinder cantilever beam. The force exerted on the cylinder by the flow of a fluid with unknown velocity bends the fiber, which corresponding to the shift of the phase of the twin-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer. This twin-core fiber sensing technique could automatically compensate the variation of environmental temperature and pressure due to both arms of the interferometer would be affected equally by such changes.

  17. MR velocity mapping measurement of renal artery blood flow in patients with impaired kidney function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M; Petersen, L.J.; Stahlberg, F

    1996-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in 9 patients with chronic impaired kidney function using MR velocity mapping and compared to PAH clearance and 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. An image plane suitable for flow measurement perpendicular to the renal arteries was chosen from 2-dimensional MR angiography...... by 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. A reduction of RBF was found, and there was a significant correlation between PAH clearance multiplied by 1/(1-hematocrit) and RBF determined by MR velocity mapping. Furthermore, a significant correlation between the distribution of renal function and the percent distribution...

  18. Transverse radius dependence for transverse velocity and elliptic flow in intermediate energy HIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ting-Zhi; LI Shan

    2011-01-01

    The mean transverse velocity and elliptic flow of light fragments (A≤2) as a function of transverse radius are studied for 25 MeV/nucleon Cu+Cu collisions with impact parameters 3-5 fm by the isospin- dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. By comparison between the in-plane and the out-of-plane transverse velocities, the elliptic flow dependence on the transverse radius can be understood qualitatively, and variation of the direction of the resultant force on the fragments can be investigated qualitatively.

  19. The Unsteady Fluctuating Pressure and Velocity in a Cross Flow Fan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaye Gan; Fei Liu; Min Liu; Keqi Wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the relations between the fluctuating pressure and velocity of the source by means of nu-merical method and sound pressure in the far field obtained with an noise experiment for a novel cross flow fan. The frequency characteristics of the fluctuating pressure and velocity in a cross flow fan are analyzed by means of spectral analysis and wavelet transform. The fluctuating pressures obtained by large eddy simulation on the cas-ing wall are compared with that of experiments and show good agreement. From the spectral analysis of sound source, it is found that the pressure fluctuating peak is correspond with the sound pressure in the far field.

  20. Surface ice flow velocity and tide retrieval of the amery ice shelf using precise point positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, X.H.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2006-01-01

    Five days of continuous GPS observation data were collected in the frontal zone of the Amery ice shelf and subsequently post-processed using precise point position (PPP) technology based on precise orbit and clock products from the International GNSS service. The surface ice flow velocity...... replace double-difference GPS positioning in remote or hostile environments, and be used to retrieve the surface ice flow velocity without any reference station. Furthermore, the solution can be derived epoch-by-epoch with accuracy in the centimeters to decimeter range....

  1. Determine of velocity field with PIV and CFD during the flow around of bridge piers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picka D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the processing of specific junior research FAST-J-11-51/1456 which dealt with physical and CFD of the velocity field during the flow around of bridge piers. Physical modelling has been carried out in Laboratory of water management research in Institute of Water Structures in Brno University of Technology – Faculty of Civil Engineering. To measure of the velocity field in profile of bridge piers were used laser measuring method PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry. The results of PIV served as a basis for comparing experimental data with CFD results of this type of flow in the commercial software ANSYS CFX.

  2. Measurement of Flow Velocity and Inference of Liquid Viscosity in a Microfluidic Channel by Fluorescence Photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Nick J.; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Parsa, Shima

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple, noninvasive method for simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and inference of liquid viscosity in a microfluidic channel. We track the dynamics of a sharp front of photobleached fluorescent dye using a confocal microscope and measure the intensity at a single point...... downstream of the initial front position. We fit an exact solution of the advection diffusion equation to the fluorescence intensity recovery curve to determine the average flow velocity and the diffusion coefficient of the tracer dye. The dye diffusivity is correlated to solute concentration to infer...

  3. Assessment of blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T quantitative flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvy, W H; Geurts, L J; Kuijf, H J; Luijten, P R; Kappelle, L J; Biessels, G J; Zwanenburg, J J M

    2016-09-01

    Thus far, blood flow velocity measurements with MRI have only been feasible in large cerebral blood vessels. High-field-strength MRI may now permit velocity measurements in much smaller arteries. The aim of this proof of principle study was to measure the blood flow velocity and pulsatility of cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T MRI. A two-dimensional (2D), single-slice quantitative flow (Qflow) sequence was used to measure blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycle in perforating arteries in the basal ganglia (BG) and semioval centre (CSO), from which a mean normalised pulsatility index (PI) per region was calculated (n = 6 human subjects, aged 23-29 years). The precision of the measurements was determined by repeated imaging and performance of a Bland-Altman analysis, and confounding effects of partial volume and noise on the measurements were simulated. The median number of arteries included was 14 in CSO and 19 in BG. In CSO, the average velocity per volunteer was in the range 0.5-1.0 cm/s and PI was 0.24-0.39. In BG, the average velocity was in the range 3.9-5.1 cm/s and PI was 0.51-0.62. Between repeated scans, the precision of the average, maximum and minimum velocity per vessel decreased with the size of the arteries, and was relatively low in CSO and BG compared with the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The precision of PI per region was comparable with that of M1. The simulations proved that velocities can be measured in vessels with a diameter of more than 80 µm, but are underestimated as a result of partial volume effects, whilst pulsatility is overestimated. Blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries have been measured directly in vivo for the first time, with moderate to good precision. This may be an interesting metric for the study of haemodynamic changes in aging and cerebral small vessel disease. © 2015 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. New experiment in Plane Poiseuille flow with zero mean advection velocity: observation of stationary turbulent spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Lukasz; Lemoult, Gregoire; Wesfreid, Jose Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We describe a new experimental set-up which allows us to study the sub-critical transition to turbulence in a two dimensional shear flow (including plane Couette, plane Couette-Poiseuille and plane Poiseuille flows). Our facility is an extension of a classical plane Couette experiment, in which one uses a single closed loop of plastic belt to generate the opposite sign velocity at each wall of the test section. However, in our case, we use two independent closed loops of plastic belt, one at each wall of the test section. The speed of these belts may be controlled separately. That enables to set two different velocities (in value and direction) as a boundary conditions at each of two test section's walls. In addition the pressure gradient in streamwise direction can be controlled. In particular, the plane Poiseuille flow with zero mean advection velocity can be created. We characterize by PIV the basic flow for different configurations. For a plane Poiseuille flows as base flow, we were able to observe for the first time the nearly stationary turbulent spots in this flow, with structures of characteristic wavelength ~ the distance between the two plates.

  5. An investigation of constant-pressure gas well testing influenced by high-velocity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, Sergio; Samaniego, Fernando; Cinco, Heber [PEMEX E and P and UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, Mexico (Mexico)

    1997-11-05

    This paper presents the results of a study of transient pressure analysis of gas flow under either constant bottom-hole pressure conditions or the constant wellhead pressure conditions. The effects of formation damage, wellbore storage and high-velocity flow are included in the model. The analysis of simulated well tests showed that the interpretation methods used for liquid flow are generally accurate when the m(p) is used. For these conditions, a graph of 1/q{sub D} vs. logt{sub D} presents gradually lower values of 1.1513 as the value of p{sub wf} decreases: for pressure buildup conditions, a graph of m{sub D}(1, {Delta}t{sub a{sub D}})/q{sub D}({Delta}t{sub a{sub D}}=0) vs. (t{sub a{sub D}}+{Delta}t{sub a{sub D}})/{Delta}t{sub a{sub D}} shows values of this slope within 1% of the 1.1513 value. However, when high-velocity flow influences constant pressure production tests, the slope can yield errors up to 13%. This upper limit occurs when the formation has a relatively `high` permeability (around 1 mD) and the rate performance test is affected by high-velocity flow. It was found that pressure buildup tests are superior to rate performance tests because high-velocity flow does not affect the slope of the straight line portion of the buildup curve. Derivative analysis of simulated buildup tests showed that the skin factor is considerably miscalculated when the high-velocity flow effect is significant. This problem could lead to errors in the calculation of the skin factor, s, up to 300%

  6. Impact of flow velocity on biochemical processes – a laboratory experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boisson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and predicting hydraulic and chemical properties of natural environments are current crucial challenges. It requires considering hydraulic, chemical and biological processes and evaluating how hydrodynamic properties impact on biochemical reactions. In this context, an original laboratory experiment to study the impact of flow velocity on biochemical reactions along a one-dimensional flow streamline has been developed. Based on the example of nitrate reduction, nitrate-rich water passes through plastic tubes at several flow velocities (from 6.2 to 35 mm min−1, while nitrate concentration at the tube outlet is monitored for more than 500 h. This experimental setup allows assessing the biologically controlled reaction between a mobile electron acceptor (nitrate and an electron donor (carbon coming from an immobile phase (tube that produces carbon during its degradation by microorganisms. It results in observing a dynamic of the nitrate transformation associated with biofilm development which is flow-velocity dependent. It is proposed that the main behaviors of the reaction rates are related to phases of biofilm development through a simple analytical model including assimilation. Experiment results and their interpretation demonstrate a significant impact of flow velocity on reaction performance and stability and highlight the relevance of dynamic experiments over static experiments for understanding biogeochemical processes.

  7. Hemodynamic Correlates of Late Systolic Flow Velocity Augmentation in the Carotid Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Heffernan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx. We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years. Forward waves ( and backward waves (negative area, NA were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/ = RIx. Additional parameters included which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx. Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included , logRIx , and AIx . FAIx was not associated with CCA stiffness . Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  8. Hemodynamic correlates of late systolic flow velocity augmentation in the carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years). Forward waves (W 1) and backward waves (negative area, NA) were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/W 1 = RIx). Additional parameters included W 2 which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx). Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included W 2 (r = - 0.52, P 0.05). Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle) and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  9. Volumetric vessel reconstruction method for absolute blood flow velocity measurement in Doppler OCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-02-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it not only relates to the properties of the laser and the scattering particles, but also relates to the geometry of both directions of the laser beam and the flow. In this paper, focusing on the analysis of cerebral hemodynamics, we presents a method to quantify the total absolute blood flow velocity in middle cerebral artery (MCA) based on volumetric vessel reconstruction from pure DOCT images. A modified region growing segmentation method is first used to localize the MCA on successive DOCT B-scan images. Vessel skeletonization, followed by an averaging gradient angle calculation method, is then carried out to obtain Doppler angles along the entire MCA. Once the Doppler angles are determined, the absolute blood flow velocity of each position on the MCA is easily found. Given a seed point position on the MCA, our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV. Based on experiments conducted using a swept-source optical coherence tomography system, our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches in the rodent brain.

  10. The Critical Flow back Velocity in Hydraulic-Fracturing Shale Gas Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The loss of prop pant during the flow back process in hydraulic fracturing treatments has been a problem for many years. The effectiveness of the fracture treatment is reduced. A well cleanup is often required to remove the unwanted proppant from the wellbore to re-establish production. Among several techniques available to reduce the prop pant loss, controlling flow back velocity within a critical range is an essential measure. The objective of this study is to determine the critical flow back velocity under different confining pressures in the propped fractures of different thicknesses. This objective is achieved based experimental studies conducted in a specially designed apparatus. For a fracture with a given width, the closure stress helps hold the proppant in place. This is due to the friction force that is proportional to the normal force created by the closure stress. The critical flow back velocity necessary to mobilize the proppant therefore increases with closure stress. However, the stress effect may be influenced by the shape of solid particles and friction coefficient of solid. Under the condition of constant closure stress, a narrow fracture holds proppant better than a wide fracture, resulting in increased critical flow back velocity. This is interpreted to be due to the “tighter” packing of proppant in narrow fractures.

  11. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo...... than circular, vessel area and correcting the ultrasound beam for being off-axis, gave a significant (p = 0.008) reduction in error from 31.2% to 24.3%. The error is relative to the Ultrasound Dilution Technique, which is considered the gold standard for volume flow estimation for dialysis patients....... This paper investigates errors from estimating volumetric flow using a commercial ultrasound scanner and the common assumptions made in the literature. The theoretical model shows, e.g. that volume flow is underestimated by 15%, when the scan plane is off-axis with the vessel center by 28% of the vessel...

  12. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  13. A new imaging tool for realtime measurement of flow velocity in intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios K. Petridis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With modern imaging modalities of the brain a significant number of unruptured aneurysms are detected. However, not every aneurysm is prone to rupture. Because treatment morbidity is about 10% it is crucial to identify unstable aneurysms for which treatment should be discussed. Recently, new imaging tools allow analysis of flow dynamics and wall stability have become available. It seems that they might provide additional data for better risk profiling. In this study we present a new imaging tool for analysis of flow dynamics, which calculates fluid velocity in an aneurysm (Phillips Electronics, N.V.. It may identify regions with high flow and calculate flow reduction after stenting of aneurysms. Contrast is injected with a stable injection speed of 2 mL/sec for 3 sec. Two clinical cases are illustrated. Velocity in aneurysms and areas of instability can be identified and calculated during angiography in real-time. After stenting and flow diverter deployment flow reduction in the internal carotid aneurysm was reduced by 60% and there was a reduction of about 65% in the posterior cerebral artery in the second case we are reporting. The dynamic flow software calculates the flow profile in the aneurysm immediately after contrast injection. It is a real-time, patient specific tool taking into account systole, diastole and flexibility of the vasculature. These factors are an improvement as compared to current models of computational flow dynamics. We think it is a highly efficient, user friendly tool. Further clinical studies are on their way.

  14. A New Imaging Tool for Realtime Measurement of Flow Velocity in Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Athanasios K; Kaschner, Marius; Cornelius, Jan F; Kamp, Marcel A; Tortora, Angelo; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Turowski, Bernd

    2017-06-07

    With modern imaging modalities of the brain a significant number of unruptured aneurysms are detected. However, not every aneurysm is prone to rupture. Because treatment morbidity is about 10% it is crucial to identify unstable aneurysms for which treatment should be discussed. Recently, new imaging tools allow analysis of flow dynamics and wall stability have become available. It seems that they might provide additional data for better risk profiling. In this study we present a new imaging tool for analysis of flow dynamics, which calculates fluid velocity in an aneurysm (Phillips Electronics, N.V.). It may identify regions with high flow and calculate flow reduction after stenting of aneurysms. Contrast is injected with a stable injection speed of 2 mL/sec for 3 sec. Two clinical cases are illustrated. Velocity in aneurysms and areas of instability can be identified and calculated during angiography in real-time. After stenting and flow diverter deployment flow reduction in the internal carotid aneurysm was reduced by 60% and there was a reduction of about 65% in the posterior cerebral artery in the second case we are reporting. The dynamic flow software calculates the flow profile in the aneurysm immediately after contrast injection. It is a real-time, patient specific tool taking into account systole, diastole and flexibility of the vasculature. These factors are an improvement as compared to current models of computational flow dynamics. We think it is a highly efficient, user friendly tool. Further clinical studies are on their way.

  15. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  16. Comparison of vertebral artery velocity and flow volume measurements for diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency using color duplex sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Murat [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, Kirmizi Hastane, 03200 Afyon (Turkey)]. E-mail: drmacar@hotmail.com; Degirmenci, Bumin [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, Kirmizi Hastane, 03200 Afyon (Turkey); Yucel, Aylin [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, Kirmizi Hastane, 03200 Afyon (Turkey); Albayrak, Ramazan [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, Kirmizi Hastane, 03200 Afyon (Turkey); Haktanir, Alpay [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, Kirmizi Hastane, 03200 Afyon (Turkey); Yaman, Mehmet [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Afyon Kocatepe University, 03200 Afyon (Turkey)

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the measurements of vertebral artery (VA) systolic flow velocity and flow volume for diagnosis of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI). Material and methods: We examined 96 patients who were referred for evaluation of VBI. Net vertebral artery flow volume and mean systolic flow velocity were determined by using color duplex sonography. We had grouped the patients into three according to VA flow volume: group 1 was consisted of patients with severely damped VA flow volume (lower than 120 mL/min), group 2 was consisted of patients with moderately damped VA flow volume (120-200 mL/min), group 3 was consisted of patients with normal VA flow volume (>200 mL/min). The mean systolic flow velocities in each group were compared by one-way ANOVA. Results: Mean VA systolic flow velocities of groups 1, 2 and 3 were 32 {+-} 12, 42 {+-} 10 and 46 {+-} 8 cm/s, respectively. Mean VA systolic flow velocity in group 1 was significantly lower than that of group 2 (P = 0.001). However, there were no significant differences between VA systolic flow velocities in groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.2). Conclusions: According to our findings, measurement of volume in addition to velocity is more valuable in detection of moderately damped VA flow volumes in diagnosis of VBI.

  17. Influence of Rough Flow over Sea Surface on Dry Atmospheric Deposition Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Meteorological model and a dry deposition module were used to estimate the effects of sea surface rough flow (SSRF over the sea surface on dry deposition velocities. The dry deposition turbulence resistance, Ra, and sub-layer resistance, Rb, decreased more than 10% and 5% due to SSRF, respectively. For example, for HNO3, the mean dry deposition velocities (Vd were 0.51 cm s-1 in January, 0.58 in April, 0.65 cm s-1 in July and 0.79 cm s-1 in October with only smooth flow over the sea surface. However, the SSRF increased the Vd of HNO3 by 5 - 20% in the east China seas. These results show that SSRF is an important factor in estimating surface roughness to further improve calculation of the dry deposition velocities over the ocean. Improvements in parameterization of sea roughness length will be a worthwhile effort in related future studies.

  18. Numerical Simulation on Supersonic Flow in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Hideki YAMAMOTO; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of coating particles as well as the gas flow both inside and outside of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun by using a quasi-one-dimensional analysis and a numerical simulation. The HVOF gun in the present analysis is an axially symmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0. From the present analysis, the distributions of velocity and temperature of the coating particles flying inside and outside of the HVOF gun are predicted. The velocity and temperature of the coating particles at the exit of the gun calculated by the present method agree well with the previous experimental results. Therefore, the present method of calculation is considered to be useful for predicting the HVOF gas and particle flows.

  19. Nonlinear output feedback control of underwater vehicle propellers using feedback form estimated axial flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, T.I.; Blanke, M.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate propeller shaft speed controllers can be designed by using nonlinear control theory and feedback from the axial water velocity in the propeller disc. In this paper, an output feedback controller is derived, reconstructing the axial flow velocity from vehicle speed measurements, using...... a three-state model of propeller shaft speed, forward (surge) speed of the vehicle, and the axial flow velocity. Lyapunov stability theory is used to prove that a nonlinear observer combined with an output feedback integral controller provide exponential stability. The output feedback controller...... compensates for variations in thrust due to time variations in advance speed. This is a major problem when applying conventional vehicle-propeller control systems, The proposed controller is simulated for an underwater vehicle equipped with a single propeller. The simulations demonstrate that the axial water...

  20. Observation of E×B Flow Velocity Profile Change Using Doppler Reflectometry in HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Wei-Wen; ZOU Xiao-Lan; DING Xuan-Tong; DONG Jia-Qi; LIU Ze-Tian; SONG Shao-Dong; GAO Ya-Dong; YAO Liang-Hua; FENG Bei-Bin; SONG Xian-Ming; CHEN Cheng-Yuan; SUN Hong-Juan; LI Yong-Gao; YANG Qing-Wei; YAN Long-Wen; LIU Yi; DUAN Xu-Ru; PAN Chuan-Hong; LIU Yong

    2009-01-01

    A broadband,O-mode sweeping Doppler reflectometry designed for measuring plasma E×B flow velocity profiles is operated in HL-2A.The main feature of the Doppler reflectometry is its capability to be tuned to any selected frequency in total waveband from 26-40 GHz.This property enables us to probe several plasma layers within a short time interval during a discharge,permitting the characterization of the radial distribution of plasma fluctuations.The system allows us to extract important information about the velocity change layer,namely its spatial localization.In purely Ohmic discharge a change of the E×B flow velocity profiles has been observed in the region for 28 < r < 30cm if only the line average density exceeds 2.2×1019 m-3.The density gradient change is measured in the same region,too.

  1. Curved ducts with strong secondary motion - Velocity measurements of developing laminar and turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1982-01-01

    Two orthogonal components of velocity and associated Reynolds stresses are determined in a square-sectioned, 90 degree bend of 2.3 radius ratio by utilizing laser-Doppler velocimetry for Reynolds numbers of 790 and 40,000. Results show that boundary layers at the bend inlet of 0.25 and 0.15 of the hydraulic diameter create secondary velocity maxima of 0.6 and 0.4 of the bulk flow velocity, respectively. It is concluded that the boundary layer thickness is important to the flow development, mainly in the first half of the bend, especially when it is reduced to 0.15 of the hydraulic diameter. Smaller secondary velocities are found for turbulent flow in an identical duct with a radius ratio of 7.0 than in the strongly curved bend, although their effect is more important to the streamwise flow development because of the smaller pressure gradients. In addition, the detail and accuracy of the measurements make them suitable for evaluation of numerical techniques and turbulence models.

  2. Intracoronary Blood Flow Velocity and Transstenotic Pressure Drop in an Awake Human Being During Coronary Vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Zijlstra (Felix); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe pressure drop over a coronary stenosis and the intracoronary Doppler blood flow velocity were measured at rest and during coronary vasodilation. We report the first observation that confirms the validity of fluid dynamic equations to describe the hemodynamics of a coronary stenosis b

  3. Measurements of solids concentration and axial solids velocity in gas-solid two-phase flows.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwland, J.J.; Meijer, R.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several techniques reported in the literature for measuring solids concentration and solids velocity in (dense) gas-solid two-phase flow have been briefly reviewed. An optical measuring system, based on detection of light reflected by the suspended particles, has been developed to measure local soli

  4. Real-Time GPU Implementation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradway, David; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    , Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex...

  5. Constitutive Curve and Velocity Profile in Entangled Polymers during Start-Up of Steady Shear Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2010-05-11

    Time-dependent shear stress versus shear rate, constitutive curve, and velocity profile measurements are reported in entangled polymer solutions during start-up of steady shear flow. By combining confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we determine the time-dependent velocity profile in polybutadiene and polystyrene solutions seeded with fluorescent 150 nm silica and 7.5 μm melamine particles. By comparing these profiles with time-dependent constitutive curves obtained from experiment and theory, we explore the connection between transient nonmonotonic regions in the constitutive curve for an entangled polymer and its susceptibility to unstable flow by shear banding [Adams et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 102, 067801-4]. Surprisingly, we find that even polymer systems which exhibit transient, nonmonotonic shear stress-shear rate relationships in bulk rheology experiments manifest time-dependent velocity profiles that are decidedly linear and show no evidence of unstable flow. We also report that interfacial slip plays an important role in the steady shear flow behavior of entangled polymers at shear rates above the reciprocal terminal relaxation time but has little, if any, effect on the shape of the velocity profile. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Measurement of Plasma Ion Temperature and Flow Velocity from Chord-Averaged Emission Line Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xu Wei

    2011-03-01

    The distinction between Doppler broadening and Doppler shift has been analysed, the differences between Gaussian fitting and the distribution of chord-integral line shape have also been discussed. Local ion temperature and flow velocity have been derived from the chord-averaged emission line profile by a chosen-point Gaussian fitting technique.

  7. Blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein using transverse oscillation ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Holbek, Simon; Lönn, Lars; Strandberg, Charlotte; Bækgaard, Niels; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition leading to varicose veins, leg edema, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcerations. Ultrasound (US) is the main modality for examination of venous disease. Color Doppler and occasionally spectral Doppler US (SDUS) are used for evaluation of the venous flow. Peak velocities measured by SDUS are rarely used in a clinical setting for evaluating chronic venous disease due to inadequate reproducibility mainly caused by the angle dependency of the estimate. However, estimations of blood velocities are of importance in characterizing venous disease. Transverse Oscillation US (TOUS), a non-invasive angle independent method, has been implemented on a commercial scanner. TOUS's advantage compared to SDUS is a more elaborate visualization of complex flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether TOUS perform equal to SDUS for recording velocities in the veins of the lower limbs. Four volunteers were recruited for the study. A standardized flow was provoked with a cuff compression-decompression system placed around the lower leg. The average peak velocity in the popliteal vein of the four volunteers was 151.5 cm/s for SDUS and 105.9 cm/s for TOUS (p measures for the evaluation of venous blood flow.

  8. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON VELOCITY PROFILE OF SUBMERGED ABRASIVE SUSPENSION JET FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Abrasive jet cutting, as a more efficient machining or cutting method, has emerged in recent years in mining and machining industries, but the knowledge about velocity profile of abrasive jet flow lacks in general. In practice, the Polyacrylamide (PAM) is generally applied to jet fluid to increase the suspension of the abrasive particles. Also, the effects of PAM on jet flow are not very clear. In this paper, velocity fields of both the abrasive particles and the fluid were systematically studied with the PIV technology. The slip velocity between the abrasive particle and the surrounding fluid was subtracted out to give a further description of abrasive suspension jet. The effects of polymer PAM on both the fluid flow and the movement of the suspending abrasive particles were also measured. And it is found that the PAM is a proper type of additive to improve velocity fields for both the abrasive particles and the fluid in a jet. The results of the PIV measurement can help give a better understanding about the basic physics of abrasive suspension jet flow, and a good guidance to validate and develop reliable computational models to describe the jet.

  10. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to e

  11. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of a non-isothermal turbulentchannel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The particles inertia is varied by changingthe particles diameter. The density of particles is kept constant. A two-way coupled...

  12. Rizatriptan does not change cerebral blood flow velocity during migraine attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, S; Morelli, N; Bellini, G; Bonanni, E; Manca, L; Orlandi, G; Iudice, A; Murri, L

    2005-04-30

    Rizatriptan represents a major advance in the treatment of migraine attack: inhibition of peripheral trigeminal nerve and constriction of intracranial extracerebral blood vessels have been proposed as its main antimigraine mechanisms of action. Although many studies may suggest that rizatriptan causes highly selective vasoconstriction within intracranial extracerebral vessels (i.e., meningeal arteries), no literature data are available to date on possible cerebral hemodynamic changes in humans after treatment with rizatriptan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of rizatriptan on cerebral blood flow velocity performing transcranial Doppler during spontaneous attacks of migraine without aura. Fourteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were monitored to evaluate mean flow velocity changes on both middle cerebral arteries during migraine attack 30 min before and 120 min after oral administration of rizatriptan 10mg. Monitoring was repeated for 30 min during the pain-free period. All patients turned out to be drug responders and no significant mean flow velocity changes were observed between the pain-free period and pre-treatment phase; besides no significant difference in mean flow velocity value have been detected between the periods after the drug administration during the attack versus both pre-treatment period and pain-free phase. These findings indicate that the antimigraine action of rizatriptan is not associated with clear intracranial cerebral hemodynamic changes and may support its cerebrovascular safety.

  13. Finite element simulation of internal flows with heat transfer using a velocity correction approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Varaprasad Patnaik; Y T K Gowda; M S Ravisankar; P A Aswatha Narayana; K N Seetharamu

    2001-06-01

    This paper enumerates finite-element based prediction of internal flow problems, with heat transfer. The present numerical simulations employ a velocity correction algorithm, with a Galerkin weighted residual formulation. Two problems each in laminar and turbulent flow regimes are investigated, by solving full Navier-Stokes equations. Flow over a backward-facing step is studied with extensive validations. The robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated by solving a very complex problem viz. a disk and doughnut baffled heat exchanger, which has several obstructions in its flow path. The effect of wall conductivity in turbulent heat transfer is also studied by performing a conjugate analysis. Temporal evolution of flow in a channel due to circular, square and elliptic obstructions is investigated, to simulate the vortex dynamics. Flow past an in-line tube bank of a heat exchanger shell is numerically studied. Resulting heat and fluid flow patterns are analysed. Important design parameters of interest such as the Nusselt number, Strouhal number, skin friction coefficient, pressure drop etc. are obtained. It is successfully demonstrated that the velocity correction approach with a Galerkin weighted residual formulation is able to effectively simulate a wide range of fluid flow features.

  14. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelio E. Ramírez-Miquet

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optical feedback interferometry (OFI is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel.

  15. Velocity statistics in holographic fluids: magnetized quark-gluon plasma and superfluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areán, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805, Munich (Germany); Zayas, Leopoldo A. Pando [The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics,Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Michigan,450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patiño, Leonardo; Villasante, Mario [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,A.P. 70-542, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2016-10-28

    We study the velocity statistics distribution of an external heavy particle in holographic fluids. We argue that when the dual supergravity background has a finite temperature horizon the velocity statistics goes generically as 1/v, compatible with the jet-quenching intuition from the quark-gluon plasma. A careful analysis of the behavior of the classical string whose apparent world sheet horizon deviates from the background horizon reveals that other regimes are possible. We numerically discuss two cases: the magnetized quark-gluon plasma and a model of superfluid flow. We explore a range of parameters in these top-down supergravity solutions including, respectively, the magnetic field and the superfluid velocity. We determine that the velocity statistics goes largely as 1/v, however, as we leave the non-relativistic regime we observe some deviations.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Viscous Flow Velocity Field around a Marine Cavitating Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Zhu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Velocity field around a ship cavitating propeller is investigated based on the viscous multiphase flow theory. Using a hybrid grid, the unsteady Navier-stokes (N-S and the bubble dynamics equations are solved in this paper to predict the velocity in a propeller wake and the vapor volume fraction on the back side of propeller blade for a uniform inflow. Compared with experimental results, the numerical predictions of cavitation and axial velocity coincide with the measured data. The evolution of tip vortex is shown, and the interaction between the tip vortex of the current blade and the wake of the next one occurs in the far propeller wake. The frequency of velocity signals changes from shaft rate to blade rate. The phenomena reflect the instability of propeller wake.

  17. Correlation of Spherical Thermistor for the Measurement of Low Velocity Air Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-GangLiang; Ying-PingZhang; 等

    1998-01-01

    A spherical thermistor,an accurate temperature sensor is employed as an air velocity sensor in this work.The measuring principle is derived and the effects of the insulation layer,air temperature,netural convection and thermal radiation are discussed.Two different correlation relations for velocity measurements are proposed based on theoretical analyses and experimental calibrations,Experiments have shown that spherical thermistor is a good velocity sensor for speed between 0.1-2.5m/s at room temperature and the insulation layer hardly influences the accuracy of the thermistor used in the present work,Modification of correlation can even further imporve measurement accuracy.Since the thermistor is small and cheap,it is possible to apply this method to multi-Point velocity measurement with a low disturbance to the flow field.

  18. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  19. Groundwater–Surface Water Exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karan, Sachin

    The exchange of groundwater-surface water has been invetigated in the western part of Denmark. Holtum AA provides the framework for all the performed investigations. Several methods are used, primarily eld based measurements ombined with numerical models to achieve insight to the governing...... processes of interaction between groundwater and surface water. By using heat as a tracer it has been possible to use temperature directly as calibrationtargets in a groundwater and heat transport model. Thus, it is possible to use heat investigate the change in groundwater discharge in dynamic conditions...... by using simple temperature devices along a stream to delineate the areas of interest in regard to GW{SW exchange. Thus, at several locations in a stream a temperature data logger was placed in the water column and right at the streambed-water interface. By looking at the correlation of streambed...

  20. Increased Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity in Children with Mild Sleep-Disordered Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Catherine M.; Hogan, Alexandra M.; Onugha, Nwanneka; Harrison, Dawn; Cooper, Sara; McGrigor, Victoria J.; Datta, Avijit; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Sleep-disordered breathing describes a spectrum of upper airway obstruction in sleep from simple primary snoring, estimated to affect 10% of preschool children, to the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea. Emerging evidence has challenged previous assumptions that primary snoring is benign. A recent report identified reduced attention and higher levels of social problems and anxiety/depressive symptoms in snoring children compared with controls. Uncertainty persists regarding clinical thresholds for medical or surgical intervention in sleep-disordered breathing, underlining the need to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. Adults with sleep-disordered breathing have an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease independent of atherosclerotic risk factors. There has been little focus on cerebrovascular function in children with sleep-disordered breathing, although this would seem an important line of investigation, because studies have identified abnormalities of the systemic vasculature. Raised cerebral blood flow velocities on transcranial Doppler, compatible with raised blood flow and/or vascular narrowing, are associated with neuropsychological deficits in children with sickle cell disease, a condition in which sleep-disordered breathing is common. We hypothesized that there would be cerebral blood flow velocity differences in sleep-disordered breathing children without sickle cell disease that might contribute to the association with neuropsychological deficits. Design Thirty-one snoring children aged 3 to 7 years were recruited from adenotonsillectomy waiting lists, and 17 control children were identified through a local Sunday school or as siblings of cases. Children with craniofacial abnormalities, neuromuscular disorders, moderate or severe learning disabilities, chronic respiratory/cardiac conditions, or allergic rhinitis were excluded. Severity of sleep-disordered breathing in snoring children was categorized by attended

  1. The respective roles of bulk friction and slip velocity during a granular mass flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic granular mass flows form an important natural hazard. Mitigation has motivated numerous studies on the properties of natural granular flows, and in particular, their ability to travel long distances away from the release point. The mobility of granular flows is commonly characterised through the definition of rheological properties and effective friction. Yet, it is widely accepted that the description in term of effective friction may include various lubrication effects, softening at the base of the flow and large slip velocities being a most likely one. In this case, flow bulk properties may obliterate the flow boundary conditions. In this contribution, we investigate how disentangling bulk properties from boundary conditions may improve our understanding of the flow. Using discrete simulations, we induce increasing slip velocities in different flow configurations. We show that increased mobility may be achieved without changing bulk properties. The results are interpreted in terms of a Robin-Navier slip condition and implemented in a continuum Navier-Stokes solver. We quantify the respective role of rheological bulk properties and boundary conditions in the general behaviour of a transient mass flow. We show that omitting the description of boundary conditions leads to misinterpretation of the flow properties. The outcome is discussed in terms of models reliability. References P.-Y. Lagrée et al, The granular column collapse as a continuum: validity of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes model with the mu(I) rheology, J. Fluid Mech. 686, 378-408 (2011) L. Staron and E. Lajeunesse, Understanding how the volume affects the mobility of dry debris flows, Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L12402 (2009) L. Staron, Mobility of long-runout rock flows: a discrete numerical investigation, Geophys. J. Int. 172, 455-463 (2008)

  2. Investigation of the Velocity Field and Flow Regime of David Glacier and Drygalski Ice Tongue, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuite, J.; Jezek, K. C.

    2005-12-01

    Recent observations of outlet glaciers in both Greenland and Antarctica show surprising and unexpectedly rapid changes in flow velocities. Outlet glaciers drain the majority of the polar ice sheets and consequently these changes threaten their stability and can lead to rising sea levels. It is therefore important to investigate their flow governing processes and document changes. We measured surface velocity over large portions of David Glacier and its floating seaward extension Drygalski Ice Tongue. This is the largest outlet glacier on the Scott Coast draining a section of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet into the Ross Sea. Giant iceberg B15-A recently collided with the ice tongue and broke off a significant section. To obtain velocities we used combinations of intensity feature tracking, interferometric speckle tracking and phase interferometry using RADARSAT-1 images acquired during the AMM-1 and MAMM missions. We compare short term velocities, 3-year averaged velocities and earlier studies to analyze spatial and temporal variability of the surface velocity field. We use obtained velocities, in combination with isostatically derived ice thickness from ICESat data, to estimate basal melting along the glacier. Also we investigate the role of lateral drag through force-budget theory and determine the equilibrium profile of the ice tongue. Unlike for example the West Antarctic Ice Streams and Jakobshavn Isbrae, our data suggests that the David Glacier velocity field has remained relatively constant from about 1991 - 2000 and likely much longer. The pattern of melting and freezing along the base of the glacier is consistent with an ice pump mechanism. In the fjord lateral drag opposes approximately 90% of the driving stress; this gradually drops to the point where most resistance comes from longitudinal stress gradients. We find the modeled and ICESat derived profile agree favorably suggesting steady state conditions

  3. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  4. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N. Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s, flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s, and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s. Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s than with force (3.56 cm/s. A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression.

  5. Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over typical underlying surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over Gobi and mobile sand surface have been investigated experimentally in the wind tunnel. The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the relation- ship between pulsatory characteristics of instantaneous wind speed in sand flow and the motion state of sand grains. For a given underlying surface, pulsation of wind velocities in sand flow on different heights has a good correlation. As the space distance among different heights increases, fluctuation of instantaneous wind speed presents a decreasing trend and its amplitude is closely related to the mo- tion state of sand grains and their transport. Pulsatory intensity increases with the indicated wind speed, but its relative value does not depend on it, only agrees with height.

  6. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  7. Velocity-coupled flow oscillations in a simulated solid-propellant rocket environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Vigor; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Tseng, Jesse I. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical analysis has been carried out to study the unsteady flowfields in a simulated rocket-motor environment. The model is based on the time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a two-equation turbulence closure scheme. Various important aspects of the coupling between acoustic oscillations and mean flowfields, including flow reversal, modification of transport properties, etc., are addressed. Results indicate that multi-dimensional effects play important roles in determining local flow structures and wave characteristics. In much of the domain, acoustic velocity nodal points are observed in the near-wall region. The classical one-dimensional theory fails to describe several important mechanisms associated with velocity-induced flow instabilities.

  8. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharf Abdusalam M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig and computational (employing CFD software investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  9. A comparison of measured and modeled velocity fields for a laminar flow in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, B. D.; Apte, S. V.; Liburdy, J. A.; Ziazi, R. M.; He, X.; Finn, J. R.; Patil, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining highly-resolved velocity data from experimental measurements in porous media is a significant challenge. The goal of this work is to compare the velocity fields measured in a randomly-packed porous medium obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) with corresponding fields predicted from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Experimentally, the porous medium was comprised of 15 mm diameter spherical beads made of optical glass placed in a glass flow cell to create the packed bed. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate was refractive-index matched to the glass creating a medium that could be illuminated with a laser sheet without distortion. The bead center locations were quantified using the imaging system so that the geometry of the porous medium was known very accurately. Two-dimensional PIV data were collected and processed to provide high-resolution velocity fields at a single plane within the porous medium. A Cartesian-grid-based fictitious domain approach was adopted for the direct numerical simulation of flow through the same geometry as the experimental measurements and without any adjustable parameters. The uncertainties associated with characterization of the pore geometry, PIV measurements, and DNS predictions were all systematically quantified. Although uncertainties in bead position measurements led to minor discrepancies in the comparison of the velocity fields, the axial and normal velocity deviations exhibited normalized root mean squared deviations (NRMSD) of only 11.32% and 4.74%, respectively. The high fidelity of both the experimental and numerical methods have significant implications for understanding and even for engineering the micro-macro relationship in porous materials. The ability to measure and model sub-pore-scale flow features also has relevance to the development of upscaled models for flow in porous media, where physically reasonable closure models must be developed at the sub-pore scale. These results provide valuable data

  10. Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve in Burn Injury: A Prospective Clinical Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Mustafa; Turk, Emin; Karagulle, Erdal; Ciftci, Ozgur; Oguz, Hakan; Kostek, Osman; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to evaluate coronary microvascular function and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography in burn patients. In this study, 32 adult burn patients with partial or full-thickness scald burns that were hospitalized and treated were included. The control group was matched for age and sex and was composed of otherwise healthy volunteers. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for cardiac evaluation were performed on the sixth month after burn injury as well as with the control group. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in the burn patients than in controls (5.17 ± 3.86 vs 2.42 ± 1.78; P = .001). Lateral isovolumic relaxation time was significantly higher in the burn injury group than in the control group (92.7 ± 15.7 vs 85.5 ± 8.3; P = .03). Baseline coronary diastolic peak flow velocity of the left anterior descending artery was similar in both groups. However, hyperemic diastolic peak flow velocity and coronary flow velocity reserve (2.26 ± 0.48 vs 2.94 ± 0.47; P < .001) were significantly lower in the burn injury group than in the control group. Coronary flow velocity reserve was significantly and inversely correlated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, burn ratio, creatinine, and mitral A-wave max velocity. At the sixth month of treatment, burn patients had high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels during this period, suggesting that inflammation still exists. In addition, subclinical coronary microvascular and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction can occur in burn patients without traditional cardiovascular risk factors. However, these results must be supported by additional studies.

  11. VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN TRAPEZOID-SECTION OPEN CHANNEL FLOW WITH A NEW REYNOLDS-STRESS EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zheng

    2003-01-01

    By considering that the coherent structure is the main cause of the Reynolds stress, a new Reynolds stress expression was given. On this basis the velocity distribution in the trapezoid-section open channel flow was worked out with the pseudo-spectral method. The results were compared with experimental data and the influence of the ratio of length to width of the cross-section and the lateral inclination on the velocity distribution was analyzed. This model can be used the large flux in rivers and open channes.

  12. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  13. Sanitary quality of surface water during base-flow conditions in the Municipality of Caguas, Puerto Rico, 2014–15: A comparison with results from a similar 1997–99 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Jesús; Guzmán-Ríos, Senén

    2017-06-26

    A study was conducted in 2014–15 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Municipality of Caguas, to determine if changes in the stream sanitary quality during base-flow conditions have occurred since 1997–99, when a similar study was completed by the USGS. Water samples were collected for the current study during two synoptic surveys in 2014 and 2015. Water samples were analyzed for fecal and total coliform bacteria, nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, and human health and pharmaceutical products. Water sampling occurred at 39 stream locations used during the 1997–99 study by the USGS and at 11 additional sites. A total of 151 stream miles were classified on the basis of fecal and total coliform bacteria results.The overall spatial pattern of the sanitary quality of surface water during 2014–15 is similar to the pattern observed in 1997–99 in relation to the standards adopted by the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board in 1990. Surface water at most of the water-sampling sites exceeded the current standard for fecal coliform of 200 colonies per 100 milliliters adopted by the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board in 2010. The poorest sanitary quality was within the urban area of the Municipality of Caguas, particularly in urban stream reaches of Río Caguitas and in rural and suburban reaches bordered by houses in high density that either have inadequate septic tanks or discharge domestic wastewater directly into the stream channels. The best sanitary quality occurred in areas having little or no human development, such as in the wards of San Salvador and Beatriz to the south and southwest of Caguas, respectively. The concentration of nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen ranged from 0.02 to 9.0 milligrams per liter, and did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standard for nitrate as nitrogen of 10 milligrams per liter. The composition of nitrogen and oxygen

  14. Real-time GPU implementation of transverse oscillation vector velocity flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradway, David Pierson; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Kjær, Carsten Straso; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-03-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work, Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner's built-in processing, it enables new opportunities for prototyping novel algorithms, optimizing processing parameters, and accelerating the path from development lab to clinic.

  15. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  16. Velocity measurements of flow through a step stenosis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, K. W.; Kutter, E. C.; Georgiadis, J. G.; Buckius, R. O.; Morris, H. D.; Torczynski, J. R.

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a versatile noninvasive tool for achieving full-field quantitative visualization of complex fluid flows. The MRI signal results from the interaction of radio-frequency (RF) pulses with nuclear spins exposed to a strong static magnetic field. The two main techniques of MRI velocimetry are time-of-flight and phase contrast techniques. Time-of- flight techniques involve tagging and tracking a material volume of fluid, whereas phase contrast techniques use magnetic field gradients to encode velocity information into the phase of the MRI signal. In this study, both techniques are used to probe the pressure-driven steady flow of water in a pipe with a step stenosis. The velocity measurements were then compared with computational results obtained using the FIDAP software package. The experiments show that the phase contrast method gives more accurate results, with 90% of the measurements within 10% of the local computational fluid dynamics (CFD) velocity predictions at Re=100 and 94% of the measurements within 10% of the local CFD predictions at Re=258. Although the time-of-flight experiments were not as accurate, they provide a good qualitative image of the flow field. Sources of the discrepancies between the MRI data and the CFD results are also discussed, including acceleration and spin flow-through artifacts.

  17. Velocity measurements of flow through a step stenosis using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, K.W.; Kutter, E.C.; Georgiadis, J.G.; Buckius, R.O. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Morris, H.D. [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2100 South Goodwin Avenue Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Torczynski, J.R. [Engineering Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0834 (United States)

    2000-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a versatile noninvasive tool for achieving full-field quantitative visualization of complex fluid flows. The MRI signal results from the interaction of radio-frequency (RF) pulses with nuclear spins exposed to a strong static magnetic field. The two main techniques of MRI velocimetry are time-of-flight and phase contrast techniques. Time-of- flight techniques involve tagging and tracking a material volume of fluid, whereas phase contrast techniques use magnetic field gradients to encode velocity information into the phase of the MRI signal. In this study, both techniques are used to probe the pressure-driven steady flow of water in a pipe with a step stenosis. The velocity measurements were then compared with computational results obtained using the FIDAP software package. The experiments show that the phase contrast method gives more accurate results, with 90% of the measurements within 10% of the local computational fluid dynamics (CFD) velocity predictions at Re=100 and 94% of the measurements within 10% of the local CFD predictions at Re=258. Although the time-of-flight experiments were not as accurate, they provide a good qualitative image of the flow field. Sources of the discrepancies between the MRI data and the CFD results are also discussed, including acceleration and spin flow-through artifacts. (orig.)

  18. Surface velocity divergence model of air/water interfacial gas transfer in open-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjou, M.; Nezu, I.; Okamoto, T.

    2017-04-01

    Air/water interfacial gas transfer through a free surface plays a significant role in preserving and restoring water quality in creeks and rivers. However, direct measurements of the gas transfer velocity and reaeration coefficient are still difficult, and therefore a reliable prediction model needs to be developed. Varying systematically the bulk-mean velocity and water depth, laboratory flume experiments were conducted and we measured surface velocities and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in open-channel flows to reveal the relationship between DO transfer velocity and surface divergence (SD). Horizontal particle image velocimetry measurements provide the time-variations of surface velocity divergence. Positive and negative regions of surface velocity divergence are transferred downstream in time, as occurs in boil phenomenon on natural river free-surfaces. The result implies that interfacial gas transfer is related to bottom-situated turbulence motion and vertical mass transfer. The original SD model focuses mainly on small-scale viscous motion, and this model strongly depends on the water depth. Therefore, we modify the SD model theoretically to accommodate the effects of the water depth on gas transfer, introducing a non-dimensional parameter that includes contributions of depth-scale large-vortex motion, such as secondary currents, to surface renewal events related to DO transport. The modified SD model proved effective and reasonable without any dependence on the bulk mean velocity and water depth, and has a larger coefficient of determination than the original SD model. Furthermore, modeling of friction velocity with the Reynolds number improves the practicality of a new formula that is expected to be used in studies of natural rivers.

  19. Limitations of fibre optic distributed temperature sensing for quantifying surface water groundwater interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Roshan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of surface water–groundwater interactions using fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS has increased in recent years. However, only a few studies to date have explored the limitations of FO-DTS in detecting groundwater discharge to streams. A FO_DTS system was therefore tested in a flume under controlled laboratory conditions for its ability to accurately measure the discharge of hot or cold groundwater into a simulated surface water flow. In the experiment the surface water (SW and groundwater (GW velocities, expressed as ratios (vgw/vsw, were varied from 0.21% to 61.7%; temperature difference between SW-GW were varied from 2 to 10 °C; the direction of temperature gradient were varied with both cold and-hot water injection; and two different bed materials were used to investigate their effects on FO_DTS's detection limit of groundwater discharge. The ability of the FO_DTS system to detect the discharge of groundwater of a different temperature in the laboratory environment was found to be mainly dependent upon the surface and groundwater flow velocities and their temperature difference. A correlation was proposed to estimate the groundwater discharge from temperature. The correlation is valid when the ratio of the apparent temperature response to the source temperature difference is above 0.02.

  20. Multiple critical velocities in oscillatory flow of superfluid 4He due to quartz tuning forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoranzer, D.; Jackson, M. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Človečko, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-12-01

    We report recent investigations into the transition to turbulence in superfluid 4He, realized experimentally by measuring the drag forces acting on two custom-made quartz tuning forks with fundamental resonances at 6.5 kHz and 55.5 kHz, in the temperature range 10 mK to 2.17 K. In pure superfluid in the zero temperature limit, three distinct critical velocities were observed with both tuning forks. We discuss the significance of all critical velocities and associate the third critical velocity reported here with the development of large vortical structures in the flow, which thus starts to mimic turbulence in classical fluids. The interpretation of our results is directly linked to previous experimental work with oscillators such as tuning forks, grids, and vibrating wires, focusing on the behavior of purely superfluid 4He at very low temperatures.

  1. Velocity distribution of flow with submerged flexible vegetations based on mixing-length approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-xin HUAI; Jie HAN; Yu-hong ZENG; Xiang AN; Zhong-dong QIAN

    2009-01-01

    By choosing a PVC slice to simulate flexible vegetation, we carried out ex-periments in an open channel with submerged flexible vegetation. A 3D acoustic Doppler velocimeter (micro ADV) was used to measure local flow velocities and Reynolds stress. The results show that hydraulic characteristics in non-vegetation and vegetation layers are totally different. In a region above the vegetation, Reynolds stress distribution is linear, and the measured velocity profile is a classical logarithmic one. Based on the concept of new-riverbed, the river compression parameter representing the impact of vegetation on river is given, and a new assumption of mixing length expression is made. The formula for time-averaged velocity derived from the expression requires less parameters and simple calculation, and is useful in applications.

  2. Tangential Velocity Profile for Axial Flow Through Two Concentric Rotating Cylinders with Radial Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girishwar Nath

    1970-10-01

    Full Text Available A closed form solution of the Navier-Stokes equations has been obtained in the case of steady axisymmetric flow of an incompressible electrically conducting viscous fluid between two concentric rotating cylinders composed of an insulating material under the influence of radial magnetic field. It has been found that the velocity components are less than those of the classical hydrodynamic case. In the presence of the magnetic field, the tangential velocity becomes fully developed in a smaller axial distance than in the absence of the magnetic field. For small Reynolds number, the fully developed tangential velocity is achieved in a small axial distance, but it requires greater axial distance for large Reynolds number.

  3. Numerical simulations of leading-edge vortex core axial velocity for flow over delta wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the characteristics of leading-edge vortex core axial velocity over two delta wings with leading edge swept angles Λ =50°and 76°, respectively. It is obtained that Reynolds number has the most important effect on the axial velocity of the primary leading-edge vortex core. At Reynolds numbers larger than 105, the jet-like flow of the vortex core is the most common type for both the large and the moderate swept delta wings. While if Reynolds number decreases to 103―104, the core axial velocity distributions for these two delta wings present the wake-like profile for all angles of attack considered in the present investigation.

  4. The effects of non-uniform flow velocity on vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotube conveying fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem [Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Mohammad [Sirjan University of Technology, Sirjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    The vibrational behavior of a viscous nanoflow-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated. The nonuniformity of the flow velocity distribution caused by the viscosity of fluid and the small-size effects on the flow field was considered. Euler-Bernoulli beam model was used to investigate flow-induced vibration of the nanotube, while the non-uniformity of the flow velocity and the small-size effects of the flow field were formulated through Knudsen number (Kn), as a discriminant parameter. For laminar flow in a circular nanotube, the momentum correction factor was developed as a function of Kn. For Kn = 0 (continuum flow), the momentum correction factor was found to be 1.33, which decreases by the increase in Kn may even reach near 1 for the transition flow regime. We observed that for passage of viscous flow through a nanotube with the non-uniform flow velocity, the critical continuum flow velocity for divergence decreased considerably as opposed to those for the uniform flow velocity, while by increasing Kn, the difference between the uniform and non-uniform flow models may be reduced. In the solution part, the differential transformation method (DTM) was used to solve the governing differential equations of motion.

  5. [Intracranial blood flow velocities evaluated by color Doppler (duplex) in preterm infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Marcelo Cardoso; Machado, Helio Rubens

    2004-03-01

    In order to ascertain the blood flow velocities in the intracranial arteries we evaluated 73 preterm neonates during a period ranging from June 1994 to March 1999. These preterm infants were divided in two separate groups, 18 healthy and 55 with intracranial hemorrhage. They were subjected to sequential measurements of blood flow velocities in the intracranial arteries. The gestational age of the whole group varied from 28 to 36 weeks and birth weights between 720 and 2530 g. The diagnosis of the intracerebral hemorrhages in these preterm neonates were done using high resolution gray and color scale transfontanellar ultrasonography brain scans. The ultrasound evaluations were performed in the initial 3rd, 7th and 14th day of life. The 73 preterm infants were evaluated with sequential measurements of blood flow velocity in the intracranial arteries using the Doppler technique through the anterior fontanelle. Doppler evaluation of the cerebral vessels were performed on days 3, 7, 30 and 90 of life. These evaluations were performed in the six intracranial arteries, meaning: right and left anterior and middle cerebral arteries and right and left internal carotid arteries. Doppler recordings were made using Duplex Color-Doppler system, pulse echo probe of 3,5; 5,0 and 7,5 MHz. Measuring the blood flow velocity in the cerebral arteries we obtained a maximum systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity with a rate in meters per second (m/s) for each cardiac cycle. After obtaining these numerical values for these velocities we obtained the resistance index (RI) or Pourcelot index. In a progressive way as the resistance index (RI) values were being obtained in each stage of this study they were also being checked in the cerebral arteries of healthy preterm infants and infants with intracranial hemorrhages. We also analyzed in a comparative method the values of the resistive index between the two groups of preterm infants observing their behaviour. The results obtained when

  6. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media:Influence of flow velocity and influent concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaorong Wei; Mingan Shao; Lina Du; Robert Horton

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces.A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations.Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients,which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns.Consequently,retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed.These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix.Accordingly,this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  7. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires...... several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. METHODS: There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean......: Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold...

  8. Velocity Profile in a Two-Layer Kolmogorov-Like Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Suri, Balachandra; Mitchell, Radford; Grigoriev, Roman O; Schatz, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    In this article we discuss flows in shallow, stratified horizontal layers of two immiscible fluids. The top layer is an electrolyte which is electromagnetically driven and the bottom layer is a dielectric fluid. Using a quasi-two-dimensional approximation, we derive the depth-averaged two-dimensional (2D) vorticity equation which includes a prefactor to the advection term, previously unaccounted for. In addition, we study how the horizontal components of velocity vary in the vertical direction. For a Kolmogorov-like flow, we evaluate analytical expressions for the coefficients in the generalized 2D vorticity equation, uncovering their dependence on experimental parameters. To test the accuracy of these estimates, we experimentally measure the horizontal velocity fields at the free-surface and at the electrolyte-dielectric interface using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We show that there is excellent agreement between the analytical predictions and the experimental measurements. Our analysis shows that by i...

  9. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  10. Velocity measurements in the liquid metal flow driven by a two-phase inductor

    CERN Document Server

    Pedcenko, A; Priede, J; Gerbeth, G; Hermann, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of velocity measurements obtained by ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry and local potential probes in the flow of GaInSn eutectic melt driven by a two-phase inductor in a cylindrical container. This type of flow is expected in a recent modification to the floating zone technique for the growth of small-diameter single intermetallic compound crystals. We show that the flow structure can be changed from the typical two toroidal vortices to a single vortex by increasing the phase shift between the currents in the two coils from 0 to 90 degrees. The latter configuration is thought to be favourable for the growth of single crystals. The flow is also computed numerically and a reasonable agreement with the experimental results is found. The obtained results may be useful for the design of combined two-phase electromagnetic stirrers and induction heaters for metal or semiconductor melts.

  11. Aerodynamic Study on Supersonic Flows in High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Takeshi MATSUOKA; Seiji KURODA; Jin KAWAKITA; Hirotaka FUKANUMA; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2005-01-01

    @@ To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  12. Flow Rate of Particles through Apertures Obtained from Self-Similar Density and Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Alvaro; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego

    2012-06-01

    “Beverloo’s law” is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for them the mass flow rate is calculated. The comparison of this expression with the Beverloo’s one reveals some differences which are crucial to understanding the mechanism that governs the flow of particles through orifices.

  13. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  14. Effect of flow velocity, substrate concentration and hydraulic cleaning on biofouling of reverse osmosis feed channels

    KAUST Repository

    Radu, Andrea I.

    2012-04-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model coupling fluid dynamics, salt and substrate transport and biofilm development in time was used to investigate the effects of cross-flow velocity and substrate availability on biofouling in reverse osmosis (RO)/nanofiltration (NF) feed channels. Simulations performed in channels with or without spacer filaments describe how higher liquid velocities lead to less overall biomass amount in the channel by increasing the shear stress. In all studied cases at constant feed flow rate, biomass accumulation in the channel reached a steady state. Replicate simulation runs prove that the stochastic biomass attachment model does not affect the stationary biomass level achieved and has only a slight influence on the dynamics of biomass accumulation. Biofilm removal strategies based on velocity variations are evaluated. Numerical results indicate that sudden velocity increase could lead to biomass sloughing, followed however by biomass re-growth when returning to initial operating conditions. Simulations show particularities of substrate availability in membrane devices used for water treatment, e.g., the accumulation of rejected substrates at the membrane surface due to concentration polarization. Interestingly, with an increased biofilm thickness, the overall substrate consumption rate dominates over accumulation due to substrate concentration polarization, eventually leading to decreased substrate concentrations in the biofilm compared to bulk liquid. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Uncertainty in velocity measurement based on diode-laser absorption in nonuniform flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Yu, Xilong; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Lin

    2012-07-10

    This work investigates the error caused by nonuniformities along the line-of-sight in velocity measurement using tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Past work has demonstrated TDLAS as an attractive diagnostic technique for measuring velocity, which is inferred from the Doppler shift of two absorption features using two crossing laser beams. However, because TDLAS is line-of-sight in nature, the obtained velocity is a spatially averaged value along the probing laser beams. As a result, nonuniformities in the flow can cause uncertainty in the velocity measurement. Therefore, it is the goal of this work to quantify the uncertainty caused by various nonuniformities typically encountered in practice, including boundary layer effects, the divergence/convergence of the flow, and the methods used to fit the Doppler shift. Systematic analyses are performed to quantify the uncertainty under various conditions, and case studies are reported to illustrate the usefulness of such analysis in interpreting experimental data obtained from a scramjet facility. We expect this work to be valuable for the design and optimization of TDLAS-based velocimetry, and also for the quantitative interpretation of the measurements.

  16. Comparison between Normal and HeII Two-phase Flows at High Vapor Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Van Weelderen, R; Rousset, B; Thibault, P; Wolf, P E

    2006-01-01

    We present results on helium co-current two-phase flow experiments at high vapor velocity obtained with the use of the new CEA/SBT 400 W/1.8 K refrigerator [1]. For vapor velocities larger than typically 4 m/s, a mist of droplets develops from the bulk liquid interface accompanied by an increase in heat transfer at the wall. Experiments were conducted in a 10 m long, 40 mm I.D. straight pipe, both in helium II and in helium I to compare these two situations. The respective roles of vapor density, vapor velocity and liquid level on atomization were systematically investigated. Light scattering experiments were performed to measure sizes, velocities and interfacial areas of droplets in a complete cross section. In-house-made heat transfer sensors located in the mist allowed us to deduce an upper value of the extra cooling power of the dispersed phase. The practical interest of atomized flow for cooling large cryogenic facilities is discussed by considering the balance between increase in heat transfer and press...

  17. Wavefront shaping for imaging-based flow velocity measurements through distortions using a Fresnel guide star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Fregin, Bob; König, Jörg; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen W

    2016-09-19

    Imaging-based flow measurement techniques, like particle image velocimetry (PIV), are vulnerable to time-varying distortions like refractive index inhomogeneities or fluctuating phase boundaries. Such distortions strongly increase the velocity error, as the position assignment of the tracer particles and the decrease of image contrast exhibit significant uncertainties. We demonstrate that wavefront shaping based on spatially distributed guide stars has the potential to significantly reduce the measurement uncertainty. Proof of concept experiments show an improvement by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications for the wavefront shaping PIV range from measurements in jets and film flows to biomedical applications.

  18. A spectral optical flow method for determining velocities from digital imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Hurlburt, Neal

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for determining surface flows from solar images based upon optical flow techniques. We apply the method to sets of images obtained by a variety of solar imagers to assess its performance. The {\\tt opflow3d} procedure is shown to extract accurate velocity estimates when provided perfect test data and quickly generates results consistent with completely distinct methods when applied on global scales. We also validate it in detail by comparing it to an established method when applied to high-resolution datasets and find that it provides comparable results without the need to tune, filter or otherwise preprocess the images before its application.

  19. Tidal reversal and flow velocities using temperature and specific conductance in a small wetland creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Timothy T.

    2016-11-01

    Characterizing flow dynamics in very small tidal creeks is complicated and not well suited to methods developed for upland streams or coastal estuaries, due to low flows, bidirectionality and shallow waters. Simple instrumentation enables thermal and salinity signals to be used to observe flow directions and estimate velocities in these settings. Using multiple inexpensive sensors over 500 m along a tidally influenced wetland creek, I demonstrate how advection of temperature and specific conductance pulses reveal flood and ebb tides and the temporary reversal of flow by warmer, estuarine water from the receiving embayment. The sequential rise of temperature upstream was most evident under hot and dry conditions, after daily peak air temperatures of 25 °C or above, and was subdued or disrupted under cooler or rainy conditions in summertime. Changes in specific conductance at successive sites upstream were less susceptible to environmental influences and confirm tidal flood velocity of between 0.07 and 0.37 m/s. The tidally-induced flow reversal suggests that periodic high tide conditions can interfere with rapid dispersal of pollution discharges, such as from the combined sewer overflow (CSO) located upstream of the studied creek reach. This low-cost approach of temperature and specific conductance sensing in vegetated coastal wetlands where access, precise elevation control and creek discharge measurements are difficult, provides a simple way of tracking water masses when sufficient contrast exists between water sources.

  20. Optimization of the AC-gradient method for velocity profile measurement and application to slow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartäusch, Ralf; Helluy, Xavier; Jakob, Peter Michael; Fidler, Florian

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a spectroscopic method to measure slow flow. Within a single shot the velocity distribution is acquired. This allows distinguishing rapidly between single velocities within the sampled volume with a high sensitivity. The technique is based on signal acquisition in the presence of a periodic gradient and a train of refocussing RF pulses. The theoretical model for trapezoidal bipolar pulse shaped gradients under consideration of diffusion and the outflow effect is introduced. A phase correction technique is presented that improves the spectral accuracy. Therefore, flow phantom measurements are used to validate the new sequence and the simulation based on the theoretical model. It was demonstrated that accurate parabolic flow profiles can be acquired and flow variations below 200 μm/s can be detected. Three post-processing methods that eliminate static background signal are also presented for applications in which static background signal dominates. Finally, this technique is applied to flow measurement of a small alder tree demonstrating a typical application of in vivo plant measurements.

  1. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo;

    2008-01-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold...... immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response....

  2. Velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meir, A.J. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this work we discuss some aspects of the velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows. We describe reasonable boundary conditions that should be imposed on the vorticity and a compatibility condition that the vorticity must satisfy. This formulation may give rise to efficient numerical algorithms for approximating solutions of the Stokes problem, which in turn yields an iterative method for approximating solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Cross-correlation based time delay estimation for turbulent flow velocity measurements: Statistical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, Balazs; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sandor; Veres, Gabor [KFKI-Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Association EURATOM, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Por, Gabor [Department of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Association EURATOM, Muegyetem rkp. 9., H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-12-15

    Time delay estimation methods (TDE) are well-known techniques to investigate poloidal flows in hot magnetized plasmas through the propagation properties of turbulent structures in the medium. One of these methods is based on the estimation of the time lag at which the cross-correlation function (CCF) estimation reaches its maximum value. The uncertainty of the peak location refers to the smallest determinable flow velocity modulation, and therefore the standard deviation of the time delay imposes important limitation to the measurements. In this article, the relative standard deviation of the CCF estimation and the standard deviation of its peak location are calculated analytically using a simple model of turbulent signals. This model assumes independent (non interacting) overlapping events (coherent structures) with randomly distributed spatio-temporal origins moving with background flow. The result of our calculations is the derivation of a general formula for the CCF variance, which is valid not exclusively in the high event density limit, but also for arbitrary event densities. Our formula reproduces the well known expression for high event densities previously published in the literature. In this paper we also present a derivation of the variance of time delay estimation that turns out to be inversely proportional to the applied time window. The derived formulas were tested in real plasma measurements. The calculations are an extension of the earlier work of Bencze and Zoletnik [Phys. Plasmas 12, 052323 (2005)] where the autocorrelation-width technique was developed. Additionally, we show that velocities calculated by a TDE method possess a broadband noise which originates from this variance, its power spectral density cannot be decreased by worsening the time resolution and can be coherent with noises of other velocity measurements where the same turbulent structures are used. This noise should not be confused with the impact of zero mean frequency zonal flow

  4. Vertical velocity of mantle flow of East Asia and adjacent areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xianqiong; ZHU Jieshou; CAI Xuelin

    2007-01-01

    Based on the high-resolution body wave tomo- graphic image and relevant geophysical data, we calculated the form and the vertical and tangential velocities of mantle flow. We obtained the pattern of mantle convection for East Asia and the West Pacific. Some important results and under- standings are gained from the images of the vertical velocity of mantle flow for East Asia and the West Pacific. There is an upwelling plume beneath East Asia and West Pacific, which is the earth's deep origin for the huge rift valley there. We have especially outlined the tectonic features of the South China Sea, which is of the "工" type in the upper mantle shield type in the middle and divergent in the lower; the Siberian clod downwelling dives from the surface to near Core and mantle bounary (CMB), which is convergent in the upper mantle and divergent in the lower mantle; the Tethyan subduction region, centered in the Qinghai-Tibet plateau, is visible from 300 to 2 000 km, which is also convergent in the upper mantle and divergent in the lower mantle. The three regions of mantle convection beneath East Asia and the West Pacific are in accordance with the West Pacific, Ancient Asia and the Tethyan structure regions. The mantle upwelling orig- inates from the core-mantle boundary and mostly occurs in the middle mantle and the lower part of the upper mantle. The velocities of the vertical mantle flow are about 1-4 cm per year and the tangential velocities are 1-10 cm per year. The mantle flow has an effect on controlling the movement of plates and the distributions of ocean ridges, subduction zones and collision zones. The mantle upwelling regions are clearly related with the locations ofhotspots on the earth's surface.

  5. Liquid mean velocity and turbulence in a horizontal air-water bubbly flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The liquid phase turbulent structure of an air-water bubbly horizontal flow in a circular pipe has been investigated experimentally. Three-dimensional measurements were implemented with two "X" type probes oriented in different planes, and local liquid-phase velocities and turbulent stresses were simultaneously obtained. Systematic measurements were conducted covering a range of local void fraction from 0 to 11.7%. The important experiment results and parametric trends are summarized and discussed.

  6. On Ultrasonic MTI Measurement of Velocity Profiles in Blood-Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn A.J. Angelsen

    1981-04-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical analysis of Doppler frequency estimators proposed to be used in ultrasonic MTI measurements of velocity profiles in blood flow, is given. The estimators give an output in form of a single analogue voltage and the relation of the output to the Doppler spectrum is discussed. Three new estimators are also proposed. All estimators work fairly well for narrow-band Doppler spectra, but errors are found when broad-band spectra are present.

  7. Velocity contrasts enhancement for shear thinning solutions flowing in a rough fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Auradou, H; Chertcoff, R; Gabbanelli, S; Hulin, J P; Ippolito, I; Auradou, Harold; Boschan, Alejandro; Chertcoff, Ricardo; Gabbanelli, Susana; Hulin, Jean-Pierre; Ippolito, Irene

    2007-01-01

    Flow and transport are studied in transparent model fractures with rough complementary self-affine walls with a relative shear displacement $\\vec{u}$. The aperture field is shown to display long range correlations perpendicular to $\\vec{u}$: for flow in that direction, the width and geometry of the front of a dyed shear-thinning polymer solution displacing a transparent one have been studied as a function of the fluid rheology and flow rate. The front width increases linearly with distance indicating a convection of the fluids with a low transverse mixing between the flow paths. The width also increases with the flow-rate as the fluid rheology shifts from Newtonian at low shear rates $\\dot \\gamma$ towards a shear thinning behaviour at higher $\\dot \\gamma$ values. The width also increases with the polymer concentration at high flow-rates. These results demonstrate the enhancement of the flow velocity contrasts between different flow channels for shear thinning fluids. The relative widths at low and high $\\dot ...

  8. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee-Kyung; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were studied. Bipolar adhesive pad electrodes were used to stimulate the autonomic nervous system at the thoracic vertebrae 1-4 levels for 20 min. Using Doppler ultrasonography, blood flow was measured to determine velocity and vessel size before, immediately after, and 30 min after electrical stimulation. Changes in blood flow velocity were significantly different immediately and 30 min after stimulation. The interaction between intervention periods and groups was significantly different between the exercise and pain stimulation groups immediately after stimulation (p<0.05). The vessel size was significantly different before and 30 min after stimulation (p<0.05). Imbalances in the sympathetic nervous system, which regulates balance throughout the body, may present with various symptoms. Therefore, in the clinical practice, the parameters of electrical stimulation should be selectively applied in accordance with various conditions and changes in form.

  9. A clinical study on velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow in canine heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, T; Wakao, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated methods of determining the velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow (PVF) in dogs and then investigated the relationship of the patterns to cardiac functions in heartworm disease (HD) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The results revealed that there was a good correlation between PVF patterns determined by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and TTE in animals lying on their left sides. The measurement of S and D wave velocities (PVS and PVD) by TTE was shown to allow clinical determination of the velocity patterns of PVF in dogs. The HD groups showed significant increases in PVS and PVD, and S and D wave time-velocity integrals (S-TVI and D-TVI) of the right cranial lobe PVF, when compared with the normal group, as determined by TTE (P<0.05). In contrast, the HD groups produced significant decreases in PVD and D-TVI of the right caudal lobe PVF compared with the normal group (P<0.05), and a significant increase in the ratio of S-TVI to (S-TVI + D-TVI) (P<0.05). It is, therefore, suggested that measurement of the velocity patterns of the right cranial and caudal lobe PVF could be one method of assessing the stages of obstructive lesions in the pulmonary artery.

  10. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Hansen, Peter Møller; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-08-01

    A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo. This paper investigates errors from estimating volumetric flow using a commercial ultrasound scanner and the common assumptions made in the literature. The theoretical model shows, e.g. that volume flow is underestimated by 15%, when the scan plane is off-axis with the vessel center by 28% of the vessel radius. The error sources were also studied in vivo under realistic clinical conditions, and the theoretical results were applied for correcting the volume flow errors. Twenty dialysis patients with arteriovenous fistulas were scanned to obtain vector flow maps of fistulas. When fitting an ellipsis to cross-sectional scans of the fistulas, the major axis was on average 10.2mm, which is 8.6% larger than the minor axis. The ultrasound beam was on average 1.5mm from the vessel center, corresponding to 28% of the semi-major axis in an average fistula. Estimating volume flow with an elliptical, rather than circular, vessel area and correcting the ultrasound beam for being off-axis, gave a significant (p=0.008) reduction in error from 31.2% to 24.3%. The error is relative to the Ultrasound Dilution Technique, which is considered the gold standard for volume flow estimation for dialysis patients. The study shows the importance of correcting for volume flow errors, which are often made in clinical practice.

  11. Measurements of electrical impedance and elastic wave velocity of reservoir rock under fluid-flow test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawayama, Kazuki; Kitamura, Keigo; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of water saturation under the ground is essential in geothermal fields, particularly for EGS (enhanced geothermal system). To estimate water saturation, recently, electromagnetic exploration using Magnetotelluric (MT) method has been applied in the geothermal fields. However, the relationship between electrical impedance obtained from this method and water saturation in the reservoir rock has not been well known. Our goal is to elucidate this basic relationship by fluid-flow experiments. As our first step to this goal, we developed the technique to measure and analyze the electrical impedance of the cracked rock in the geothermal reservoir. The fluid-flow test has been conducted as following procedures. At first, reservoir rock sample (pyroxene andesite, Makizono lava formation, Japan) was filled with nitrogen gas (Pp = 10 MPa) under 20 MPa of confining pressure. This nitrogen gas imitates the overheated steam in the geothermal fields. Then, brine (1wt.%-KCl, 1.75 S/m) which imitates the artificial recharge to the reservoir was injected to the samples. After flow rate of drainage fluid becomes stable, injection pressure was increased (11, 12, 14, 16, 18 MPa) and decreased (18, 16, 14, 12, 11 MPa) to vary the water saturation in the samples. During the test, water saturation, permeability, electrical impedance (10-2-105 Hz of frequency) and elastic wave velocity were measured. As a result of andesite, electrical impedance dramatically decreased from 105 to 103 Ω and P-wave velocity increased by 2% due to the brine injection. This remarkable change of the electrical impedance could be due to the replacement of pre-filled nitrogen gas to the brine. After the brine injection, electrical impedance decreased with injection pressure (small change of water saturation) by up to 40% while P-wave velocity was almost constant (less than 1%). This decrease of electrical impedance with injection pressure could be related to the flow to the narrow path (microcrack

  12. Ice-flow reorganization in West Antarctica 2.5 kyr ago dated using radar-derived englacial flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Martín, Carlos; Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; King, Edward C.

    2016-09-01

    We date a recent ice-flow reorganization of an ice divide in the Weddell Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a novel combination of inverse methods and ice-penetrating radars. We invert for two-dimensional ice flow within an ice divide from data collected with a phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar while accounting for the effect of firn on radar propagation and ice flow. By comparing isochronal layers simulated using radar-derived flow velocities with internal layers observed with an impulse radar, we show that the divide's internal structure is not in a steady state but underwent a disturbance, potentially implying a regional ice-flow reorganization, 2.5 (1.8-2.9) kyr B.P. Our data are consistent with slow ice flow in this location before the reorganization and the ice divide subsequently remaining stationary. These findings increase our knowledge of the glacial history of a region that lacks dated constraints on late-Holocene ice-sheet retreat and provides a key target for models that reconstruct and predict ice-sheet behavior.

  13. The effects of velocity difference changes with memory on the dynamics characteristics and fuel economy of traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Zhao, Xiangmo; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of velocity difference changes with memory in the intelligent transportation environment on the dynamics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we first investigate the linkage between velocity difference changes with memory and car-following behaviors with the measured data in cities, and then propose an improved cooperative car-following model considering multiple velocity difference changes with memory in the cooperative adaptive cruise control strategy, finally carry out several numerical simulations under the periodic boundary condition and at signalized intersections to explore how velocity difference changes with memory affect car's velocity, velocity fluctuation, acceleration and fuel consumptions in the intelligent transportation environment. The results show that velocity difference changes with memory have obvious effects on car-following behaviors, that the improved cooperative car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, that the stability and fuel economy of traffic flow simulated by the improved car-following model with velocity difference changes with memory is obviously superior to those without velocity difference changes, and that taking velocity difference changes with memory into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can significantly improve the stability and fuel economy of traffic flow.

  14. Relation of hydrologic processes to groundwater and surface-water levels and flow directions in a dune-beach complex at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and Beverly Shores, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, Paul M.; Cohen, David A.; Lampe, David C.; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2011-01-01

    Shores. Perennial mounding of the water table in the surficial aquifer indicates that the recharge that created the water-table mound originates within the dune-beach complex and not through flow from the adjacent hydrologic boundaries: the restored wetland, Lake Michigan, and Derby Ditch. Infiltrating precipitation causes most seasonal and episodic rises in groundwater levels beneath the dune-beach complex. Groundwater-level fluctuations lasting days to weeks in the dune-beach complex in 2008-9 were superimposed on a seasonal high water-table altitude that began with the recharge from snowmelt and rain in February 2009 and maintained through July 2009. Increases in water-table-mound altitude under the dune-beach complex recurred in 2008-9 in response to the largest rain events of 1 inch or more and to snowmelt. Smaller, shorter-term rises in water level after individual rain events persisted over hours to less than 1 week. Groundwater-level fluctuations varied over a relatively narrow range of about 2 to 3 feet, with no net fluctuations greater than 4 feet. Groundwater levels in or near low parts of the dune-beach complex were frequently within 0 to 6 feet of the land surface and indicate the potential for groundwater flooding. Groundwater-level gradients from the water-table mound to wells next to surface-water discharges increase after rainfall and snowmelt events and recede slowly as groundwater discharges from the aquifer. Evapotranspiration is responsible for part of the general pattern of decreasing water-table altitudes observed from May to August 2009. Rapid water-level rises in the restored wetland after precipitation do not likely have an effect on groundwater flooding elsewhere in the dune-beach complex. Surface-water-level fluctuations during this study generally varied over a narrower range, approximately from 1 to 1.5 feet, as compared with groundwater fluctuations, except after a very large, 10.77-inch rainfall. Time-delayed and smaller groundwater-level

  15. Flow velocities and bed shear stresses in a stone cover under an oscillatory flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenanato, F.; Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Sumer, B. Mutlu;

    2010-01-01

    I order to get a better understanding of the interaction between the wave-induced, near-bed oscillatory flow, the stome cover and the sea bed, physical model tests were carried out. The tests were conducted in an oscillating water tunnel. The bottom of the tunnes was covered by one, two and three...

  16. Using an Integrated Surface Water - Groundwater Flow Model for Evaluating the Hydrologic Impacts of Historic and Potential Future Dry Periods on Simulated Water Budgets in the Santa Rosa Plain Watershed, Northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevesi, J. A.; Woolfenden, L. R.; Nishikawa, T.

    2014-12-01

    Communities in the Santa Rosa Plain watershed (SRPW), Sonoma County, CA, USA are experiencing increasing demand for limited water resources. Streamflow in the SRPW is runoff dominated; however, groundwater also is an important resource in the basin. The watershed has an area of 262 mi2 that includes natural, agricultural, and urban land uses. To evaluate the hydrologic system, an integrated hydrologic model was developed using the U.S. Geological Survey coupled groundwater and surface-water flow model, GSFLOW. The model uses a daily time step and a grid-based discretization of the SRPW consisting of 16,741 10-acre cells for 8 model layers to simulate all water budget components of the surface and subsurface hydrologic system. Simulation results indicate significant impacts on streamflow and recharge in response to the below average precipitation during the dry periods. The recharge and streamflow distributions simulated for historic dry periods were compared to future dry periods projected from 4 GCM realizations (two different GCMs and two different CO2 forcing scenarios) for the 21st century, with the dry periods defined as 3 consecutive years of below average precipitation. For many of the projected dry periods, the decreases in recharge and streamflow were greater than for the historic dry periods due to a combination of lower precipitation and increases in simulated evapotranspiration for the warmer 21st century projected by the GCM realizations. The greatest impact on streamflow for both historic and projected future dry periods is the diminished baseflow from late spring to early fall, with an increase in the percentage of intermittent and dry stream reaches. The results indicate that the coupled model is a useful tool for water managers to better understand the potential effects of future dry periods on spatially and temporally distributed streamflow and recharge, as well as other components of the water budget.

  17. Development of a laser speckle imaging system for measuring relative blood flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael S. D.; Packulak, Ernie F.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2006-09-01

    Determining the viability of damaged or surgically reconstructed tissue is critical in most plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. Information about tissue blood flow in the region in question can make this determination much easier. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is one technique that could potentially aid in making this determination. LSI is a non-contact full-field imaging technique with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Tissue is illuminated with diffuse red laser light and the spatial and/or temporal statistics of the resulting speckle pattern can be used to calculate relative flow velocities. We have developed a LSI system that produces relative velocity blood flow images. Bench tests of the system indicate that it may be used to distinguish between normal, decreased, and increased blood flow states of a human finger. The system has also been used to take some initial laboratory measurements using an animal model - an epigastric free flap on a rat. Preliminary results indicate that the method may be used to distinguish states of venous or arterial occlusion from unoccluded states of the skin flap. While further experimentation is necessary, these initial results indicate that LSI could be a useful aid to the plastic surgeon for assessing tissue viability.

  18. GEODETIC OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION OF ICE FLOW VELOCITIES IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF SUBGLACIAL LAKE VOSTOK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of geodetic in-situ observations of ice-flow velocities in the southern part of subglacialLakeVostokare combined with data sets of the ice surface topography, ice thickness, surface accumulation, basal accretion and firn/ice density for interpretations regarding the glaciological setting of theLakeVostoksystem. Based on the ice-flow velocities and the ice thickness, mean surface accumulation rates are derived applying the flux gate method. These are representative for surface segments extending from the southern part ofLakeVostokto the Ridge B ice divide. They are consistent with the present-day accumulation rate at Vostok station and its variation upstream and thus suggest that the area has been close to steady state. In addition, ice-flow dynamics are investigated along a flow line segment extending from26 kmupstream to12 kmdownstream from Vostok station. The analysis suggests deficiencies in current modelling approaches within the transition zone from floating to grounded ice.

  19. Intrauterine growth restriction, visceral blood flow velocity and exocrine pancreatic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deenmamode Jean M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models and observations in human neonates suggest fetal exocrine pancreas vulnerability to reduced maternofetal blood flow. We investigated the relationship between superior mesenteric artery blood flow velocity (sma bfv and exocrine pancreatic function, in a cohort of very low birth weight (VLBW babies. Group 1: 9 babies Group2: 18 babies > 10th percentile for birth weight. Findings All had Doppler ultrasound scan of the superior mesenteric artery (sma, by same operator (RMN, on day 1 of life before commencement of enteral feeding. Stool samples assayed for faecal chymotrypsin and weekly serum samples assayed for amylase and lipase (kinetic colorimetric assay from days 1 to 14 of life. Growth restricted babies had significantly lower sma bfv values compared with appropriately grown preterm babies. Faecal chymotrypsin levels were also lower but this difference did not achieve statistical significance. Both groups had serum lipase levels detectable in adult concentrations. Serum amylase was undetectable in either group. Conclusion Babies with previous in-utero blood flow redistribution may exhibit altered gut ontogeny with re-setting of mesenteric blood flow velocities and altered exocrine pancreatic function.

  20. Habitat availability vs. flow rate for the Pecos River, Part 1 : Depth and velocity availability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Scott Carlton; Schaub, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2004-02-01

    The waters of the Pecos River in New Mexico must be delivered to three primary users: (1) The Pecos River Compact: each year a percentage of water from natural river flow must be delivered to Texas; (2) Agriculture: Carlsbad Irrigation District has a storage and diversion right and Fort Sumner Irrigation District has a direct flow diversion right; and, (3) Endangered Species Act: an as yet unspecified amount of water is to support Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat within and along the Pecos River. Currently, the United States Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation, the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, and the United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service are studying the Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat preference. Preliminary work by Fish and Wildlife personnel in the critical habitat suggest that water depth and water velocity are key parameters defining minnow habitat preference. However, river flows that provide adequate preferred habitat to support this species have yet to be determined. Because there is a limited amount of water in the Pecos River and its reservoirs, it is critical to allocate water efficiently such that habitat is maintained, while honoring commitments to agriculture and to the Pecos River Compact. This study identifies the relationship between Pecos River flow rates in cubic feet per second (cfs) and water depth and water velocity.

  1. Maximizing flow velocities in redox-magnetohydrodynamic microfluidics using the transient faradaic current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Melissa C; Nash, Christena K; Homesley, Jerry J; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2012-11-01

    There is a need for a microfluidic pumping technique that is simple to fabricate, yet robust, compatible with a variety of solvents, and which has easily controlled fluid flow. Redox-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers these advantages. However, the presence of high concentrations of redox species, important for inducing sufficient convection at low magnetic fields for hand-held devices, can limit the use of redox-MHD pumping for analytical applications. A new method for redox-MHD pumping is investigated that takes advantage of the large amplitude of the transient portion of the faradaic current response that occurs upon stepping the potential sufficiently past the standard electrode potential, E°, of the pumping redox species at an electrode. This approach increases the velocity of the fluid for a given redox concentration. An electronic switch was implemented between the potentiostat and electrochemical cell to alternately turn on and off different electrodes along the length of the flow path to maximize this transient electronic current and, as a result, the flow speed. Velocities were determined by tracking microbeads in a solution containing electroactive potassium ferrocyanide and potassium ferricyanide, and supporting electrolyte, potassium chloride, in the presence of a magnetic field. Fluid velocities with slight pulsation were obtained with the switch that were 70% faster than the smooth velocities without the switch. This indicates that redox species concentrations can be lowered by a similar amount to achieve a given speed, thereby diminishing interference of the redox species with detection of the analyte in applications of redox-MHD microfluidics for chemical analysis.

  2. Mobile surface water filtration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Vatsyayan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To design a mobile system for surface water filtrationMethodology: the filtration of surface impurities begins with their retraction to concentrated thickness using non ionising surfactants, then isolation using surface tension property and sedimentation of impurities in process chamber using electrocoagulation. Result:following studies done to determine the rate of spreading of crude oil on water a method for retraction of spread crude oil to concentrated volumes is developed involving addition of non -ionising surfactants in contrast to use of dispersants. Electrocoagulation process involves multiple processes taking place to lead to depositionof impurities such as oil, grease, metals. Studies of experiments conducted reveals parameters necessary for design of electrocoagulation process chamber though a holistic approach towards system designing is still required. Propeller theory is used in determining the required design of propeller and the desired thrust, the overall structure will finally contribute in deciding the choice of propeller.

  3. Dual-beam optical coherence tomography system for quantification of flow velocity in capillary phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S. M.; Silien, C.; Leahy, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    The quantification of (blood) flow velocity within the vasculature has potent diagnostic and prognostic potential. Assessment of flow irregularities in the form of increased permeability (micro haemorrhaging), the presence of avascular areas, or conversely the presence of vessels with enlarged or increased tortuosity in the acral regions of the body may provide a means of non-invasive in vivo assessment. If assessment of dermal flow dynamics were performed in a routine manner, the existence and prevalence of ailments such as diabetes mellitus, psoriatic arthritis and Raynaud's condition may be confirmed prior to clinical suspicion. This may prove advantageous in cases wherein the efficacy of a prescribed treatment is dictated by a prompt diagnosis and to alleviate patient discomfort through early detection. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality which utilises the principle of optical interferometry to distinguish between spatial changes in refractive index within the vasculature and thus formulate a multi-dimensional representation of the structure of the epi- and dermal skin layers. The use of the Doppler functionality has been the predominant force for the quantification of moving particles within media, elucidated via estimation of the phase shift in OCT A-scans. However, the theoretical formulation for the assessment of these phase shifts dictates that the angle between the incident light source and the vessel under question be known a priori; this may be achieved via excisional biopsy of the tissue segment in question, but is counter to the non-invasive premise of the OCT technique. To address the issue of angular dependence, an alternate means of estimating absolute flow velocity is presented. The design and development of a dual-beam (db) system incorporating an optical switch mechanism for signal discrimination of two spatially disparate points enabling quasi-simultaneous multiple specimen scanning is described. A crosscorrelation (c

  4. [Time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors in agroforestry system in West Liaoning Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Sun; Guan, De-xin; Yuan, Feng-hui; Wang, An-zhi; Wu, Jia-bing

    2010-11-01

    By using Granier's thermal dissipation probe, the sap flow velocity of the poplars in agroforestry system in west Liaoning was continuously measured, and the microclimate factors were measured synchronously. Dislocation contrast method was applied to analyze the sap flow velocity and corresponding air temperature, air humidity, net radiation, and vapor pressure deficit to discuss the time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors on sunny days. It was found that the poplar's sap flow velocity advanced of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure deficit, and lagged behind net radiation. The sap flow velocity in June, July, August, and September was advanced of 70, 30, 50, and 90 min to air temperature, of 80, 30, 40, and 90 min to air humidity, and of 90, 50, 70, and 120 min to vapor pressure deficit, but lagged behind 10, 10, 40, and 40 min to net radiation, respectively. The time lag time of net radiation was shorter than that of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure. The regression analysis showed that in the cases the time lag effect was contained and not, the determination coefficients between comprehensive microclimate factor and poplar's sap flow velocity were 0.903 and 0.855, respectively, indicating that when the time lag effect was contained, the determination coefficient was ascended by 2.04%, and thus, the simulation accuracy of poplar's sap flow velocity was improved.

  5. On the use of hot-wire anemometry in pulsating flows. A comment on 'A critical review on advanced velocity measurement techniques in pulsating flows'

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In their recent topical review, Nabavi and Siddiqui (Meas. Sci. Technol. 2010 21 042002) recommended the use of hot-wire anemometry for velocity measurements in pulsating flows, especially at high frequency. This recommendation is misleading. The procedures invoked by these authors are valid only for small-amplitude fluctuations, which are of little interest for pulsating flows. When large-amplitude velocity changes occur without flow reversal, new procedures for the c...

  6. Surface water and groundwater interaction on a hill island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rasmus Rumph; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Christensen, Steen

    – the hill islands – is relatively unknown. This study aims at providing new information about the rainfall-runoff processes in hill island landscapes where surface water and groundwater interaction is expected to have a dominant role and hill-slope processes not. Through stream flow measurements, field...

  7. Experimental Study of the Flow in Helical Circular Pipes: Torsion Effect on the Flow Velocity and Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An objective of the present paper is to experimentally clarify the torsion effect on the flow in helical circular pipes. We have made six helical circular pipes having different pitches and common non-dimensional curvature δ of about 0.1. The torsion parameter β0, which is defined by β0 = τ/(2δ)1/2 with non-dimensional torsion τ, are taken to be 0.02, 0.45, 0.69, 1.01, 1.38 and 1.89 covering from small to very large pitch. The velocity distributions and the turbulence of the flow are measured using an X-type hot-wire anemometer in the range of the Reynolds number from 200 to 20000. The results obtained are summarized as follows: The mean secondary flow pattern in a cross section of the pipe changes from an ordinary twin-vortex type as is seen in a curved pipe without torsion (toroidal pipe) to a single vortex type after one of the twin-vortex gradually disappears as β0 increases. The circu lation direction of the single vortex is the same as the direction of torsion of the pipe. The mean velocity distribution of the axial flow is similar to that of the toroidal pipe at small β0, but changes its shape as β0 increases, and attains the shape similar to that in a straight circular pipe when β0 = 1.89. It is also found that the critical Reynolds number, at which the flow shows a marginal behavior to turbulence, decreases as β0 increases for small β0, and then increases after taking a minimum at β0 ≈ 1.4 as β0 increases. The minimum of the critical Reynolds number experimentally obtained is about 400 at β0≈ 1.4.

  8. Flow propagation velocity is not a simple index of diastolic function in early filling. A comparative study of early diastolic strain rate and strain rate propagation, flow and flow propagation in normal and reduced diastolic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skjaerpe Terje

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strain Rate Imaging shows the filling phases of the left ventricle to consist of a wave of myocardial stretching, propagating from base to apex. The propagation velocity of the strain rate wave is reduced in delayed relaxation. This study examined the relation between the propagation velocity of strain rate in the myocardium and the propagation velocity of flow during early filling. Methods 12 normal subjects and 13 patients with treated hypertension and normal systolic function were studied. Patients and controls differed significantly in diastolic early mitral flow measurements, peak early diastolic tissue velocity and peak early diastolic strain rate, showing delayed relaxation in the patient group. There were no significant differences in EF or diastolic diameter. Results Strain rate propagation velocity was reduced in the patient group while flow propagation velocity was increased. There was a negative correlation (R = -0.57 between strain rate propagation and deceleration time of the mitral flow E-wave (R = -0.51 and between strain rate propagation and flow propagation velocity and there was a positive correlation (R = 0.67 between the ratio between peak mitral flow velocity / strain rate propagation velocity and flow propagation velocity. Conclusion The present study shows strain rate propagation to be a measure of filling time, but flow propagation to be a function of both flow velocity and strain rate propagation. Thus flow propagation is not a simple index of diastolic function in delayed relaxation.

  9. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  10. Vibrationally-Fluidized Granular Flows: Impact and Bulk Velocity Measurements Compared with Discrete Element and Continuum Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Kamyar

    A new laser displacement probe was developed to measure the impact velocities of particles within vibrationally-fluidized beds. The sensor output was also used to measure bulk flow velocity along the probe window and to provide a measure of the media packing. The displacement signals from the laser sensors were analyzed to obtain the probability distribution functions of the impact velocity of the particles. The impact velocity was affected by the orientation of the laser probe relative to the bulk flow velocity, and the density and elastic properties of the granular media. The impact velocities of the particles were largely independent of their bulk flow speed and packing density. Both the local impact and bulk flow velocities within a tub vibratory finisher were predicted using discrete element modelling (DEM) and compared to the measured values for spherical steel media. It was observed that the impact and bulk flow velocities were relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the contact coefficients of friction and restitution. It was concluded that the predicted impact and bulk flow velocities were dependent on the number of layers in the model. Consequently, the final DE model mimicked the key aspects of the experimental setup, including the submerged laser sensor. The DE method predictions of both impact velocity and bulk flow velocity were in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements, with maximum differences of 20% and 30%, respectively. Discrete element modeling of granular flows is effective, but requires large numerical models. In an effort to reduce computational effort, this work presents a finite element (FE) continuum model of a vibrationally-fluidized granular flow. The constitutive equations governing the continuum model were calibrated using the discrete element method (DEM). The bulk flow behavior of the equivalent continuum media was then studied using both Lagrangian and Eulerian FE formulations. The bulk flow velocities predicted

  11. A joint velocity-concentration PDF method for tracer flow in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Jenny, Patrick; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2010-12-01

    The probability density function (PDF) of the local concentration of a contaminant, or tracer, is an important component of risk assessment in applications that involve flow in heterogeneous subsurface formations. In this paper, a novel joint velocity-concentration PDF method for tracer flow in highly heterogeneous porous media is introduced. The PDF formalism accounts for advective transport, pore-scale dispersion (PSD), and molecular diffusion. Low-order approximations (LOAs), which are usually obtained using a perturbation expansion, typically lead to Gaussian one-point velocity PDFs. Moreover, LOAs provide reasonable approximations for small log conductivity variances (i.e., σY2 Caroni and Fiorotto (2005) for saturated transport in velocity fields, which are stationary in space and time, for domains with σY2 = 0.05, 1, and 2 and Péclet numbers ranging from 100 to 10,000. PSD is modeled using constant anisotropic dispersion coefficients in both the reference MC computations and our PDF method.

  12. Carbon dioxide induced changes in cerebral blood flow and flow velocity: role of cerebrovascular resistance and effective cerebral perfusion pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüne, Frank; Kazmaier, Stephan; Stolker, Robert J; Visser, Gerhard H; Weyland, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In addition to cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) zero flow pressure (ZFP), effective cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPe) and the resistance area product (RAP) are supplemental determinants of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Until now, the interrelationship of PaCO2-induced changes in CBF, CVR, CPPe, ZFP, and RAP is not fully understood. In a controlled crossover trial, we investigated 10 anesthetized patients aiming at PaCO2 levels of 30, 37, 43, and 50 mm Hg. Cerebral blood flow was measured with a modified Kety-Schmidt-technique. Zero flow pressure and RAP was estimated by linear regression analysis of pressure-flow velocity relationships of the middle cerebral artery. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and ZFP, CVR as the ratio CPPe/CBF. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way RM-ANOVA. When comparing hypocapnia with hypercapnia, CBF showed a significant exponential reduction by 55% and mean VMCA by 41%. Effective cerebral perfusion pressure linearly decreased by 17% while ZFP increased from 14 to 29 mm Hg. Cerebrovascular resistance increased by 96% and RAP by 39%; despite these concordant changes in mean CVR and Doppler-derived RAP correlation between these variables was weak (r=0.43). In conclusion, under general anesthesia hypocapnia-induced reduction in CBF is caused by both an increase in CVR and a decrease in CPPe, as a consequence of an increase in ZFP.

  13. Flow velocity change in the cortical vein during motor activation and its effect on functional brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kazuhiro [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    On the brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using the gradient-recalled echo technique with clinical MR scanner, the activated areas nearly correspond with the cortical veins. This suggests that the fMRI signal mainly originates from the cortical veins. In this study, we analyzed the flow velocity in the cortical vein quantitatively during brain activation and resting status using 2 dimensional time-of-flight cine MR venography (2D-TOF-cine-MRV) and 2 dimensional phase contrast MRV (2D-PC-MRV) techniques, and demonstrated that the flow velocity increased in the cortical vein corresponding to the activated area during activation status. The increase of flow velocity was calculated to be about 20%. The reason for the increased flow velocity is probably due to the increased regional cerebral blood flow and volume in the activated area. We should be careful to analyze the data of the fMRI because the flow velocity affects the fMRI signal such as the inflow effect and the oblique flow effect. When using the gradient echo method, the effect of the flow velocity is one of the important factors of the fMRI signal. (author)

  14. Simultaneous measurements of velocity and deformation in flows through compliant diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatya, D. M.; Longmire, E. K.

    2010-02-01

    Flow through a circular orifice in a deformable diaphragm mounted in a pipe was studied experimentally as a simple yet suitable case for validating numerical fluid/structure interaction (FSI) codes including structures with significant deformation and strain. The flow was characterized using pressure taps, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and hot-film anemometry while deformation of the compliant diaphragm was determined directly from PIV images. The diaphragm material properties were measured independently by a uniaxial tensile testing machine. The diaphragm material modulus, orifice diameter, and pipe Reynolds number were varied over ranges appropriate for simulations of flows through heart valves. Pipe Reynolds numbers ranged from 600 (laminar upstream condition) to 8800 (turbulent upstream condition). The pressure drop across the diaphragm resulted in a concave deformation for all cases studied. For the range of Reynolds number tested, the Euler number decreased with increasing Reynolds number as a result of orifice expansion. The flow immediately downstream of compliant diaphragms was jet-like with strong inward radial velocity components and vena contracta. Laminar low Reynolds number flow (Re=600) through both rigid and compliant diaphragms yielded early and regular roll up of coherent vortex rings at a fixed frequency in contrast to turbulent higher Reynolds number flow (Re=3900), which yielded a broad range of vortex passage frequencies. Expansion of the compliant orifice for Re=3900 resulted in an initially broader slower jet with delayed shear layer development compared with the equivalent rigid case.

  15. Measurement of the near-wall velocity profile for a nanofluid flow inside a microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamics and anomalous heat transfer enhancements have been reported in the past for colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a fluid (nanofluids). However, such augmentations may manifest itself by study of fluid flow characteristics near in the wall region. Present experimental study reports near-wall velocity profile for nanofluids (silicon dioxide nanoparticles in water) measured inside a microchannel. An objective-based nano-Particle Image Velocimetry (nPIV) technique is used to measure fluid velocity within three visible depths, O(100nm), from the wall. The near-wall fluid velocity profile is estimated after implementing the required corrections for optical properties and effects caused by hindered Brownian motion, wall-particle interactions, and non-uniform exponential illumination on the measurement technique. The fluid velocities of nanofluids at each of the three visible depths are observed to be higher than that of the base fluid resulting in a higher shear rate in this region. The relative increase in shear rates for nanofluids is believed to be the result of the near-wall shear-induced particle migration along with the Brownian motion of the nanoparticles. This research is funded by NPRP grant # 08-574-2-239 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of Qatar Foundation).

  16. Effects of respiratory manoeuvres on hepatic vein Doppler waveform and flow velocities in a healthy population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinkaya, Naime, E-mail: naimeto@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Medical School, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Koc, Zafer, E-mail: koczafer@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Medical School, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Ulusan, Serife, E-mail: sulusan@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Medical School, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Demir, Senay, E-mail: drsenaydemir@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Medical School, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Gurel, Kamil, E-mail: kamilgurel@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Baskent University Medical School, Adana (Turkey); Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Adana (Turkey)

    2011-07-15

    Objective: This study was performed to determine the variations in Doppler waveforms and flow velocity during respiratory manoeuvres in healthy individuals with no liver disease. Materials and methods: In total, 100 individuals (75 women and 25 men) without known cardiac or liver disease were examined prospectively with duplex Doppler ultrasonography (US). We recorded the Doppler waveforms and peak systolic velocities (V{sub max}) of the middle hepatic vein during normal respiration, during breath-holding after quiet expiration and also during deep inspiration. Doppler waveforms are categorised as triphasic, biphasic or monophasic. Results: During normal respiration, hepatic venous waveforms were triphasic in 93% of subjects, monophasic in 6% and biphasic in 1%. During breath-holding after quiet expiration, the percentages were 91%, 6% and 3%, respectively. During deep inspiration, they were 80%, 18% and 2%, respectively. Although significant differences were noted between rates during deep inspiration and normal respiration, they were quite similar during normal respiration and breath-holding after quiet expiration (P < 0.05). The values of V{sub max} were significantly higher during normal respiration compared to quiet expiration and during quiet expiration compared to deep inspiration (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The velocities and waveforms of hepatic veins varied during respiratory manoeuvres. The status of respiration must be taken into consideration whilst examining the hepatic vein waveforms and velocities with duplex Doppler US.

  17. Negative streamwise velocities and other rare events near the wall in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenaers, Peter; Li Qiang; Brethouwer, Geert; Schlatter, Philipp; Oerlue, Ramis, E-mail: Lenaers@mech.kth.se [Linne FLOW Centre, KTH Mechanics, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-12-22

    Negative streamwise velocities, extreme wall-normal velocites and high flatness values for the wall-normal fluctuations near the wall are investigated for turbulent channel flow simulations at a series of Reynolds numbers up to Re{sub {tau}} = 1000 in this paper. Probability density functions of the wall-shear stress and velocity components are presented, as well as joint probability density functions of the velocity components and the pressure. Backflow occurs more often (0.06% at Re{sub {tau}} = 1000) and further away from the wall into the buffer layer for rising Reynolds number. An oblique vortex outside the viscous sublayer is found to cause this backflow. Extreme v events occur also more often for rising Reynolds number. Positive and negative velocity spikes appear in pairs, located on the two edges of a strong streamwise vortex: the negative spike occurring in a high speed streak indicating a sweeping motion, while the positive spike is located between a high and low speed streak. These extreme v events cause high flatness values near the wall (F(v) = 43 at Re{sub {tau}} = 1000).

  18. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  19. An Active-Distributed Temperature Sensing method to quantify groundwater - surface water exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nataline; Bour, Olivier; Lavenant, Nicolas; Faucheux, Mickaël; Fovet, Ophélie; Longuevergne, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying groundwater and surface water interactions are key elements for the management of water quality and quantity, but also for the preservation of groundwater dependent ecosystems and riparian habitat. We developed a methodology to quantify groundwater and surface water interactions, by setting up an active heat tracer experiment using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS). The experimental setup consists in heating an armoured fiber-optic cable that has been previously deployed along the streambed within the sediments. Then, the increase in temperature along the heated cable is a function of the thermal properties of the sediments and of the fluid flow velocity within the sediments. The cable is heated electrically through the steel armouring of the cable while the elevations in temperature are continuously monitored. We tested this methodology on the Kerbernez catchment, located in south-western Brittany (France) and which is part of the AgrHys hydrological observatory. We deploy the cable in a first-order stream within this small agricultural catchment (0.12 km2). Temperature was monitored along 60 meters of stream with a spatial and temporal resolution respectively equal to 29 cm and 30 s. To interpret the data, we used an analytical solution developed for geothermal energy that considers advection and conduction of temperature in porous media. To validate the use of the analytical solution and to define the limits of the method, a 2D numerical model has been developed. This model simulates heat transport and conduction with steady state fluid flow using the Conjugate Heat Transfer module of COMSOL Multiphysics ®. During heating and cooling, the measured temperature was particularly variable along the section with temperature increases that range between 16 to 36°C. This variability can directly be associated with local variations of water fluxes by applying the appropriate analytical solution. Henceforth, it is

  20. Stormwater Priority Pollutants Versus Surface Water Quality Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Ledin, Anna; Baun, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Stormwater in urban areas comprises of a substantial part of the urban water cycle, dominating the flow in many small urban streams, and the pollution levels are sizeable. No stormwater quality criteria were found here and no European or national emission limit values exist. Stormwater pollutants...... however are present in levels exceeding most of the regulated surface water quality criteria and environmental quality standards. Therefore catchment characterisation is needed to chose suitable treatment prior to discharge into receiving surface waters, as the mixing may be insufficient in small streams....

  1. The Design Method of Axial Flow Runners Focusing on Axial Flow Velocity Uniformization and Its Application to an Ultra-Small Axial Flow Hydraulic Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a portable and ultra-small axial flow hydraulic turbine that can generate electric power comparatively easily using the low head of open channels such as existing pipe conduits or small rivers. In addition, we proposed a simple design method for axial flow runners in combination with the conventional one-dimensional design method and the design method of axial flow velocity uniformization, with the support of three-dimensional flow analysis. Applying our design method to the runner of an ultra-small axial flow hydraulic turbine, the performance and internal flow of the designed runner were investigated using CFD analysis and experiment (performance test and PIV measurement. As a result, the runners designed with our design method were significantly improved in turbine efficiency compared to the original runner. Specifically, in the experiment, a new design of the runner achieved a turbine efficiency of 0.768. This reason was that the axial component of absolute velocity of the new design of the runner was relatively uniform at the runner outlet in comparison with that of the original runner, and as a result, the negative rotational flow was improved. Thus, the validity of our design method has been verified.

  2. Exploring the velocity distribution of debris flows: An iteration algorithm based approach for complex cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Chen, Guangqi; Li, Yange; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    The estimation of debris-flow velocity in a cross-section is of primary importance due to its correlation to impact force, run up and superelevation. However, previous methods sometimes neglect the observed asymmetric velocity distribution, and consequently underestimate the debris-flow velocity. This paper presents a new approach for exploring the debris-flow velocity distribution in a cross-section. The presented approach uses an iteration algorithm based on the Riemann integral method to search an approximate solution to the unknown flow surface. The established laws for vertical velocity profile are compared and subsequently integrated to analyze the velocity distribution in the cross-section. The major benefit of the presented approach is that natural channels typically with irregular beds and superelevations can be taken into account, and the resulting approximation by the approach well replicates the direct integral solution. The approach is programmed in MATLAB environment, and the code is open to the public. A well-documented debris-flow event in Sichuan Province, China, is used to demonstrate the presented approach. Results show that the solutions of the flow surface and the mean velocity well reproduce the investigated results. Discussion regarding the model sensitivity and the source of errors concludes the paper.

  3. Measurement and simulation of the two-phase velocity correlation in sudden-expansion gas-particle flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Xing Zhou; Yang Liu; Yi Xu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the present authors measured the gas-particle two-phase velocity correlation in sudden expansion gas-particle flows with a phase Doppler particle anemometer(PDPA) and simulated the system behavior by using both a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS)model and a large-eddy simulation(LES). The results of the measurements yield the axial and radial time-averaged velocities as well as the fluctuation velocities of gas and three particle-size groups(30μm,50μm,and 95μm) and the gasparticle velocity correlation for 30μm and 50μm particles.From the measurements,theoretical analysis,and simulation,it is found that the two-phase velocity correlation of sudden-expansion flows,like that of jet flows,is less than the gas and particle Reynolds stresses. What distinguishes the two-phase velocity correlations of sudden-expansion flow from those of jet and channel flows is the absence of a clear relationship between the two-phase velocity correlation and particle size in sudden-expansion flows. The measurements,theoretical analysis,and numerical simulation all lead to the above-stated conclusions. Quantitatively,the results of the LES are better than those of the RANS model.

  4. The nature of near-wall convection velocity in turbulent channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhui Cao; Jun Chen; Zhensu She

    2008-01-01

    A novel notion of turbulent structure-the local cascade structure-is introduced to study the convection phenomenon in a turbulent channel flow. A space-time cross-correlation method is used to calculate the convection velo-city. It is found that there are two characteristic convection speeds near the wall, one associated with small-scale streaks of a lower speed and another with streamwise vortices and hairpin vortices of a higher speed. The new concept of tur-bulent structure is powerful to illustrate the dominant role of coherent structures in the near-wall convection, and to reveal also the nature of the convection-the propagation of patterns of velocity fluctuations-which is scale-dependent.

  5. A velocity tracking approach for the data assimilation problem in blood flow simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, J; Guerra, T; Sequeira, A

    2016-11-24

    Several advances have been made in data assimilation techniques applied to blood flow modeling. Typically, idealized boundary conditions, only verified in straight parts of the vessel, are assumed. We present a general approach, on the basis of a Dirichlet boundary control problem, that may potentially be used in different parts of the arterial system. The relevance of this method appears when computational reconstructions of the 3D domains, prone to be considered sufficiently extended, are either not possible, or desirable, because of computational costs. On the basis of taking a fully unknown velocity profile as the control, the approach uses a discretize then optimize methodology to solve the control problem numerically. The methodology is applied to a realistic 3D geometry representing a brain aneurysm. The results show that this data assimilation approach may be preferable to a pressure control strategy and that it can significantly improve the accuracy associated to typical solutions obtained using idealized velocity profiles.

  6. Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Cardiac Tamponade Identified by the Flow Velocity Paradoxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, William; Knight, Roneesha S; Kornblith, Aaron; Teismann, Nathan A

    2017-05-15

    The presentation of cardiac tamponade is a spectrum from occult to extreme. The clinical history, physical exam, electrocardiogram, and radiographic findings of tamponade have poor sensitivities and even worse specificities. We use a clinical scenario to demonstrate how point-of-care cardiac ultrasound can diagnose impending cardiac tamponade in a clinically stable patient. The ultrasound finding we recommend is the flow velocity paradoxus, in which respiratory variation causes significant changes in transvalvular inflow velocities, which are exaggerated when tamponade is present. The management of a pericardial effusion depends on its physiologic effect, and point-of-care ultrasound directly measures that effect and expedites patient care. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Coupled flow and anisotropy in the UltraLow Velocity Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Drombosky, Tyler W.

    2016-09-01

    Seismic observations reveal a patchwork of thin and dense structures, named UltraLow Velocity Zones (ULVZs) atop the Earth's core mantle boundary. The high width to height ratio of the ULVZs, their spatial correlation with the edges of Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs), and their preservation as distinct structures in the convecting mantle remain an enigmatic problem. In this article, we carry out a series of numerical simulations using Fast Multipole Boundary Elements Method (FMBEM) to address these questions and study the internal deformation within the ULVZs. Our results demonstrate that coupled flow between dense, low viscosity ULVZ patches and the LLSVP accumulates the ULVZ into stable piles along LLSVP corners, while coalescence and gravitational drainage leads to thin and wide ULVZs away from the corners. Deformation of the matrix is localized within the weaker ULVZ and the LLSVP edges, while the strain in the interior of the LLSVP remains uniform and low, explaining the observed localized anisotropy near LLSVP edges.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  9. A Photographic study of subcooled flow boiling burnout at high heat flux and velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G. [ENEA, National Institute of Thermal-Fluid Dynamics, Rome (Italy); Cumo, M. [University of Rome (Italy); Gallo, D. [University of Palermo (Italy). Department of Nuclear Engineering

    2007-01-15

    The present paper reports the results of a visualization study of the burnout in subcooled flow boiling of water, with square cross section annular geometry (formed by a central heater rod contained in a duct characterized by a square cross section). The coolant velocity is in the range 3-10m/s. High speed movies of flow pattern in subcooled flow boiling of water from the onset of nucleate boiling up to physical burnout of the heater are recorded. From video images (single frames taken with a stroboscope light and an exposure time of 1{mu}s), the following general behaviour of vapour bubbles was observed: when the rate of bubble generation is increasing, with bubbles growing in the superheated layer close to the heating wall, their coalescence produces a type of elongated bubble called vapour blanket. One of the main features of the vapour blanket is that it is rooted to the nucleation site on the heated surface. Bubble dimensions are given as a function of thermal-hydraulic tested conditions for the whole range of velocity until the burnout region. A qualitative analysis of the behaviour of four stainless steel heater wires with different macroscopic surface finishes is also presented, showing the importance of this parameter on the dynamics of the bubbles and on the critical heat flux. (author)

  10. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in low-Reynolds number flows

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Jannis; Ostendorf, Andreas; Gurevich, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rod-like microrotor rotating about its center in a non-axisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo \\textit{et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006)]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transpor...

  11. Comparison of measurements and computations of isothermal flow velocity inside HyperVapotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergis, A., E-mail: a.sergis09@imperial.ac.uk [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Resvanis, K.; Hardalupas, Y. [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Barrett, T. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A popular HHF device is the HyperVapotron (HV). • HVs employ a heat transfer mechanism called the Vapotron effect. • Experimental quantitative visualisation of the device has not been performed. • CFD tools used in the past to analyse HVs did not benchmark the coolant flows. • A PIV experiment is used to create benchmark data and compare them to literature. - Abstract: HyperVapotrons are two-phase water-cooled heat exchangers able to receive high heat fluxes (HHF) by employing a cyclic phenomenon called the “Vapotron Effect”. HyperVapotrons have been used routinely in HHF nuclear fusion applications. A detailed experimental investigation on the effect giving rise to the ability to sustain steady state heat fluxes in excess of 10 MW/m{sup 2} has not yet been possible and hence the phenomenon is not yet well understood. The coolant flow structures that promote the effect have been a major point of interest, and many investigations based on computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations have been performed in the past. The understanding of the physics of the coolant flow inside the device may hold the key to further optimisation of engineering designs. However, past computational investigations have not been experimentally evaluated. Isothermal flow velocity distribution measurements of the fluid flow in HyperVapotron optical models with high spatial resolution are performed in this paper. The same measurements are subsequently calculated via commercial CFD software. The isothermal CFD calculation is compared to the experimental velocity measurements to deduce the accuracy of the CFD investigations carried out. This unique comparison between computational and experimental results in HyperVapotrons will direct future efforts in analysing similar devices.

  12. Flame Spread and Extinction Over a Thick Solid Fuel in Low-Velocity Opposed and Concurrent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Lu, Zhanbin; Wang, Shuangfeng

    2016-05-01

    Flame spread and extinction phenomena over a thick PMMA in purely opposed and concurrent flows are investigated by conducting systematical experiments in a narrow channel apparatus. The present tests focus on low-velocity flow regime and hence complement experimental data previously reported for high and moderate velocity regimes. In the flow velocity range tested, the opposed flame is found to spread much faster than the concurrent flame at a given flow velocity. The measured spread rates for opposed and concurrent flames can be correlated by corresponding theoretical models of flame spread, indicating that existing models capture the main mechanisms controlling the flame spread. In low-velocity gas flows, however, the experimental results are observed to deviate from theoretical predictions. This may be attributed to the neglect of radiative heat loss in the theoretical models, whereas radiation becomes important for low-intensity flame spread. Flammability limits using oxygen concentration and flow velocity as coordinates are presented for both opposed and concurrent flame spread configurations. It is found that concurrent spread has a wider flammable range than opposed case. Beyond the flammability boundary of opposed spread, there is an additional flammable area for concurrent spread, where the spreading flame is sustainable in concurrent mode only. The lowest oxygen concentration allowing concurrent flame spread in forced flow is estimated to be approximately 14 % O2, substantially below that for opposed spread (18.5 % O2).

  13. ASSESSMENT OF DIASTOLIC FUNCTION BY COMBINED TRNSMITRAL AND PULMONARY VENOUS FLOW VELOCITY CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clinical studies have reported that 30% to 50% of patients with congestive heart failure have preserved left ventricular systolic function and isolated diastolic dysfunction. Detection of diastolic dysfunction is important factor in cardiac evaluation of hypertensives. MATERIAL AND METHODS: retrospective study carried out in Medicine department, SIMS, Shimoga for one year from Jan 2013 to Jan 2014. 50 patients who are hypertensive without any abnormality were studied general and systemic examination done, 2d echocardiography done in which transmitral flow velocity (E/A and pulmonary venous A duration- mitral A duration (∆d is measured. RESULT: 32% of subjects were newly diagnosed hypertensives in our study. 56% of cases had normal diastolic function as defined by E/A ratio (>1, 18% of cases in our study with normal E/A ratio were found to have pseudonormal pattern of diastolic function. LVDD of 62% is found in this study. CONCLUSION: The abnormal diastolic function as assessed by abnormal E/A ratio was seen in 44% of cases. Abnormal ∆d was found in 18% of cases out of 56% who had normal E/A ratio. These cases are said to have ‘pseudonormal’ pattern of diastolic function. The current study demonstrated that the presence of LV diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive patients is actually greater than previously reported by studies that analyzed transmitral flow velocity curves alone. To avoid overlooking patients with diastolic dysfunction, the combined analysis of transmitral and pulmonary venous flow velocity curves is recommended.

  14. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for multiple optimal velocity functions with different probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-08-01

    Due to the maximum velocity and safe headway distance of the different vehicles are not exactly the same, an extended macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of multiple optimal velocity functions with probabilities is proposed in this paper. By means of linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability condition considering multiple probabilities optimal velocity is obtained. The KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line through nonlinear analysis. The numerical simulations of influences of multiple maximum velocities and multiple safety distances on model's stability and traffic capacity are carried out. The cases of two different kinds of maximum speeds with same safe headway distance, two different types of safe headway distances with same maximum speed and two different max velocities and two different time-gaps are all explored by numerical simulations. First cases demonstrate that when the proportion of vehicles with a larger vmax increase, the traffic tends to unstable, which also means that jerk and brakes is not conducive to traffic stability and easier to result in stop and go phenomenon. Second cases show that when the proportion of vehicles with greater safety spacing increases, the traffic tends to be unstable, which also means that too cautious assumptions or weak driving skill is not conducive to traffic stability. Last cases indicate that increase of maximum speed is not conducive to traffic stability, while reduction of the safe headway distance is conducive to traffic stability. Numerical simulation manifests that the mixed driving and traffic diversion does not have effect on the traffic capacity when traffic density is low or heavy. Numerical results also show that mixed driving should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when the traffic density is lower, while the traffic diversion should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when

  15. A meshless scheme for incompressible fluid flow using a velocity-pressure correction method

    KAUST Repository

    Bourantas, Georgios

    2013-12-01

    A meshless point collocation method is proposed for the numerical solution of the steady state, incompressible Navier-Stokes (NS) equations in their primitive u-v-p formulation. The flow equations are solved in their strong form using either a collocated or a semi-staggered "grid" configuration. The developed numerical scheme approximates the unknown field functions using the Moving Least Squares approximation. A velocity, along with a pressure correction scheme is applied in the context of the meshless point collocation method. The proposed meshless point collocation (MPC) scheme has the following characteristics: (i) it is a truly meshless method, (ii) there is no need for pressure boundary conditions since no pressure constitutive equation is solved, (iii) it incorporates simplicity and accuracy, (iv) results can be obtained using collocated or semi-staggered "grids", (v) there is no need for the usage of a curvilinear system of coordinates and (vi) it can solve steady and unsteady flows. The lid-driven cavity flow problem, for Reynolds numbers up to 5000, has been considered, by using both staggered and collocated grid configurations. Following, the Backward-Facing Step (BFS) flow problem was considered for Reynolds numbers up to 800 using a staggered grid. As a final example, the case of a laminar flow in a two-dimensional tube with an obstacle was examined. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. A relation between velocity-vorticity correlations and skin friction in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the skin friction and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient (Cf) is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The skin friction coefficient can be derived from the mean spanwise vorticity at the wall. Double integration with respect to the wall-normal direction (from 0 to y) is needed to derive Cf from the second derivative of the mean spanwise vorticity in the mean spanwise vorticity equation. One more integration is needed to find the contribution of each component to Cf from the wall to the boundary layer edge (from 0 to δ) . The present formula encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  17. An investigation of constant pressure gas well testing influenced by high velocity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, S. [PEMEX Exploracion-Produccion, Mexico City (Mexico); Samaniego, F. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Cinco-Ley, H. [Universidad de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Facultad de Ingeniera; Bouhroum, A.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of transient pressure analysis of gas flow under either constant bottom-hole conditions or the constant wellhead pressure conditions. The effect of formation damage, wellbore storage and high velocity flow are included in the model. The analysis of simulated well tests showed that the interpretation methods used for liquid flow are generally accurate when the p{sub p}(p) is used. For these conditions, a graph of 1/q{sub D} vs log t{sub D} presents gradually lower values of 1.1513 as the value of p{sub wf} decreases: For pressure buildup conditions a graph of p{sub pD}(1, {Delta}t{sub aD})/q{sub D}({Delta}t{sub aD}=0) vs (t{sub aD}+{Delta}t{sub aD})/{Delta}t{sub aD} shows values of this slope within 1% of the 1.1513 value. The maximum error was in the rate performance simulated cases that included high-velocity flows; being less than 13%. This upper limit occurs when the formation has a relatively `high` permeability (around 1 mD) and the rate performance test is affected by high-velocity flow. It was found that pressure buildup tests are superior to rate performance tests because high-velocity flow does not affect the slope of the straight line portion of the buildup curve. However, it was also found, through derivative analysis of simulated buildup tests, that the skin factor is sensibly miscalculated when the high-velocity flow effect is singificant. This problem could lead to errors in the calculation of the skin factor, s, up to 300%. (orig.) [Deutsch] Vorgestellt werden instationaere Testergebnisse an Gas-Sonden unter konstanten Bohrlochsohlenbedingungen bzw. konstantem Bohrlochkopfdruck. Folgende Stoereffekte: Sondennahe Tragerschaedigung, Speicherkapazitaet des Bohrloches und die bei der Gasstroemung eintretende hohe Fliessgeschwindigkeit werden beruecksichtigt. Die Auswertung von simulierten Testergebnissen zeigt, dass die zur Interpretation von Erdoelsonden bewaehrten Verfahren in der Darstellung p{sub p}(p) gute

  18. Blood flow velocity in the Popliteal Vein using Transverse Oscillation Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm;

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition leading to varicose veins, leg edema, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcerations. Ultrasound (US) is the main modality for examination of venous disease. Color Doppler and occasionally spectral Doppler US (SDUS) are used for evaluation of the venous...... in the veins of the lower limbs. Four volunteers were recruited for the study. A standardized flow was provoked with a cuff compression-decompression system placed around the lower leg. The average peak velocity in the popliteal vein of the four volunteers was 151.5 cm/s for SDUS and 105.9 cm/s for TOUS (p

  19. Monitoring of surface velocity of hyper-concentrated flow in a laboratory flume by means of fully-digital PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, Donatella; Di Leonardo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    High flow conditions, which are generally characterized by high sediment concentrations, do not permit the use of traditional measurement equipment. Traditional techniques usually are based on the intrusive measure of the vertical profile of flow velocity and on the linking of water depth with the discharge through the rating curve. The major disadvantage of these measurement techniques is that they are difficult to use and not safe for operators especially in high flow conditions. The point is that, as literature shows (see as an example Moramarco and Termini, 2015), especially in such conditions, the measurement of surface velocity distribution is important to evaluate the mean flow velocity and, thus, the flow discharge. In the last decade, image-based techniques have been increasingly used for surface velocity measurements (among others Joeau et al., 2008). Experimental program has been recently conducted at the Hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials Engineering (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy) in order to analyze the propagation phenomenon of hyper-concentrated flow in a defense channel. The experimental apparatus includes a high-precision camera and a system allowing the images recording. This paper investigates the utility and the efficiency of the digital image-technique for remote monitoring of surface velocity in hyper-concentrated flow by the aid of data collected during experiments conducted in the laboratory flume. In particular the present paper attention is focused on the estimation procedure of the velocity vectors and on their sensitivity with parameters (number of images, spatial resolution of interrogation area,) of the images processing procedure. References Jodeau M., A. Hauet, A. Paquier, Le Coz J., Dramais G., Application and evaluation of LS-PIV technique for the monitoring of river surface in high flow conditions, Flow Measurements and Instrumentation, Vol.19, No.2, 2008, pp.117

  20. Changes in Maternal Posterior and Anterior Cerebral Artery Flow Velocity During Pregnancy and Postpartum-A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, Teelkien R.; Haeri, Sina; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Belfort, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundTo evaluate the normal range of blood flow velocity in the maternal anterior (ACA) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA) along the normal pregnancy and postpartum period. MethodsTranscranial Doppler ultrasound was used to measure the systolic, diastolic, and mean blood velocities in the AC

  1. Coronary artery flow measurement using navigator echo gated phase contrast magnetic resonance velocity mapping at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin; Sharma, Puneet; Oshinski, John

    2008-01-01

    A validation study and early results for non-invasive, in vivo measurement of coronary artery blood flow using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) at 3.0T is presented. Accuracy of coronary artery blood flow measurements by phase contrast MRI is limited by heart and respiratory motion as well as the small size of the coronary arteries. In this study, a navigator echo gated, cine phase velocity mapping technique is described to obtain time-resolved velocity and flow waveforms of small diameter vessels at 3.0T. Phantom experiments using steady, laminar flow are presented to validate the technique and show flow rates measured by 3.0T phase contrast MRI to be accurate within 15% of true flow rates. Subsequently, in vivo scans on healthy volunteers yield velocity measurements for blood flow in the right, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries. Measurements of average, cross-sectional velocity were obtainable in 224/243 (92%) of the cardiac phases. Time-averaged, cross-sectional velocity of the blood flow was 6.8+/-4.3cm/s in the LAD, 8.0+/-3.8cm/s in the LCX, and 6.0+/-1.6cm/s in the RCA.

  2. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of the flow velocities in a microchannel by wide/evanescent field illuminations with particle/single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Hongwei; Li, Ying; Silber-Li, Zhanhua; Ma, Yinfa; Lin, Bingcheng

    2005-04-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence imaging method was developed to simultaneously measure flow velocities in the middle and near wall of a channel with particles or single molecules, by selectively switching from the wide field excitation mode to the evanescent wave excitation mode. Fluorescent microbeads with a diameter of 175 nm were used to calibrate the system, and the collisions of microbeads with channel walls were directly observed. The 175 nm microbeads velocities in the main flow and at 275 nm from the bottom of the channel were measured. The measured velocities of particles or single molecules in two positions in a microchannel were consistent with the calculated value based on Poiseuille flow theory when the diameter of a microbead was considered. The errors caused by Brownian diffusion in our measurement were negligible compared to the flow velocity. Single lambda DNA molecules were then used as a flowing tracer to measure the velocities. The velocity can be obtained at a distance of 309.0 +/- 82.6 nm away from bottom surface of the channel. The technique may be potentially useful for studying molecular transportation both in the center and at the bottom of the channel, and interactions between molecules and microchannel surfaces. It is especially important that the technique can be permitted to measure both velocities in the same experiment to eliminate possible experimental inconsistencies.

  4. The dependence of Pi2 waveforms on periodic velocity enhancements within bursty bulk flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Murphy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pi2s are a category of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF waves associated with the onset of magnetic substorms. Recent work has suggested that the deceleration of bulk plasma flows in the central plasmasheet, known as bursty bulk flows (BBFs, are able to directly-drive Pi2 oscillations. Some of these studies have further shown evidence that there is a one-to-one correlation between Pi2 magnetic waveforms observed on the ground and periodic peaks in flow velocity within the BBF, known as flow bursts. Utilising a favourable conjunction between the Geotail spacecraft and the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity (CARISMA magnetometer array on 31 May 1998, we examine the causality of the link between BBF flow bursts and Pi2 waveforms. Using a series of analytical tests in both the time and frequency domains, we find that while the Pi2 and BBF waveforms are very similar, the ground response for this event occurs prior to the observed flow enhancements in the magnetotail. We conclude that during this specific case study the temporal variations of the flow bursts within the BBF are not directly-driving the observed ground-based Pi2 waveforms, despite the fact that a visual inspection of both time-series might initially suggest that there is a causal relationship. We postulate that rather than there being a direct causal relation, the similar waveforms observed in both Pi2s and BBFs may result from temporal variations in a common source for both the BBFs and the Pi2s, such as magnetic reconnection in the tail, this source modulating both the Pi2 and BBF at the same frequency.

  5. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  6. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  7. Feasible domain of Walker's unsteady wall-layer model for the velocity profile in turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIKHAIL D. MIKHAILOV

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work studies, in detail, the unsteady wall-layer model of Walker et al. (1989, AIAA J., 27, 140 – 149 for the velocity profile in turbulent flows. Two new terms are included in the transcendental non-linear system of equations that is used to determine the three main model parameters. The mathematical and physical feasible domains of the model are determined as a function of the non-dimensional pressure gradient parameter (p+. An explicit parameterization is presented for the average period between bursts (, the origin of time ( and the integration constant of the time dependent equation (A0 in terms of p+. In the present procedure, all working systems of differential equations are transformed, resulting in a very fast computational procedure that can be used to develop real-time flow simulators.

  8. Feasible domain of Walker's unsteady wall-layer model for the velocity profile in turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Mikhail D; Freire, Atila P Silva

    2014-12-01

    The present work studies, in detail, the unsteady wall-layer model of Walker et al. (1989, AIAA J., 27, 140 – 149) for the velocity profile in turbulent flows. Two new terms are included in the transcendental nonlinear system of equations that is used to determine the three main model parameters. The mathematical and physical feasible domains of the model are determined as a function of the non-dimensional pressure gradient parameter (p+). An explicit parameterization is presented for the average period between bursts (T+B), the origin of time (t+0 ) and the integration constant of the time dependent equation (A0) in terms of p+. In the present procedure, all working systems of differential equations are transformed, resulting in a very fast computational procedure that can be used to develop real-time flow simulators.

  9. Influence of flow velocity and experimental setup on denitrification processes at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisson, A.; Aquilina, L.; Bour, O.; De Ridder, J.

    2009-04-01

    In fractured media, physical heterogeneities lead to a large distribution of flow velocities that can partly control chemical reactions involving microbial activity. The aim of this project is to assess influence of fluid flow velocity on chemical reactivity at the laboratory scale. The experimental setup tries to reproduce autotrophic denitrification observed in a cristaline aquifer (Ploemeur; France) where denitrification seems to be enhanced by the exploitation of the aquifer. The experimental setup is based on a column filled with crushed granite from the Ploemeur site. Nitrate-rich water (C=40mg/l) is injected through the column under controlled flow conditions. Nitrate degradation is measured at the outlet and at different sampling plots along the column. These experiments use natural field water without treatment in order to use total available communities instead of one known bacterial community. Typically, the experiments are made during ten days at fluid flow velocities ranging from 0.5 to 5 cm/h. The first point is that the use of uncontrolled bacterial communities in experimental setup can lead to important evolution of the bacterial activity and competition. Results show that this competition is not only related to the experimental conditions but also to the experimental apparatus equipment. Batch experiments show that commonly used polymers (PVC, Tygon, Teflon) can react with nitrates via heterotrophic denitrification within the same time scale as the rock reactivity. Such reactions can even overwhelm the studied reaction. To assess the role of the experimental conditions, we control materials reactivity compared to the relevant time scale of the experiments. The first set of experiments exhibit autotrophic denitrification along the column with variations of the location of the reactive zone during the experiments. Reactivity arises all along the experiments in the first hours but becomes highly localized at the inlet of the column in the following

  10. Comparison of Simultaneous PIV and Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry in Low Velocity Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) technique that relies on the photo- dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser-induced fluorescence. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is about 50 micro-s. The feasibility of using HTV for probing low- speed flows (a few m/s) is investigated by using an inert, heated gas as a means to increase the OH species lifetime. Unlike particle-based techniques, MTV does not suffer from tracer settling, which is particularly problematic at low speeds. Furthermore, the flow needs to be seeded with only a small mole fraction of water vapor, making it safer for both the user and facilities than other MTV techniques based on corrosive or toxic chemical tracers. HTV is demonstrated on a steam-seeded nitrogen jet at approximately 75 C in the laminar (Umean=3.31 m/s, Re=1,540), transitional (Umean=4.48 m/s, Re=2,039), and turbulent (Umean=6.91 m/s, Re=3,016) regimes at atmospheric pressure. The measured velocity profiles are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed simultaneously with a second imager. Seeding for the PIV is achieved by introducing micron-sized water droplets into the flow with the steam; the same laser sheet is used for PIV and HTV to guarantee spatial and temporal overlap of the data. Optimizing each of these methods, however, requires conflicting operating conditions: higher temperatures benefit the HTV signals but reduce the available seed density for the PIV through evaporation. Nevertheless, data are found to agree within 10% for the instantaneous velocity profiles and within 5% for the mean profiles and demonstrate the feasibility of HTV for low-speed flows at moderate to high temperatures.

  11. A new method for quantifying and modeling large scale surface water inundation dynamics and key drivers using multiple time series of Earth observation and river flow data. A case study for Australia's Murray-Darling Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimhuber, Valentin; Tulbure, Mirela G.; Broich, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Periodically inundated surface water (SW) areas such as floodplains are hotspots of biodiversity and provide a broad range of ecosystem services but have suffered alarming declines in recent history. Large scale flooding events govern the dynamics of these areas and are a critical component of the terrestrial water cycle, but their propagation through river systems and the corresponding long term SW dynamics remain poorly quantified on continental or global scales. In this research, we used an unprecedented Landsat-based time series of SW maps (1986-2011), to develop statistical inundation models and quantify the role of driver variables across the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) (1 million square-km), which is Australia's bread basket and subject to competing demands over limited water resources. We fitted generalized additive models (GAM) between SW extent as the dependent variable and river flow data from 68 gauges, spatial time series of rainfall (P; interpolated gauge data), evapotranspiration (ET; AWRA-L land surface model) and soil moisture (SM; active passive microwave satellite remote sensing) as predictor variables. We used a fully directed and connected river network (Australian Geofabric) in combination with ancillary data, to develop a spatial modeling framework consisting of 18,521 individual modeling units. We then fitted individual models for all modeling units, which were made up of 10x10 km grid cells split into floodplain, floodplain-lake and non-floodplain areas, depending on the type of water body and its hydrologic connectivity to a gauged river. We applied the framework to quantify flood propagation times for all major river and floodplain systems across the MDB, which were in good accordance with observed travel times. After incorporating these flow lag times into the models, average goodness of fit was high across floodplains and floodplain-lake modeling units (r-squared > 0.65), which were primarily driven by river flow, and lower for non

  12. Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

  13. Comparative study of the discrete velocity and lattice Boltzmann methods for rarefied gas flows through irregular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Lindsay, Scott; Liu, Haihu; Wu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    Rooted from the gas kinetics, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a powerful tool in modeling hydrodynamics. In the past decade, it has been extended to simulate rarefied gas flows beyond the Navier-Stokes level, either by using the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature, or by introducing the relaxation time that is a function of the gas-wall distance. While the former method, with a limited number of discrete velocities (e.g., D2Q36), is accurate up to the early transition flow regime, the latter method (especially the multiple relaxation time (MRT) LBM), with the same discrete velocities as those used in simulating hydrodynamics (i.e., D2Q9), is accurate up to the free-molecular flow regime in the planar Poiseuille flow. This is quite astonishing in the sense that less discrete velocities are more accurate. In this paper, by solving the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equation accurately via the discrete velocity method, we find that the high-order Gauss-Hermite quadrature cannot describe the large variation in the velocity distribution function when the rarefaction effect is strong, but the MRT-LBM can capture the flow velocity well because it is equivalent to solving the Navier-Stokes equations with an effective shear viscosity. Since the MRT-LBM has only been validated in simple channel flows, and for complex geometries it is difficult to find the effective viscosity, it is necessary to assess its performance for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. Our numerical simulations based on the accurate discrete velocity method suggest that the accuracy of the MRT-LBM is reduced significantly in the simulation of rarefied gas flows through the rough surface and porous media. Our simulation results could serve as benchmarking cases for future development of the LBM for modeling and simulation of rarefied gas flows in complex geometries.

  14. Velocity correlations and spatial dependencies between neighbors in a unidirectional flow of pedestrians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzycki, Jakub; WÄ s, Jarosław; Hedayatifar, Leila; Hassanibesheli, Forough; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the paper is an analysis of self-organization patterns observed in the unidirectional flow of pedestrians. On the basis of experimental data from Zhang et al. [J. Zhang et al., J. Stat. Mech. (2011) P06004, 10.1088/1742-5468/2011/06/P06004], we analyze the mutual positions and velocity correlations between pedestrians when walking along a corridor. The angular and spatial dependencies of the mutual positions reveal a spatial structure that remains stable during the crowd motion. This structure differs depending on the value of n , for the consecutive n th -nearest-neighbor position set. The preferred position for the first-nearest neighbor is on the side of the pedestrian, while for further neighbors, this preference shifts to the axis of movement. The velocity correlations vary with the angle formed by the pair of neighboring pedestrians and the direction of motion and with the time delay between pedestrians' movements. The delay dependence of the correlations shows characteristic oscillations, produced by the velocity oscillations when striding; however, a filtering of the main frequency of individual striding out reduces the oscillations only partially. We conclude that pedestrians select their path directions so as to evade the necessity of continuously adjusting their speed to their neighbors'. They try to keep a given distance, but follow the person in front of them, as well as accepting and observing pedestrians on their sides. Additionally, we show an empirical example that illustrates the shape of a pedestrian's personal space during movement.

  15. Electrical conductivity and velocity of highly ionized plasma flows - Theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendell, E. W.; Park, C.; Posch, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an immersible, three-coil, magnetic-induction probe, previously tested in a low-density supersonic argon jet, to measure electrical conductivity and velocity profiles of a highly ionized high-density nitrogen jet in the continuum flow regime where effects due to probe bow shocks and boundary layers might not be negligible. Measured centerline values of electrical conductivity and velocity were compared with predictions based on a theoretical analysis previously developed to study the gas as it expanded adiabatically and inviscidly from an equilibrium sonic state to the nozzle exit. The resulting numerical exit plane values for electron density and electron temperature were then substituted into the Spitzer-Haerm conductivity formula to compute a theoretical conductivity which agreed within 40% of the measured conductivity, while the calculated and experimental velocity values differed by as much as 50%. The lack of agreement was attributed to the possible use of invalid assumptions and boundary conditions in the computer analysis or to the unknown effects of shocks on the probe data.

  16. Voids and superstructures: correlations and induced large-scale velocity flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lares, Marcelo; Luparello, Heliana E.; Maldonado, Victoria; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Paz, Dante J.; Ceccarelli, Laura; Garcia Lambas, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The expanding complex pattern of filaments, walls and voids build the evolving cosmic web with material flowing from underdense on to high density regions. Here, we explore the dynamical behaviour of voids and galaxies in void shells relative to neighbouring overdense superstructures, using the Millenium simulation and the main galaxy catalogue in Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. We define a correlation measure to estimate the tendency of voids to be located at a given distance from a superstructure. We find voids-in-clouds (S-types) preferentially located closer to superstructures than voids-in-voids (R-types) although we obtain that voids within ∼40 h-1 Mpc of superstructures are infalling in a similar fashion independently of void type. Galaxies residing in void shells show infall towards the closest superstructure, along with the void global motion, with a differential velocity component depending on their relative position in the shell with respect to the direction to the superstructure. This effect is produced by void expansion and therefore is stronger for R-types. We also find that galaxies in void shells facing the superstructure flow towards the overdensities faster than galaxies elsewhere at the same relative distance to the superstructure. The results obtained for the simulation are also reproduced for the Sky Survey Data Release data with a linearized velocity field implementation.

  17. Effects of prostaglandin analogs on blood flow velocity and resistance in the ophthalmic artery of rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amália Turner Giannico

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prostaglandin analogs on blood flow in the ophthalmic artery of clinically healthy rabbits. Methods: Fifty-five clinically healthy New Zealand white rabbits were divided into six groups, and the left eyes were treated for four weeks with the preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK only or a topical formulation of different prostaglandin analogs (bimatoprost BAK, tafluprost BAK-free, travoprost BAK, travoprost POLYQUAD, and latanoprost BAK. Color Doppler imaging was performed before and after the treatments. The mean values of the peak systolic velocity (PSV and end diastolic velocity and the resistive index (RI were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the differences pre- and post-treatment for each drug and post-treatment among the drugs. Results: The prostaglandin analogs did not affect PSV. Bimatoprost BAK, travoprost POLYQUAD, and latanoprost BAK did not change RI. Tafluprost BAK-free and travoprost BAK therapy resulted in similar reductions in RI. No significant differences pre- and post-treatment were found when BAK was administered alone. Conclusion: The prostaglandin analogs tafluprost BAK-free and travoprost BAK improved blood flow in the ophthalmic artery in healthy New Zealand white rabbits, which suggests that these drugs enhance the prevention of the progression the progression of glaucoma.

  18. The effect of nitrous oxide on cerebral blood flow velocity in children anaesthetised with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowney, D A; Fairgrieve, R; Bissonnette, B

    2004-01-01

    To determine the effects of nitrous oxide on middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) during sevoflurane anaesthesia in children, CBFV was measured using transcranial Doppler sonography in 16 ASA I or II children. Anaesthesia consisted of 1.0 MAC sevoflurane in 30% oxygen with intermittent positive pressure ventilation maintaining FEco2 at 38 mmHg (5.0 kPa) and a caudal epidural block using 0.25% bupivacaine 1.0 ml.kg-1. The remainder of the inspired gas was varied in one of two sequences either air/nitrous oxide/air or nitrous oxide/air/nitrous oxide. The results showed that CBFV decreased when nitrous oxide was replaced by air (p = 0.03) and returned to its initial value when nitrous oxide was reintroduced. CBFV increased when air was replaced by nitrous oxide (p = 0.04) and returned to its initial value when air was reintroduced. Mean heart rate and blood pressure remained constant. We conclude that nitrous oxide increases cerebral blood flow velocity in healthy children anaesthetised with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane.

  19. Interfacial area, velocity and void fraction in two-phase slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojasoy, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Riznic, J.R. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The internal flow structure of air-water plug/slug flow in a 50.3 mm dia transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a four-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 0.55 to 2.20 m/s and 0.27 to 2.20 m/s, respectively, and area-averaged void fractions ranged from about 10 to 70%. The local distributions of void fractions, interfacial area concentration and interface velocity were measured. Contributions from small spherical bubbles and large elongated slug bubbles toward the total void fraction and interfacial area concentration were differentiated. It was observed that the small bubble void contribution to the overall void fraction was small indicating that the large slug bubble void fraction was a dominant factor in determining the total void fraction. However, the small bubble interfacial area contribution was significant in the lower and upper portions of the pipe cross sections.

  20. Two different approaches for creating a prescribed opposed-flow velocity field for flame spread experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmignani Luca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Opposed-flow flame spread over solid fuels is a fundamental area of research in fire science. Typically combustion wind tunnels are used to generate the opposing flow of oxidizer against which a laminar flame spread occurs along the fuel samples. The spreading flame is generally embedded in a laminar boundary layer, which interacts with the strong buoyancy-induced flow to affect the mechanism of flame spread. In this work, two different approaches for creating the opposed-flow are compared. In the first approach, a vertical combustion tunnel is used where a thin fuel sample, thin acrylic or ashless filter paper, is held vertically along the axis of the test-section with the airflow controlled by controlling the duty cycles of four fans. As the sample is ignited, a flame spreads downward in a steady manner along a developing boundary layer. In the second approach, the sample is held in a movable cart placed in an eight-meter tall vertical chamber filled with air. As the sample is ignited, the cart is moved downward (through a remote-controlled mechanism at a prescribed velocity. The results from the two approaches are compared to establish the boundary layer effect on flame spread over thin fuels.

  1. Velocity fields of a bed-load layer under a turbulent liquid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Penteado, Marcos Roberto Mendes

    2016-01-01

    The transport of sediments by a fluid flow is commonly found in nature and in industry. In nature, it is found in rivers, oceans, deserts, and other environments. In industry, it is found in petroleum pipelines conveying grains, in sewer systems, and in dredging lines, for example. This study investigates experimentally the transport of the grains of a granular bed sheared by a turbulent liquid flow. In our experiments, fully developed turbulent water flows were imposed over a flat granular bed of known granulometry. Under the tested conditions, the grains were transported as bed load, i.e., they became entrained by rolling and sliding over each other, forming a moving granular layer. The present experiments were performed close to incipient bed load, a case for which experimental data on grains velocities are scarce. Distinct from previous experiments, an entrance length assured that the water stream over the loose bed was fully developed. At different water flow rates, the moving layer was filmed using a hi...

  2. Two different approaches for creating a prescribed opposed-flow velocity field for flame spread experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmignani, Luca; Celniker, Greg; Bussett, Kyle; Paolini, Christopher; Bhattacharjee, Subrata

    2015-05-01

    Opposed-flow flame spread over solid fuels is a fundamental area of research in fire science. Typically combustion wind tunnels are used to generate the opposing flow of oxidizer against which a laminar flame spread occurs along the fuel samples. The spreading flame is generally embedded in a laminar boundary layer, which interacts with the strong buoyancy-induced flow to affect the mechanism of flame spread. In this work, two different approaches for creating the opposed-flow are compared. In the first approach, a vertical combustion tunnel is used where a thin fuel sample, thin acrylic or ashless filter paper, is held vertically along the axis of the test-section with the airflow controlled by controlling the duty cycles of four fans. As the sample is ignited, a flame spreads downward in a steady manner along a developing boundary layer. In the second approach, the sample is held in a movable cart placed in an eight-meter tall vertical chamber filled with air. As the sample is ignited, the cart is moved downward (through a remote-controlled mechanism) at a prescribed velocity. The results from the two approaches are compared to establish the boundary layer effect on flame spread over thin fuels.

  3. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo; Pott, Frank Christian

    2008-08-01

    In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response. There were nine volunteers (four women) who were lowered into a 0 degrees C immersion tank for 60 s. Middle cerebral artery mean velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation in respiratory rate (from 12 +/- 3 to 21 +/- 5 breaths, min(-1)) and tidal volume (1022 +/- 142 to 1992 +/- 253 ml). Though end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased from 4.9 +/- 0.13 to 3.9 +/- 0.21 kPa, CBFV was insignificantly reduced by 7 +/- 4% during immersion with a brief nadir of 21 +/- 4%. Even without prior cold-water experience, subjects were able to suppress reflex hyperventilation following ice-water immersion, maintaining the cerebral blood flow velocity at a level not associated with impaired consciousness. This study implies that those susceptible to accidental cold-water immersion could benefit from education in cold-shock response and the possibility of reducing the ventilatory response voluntarily.

  4. Velocity distribution of the flow field in the cyclonic zone of cyclone-static micro-bubble flotation column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Xiao-wei; Liu Jiong-tian; Wang Yong-tian; Cao Yi-jun

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been conducted to study the flow field in a cyclone static micro-bubble flotation column.The method of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used.The flow field velocity distribution in both cross section and longitudinal section within cyclonic zone was studied for different circulating volumes.The cross sectional vortex was also analyzed.The results show that in cross section as the circulating volume increases from 0.187 to 0.350 m3/h,the flow velocity ranges from 0 to 0.68 m/s.The flow field is mainly a non-vortex potential flow that forms a free vortex without outside energy input.In the cyclonic region the vortex deviates from the center of the flotation column because a single tangential opening introduces circulating fluid into the column.The tangential component of the velocity plays a defining role in the cross section.In the longitudinal section the velocity ranges from 0 to 0.08 m/s.The flow velocity increases as does the circulating volume.Advantageous mineral separation conditions arise from the combined effects of cyclonic flow in cross and longitudinal section.

  5. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  6. The influence of lithology on surface water sources | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variability of surface water sources within a basin is vital to our ability to manage the impacts of climate variability and land cover change. Water stable isotopes can be used as a tool to determine geographic and seasonal sources of water at the basin scale. Previous studies in the Coastal Range of Oregon reported that the variation in the isotopic signatures of surface water does not conform to the commonly observed “rainout effect”, which exhibits a trend of increasing isotopic depletion with rising elevation. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate the mechanisms governing seasonal and spatial variations in the isotopic signature of surface waters within the Marys River Basin, located in the leeward side of the Oregon Coastal Range. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected every 2-3 weeks for isotopic analysis of δ18O and δ2H for one year. Results indicate a significant difference in isotopic signature between watersheds underlain by basalt and sandstone. The degree of separation was the most distinct during the summer when low flows reflect deeper groundwater sources, whereas isotopic signatures during the rainy season (fall and winter) showed a greater degree of similarity between the two lithologies. This indicates that baseflow within streams drained by sandstone versus basalt is being supplied from two distinctly separate water sources. In addition, Marys River flow at the outle

  7. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-01-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in s

  8. Integrated modeling of groundwater–surface water interactions in a tile-drained agricultural field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemeijer, J.C.; Velde, van der Y.; McLaren, R.G.; Geer, van F.C.; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of groundwater–surface water interaction is needed to evaluate and simulate water and solute transport in catchments. However, direct measurements of the contributions of different flow routes from specific surfaces within a catchment toward the surface water are rarely av

  9. Detailed documentation of dynamic changes in flow depth and surface velocity during a large flood in a steep mountain stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yuko; Uchida, Taro

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the discharge capacity of channels and changes in hydraulic properties during large storms is essential for prediction of flash floods. However, such information is limited for steep mountain channels because of their complex nature and the lack of measured data. Thus, we obtained detailed water-level and surface-velocity data during large floods of a steep mountain channel, and documented how complex channel morphology affected water flow during large storms. We installed water-level and surface-velocity sensors at a cascade and at a pool that was 10 m downstream at the Aono Research Forest of the Arboricultural Research Institute of the University of Tokyo Forests in Japan. We successfully obtained 1-min interval data for a major storm with total precipitation of 288 mm that fell over 59 h and a maximum rainfall intensity of 25 mm/h. During the storm, height of the water surface from the deepest point of each cross section ranged from 0.35 to 1.57 m and surface velocity ranged from 0.35 to 4.15 m/s. As expected, the changes in flow depth, surface velocity, and velocity profiles were complex and differed even between the cascade and adjacent pool cross sections. Dramatic changes in flow conditions first occurred at the cascade when discharge increased to a certain point, when water suddenly stagnated at the foot of the cascade and submerged flow might have occurred. Thereafter, the water level increased remarkably but surface velocity and the velocity profile stayed almost constant at the cascade cross section. At the downstream pool, where most rocks were submerged at a mean water depth of 0.7 m, surface velocity suddenly increased dramatically and the velocity profile changed as very slow flow developed in the lower portion of the profile, while water levels increased only slightly. When the rainfall diminished, first, the surface velocity markedly declined, then the velocity profile returned to its original state at the pool, and then submerged

  10. The effect of channel shape, bed morphology, and shipwrecks on flow velocities in the Upper St. Clair River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Oberg, Kevin; Best, Jim; Parsons, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Great Lakes of North America, the St. Clair River is the major outlet of Lake Huron and conveys water to Lake St. Clair which then flows to Lake Erie. One major topic of interest is morphological change in the St. Clair River and its impact on water levels in the Upper Great Lakes and connecting channel flows. A combined multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetric survey and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) flow survey of the outlet of Lake Huron and the Upper St. Clair River was conducted July 21 – 25, 2008. This paper presents how channel morphology and shipwrecks affect the flow in the Upper St. Clair River. The river is most constricted at the Blue Water Bridge near Port Huron, Michigan, with water velocities over 2 ms-1 for a flow of 5,200 m3s-1. Downstream of this constriction, the river flows around a bend and expands creating a large recirculation zone along the left bank due to flow separation. This recirculation zone reduces the effective channel width, and thus increases flow velocities to over 2 ms-1 in this region. The surveys reveal several shipwrecks on the bed of the St. Clair River, which possess distinct wakes in their flow velocity downstream of the wrecks. The constriction and expansion of the channel, combined with forcing of the flow by bed topography, initiates channel-scale secondary flow, creating streamwise vortices that maintain coherence downstream over a distance of several channel widths.

  11. High-flow-velocity and shear-rate imaging by use of color Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, T G; Kulkarni, M D; Yazdanfar, S; Rollins, A M; Izatt, J A

    1999-11-15

    Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is capable of precise velocity mapping in turbid media. Previous CDOCT systems based on the short-time Fourier transform have been limited to maximum flow velocities of the order of tens of millimeters per second. We describe a technique, based on interference signal demodulation at multiple frequencies, to extend the physiological relevance of CDOCT by increasing the dynamic range of measurable velocities to hundreds of millimeters per second. The physiologically important parameter of shear rate is also derived from CDOCT measurements. The measured flow-velocity profiles and shear-rate distributions correlate very well with theoretical predictions. The multiple demodulation technique, therefore, may be useful to monitor blood flow in vivo and to identify regions with high and low shear rates.

  12. [Coronary artery blood flow velocity non-invasively measured using a vessel-tracking pulsed Doppler system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, O; Aizawa, O; Okamura, T; Yoshida, T; Furuhata, H; Seo, Y; Iinuma, K; Shiki, E

    1988-09-01

    A newly-developed noninvasive method was used to measure left coronary blood flow during phantom experiments. Two techniques were used in which: (1) the sample position can always be set in a fluctuating vessel using a wall echo-tracking method with a phase-locked-loop, and (2) the Doppler reference signal was generated separately synchronous with the wall echo signal. These techniques were combined, using a commercially available pulsed Doppler apparatus (SSH-40B: Toshiba). Basic experiments were performed using a blood vessel phantom to verify the validity of these systems. Blood flow velocity in the fluctuating tube could be measured clearly using a vessel-tracking method. The blood flow velocity of the left anterior descending artery was measured in three normal subjects and in seven patients from the third intercostal space along the left sternal border. The velocity pattern was characterized by a crescendo-decrescendo shape in diastole. The peak velocity which appeared in diastole ranged from 19 to 69 cm/sec, with no difference by disease entity. However, in all cases, the blood flow velocity signals were marred by extraneous signals, making it impossible to measure blood flow velocity during systole. Further improvement of the system is mandatory in order to use this flowmeter clinically.

  13. Development of ultrasonic velocity profile method for flow rate measurements of power plant (effect of measurement volume on turbulent flow measurement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroshige, Kikura; Gentaro, Yamanaka; Tsuyoshi, Taishi; Masanori, Aritomi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Yasushi, Takeda [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Michitsugu, Mori [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Ultrasonic Velocity Profile method has many advantages for flow rate measurement of power plant over the conventional flow measurement methods, such as measurement of the instantaneous velocity profile along the measuring line and its applicability to opaque liquids. Furthermore, the method has an advantage of being non-intrusive. Hence, it is applicable to various flow conditions, although it requires a relatively large measurement volume. In this paper, the effects of the measurement volume on the mean velocity profile for flow rate measurements of power plant and the Reynolds stress measurement have been investigated for fully developed turbulent pipe flows in a vertical pipe. The results are then compared with data obtained by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). (authors)

  14. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (h alpha CGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of haCGRP (2 mu...

  15. Combining flow routing modelling and direct velocity measurement for optimal discharge estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Corato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure is proposed for estimating river discharge hydrographs during flood events, using only water level data measured at a gauged site, as well as 1-D shallow water modelling and sporadic maximum surface flow velocity measurements. During flood, the piezometric level is surmised constant in the vertical plane of the river section, where the top of the banks is always above the river level, and is well represented by the recorded stage hydrograph. The river is modelled along the reach directly located downstream the upstream gauged section, where discharge hydrograph is sought after. For the stability with respect to the topographic error, as well as for the simplicity of the data required to satisfy the boundary conditions, a diffusive hydraulic model is adopted for flow routing. Assigned boundary conditions are: (1 the recorded stage hydrograph at the upstream river site and (2 the zero diffusion condition at the downstream end of the reach. The MAST algorithm is used for the numerical solution of the flow routing problem, which is embedded in the Brent algorithm used for the computation of the optimum Manning coefficient. Based on synthetic tests concerning a broad prismatic channel, the optimal reach length is chosen so that the approximated downstream boundary condition effects on discharge hydrograph assessment at upstream end are negligible. The roughness Manning coefficient is calibrated by using sporadic instantaneous surface velocity measurements during the rising limb of flood that are turned into instantaneous discharges through the solid of velocity estimated by a two-dimensional entropic model. Several historical events, occurring in three gauged sites along the upper Tiber River wherein a reliable rating curve is available, have been used for the validation. The analysis outcomes can be so summarized: (1 criteria adopted for selecting the optimal channel length and based on synthetic tests have been proved reliable by

  16. Partially obstructed channel: Contraction ratio effect on the flow hydrodynamic structure and prediction of the transversal mean velocity profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Meftah, M.; Mossa, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this manuscript, we focus on the study of flow structures in a channel partially obstructed by arrays of vertical, rigid, emergent, vegetation/cylinders. Special attention is given to understand the effect of the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the obstructed area width to the width of the unobstructed area, on the flow hydrodynamic structures and to analyze the transversal flow velocity profile at the obstructed-unobstructed interface. A large data set of transversal mean flow velocity profiles and turbulence characteristics is reported from experiments carried out in a laboratory flume. The flow velocities and turbulence intensities have been measured with a 3D Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)-Vectrino manufactured by Nortek. It was observed that the arrays of emergent vegetation/cylinders strongly affect the flow structures, forming a shear layer immediately next to the obstructed-unobstructed interface, followed by an adjacent free-stream region of full velocity flow. The experimental results show that the contraction ratio significantly affects the flow hydrodynamic structure. Adaptation of the Prandtl's log-law modified by Nikuradse led to the determination of a characteristic hydrodynamic roughness height to define the array resistance to the flow. Moreover, an improved modified log-law predicting the representative transversal profile of the mean flow velocity, at the obstructed-unobstructed interface, is proposed. The benefit of this modified log-law is its easier practical applicability, i.e., it avoids the measurements of some sensitive turbulence parameters, in addition, the flow hydrodynamic variables forming it are predictable, using the initial hydraulic conditions.

  17. Long-period fiber grating sensors for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Neng; Luo, Ching-Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and assessment of two types of Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG)-based sensors including a mobile liquid level sensor and a reflective sensor for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. Shewhart control charts were used to assess the liquid level sensing capacity and reliability of the mobile CO(2)-laser engraved LPFG sensor. There were ten groups of different liquid level experiment and each group underwent ten repeated wavelength shift measurements. The results showed that all measurands were within the control limits; thus, this mobile sensor was reliable and exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. In addition, a reflective sensor consisting of five LPFGs in series with a reflective end has been developed to evaluate the liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. These five LPFGs were fabricated by the electrical arc discharge method and the reflective end was coated with silver by Tollen's test. After each liquid level experiment was performed five times, the average values of the resonance wavelength shifts for LPFG Nos. 1-5 were in the range of 1.35-9.14 nm. The experimental findings showed that the reflective sensor could be used to automatically monitor five fixed liquid levels. This reflective sensor also exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. The mechanism of the fluid-flow velocity sensor was based on analyzing the relationship among the optical power, time, and the LPFG's length. There were two types of fluid-flow velocity measurements: inflow and drainage processes. The differences between the LPFG-based fluid-flow velocities and the measured average fluid-flow velocities were found in the range of 8.7-12.6%. For the first time to our knowledge, we have demonstrated the feasibility of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity sensing with a reflective LPFG-based sensor without modifying LPFGs or coating chemical compounds.

  18. Influence of flow velocity and spatial heterogeneity on DNAPL migration in porous media: insights from laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Gao, Yanwei; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Wu, Jichun

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the migration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in complex subsurface systems is important for evaluating contamination source zones and designing remediation schemes after spill events. Six sandbox experiments were performed to explore the individual effect of flow velocity, and the combined effect of flow velocity and layered lenses on a DNAPL (PCE) migration in porous media. DNAPL saturation was measured using a light transmission system, and saturation distribution was quantified by spatial moments. The experimental results show that large flow velocity significantly promotes lateral and vertical migration of the low-viscosity DNAPL, while when layered lenses exist, the infiltration rate decreases and horizontal spread increases. Migration processes were numerically simulated, and the modelling results tested against experimental results. Furthermore, migration of DNAPLs with different viscosities was simulated to explore the combined effects of flow velocity and geological heterogeneity. Simulation results show that enhanced heterogeneity makes low-viscosity DNAPLs migrate along preferential pathways, resulting in irregular DNAPL morphology. Layered lenses combined with heterogeneity complicate the effect of flow velocity on the migration of low-viscosity DNAPLs by changing percolation paths. Results also demonstrate that flow velocity exhibits relatively little influence on the migration of medium/high-viscosity DNAPLs, which is predominantly controlled by viscosity and heterogeneity. Enhanced heterogeneity has a larger effect on migration behavior. Findings indicate that the migration paths and position of the source zone could change significantly, due to the combined effect of groundwater flow velocity and geological heterogeneity; thus, comprehensive hydrogeological investigation is needed to characterize the source zone.

  19. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  20. Changes in uterine artery Doppler flow velocity waveforms during the third stage of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maymon, R; Herman, A; Halperin, R; Bukovsky, I; Weinraub, Z; Ariely, S

    1995-01-01

    Transabdominal Doppler velocity waveform measurements of the uterine arteries during the third stage of labor were performed upon 25 patients with uncomplicated vaginal deliveries and 5 with prolonged third stage in order to further assess third-stage mechanisms. Based on Doppler flow measurements, three phases of the third stage of labor were observed: (1) a latent phase with a systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D) and a pulsatility index (PI) of 2.14 +/- 0.49 and 0.89 +/- 0.17, respectively; (2) a contraction and detachment phase with an S/D and PI of 2.53 +/- 0.53 and 1.28 +/- 0.37, respectively, and (3) an expulsion phase with an S/D and PI of 2.20 +/- 0.34 and 0.91 +/- 0.20, respectively (p contractions squeezed the uterine vessels as they traversed the myometrium, leading to an increase in the extrinsic resistance, which was reflected by high resistance flow. Following placental separation and changes in the placental-site wall, there was slight uterine relaxation resulting in decreased uterine vessel resistance. This observation encourages the authors to continue investigating the contribution of ultrasound and Doppler flow for studies of the postpartum period.

  1. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  2. Determination of object position, vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity using artificial lateral line canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Klein

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The lateral line system of fish consists of superficial neuromasts, and neuromasts embedded in lateral line canals. Lateral line neuromasts allow fish to sense both minute water motions and pressure gradients, thereby enabling them to detect predators and prey or to recognize and discriminate stationary objects while passing them. With the aid of the lateral line, fish can also sense vortices caused by an upstream object or by undulatory swimming movements of fish. We show here that artificial lateral line canals equipped with optical flow sensors can be used to detect the water motions generated by a stationary vibrating sphere, the vortices caused by an upstream cylinder or the water (air movements caused by a passing object. The hydrodynamic information retrieved from optical flow sensors can be used to calculate bulk flow velocity and thus the size of the cylinder that shed the vortices. Even a bilateral sensor platform equipped with only one artificial lateral line canal on each side is sufficient to determine the position of an upstream cylinder.

  3. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  4. Sheared velocity flows as a source of pressure anisotropy in low collisionality plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sarto, Daniele; Pegoraro, Francesco; Cerri, Silvio Sergio; Califano, Francesco; Tenerani, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Non-Maxwellian metaequilibrium states may exist in low-collisionality plasmas as evidenced by direct (particle distributions) and indirect (e.g., instabilities driven by pressure anisotropy) satellite and laboratory measurements. These are directly observed in the solar wind (e.g. [1]), in magnetospheric reconnection events [2], in magnetically confined plasmas [3] or in simulations of Vlasov turbulence [4]. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show that a sheared velocity field can provide an effective mechanism that makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic. We discuss how the propagation of "magneto-elastic" waves can affect the pressure tensor anisotropization and the small scale formation that arise from the interplay between the gyrotropic terms due to the magnetic field and flow vorticity, and the non-gyropropic effect of the flow strain tensor. We support this analysis by a numerical integration of the nonlinear equations describing the pressure tensor evolution. This anisotropization mechanism might provide a good candidate for the understanding of the observed correlation between the presence of a sheared velocity flow and the signature of pressure anisotropies which are not yet explained within the standard models based e.g. on the CGL paradigm (see also [5]). Examples of these signatures are provided by the threshold lowering of ion-Weibel instabilities in the geomagnetic tail, observed in concomitance to the presence of a velocity shear in the near-earth plasma profile [6], or by the relatively stronger anisotropization measured for core protons in the fast solar wind [4,7] or in "space simulation" laboratory plasma experiments [3]. 1] E. Marsch et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 109, A04120 (2004); Yu. V. Khotyainstev at el., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 165001 (2011). [2] N. Aunai et al., Ann. Geophys. 29, 1571 (2011); N. Aunai et al., Journ. Geophys. Res. 116, A09232 (2011). [3] E.E. Scime et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2157

  5. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  6. Time-averaged second-order pressure and velocity measurements in a pressurized oscillating flow prime mover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paridaens, Richard [DynFluid, Arts et Metiers, 151 boulevard de l' Hopital, Paris (France); Kouidri, Smaine [LIMSI-CNRS, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2016-11-15

    Nonlinear phenomena in oscillating flow devices cause the appearance of a relatively minor secondary flow known as acoustic streaming, which is superimposed on the primary oscillating flow. Knowledge of control parameters, such as the time-averaged second-order velocity and pressure, would elucidate the non-linear phenomena responsible for this part of the decrease in the system's energetic efficiency. This paper focuses on the characterization of a travelling wave oscillating flow engine by measuring the time-averaged second order pressure and velocity. Laser Doppler velocimetry technique was used to measure the time-averaged second-order velocity. As streaming is a second-order phenomenon, its measurement requires specific settings especially in a pressurized device. Difficulties in obtaining the proper settings are highlighted in this study. The experiments were performed for mean pressures varying from 10 bars to 22 bars. Non-linear effect does not constantly increase with pressure.

  7. Cardiac surgery during pregnancy: Continuous fetal monitoring using umbilical artery Doppler flow velocity indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fetal death rate associated with cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is as high as 9.5-29%. We report continuous monitoring of fetal heart rate and umbilical artery flow-velocity waveforms by transvaginal ultrasonography and their analyses in relation to events of the CPB in two cases in second trimester of pregnancy undergoing mitral valve replacement. Our findings suggest that the transition of circulation from corporeal to extracorporeal is the most important event during surgery; the associated decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP at this stage potentially has deleterious effects on the fetus, which get aggravated with the use of vasopressors. We suggest careful management of CPB at this stage, which include partial controlled CPB at initiation and gradual transition to full CPB; this strategy maintains high MAP and avoids the use of vasopressors. Maternal and fetal monitoring can timely recognize the potential problems and provide window for the required treatment.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity of biofouling under different cross-flow velocities in reverse osmosis membrane systems

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, N.M.

    2016-09-06

    The spatially heterogeneous distribution of biofouling in spiral wound membrane systems restricts (i) the water distribution over the membrane surface and therefore (ii) the membrane-based water treatment. The objective of the study was to assess the spatial heterogeneity of biofilm development over the membrane fouling simulator (MFS) length (inlet and outlet part) at three different cross-flow velocities (0.08, 0.12 and 0.16 m/s). The MFS contained sheets of membrane and feed spacer and simulated the first 0.20 m of spiral-wound membrane modules where biofouling accumulates the most in practice. In-situ non-destructive oxygen imaging using planar optodes was applied to determine the biofilm spatially resolved activity and heterogeneity.

  9. Carotid flow velocity/diameter ratio is a predictor of cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellinazzi, Vera R; Cipolli, José A; Pimenta, Marcio V

    2015-01-01

    was followed up for a median of 1260 (714) days, and 27 suffered MACEs. At baseline, participants were evaluated by clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic and carotid ultrasound analysis. RESULTS: Patients with peak-systolic flow velocity (sFV) less than the median value and systolic artery diameter (s......AD) greater than the median value presented the worst clinical outcome compared to those with isolated sFV less than the median value or sAD greater than the median value, suggesting an additive effect of these two variables. Further, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated worse outcome for individuals with sFV/s......AD ratio less than 85.7/s (optimal cut-off point obtained by receiver-operating characteristic analysis) compared to those with higher sFV/sAD values (log-rank test: P sFV/sAD was significantly associated with MACEs (P 

  10. Estimation of volume flow in curved tubes based on analytical and computational analysis of axial velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkaik, A. C.; Beulen, B. W. A. M. M.; Bogaerds, A. C. B.; Rutten, M. C. M.; van de Vosse, F. N.

    2009-02-01

    To monitor biomechanical parameters related to cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to perform correct volume flow estimations of blood flow in arteries based on local blood velocity measurements. In clinical practice, estimates of flow are currently made using a straight-tube assumption, which may lead to inaccuracies since most arteries are curved. Therefore, this study will focus on the effect of curvature on the axial velocity profile for flow in a curved tube in order to find a new volume flow estimation method. The study is restricted to steady flow, enabling the use of analytical methods. First, analytical approximation methods for steady flow in curved tubes at low Dean numbers (Dn) and low curvature ratios (δ) are investigated. From the results a novel volume flow estimation method, the cos θ-method, is derived. Simulations for curved tube flow in the physiological range (1≤Dn≤1000 and 0.01≤δ≤0.16) are performed with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The asymmetric axial velocity profiles of the analytical approximation methods are compared with the velocity profiles of the CFD model. Next, the cos θ-method is validated and compared with the currently used Poiseuille method by using the CFD results as input. Comparison of the axial velocity profiles of the CFD model with the approximations derived by Topakoglu [J. Math. Mech. 16, 1321 (1967)] and Siggers and Waters [Phys. Fluids 17, 077102 (2005)] shows that the derived velocity profiles agree very well for Dn≤50 and are fair for 50100), no analytical approximation method exists. In the position of the maximum axial velocity, a shift toward the inside of the curve is observed for low Dean numbers, while for high Dean numbers, the position of the maximum velocity is located at the outer curve. When the position of the maximum velocity of the axial velocity profile is given as a function of the Reynolds number, a "zero-shift point" is found at Re=21.3. At this point the shift in

  11. VELOCITY FIELD COMPUTATION IN VIBRATED GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN OPTICAL FLOW BASED MULTISCALE IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Debayle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An image analysis method has been developed in order to compute the velocity field of a granular medium (sand grains, mean diameter 600 μm submitted to different kinds of mechanical stresses. The differential method based on optical flow conservation consists in describing a dense motion field with vectors associated to each pixel. A multiscale, coarse-to-fine, analytical approach through tailor sized windows yields the best compromise between accuracy and robustness of the results, while enabling an acceptable computation time. The corresponding algorithmis presented and its validation discussed through different tests. The results of the validation tests of the proposed approach show that the method is satisfactory when attributing specific values to parameters in association with the size of the image analysis window. An application in the case of vibrated sand has been studied. An instrumented laboratory device provides sinusoidal vibrations and enables external optical observations of sand motion in 3D transparent boxes. At 50 Hz, by increasing the relative acceleration G, the onset and development of two convective rolls can be observed. An ultra fast camera records the grain avalanches, and several pairs of images are analysed by the proposed method. The vertical velocity profiles are deduced and allow to precisely quantify the dimensions of the fluidized region as a function of G.

  12. Magnetic resonance flow velocity and temperature mapping of a shape memory polymer foam device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Thomas S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. Methods A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Results Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Conclusions Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  13. A Zonal Similarity Analysis of Velocity Profiles in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Shear Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Tuoc, Trinh Khanh

    2010-01-01

    It is argued that there are three distinct zones in a wall bounded turbulent flow field dominated by three completely different mechanisms: - An outer region where the velocity profile is determined by the pressure distribution - A highly active wall layer dominated by a sequence of inrush-sweep and ejections, and - An intermediate region well described by the traditional logarithmic law proposed by independently Millikan and Prandtl. The log-law and the wall layer are sometimes referred to as the inner region. Under these conditions, a unique set of normalisation parameters cannot possibly apply to all three zones. The inner region can be more successfully represented by normalising the distance and velocity with the values of these scales at the edge of the wall layer since they are shared by both the wall layer and the log-law region. The application of this similarity analysis has successfully collapsed extensive published data for the inner region covering a range of Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 1,000,0...

  14. Changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity during cognitive task-induced cerebral fatigue in high performance fighter pilots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongsheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have demonstrated that sustained cognitive tasks can induce cognitive fatigue and that the mean cerebral blood flow velocity changes in some cerebral regions during cerebral fatigue. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically monitor the changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in different brain regions of high performance fighter pilots during mental arithmetic tasks and consecutive performance tasks. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The present neurophysiological trial, based on controlled observation, was performed at the Laboratory of Neurophysiology, Institute of Aviation Medicine, Air Force of China between January 2003 and December 2005. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five males, high performance fighter pilots, averaging (27.6 ± 2.5) years, were recruited for this study. METHODS: The mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, and posterior cerebral artery of subjects was dynamically tested using transcranial Doppler during 5- hour mental arithmetic tasks and during 5- hour consecutive performance tasks. The neurobehavioral ability index was analyzed throughout each trial according to the number of correct responses, false responses, and lost responses. Simultaneously, cerebral cognitive fatigue-induced lethargy was assessed by the Stanford Sleepiness Scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery, middle cerebral artery, and posterior cerebral artery; neurobehavioral ability index of mental arithmetic and consecutive performance tasks; Stanford Sleepiness Scale scores. RESULTS: During mental arithmetic tasks, the mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery increased during hour 2 and decreased after hour 4. There was no significant change in mean cerebral blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery. During hour 4, cerebral cognitive fatigue was observed and, simultaneously, Stanford Sleepiness

  15. Landsat imagery and its treatment in a publicly available data portal to monitor flow velocity variations of Greenland outlet glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinert, M.; Rosenau, R.; Ebermann, B.; Horwath, M.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the freely available Landsat archive we have set up a monitoring system to process and provide flow-velocity fields for more than 300 outlet glaciers along the margin of the Greenland ice sheet. We will present major processing steps. These include, among others, an improved orthorectification that is based on the Global Digital Elevation Map V2 (GDEM-V2) of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). For those Landsat 7 products which feature the scan line corrector (SLC) failure a destriping correction was applied. An adaptive, recursive filter approach was applied in order to remove outliers. Altogether, the enhanced processing leads to a higher accuracy of the flow-velocity fields. By mid-2016 we succeeded in incorporating more than 37,000 optical multi-sensoral scenes from Landsat 1 to 8. These scenes cover the period from 1972 to 2015. Until now, for almost 300 glaciers we processed more than 100,000 flow-velocity fields for the time span until 2012. For the time until 2015 velocity fields were inferred only for the fastest flowing glaciers. However, new recordings of Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 as well as the availability of further scenes through the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation (LGAC) effort will help to enlarge the database. With a further quality check, we can provide more than 40,000 flow-velocity for public accessibility. More products will be added continuously while the almost automated processing is ongoing. The long time span enables to determine trends of the flow velocity over different (long) periods. A major achievement can be seen in the fact that a high temporal resolution facilitates the analysis of seasonal flow-velocity variations. We will discuss prominent examples of the non-uniform pattern of ice flow velocity changes. For this, a powerful tool is provided by the monitoring system and its web-based data portal. It allows to study the flow-velocity changes in time and space, and to possibly

  16. Measurement of the Velocities of Nanoparticles in Flowing Nanofluids using the Zero-Crossing Laser Speckle Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Qin; LU Jian; NI Xiao-Wu

    2012-01-01

    A zero-crossing dynamic speckle method is proposed to determine the velocities of nanoparticles in nanofluids.A Gaussian laser beam is used to illuminate nanofluids in a pipe,and the dynamic speckles are detected by a spatially integrating detector with an aperture.The integrated speckle intensity signal is processed by a computer and the zero-crossing rate is counted.The velocity of the nanoparticles can be determined from its relationship to zero-crossing rate.The results show that the nanoparticles exhibit features of flowing nanofluids,and when the average velocity of the nanofluids is 53.4mm/s,the average velocity of the nanoparticles is 51.8 ± 5.1 mm/s.%A zero-crossing dynamic speckle method is proposed to determine the velocities of nanoparticles in nanofluids. A Gaussian laser beam is used to illuminate nanofluids in a pipe, and the dynamic speckles are detected by a spatially integrating detector with an aperture. The integrated speckle intensity signal is processed by a computer and the zero-crossing rate is counted. The velocity of the nanoparticles can be determined from its relationship to zero-crossing rate. The results show that the nanoparticles exhibit features of flowing nanofluids, and when the average velocity of the nanofluids is 53.4mm/s, the average velocity of the nanoparticles is 51.8 ± 5.1 mm/s.

  17. Basilar artery blood flow velocity and the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in mountaineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gerard F A; Kagenaar, Dick A; Basnyat, Buddha; Odoom, Joseph A

    2002-10-23

    Hypoxic ventilatory response is higher in successful extreme-altitude climbers than in controls. We hypothesized that these climbers have lower brainstem blood flow secondary to hypoxia which may possibly cause retention of medullary CO(2) and greater ventilatory drive. Using transcranial Doppler, basilar artery blood flow velocity (Vba) was measured at sea level in 7 extreme-altitude climbers and 10 controls in response to 10 min sequential exposures to inspired oxygen fractions (FI(O(2))) of 0.21 (baseline), 0.13, 0.11, 0.10, 0.09, 0.08 and 0.07. Sa(O(2)) was higher in climbers at FI(O(2)) of 0.11 (P<0.05), 0.08 and 0.07 (both P<0.0001). Expired ventilation (VE) increased more (n.s.), and PET(CO(2)) decreased more (n.s.) in the climbers than in controls. Vba did not significantly change in both groups at FI(O(2)) of 0.13-0.09. At FI(O(2)) of 0.08 and 0.07, Vba decreased 21% (P<0.03) and 27% (P<0.01), respectively, in climbers, and increased 29% (P<0.01) and 27% (P<0.01), respectively, in controls. The conflicting effects of hypoxia and hypocapnia on both medullary blood flow and ventilatory drive thus balance out, giving climbers a greater drive and higher Sa(O(2)), despite lower PET(CO(2)) and lower brain stem blood flow.

  18. 3D CFD modeling of flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries and various flow velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoby, Eyal; Waichman, Karol; Sadot, Oren; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Scaling-up flowing-gas diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) to megawatt class power is studied using accurate three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, taking into account the effects of temperature rise and losses of alkali atoms due to ionization. Both the maximum achievable power and laser beam quality are estimated for Cs and K lasers. We examined the influence of the flow velocity and Mach number M on the maximum achievable power of subsonic and supersonic lasers. For Cs DPAL devices with M = 0.2 - 3 the output power increases with increasing M by only 20%, implying that supersonic operation mode has only small advantage over subsonic. In contrast, the power achievable in K DPALs strongly depends on M. The output power increases by 100% when M increases from 0.2 to 4, showing a considerable advantage of supersonic device over subsonic. The reason for the increase of the power with M in both Cs and K DPALs is the decrease of the temperature due to the gas expansion in the flow system. However, the power increase for K lasers is much larger than for the Cs devices mainly due to the much smaller fine-structure splitting of the 2P states ( 58 cm-1 for K and 554 cm-1 for Cs), which results in a much stronger effect of the temperature decrease in K DPALs. For pumping by beams of the same rectangular cross section, comparison between end-pumping and transverse-pumping shows that the output power is not affected by the pump geometry. However, the intensity of the output laser beam in the case of transverse-pumped DPALs is strongly non-uniform in the laser beam cross section resulting in higher brightness and better beam quality in the far field for the end-pumping geometry where the intensity of the output beam is uniform.

  19. PRESSURE AND VELOCITY AMPLITUDES OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUID IN CONCENTRIC ANNULAR PASSAGE WITH OSCILLATORY BOUNDARY: TURBULENT FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABOLGHASEM MEKANIK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady program based on a turbulence model called Baseline (BSL komega model was conducted to simulate three turbulent flows with Re numbers of 4×103, 8×103 and 1×104, between two initially concentric cylinders. The effects of principal flow variables, i.e., mean axial velocity and fluid temperature, annular passage configurations, i.e., the gap width and radii of cylinders on the pressure and circumferential velocity of a three dimensional turbulent flow in the annular passage were investigated. The results were validated with the available solutions in the literature and fairly good agreements are seen. By increasing the gap of the annular passage and the axial flow velocity, smaller values for the unsteady pressure and the circumferential velocity amplitudes are produced. For each of the turbulent flows the unsteady pressure amplitude increases with the fluid temperature, as well as the circumferential velocity amplitude. The results of this investigation are favorably used for FIV and FSI calculations in such configurations.

  20. Validating city-scale surface water flood modelling using crowd-sourced data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dapeng; Yin, Jie; Liu, Min

    2016-12-01

    Surface water and surface water related flood modelling at the city-scale is challenging due to a range of factors including the availability of subsurface data and difficulty in deriving runoff inputs and surcharge for individual storm sewer inlets. Most of the research undertaken so far has been focusing on local-scale predictions of sewer surcharge induced surface flooding, using a 1D/1D or 1D/2D coupled storm sewer and surface flow model. In this study, we describe the application of an urban hydro-inundation model (FloodMap-HydroInundation2D) to simulate surface water related flooding arising from extreme precipitation at the city-scale. This approach was applied to model an extreme storm event that occurred on 12 August 2011 in the city of Shanghai, China, and the model predictions were compared with a ‘crowd-sourced’ dataset of flood incidents. The results suggest that the model is able to capture the broad patterns of inundated areas at the city-scale. Temporal evaluation also demonstrates a good level of agreement between the reported and predicted flood timing. Due to the mild terrain of the city, the worst-hit areas are predicted to be topographic lows. The spatio-temporal accuracy of the precipitation and micro-topography are the two critical factors that affect the prediction accuracies. Future studies could be directed towards making more accurate and robust predictions of water depth and velocity using higher quality topographic, precipitation and drainage capacity information.

  1. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 1998 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. A. Shaull; M. R. Alexander; R. P. Reynolds; C. T. McLean; R. P. Romero

    1999-02-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 19 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Also included are discharge data from three springs that flow into Caiion de Vane.

  2. A novel macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of anticipation optimal velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G. H.; Song, W.; Peng, Y. J.; Wang, S. H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a novel macro model which can investigate wide moving jams is derived from car-following model by applying the relationship between the micro and macro variables with the consideration of anticipation optimal velocity on single lane. The theoretic analysis and numerical simulation show that the new macro model of traffic flow can correctly reproduce common evolution of shock, rarefaction wave and local cluster effect under small perturbation, which shows that the congested traffic patterns about wide moving jam propagation are in accordance with empirical results. Furthermore, the results uncover that the anticipation effect can smooth the front of the shock wave and the rarefaction wave, which means that anticipation effect hasten the diffusion process of congregate in the shock wave and dissolution in rarefaction wave. The key improvement of this new macro model over the previous ones lies in the fact that the anticipation traffic behaviors can improve the stability of traffic flow with the consideration of the proper anticipation effect.

  3. Velocity Measurement of Induced Flow by a Laser Focusing Shock Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki HIRAHARA; Masaru FUJINAMI; Masaaki KAWAHASHI

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the shock wave for control in a micro channel. The shock wave was generated by a laser focusing of pulsed laser beam in the channel. Using a pulse laser to generate a shock wave,a non-stationary flow was induced in the small space between the parallel plates. The spherical and cylindrical shock propagations were observed with schlieren method. The shock Mach number decreases with time and approaches to unity. As reported in the previous investigations, the shock speed was attenuated in a short distance and time. In the present experiment, It was not found a remarkable difference in the shock speed between the spherical and cylindrical shock experiments. Subsequently, the flow induced by the cylindrical shock wave was studied using PIV technique. A smoke tracer was used in the experiment and its velocity was measured within 100 μs. A numerical simulation was carried out to investigate the momentum relaxation between the gas and smoke particle. A suitable shock initiation model was introduced in the simulation. The experimental results show that a wide acceleration and deceleration zone exist behind the shock wave. Also,the relaxation distance in the experimental data is much longer than that in numerical simulation.

  4. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Lacey, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra of identified particles ($\\pi^{\\pm}$, $K^{\\pm}$, $p$, and $\\bar p$) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV [one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies] to 2.76 TeV [one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies]. For the spectra with a narrow $p_T$ range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide $p_T$ range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power-law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature ($T_0$) and radial flow velocity ($\\beta_T$) increase with the increase of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$, which indicate a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of $T_0$ and $\\beta_T$ in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they...

  5. Depression storage and infiltration effects on overland flow depth-velocity-friction at desert conditions: field plot results and model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Water infiltration and overland flow are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological models and management. In arid and semi-arid regions, these processes present characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina were performed in order to estimate the effect of depression storage areas and infiltration rates on depths, velocities and friction of overland flows. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots was characterized at z-scale 1 mm through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical tools. The overland flow areas produced by controlled water inflows were video-recorded and the flow velocities were measured with image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the upper soil were estimated based on soil core analyses. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, mass balanced, time explicit model of infiltration and overland flows. Modelling results reproduced the time series of observed flow areas, velocities and infiltration depths. Estimates of hydrodynamic parameters of overland flow (Reynolds-Froude numbers are informed. To our knowledge, the study here presented is novel in combining several aspects that previous studies do not address simultaneously: (1 overland flow and infiltration parameters were obtained in undisturbed field conditions; (2 field measurements of overland flow movement were coupled to a detailed analysis of soil microtopography at 1 mm depth scale; (3 the effect of depression storage areas in infiltration rates and depth-velocity friction of overland flows is addressed. Relevance of the results to other similar desert areas is justified by the accompanying

  6. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging using ultrasound: In-vivo examples of complex blood flow in the vascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik;

    2008-01-01

    speckle tracking between segments in consecutive speckle images. The flow patterns of six bifurcations and two veins were investigated in-vivo. It was shown: 1) that a stable vortex in the carotid bulb was present opposed to other examined bifurcations, 2) that retrograde flow was present......Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood motion are restricted by a relatively low frame rate and angle dependent velocity estimates. The Plane Wave Excitation (PWE) method has been proposed to solve these limitations. The frame rate can be increased, and the 2-D...... vector velocity of the blood motion can be estimated. The transmitted pulse is not focused, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired for each emission. A 13 bit Barker code is transmitted simultaneously from each transducer element. The 2-D vector velocity of the blood is found using 2-D...

  7. Two-Dimensional Stagnation-Point Velocity-Slip Flow and Heat Transfer over Porous Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FEROZ AHMED SOOMRO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Present paper investigates 2D (Two-Dimensional stagnation-point velocity-slip flow over porous stretching sheet. The governing non-linear PDEs (Partial Differential Equations are non-dimensionlized by using the similarity transformation technique that results into coupled non-linear ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations. Such ODEs are then solved by using shooting technique with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. Since the behavior of boundary layer stagnation-point flow depends on the rate of cooling and stretching. Therefore, the main objective of this paper is to analyze the effects of different working parameters on shear stress, heat transfer, velocity and temperature of fluid. The results revealed that the velocity-slip has significant effect on the fluid flow as well as on the heat transfer. The numerical results are also compared with existing work for no-slip condition and found to have good agreement with improved asymptotic behavior.

  8. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Y.; Mishima, K. [Kyoto Univ. Kumatori, Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tobita, Y.; Suzuki, T. [O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Institute, Tokai Research Establishment (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Neutron radiography and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) techniques were applied to measurements of velocity field in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow. Visualization and measurements of two-phase flow were conducted using molten lead bismuth and nitrogen gas as working fluids and particles made of gold-cadmium (AuCd{sub 3}) inter-metallic alloy were employed as the tracer. Discrimination method between bubble and tracer images in two-phase flow was developed based on the {sigma}-scaling method. Time-averaged liquid velocity fields, gas velocity fields and void profile were calculated from discriminated images, respectively. From these measurements, the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. (author)

  9. Experimental and modeling study of fluidized bed granulation: Effect of binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Vengateson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized bed granulation is a widely used technique of producing granules in pharmaceutical, food, detergent, and fertilizer industries. In this study, fluidized bed granulation of two powders – wheat flour and rice powder – with water as binder is studied experimentally and by modeling. The effects of two process parameters – binder flow rate, fluidizing air velocity – are determined. Experimental results show that increasing the binder flow rate favors the formation of bigger granules while increasing fluidizing air velocity leads to a decrease in average granule diameter. Population balance model with suitable form of coalescence kernel (β has been used to describe the granule growth. Later, this kernel is linked with process parameters – binder flow rate and fluidizing air velocity.

  10. Critical velocity for superfluid flow across the BEC-BCS crossover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D E; Chin, J K; Stan, C A; Liu, Y; Setiawan, W; Sanner, C; Ketterle, W

    2007-08-17

    Critical velocities have been observed in an ultracold superfluid Fermi gas throughout the BEC-BCS crossover. A pronounced peak of the critical velocity at unitarity demonstrates that superfluidity is most robust for resonant atomic interactions. Critical velocities were determined from the abrupt onset of dissipation when the velocity of a moving one-dimensional optical lattice was varied. The dependence of the critical velocity on lattice depth and on the inhomogeneous density profile was studied.

  11. Review of critical flow rate, propagation of pressure pulse, and sonic velocity in two-phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y.

    1972-01-01

    For single-phase media, the critical discharge velocity, the sonic velocity, and the pressure pulse propagation velocity can be expressed in the same form by assuming isentropic, equilibria processes. In two-phase mixtures, the same concept is not valid due to the existence of interfacial transports of momentum, heat, and mass. Thus, the three velocities should be treated differently and separately for each particular condition, taking into account the various transport processes involved under that condition. Various attempts are reviewed to predict the critical discharge rate or the propagation velocities by considering slip ratio (momentum change), evaporation (mass and heat transport), flow pattern, etc. Experimental data were compared with predictions based on various theorems. The importance is stressed of the time required to achieve equilibrium as compared with the time available during the process, for example, of passing a pressure pulse.

  12. Total Phosphorus in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess phosphorus in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALPFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources,...

  13. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  14. Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Surface Waters Information Management System (SWIMS) has been designed to meet multi-agency hydrologic database needs for Kansas. The SWIMS project was supported...

  15. A Novel Dynamic Model for Predicting Pressure Wave Velocity in Four-Phase Fluid Flowing along the Drilling Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic pressure wave velocity model is presented based on momentum equation, mass-balance equation, equation of state, and small perturbation theory. Simultaneously, the drift model was used to analyze the flow characteristics of oil, gas, water, and drilling fluid multiphase flow. In addition, the dynamic model considers the gas dissolution, virtual mass force, drag force, and relative motion of the interphase as well. Finite difference and Newton-Raphson iterative are introduced to the numerical simulation of the dynamic model. The calculation results indicate that the wave velocity is more sensitive to the increase of gas influx rate than the increase of oil/water influx rate. Wave velocity decreases significantly with the increase of gas influx. Influenced by the pressure drop of four-phase fluid flowing along the annulus, wave velocity tends to increase with respect to well depth, contrary to the gradual reduction of gas void fraction at different depths with the increase of backpressure (BP. Analysis also found that the growth of angular frequency will lead to an increase of wave velocity at low range. Comparison with the calculation results without considering virtual mass force demonstrates that the calculated wave velocity is relatively bigger by using the presented model.

  16. Flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a rotating porous disk with velocity slip and temperature jump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Chenguang; Zheng, Liancun [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing (China). School of Mathematics and Physics; Zhang, Chaoli [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing (China). School of Mathematics and Physics; Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhang, Xinxin [Univ. of Science and Technology Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids over a rotating porous disk with velocity slip and temperature jump. Three types of nanoparticles - Cu, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CuO - are considered with water as the base fluid. The nonlinear governing equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by Von Karman transformations and solved using homotopy analysis method (HAM), which is verified in good agreement with numerical ones. The effects of involved parameters such as porous parameter, velocity slip, temperature jump, as well as the types of nanofluids on velocity and temperature fields are presented graphically and analysed.

  17. Drainage-water travel times as a key factor for surface water contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Groenendijk, P.; Eertwegh, van den, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the unsaturated zone as an inextricable part of the hydrologic cycle has long been recognized. The root zone and the unsaturated sub-surface domain are chemically and biologically the most active zones. The interrelationships between soil, subsoil and surface waters make it unrealistic to treat the saturated and unsaturated zones and the discharge to surface waters separately. Point models describe vertical water flow in the saturated zone and possibly lateral flow by defini...

  18. The diastolic flow velocity-pressure gradient relation and dpv50 to assess the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Koen M J; van Eenige, Machiel J; Spruijt, Hugo J; Westerhof, Nico; Twisk, Jos; Visser, Cees A; Visser, Frans C

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic impact of coronary stenoses, the fractional (FFR) or coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) usually is measured. The combined measurement of instantaneous flow velocity and pressure gradient (v-dp relation) is rarely used in humans. We derived from the v-dp relation a new index, dp(v50) (pressure gradient at flow velocity of 50 cm/s), and compared the diagnostic performance of dp(v50), CFVR, and FFR. Before coronary angiography was performed, patients underwent noninvasive stress testing. In all coronary vessels with an intermediate or severe stenosis, the flow velocity, aortic, and distal coronary pressure were measured simultaneously with a Doppler and pressure guidewire after induction of hyperemia. After regression analysis of all middiastolic flow velocity and pressure gradient data, the dp(v50) was calculated. With the use of the results of noninvasive stress testing, the dp(v50) cutoff value was established at 22.4 mmHg. In 77 patients, 124 coronary vessels with a mean 39% (SD 19) diameter stenosis were analyzed. In 43 stenoses, ischemia was detected. We found a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 56%, 86%, and 76% for CFVR; 77%, 99%, and 91% for FFR; and 95%, 95%, and 95% for dp(v50). To establish that dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia, dp(v50) was recalculated after omission of the highest quartile of flow velocity data, showing a difference of 3%. We found that dp(v50) provided the highest sensitivity and accuracy compared with FFR and CFVR in the assessment of coronary stenoses. In contrast to CFVR and FFR, assessment of dp(v50) is not dependent on maximal hyperemia.

  19. A remark on "Nonlinear output feedback control of underwater vehicle propellers using feedback form estimated axial flow velocity"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Lottin, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out with a L......For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out...

  20. RESEARCH ON DESIGN METHODOLOGY OF SMALL AXIAL FAN ‐CONSIDERATION OF INLET FLOW VELOCITY FOR PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT‐

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of small axial fan used as cooling device in information technology machines is extremely low, comparing with conventional axial fan which is much larger than small fan. In the design of conventional axial fan, the axial velocity of the inlet flow is regarded as uniform along the blade span. However, in case of the small fan, the velocity could not be uniform.Because the hub-tip ratiois so large that the blade span will be too short to keep the uniform flow region. So, it is im...

  1. A remark on "Nonlinear output feedback control of underwater vehicle propellers using feedback form estimated axial flow velocity"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Lottin, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out with a L......For original paper see T.I.Fossen and M.Blanke, ibid., vol.25, pp.241-55 (2000). In the work presented by Fossen and Blanke, a nonlinear observer for estimation of propeller axial flow velocity for UUVs was introduced. The proof of the convergence behavior of the observer was carried out...

  2. Flow velocity profiling using acoustic time of flight flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beam-forming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgan, I.; Candel, I.; Ioana, C.; Digulescu, A.; Bunea, F.; Ciocan, G. D.; Anghel, A.; Vasile, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to non-intrusive flow velocity profiling technique using multi-element sensor array and wide-band signal's processing methods. Conventional techniques for the measurements of the flow velocity profiles are usually based on intrusive instruments (current meters, acoustic Doppler profilers, Pitot tubes, etc.) that take punctual velocity readings. Although very efficient, these choices are limited in terms of practical cases of applications especially when non-intrusive measurements techniques are required and/or a spatial accuracy of the velocity profiling is required This is due to factors related to hydraulic machinery down time, the often long time duration needed to explore the entire section area, the frequent cumbersome number of devices that needs to be handled simultaneously, or the impossibility to perform intrusive tests. In the case of non-intrusive flow profiling methods based on acoustic techniques, previous methods concentrated on using a large number of acoustic transducers placed around the measured section. Although feasible, this approach presents several major drawbacks such as a complicated signal timing, transmission, acquisition and recording system, resulting in a relative high cost of operation. In addition, because of the geometrical constraints, a desired number of sensors may not be installed. Recent results in acoustic flow metering based on wide band signals and adaptive beamforming proved that it is possible to achieve flow velocity profiles using less acoustic transducers. In a normal acoustic time of flight path the transducers are both emitters and receivers, sequentially changing their roles. In the new configuration, proposed in this paper, two new receivers are added on each side. Since the beam angles of each acoustic transducer are wide enough the newly added transducers can receive the transmitted signals and additional time of flight estimation can be done. Thus, several flow

  3. Ratio of left ventricular peak E-wave velocity to flow propagation velocity assessed by color M-mode Doppler echocardiography in first myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J E; Søndergaard, E; Seward, J B;

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the ability of the ratio of peak E-wave velocity to flow propagation velocity (E/Vp) measured with color M-mode Doppler echocardiography to predict in-hospital heart failure and cardiac mortality in an unselected consecutive population with first myocardial infarction (MI......). BACKGROUND: Several experimental studies indicate color M-mode echocardiography to be a valuable tool in the evaluation of diastolic function, but data regarding the clinical value are lacking. METHODS: Echocardiography was performed within 24 h of arrival at the coronary care unit in 110 consecutive...... or =1.5 measured with color M-mode echocardiography is a strong predictor of in-hospital heart failure. Furthermore, E/Vp is superior to systolic measurements in predicting 35 day survival although Dt

  4. Fabry-Perot spectroscopy for kinetic temperature and velocity measurements of a high enthalpy air plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Fabian; Löhle, Stefan; Hermann, Tobias; Fulge, Hannes

    2017-08-01

    The atomic translational temperatures and velocities of a low pressure, high enthalpy air plasma are measured using Fabry-Perot spectroscopy. The measurements presented here are the first measurements using this system at this enthalpy level. The sub-picometre resolution of the unique system has allowed accurate translational temperature and velocity measurements of the atomic species in the plasma. The detection system allows the Doppler broadening of multiple atomic nitrogen and oxygen lines to be measured simultaneously. Additionally, having two optical paths, one perpendicular to the flow and one at 45 deg. allows the Doppler shift to be measured. Measurements were taken during three different plasma wind tunnel tests. Mean atomic nitrogen temperatures of 1.08+/- 0.11 × 104 K and atomic oxygen translational temperatures of 1.23+/- 0.12 ×104 K were measured. The thermal non-equilibrium determined verified earlier measurements of the same phenomena, however, the mechanism behind this has not yet been determined. The mean measured flow velocity was 3350+/- 840~m~s-1 and was consistent between the atomic species. The translational temperature and velocity contribute approximately 35% of the local enthalpy of the flow. The direct measurement of these parameters, removing previously required assumptions, increases the fidelity of the flow characterisation significantly. This allows high quality testing to be conducted in this flow field.

  5. Depth-encoded dual beam phase-resolved Doppler OCT for Doppler-angle-independent flow velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Cheng, Wei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xinjian; Mo, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography (PR-D-OCT) is a functional OCT imaging technique that can provide high-speed and high-resolution depth-resolved measurement on flow in biological materials. However, a common problem with conventional PR-D-OCT is that this technique often measures the flow motion projected onto the OCT beam path. In other words, it needs the projection angle to extract the absolute velocity from PR-D-OCT measurement. In this paper, we proposed a novel dual-beam PR-D-OCT method to measure absolute flow velocity without separate measurement on the projection angle. Two parallel light beams are created in sample arm and focused into the sample at two different incident angles. The images produced by these two beams are encoded to different depths in single B-scan. Then the Doppler signals picked up by the two beams together with the incident angle difference can be used to calculate the absolute velocity. We validated our approach in vitro on an artificial flow phantom with our home-built 1060 nm swept source OCT. Experimental results demonstrated that our method can provide an accurate measurement of absolute flow velocity with independency on the projection angle.

  6. Detection of severe left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis by transthoracic evaluation of resting coronary flow velocity dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward G. Abinader

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of severe stenosis, coronary artery flow may be reduced at rest. Recent advances in echocardiography have made non-invasive sampling of velocities in the left an­terior descending coronary artery (LAD possible. The aim of our study was to evaluate feasi­bility and capability of transthoracic Doppler to detect severe stenosis of the LAD. The study population consisted of 42 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease scheduled for coronary angiography. All had complete transthoracic echocardiography and Doppler sampling of LAD velocities. Quantitative cor­onary angiography was performed within 24 hours of the echocardiogram. Correlations between LAD velocity profile, measurements and calculations, and the angiographic results were performed. Six subjects had LAD occlusion, 10 had severe (>80% diameter LAD stenosis, and 26 had normal or non-occlusive LAD disease. In all six subjects with LAD occlusion, distal LAD velocities were not detectable, while in the other 36 subjects, LAD velocities were recorded indicating the vessels were patent. In the 10 subjects with severe LAD stenosis, the diastolic/systolic velocity ratio was <1.5, while in those with non-signifi­cant LAD disease, the diastolic/systolic velocity ratio was >1.5 (P<0.005. Diastolic LAD flow was 21.8±13 mL/min in the presence of severe stenosis as compared to 48.5±20 mL/min in subjects without severe stenosis (P<0.0013. LAD velocities had high sensitiv­ity and specificity for the prediction of severe angiographic stenosis. Thus transthoracic Doppler measurement of LAD velocities is feas­ible and can predict the presence of severe LAD stenosis or occlusion.

  7. Quantification of long-term wastewater fluxes at the surface water/groundwater-interface: An integrative model perspective using stable isotopes and acesulfame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, I., E-mail: i.engelhardt@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); Barth, J.A.C. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Bol, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Agrosphere — IBG-3 (Germany); Schulz, M.; Ternes, T.A. [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) (Germany); Schüth, C. [Technical University of Darmstadt, Institute of Applied Geosciences (Germany); van Geldern, R. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The suitability of acesulfame to trace wastewater-related surface water fluxes from streams into the hyporheic and riparian zones over long-term periods was investigated. The transport behavior of acesulfame was compared with the transport of water stable isotopes (δ{sup 18}O or δ{sup 2}H). A calibrated model based on a joint inversion of temperature, acesulfame, and piezometric pressure heads was employed in a model validation using data sets of acesulfame and water stable isotopes collected over 5 months in a stream and groundwater. The spatial distribution of fresh water within the groundwater resulting from surface water infiltration was estimated by computing groundwater ages and compared with the predicted acesulfame plume obtained after 153 day simulation time. Both, surface water ratios calculated with a mixing equation from water stable isotopes and simulated acesulfame mass fluxes, were investigated for their ability to estimate the contribution of wastewater-related surface water inflow within groundwater. The results of this study point to limitations for the application of acesulfame to trace surface water–groundwater interactions properly. Acesulfame completely missed the wastewater-related surface water volumes that still remained in the hyporheic zone under stream-gaining conditions. In contrast, under stream-losing conditions, which developed after periods of stagnating hydraulic exchange, acesulfame based predictions lead to an overestimation of the surface water volume of up to 25% in the riparian zone. If slow seepage velocities prevail a proportion of acesulfame might be stored in smaller pores, while when released under fast flowing water conditions it will travel further downstream with the groundwater flow direction. Therefore, under such conditions acesulfame can be a less-ideal tracer in the hyporheic and riparian zones and additional monitoring with other environmental tracers such as water stable isotopes is highly recommended

  8. GPC-Based Gust Response Alleviation for Aircraft Model Adapting to Various Flow Velocities in the Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Dai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified autoregressive (AR model is identified, based on the wind tunnel test data of open-loop gust response for an aircraft model. The identified AR model can be adapted to various flow velocities in the wind tunnel test. Due to the lack of discrete gust input measurement, a second-order polynomial function is used to approximate the gust input amplitude by flow velocity. Afterwards, with the identified online aeroelastic model, the modified generalized predictive control (GPC theory is applied to alleviate wing tip acceleration induced by sinusoidal gust. Finally, the alleviation effects of gust response at different flow velocities are estimated based on the comparison of simulated closed-loop acceleration with experimental open-loop one. The comparison indicates that, after gust response alleviation, the wing tip acceleration can be reduced up to 20% at the tested velocities ranging from 12 m/s to 24 m/s. Demonstratively, the unified control law can be adapted to varying wind tunnel velocities and gust frequencies. It does not need to be altered at different test conditions, which will save the idle time.

  9. Uterine artery flow velocity waveforms during uterine contractions: differences between oxytocin-induced contractions and spontaneous labor contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Mie; Nakai, Yuichiro; Yasui, Tomoyo; Nishimoto, Sachiyo; Nakano, Akemi; Matsumoto, Makiko; Nobeyama, Hiroyuki; Nishihara, Rika; Iwanaga, Naoko; Ishiko, Osamu

    2009-10-01

    To clarify the effects on uterine arterial flow velocity waveforms of uterine contractions following oxytocin infusion and during spontaneous labor. Uterine arterial flow velocity waveforms were obtained by pulsed Doppler methods from 22 women during an oxytocin challenge test (OCT), 26 women during oxytocin-induced labor, and 40 women during spontaneous labor. Mean resistance index (RI) for bilateral arteries was used for analyses. After the onset of labor, flow velocity waveforms were assessed according to cervical dilatation. During OCT, Doppler flow velocimetry was performed when three uterine contractions occurred per 10-min period. RI values did not differ significantly between induced and spontaneous labor during relaxations at any level of cervical dilatation. However, during contractions, RI was significantly higher for induced labor than for spontaneous labor. Absence or reversal of flow was more frequent in the OCT group than in the induced labor group (P labor groups. Interactions between the contracting uterine body and the relaxing lower segment in oxytocin-induced labor might be associated with differences in uterine arterial flow during contraction between oxytocin-induced and spontaneous labor. However, changes in the intensity of uterine contractions during labor progression might differ between oxytocin-induced and spontaneous labor.

  10. In-situ Observations of Swash-zone Flow Velocities and Sediment Transport on a Steep Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon-Maldonado, P.; Puleo, J. A.; Figlus, J.

    2014-12-01

    A 45 m scaffolding frame containing an array of instruments was installed at South Bethany Beach, Delaware, to obtain in-situ measurements in the swash zone. Six cross-shore stations were established to simultaneously measure near-bed velocity profiles, sediment concentration and water level fluctuations on a steep beach. Measurements of swash-zone hydrodynamics and morphological change were collected from February 12 to 25, 2014, following a large Nor'easter storm with surf zone significant wave height exceeding 5 m. Swash-zone flow velocities (u,v,w) were measured at each cross-shore location using a Nortek Vectrino profiling velocimeter that measured a 30 mm velocity profile at 1 mm vertical increments at 100 Hz. These velocity profiles were used to quantify the vertical flow structure over the foreshore and estimate hydrodynamic parameters such as bed shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy dissipation. Sediment concentrations were measured using optical backscatter sensors (OBS) to obtain spatio-temporal measurements during both uprush and backwash phases of the swash cycle. Cross-shore sediment transport rates at each station were estimated by taking the product of cross-shore velocity and sediment concentration. Foreshore elevations were sampled every low tide using a Leica GPS system with RTK capability. Cross-shore sediment transport rates and gradients derived from the velocities and bed shear stress estimates will be related to the observed morphological change.

  11. Groundwater flow and velocity in a 500 ka pre-Illinoian till, eastern Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Tassier-Surine, S.

    2006-01-01

    Few hydrology studies have investigated glacial till older than Illinoian time (> 300,000 BP) despite these older tills overlying a large portion of North America. An 8- and 6-well monitoring well nest installed into a 31 m thick pre-Illinoian till sequence near Cedar Rapids, Iowa was characterized using traditional hydrologic methods and chemical tracers. The aquitard system consists of about 9 m of fine-grained oxidized pre-Illinoian till overlying 22 m of unoxidized till and Devonian dolomite bedrock. Hydraulic conductivity ranged from 10-7 m/s in oxidized till and 10-10 m/s in unoxidized till. Hydraulic head relations indicated downward groundwater flow through the till profile with hydraulic gradients steepest near the unoxidized till/bedrock interface. Tritium and nitrate concentrations indicated recent (groundwater velocity through the unoxidized till was estimated to range from 0.4 to 5.7 cm/year. The thickness of unoxidized pre-Illinoian till in Linn County was estimated from available records and contoured against vertical travel times to evaluate the effectiveness of pre-Illinoian till in preventing nitrate migration to underlying bedrock aquifers. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  12. Regional differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity response to hypobaric hypoxia at high altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Berend; Neupane, Pritam; Thanbichler, Florian; Hadolt, Irmgard; Sattelmeyer, Vera; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Waanders, Robb; Noachtar, Soheyl; Ausserer, Harald

    2015-11-01

    Symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) may appear above 2,500 m altitude, if the time allowed for acclimatization is insufficient. As the mechanisms underlying brain adaptation to the hypobaric hypoxic environment are not fully understood, a prospective study was performed investigating neurophysiological changes by means of near infrared spectroscopy, electroencephalograpy (EEG), and transcranial doppler sonography at 100, 3,440 and 5,050 m above sea level in the Khumbu Himal, Nepal. Fourteen of the 26 mountaineers reaching 5,050 m altitude developed symptoms of AMS between 3,440 and 5,050 m altitude (Lake-Louise Score ⩾3). Their EEG frontal beta activity and occipital alpha activity increased between 100 and 3,440 m altitude, i.e., before symptoms appeared. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the anterior and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) increased in all mountaineers between 100 and 3,440 m altitude. During further ascent to 5,050 altitude, mountaineers with AMS developed a further increase in CBFV in the MCA, whereas in all mountaineers CBFV decreased continuously with increasing altitude in the posterior cerebral arteries. These results indicate that hypobaric hypoxia causes different regional changes in CBFV despite similar electrophysiological changes.

  13. Velocity asymmetry of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in the creep and flow regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaňatka, M; Rojas-Sánchez, J-C; Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Belmeguenai, M; Roussigné, Y; Stashkevich, A; Thiaville, A; Pizzini, S

    2015-08-19

    We have carried out measurements of domain wall dynamics in a Pt/Co/GdOx(t) wedge sample with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. When driven by an easy-axis field Hz in the presence of an in-plane field Hx, the domain wall propagation is different along [Formula: see text]x, as expected for samples presenting Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DMI) interaction. In the creep regime, the sign and the value of the domain wall velocity asymmetry changes along the wedge. We show that in our samples the domain wall speed versus Hx curves in the creep regime cannot be explained simply in terms of the variation of the domain wall energy with Hx, as suggested by previous works. For this reason the strength and the sign of the DMI cannot be extracted from these measurements. To obtain reliable information on the DMI strength using magnetic field-induced domain wall dynamics, measurements have been performed with high fields, bringing the DW close to the flow regime of propagation. In this case we find large values of the DMI, consistent in magnitude and sign with those obtained from Brillouin light scattering measurements.

  14. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect. A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  15. Dynamical equations for the vector potential and the velocity potential in incompressible irrotational Euler flows: a refined Bernoulli theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2015-09-01

    We consider incompressible Euler flows in terms of the stream function in two dimensions and the vector potential in three dimensions. We pay special attention to the case with singular distributions of the vorticity, e.g., point vortices in two dimensions. An explicit equation governing the velocity potentials is derived in two steps. (i) Starting from the equation for the stream function [Ohkitani, Nonlinearity 21, T255 (2009)NONLE50951-771510.1088/0951-7715/21/12/T02], which is valid for smooth flows as well, we derive an equation for the complex velocity potential. (ii) Taking a real part of this equation, we find a dynamical equation for the velocity potential, which may be regarded as a refinement of Bernoulli theorem. In three-dimensional incompressible flows, we first derive dynamical equations for the vector potentials which are valid for smooth fields and then recast them in hypercomplex form. The equation for the velocity potential is identified as its real part and is valid, for example, flows with vortex layers. As an application, the Kelvin-Helmholtz problem has been worked out on the basis the current formalism. A connection to the Navier-Stokes regularity problem is addressed as a physical application of the equations for the vector potentials for smooth fields.

  16. Fetal ductus venosus flow velocity waveforms and maternal serum AFP before and after first-trimester transabdominal chorionic villus sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Brezinka (Christoph); A.M. Hagenaars (A.); J.W. Wladimiroff (Juriy); F.J. Los

    1995-01-01

    textabstractDoppler flow velocity waveform recording in the fetal ductus venosus and umbilical artery as well as maternal blood sampling for serum alpha-fetoprotein (MSAFP) was performed before and after transabdominal chorion villus sampling (TACVS) in 36 women of advanced maternal age (≥ 36 years)

  17. Influence of flow velocity on biofilm growth in a tubular heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M; Vega, Luis M; Madariaga, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The influence of flow velocity (FV) on the heat transfer process in tubes made from AISI 316L stainless steel in a heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater was evaluated based on the characteristics of the resulting biofilm that adhered to the internal surface of the tubes at velocities of 1, 1.2, 1.6, and 3 m s(-1). The results demonstrated that at a higher FV, despite being more compact and consistent, the biofilm was thinner with a lower concentration of solids, and smoother, which favoured the heat transfer process within the equipment. However, higher velocities increase the initial cost of the refrigerating water-pumping equipment and its energy consumption cost to compensate for the greater pressure drops produced in the tube. The velocity of 1.6 m s(-1) represented the equilibrium between the advantages and disadvantages of the variables analysed for the test conditions in this study.

  18. Velocity overshoot of start-up flow for a Maxwell fluid in a porous half-space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Wen-Chang

    2006-01-01

    Stokes' first problem has been investigated for a Maxwell fluid in a porous half-space for gaining insight into the effect of viscoelasticity on the start-up flow in a porous medium. An exact solution was obtained by using the Fourier sine transform. It was found that at large values of the relaxation time the velocity overshoot occurs obviously and the system exhibits viscoelastic behaviours. On the other hand, for short relaxation time the velocity overshoot disappears and the system exhibits viscous behaviours. A critical value of the relaxation time was obtained for the emergence of the velocity overshoot. Furthermore, it was found that the velocity overshoot is caused by both the viscoelasticity of the Maxwell fluid and the Darcy resistance resulting from the structure of the micropore in the porous medium.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity of air flow over 1000°C using two color phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masatoshi; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; LCS Team

    2016-11-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were applied to the gas turbines and the internal combustion engines for the high thermal efficiency. The evaluation and the improvement of coatings require to measure transient gaseous flow near the wall with coatings. An aim of this study is to combine a two color phosphor thermometry with the PIV to measure simultaneously temperature and velocity of the gas over 1000°C. The temperature and velocity distribution of an impinging jet of high temperature air was simultaneously visualized in experiments. The temperature was estimated from an intensity ratio of luminescent in different ranges of wavelength, 500 600 nm and 400 480 nm. Uncertainty of measured temperature was less than 10°C. Temperatures measured by the developed method and by thermocouples were agreed well. The measured velocity by the PIV with phosphor particles were also agreed well with the velocity measured by a Laser Doppler Velocimeter.

  20. Long-Period Fiber Grating Sensors for the Measurement of Liquid Level and Fluid-Flow Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Neng Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and assessment of two types of Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG-based sensors including a mobile liquid level sensor and a reflective sensor for the measurement of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. Shewhart control charts were used to assess the liquid level sensing capacity and reliability of the mobile CO2-laser engraved LPFG sensor. There were ten groups of different liquid level experiment and each group underwent ten repeated wavelength shift measurements. The results showed that all measurands were within the control limits; thus, this mobile sensor was reliable and exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. In addition, a reflective sensor consisting of five LPFGs in series with a reflective end has been developed to evaluate the liquid level and fluid-flow velocity. These five LPFGs were fabricated by the electrical arc discharge method and the reflective end was coated with silver by Tollen’s test. After each liquid level experiment was performed five times, the average values of the resonance wavelength shifts for LPFG Nos. 1–5 were in the range of 1.35–9.14 nm. The experimental findings showed that the reflective sensor could be used to automatically monitor five fixed liquid levels. This reflective sensor also exhibited at least 100-cm liquid level measurement capacity. The mechanism of the fluid-flow velocity sensor was based on analyzing the relationship among the optical power, time, and the LPFG’s length. There were two types of fluid-flow velocity measurements: inflow and drainage processes. The differences between the LPFG-based fluid-flow velocities and the measured average fluid-flow velocities were found in the range of 8.7–12.6%. For the first time to our knowledge, we have demonstrated the feasibility of liquid level and fluid-flow velocity sensing with a reflective LPFG-based sensor without modifying LPFGs or coating chemical compounds.

  1. Anterior-to-posterior wave of buccal expansion in suction feeding fishes is critical for optimizing fluid flow velocity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kristin L; Wainwright, Peter C; Holzman, Roi

    2008-11-01

    In fishes that employ suction feeding, coordinating the timing of peak flow velocity with mouth opening is likely to be an important feature of prey capture success because this will allow the highest forces to be exerted on prey items when the jaws are fully extended and the flow field is at its largest. Although it has long been known that kinematics of buccal expansion in feeding fishes are characterized by an anterior-to-posterior wave of expansion, this pattern has not been incorporated in most previous computational models of suction feeding. As a consequence, these models have failed to correctly predict the timing of peak flow velocity, which according to the currently available empirical data should occur around the time of peak gape. In this study, we use a simple fluid dynamic model to demonstrate that the inclusion of an anterior-to-posterior wave of buccal expansion can correctly reproduce the empirically determined flow velocity profile, although only under very constrained conditions, whereas models that do not allow this wave of expansion inevitably predict peak velocity earlier in the strike, when the gape is less than half of its maximum. The conditions that are required to produce a realistic velocity profile are as follows: (i) a relatively long time lag between mouth opening and expansion of the more posterior parts of the mouth, (ii) a short anterior portion of the mouth relative to more posterior sections, and (iii) a pattern of movement that begins slowly and then rapidly accelerates. Greater maximum velocities were generated in simulations without the anterior-to-posterior wave of expansion, suggesting a trade-off between maximizing fluid speed and coordination of peak fluid speed with peak gape.

  2. Differential increases in blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery after tourniquet deflation during sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Y; Kawauchi, C H; Ide, M; Saito, S; Mizutani, A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the comparative effects of sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol on cerebral blood flow velocity after tourniquet deflation during orthopaedic surgery. Thirty patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery were randomly divided into sevoflurane, isoflurane and propofol groups. Anaesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, isoflurane or propofol infusion in 33% oxygen and 67% nitrous oxide, in whatever concentrations were necessary to keep bispectral index values between 45 and 50. Ventilatory rate or tidal volume was adjusted to target PaCO2 of 35 mmHg. A 2.0 MHz transcranial Doppler probe was attached to the patient's head at the temporal window and mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery was continuously measured. The extremity was exsanguinated with an Esmarch bandage and the pneumatic tourniquet was inflated to a pressure of 450 mmHg. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, velocity in the middle cerebral artery and arterial blood gas analysis were measured every minute for 10 minutes after release of the tourniquet in all three groups. Velocity in the middle cerebral artery in the three groups increased for five minutes after tourniquet deflation. Because of the different cerebrovascular effects of the three agents, the degree of increase in flow velocity in the isoflurane group was greater than in the other two groups, the change in flow velocity in the propofol group being the lowest (at three minutes after deflation 40 +/- 7%, 32 +/- 6% and 28 +/- 10% in the isoflurane, sevoflurane and propofol groups respectively, P < 0.05).

  3. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  4. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  5. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  6. On the influence of the gas velocity profile on the theoretically predicted opposed flow flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiBlasi, C.; Crescitelli, S.; Russo, G. (Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita de Napoli, Piazzale v Tecchio, Naples (IT)); FernandezPello, A.C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the effect on the predicted flame spread rate and flame structure of a prescribed gas velocity field opposing the direction of flame propagation. The calculations are made for two limiting cases of oxygen mass fraction and with Oseen and Hagen-Poiseuille velocity profiles. It is shown that the selected gas