WorldWideScience

Sample records for surface-exposed tyrosine residues

  1. The effects of the surface-exposed residues on the binding and hydrolytic activities of Vibrio carchariae chitinase A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suginta Wipa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio carchariae chitinase A (EC3.2.1.14 is a family-18 glycosyl hydrolase and comprises three distinct structural domains: i the amino terminal chitin binding domain (ChBD; ii the (α/β8 TIM barrel catalytic domain (CatD; and iii the α + β insertion domain. The predicted tertiary structure of V. carchariae chitinase A has located the residues Ser33 & Trp70 at the end of ChBD and Trp231 & Tyr245 at the exterior of the catalytic cleft. These residues are surface-exposed and presumably play an important role in chitin hydrolysis. Results Point mutations of the target residues of V. carchariae chitinase A were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. With respect to their binding activity towards crystalline α-chitin and colloidal chitin, chitin binding assays demonstrated a considerable decrease for mutants W70A and Y245W, and a notable increase for S33W and W231A. When the specific hydrolyzing activity was determined, mutant W231A displayed reduced hydrolytic activity, whilst Y245W showed enhanced activity. This suggested that an alteration in the hydrolytic activity was not correlated with a change in the ability of the enzyme to bind to chitin polymer. A mutation of Trp70 to Ala caused the most severe loss in both the binding and hydrolytic activities, which suggested that it is essential for crystalline chitin binding and hydrolysis. Mutations varied neither the specific hydrolyzing activity against pNP-[GlcNAc]2, nor the catalytic efficiency against chitohexaose, implying that the mutated residues are not important in oligosaccharide hydrolysis. Conclusion Our data provide direct evidence that the binding as well as hydrolytic activities of V. carchariae chitinase A to insoluble chitin are greatly influenced by Trp70 and less influenced by Ser33. Though Trp231 and Tyr245 are involved in chitin hydrolysis, they do not play a major role in the binding process of crystalline chitin and the guidance of the chitin chain

  2. Mutations Affecting Keratin 10 Surface-Exposed Residues Highlight the Structural Basis of Phenotypic Variation in Epidermolytic Ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Haris; Kumar, Anil; Craiglow, Brittany G; Zhou, Jing; Saraceni, Corey; Torbeck, Richard; Ragsdale, Bruce; Rehder, Paul; Ranki, Annamari; Choate, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) due to KRT10 mutations is a rare, typically autosomal dominant, disorder characterized by generalized erythema and cutaneous blistering at birth followed by hyperkeratosis and less frequent blistering later in life. We identified two KRT10 mutations p.Q434del and p.R441P in subjects presenting with a mild EI phenotype. Both occur within the mutational "hot spot" of the keratin 10 (K10) 2B rod domain, adjacent to severe EI-associated mutations. p.Q434del and p.R441P formed collapsed K10 fibers rather than aggregates characteristic of severe EI KRT10 mutations such as p.R156C. Upon differentiation, keratinocytes from p.Q434del showed significantly lower apoptosis (P-value<0.01) compared with p.R156C as assessed by the TUNEL assay. Conversely, the mitotic index of the p.Q434del epidermis was significantly higher compared with that of p.R156C (P-value<0.01) as estimated by the Ki67 assay. Structural basis of EI phenotype variation was investigated by homology-based modeling of wild-type and mutant K1-K10 dimers. Both mild EI mutations were found to affect the surface-exposed residues of the K10 alpha helix coiled-coil and caused localized disorganization of the K1-K10 heterodimer. In contrast, adjacent severe EI mutations disrupt key intermolecular dimer interactions. Our findings provide structural insights into phenotypic variation in EI due to KRT10 mutations.

  3. Ionization of tyrosine residues in human serum albumin and in its complexes with bilirubin and laurate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1992-01-01

    Spectrophotometric titration of human serum albumin indicates that ionization of the 18 tyrosine residues takes place between pH 9 and 12.7. A Hill plot indicates that protons dissociate co-operatively from tyrosine residues, in pure albumin between pH 11.0 and 11.4 with a Hill coefficient 1.7, a...

  4. A Multifeatures Fusion and Discrete Firefly Optimization Method for Prediction of Protein Tyrosine Sulfation Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Liu, Chunhua; Zhou, Peng; Li, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is one of the ubiquitous protein posttranslational modifications, where some sulfate groups are added to the tyrosine residues. It plays significant roles in various physiological processes in eukaryotic cells. To explore the molecular mechanism of tyrosine sulfation, one of the prerequisites is to correctly identify possible protein tyrosine sulfation residues. In this paper, a novel method was presented to predict protein tyrosine sulfation residues from primary sequences. By means of informative feature construction and elaborate feature selection and parameter optimization scheme, the proposed predictor achieved promising results and outperformed many other state-of-the-art predictors. Using the optimal features subset, the proposed method achieved mean MCC of 94.41% on the benchmark dataset, and a MCC of 90.09% on the independent dataset. The experimental performance indicated that our new proposed method could be effective in identifying the important protein posttranslational modifications and the feature selection scheme would be powerful in protein functional residues prediction research fields.

  5. Protein-bound glycogen is linked to tyrosine residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Aon, M A; Curtino, J A

    1985-01-01

    Tyrosine-glycogen obtained from retina proteoglycogen by exhaustive proteolytic digestion was radiolabelled with 125I. The 125I-labelled tyrosine-glycogen was degraded by amylolytic digestion to a very small radioactive product, which was identified as iodotyrosine by h.p.l.c. The amylolytic mixture used released glucose and maltose that were alpha-linked to the phenolic hydroxy group of p-nitrophenol. No free iodotyrosine was found before or after the intact [125I]iodotyrosine-glycogen was s...

  6. Requirement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor for selected GH-stimulated function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobie, P E; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the involvement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor in the cellular response to GH. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones expressing a receptor with tyrosine residues at position 333 and 338 of the receptor substituted for phenylalanine (...

  7. Importance of the content and localization of tyrosine residues for thyroxine formation within the N-terminal part of human thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, M. T.; Sijmons, C. C.; Bakker, O.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is formed by coupling of iodinated tyrosine residues within thyroglobulin (TG). In mature TG, some iodinated tyrosine residues are involved preferentially in T4 formation. In order to investigate the specific role of various tyrosine residues in T4 formation, N-terminal TG fragments

  8. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  9. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD catalyzes NO-dependent tyrosine residue nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRDJAN STOJANOVIC

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The peroxynitrite-induced nitration of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD tyrosine residue, which causes enzyme inactivation, is well established. This led to suggestions that MnSOD nitration and inactivation in vivo, detected in various diseases associated with oxidative stress and overproduction of nitric monoxide (NO, conditions which favor peroxynitrite formation, is also caused by peroxynitrite. However, our previous in vitro study demonstrated that exposure of MnSOD to NO led to NO conversion into nitrosonium (NO+ and nitroxyl (NO– species, which caused enzyme modifications and inactivation. Here it is reported that MnSOD is tyrosine nitrated upon exposure to NO, as well as that MnSOD nitration contributes to inactivation of the enzyme. Collectively, these observations provide a compelling argument supporting the generation of nitrating species in MnSOD exposed to NO and shed a new light on MnSOD tyrosine nitration and inactivation in vivo. This may represent a novel mechanism by which MnSOD protects cell from deleterious effects associated with overproduction of NO. However, extensive MnSOD modification and inactivation associated with prolonged exposure to NO will amplify the toxic effects caused by increased cell superoxide and NO levels.

  10. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Naomi L.; Moeke, Cassidy H.; Fantoni, Luca I.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (S...

  11. The carboxyl terminal tyrosine 417 residue of NOK has an autoinhibitory effect on NOK-mediated signaling transductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yinghua; Zhong Shan; Rong Zhili; Ren Yongming; Li Zhiyong; Zhang Shuping; Chang Zhijie; Liu Li

    2007-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine kinases (RPTKs) are essential mediators of cell growth, differentiation, migration, and metabolism. Recently, a novel RPTK named NOK has been cloned and characterized. In current study, we investigated the role of the carboxyl terminal tyrosine 417 residue of NOK in the activations of different signaling pathways. A single tyrosine to phenylalanine point mutation at Y417 site (Y417 F) not only dramatically enhanced the NOK-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but also markedly promoted the NOK-mediated activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 (STAT1 and 3). Moreover, the proliferation potential of NIH3T3-NOK (Y417F) stable cells were significantly elevated as compared with that of NIH3T3-NOK. Overall, our results demonstrate that the tyrosine Y417 residue at the carboxyl tail of NOK exhibits an autoinhibitory role in NOK-mediated signaling transductions

  12. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  13. Requirement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor for selected GH-stimulated function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobie, P E; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the involvement of tyrosine residues 333 and 338 of the growth hormone (GH) receptor in the cellular response to GH. Stable Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clones expressing a receptor with tyrosine residues at position 333 and 338 of the receptor substituted for phenylalanine...... (CHO-GHR1-638 Y333F, Y338F) were generated by cDNA transfection. Compared with the wild type receptor the Y333F,Y338F mutant possessed normal high affinity ligand binding, hormone internalization, and ligand-induced receptor down-regulation. GH activation of mitogen-associated protein kinase was also...... similar in CHO clones expressing similar wild type and Y333F,Y338F receptor number. However, two GH-regulated cellular events (lipogenesis, and protein synthesis) were deficient in the tyrosine substituted receptor. In contrast, transcriptional regulation by GH (as evidenced by chloramphenicol...

  14. Replacement of insulin receptor tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 does not alter the mitogenic effect of the hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debant, A.; Clauser, E.; Ponzio, G.; Filloux, C.; Auzan, C.; Contreres, J.O.; Rossi, B.

    1988-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary transfectants that express insulin receptors in which tyrosine residues 1162 and 1163 were replaced by phenylalanine exhibit a total inhibition of the insulin-mediated tyrosine kinase activity toward exogenous substrates; this latter activity is associated with total inhibition of the hypersensitivity reported for insulin in promoting 2-deoxyglucose uptake. The authors now present evidence that the twin tyrosines also control the insulin-mediated stimulation of glycogen synthesis. Surprisingly, this type of Chinese hamster ovary transfectant is as hypersensitive to insulin for its mitogenic effect as are Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing many intact insulin receptors. Such data suggest that (i) the insulin mitogenic effect routes through a different pathway than insulin uses to activate the transport and metabolism of glucose and (ii) the mitogenic effect of insulin is not controlled by the twin tyrosines. At the molecular level, the solubilized mutated receptor has not insulin-dependent tyrosine kinase activity, whereas this receptor displays measurable insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of its β subunit in 32 P-labeled cells. The authors therefore propose that the autocatalytic phosphorylating activity of the receptor reports a cryptic tyrosine kinase activity that cannot be visualized by the use of classical exogenous substrates

  15. Roles of the C-terminal tyrosine residues of LAT in GPVI-induced platelet activation: insights into the mechanism of PLC gamma 2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Ashraf; Séverin, Sonia; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Aguado, Enrique; Malissen, Marie; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Malissen, Bernard; Ragab-Thomas, Jeannie; Payrastre, Bernard

    2007-10-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is an adaptor protein required for organization of the signaling machinery downstream of the platelet collagen receptor, the glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Here, we investigated the effect of LAT mutations on specific signaling pathways and on platelet functions in response to GPVI triggering by convulxin (Cvx). Using mice containing tyrosine to phenylalanine mutations of the adaptor, we show the crucial role played by the tyrosine residues at positions 175, 195, and 235 in the phosphorylation of LAT and in the whole pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to Cvx. These 3 C-terminal tyrosine residues are important to recruit the tyrosine kinase Fyn, which may be involved in LAT phosphorylation. Efficient phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation requires the 3 C-terminal tyrosine residues of LAT but not its tyrosine 136. Interestingly, single mutation of the tyrosine 136 results in the loss of phospholipase C gamma2 (PLCgamma2) activation without affecting its PI3K-dependent membrane association, and is sufficient to impair platelet responses to Cvx. Thus, activation of PLCgamma2 via GPVI is dependent on 2 complementary events: its interaction with the tyrosine 136 of LAT and its membrane location, which itself requires events mediated by the 3 C-terminal tyrosines of LAT.

  16. Identification of tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor required for transcriptional signaling and Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Wang, X.; Kopchick, J J

    1996-01-01

    phosphorylation in intracellular signaling, we constructed GH receptors in which combinations of tyrosines were mutated to phenylalanines. We identified three tyrosine residues at positions 534, 566, and 627 that were required for activation of GH-stimulated transcription of the serine protease inhibitor (Spi) 2...

  17. Oxidation of protein tyrosine or methionine residues: From the amino acid to the peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, 75005 Paris (France); Trouillas, P [EA 4021 Faculte de Pharmacie, 2 Rue du Dr. Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France); Houee-Levin, C, E-mail: jb@lct.jussieu.fr, E-mail: patrick.trouillas@unilim.fr, E-mail: chantal.houee@u-psud.fr [Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8000, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, 91405 Orsay (France) (France)

    2011-01-01

    Methionine and tyrosine are competing targets of oxidizing free radicals in peptides or proteins. The first step is the addition of OH radicals either on the sulphur atom of methionine, followed by OH{sup -} elimination, or on the aromatic cycle of tyrosine. The next step can be stabilization of methionine radical cation by a two centre-three electron bond, or intramolecular electron transfer from tyrosine to the methionine radical cation. In this latter case a tyrosine radical is formed, which appears deprotonated. In a first step we have compared the stability of the OH radical adducts on Methionine or on Tyrosine. In agreement with experimental results, the thermodynamical data indicate that the OH adduct on Tyrosine and the radical cation are more stable than those on methionine. In a second step we have investigated the stabilization of the radical cations of Methionine by formation of intramolecular S:X two-center three-electron bond (X=S, N, O). Finally we have compared the spin densities on separated amino acids to that in a radical pentapeptide, methionine enkephalin. One observes a delocalisation of the orbital of the odd electron on the sulfur atom of Met and on the cycle of Tyr. The peptidic chain is also concerned.

  18. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  19. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in

  20. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Y; Mariotti, Michele; Hammer, Astrid; Hoefler, Gerald; Hägglund, Per; Malle, Ernst; Wise, Steven G; Davies, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30-57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH), a potent oxidising and nitrating agent, is formed in vivo from superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. Considerable evidence supports ONOOH formation in the inflamed artery wall, and a role for this species in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions, with ONOOH-damaged extracellular matrix implicated in lesion rupture. We demonstrate that TE is highly sensitive to ONOOH, with this resulting in extensive dimerization, fragmentation and nitration of Tyr residues to give 3-nitrotyrosine (3-nitroTyr). This occurs with equimolar or greater levels of oxidant and increases in a dose-dependent manner. Quantification of Tyr loss and 3-nitroTyr formation indicates extensive Tyr modification with up to two modified Tyr per protein molecule, and up to 8% conversion of initial ONOOH to 3-nitroTyr. These effects were modulated by bicarbonate, an alternative target for ONOOH. Inter- and intra-protein di-tyrosine cross-links have been characterized by mass spectrometry. Examination of human atherosclerotic lesions shows colocalization of 3-nitroTyr with elastin epitopes, consistent with TE or elastin modification in vivo, and also an association of 3-nitroTyr containing proteins and elastin with lipid deposits. These data suggest that exposure of TE to ONOOH gives marked chemical and structural changes to TE and altered matrix assembly, and that such damage accumulates in human arterial tissue during the development of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalon, Miriam C. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Wilke, Natalia [CIQUIBIC, Dpto. de Quimica Biologica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Pabellon Argentina, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA, Cordoba (Argentina); Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano [Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata 00133, Rome (Italy); Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N. [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina); Vincent, Paula A., E-mail: pvincent@fbqf.unt.edu.ar [Departamento de Bioquimica de la Nutricion, Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas-Universidad Nacional de Tucuman) and Instituto de Quimica Biologica ' Dr Bernabe Bloj' , Chacabuco 461, 4000 San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). {yields} Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. {yields} Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated. {yields} Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  2. Redox-active tyrosine residue in the microcin J25 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalon, Miriam C.; Wilke, Natalia; Pedersen, Jens; Rufini, Stefano; Morero, Roberto D.; Cortez, Leonardo; Chehin, Rosana N.; Farias, Ricardo N.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of MccJ25 and MccJ25 (Y9F). → Infrared spectroscopy studies showed that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation. → Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated. → Tyr9 but not Tyr20 can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical. -- Abstract: Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a 21 amino acid lasso-peptide antibiotic produced by Escherichia coli and composed of an 8-residues ring and a terminal 'tail' passing through the ring. We have previously reported two cellular targets for this antibiotic, bacterial RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain, and shown that Tyr9 is essential for the effect on the membrane respiratory chain which leads to superoxide overproduction. In the present paper we investigated the redox behavior of MccJ25 and the mutant MccJ25 (Y9F). Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed irreversible oxidation of both Tyr9 and Tyr20 in MccJ25, but infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that only Tyr9 could be deprotonated upon chemical oxidation in solution. Formation of a long-lived tyrosyl radical in the native MccJ25 oxidized by H 2 O 2 was demonstrated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; this radical was not detected when the reaction was carried out with the MccJ25 (Y9F) mutant. These results show that the essential Tyr9, but not Tyr20, can be easily oxidized and form a tyrosyl radical.

  3. Tyrosine Mutation in AAV9 Capsid Improves Gene Transfer to the Mouse Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina V. Martini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors are being increasingly used as the vector of choice for in vivo gene delivery and gene therapy for many pulmonary diseases. Recently, it was shown that phosphorylation of surface-exposed tyrosine residues from AAV capsid targets the viral particles for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and mutations of these tyrosine residues lead to highly efficient vector transduction in vitro and in vivo in different organs. In this study, we evaluated the pulmonary transgene expression efficacy of AAV9 vectors containing point mutations in surface-exposed capsid tyrosine residues. Methods: Eighteen C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into three groups: (1 a control group (CTRL animals underwent intratracheal (i.t. instillation of saline, (2 the wild-type AAV9 group (WT-AAV9, 1010 vg, and (3 the tyrosine-mutant Y731F AAV9 group (M-AAV9, 1010 vg, which received (i.t. self-complementary AAV9 vectors containing the DNA sequence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP. Four weeks after instillation, lung mechanics, morphometry, tissue cellularity, gene expression, inflammatory cytokines, and growth factor expression were analyzed. Results: No significant differences were observed in lung mechanics and morphometry among the experimental groups. However, the number of polymorphonuclear cells was higher in the WT-AAV9 group than in the CTRL and M-AAV9 groups, suggesting that the administration of tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors was better tolerated. Tyrosine-mutant AAV9 vectors significantly improved transgene delivery to the lung (30% compared with their wild-type counterparts, without eliciting an inflammatory response. Conclusion: Our results provide the impetus for further studies to exploit the use of AAV9 vectors as a tool for pulmonary gene therapy.

  4. Single Tyrosine Mutation in AAV8 Vector Capsid Enhances Gene Lung Delivery and Does Not Alter Lung Morphofunction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina V. Martini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vectors derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAVs are important gene delivery tools for treating pulmonary diseases. Phosphorylation of surface-exposed tyrosine residues from AAV2 capsid targets the viral particles for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and mutations of these tyrosine residues lead to highly efficient vector transduction in vitro and in vivo in different organs. We evaluated the pulmonary transduction efficiency of AAV8 vectors containing point mutations in surface-exposed capsid tyrosine residues. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice (20-25 g, n=24 were randomly assigned into three groups: control group animals received intratracheal (i.t. instillation of saline (50 μl, wild-type AAV8 group, and capsid mutant Y733F AAV8 group, which received (i.t. AAV8 vectors containing the DNA sequence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP. Four weeks after instillation, lung mechanics and morphometry, vector transduction (immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression of eGFP, and inflammatory cytokines and growth factor expression were analyzed. Results: Tyrosine-mutant AAV8 vectors displayed significantly increased transduction efficiency in the lung compared with their wild-type counterparts. No significant differences were observed in lung mechanics and morphometry between experimental groups. There was no evidence of inflammatory response in any group. Conclusion: AAV8 vectors may be useful for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of pulmonary diseases.

  5. A Conserved Active Site Tyrosine Residue of Proline Dehydrogenase Helps Enforce the Preference for Proline over Hydroxyproline as the Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrander, E.L.; Larson, J.D.; Schuermann, J.P.; Tanner, J.J.; (Cornell); (Missouri)

    2009-03-02

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the oxidation of L-proline to {Delta}-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate. PRODHs exhibit a pronounced preference for proline over hydroxyproline (trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline) as the substrate, but the basis for specificity is unknown. The goal of this study, therefore, is to gain insight into the structural determinants of substrate specificity of this class of enzyme, with a focus on understanding how PRODHs discriminate between the two closely related molecules, proline and hydroxyproline. Two site-directed mutants of the PRODH domain of Escherichia coli PutA were created: Y540A and Y540S. Kinetics measurements were performed with both mutants. Crystal structures of Y540S complexed with hydroxyproline, proline, and the proline analogue L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid were determined at resolutions of 1.75, 1.90, and 1.85 {angstrom}, respectively. Mutation of Tyr540 increases the catalytic efficiency for hydroxyproline 3-fold and decreases the specificity for proline by factors of 20 (Y540S) and 50 (Y540A). The structures show that removal of the large phenol side chain increases the volume of the substrate-binding pocket, allowing sufficient room for the 4-hydroxyl of hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the introduced serine residue participates in recognition of hydroxyproline by forming a hydrogen bond with the 4-hydroxyl. This result has implications for understanding the substrate specificity of the related enzyme human hydroxyproline dehydrogenase, which has serine in place of tyrosine at this key active site position. The kinetic and structural results suggest that Tyr540 is an important determinant of specificity. Structurally, it serves as a negative filter for hydroxyproline by clashing with the 4-hydroxyl group of this potential substrate.

  6. Plastic roles of phenylalanine and tyrosine residues of TLS/FUS in complex formation with the G-quadruplexes of telomeric DNA and TERRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keiko; Mashima, Tsukasa; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yagi, Ryota; Kurokawa, Riki; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2018-02-12

    The length of a telomere is regulated via elongation and shortening processes. Telomeric DNA and telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which both contain G-rich repeated sequences, form G-quadruplex structures. Previously, translocated in liposarcoma (TLS) protein, also known as fused in sarcoma (FUS) protein, was found to form a ternary complex with the G-quadruplex structures of telomeric DNA and TERRA. We then showed that the third RGG motif of TLS, the RGG3 domain, is responsible for the complex formation. However, the structural basis for their binding remains obscure. Here, NMR-based binding assaying revealed the interactions in the binary and ternary complexes of RGG3 with telomeric DNA or/and TERRA. In the ternary complex, tyrosine bound exclusively to TERRA, while phenylalanine bound exclusively to telomeric DNA. Thus, tyrosine and phenylalanine each play a central role in the recognition of TERRA and telomeric DNA, respectively. Surprisingly in the binary complexes, RGG3 used both tyrosine and phenylalanine residues to bind to either TERRA or telomeric DNA. We propose that the plastic roles of tyrosine and phenylalanine are important for RGG3 to efficiently form the ternary complex, and thereby regulate the telomere shortening.

  7. Identification of Surface-Exposed Protein Radicals and A Substrate Oxidation Site in A-Class Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase from Thermomonospora curvata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Ruben; Chen, Xuejie; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Hayati, Zahra; Carlson, Eric A.; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Song, Likai; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Li, Ping (FSU); (KSU)

    2016-12-12

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of heme peroxidases in which a catalytic distal aspartate is involved in H2O2 activation to catalyze oxidations under acidic conditions. They have received much attention due to their potential applications in lignin compound degradation and biofuel production from biomass. However, the mode of oxidation in bacterial DyPs remains unknown. We have recently reported that the bacterial TcDyP from Thermomonospora curvata is among the most active DyPs and shows activity toward phenolic lignin model compounds. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structure solved at 1.75 Å, sigmoidal steady-state kinetics with Reactive Blue 19 (RB19), and formation of compound II like product in the absence of reducing substrates observed with stopped-flow spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we hypothesized that the TcDyP catalyzes oxidation of large-size substrates via multiple surface-exposed protein radicals. Among 7 tryptophans and 3 tyrosines in TcDyP consisting of 376 residues for the matured protein, W263, W376, and Y332 were identified as surface-exposed protein radicals. Only the W263 was also characterized as one of the surface-exposed oxidation sites. SDS-PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that W376 represents an off-pathway destination for electron transfer, resulting in the cross-linking of proteins in the absence of substrates. Mutation of W376 improved compound I stability and overall catalytic efficiency toward RB19. While Y332 is highly conserved across all four classes of DyPs, its catalytic function in A-class TcDyP is minimal, possibly due to its extremely small solvent-accessible areas. Identification of surface-exposed protein radicals and substrate oxidation sites is important for understanding the DyP mechanism and modulating its catalytic functions for improved activity on phenolic lignin.

  8. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...... processes are important in vivo and can contribute to cellular pathology....

  9. Identification of Surface Exposed Elementary Body Antigens of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to identify the surface exposed antigenic components of Cowdria ruminantium elementary body (EB) by biotin labeling, determine effect of reducing and non-reducing conditions and heat on the mobility of these antigens and their reactivity to antibodies from immunized animals by Western blotting.

  10. Exposure of tropoelastin to peroxynitrous acid gives high yields of nitrated tyrosine residues, di-tyrosine cross-links and altered protein structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degendorfer, Georg; Chuang, Christine Yu-Nung; Mariotti, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Elastin is an abundant extracellular matrix protein in elastic tissues, including the lungs, skin and arteries, and comprises 30–57% of the aorta by dry mass. The monomeric precursor, tropoelastin (TE), undergoes complex processing during elastogenesis to form mature elastic fibres. Peroxynitrous......-damaged extracellular matrix implicated in lesion rupture. We demonstrate that TE is highly sensitive to ONOOH, with this resulting in extensive dimerization, fragmentation and nitration of Tyr residues to give 3-nitrotyrosine (3-nitroTyr). This occurs with equimolar or greater levels of oxidant and increases in a dose...... with lipid deposits. These data suggest that exposure of TE to ONOOH gives marked chemical and structural changes to TE and altered matrix assembly, and that such damage accumulates in human arterial tissue during the development of atherosclerosis....

  11. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases in zebrafish gastrulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eekelen, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a key role in relaying external stimuli and signals into the cell towards the appropriate responses. This process is mediated by protein-tyrosine kinases adding a phosphor group to a tyrosine residue and protein-tyrosine phosphatases removing a phosphor group

  12. A Tyrosine Residue Along with a Glutamic Acid of the Omega-Like Loop Governs the Beta-Lactamase Activity of MSMEG_4455 in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankita; Kar, Debasish; Pandey, Satya Deo; Matcha, Ashok; Kumar, N Ganesh; Nathan, Soshina; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2017-06-01

    Mycobacterial beta-lactamases are involved in exerting beta-lactam resistance, though many of these proteins remain uncharacterized. Here, we have characterized MSMEG_4455 of Mycobacterium smegmatis as a beta-lactamase using molecular, biochemical and mutational techniques. To elucidate its nature in vivo and in vitro, and to predict its structure-function relationship in silico analysis is done. The MSMEG_4455 is cloned and expressed ectopically in a beta-lactamase deficient Escherichia coli mutant to establish the in vivo beta-lactamase like nature via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. Likewise the in vivo results, purified soluble form of MSMEG_4455 showed beta-lactam hydrolysis pattern similar to group 2a penicillinase. In silico analyses of MSMEG_4455 reveal glutamic acid (E)193 and tyrosine (Y)194 of omega-like loop might have importance in strengthening hydrogen bond network around the active-site, though involvement of tyrosine is rare for beta-lactamase activity. Accordingly, these residues are mutated to alanine (A) and phenylalanine (F), respectively. The mutated proteins have partially lost their ability to exert beta-lactamase activity both in vivo and in vitro. The Y194F mutation had more prominent effect on the enzymatic activity. Therefore, we infer that Y194 is the key for beta-lactamase activity of MSMEG_4455.

  13. Residue 259 in protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and PTPα determines the flexibility of glutamine 262

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Iversen, L.F.; Andersen, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    To study the flexibility of the substrate-binding site and in particular of Gln262, we have performed adiabatic conformational search and molecular dynamics simulations on the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of wild-type protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B, a mutant PTP1B(R47V),(D48N...... around Gln262 and the active site Cys215 reveals that the probability of finding a water molecule correctly positioned for catalysis is much larger in PTP1B than in PTP1B(R47V),(D48N),(M258C),(G259Q) and PTPalpha, in accordance with experiments....

  14. Activation of Bacillus subtilis Ugd by the BY-Kinase PtkA Proceeds via Phosphorylation of Its Residue Tyrosine 70

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petranovic, Dina; Grangeasse, C.; Macek, B.

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorylation-dependent activation of bacterial UDP-glucose dehydrogenases by BY-kinases has been previously described in several bacterial model organisms, but the identity of phosphorylated tyrosine(s) and the exact activation mechanism remained unknown. A recent site-specific phosphoprot......The phosphorylation-dependent activation of bacterial UDP-glucose dehydrogenases by BY-kinases has been previously described in several bacterial model organisms, but the identity of phosphorylated tyrosine(s) and the exact activation mechanism remained unknown. A recent site...

  15. The Effect of Neighboring Methionine Residue on Tyrosine Nitration & Oxidation in Peptides Treated with MPO, H2O2, & NO2- or Peroxynitrite and Bicarbonate: Role of Intramolecular Electron-Transfer Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Zielonka, Jacek; Sikora, Adam; Joseph, Joy; Xu, Yingkai; Kalyanaraman, B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that intramolecular electron-transfer reactions can profoundly affect the site and specificity of tyrosyl nitration and oxidation in peptides and proteins. Here we investigated the effects of methionine on tyrosyl nitration and oxidation induced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), H2O2 and NO2- and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) or ONOO- and bicarbonate (HCO3-) in model peptides, tyrosylmethionine (YM), tyrosylphenylalanine (YF) and tyrosine. Nitration and oxidation products of these peptides were analysed by HPLC with UV/Vis and fluorescence detection, and mass spectrometry; radical intermediates were identified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin-trapping. We have previously shown (Zhang et al., J. Biol. Chem. (2005) 280, 40684-40698) that oxidation and nitration of tyrosyl residue was inhibited in tyrosylcysteine(YC)-type peptides as compared to free tyrosine. Here we show that methionine, another sulfur-containing amino acid, does not inhibit nitration and oxidation of a neighboring tyrosine residue in the presence of ONOO- (or ONOOCO2-) or MPO/H2O2/NO2- system. Nitration of tyrosyl residue in YM was actually stimulated under the conditions of in situ generation of ONOO- (formed by reaction of superoxide with nitric oxide during SIN-1 decomposition), as compared to YF, YC and tyrosine. The dramatic variations in tyrosyl nitration profiles caused by methionine and cysteine residues have been attributed to differences in the direction of intramolecular electron transfer mechanism in these peptides. Further confirmation of HPLC data analysis was obtained by steady-state radiolysis and photolysis experiments. Potential implications of the intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism in mediating selective nitration of protein tyrosyl groups are discussed. PMID:19056332

  16. Identification of tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor required for transcriptional signaling and Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Wang, X.; Kopchick, J J

    1996-01-01

    The binding of growth hormone (GH) to its receptor results in its dimerization followed by activation of Jak2 kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation of the GH receptor itself, as well as Jak2 and the transcription factors Stat1, -3, and -5. In order to study the role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphor...

  17. Tyrosine Modifications in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Maria B.; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Significance: The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may cont...

  18. Droplet impaction on solid surfaces exposed to impinging jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Zia

    2005-12-15

    The thermal response of hot surfaces exposed to impinging jet fire and subsequent impacting water droplets is investigated. The research was done mainly experimentally by utilizing three different concepts. This included experiments on a laboratory scale steel plate and large outdoor fire tests with a quadratic steel channel and steel plates. Besides the horizontal jet flame itself was characterized in a comprehensive study. As a comparative study, the last three types of the experiment were additionally modeled by the CFD-code Kameleon FireEx for validation of results. The purpose of the experiments done on bench scale steel plate (L x W x T : 300 x 200 x 8 mm) was mainly to map data on wetting temperature, water droplet size, droplet impingement angle, and droplet velocity prior to large scale jet fire tests. The droplet release angle normal to hot surface gives best cooling effect, when the surface is oriented in upright position. The partial wetting begins at about 165 degrees C. When the surface is positioned in horizontal plane, the droplet of about 5 mm in diameter wets the hot surface partially at around 240-250 degrees C within an impaction distance of 20 cm. At about 150 degrees C, the droplet is entirely attached to the surface with almost zero contact angle, and cools down the solid at a critical heat flux equivalent to 1750 kW/m{sup 2}. The cooling effectiveness is about 8 % with a Weber number of 68. Although in the event of horizontal channel (L x W x T : 1000 x 200 x 8 mm) water droplets were not applied, however, the knowledge gained with jet fire tests gave valuable information about temperature progress in solids (steels and insulation) and their response to impinging jet fire during long duration experiments. The temperature of the insulated area of the channel keeps 200 degrees C below that of the exposed surface, as long as the insulation material remained intact. Upon long test fire durations, the insulation either burns or degrades despite

  19. Dityrosine formation is impaired by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, S; Bernhard, G; Patrizia, R; Brigitte, M

    1992-10-15

    Using pure tyrosine and phosphotyrosine we have recently shown that phosphotyrosine is unable to form peroxidase catalyzed dimers (1989, FEBS Lett. 255, 395-397). In the present report, the effect of phosphotyrosine residues within a protein structure on dityrosine formation was studied using casein as a model protein. Dephosphorylation of casein resulted in a dose and time dependent increased synthesis of dityrosines following treatment with peroxidase/H2O2. The extent of crosslink formation was inversely related to the amount of phosphorylated tyrosine residues as quantitated by immunoblotting. Thus, phosphorylation of tyrosine residues could play a regulatory role in protein-crosslinking where dityrosine bonds are involved.

  20. Multiple tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of the common ß subunit of the interleukin 5 receptor are involved in activation of STAT5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Thamar B. van; Caldenhoven, Eric; Raaijmakers, J.A.M.; Lammers, J.W.J.; Koenderman, L.; Groot, Rolf P. de

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In contrast to the general model of cytokine-induced JAK/STAT signaling, tyrosine phosphorylation of the IL-5R ß chain seems to be dispensable for STAT activation in cells overexpressing exogenous STAT proteins. In this study we expressed IL-5 receptor mutants in 293 cells and studied

  1. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues 31 and 118 on paxillin regulates cell migration through an association with CRK in NBT-II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, V; Boyer, B; Lentz, D; Turner, C E; Thiery, J P; Vallés, A M

    2000-03-06

    Identification of signaling molecules that regulate cell migration is important for understanding fundamental processes in development and the origin of various pathological conditions. The migration of Nara Bladder Tumor II (NBT-II) cells was used to determine which signaling molecules are specifically involved in the collagen-mediated locomotion. We show here that paxillin is tyrosine phosphorylated after induction of motility on collagen. Overexpression of paxillin mutants in which tyrosine 31 and/or tyrosine 118 were replaced by phenylalanine effectively impaired cell motility. Moreover, stimulation of motility by collagen preferentially enhanced the association of paxillin with the SH2 domain of the adaptor protein CrkII. Mutations in both tyrosine 31 and 118 diminished the phosphotyrosine content of paxillin and prevented the formation of the paxillin-Crk complex, suggesting that this association is necessary for collagen-mediated NBT-II cell migration. Other responses to collagen, such as cell adhesion and spreading, were not affected by these mutations. Overexpression of wild-type paxillin or Crk could bypass the migration-deficient phenotype. Both the SH2 and the SH3 domains of CrkII are shown to play a critical role in this collagen-mediated migration. These results demonstrate the important role of the paxillin-Crk complex in the collagen-induced cell motility.

  2. Structure-based network analysis of activation mechanisms in the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases: the regulatory spine residues are global mediators of structural stability and allosteric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A James

    Full Text Available The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced "superacceptor" activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not

  3. Effect of enzymatic desialylation of human serum amyloid P component on surface exposure of laser photo CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization) - reactive histidine, tryptophan and tyrosine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Siebert, H.-C; André, S.; Reuter, G.; Gabius, H.-J.; Kaptein, R.

    1995-01-01

    The human pentraxin serum amyloid P component (SAP) exhibits no microheterogeneity in its complex di-antennary glycan. To elucidate whether the removal of sialic acids from this glycoprotein might affect the accessibility of certain amino acid residues of the protein we employed the laser photo

  4. High-performance heterogeneous catalysis with surface-exposed stable metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Xu, Yanhong; Jiang, Donglin

    2014-11-27

    Protection of metal nanoparticles from agglomeration is critical for their functions and applications. The conventional method for enhancing their stability is to cover them with passivation layers to prevent direct contact. However, the presence of a protective shell blocks exposure of the metal species to reactants, thereby significantly impeding the nanoparticles' utility as catalysts. Here, we report that metal nanoparticles can be prepared and used in a surface-exposed state that renders them inherently catalytically active. This strategy is realised by spatial confinement and electronic stabilisation with a dual-module mesoporous and microporous three-dimensional π-network in which surface-exposed nanoparticles are crystallised upon in situ reduction. The uncovered palladium nanoparticles serve as heterogeneous catalysts that are exceptionally active in water, catalyse unreactive aryl chlorides for straightforward carbon-carbon bond formation and are stable for repeated use in various types of cross couplings. Therefore, our results open new perspectives in developing practical heterogeneous catalysts.

  5. Recent advances in understanding the role of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in development and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, Alexander James; Ter Steege, Eline; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) remove phosphate groups from tyrosine residues, and thereby propagate or inhibit signal transduction, and hence influence cellular processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation. The importance of tightly controlled PTP activity is reflected by the

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation in signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.M.; Kaplan, D.; Morgan, W.; Keller, T.; Mamon, H.; Piwnica-Worms, H.; Druker, B.; Whitman, M.; Morrison, D.; Cohen, B.; Schaffhausen, B.; Cantley, L.; Rapp, U.

    1988-01-01

    Recent work has focused on the elucidation of the mechanisms by which membrane-bound tyrosine kinases transmit signals within the cell. To examine the role of tyrosine phosphorylation the authors have employed the following strategy. First, they have utilized antibodies to phosphotyrosine (anti-P.Tyr) to identify candidate substrates of various tyrosine kinases, such as pp60 c-src , the CSF- receptor, or the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor. Second, they have attempted to characterize the biochemical properties of the putative substrates and to determine in what manner these properties are modified by phosphorylation on tyrosine residues. In this endeavor, they are recapitulating the classic biochemical analysis used to study the effect of kinases on metabolism. The final portion of our work consists of using modern molecular biological strategies to clone the genes or cDNAs for the substrates and overproduce the relevant proteins for studies in vitro in defined systems. This paper describes the first and second aspects of this strategy, the identification and characterization of novel substrate molecules

  7. Autophosphorylation of Specific Threonine and Tyrosine Residues in Arabidopsis CERK1 is Essential for the Activation of Chitin-Induced Immune Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maruya; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Shimada, Hikaru; Motoyama, Noriko; Nakashima, Masato; Takahashi, Shohei; Suto, Kenkichi; Yoshida, Issei; Matsui, Saki; Tsujimoto, Natsumi; Ohnishi, Mihoko; Ishibashi, Yuko; Fujimoto, Zui; Desaki, Yoshitake; Kaku, Hanae; Kito, Keiji; Shibuya, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    Pattern recognition receptors on the plant cell surface mediate the recognition of microbe/damage-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs/DAMPs) and activate downstream immune signaling. Autophosphorylation of signaling receptor-like kinases is a critical event for the activation of downstream responses but the function of each phosphorylation site in the regulation of immune signaling is not well understood. In this study, 41 Ser/Thr/Tyr and 15 Ser/Thr residues were identified as in vitro and in vivo autophosphorylation sites of Arabidopsis CERK1, which is essential for chitin signaling. Comprehensive analysis of transgenic plants expressing mutated CERK1 genes for each phosphorylation site in the cerk1-2 background indicated that the phosphorylation of T479 in the activation segment and Y428 located upstream of the catalytic loop is important for the activation of chitin-triggered defense responses. Contribution of the phosphorylation of T573 to the chitin responses was also suggested. In vitro evaluation of kinase activities of mutated kinase domains indicated that the phosphorylation of T479 and T573 is directly involved in the regulation of kinase activity of CERK1 but the phosphorylation of Y428 regulates chitin signaling independently of the regulation of kinase activity. These results indicated that the phosphorylation of specific residues in the kinase domain contributes to the regulation of downstream signaling either through the regulation of kinase activity or the different mechanisms, e.g. regulation of protein-protein interactions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Tyrosine modifications in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Maria B; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may contribute to biological aging and age-related pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and cataracts. Studies characterizing proteins in which Tyr has been modified to 3-nitrotyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 3,3'-dityrosine and other cross-links, or 3-chlorotyrosine are reviewed, with an emphasis on structural and functional consequences. Distinguishing between inconsequential modifications and functionally significant ones requires careful biochemical and biophysical analysis of target proteins, as well as innovative methods for isolating the effects of the multiple modifications that often occur under oxidizing conditions. The labor-intensive task of isolating and characterizing individual modified proteins must continue, especially given the expanding list of known modifications. Emerging approaches, such as genetic and metabolic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, hold promise for additional focused studies of this kind.

  9. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  10. The Sulfinator: predicting tyrosine sulfation sites in protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monigatti, Flavio; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Bairoch, Amos; Jung, Eva

    2002-05-01

    Protein tyrosine sulfation is an important post-translational modification of proteins that go through the secretory pathway. No clear-cut acceptor motif can be defined that allows the prediction of tyrosine sulfation sites in polypeptide chains. The Sulfinator is a software tool that can be used to predict tyrosine sulfation sites in protein sequences with an overall accuracy of 98%. Four different Hidden Markov Models were constructed, each of them specialized to recognize sulfated tyrosine residues depending on their location within the sequence: near the N-terminus, near the C-terminus, in the center of a window with a size of at least 25 amino acids, as well as in windows containing several tyrosine residues. The Sulfinator is accessible at (http://www.expasy.org/tools/sulfinator/). Sulfinator documentation is accessible at (http://www.expasy.org/tools/sulfinator/sulfinator-doc.html).

  11. Organic surfaces exposed by self-assembled organothiol monolayers: Preparation, characterization, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Martin; Wöll, Christof

    2009-07-01

    Organic surfaces play a major role in materials science. Most surfaces that we touch in our daily lives are made from organic materials, e.g., vegetables, fruit, skin, wood, and textiles made from natural fibers. In the context of biology, organic surfaces play a prominent role too, proteins docking onto cell surfaces are a good example. To better understand the characteristics of organic surfaces, including physico-chemical properties like wettability or chemical reactivities and physical properties like friction and lubrication, a structurally well-defined model system that can be investigated with numerous analytical techniques is desirable. In the last two decades, one particular system, self-assembled monolayers or SAMs, have demonstrated their suitability for this purpose. In particular, organothiols consisting of an organic molecule with an attached SH-group are well suited to fabricating structurally well-defined adlayers of monolayer thickness on gold substrates using a simple preparation procedure. These ultrathin monolayers expose an organic surface with properties that can be tailored by varying the type of organothiol employed. After a short introduction into the preparation of SAMs, this article provides an overview of the possibilities and limitations of organic surfaces exposed by Au-thiolate SAMs. Applications are as diverse as the metallization of organic surfaces, a fundamental problem in materials science, and the fabrication of surfaces that resist the adsorption of proteins. In addition to a number of different case studies, we will also discuss the most powerful analytical techniques needed to characterize these important model systems.

  12. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de [Walther-Straub-Institut Für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, 80336 München (Germany); Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk [Clinical Pharmacology Unit, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jiang, Wei, E-mail: wjiang@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Schopfer, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmschopf@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States); Lockridge, Oksana, E-mail: olockrid@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  13. Structural features and activity of Brazzein and its mutants upon substitution of a surfaced exposed alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanavatian, Parisa; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jafarian, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a member of sweet-tasting protein containing four disulfide bonds. It was reported as a compact and heat-resistant protein. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and replaced a surface-exposed alanine with aspartic acid (A19D mutant), lysine (A19K mutant) and glycine (A19G mutant). Activity comparisons of wild-type (WT) and mutants using taste panel test procedure showed that A19G variant has the same activity as WT protein. However, introduction of a positive charge in A19K mutant led to significant increase in Brz's sweetness, while A19D has reduced sweetness compared to WT protein. Docking studies showed that mutation at position 19 results in slight chain mobility of protein at the binding surface and changing the patterns of interactions toward more effective binding of E9K variant in the concave surface of sweet taste receptor. Far-UV CD data spectra have a characteristic shape of beta structure for all variants, however different magnitudes of spectra suggest that beta-sheet structure in WT and A19G is more stable than that of A19D and A19K. Equilibrium unfolding studies with fluorescence spectroscopy and using urea and dithiothritol (DTT) as chemical denaturants indicates that A19G mutant gains more stability against urea denaturation; while conformational stability of A19D and A19K decreases when compared with WT and A19G variants. We concluded that the positive charge at the surface of protein is important factor responsible for the interaction of protein with the human sweet receptor and Ala 19 can be considered as a key region for investigating the mechanism of the interaction of Brz with corresponding receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Gong

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs, which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  15. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  16. UV?Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 1: basic principles and properties of tyrosine chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    Antosiewicz, Jan M.; Shugar, David

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tyrosine residues may be employed in structural studies of proteins. Here we discuss several different types of UV?Vis spectroscopy, like normal, difference and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and corresponding optical properties of the tyrosine chromophore, phenol, which are used to study protein structure.

  17. Tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Diana; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2013-06-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease for which the main treatment is the dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet has to be initiated in the neonatal period to prevent or reduce mental handicap. However, the diet is very restrictive and unpalatable and can be difficult to follow. A deficiency of the amino acid tyrosine has been suggested as a cause of some of the neuropsychological problems exhibited in phenylketonuria. Therefore, this review aims to assess the efficacy of tyrosine supplementation for phenylketonuria. To assess the effects of tyrosine supplementation alongside or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet for people with phenylketonuria, who commenced on diet at diagnosis and either continued on the diet or relaxed the diet later in life. To assess the evidence that tyrosine supplementation alongside, or instead of a phenylalanine-restricted diet improves intelligence, neuropsychological performance, growth and nutritional status, mortality rate and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Additional studies were identified from handsearches of the Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (from inception in 1978 to 1998). The manufacturers of prescribable dietary products used in the treatment of phenylketonuria were also contacted for further references.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 28 June 2012. All randomised or quasi-randomised trials investigating the use of tyrosine supplementation versus placebo in people with phenylketonuria in addition to, or instead of, a phenylalanine-restricted diet. People treated for maternal phenylketonuria were excluded. Two authors independently assessed the trial eligibility, methodological quality

  18. Tyrosine 769 of the keratinocyte growth factor receptor is required for receptor signaling but not endocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceridono, Mara; Belleudi, Francesca; Ceccarelli, Simona; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria

    2005-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed on epithelial cells which belongs to the family of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs). Following ligand binding, KGFR is rapidly autophosphorylated on specific tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain, recruits substrate proteins, and is rapidly internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The role of different autophosphorylation sites in FGFRs, and in particular the role of the tyrosine 766 in FGFR1, first identified as PLCγ binding site, has been extensively studied. We analyzed here the possible role of the tyrosine 769 in KGFR, corresponding to tyrosine 766 in FGFR1, in the regulation of KGFR signal transduction and MAPK activation as well as in the control of the endocytic process of KGFR. A mutant KGFR in which tyrosine 769 was substituted by phenylalanine was generated and transfected in NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Our results indicate that tyrosine 769 is required for the binding to KGFR and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCγ as well as for the full activation of MAPKs and for cell proliferation through the regulation of FRS2 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that this residue represents a key regulator of KGFR signal transduction. Our data also show that tyrosine 769 is not involved in the regulation of the endocytic process of KGFR

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 by Src kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaosi; Zhang, Jiaming; Chen, Lingqiu; Chen, Yongjun; Xu, Xiaohui; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2017-07-01

    The small molecular weight GTPase Rab7 is a key regulator for late endosomal/lysosomal membrane trafficking, it was known that Rab7 is phosphorylated, but the corresponding kinase and the functional regulation of Rab7 phosphorylation remain unclear. We provide evidence here that Rab7 is a substrate of Src kinase, and is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src, withY183 residue of Rab7 being the optimal phosphorylation site for Src. Further investigations demonstrated that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 depends on the guanine nucleotide binding activity of Rab7 and the activity of Src kinase. The tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 is physiologically induced by EGF, and impairs the interaction of Rab7 with RILP, consequently inhibiting EGFR degradation and sustaining Akt signaling. These results suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation of Rab7 may be involved in coordinating membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Tyrosine nitration affects thymidylate synthase properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska-Maś, Elżbieta; Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Radziszewska, Karolina; Wilk, Piotr; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Jurkiewicz, Agata; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Leś, Andrzej; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Rode, Wojciech

    2012-01-14

    Highly purified preparations of thymidylate synthase, isolated from calf thymus, and L1210 parental and FdUrd-resistant cells, were found to be nitrated, as indicated by a specific reaction with anti-nitro-tyrosine antibodies, suggesting this modification to appear endogenously in normal and tumor tissues. Each human, mouse and Ceanorhabditis elegans recombinant TS preparation, incubated in vitro in the presence of NaHCO(3), NaNO(2) and H(2)O(2) at pH 7.5, underwent tyrosine nitration, leading to a V(max)(app) 2-fold lower following nitration of 1 (with human or C. elegans TS) or 2 (with mouse TS) tyrosine residues per monomer. Enzyme interactions with dUMP, meTHF or 5-fluoro-dUMP were not distinctly influenced. Nitration under the same conditions of model tripeptides of a general formula H(2)N-Gly-X-Gly-COOH (X = Phe, Tyr, Trp, Lys, Arg, His, Ser, Thr, Cys, Gly), monitored by NMR spectroscopy, showed formation of nitro-species only for H-Gly-Tyr-Gly-OH and H-Gly-Phe-Gly-OH peptides, the chemical shifts for nitrated H-Gly-Tyr-Gly-OH peptide being in a very good agreement with the strongest peak found in (15)N-(1)H HMBC spectrum of nitrated protein. MS analysis of nitrated human and C. elegans proteins revealed several thymidylate synthase-derived peptides containing nitro-tyrosine (at positions 33, 65, 135, 213, 230, 258 and 301 in the human enzyme) and oxidized cysteine (human protein Cys(210), with catalytically critical Cys(195) remaining apparently unmodified) residues.

  1. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    of residue, i.e. serine, threonine, tyrosine and cysteine, is also quite common. The phosphorylation of the ester type (phospho-serine/threonine/tyrosine) is more stable than the aspartate phosphorylation of TCSs. The kinases which catalyse these phosphorylation events (Hanks-type serine/threonine protein...

  2. [Tyrosine hydroxylase of the blood leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineeva, M F

    1987-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase activity has been established in blood plasma leucocytes of rat, cat and man. Tyrosine precursors and some nuclear erythroid cells. GFU-GM did hydroxylase activity in leucocytes shows the Km for tyrosine inhibited by high concentrations of L6 tyrosine (substrate inhibition), alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine dopamine. The kinetic properties of leucocyte tyrosine hydroxylase are qualitatively similar to the properties of brain tyrosine hydroxylase.

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the human guanylyl cyclase C receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    5, in Luria Bertani broth ..... bacteria has been used by Larose et al (1993) to identify residues in the platelet derived growth factor ... GCC by EphB1 within bacterial cells suggests that GCC may be a substrate for the Eph family of tyrosine ...

  4. Dityrosine, 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and radical formation from tyrosine residues on milk proteins with globular and flexible structures as a result of riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; Nielsen, Jacob Holm; Brown, Bronwyn

    2011-01-01

    Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals, with thi......Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals...

  5. Tyrosine sulfation modulates activity of tick-derived thrombin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert E.; Liu, Xuyu; Ripoll-Rozada, Jorge; Alonso-García, Noelia; Parker, Benjamin L.; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Payne, Richard J.

    2017-09-01

    Madanin-1 and chimadanin are two small cysteine-free thrombin inhibitors that facilitate blood feeding in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Here, we report a post-translational modification—tyrosine sulfation—of these two proteins that is critical for potent anti-thrombotic and anticoagulant activity. Inhibitors produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells displayed heterogeneous sulfation of two tyrosine residues within each of the proteins. One-pot ligation-desulfurization chemistry enabled access to homogeneous samples of all possible sulfated variants of the proteins. Tyrosine sulfation of madanin-1 and chimadanin proved crucial for thrombin inhibitory activity, with the doubly sulfated variants three orders of magnitude more potent than the unmodified inhibitors. The three-dimensional structure of madanin-1 in complex with thrombin revealed a unique mode of inhibition, with the sulfated tyrosine residues binding to the basic exosite II of the protease. The importance of tyrosine sulfation within this family of thrombin inhibitors, together with their unique binding mode, paves the way for the development of anti-thrombotic drug leads based on these privileged scaffolds.

  6. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Impurity recycling and retention on Au and C surfaces exposed to the scrape-off layer of the TCA tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimzewski, J.K.; Veprek, S.; Hofmann, F.; Hollenstein, C.; Lister, J.B.; Pochelon, A.; Groner, P.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to impurity trapping, surfaces exposed to the boundary layer of a tokamak and other fusion devices are subjected to erosion phenomena. On local surface regions which do not experience unipolar arcing, these processes are due to the energetic fluxes of impurity and plasma particles which induce sputtering. Data are presented on collection probe experiments in the TCA tokamak which demonstrate that this erosion behavior may be evaluated from a knowledge of the shot dependence of the areal concentrations and impact energies of the trapped particles within the surface. Furthermore, a semiempirical parameter, which we call the ''impurity recycling factor'' (k), can be used to describe impurity retention and sputtering behavior for local plasma-surface interactions. Data on impurity retention and reemission are presented with respect to the impurity recycling factor as a function of the distance from the plasma edge

  8. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope proteome by capture of surface-exposed proteins on activated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vecchietti

    Full Text Available We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedded in the cell envelope fragments. For a high number of proteins, our analysis strongly indicates either surface exposure or localization in an envelope district. The localization of most identified proteins was only predicted or totally unknown. This novel approach greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of the previous methods, such as surface shaving with proteases that was also tested on P. aeruginosa. The magneto-capture procedure is simple, safe, and rapid, and appears to be well-suited for envelope studies in highly pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Computational analysis and determination of a highly conserved surface exposed segment in H5N1 avian flu and H1N1 swine flu neuraminidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandy Ashesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Catalytic activity of influenza neuraminidase (NA facilitates elution of progeny virions from infected cells and prevents their self-aggregation mediated by the catalytic site located in the body region. Research on the active site of the molecule has led to development of effective inhibitors like oseltamivir, zanamivir etc, but the high rate of mutation and interspecies reassortment in viral sequences and the recent reports of oseltamivir resistant strains underlines the importance of determining additional target sites for developing future antiviral compounds. In a recent computational study of 173 H5N1 NA gene sequences we had identified a 50-base highly conserved region in 3'-terminal end of the NA gene. Results We extend the graphical and numerical analyses to a larger number of H5N1 NA sequences (514 and H1N1 swine flu sequences (425 accessed from GenBank. We use a 2D graphical representation model for the gene sequences and a Graphical Sliding Window Method (GSWM for protein sequences scanning the sequences as a block of 16 amino acids at a time. Using a protein sequence descriptor defined in our model, the protein sliding scan method allowed us to compare the different strains for block level variability, which showed significant statistical correlation to average solvent accessibility of the residue blocks; single amino acid position variability results in no correlation, indicating the impact of stretch variability in chemical environment. Close to the C-terminal end the GSWM showed less descriptor-variability with increased average solvent accessibility (ASA that is also supported by conserved predicted secondary structure of 3' terminal RNA and visual evidence from 3D crystallographic structure. Conclusion The identified terminal segment, strongly conserved in both RNA and protein sequences, is especially significant as it is surface exposed and structural chemistry reveals the probable role of this stretch in

  10. Biofilm Composition and Threshold Concentration for Growth of Legionella pneumophila on Surfaces Exposed to Flowing Warm Tap Water without Disinfectant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Geo L.; Italiaander, Ronald; Veenendaal, Harm R.; Wullings, Bart A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila in potable water installations poses a potential health risk, but quantitative information about its replication in biofilms in relation to water quality is scarce. Therefore, biofilm formation on the surfaces of glass and chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) in contact with tap water at 34 to 39°C was investigated under controlled hydraulic conditions in a model system inoculated with biofilm-grown L. pneumophila. The biofilm on glass (average steady-state concentration, 23 ± 9 pg ATP cm−2) exposed to treated aerobic groundwater (0.3 mg C liter−1; 1 μg assimilable organic carbon [AOC] liter−1) did not support growth of the organism, which also disappeared from the biofilm on CPVC (49 ± 9 pg ATP cm−2) after initial growth. L. pneumophila attained a level of 4.3 log CFU cm−2 in the biofilms on glass (1,055 ± 225 pg ATP cm−2) and CPVC (2,755 ± 460 pg ATP cm−2) exposed to treated anaerobic groundwater (7.9 mg C liter−1; 10 μg AOC liter−1). An elevated biofilm concentration and growth of L. pneumophila were also observed with tap water from the laboratory. The Betaproteobacteria Piscinibacter and Methyloversatilis and amoeba-resisting Alphaproteobacteria predominated in the clones and isolates retrieved from the biofilms. In the biofilms, the Legionella colony count correlated significantly with the total cell count (TCC), heterotrophic plate count, ATP concentration, and presence of Vermamoeba vermiformis. This amoeba was rarely detected at biofilm concentrations of TCC = 1 × 106 to 2 × 106 cells cm−2) was derived for growth of L. pneumophila in biofilms. IMPORTANCE Legionella pneumophila is the etiologic agent in more than 10,000 cases of Legionnaires' disease that are reported annually worldwide and in most of the drinking water-associated disease outbreaks reported in the United States. The organism proliferates in biofilms on surfaces exposed to warm water in engineered freshwater installations. An

  11. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  12. Cloning and Characterization of Secretory Tyrosine Phosphatases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Anil; Choidas, Axel; Treder, Martin; Tyagi, Anil K.; Drlica, Karl; Singh, Yogendra; Ullrich, Axel

    2000-01-01

    Two genes with sequence homology to those encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases were cloned from genomic DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The calculated molecular masses of these two putative tyrosine phosphatases, designated MPtpA and MPtpB, were 17.5 and 30 kDa, respectively. MPtpA and MPtpB were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The affinity-purified proteins dephosphorylated the phosphotyrosine residue of myelin basic protein (MBP), but they failed to dephosphorylate serine/threonine residues of MBP. The activity of these phosphatases was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases. Mutations at the catalytic site motif, cysteine 11 of MPtpA and cysteine 160 of MPtpB, abolished enzyme activity. Southern blot analysis revealed that, while mptpA is present in slow-growing mycobacterial species as well as fast-growing saprophytes, mptpB was restricted to members of the M. tuberculosis complex. These phosphatases were present in both whole-cell lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that these proteins are secreted into the extracellular medium. Since tyrosine phosphatases are essential for the virulence of several pathogenic bacteria, the restricted distribution of mptpB makes it a good candidate for a virulence gene of M. tuberculosis. PMID:10986245

  13. Cloning and characterization of secretory tyrosine phosphatases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, A; Choidas, A; Treder, M; Tyagi, A K; Drlica, K; Singh, Y; Ullrich, A

    2000-10-01

    Two genes with sequence homology to those encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases were cloned from genomic DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv. The calculated molecular masses of these two putative tyrosine phosphatases, designated MPtpA and MPtpB, were 17. 5 and 30 kDa, respectively. MPtpA and MPtpB were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. The affinity-purified proteins dephosphorylated the phosphotyrosine residue of myelin basic protein (MBP), but they failed to dephosphorylate serine/threonine residues of MBP. The activity of these phosphatases was inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, but not by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of serine/threonine phosphatases. Mutations at the catalytic site motif, cysteine 11 of MPtpA and cysteine 160 of MPtpB, abolished enzyme activity. Southern blot analysis revealed that, while mptpA is present in slow-growing mycobacterial species as well as fast-growing saprophytes, mptpB was restricted to members of the M. tuberculosis complex. These phosphatases were present in both whole-cell lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that these proteins are secreted into the extracellular medium. Since tyrosine phosphatases are essential for the virulence of several pathogenic bacteria, the restricted distribution of mptpB makes it a good candidate for a virulence gene of M. tuberculosis.

  14. Evaluation of Brachypodium distachyon L-Tyrosine Decarboxylase Using L-Tyrosine Over-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhei Noda

    Full Text Available To demonstrate that herbaceous biomass is a versatile gene resource, we focused on the model plant Brachypodium distachyon, and screened the B. distachyon for homologs of tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, which is involved in the modification of aromatic compounds. A total of 5 candidate genes were identified in cDNA libraries of B. distachyon and were introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae to evaluate TDC expression and tyramine production. It is suggested that two TDCs encoded in the transcripts Bradi2g51120.1 and Bradi2g51170.1 have L-tyrosine decarboxylation activity. Bradi2g51170.1 was introduced into the L-tyrosine over-producing strain of S. cerevisiae that was constructed by the introduction of mutant genes that promote deregulated feedback inhibition. The amount of tyramine produced by the resulting transformant was 6.6-fold higher (approximately 200 mg/L than the control strain, indicating that B. distachyon TDC effectively converts L-tyrosine to tyramine. Our results suggest that B. distachyon possesses enzymes that are capable of modifying aromatic residues, and that S. cerevisiae is a suitable host for the production of L-tyrosine derivatives.

  15. Biofilm Composition and Threshold Concentration for Growth of Legionella pneumophila on Surfaces Exposed to Flowing Warm Tap Water without Disinfectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Dick; Bakker, Geo L; Italiaander, Ronald; Veenendaal, Harm R; Wullings, Bart A

    2017-03-01

    exposed to warm water in engineered freshwater installations. An investigation with a test system supplied with different types of warm drinking water without disinfectant under controlled hydraulic conditions showed that treated aerobic groundwater (0.3 mg liter -1 of organic carbon) induced a low biofilm concentration that supported no or very limited growth of L. pneumophila Elevated biofilm concentrations and L. pneumophila colony counts were observed on surfaces exposed to two types of extensively treated groundwater, containing 1.8 and 7.9 mg C liter -1 and complying with the microbial water quality criteria during distribution. Control measures in warm tap water installations are therefore essential for preventing growth of L. pneumophila . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. A method for visualizing surface-exposed and internal PfEMP1 adhesion antigens in Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Dominique; Sowa, Kordai M; Salanti, Ali

    2008-01-01

    -ionic detergent to permit access of antibodies to internal parasite antigens. Differentiation between surface and internal antigens is achieved using antibodies labelled with different fluorochromes and confocal microscopy RESULTS: Surface exposed PfEMP1 is first detectable by antibodies at the trophozoite stage...

  17. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    phosphorylation. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in bacteria is particular with respect to very low occupancy of phosphorylation sites in vivo; this has represented a major challenge for detection techniques. Only the recent breakthroughs in gel-free high resolution mass spectrometry allowed the systematic...... detection of phosphorylated tyrosines by phosphoprotomics studies in bacteria. Other pioneering studies conducted in recent years, such as the first structures of BY-kinases and biochemical and phyiological studies of new BY-kinase substrates significantly furthered our understanding of these enzymes...

  18. Tyrosine phosphorylation in human lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haralambieva, E; Jones, M.; Roncador, GM; Cerroni, L; Lamant, L; Ott, G; Rosenwald, A; Sherman, C; Thorner, P; Kusec, R; Wood, KM; Campo, E; Falini, B; Ramsay, A; Marafioti, T; Stein, H; Kluin, PM; Pulford, K; Mason, DY

    2002-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that the high level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation present in lymphomas containing an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) can be demonstrated in routinely processed paraffin tissue sections using immunolabelling techniques. In the present study we investigated

  19. Residual deposits (residual soil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Residual soil deposits is accumulation of new formate ore minerals on the earth surface, arise as a result of chemical decomposition of rocks. As is well known, at the hyper genes zone under the influence of different factors (water, carbonic acid, organic acids, oxygen, microorganism activity) passes chemical weathering of rocks. Residual soil deposits forming depends from complex of geologic and climatic factors and also from composition and physical and chemical properties of initial rocks

  20. Characterization of the hypertonically induced tyrosine phosphorylation of erythrocyte band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, G; Seppi, C; Ciana, A; Balduini, C; Low, P S; Brovelli, A

    1998-01-01

    Human erythrocyte band 3 becomes rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues after exposure of erythrocytes to hypertonic conditions. The driving force for this phosphorylation reaction seems to be a decrease in cell volume, because (1) changes in band 3 phosphotyrosine content accurately track repeated changes in erythrocyte volume through several cycles of swelling and shrinking; (2) the level of band 3 phosphorylation is independent of the osmolyte employed but strongly sensitive to the magnitude of cell shrinkage; and (3) exposure of erythrocytes to hypertonic buffers under conditions in which intracellular osmolarity increases but volume does not change (nystatin-treated cells) does not promote an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. We hypothesize that shrinkage-induced tyrosine phosphorylation results either from an excluded-volume effect, stemming from an increase in intracellular crowding, or from changes in membrane curvature that accompany the decrease in cell volume. Although the net phosphorylation state of band 3 is shown to be due to a delicate balance between a constitutively active tyrosine phosphatase and constitutively active tyrosine kinase, the increase in phosphorylation during cell shrinkage was demonstrated to derive specifically from an activation of the latter. Further, a peculiar inhibition pattern of the volume-sensitive erythrocyte tyrosine kinase that matched that of p72syk, a tyrosine kinase already known to associate with band 3 in vivo, suggested the involvement of this kinase in the volume-dependent response. PMID:9761728

  1. DMPD: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15081522 Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signall...ruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? PubmedID 15081522 Title Bruton...'s tyrosine kinase (Btk)-the critical tyrosine kinase in LPS signalling? Authors

  2. Tracer experiment administering L-phenylalanine-U-14C and L-tyrosine-U-14C to the tissue slices of bamboo shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozukue, E.; Mizuno, S.

    1987-01-01

    Uniformly 14 C-labeled L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine were administered to tissue slices of both top and base sections of bamboo shoots. Alcohol soluble substances were extracted and then separated into organic acid, sugar and amino acid fractions by ion exchange chromatography. The homogentisic acid fraction among the organic acids was collected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its radioactivity was measured, while the alcohol insoluble residue was used for the analysis of lignin aldehyde by the method of alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. 1. The two labeled amino acids were steadily incorporated into the tissues during incubation and rapidly converted to organic acid, sugar and alcohol insoluble residue, especially the latter. 2. On determining the amount of phenylalanine converted to tyrosine, it was found that this was extremely small. 3. The incorporation of phenylalanine-U- 14 C into alcohol insoluble residue was higher than that of tyrosine in both sections. 4. Although the conversion into lignin aldehyde from phenylalanine-U- 14 C was higher than that from tyrosine-U- 14 C, it was found that tyrosine incorporated into the shoots was converted to a remarkable extent for formation of lignin aldehyde. 5. The incorporation of phenylalanine and tyrosine into homogentisic acid was very low. From these results, we assume that the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine or of tyrosine to homogentisic acid is very small, and that a part of the high amount of tyrosine in the shoots may be used for formation of lignin

  3. A curvature-dependent membrane binding by tyrosine kinase Fer involves an intrinsically disordered region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hikaru; Kondo, Akihiro; Itoh, Toshiki

    2018-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are important enzymes that mediate signal transduction at the plasma membrane. While the significance of membrane localization of tyrosine kinases has been well evaluated, the role of membrane curvature in their regulation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that an intrinsically disordered region in the tyrosine kinase Fer acts as a membrane curvature sensor that preferentially binds to highly curved membranes in vitro. This region forms an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with curved membranes, aligning hydrophobic residues on one side of the helical structure. Further, the tyrosine kinase activity of Fer is significantly enhanced by the membrane in a manner dependent on curvature. We propose a model for the regulation of Fer based on an intramolecular interaction and the curvature-dependent membrane binding mediated by its intrinsically disordered region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  5. In vitro characterization of the Bacillus subtilis protein tyrosine phosphatase YwqE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose first characterized member was CpsB from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacillus subtilis contains...

  6. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Among all the receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase RPTP alpha clones described from mammalian tissues, one differed in that it encoded a 9-amino-acid insert 3 residues upstream from the transmembrane segment (Kaplan, R., Morse, B., Huebner, K., Croce, C., Howk, R. Ravera, M., Ricca, G...

  7. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.

    2005-01-01

    of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation. We discuss the approaches currently used to chart this network: ranging from studies of substrate specifi city and the physiological role of tyrosine phosphorylation of individual enzymes to the global approaches at the level of systems biology....... on protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  8. Protein tyrosine nitration in plants: Present knowledge, computational prediction and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Feigl, Gábor; Bordé, Ádám; Molnár, Árpád; Erdei, László

    2017-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and related molecules (reactive nitrogen species) regulate diverse physiological processes mainly through posttranslational modifications such as protein tyrosine nitration (PTN). PTN is a covalent and specific modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues resulting in altered protein structure and function. In the last decade, great efforts have been made to reveal candidate proteins, target Tyr residues and functional consequences of nitration in plants. This review intends to evaluate the accumulated knowledge about the biochemical mechanism, the structural and functional consequences and the selectivity of plants' protein nitration and also about the decomposition or conversion of nitrated proteins. At the same time, this review emphasizes yet unanswered or uncertain questions such as the reversibility/irreversibility of tyrosine nitration, the involvement of proteasomes in the removal of nitrated proteins or the effect of nitration on Tyr phosphorylation. The different NO producing systems of algae and higher plants raise the possibility of diversely regulated protein nitration. Therefore studying PTN from an evolutionary point of view would enrich our present understanding with novel aspects. Plant proteomic research can be promoted by the application of computational prediction tools such as GPS-YNO 2 and iNitro-Tyr software. Using the reference Arabidopsis proteome, Authors performed in silico analysis of tyrosine nitration in order to characterize plant tyrosine nitroproteome. Nevertheless, based on the common results of the present prediction and previous experiments the most likely nitrated proteins were selected thus recommending candidates for detailed future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The oncogenic tyrosine kinase Lyn impairs the pro-apoptotic function of Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aira, Lazaro E; Villa, Elodie; Colosetti, Pascal; Gamas, Parvati; Signetti, Laurie; Obba, Sandrine; Proics, Emma; Gautier, Fabien; Bailly-Maitre, Béatrice; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Luciano, Frédéric; Juin, Philippe P; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Auberger, Patrick; Marchetti, Sandrine

    2018-02-02

    Phosphorylation of Ser/Thr residues is a well-established modulating mechanism of the pro-apoptotic function of the BH3-only protein Bim. However, nothing is known about the putative tyrosine phosphorylation of this Bcl-2 family member and its potential impact on Bim function and subsequent Bax/Bak-mediated cytochrome c release and apoptosis. As we have previously shown that the tyrosine kinase Lyn could behave as an anti-apoptotic molecule, we investigated whether this Src family member could directly regulate the pro-apoptotic function of Bim. In the present study, we show that Bim is phosphorylated onto tyrosine residues 92 and 161 by Lyn, which results in an inhibition of its pro-apoptotic function. Mechanistically, we show that Lyn-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Bim increases its interaction with anti-apoptotic members such as Bcl-xL, therefore limiting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent apoptosis. Collectively, our data uncover one molecular mechanism through which the oncogenic tyrosine kinase Lyn negatively regulates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which may contribute to the transformation and/or the chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells.

  10. Tyrosine dephosphorylation regulates AMPAR internalisation in mGluR-LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Clare M; Collett, Valerie J; Jia, Zhengping; Bashir, Zafar I; Collingridge, Graham L; Molnár, Elek

    2009-02-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) can be induced at hippocampal CA1 synapses by activation of either NMDA receptors (NMDARs) or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), using their selective agonists NMDA and (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), respectively. Recent studies revealed that DHPG-LTD is dependent on activation of postsynaptic protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which transiently dephosphorylate tyrosine residues in AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Here we show that while both endogenous GluR2 and GluR3 AMPAR subunits are tyrosine phosphorylated at basal activity, only GluR2 is dephosphorylated in DHPG-LTD. The tyrosine dephosphorylation of GluR2 does not occur in NMDA-LTD. Conversely, while NMDA-LTD is associated with the dephosphorylation of GluR1-serine-845, DHPG-LTD does not alter the phosphorylation of this site. The increased AMPAR endocytosis in DHPG-LTD is PTP-dependent and involves tyrosine dephosphorylation of cell surface AMPARs. Together, these results indicate that the subunit selective tyrosine dephosphorylation of surface GluR2 regulates AMPAR internalisation in DHPG-LTD but not in NMDA-LTD in the hippocampus.

  11. Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinases in Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancer Yu-Ming Chang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carcinoma of the prostate (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States. Signal transduction molecules such as tyrosine kinases play important roles in CaP. Src, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK and the first proto-oncogene discovered is shown to participate in processes such as cell proliferation and migration in CaP. Underscoring NRTK's and, specifically, Src's importance in cancer is the recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of dasatinib, the first commercial Src inhibitor for clinical use in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. In this review we will focus on NRTKs and their roles in the biology of CaP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Publicly available literature from PubMed regarding the topic of members of NRTKs in CaP was searched and reviewed. RESULTS: Src, FAK, JaK1/2, and ETK are involved in processes indispensable to the biology of CaP: cell growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Src emerges as a common signaling and regulatory molecule in multiple biological processes in CaP. Src's relative importance in particular stages of CaP, however, required further definition. Continued investigation of NRTKs will increase our understanding of their biological function and potential role as new therapeutic targets.

  12. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental tyrosine is effective at limiting cold-induced decreases in working memory, presumably by augmenting brain catecholamine levels, since tyrosine is a precursor for catecholamine synthesis...

  13. Structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere: Experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Medina, M.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Liu, H.B. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico); Canizal, G. [Centro de Educacion Continua y a Distancia (Unidad Allende), Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Allende No. 38, Centro, Mexico D.F. 06010 (Mexico); Ascencio, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Lazaro Cardenas 152, San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. C.P. 07730 (Mexico)]. E-mail: ascencio@imp.mx

    2007-01-15

    Characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy analysis with energy dispersive spectrometry and scanning probe microscope for structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N{sub 2} + SO{sub 2} atmosphere at high temperature. First principle calculations were also employed in order to clarify the formation of new product on the surface and its mechanism. The results demonstrate that the tendency of the structure with oxygen atoms involve a stronger interaction and lower energy to be formed with the surface and consequently the possible production of oxide-species is more probable and multiple aggregates with different shapes can be generated for the temperatures of 625 and 700 deg. C, with no preferential crystal habit. Sample treated at 775 deg. C denotes the production of hexagonal crystals, which is externally characterized by polyhedrons growing in axial direction as fibbers with flat faces that match with the alumina.

  14. Structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N2 + SO2 atmosphere: Experimental and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Liu, H.B.; Canizal, G.; Ascencio, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy analysis with energy dispersive spectrometry and scanning probe microscope for structural evolution of derived species on FeAl surface exposed to a N 2 + SO 2 atmosphere at high temperature. First principle calculations were also employed in order to clarify the formation of new product on the surface and its mechanism. The results demonstrate that the tendency of the structure with oxygen atoms involve a stronger interaction and lower energy to be formed with the surface and consequently the possible production of oxide-species is more probable and multiple aggregates with different shapes can be generated for the temperatures of 625 and 700 deg. C, with no preferential crystal habit. Sample treated at 775 deg. C denotes the production of hexagonal crystals, which is externally characterized by polyhedrons growing in axial direction as fibbers with flat faces that match with the alumina

  15. Tyrosine kinase fusion genes in pediatric BCR-ABL1-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Judith M; Steeghs, Elisabeth M P; Marchante, João R M; Boeree, Aurélie; Beaudoin, James J; Beverloo, H Berna; Kuiper, Roland P; Escherich, Gabriele; van der Velden, Vincent H J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L

    2017-01-17

    Approximately 15% of pediatric B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) is characterized by gene expression similar to that of BCR-ABL1-positive disease and unfavorable prognosis. This BCR-ABL1-like subtype shows a high frequency of B-cell development gene aberrations and tyrosine kinase-activating lesions. To evaluate the clinical significance of tyrosine kinase gene fusions in children with BCP-ALL, we studied the frequency of recently identified tyrosine kinase fusions, associated genetic features, and prognosis in a representative Dutch/German cohort. We identified 14 tyrosine kinase fusions among 77 BCR-ABL1-like cases (18%) and none among 76 non-BCR-ABL1-like B-other cases. Novel exon fusions were identified for RCSD1-ABL2 and TERF2-JAK2. JAK2 mutation was mutually exclusive with tyrosine kinase fusions and only occurred in cases with high CRLF2 expression. The non/late response rate and levels of minimal residual disease in the fusion-positive BCR-ABL1-like group were higher than in the non-BCR-ABL1-like B-others (pfusion-negative BCR-ABL1-like group. The 8-year cumulative incidence of relapse in the fusion-positive BCR-ABL1-like group (35%) was comparable with that in the fusion-negative BCR-ABL1-like group (35%), and worse than in the non-BCR-ABL1-like B-other group (17%, p=0.07). IKZF1 deletions, predominantly other than the dominant-negative isoform and full deletion, co-occurred with tyrosine kinase fusions. This study shows that tyrosine kinase fusion-positive cases are a high-risk subtype of BCP-ALL, which warrants further studies with specific kinase inhibitors to improve outcome.

  16. Nicotinic stimulation of catecholamine synthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation in cervine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, P J; Douglas, S A; Bunn, S J

    2011-03-01

    The synthesis and secretion of catecholamines by the adrenal medulla is of major importance in the stress response. Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for catecholamine biosynthesis, has been extensively studied in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells from a number of species. Cervine chromaffin cells are of interest because the deer is known to be a relatively stress-prone reactive species. We report the first characterisation of tyrosine hydroxylase regulation in cervine chromaffin cells. Nicotinic receptor activation resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent increase in catecholamine synthesis, which was significantly reduced by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signalling pathway inhibitor PD98059 and the calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II inhibitor KN-93, but not by H89 or bisindolylmaleimide I, inhibitors of protein kinase A and C, respectively. Nicotinic stimulation also increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and tyrosine hydroxylase. This latter response occurred on serine residues 19, 31 and 40 of the enzyme. The nicotinic-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and serine 31 of tyrosine hydroxylase was suppressed by PD98059 but not bisindolylmaleimide I. These data indicate that nicotinic stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase involves the phosphorylation of serine 31 via an ERK1/2-dependent, protein kinase C-independent pathway. Protein kinase C activation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also caused an ERK1/2-dependent increase in the serine 31 phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase but, in contrast to the nicotinic response, was not accompanied by an increase in enzyme activity. Thus, ERK1/2-mediated serine 31 phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase appears necessary but not sufficient for nicotinic activation of catecholamine synthesis in cervine chromaffin cells. These data present potentially important similarities and differences between the regulation of catecholamine synthesis in cervine and the more widely studied

  17. Identification and analysis of a novel protein-tyrosine kinase from bovine thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A cytosolic protein-tyrosine kinase has been identified and purified to near homogeneity from calf thymus by using the phosphorylation of the tyrosine-containing peptide angiotensin I as an assay. Specific peptide phosphorylating activity was enhanced by carrying out the assay at high ionic strength (2M NaCl). The inclusion of NaCl at this concentration acts to stimulate endogenous protein-tyrosine kinase activity while simultaneously inhibiting other endogenous kinases. The purification procedure involved extraction of the enzyme from calf-thymus and sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-cellulose, heparin-agarose, casein-sepharose, butylagarose, and Sephadex G-75. Analysis of the most highly purified preparations by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single Coomassie blue-stained band of 41 KDa. This molecular weight was consistent with results obtained from gel filtration, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The enzyme has also been found to catalyze an autophosphorylation reaction. Incubation of the enzyme with Mn 2+ and [γ- 32 P]ATP led to its modification on a tyrosine residue. Phosphopeptide mapping experiments indicated that the 41 KDa kinase was distinct from p56, the major membrane-associated protein-tyrosine kinase in T lymphocytes

  18. No effect of oral tyrosine on total tyrosine levels in breast milk: implications for dietary supplementation in early postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlati, Yekta; Ravindran, Arun V; Maheux, Maxim; Steiner, Meir; Stewart, Donna E; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2014-12-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbearing with a 13 % prevalence rate, and there is no widespread approach for prevention. There is an appealing theoretical rationale for oral tyrosine to help prevent PPD. However, the effect of oral tyrosine on its total and free concentrations in breast milk and plasma of breastfeeding mothers is not known. Twenty-four healthy breastfeeding women were randomly assigned to 0, 2, 5, or 10 g of oral tyrosine. Free and total tyrosine in breast milk and free tyrosine in plasma were measured. Free tyrosine was also measured in 12 different infant formulas. Total tyrosine in breast milk did not rise, but there was a slight tendency towards a reduction (up to −12 %; repeated measures ANOVA (RMANOVA): p = 0.074). Maternal plasma tyrosine rose (RMANOVA: p oral tyrosine on its concentration in breast milk supports further development of oral tyrosine as part of a prevention strategy for PPD.

  19. Residuation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blyth, T S; Sneddon, I N; Stark, M

    1972-01-01

    Residuation Theory aims to contribute to literature in the field of ordered algebraic structures, especially on the subject of residual mappings. The book is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on ordered sets; directed sets; semilattices; lattices; and complete lattices. Chapter 2 tackles Baer rings; Baer semigroups; Foulis semigroups; residual mappings; the notion of involution; and Boolean algebras. Chapter 3 covers residuated groupoids and semigroups; group homomorphic and isotone homomorphic Boolean images of ordered semigroups; Dubreil-Jacotin and Brouwer semigroups; and loli

  20. Formation of periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of a single femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romashevskiy, S.A.; Ashitkov, S.I.; Ovchinnikov, A.V.; Kondratenko, P.S.; Agranat, M.B.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Single pulse irradiation of silicon gave rise to the periodic mesoscale structures. • The number of the periodic structures depends on the incident laser fluence. • The theory of periodically modulated absorption of laser energy is proposed. - Abstract: The periodic mesoscale structures arranged in a circular symmetry were found at the silicon surface exposed to radiation of the single femtosecond laser pulse with a Gaussian intensity profile in the ambient air conditions. These peculiar structures have the appearance of the protrusions of ∼10 nm height and of ∼600 nm width (at a FWHM) separately located inside the ablated region with a period of the incident laser wavelength. It was found that their position at the surface corresponds to the specified laser intensity slightly above the ablation threshold. The number of the formed periodic structures varies with the fluence of the incident laser pulse and in our experiments it was found to have changed from one to eleven. We suppose that formation of these mesoscale structures is caused by heating of a microscale volume to the strongly defined temperature. The theoretical model was proposed to explain the obtained data. It assumes that the interference of incident laser radiation with laser-induced surface electromagnetic waves results in generation of periodic distribution of electron temperature. Thus formation of the periodic structures at the specified laser intensity is attributed to periodically modulated absorption of laser energy at a focal laser spot.

  1. UV-Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Jan M; Shugar, David

    2016-06-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV-Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  2. UV?Vis spectroscopy of tyrosine side-groups in studies of protein structure. Part 2: selected applications

    OpenAIRE

    Antosiewicz, Jan M.; Shugar, David

    2016-01-01

    In Part 2 we discuss application of several different types of UV?Vis spectroscopy, such as normal, difference, and second-derivative UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, linear and circular dichroism spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, of the side-chain of tyrosine residues in different molecular environments. We review the ways these spectroscopies can be used to probe complex protein structures.

  3. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  4. Conformational basis for substrate recruitment in Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 10D†

    OpenAIRE

    Madan, Lalima L.; Gopal, B.

    2011-01-01

    The coordinated activity of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTP) is crucial to initiate, modulate and terminate diverse cellular processes. The catalytic activity of this protein depends on a nucleophilic cysteine at the active site that mediates the hydrolysis of the incoming phosphotyrosine substrate. While the role of conserved residues in the catalytic mechanism of PTPs has been extensively examined, the diversity in the mechanisms of substrate recognition and modulation of catalytic activ...

  5. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  6. Mechanisms of Peroxynitrite Mediated Nitration of Tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite, or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid mediated nitration of phenol occurs via the unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or of nitrosoperoxycarbonate. PMID:19374346

  7. Residue processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, W.; Rank, V.

    1942-10-15

    In the first stage of coal hydrogenation, the liquid phase, light and heavy oils were produced; the latter containing the nonliquefied parts of the coal, the coal ash, and the catalyst substances. It was the problem of residue processing to extract from these so-called let-down oils that which could be used as pasting oils for the coal. The object was to obtain a maximum oil extraction and a complete removal of the solids, because of the latter were returned to the process they would needlessly burden the reaction space. Separation of solids in residue processing could be accomplished by filtration, centrifugation, extraction, distillation, or low-temperature carbonization (L.T.C.). Filtration or centrifugation was most suitable since a maximum oil yield could be expected from it, since only a small portion of the let-down oil contained in the filtration or centrifugation residue had to be thermally treated. The most satisfactory centrifuge at this time was the Laval, which delivered liquid centrifuge residue and centrifuge oil continuously. By comparison, the semi-continuous centrifuges delivered plastic residues which were difficult to handle. Various apparatus such as the spiral screw kiln and the ball kiln were used for low-temperature carbonization of centrifuge residues. Both were based on the idea of carbonization in thin layers. Efforts were also being made to produce electrode carbon and briquette binder as by-products of the liquid coal phase.

  8. Phenylketonuria : tyrosine supplementation in phenylalanine-restricted diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; van Rijn, M; Bekhof, J; Koch, R; Smit, PGA

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) consists of restriction of natural protein and provision of a protein substitute that lacks phenylalanine but is enriched in tyrosine. Large and unexplained differences exist, however, in the tyrosine enrichment of the protein substitutes. Furthermore, some

  9. Chlorinated tyrosine derivatives in insect cuticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Svend Olav

    2004-01-01

    , not-yet sclerotized cuticle of adult femur and tibia, the amounts increased rapidly during the first 24 h after ecdysis and more slowly during the next two weeks. Control analyses using stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry have confirmed that the chlorinated tyrosines are not artifacts formed...

  10. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  11. Morphological Features of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current immunohistochemical study used the antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) to observe the immunoreactive elements in the mouse pancreas. The results indicated the presence of immunoreactive nerve fibers and endocrine cells. The immunopositive nerve fibers appeared as thick and thin bundles; thick ...

  12. Mutational properties of amino acid residues: implications for evolvability of phosphorylatable residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M.; Tan, Chris Soon Heng

    2012-01-01

    in terms of their mutational activity. Moreover, we highlight the importance of the genetic code and physico-chemical properties of the amino acid residues as likely causes of these inequalities and uncover serine as a mutational hot spot. Finally, we explore the consequences that these different......; it is typically assumed that all amino acid residues are equally likely to mutate or to result from a mutation. Here, by reconstructing ancestral sequences and computing mutational probabilities for all the amino acid residues, we refute this assumption and show extensive inequalities between different residues...... mutational properties have on phosphorylation site evolution, showing that a higher degree of evolvability exists for phosphorylated threonine and, to a lesser extent, serine in comparison with tyrosine residues. As exemplified by the suppression of serine's mutational activity in phosphorylation sites, our...

  13. Phenylketonuria : Tyrosine beyond the phenylalanine-restricted diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; Smit, PGA; Koch, R

    Controversies exist on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis of phenylketonuria (PKU) and, consequently, on the therapeutic role of tyrosine. This review examines data and theoretical considerations on the role of tyrosine in the pathogenesis and treatment of PKU. It is concluded that treatment

  14. Requirements for superoxide-dependent tyrosine hydroperoxide formation in peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Parsons-Mair, Helena N; Gebicki, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    requirements for hydroperoxide formation using tyrosine analogues and di- and tri-peptides. Superoxide and phenoxyl radicals were generated using xanthine oxidase, peroxidase and the respective tyrosine derivative, or by gamma-radiation. Peroxides were measured using FeSO4/Xylenol Orange. Tyrosine and tyramine...

  15. Artificial Neural Network for the Prediction of Tyrosine-Based Sorting Signal Recognition by Adaptor Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorting of transmembrane proteins to various intracellular compartments depends on specific signals present within their cytosolic domains. Among these sorting signals, the tyrosine-based motif (YXXØ is one of the best characterized and is recognized by μ-subunits of the four clathrin-associated adaptor complexes (AP-1 to AP-4. Despite their overlap in specificity, each μ-subunit has a distinct sequence preference dependent on the nature of the X-residues. Moreover, combinations of these residues exert cooperative or inhibitory effects towards interaction with the various APs. This complexity makes it impossible to predict a priori, the specificity of a given tyrosine-signal for a particular μ-subunit. Here, we describe the results obtained with a computational approach based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN paradigm that addresses the issue of tyrosine-signal specificity, enabling the prediction of YXXØ-μ interactions with accuracies over 90%. Therefore, this approach constitutes a powerful tool to help predict mechanisms of intracellular protein sorting.

  16. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family...... of tyrosine kinases, the activity of which is tightly controlled by inhibitory phosphorylation of a carboxyterminal tyrosine residue (Tyr527 in chicken c-Src); this phosphorylation induces the kinases to form an inactive conformation. Whereas the identity of such inhibitory Tyr527 kinases has been well...... established, no corresponding phosphatases have been identified that, under physiological conditions, function as positive regulators of c-Src and Fyn in fibroblasts. RESULTS: Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) was inactivated by homologous recombination. Fibroblasts derived from...

  17. Cytochrome C is tyrosine 97 phosphorylated by neuroprotective insulin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Sanderson

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in isolation techniques for cytochrome c (Cytc have allowed us to discover post-translational modifications of this protein. We previously identified two distinct tyrosine phosphorylated residues on Cytc in mammalian liver and heart that alter its electron transfer kinetics and the ability to induce apoptosis. Here we investigated the phosphorylation status of Cytc in ischemic brain and sought to determine if insulin-induced neuroprotection and inhibition of Cytc release was associated with phosphorylation of Cytc. Using an animal model of global brain ischemia, we found a ∼50% decrease in neuronal death in the CA1 hippocampal region with post-ischemic insulin administration. This insulin-mediated increase in neuronal survival was associated with inhibition of Cytc release at 24 hours of reperfusion. To investigate possible changes in the phosphorylation state of Cytc we first isolated the protein from ischemic pig brain and brain that was treated with insulin. Ischemic brains demonstrated no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast Cytc isolated from brains treated with insulin showed robust phosphorylation of Cytc, and the phosphorylation site was unambiguously identified as Tyr97 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We next confirmed these results in rats by in vivo application of insulin in the absence or presence of global brain ischemia and determined that Cytc Tyr97-phosphorylation is strongly induced under both conditions but cannot be detected in untreated controls. These data suggest a mechanism whereby Cytc is targeted for phosphorylation by insulin signaling, which may prevent its release from the mitochondria and the induction of apoptosis.

  18. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine-phos...

  19. Classification of binding site conformations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Tanin, Volodymyr O; Vovk, Andriy I

    2012-07-01

    Hundred and two binding sites from 91 Protein Data Bank files for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with different ligands have been compared. It was found that they can be divided into five clusters. Additional clusters were formed by the unliganded and oxidized enzyme. The centroids of the clusters can be used as starting points for further studies of enzyme-inhibitor interaction by computer simulations. A special software tool has been created for the investigation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and other enzymes. It performs multiple comparisons of selected parts of Protein Data Bank files, as well as further clustering, and determines mobility of separate residues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Residual risk

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ing the residual risk of transmission of HIV by blood transfusion. An epidemiological approach assumed that all HIV infections detected serologically in first-time donors were pre-existing or prevalent infections, and that all infections detected in repeat blood donors were new or incident infections. During 1986 - 1987,0,012%.

  1. Quantitative Tyrosine Phosphoproteomics of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-treated Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells Reveals Potential Novel Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Maity, Tapan; Kashyap, Manoj K; Bansal, Mukesh; Venugopalan, Abhilash; Singh, Sahib; Awasthi, Shivangi; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Charles Jacob, Harrys Kishore; Belkina, Natalya; Pitts, Stephanie; Cultraro, Constance M; Gao, Shaojian; Kirkali, Guldal; Biswas, Romi; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Califano, Andrea; Pandey, Akhilesh; Guha, Udayan

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in the Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain, such as the L858R missense mutation and deletions spanning the conserved sequence 747 LREA 750 , are sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The gatekeeper site residue mutation, T790M accounts for around 60% of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. The first generation EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, and the second generation inhibitor, afatinib are FDA approved for initial treatment of EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinoma. The predominant biomarker of EGFR TKI responsiveness is the presence of EGFR TKI-sensitizing mutations. However, 30-40% of patients with EGFR mutations exhibit primary resistance to these TKIs, underscoring the unmet need of identifying additional biomarkers of treatment response. Here, we sought to characterize the dynamics of tyrosine phosphorylation upon EGFR TKI treatment of mutant EGFR-driven human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines with varying sensitivity to EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and afatinib. We employed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry to identify and quantify tyrosine phosphorylated peptides. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated sites that had reduced phosphorylation upon erlotinib or afatinib treatment correlated with the degree of TKI-sensitivity. Afatinib, an irreversible EGFR TKI, more effectively inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of a majority of the substrates. The phosphosites with phosphorylation SILAC ratios that correlated with the TKI-sensitivity of the cell lines include sites on kinases, such as EGFR-Y1197 and MAPK7-Y221, and adaptor proteins, such as SHC1-Y349/350, ERRFI1-Y394, GAB1-Y689, STAT5A-Y694, DLG3-Y705, and DAPP1-Y139, suggesting these are potential biomarkers of TKI sensitivity. DAPP1, is a novel target of mutant EGFR signaling and Y-139 is the major site of DAPP1 tyrosine phosphorylation. We also uncovered several off-target effects of these TKIs, such as MST1R-Y1238

  2. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase SHP2 Contributes to GDNF Neurotrophic Activity through Direct Binding to Phospho-Tyr687 in the RET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrinjaquet, Maurice; Vilar, Marçal; Ibáñez, Carlos F.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms by which neurotrophic receptors regulate neuronal survival and axonal growth are still incompletely understood. In the receptor tyrosine kinase RET, a receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), the functions of the majority of tyrosine residues that become phosphorylated are still unknown. Here we have identified the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 as a novel direct interactor of RET and the first effector known to bind to phosphorylated Tyr687 in the juxtamembrane region of the receptor. We show that SHP2 is recruited to RET upon ligand binding in a cooperative fashion, such that both interaction with Tyr687 and association with components of the Tyr1062 signaling complex are required for stable recruitment of SHP2 to the receptor. SHP2 recruitment contributes to the ability of RET to activate the PI3K/AKT pathway and promote survival and neurite outgrowth in primary neurons. Furthermore, we find that activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by forskolin reduces the recruitment of SHP2 to RET and negatively affects ligand-mediated neurite outgrowth. In agreement with this, mutation of Ser696, a known PKA phosphorylation site in RET, enhances SHP2 binding to the receptor and eliminates the effect of forskolin on ligand-induced outgrowth. Together, these findings establish SHP2 as a novel positive regulator of the neurotrophic activities of RET and reveal Tyr687 as a critical platform for integration of RET and PKA signals. We anticipate that several other phosphotyrosines of unknown function in neuronal receptor tyrosine kinases will also support similar regulatory functions. PMID:20682772

  3. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 contributes to GDNF neurotrophic activity through direct binding to phospho-Tyr687 in the RET receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrinjaquet, Maurice; Vilar, Marçal; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-10-08

    The signaling mechanisms by which neurotrophic receptors regulate neuronal survival and axonal growth are still incompletely understood. In the receptor tyrosine kinase RET, a receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), the functions of the majority of tyrosine residues that become phosphorylated are still unknown. Here we have identified the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 as a novel direct interactor of RET and the first effector known to bind to phosphorylated Tyr(687) in the juxtamembrane region of the receptor. We show that SHP2 is recruited to RET upon ligand binding in a cooperative fashion, such that both interaction with Tyr(687) and association with components of the Tyr(1062) signaling complex are required for stable recruitment of SHP2 to the receptor. SHP2 recruitment contributes to the ability of RET to activate the PI3K/AKT pathway and promote survival and neurite outgrowth in primary neurons. Furthermore, we find that activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by forskolin reduces the recruitment of SHP2 to RET and negatively affects ligand-mediated neurite outgrowth. In agreement with this, mutation of Ser(696), a known PKA phosphorylation site in RET, enhances SHP2 binding to the receptor and eliminates the effect of forskolin on ligand-induced outgrowth. Together, these findings establish SHP2 as a novel positive regulator of the neurotrophic activities of RET and reveal Tyr(687) as a critical platform for integration of RET and PKA signals. We anticipate that several other phosphotyrosines of unknown function in neuronal receptor tyrosine kinases will also support similar regulatory functions.

  4. Tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV2 vectors and its consequences on viral intracellular trafficking and transgene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Li; Li Baozheng; Jayandharan, Giridhararao; Mah, Cathryn S.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Herzog, Roland W.

    2008-01-01

    We have documented that epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase (EGFR-PTK) signaling negatively affects intracellular trafficking and transduction efficiency of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors. Specifically, inhibition of EGFR-PTK signaling leads to decreased ubiquitination of AAV2 capsid proteins, which in turn, facilitates viral nuclear transport by limiting proteasome-mediated degradation of AAV2 vectors. In the present studies, we observed that AAV capsids can indeed be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by EGFR-PTK in in vitro phosphorylation assays and that phosphorylated AAV capsids retain their structural integrity. However, although phosphorylated AAV vectors enter cells as efficiently as their unphosphorylated counterparts, their transduction efficiency is significantly reduced. This reduction is not due to impaired viral second-strand DNA synthesis since transduction efficiency of both single-stranded AAV (ssAAV) and self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vectors is decreased by ∼ 68% and ∼ 74%, respectively. We also observed that intracellular trafficking of tyrosine-phosphorylated AAV vectors from cytoplasm to nucleus is significantly decreased, which results from ubiquitination of AAV capsids followed by proteasome-mediated degradation, although downstream consequences of capsid ubiquitination may also be affected by tyrosine-phosphorylation. These studies provide new insights into the role of tyrosine-phosphorylation of AAV capsids in various steps in the virus life cycle, which has implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy

  5. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Kuntz, Steven G; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity, an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and, in particular, we focus on their function as Wnt receptors.

  6. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  7. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein......Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  8. Extracellular phosphorylation of a receptor tyrosine kinase controls synaptic localization of NMDA receptors and regulates pathological pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler-Collins, Sean I.; Xia, Nan L.; Henderson, Nathan; Tillu, Dipti V.; Hassler, Shayne; Spellman, Daniel S.; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A.; Price, Theodore J.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular phosphorylation of proteins was suggested in the late 1800s when it was demonstrated that casein contains phosphate. More recently, extracellular kinases that phosphorylate extracellular serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues of numerous proteins have been identified. However, the functional significance of extracellular phosphorylation of specific residues in the nervous system is poorly understood. Here we show that synaptic accumulation of GluN2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and pathological pain are controlled by ephrin-B-induced extracellular phosphorylation of a single tyrosine (p*Y504) in a highly conserved region of the fibronectin type III (FN3) domain of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2. Ligand-dependent Y504 phosphorylation modulates the EphB-NMDAR interaction in cortical and spinal cord neurons. Furthermore, Y504 phosphorylation enhances NMDAR localization and injury-induced pain behavior. By mediating inducible extracellular interactions that are capable of modulating animal behavior, extracellular tyrosine phosphorylation of EphBs may represent a previously unknown class of mechanism mediating protein interaction and function. PMID:28719605

  9. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  10. Rapid Phospho-Turnover by Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Impacts Downstream Signaling and Drug Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiman, Laura B.; Maiwald, Thomas; Conzelmann, Holger; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB1–4) are oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that regulate diverse cellular processes. In this study, we combine measurement and mathematical modeling to quantify phospho-turnover at ErbB receptors in human cells and to determine the consequences for signaling and drug binding. We find that phosphotyrosine residues on ErbB1 have half-lives of a few seconds and therefore turn over 100–1000 times in the course of a typical immediate-early response t...

  11. Src Inhibits the Hippo Tumor Suppressor Pathway through Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Lats1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yuan; Ji, Xinyan; Cao, Xiaolei; Dai, Xiaoming; Xu, Lingyi; Zhao, Hongxia; Guo, Xiaocan; Yan, Huan; Zhang, Haitao; Zhu, Chu; Zhou, Qi; Tang, Mei; Xia, Zongping; Li, Li; Cong, Yu-Sheng; Ye, Sheng; Liang, Tingbo; Feng, Xin-Hua; Zhao, Bin

    2017-09-15

    The Hippo pathway regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stem cell self-renewal, and its inactivation in animal models causes organ enlargement followed by tumorigenesis. Hippo pathway deregulation occurs in many human cancers, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we report tyrosine phosphorylation of the Hippo pathway tumor suppressor LATS1 as a mechanism underlying its regulation by cell adhesion. A tyrosine kinase library screen identified Src as the kinase to directly phosphorylate LATS1 on multiple residues, causing attenuated Mob kinase activator binding and structural alteration of the substrate-binding pocket in the kinase domain. Cell matrix adhesion activated the Hippo pathway effector transcription coactivator YAP partially through Src-mediated phosphorylation and inhibition of LATS1. Aberrant Src activation abolished the tumor suppressor activity of LATS1 and induced tumorigenesis in a YAP-dependent manner. Protein levels of Src in human breast cancer tissues correlated with accumulation of active YAP dephosphorylated on the LATS1 target site. These findings reveal tyrosine phosphorylation of LATS1 by Src as a novel mechanism of Hippo pathway regulation by cell adhesion and suggest Src activation as an underlying reason for YAP deregulation in tumorigenesis. Cancer Res; 77(18); 4868-80. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Euglena mitochondria and chloroplasts form tyrosine-O-sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidha, T.; Hanfstingl, U.; Schiff, J.A. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Mitochondria from light-grown wild-type Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris Cori or dark-grown mutant W{sub 10}BSmL incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, or with {sup 14}C-tyrosine, non-radioactive sulfate and ATP accumulate a labeled compound in the medium. Since this compound shows exact coelectrophoresis with tyrosine-O-sulfate (TOS) at pH 2.0, 5.8 or 8.0., yields sulfate and tyrosine on acid hydrolysis, and treatment with aryl sulfatase from Aerobacter aerogenes yields sulfate and tyrosine but no tyrosine methyl ester, it is identified as TOS. No TOS is found outside purified developing chloroplasts incubated with {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} and ATP, but both chloroplasts and mitochondria form to {sup 35}S externally when incubated with adenosine 3{prime} phosphate 5{prime}phospho({sup 35}S) sulfate (PAP{sup 35}S). Since no tyrosine need be added, tyrosine is provided from endogenous sources. Although TOS is found in the free pool of Euglena cells it cannot be detected in proteins of cells or mucus ruling our sulfation of tyrosine of protein or incorporation of TOS into proteins. The system forming TOS is membrane-bound and may be involved in tyrosine transport.

  13. Tyrosine metabolic enzymes from insects and mammals: a comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, Christopher John; Han, Qian; Mehere, Prajwalini; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2014-02-01

    Differences in the metabolism of tyrosine between insects and mammals present an interesting example of molecular evolution. Both insects and mammals possess fine-tuned systems of enzymes to meet their specific demands for tyrosine metabolites; however, more homologous enzymes involved in tyrosine metabolism have emerged in many insect species. Without knowledge of modern genomics, one might suppose that mammals, which are generally more complex than insects and require tyrosine as a precursor for important catecholamine neurotransmitters and for melanin, should possess more enzymes to control tyrosine metabolism. Therefore, the question of why insects actually possess more tyrosine metabolic enzymes is quite interesting. It has long been known that insects rely heavily on tyrosine metabolism for cuticle hardening and for innate immune responses, and these evolutionary constraints are likely the key answers to this question. In terms of melanogenesis, mammals also possess a high level of regulation; yet mammalian systems possess more mechanisms for detoxification whereas insects accelerate pathways like melanogenesis and therefore must bear increased oxidative pressure. Our research group has had the opportunity to characterize the structure and function of many key proteins involved in tyrosine metabolism from both insects and mammals. In this mini review we will give a brief overview of our research on tyrosine metabolic enzymes in the scope of an evolutionary perspective of mammals in comparison to insects. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Dietary Tyrosine Benefits Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance During Body Cooling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Catherine; Mahoney, Caroline; Tharion, William J; Sils, Ingrid V; Castellani, John W

    2007-01-01

    ... examined. This study evaluated the effect of tyrosine supplementation on cognitive, psychomotor, and physical performance following a cold water immersion protocol that lowered body core temperature...

  15. SH3 domain tyrosine phosphorylation--sites, role and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Tatárová

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SH3 domains are eukaryotic protein domains that participate in a plethora of cellular processes including signal transduction, proliferation, and cellular movement. Several studies indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation could play a significant role in the regulation of SH3 domains. RESULTS: To explore the incidence of the tyrosine phosphorylation within SH3 domains we queried the PhosphoSite Plus database of phosphorylation sites. Over 100 tyrosine phosphorylations occurring on 20 different SH3 domain positions were identified. The tyrosine corresponding to c-Src Tyr-90 was by far the most frequently identified SH3 domain phosphorylation site. A comparison of sequences around this tyrosine led to delineation of a preferred sequence motif ALYD(Y/F. This motif is present in about 15% of human SH3 domains and is structurally well conserved. We further observed that tyrosine phosphorylation is more abundant than serine or threonine phosphorylation within SH3 domains and other adaptor domains, such as SH2 or WW domains. Tyrosine phosphorylation could represent an important regulatory mechanism of adaptor domains. CONCLUSIONS: While tyrosine phosphorylation typically promotes signaling protein interactions via SH2 or PTB domains, its role in SH3 domains is the opposite - it blocks or prevents interactions. The regulatory function of tyrosine phosphorylation is most likely achieved by the phosphate moiety and its charge interfering with binding of polyproline helices of SH3 domain interacting partners.

  16. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-media and multi-pollutant impacts of air toxics emissions on human health and the environment. Details on the assessment process and methodologies can be found in EPA's Residual Risk Report to Congress issued in March of 1999 (see web site). To assess the health risks imposed by air toxics emissions from Coke Ovens to determine if control technology standards previously established are adequately protecting public health.

  17. Large daily fluctuations in plasma tyrosine in treated patients with phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSpronsen, FJ; vanDijk, T; Smit, GPA; vanRijn, M; Reijngoud, DJ; Berger, Ruud; Heymans, HSA

    1996-01-01

    In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), extra tyrosine supplementation is advocated in addition to tyrosine-enriched amino acid mixtures. PKU patients have low fasting plasma tyrosine concentrations, but little is known about tyrosine fluctuations during the day. Plasma tyrosine concentrations were

  18. ROR-Family Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Sigmar; Rauschenberger, Verena; Schambony, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    ROR-family receptor tyrosine kinases form a small subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), characterized by a conserved, unique domain architecture. ROR RTKs are evolutionary conserved throughout the animal kingdom and act as alternative receptors and coreceptors of WNT ligands. The intracellular signaling cascades activated downstream of ROR receptors are diverse, including but not limited to ROR-Frizzled-mediated activation of planar cell polarity signaling, RTK-like signaling, and antagonistic regulation of WNT/β-Catenin signaling. In line with their diverse repertoire of signaling functions, ROR receptors are involved in the regulation of multiple processes in embryonic development such as development of the axial and paraxial mesoderm, the nervous system and the neural crest, the axial and appendicular skeleton, and the kidney. In humans, mutations in the ROR2 gene cause two distinct developmental syndromes, recessive Robinow syndrome (RRS; MIM 268310) and dominant brachydactyly type B1 (BDB1; MIM 113000). In Robinow syndrome patients and animal models, the development of multiple organs is affected, whereas BDB1 results only in shortening of the distal phalanges of fingers and toes, reflecting the diversity of functions and signaling activities of ROR-family RTKs. In this chapter, we give an overview on ROR receptor structure and function. We discuss their signaling functions and role in vertebrate embryonic development with a focus on those developmental processes that are affected by mutations in the ROR2 gene in human patients. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Residual nilpotence and residual solubility of groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, R V

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the residual nilpotence and the residual solubility of groups are studied. The main objects under investigation are the class of residually nilpotent groups such that each central extension of these groups is also residually nilpotent and the class of residually soluble groups such that each Abelian extension of these groups is residually soluble. Various examples of groups not belonging to these classes are constructed by homological methods and methods of the theory of modules over group rings. Several applications of the theory under consideration are presented and problems concerning the residual nilpotence of one-relator groups are considered.

  20. Analysis of conformational flexibility of loop 110-120 of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchuk, V Yu; Tanin, V O; Vovk, A I

    2013-01-01

    Conformations of the catalytic center of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and surrounding loops are known to be important in catalysis and inhibition of the enzyme. There were 98 conformations from 88 PDB files representing PTP1B with different ligands which were analyzed to investigate the details of loop 110-120 movement and mobility of separate residues. The differences were identified by a special software tool which performs multiple comparisons of selected parts of PDB files. The conformations were divided into 6 clusters. It was found that the loop formed by residues 110-120 can be characterized by four main conformations. Predominantly, the loop 110-120 adopts the main conformation and keeps it during WPD loop movement. Three other conformations appear to be stabilized in case of closed WPD loop and seem to be favorable for PTP1B with subunit structure.

  1. Deuterium Labelling of L-Tyrosine with Raney Alloys in Alkaline Deuterium Oxide Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuzuki, Hirohisa; Mukumoto, Mamoru; Udagawa, Jun; Mataka, Shuntaro; Tashiro, Masashi

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of deuteriated L-tyrosines with Raney alloys in alkaline deuterium oxide solutions, involving reductive debromination of brominated L-tyrosines and hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of L-tyrosines, without causing racemization, is presented.

  2. Substrate specificities of tyrosine-specific protein kinases toward cytoskeletal proteins in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, T.; Kadowaki, T.; Nishida, E.; Kadooka, T.; Ogawara, H.; Fukami, Y.; Sakai, H.; Takaku, F.; Kasuga, M.

    1986-11-05

    The authors have previously reported that fodrin (..beta.. subunit), tubulin (..cap alpha.. subunit) and microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs; MAP2 and tau) are good substrates for the purified insulin receptor kinase. In this study, to investigate the substrate specificities of tyrosine kinases, they have examined the actions of the purified epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase and Rous sarcoma virus src kinase on purified microfilament- and microtubule-related proteins. Among microfilament-related proteins examined, the purified EGF receptor kinase phosphorylated the ..beta.. subunit, but not the ..cap alpha.. subunit, of fodrin on tyrosine residues with a K/sub m/ below the micromolar range. The fodrin phosphorylation by the EGF receptor kinase was markedly inhibited by F-actin. In contrast, the purified src kinase preferentially phosphorylated the ..cap alpha.. subunit of fodrin on tyrosine residues. Fodrin phosphorylation by the src kinase was not inhibited by F-actin. Among microtubule proteins examined, MAP-2 was the best substrate for the EGF receptor kinase. The peptide mapping of MAP2 phosphorylated by the EGF receptor kinase and by the insulin receptor kinase produced very similar patterns of phosphopeptides, while that of MAP2 phosphorylated by the src kinase gave a distinctly different pattern. When the phosphorylation of the tubulin subunits was examined, the EGF receptor kinase preferred ..beta.. subunit to ..cap alpha.. subunit, but the src kinase phosphorylated both ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits to a similar extent. These results, together with our previous results, indicate that the substrate specificities of the EGF receptor kinase and the insulin receptor kinase are very similar, but not identical, while that of the src kinase is distinctly different from that of these growth factor receptor kinases.

  3. Determination of o-tyrosine in irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, O.; Schoeni, D.; Zimmerli, B.

    1991-01-01

    The author explains his method to determine O-Tyrosine in irradiated chickens with a high-performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple and fast, but a proper chromatographic separation is difficult. The detection limit with a high sensitive detector is about 0.05-0.1 mg O-Tyrosine/kg meat (9 refs)

  4. Tyrosine improves working memory in a multitasking environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J R; Lockwood, P A; Singh, A; Deuster, P A

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that tyrosine may prove useful in promoting improved performance in situations in which performance is compromised by stress. To extend the generality of previous tyrosine findings, the present study examined the effects of tyrosine ingestion on performance during both a Multiple Task and a Simple Task battery. The multiple task battery was designed to measure working memory, arithmetic skills, and visual and auditory monitoring simultaneously, whereas the simple task battery measured only working memory and visual monitoring. Ten men and 10 women subjects underwent these batteries 1 h after ingesting 150 mg/kg of l-tyrosine or placebo. Administration of tyrosine significantly enhanced accuracy and decreased frequency of list retrieval on the working memory task during the multiple task battery compared with placebo. However, tyrosine induced no significant changes in performance on the arithmetic, visual, or auditory tasks during the Multiple Task, or modified any performance measures during the Simple Task battery. Blood levels of ACTH and cortisol were not, but heart rate and blood pressure were significantly increased during the performance tasks. The present results indicate that tyrosine may sustain working memory when competing requirements to perform other tasks simultaneously degrade performance, and that supplemental tyrosine may be appropriate for maintaining performance when mild to severe decrements are anticipated.

  5. Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine restores expression and glycosylation of cyclooxygenase-2 by 2-deoxy-D-glucose-caused endoplasmic reticulum stress in rabbit articular chondrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Mi Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 2-deoxy-D-glucose(2DG-caused endoplasmic reticulum (ERstress inhibits protein phosphorylation at tyrosine residues.However, the accurate regulatory mechanisms, which determinethe inflammatory response of chondrocytes to ER stress via proteintyrosine phosphorylation, have not been systematicallyevaluated. Thus, in this study, we examined whether proteinphosphorylation at tyrosine residues can modulate the expressionand glycosylation of COX-2, which is reduced by 2DG-inducedER stress. We observed that protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP inhibitors,sodium orthovanadate (SOV, and phenylarsine oxide(PAO significantly decreased expression of ER stress inducibleproteins, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94, and CCAAT/ enhancer-binding-protein- related gene (GADD153, which was inducedby 2DG. In addition, we demonstrated that SOV and PAOnoticeably restored the expression and glycosylation of COX-2 aftertreatment with 2DG. These results suggest that protein phosphorylationof tyrosine residues plays an important role in theregulation of expression and glycosylation during 2DG-inducedER stress in rabbit articular chondrocytes. [BMB reports 2012;45(5: 317-322

  6. Primary structure and conformational analysis of peptide methionine-tyrosine, a peptide related to neuropeptide Y and peptide YY isolated from lamprey intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conlon, J M; Bjørnholm, B; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1991-01-01

    A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-......A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met......%) or with pig pancreatic polypeptide (42%). Molecular modelling and dynamic simulation, based upon sequence similarity with turkey pancreatic polypeptide, indicates that the conformations of the polyproline-helix-like region (residues 1-8) and the alpha-helical region (residues 15-30) in turkey pancreatic...... polypeptide are conserved in peptide methionine-tyrosine, and that non-bonded interactions between these domains have preserved the overall polypeptide fold in the molecule. The substitution of the otherwise totally conserved Gly9 residue by serine in lamprey peptide methionine-tyrosine, however, results...

  7. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  8. Identification by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange of Structural Changes in Tyrosine Hydroxylase Associated with Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanzhi; Sura, Giri R.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of tyrosine hydroxylase is regulated by reversible phosphorylation of serine residues in an N-terminal regulatory domain and catecholamine inhibition at the active site. Catecholamines such as dopamine bind very tightly to the resting enzyme; phosphorylation of Ser40 decreases the affinity for catecholamines by three orders of magnitude. The effects of dopamine binding and phosphorylation of Ser40 on the kinetics of deuterium incorporation into peptide bonds were examined by mass spectrometry. When dopamine is bound, three peptic peptides show significantly slower deuterium incorporation, 35-41 and 42-71 in the regulatory domain and 295-299 in the catalytic domain. In the phosphorylated enzyme, peptide 295-299 shows more rapid incorporation of deuterium, while 35-41 and 42-71 can not be detected. These results are consistent with tyrosine hydroxylase existing in two different conformations. In the closed conformation, the regulatory domain lies across the active site loop containing residues 295-298; this is stabilized when dopamine is bound in the active site. In the open conformation, the regulatory domain has moved out of the active site, allowing substrates access; this conformation is favored by phosphorylation of Ser40. PMID:19371093

  9. Adaptation of phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolic pathway to hibernation in bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi-Hsuan; Zhang, Yijian; Cui, Jie; Liu, Yang; McAllan, Bronwyn M; Liao, Chen-Chung; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    Some mammals hibernate in response to harsh environments. Although hibernating mammals may metabolize proteins, the nitrogen metabolic pathways commonly activated during hibernation are not fully characterized. In contrast to the hypothesis of amino acid preservation, we found evidence of amino acid metabolism as three of five key enzymes, including phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), fumarylacetoacetase (FAH), involved in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism were co-upregulated during hibernation in two distantly related species of bats, Myotis ricketti and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. In addition, the levels of phenylalanine in the livers of these bats were significantly decreased during hibernation. Because phenylalanine and tyrosine are both glucogenic and ketogenic, these results indicate the role of this catabolic pathway in energy supply. Since any deficiency in the catabolism of these two amino acids can cause accumulations of toxic metabolites, these results also suggest the detoxification role of these enzymes during hibernation. A higher selective constraint on PAH, HPD, and HGD in hibernators than in non-hibernators was observed, and hibernators had more conserved amino acid residues in each of these enzymes than non-hibernators. These conserved amino acid residues are mostly located in positions critical for the structure and activity of the enzymes. Taken together, results of this work provide novel insights in nitrogen metabolism and removal of harmful metabolites during bat hibernation.

  10. Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 directly interacts with integrin β1 and regulates its phosphorylation at tyrosine 783

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3 or PTP4A3 has been implicated in controlling cancer cell proliferation, motility, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Deregulated expression of PRL-3 is highly correlated with cancer progression and predicts poor survival. Although PRL-3 was categorized as a tyrosine phosphatase, its cellular substrates remain largely unknown. Results We demonstrated that PRL-3 interacts with integrin β1 in cancer cells. Recombinant PRL-3 associates with the intracellular domain of integrin β1 in vitro. Silencing of integrin α1 enhances PRL-3-integrin β1 interaction. Furthermore, PRL-3 diminishes tyrosine phosphorylation of integrin β1 in vitro and in vivo. With site-specific anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies against residues in the intracellular domain of integrin β1, tyrosine-783, but not tyrosine-795, is shown to be dephosphorylated by PRL-3 in a catalytic activity-dependant manner. Phosphorylation of Y783 is potentiated by ablation of PRL-3 or by treatment with a chemical inhibitor of PRL-3. Conversely, depletion of integrin α1 decreases the phosphorylation of this site. Conclusions Our results revealed a direct interaction between PRL-3 and integrin β1 and characterized Y783 of integrin β1 as a bona fide substrate of PRL-3, which is negatively regulated by integrin α1.

  11. c-Abl mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin regulates LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction and lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usatyuk, Peter V.; Lele, Abhishek; Harijith, Anantha; Gregorio, Carol C.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Salgia, Ravi; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Paxillin is phosphorylated at multiple residues; however, the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin in endothelial barrier dysfunction and acute lung injury (ALI) remains unclear. We used siRNA and site-specific nonphosphorylable mutants of paxillin to abrogate the function of paxillin to determine its role in lung endothelial permeability and ALI. In vitro, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) resulted in enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 with no significant change in Y181 and significant barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of paxillin with siRNA attenuated LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and destabilization of VE-cadherin. LPS-induced paxillin phosphorylation at Y31 and Y118 was mediated by c-Abl tyrosine kinase, but not by Src and focal adhesion kinase. c-Abl siRNA significantly reduced LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Transfection of HLMVECs with paxillin Y31F, Y118F, and Y31/118F double mutants mitigated LPS-induced barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin destabilization. In vivo, the c-Abl inhibitor AG957 attenuated LPS-induced pulmonary permeability in mice. Together, these results suggest that c-Abl mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin at Y31 and Y118 regulates LPS-mediated pulmonary vascular permeability and injury. PMID:25795725

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  13. Application of an M13 bacteriophage displaying tyrosine on the surface for detection of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohua; Niu, Chuncheng; Wu, Yunhua; Liang, Xiaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Ferric and ferrous ion plays critical roles in bioprocesses, their influences in many fields have not been fully explored due to the lack of methods for quantification of ferric and ferrous ions in biological system or complex matrix. In this study, an M13 bacteriophage (phage) was engineered for use as a sensor for ferric and ferrous ions via the display of a tyrosine residue on the P8 coat protein. The interaction between the specific phenol group of tyrosine and Fe(3+) / Fe(2+) was used as the sensor. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregation of the tyrosine-displaying phages after incubation with Fe(3+) and Fe(2+). The aggregated phages infected the host bacterium inefficiently. This phenomenon could be utilized for detection of ferric and ferrous ions. For ferric ions, a calibration curve ranging from 200 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 58 nmol/L was acquired. For ferrous ions, a calibration curve ranging from 800 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 641.7 nmol/L was acquired. The assay was specific for Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) when tested against Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Ba(2+), and K(+). The tyrosine displaying phage to Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) interaction would have plenty of room in application to biomaterials and bionanotechnology.

  14. Measurement of optical purity of p-BPA-Tyrosine dipeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, K.; Sato, N.; Kitta, K.; Saitake, Y. [Shinshu Univ., Faculty of Science, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan); Hiratsuka, J. [Kawasaki Medical School, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Ichihashi, M. [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Melanin biosynthesis is very active in melanoma cells, and tyrosine is one of the substrates of the melanin biosynthesis. Tyrosine is oxidized to dopa by tyrosinase at the beginning of melanin biosynthesis process. Therefore, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA)-tyrosine dipeptide is expected to be a substrate of melanin biosynthesis process, and the peptide will be incorporated in melanoma cells, and then tumor boron concentration lasts in their cells for long time. Since p-BPA tyrosine are amino acids, they have D, L isomers. Therefore, we have tried to synthesize four isomers (L-L, L-D, D-L, D-D) of p-BPA-Tyrosine dipeptide, and have measured their optical purity with HPLC. (author)

  15. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Selectivity, physicochemical and biological consequences, denitration and proteomics methods for the identification of tyrosine-nitrated proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, N.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Postma, D.S; Bischoff, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO2). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and elucidate

  16. Protein Tyrosine Nitration : Selectivity, Physicochemical and Biological Consequences, Denitration, and Proteomics Methods for the Identification of Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, Nicolas; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Bischoff, Rainer

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO(2)). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and

  17. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...... links a receptor tyrosine phosphatase with a key component of a central cellular signalling pathway and provides a basis for addressing R-PTP-alpha function....

  18. Coupled regulation by the juxtamembrane and sterile α motif (SAM) linker is a hallmark of Ephrin tyrosine kinase evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Annie; John, Mihir; Ruan, Zheng; Kannan, Natarajan

    2018-02-12

    Ephrin (Eph) receptor tyrosine kinases have evolutionarily diverged from other tyrosine kinases to respond to specific activation and regulatory signals that requires close coupling of kinase catalytic and regulatory functions. However, the evolutionary basis for such functional coupling is not fully understood. We employed an evolutionary systems approach involving statistical mining of large sequence and structural datasets to define the hallmarks of Eph kinase evolution and functional specialization. We find that some of the most distinguishing Eph- specific residues structurally tether the flanking juxtamembrane and sterile α motif (SAM) linker regions to the kinase domain, and substitutions of these residues in EphA3 result in faster kinase activation. We report for the first time that the SAM domain linker is functionally coupled to the juxtamembrane through co-conserved residues in the kinase domain, and that together these residues provide a structural framework for coupling catalytic and regulatory functions. The unique organization of Eph-specific tethering networks and the identification of other Eph-specific sequence features of unknown functions provide new hypotheses for future functional studies and new clues to disease mutations altering Eph kinase-specific functions. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Tyrosine aminotransferase contributes to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter J

    2011-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrAT) catalyzes the transamination of L-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, yielding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and L-glutamate. The decarboxylation product of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, is a precursor to a large and diverse group of natural products known collectively as benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). We have isolated and characterized a TyrAT cDNA from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which remains the only commercial source for several pharmaceutical BIAs, including codeine, morphine, and noscapine. TyrAT belongs to group I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes wherein Schiff base formation occurs between PLP and a specific Lys residue. The amino acid sequence of TyrAT showed considerable homology to other putative plant TyrATs, although few of these have been functionally characterized. Purified, recombinant TyrAT displayed a molecular mass of approximately 46 kD and a substrate preference for L-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, with apparent K(m) values of 1.82 and 0.35 mm, respectively. No specific requirement for PLP was detected in vitro. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the conversion of L-Tyr to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. TyrAT gene transcripts were most abundant in roots and stems of mature opium poppy plants. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to evaluate the contribution of TyrAT to BIA metabolism in opium poppy. TyrAT transcript levels were reduced by at least 80% in silenced plants compared with controls and showed a moderate reduction in total alkaloid content. The modest correlation between transcript levels and BIA accumulation in opium poppy supports a role for TyrAT in the generation of alkaloid precursors, but it also suggests the occurrence of other sources for 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde.

  20. Degradation of poly(glutamic acid-CO-tyrosine) in the solid state by gamma-radiation at 77 and 303 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.T.; Ho, S.Y.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The degradation of poly-L-glutamic acid, two copolymers of L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine and poly-L-tyrosine by γ-radiation at 77 and 303 K has been investigated. The volatile radiolysis products and their yields have been measured at 303 K and the radical intermediates have been identified at 77 and 303 K, and the radical yields determined from ESR spectra. The scission and crosslinking yields have been determined from molecular weight measurements by gel permeation chromatography. The tyrosine residues in the copolymers lead to reduced yields of volatile products, radical intermediates and scission as a result of the protective effect of these aromatic units. (author)

  1. The tyrosine phosphatase Shp2 interacts with NPM-ALK and regulates anaplastic lymphoma cell growth and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voena, Claudia; Conte, Chiara; Ambrogio, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    , leading to increased cell growth, resistance to apoptosis, and changes in morphology and migration of transformed cells. To search for new NPM-ALK interacting molecules, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach in HEK293 cells expressing an inducible NPM-ALK and identified the tyrosine......), formed a complex with Shp2, Gab2, and growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), where Grb2 bound to the phosphorylated Shp2 through its SH2 domain. Shp2 knock down by specific shRNA decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and of the tyrosine residue Y416...... in the activation loop of Src, resulting in impaired ALCL cell proliferation and growth disadvantage. Finally, migration of ALCL cells was reduced by Shp2 shRNA. These findings show a direct involvement of Shp2 in NPM-ALK lymphomagenesis, highlighting its critical role in lymphoma cell proliferation and migration....

  2. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  3. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signalingr driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-03-08

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology.

  4. Characterization of the interactions between the active site of a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrapetov Marina K

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine kinases are important enzymes for cell signalling and key targets for anticancer drug discovery. The catalytic mechanisms of protein tyrosine kinase-catalysed phosphorylation are not fully understood. Protein tyrosine kinase Csk requires two Mg2+ cations for activity: one (M1 binds to ATP, and the other (M2 acts as an essential activator. Results Experiments in this communication characterize the interaction between M2 and Csk. Csk activity is sensitive to pH in the range of 6 to 7. Kinetic characterization indicates that the sensitivity is not due to altered substrate binding, but caused by the sensitivity of M2 binding to pH. Several residues in the active site with potential of binding M2 are mutated and the effect on metal activation studied. An active mutant of Asn319 is generated, and this mutation does not alter the metal binding characteristics. Mutations of Glu236 or Asp332 abolish the kinase activity, precluding a positive or negative conclusion on their role in M2 coordination. Finally, the ability of divalent metal cations to activate Csk correlates to a combination of ionic radius and the coordination number. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that M2 binding to Csk is sensitive to pH, which is mainly responsible for Csk activity change in the acidic arm of the pH response curve. They also demonstrate critical differences in the metal activator coordination sphere in protein tyrosine kinase Csk and a protein Ser/Thr kinase, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. They shed light on the physical interactions between a protein tyrosine kinase and a divalent metal activator.

  5. rse, a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase with homology to Axl/Ufo, is expressed at high levels in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M R; Scadden, D T; Wang, Z; Gu, Q; Goddard, A; Godowski, P J

    1994-04-08

    We have isolated cDNA clones that encode the human and murine forms of a novel receptor-type tyrosine kinase termed Rse. Sequence analysis indicates that human Rse contains 890 amino acids, with an extracellular region composed of two immunoglobulin-like domains followed by two fibronectin type III domains. Murine Rse contains 880 amino acids and shares 90% amino acid identity with its human counterpart. Rse is structurally similar to the receptor-type tyrosine kinase Axl/Ufo, and the two proteins have 35 and 63% sequence identity in their extracellular and intracellular domains, respectively. To study the synthesis and activation of this putative receptor-type tyrosine kinase, we constructed a version of Rse (termed gD-Rse, where gD represents glycoprotein D) that contains an NH2-terminal epitope tag. NIH3T3 cells were engineered to express gD-Rse, which could be detected at the cell surface by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, gD-Rse was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon incubation of the cells with an antibody directed against the epitope tag, suggesting that rse encodes an active tyrosine kinase. In the human tissues we examined, the highest level of expression of rse mRNA was observed in the brain; rse mRNA was also detected in the premegakaryocytopoietic cell lines CMK11-5 and Dami. The gene for rse was localized to human chromosome 15.

  6. Direct observation of spin-injection in tyrosinate-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Ampoumogli, Asem; Gournis, Dimitrios; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Jankovic, Lubos; Christoforidis, Konstantinos C.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Froudakis, George E.; Maccallini, Enrico; Rudolf, Petra; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    In this work, we report on the interaction of a tyrosinate radical with single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). The tyrosinate radical was formed from tyrosine (ester) by Fenton's reagent and, reacted in situ with carbon nanotubes resulting in novel tyrosinated carbon nanotube derivatives. The covalent

  7. Cytochrome c Is Tyrosine 97 Phosphorylated by Neuroprotective Insulin Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanderson, T. H.; Mahapatra, G.; Pecina, Petr; Ji, Q.; Yu, K.; Sinkler, Ch.; Varughese, A.; Kumar, R.; Bukowski, M. J.; Tousignant, R. N.; Salomon, A. R.; Lee, I.; Hüttemann, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2013), e78627 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cytochrome c * tyrosine phosphorylation * brain ischemia * insulin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  8. Tyrosine biosynthesis, metabolism, and catabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Craig A; Maeda, Hiroshi A

    2018-05-01

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is an aromatic amino acid (AAA) required for protein synthesis in all organisms, but synthesized de novo only in plants and microorganisms. In plants, Tyr also serves as a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites that have diverse physiological roles as electron carriers, antioxidants, attractants, and defense compounds. Some of these Tyr-derived plant natural products are also used in human medicine and nutrition (e.g. morphine and vitamin E). While the Tyr biosynthesis and catabolic pathways have been extensively studied in microbes and animals, respectively, those of plants have received much less attention until recently. Accumulating evidence suggest that the Tyr biosynthetic pathways differ between microbes and plants and even within the plant kingdom, likely to support the production of lineage-specific plant specialized metabolites derived from Tyr. The interspecies variations of plant Tyr pathway enzymes can now be used to enhance the production of Tyr and Tyr-derived compounds in plants and other synthetic biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Manzamenones Inhibit T-Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun'ichi Kobayashi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Manzamenones A~C (1~3 and E~F (5~6, unique oxylipin metabolites isolated from a marine sponge Plakortis sp., have been found to exhibit inhibitory activity against Tcell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP. The inhibitory activity of 2 and 5 against TCPTP was 4 times more potent than that against protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B.

  10. Co-conserved features associated with cis regulation of ErbB tyrosine kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Mirza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidermal growth factor receptor kinases, or ErbB kinases, belong to a large sub-group of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, which share a conserved catalytic core. The catalytic core of ErbB kinases have functionally diverged from other RTKs in that they are activated by a unique allosteric mechanism that involves specific interactions between the kinase core and the flanking Juxtamembrane (JM and COOH-terminal tail (C-terminal tail. Although extensive studies on ErbB and related tyrosine kinases have provided important insights into the structural basis for ErbB kinase functional divergence, the sequence features that contribute to the unique regulation of ErbB kinases have not been systematically explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we use a Bayesian approach to identify the selective sequence constraints that most distinguish ErbB kinases from other receptor tyrosine kinases. We find that strong ErbB kinase-specific constraints are imposed on residues that tether the JM and C-terminal tail to key functional regions of the kinase core. A conserved RIxKExE motif in the JM-kinase linker region and a glutamine in the inter-lobe linker are identified as two of the most distinguishing features of the ErbB family. While the RIxKExE motif tethers the C-terminal tail to the N-lobe of the kinase domain, the glutamine tethers the C-terminal tail to hinge regions critical for inter-lobe movement. Comparison of the active and inactive crystal structures of ErbB kinases indicates that the identified residues are conformationally malleable and can potentially contribute to the cis regulation of the kinase core by the JM and C-terminal tail. ErbB3, and EGFR orthologs in sponges and parasitic worms, diverge from some of the canonical ErbB features, providing insights into sub-family and lineage-specific functional specialization. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis pinpoints key residues for mutational analysis, and

  11. Autophosphorylation of JAK2 on tyrosines 221 and 570 regulates its activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K; Steen, Hanno

    2004-01-01

    or which of the 49 tyrosines in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. In this study, mass spectrometry and two-dimensional peptide mapping were used to determine that tyrosines 221, 570, and 1007 in JAK2 are autophosphorylated. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 570 is particularly robust. In response to growth hormone......, JAK2 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at tyrosines 221 and 570, returning to basal levels by 60 min. Analysis of the sequences surrounding tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 and tyrosines in other proteins that are phosphorylated in response to ligands that activate JAK2 suggests that the YXX......[L/I/V] motif is one of the motifs recognized by JAK2. Experiments using JAK2 with tyrosines 221 and 570 mutated to phenylalanine suggest that tyrosines 221 and 570 in JAK2 may serve as regulatory sites in JAK2, with phosphorylation of tyrosine 221 increasing kinase activity and phosphorylation of tyrosine 570...

  12. Cryopreservation of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) sperm induces protein phosphorylation in tyrosine and threonine residues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, P.; Hulák, M.; Li, Z.; H.; Šulc, Miroslav; Pšenička, M.; Rodina, M.; Gela, D.; Linhart, O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 2 (2013), s. 84-89 ISSN 0093-691X Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cryopreservation * Sperm * Phosphorylation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2013

  13. Residue 182 influences the second step of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-mediated catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Guo, X.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    , in comparison with Phe(182)-PTPs, have significantly decreased k(cat) values, and to a lesser degree, decreased k(cat)/K-m values. Combined enzyme kinetic, X-ray crystallographic and molecular dynamics studies indicate that the effect of His(182) is due to interactions with Asp(181) and with Gln(262). We...

  14. Salivary peptide tyrosine-tyrosine 3-36 modulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Maria D; Sergeyev, Valeriy G; Acosta, Andres; Spegele, Michael; La Sala, Michael; Waler, Nickolas J; Chiriboga-Hurtado, Juan; Currlin, Seth W; Herzog, Herbert; Dotson, Cedrick D; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Zolotukhin, Sergei

    2013-11-20

    Hormone peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY) is secreted into circulation from the gut L-endocrine cells in response to food intake, thus inducing satiation during interaction with its preferred receptor, Y2R. Clinical applications of systemically administered PYY for the purpose of reducing body weight were compromised as a result of the common side effect of visceral sickness. We describe here a novel approach of elevating PYY in saliva in mice, which, although reliably inducing strong anorexic responses, does not cause aversive reactions. The augmentation of salivary PYY activated forebrain areas known to mediate feeding, hunger, and satiation while minimally affecting brainstem chemoreceptor zones triggering nausea. By comparing neuronal pathways activated by systemic versus salivary PYY, we identified a metabolic circuit associated with Y2R-positive cells in the oral cavity and extending through brainstem nuclei into hypothalamic satiety centers. The discovery of this alternative circuit that regulates ingestive behavior without inducing taste aversion may open the possibility of a therapeutic application of PYY for the treatment of obesity via direct oral application.

  15. Identification of Tyrosine Kinase Src Responsible for Antimicrobial Peptides Production in Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianyang; Hua, Xiaoting; Song, Liang; Xia, Qingyou; Wang, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Src is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase ubiquitously expressed in animals. It is involved in various cellular processes, including the innate immune response in mammals. However, less is known about the function of insect Src. Here we presented a homologue of Src in silkworm (Bombyx mori), named as BmSrc by phylogenetic analysis, homologous comparison and domain prediction. BmSrc contains the conserved phosphorylation residues and possesses tyrosine kinase activity. The expression pattern of BmSrc mRNA was specific in developmental stages and tissues. The highest expression of BmSrc was detected in moth stage, and the gonads showed the highest expression during larval stage. We then found over-expression of BmSrc in BmE cell resulted in an increase of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and Akt phosphorylation but a decrease in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Finally, we demonstrated that BmSrc promoted the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These results implied that BmSrc is involved in immune response of silkworm possibly through activating p38 MAPK and Akt signaling pathway. Our study may provide reference for further investigation of the biological function of BmSrc in Bombyx mori. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  17. Sequential Proton Loss Electron Transfer in Deactivation of Iron(IV) Binding Protein by Tyrosine Based Food Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    to understand the relationship between density functional theory calculated molecular descriptors and kinetic data, which was further modeled by partial least squares for quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. In addition, a three tyrosine residue containing protein, lysozyme, was also found...... by protonation of ferrylmyoglobin and facilitated proton transfer at acidic conditions. Enthalpy-entropy compensation effects were observed for the activation parameters (ΔH† and ΔS†), indicating the common reaction mechanism. Moreover, principal component analysis combined with heat map were performed...... to be able to reduce ferrylmyoglobin with a second order rate constant of 66 ± 28 L/mol/s as determined by a competitive kinetic method....

  18. Molecular basis of the evolution of alternative tyrosine biosynthetic routes in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenck, Craig A.; Holland, Cynthia K.; Schneider, Matthew R.; Men, Yusen; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.; Maeda , Hiroshi A. (UW); (WU)

    2017-06-26

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is essential for protein synthesis and is a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites crucial for plant and human health. Tyr can be synthesized via two alternative routes by different key regulatory TyrA family enzymes, prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH, also known as TyrAp) or arogenate dehydrogenase (ADH, also known as TyrAa), representing a unique divergence of primary metabolic pathways. The molecular foundation underlying the evolution of these alternative Tyr pathways is currently unknown. Here we characterized recently diverged plant PDH and ADH enzymes, obtained the X-ray crystal structure of soybean PDH, and identified a single amino acid residue that defines TyrA substrate specificity and regulation. Structures of mutated PDHs co-crystallized with Tyr indicate that substitutions of Asn222 confer ADH activity and Tyr sensitivity. Reciprocal mutagenesis of the corresponding residue in divergent plant ADHs further introduced PDH activity and relaxed Tyr sensitivity, highlighting the critical role of this residue in TyrA substrate specificity that underlies the evolution of alternative Tyr biosynthetic pathways in plants.

  19. Molecular basis of the evolution of alternative tyrosine biosynthetic routes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Craig A; Holland, Cynthia K; Schneider, Matthew R; Men, Yusen; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M; Maeda, Hiroshi A

    2017-09-01

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is essential for protein synthesis and is a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites crucial for plant and human health. Tyr can be synthesized via two alternative routes by different key regulatory TyrA family enzymes, prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH, also known as TyrA p ) or arogenate dehydrogenase (ADH, also known as TyrA a ), representing a unique divergence of primary metabolic pathways. The molecular foundation underlying the evolution of these alternative Tyr pathways is currently unknown. Here we characterized recently diverged plant PDH and ADH enzymes, obtained the X-ray crystal structure of soybean PDH, and identified a single amino acid residue that defines TyrA substrate specificity and regulation. Structures of mutated PDHs co-crystallized with Tyr indicate that substitutions of Asn222 confer ADH activity and Tyr sensitivity. Reciprocal mutagenesis of the corresponding residue in divergent plant ADHs further introduced PDH activity and relaxed Tyr sensitivity, highlighting the critical role of this residue in TyrA substrate specificity that underlies the evolution of alternative Tyr biosynthetic pathways in plants.

  20. Multiple forms of the human tyrosine phosphatase RPTP alpha. Isozymes and differences in glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daum, G; Regenass, S; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    -linked carbohydrates. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that the smaller RPTP alpha protein is a precursor of the larger one. A high affinity antibody was generated that recognizes the immature protein only; however, both proteins can be detected by Western blot analysis after a simple chemical hydrolysis......Among all the receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase RPTP alpha clones described from mammalian tissues, one differed in that it encoded a 9-amino-acid insert 3 residues upstream from the transmembrane segment (Kaplan, R., Morse, B., Huebner, K., Croce, C., Howk, R. Ravera, M., Ricca, G....... Following Superose 12 chromatography, the 100- and 130-kDa species of RPTP alpha emerged as 200- and 340-kDa proteins, respectively. Both species exhibited similar enzymatic activities as determined with a peptide substrate in immunoprecipitates....

  1. Water molecule network and active site flexibility of apo protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    the conformation and flexibility of active-site residues as well as the water-molecule network, is a key issue in understanding ligand binding and enzyme kinetics and in structure-based drug design. A 1.95 Angstrom apo PTP1B structure has been obtained, showing four highly coordinated water molecules in the active......Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signalling and is therefore considered to be an important molecular target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Detailed structural information about the structure of PTP1B, including......-site pocket of the enzyme; hence, the active site is highly solvated in the apo state. Three of the water molecules are located at positions that approximately correspond to the positions of the phosphate O atoms of the natural substrate phosphotyrosine and form a similar network of hydrogen bonds. The active...

  2. In Vitro Characterization of the Bacillus subtilis Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YwqE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Petranovic, Dina; Edwards, Robert A.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Mustelin, Tomas; Deutscher, Josef; Bottini, Nunzio

    2005-01-01

    Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria possess protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) with a catalytic Cys residue. In addition, many gram-positive bacteria have acquired a new family of PTPs, whose first characterized member was CpsB from Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bacillus subtilis contains one such CpsB-like PTP, YwqE, in addition to two class II Cys-based PTPs, YwlE and YfkJ. The substrates for both YwlE and YfkJ are presently unknown, while YwqE was shown to dephosphorylate two phosphotyrosine-containing proteins implicated in UDP-glucuronate biosynthesis, YwqD and YwqF. In this study, we characterize YwqE, compare the activities of the three B. subtilis PTPs (YwqE, YwlE, and YfkJ), and demonstrate that the two B. subtilis class II PTPs do not dephosphorylate the physiological substrates of YwqE. PMID:15866923

  3. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Kanwal [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Zhe [Zhejiang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sakamoto, Akira [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan); Zhang, Yan Fang [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Naranmandura, Hua, E-mail: narenman@zju.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Suzuki, Noriyuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260‐8675 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Dual-Specificity Tyrosine-Regulated Kinase 3 Reveals New Structural Features and Insights into its Auto-phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kuglae; Cha, Jeong Seok; Cho, Yong-Soon; Kim, Hoyoung; Chang, Nienping; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2018-04-07

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) auto-phosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in their activation loop and phosphorylate their substrate on serine and threonine residues. The auto-phosphorylation occurs intramolecularly and is a one-off event. DYRK3 is selectively expressed at a high level in hematopoietic cells and attenuates erythroblast development, leading to anemia. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the mature form of human DYRK3 in complex with harmine, an ATP competitive inhibitor. The crystal structure revealed a phosphorylation site, residue S350, whose phosphorylation increases the stability of DYRK3 and enhances its kinase activity. In addition, our structural and biochemical assays suggest that the N-terminal auto-phosphorylation accessory domain stabilizes the DYRK3 protein, followed by auto-phosphorylation of the tyrosine of the activation loop, which is important for kinase activity. Finally, our docking analysis provides information for the design of novel and potent therapeutics to treat anemia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Insulin and Metabolic Stress Stimulate Multisite Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation of Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 and Inhibit Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hançer, Nancy J.; Qiu, Wei; Cherella, Christine; Li, Yedan; Copps, Kyle D.; White, Morris F.

    2014-01-01

    IRS1 and IRS2 are key substrates of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Mass spectrometry reveals more than 50 phosphorylated IRS1 serine and threonine residues (Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues) in IRS1 from insulin-stimulated cells or human tissues. We investigated a subset of IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues using a newly developed panel of 25 phospho-specific monoclonal antibodies (αpS/TmAbIrs1). CHO cells overexpressing the human insulin receptor and rat IRS1 were stimulated with insulin in the absence or presence of inhibitors of the PI3K → Akt → mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) → S6 kinase or MEK pathways. Nearly all IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues were stimulated by insulin and significantly suppressed by PI3K inhibition; fewer were suppressed by Akt or mTOR inhibition, and none were suppressed by MEK inhibition. Insulin-stimulated Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr(P)Irs1) was enhanced by inhibition of the PI3K → Akt → mTOR pathway and correlated with decreased Ser(P)-302Irs1, Ser(P)-307Irs1, Ser(P)-318Irs1, Ser(P)-325Irs1, and Ser(P)-346Irs1. Metabolic stress modeled by anisomycin, thapsigargin, or tunicamycin increased many of the same Ser(P)/Thr(P) residues as insulin, some of which (Ser(P)-302Irs1, Ser(P)-307Irs1, and four others) correlated significantly with impaired insulin-stimulated Tyr(P)Irs1. Thus, IRS1 Ser(P)/Thr(P) is an integrated response to insulin stimulation and metabolic stress, which associates with reduced Tyr(P)Irs1 in CHOIR/IRS1 cells. PMID:24652289

  6. Identification of a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Jin, Qiaojun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Liu, Huiquan

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) specifically catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in proteins and play essential roles in many cellular processes. Although TKs mainly exist in animals, recent studies revealed that some organisms outside the Opisthokont clade also contain TKs. The fungi, as the sister group to animals, are thought to lack TKs. To better understand the origin and evolution of TKs, it is important to investigate if fungi have TK or TK-related genes. We therefore systematically identified possible TKs across the fungal kingdom by using the profile hidden Markov Models searches and phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed that fungi lack the orthologs of animal TKs. We identified a fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases (FslK) that appears to be a sister group closely related to TKs. Sequence analysis revealed that members of the FslK clade contain all the conserved protein kinase sub-domains and thus are likely enzymatically active. However, they lack key amino acid residues that determine TK-specific activities, indicating that they are not true TKs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the last common ancestor of fungi may have possessed numerous members of FslK. The ancestral FslK genes were lost in Ascomycota and Ustilaginomycotina and Pucciniomycotina of Basidiomycota during evolution. Most of these ancestral genes, however, were retained and expanded in Agaricomycetes. The discovery of the fungi-specific lineage of protein kinases closely related to TKs helps shed light on the origin and evolution of TKs and also has potential implications for the importance of these kinases in mushroom fungi.

  7. Resistance to EGF receptor inhibitors in glioblastoma mediated by phosphorylation of the PTEN tumor suppressor at tyrosine 240.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Tim R; Nathanson, David; Ponte de Albuquerque, Claudio; Kuga, Daisuke; Iwanami, Akio; Dang, Julie; Yang, Huijun; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Uno, Miyuki; Inda, Maria del Mar; Wykosky, Jill; Bachoo, Robert M; James, C David; DePinho, Ronald A; Vandenberg, Scott R; Zhou, Huilin; Marie, Suely K N; Mischel, Paul S; Cavenee, Webster K; Furnari, Frank B

    2012-08-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive of the astrocytic malignancies and the most common intracranial tumor in adults. Although the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed and/or mutated in at least 50% of GBM cases and is required for tumor maintenance in animal models, EGFR inhibitors have thus far failed to deliver significant responses in GBM patients. One inherent resistance mechanism in GBM is the coactivation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, which generates redundancy in activation of phosphoinositide-3'-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Here we demonstrate that the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor is frequently phosphorylated at a conserved tyrosine residue, Y240, in GBM clinical samples. Phosphorylation of Y240 is associated with shortened overall survival and resistance to EGFR inhibitor therapy in GBM patients and plays an active role in mediating resistance to EGFR inhibition in vitro. Y240 phosphorylation can be mediated by both fibroblast growth factor receptors and SRC family kinases (SFKs) but does not affect the ability of PTEN to antagonize PI3K signaling. These findings show that, in addition to genetic loss and mutation of PTEN, its modulation by tyrosine phosphorylation has important implications for the development and treatment of GBM.

  8. Fundamentals on the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and protein tyrosine nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Bartesaghi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review we provide an analysis of the biochemistry of peroxynitrite and tyrosine nitration. Peroxynitrite is the product of the diffusion-controlled reaction between superoxide (O2•- and nitric oxide (•NO. This process is in competition with the enzymatic dismutation of O2•- and the diffusion of •NO across cells and tissues and its reaction with molecular targets (e.g. guanylate cyclase. Understanding the kinetics and compartmentalization of the O2•- / •NO interplay is critical to rationalize the shift of •NO from a physiological mediator to a cytotoxic intermediate. Once formed, peroxynitrite (ONOO- and ONOOH; pKa = 6,8 behaves as a strong one and two-electron oxidant towards a series of biomolecules including transition metal centers and thiols. In addition, peroxynitrite anion can secondarily evolve to secondary radicals either via its fast reaction with CO2 or through proton-catalyzed homolysis. Thus, peroxynitrite can participate in direct (bimolecular and indirect (through secondary radical intermediates oxidation reactions; through these processes peroxynitrite can participate as cytotoxic effector molecule against invading pathogens and/or as an endogenous pathogenic mediator. Peroxynitrite can cause protein tyrosine nitration in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, tyrosine nitration is a hallmark of the reactions of •NO-derived oxidants in cells and tissues and serves as a biomarker of oxidative damage. Protein tyrosine nitration can mediate changes in protein structure and function that affect cell homeostasis. Tyrosine nitration in biological systems is a free radical process that can be promoted either by peroxynitrite-derived radicals or by other related •NO-dependent oxidative processes. Recently, mechanisms responsible of tyrosine nitration in hydrophobic biostructures such as membranes and lipoproteins have been assessed and involve the parallel occurrence and connection with lipid

  9. Identifying proteins that can form tyrosine-cysteine crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinie, Ryan J; Godakumbura, Pahan I; Porter, Elizabeth G; Divakaran, Anand; Burkhart, Brandon J; Wertz, John T; Benson, David E

    2012-10-01

    Protein cofactors represent a unique class of redox active posttranslational protein modifications formed in or by metalloproteins. Once formed, protein cofactors provide a one-electron oxidant, which is tethered to the protein backbone. Twenty-five proteins are known to contain protein cofactors, but this number is likely limited by the use of crystallography as the identification technique. In order to address this limitation, a search of all reported protein structures for chemical environments conducive to forming a protein cofactor through tyrosine and cysteine side chain crosslinking yielded three hundred candidate proteins. Using hydrogen bonding and metal center proximity, the three hundred proteins were narrowed to four highly viable candidates. An orphan metalloprotein (BF4112) was examined to validate this methodology, which identifies proteins capable of crosslinking tyrosine and cysteine sidechains. A tyrosine-cysteine crosslink was formed in BF4112 using copper-dioxygen chemistry, as in galactose oxidase. Liquid chromatography-MALDI mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy confirmed tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation in BF4112. This finding demonstrates the efficacy of these predictive methods and the minimal constraints, provided by the BF4112 protein structure, in tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation. This search method, when coupled with physiological evidence for crosslink formation and function as a cofactor, could identify additional protein-derived cofactors.

  10. Dynamics of allostery in hemoglobin: roles of the penultimate tyrosine H bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Chen, Ruopian; Shen, Tong-Jian; Sahu, Sarata C; Ho, Nancy T; Giovannelli, Janel L; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ho, Chien; Spiro, Thomas G

    2006-02-17

    The tyrosine residues adjacent to the C termini of the hemoglobin (Hb) subunits, alphaY140 and betaY145, are expected to play important structural roles, because the C termini are the loci of T-state quaternary salt-bridges, and because the tyrosine side-chains bridge the H and F helices via H bonds to the alphaV93 and betaV98 carbonyl groups. These roles have been investigated via measurements of oxygen binding, (1)H NMR spectra, resonance Raman (RR) spectra, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectra on site mutants in which the Hcdots, three dots, centeredF H bonds are eliminated by replacing the tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. The TR(3) spectra confirm the hypothesis, based on TR(3) studies of wild-type Hb, that the Hcdots, three dots, centeredF H bonds break and then re-form during the sub-microsecond phase of the R-T quaternary transition. The TR(3) spectra support the inference from other mutational studies that the alphabeta dimers act as single dynamic units in this early phase, motions of the E and F helices being coupled tightly across the dimer interface. Formation of T quaternary contacts occurs at about the same rate in the mutants as in HbA. However, these contacts are weakened substantially by the Y/F substitutions. Equilibrium perturbations are apparent also, especially for the alpha-subunits, in which relaxation of the Fe-His bond, strengthening of the Acdots, three dots, centeredE interhelical H bond, and weakening of the "switch" quaternary contact in deoxyHb are all apparent. Structural effects are less marked for the beta-chain Y/F replacement, but the Bohr effect is reduced by 25%, indicating that the salt-bridge and H bond interactions of the adjacent C terminus are loosened. The alpha-chain replacement reduces the Bohr effect much more, consistent with the global perturbations detected by the structure probes.

  11. Involvement of three meningococcal surface-exposed proteins, the heparin-binding protein NhbA, the α-peptide of IgA protease and the autotransporter protease NalP, in initiation of biofilm formation

    KAUST Repository

    Arenas, Jesús

    2012-12-04

    Neisseria meningitidis is a common and usually harmless inhabitant of the mucosa of the human nasopharynx, which, in rare cases, can cross the epithelial barrier and cause meningitis and sepsis. Biofilm formation favours the colonization of the host and the subsequent carrier state. Two different strategies of biofilm formation, either dependent or independent on extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been described for meningococcal strains. Here, we demonstrate that the autotransporter protease NalP, the expression of which is phase variable, affects eDNA-dependent biofilm formation in N.meningitidis. The effect of NalP was found in biofilm formation under static and flow conditions and was dependent on its protease activity. Cleavage of the heparin-binding antigen NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease, resulting in the release of positively charged polypeptides from the cell surface, was responsible for the reduction in biofilm formation when NalP is expressed. Both NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease were shown to bind DNA. We conclude that NhbA and the α-peptide of IgA protease are implicated in biofilm formation by binding eDNA and that NalP is an important regulator of this process through the proteolysis of these surface-exposed proteins. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Use of synthetic peptides to represent surface-exposed epitopes defined by neutralizing dengue complex- and flavivirus group-reactive monoclonal antibodies on the native dengue type-2 virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K I

    2008-07-01

    The reactions of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that defined dengue virus (DENV) complex, flavivirus subgroup or group neutralizing epitopes were tested against synthetic peptide sequences from domains I, II and III of the envelope (E) glycoproteins of different DENV-2 genotypes/strains. The DENV complex-reactive mAb identified the surface-exposed 304-GKFKV/IVKEIA-313 peptides and the DENV complex-conserved 393-KKGSSIGQ/KM-401 peptides in domain III, which were located adjacently in the native glycoprotein. Both flavivirus group-reactive mAbs reacted most strongly with fusion sequence peptides from domain II when they contained a cysteine (C) by glycine (G) substitution (underlined) (101-WGNGGGLFG-109) to represent the native rotated C side chain. The 393-401 sequence represents a newly identified epitope, present as a highly flexible coil located between the 385 and 393 cell-binding sequence and the 401 and 413 sequence involved in the E glycoprotein homo-trimer formation. The 101-109 sequence containing 105-C by G substitution and the 393-401 sequence are good candidates for diagnostic assays and cross-protection experiments.

  13. Mutagenesis of tGCN5 core region reveals two critical surface residues F90 and R140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kinjal Rajesh; Chan, Yan M.; Lee, Man X.; Yang, Ching Yao; Voloshchuk, Natalya [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Montclare, Jin Kim, E-mail: jmontcla@poly.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, 6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, SUNY-Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11203 (United States)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutagenesis of the tGCN5 core region reveals two residues important for function. {yields} Developed a fluorescent lysate-based activity assay to assess mutants. {yields} Surface-exposed residues F90 and R140 of tGCN5 are critical for H3 acetylation. -- Abstract: Tetrahymena General Control Non-Derepressor 5 (tGCN5) is a critical regulator of gene transcription via acetylation of histones. Since the acetylation ability has been attributed to the 'core region', we perform mutagenesis of residues within the tGCN5 'core region' in order to identify those critical for function and stability. Residues that do not participate in catalysis are identified, mutated and characterized for activity, structure and thermodynamic stability. Variants I107V, Q114L, A121T and A130S maintain the acetylation function relative to wild-type tGCN5, while variants F90Y, F112R and R140H completely abolish function. Of the three non-functional variants, since F112 is mutated into a non-homologous charged residue, a loss in function is expected. However, the remaining two variants are mutated into homologous residues, suggesting that F90 and R140 are critical for the activity of tGCN5. While mutation to homologous residue maintains acetylation of histone H3 for the majority of the variants, the two surface-exposed residues, F90 and R140, appear to be essential for tGCN5 function, structure or stability.

  14. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has recently received much attention as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes. This has in particular been spurred by the finding that PTP1B knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, the highly...... homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...

  15. Steric Hindrance as a Basis for Structure-Based Design of Selective Inhibitors of Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L. F.; Andersen, H. S.; Møller, K. B.

    2001-01-01

    Utilizing structure-based design, we have previously demonstrated that it is possible to obtain selective inhibitors of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). A basic nitrogen was introduced into a general PTP inhibitor to form a salt bridge to Asp48 in PTP1B and simultaneously cause repulsion...... residues in the same position in other PTPs cause steric hindrance and reduced substrate recognition capacity [Peters, G. H., et al. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 18201−18209]. The current study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of structure-based design, utilizing these differences...... in accessibility to the active site among various PTPs. We show that a general, low-molecular weight PTP inhibitor can be developed into a highly selective inhibitor for PTP1B and TC-PTP by introducing a substituent, which is designed to address the region around residues 258 and 259. Detailed enzyme kinetic...

  16. Novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites in rat skeletal muscle revealed by phosphopeptide enrichment and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Højlund, Kurt; Luo, Moulun

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a fundamental role in many cellular processes including differentiation, growth and insulin signaling. In insulin resistant muscle, aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins has been detected. However, due to the low abundance of tyrosine phosphorylation (...

  17. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y...

  18. Expression of tyrosine kinase gene in mouse thymic stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Izon, D. J.; Revilla, C.; Oosterwegel, M.; Bakker, A. Q.; van Ewijk, W.; Kruisbeek, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Amongst the most important signal transduction molecules involved in regulating growth and differentiation are the protein tyrosine kinases (PTK). Since T cell development is a consequence of interactions between thymic stromal cells (TSC) and thymocytes, identification of the PTK in both

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in osmoregulation of ionic conductances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Tilly (Bernard); N. van den Berghe (Nina); L.G. Tertoolen; M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractUsing the human Intestine 407 cell line as a model, we investigated a possible role for tyrosine kinase(s) in regulating the ion efflux pathways induced by hyposmotic stimulation (regulatory volume decrease, RVD). Pretreatment of 125I(-)-and 86Rb(+)-loaded

  20. Auto-thiophosphorylation activity of Src tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabail, M Zulema; Chen, Emily I; Koller, Antonius; Miller, W Todd

    2016-07-07

    Intermolecular autophosphorylation at Tyr416 is a conserved mechanism of activation among the members of the Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Like several other tyrosine kinases, Src can catalyze the thiophosphorylation of peptide and protein substrates using ATPγS as a thiophosphodonor, although the efficiency of the reaction is low. Here, we have characterized the ability of Src to auto-thiophosphorylate. Auto-thiophosphorylation of Src at Tyr416 in the activation loop proceeds efficiently in the presence of Ni(2+), resulting in kinase activation. Other tyrosine kinases (Ack1, Hck, and IGF1 receptor) also auto-thiophosphorylate in the presence of Ni(2+). Tyr416-thiophosphorylated Src is resistant to dephosphorylation by PTP1B phosphatase. Src and other tyrosine kinases catalyze auto-thiophosphorylation in the presence of Ni(2+). Thiophosphorylation of Src occurs at Tyr416 in the activation loop, and results in enhanced kinase activity. Tyr416-thiophosphorylated Src could serve as a stable, persistently-activated mimic of Src.

  1. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  2. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cells and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal Singh, S. (Simar); F. Dammeijer (Floris); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a non-receptor kinase that plays a crucial role in oncogenic signaling that is critical for proliferation and survival of leukemic cells in many B cell malignancies. BTK was initially shown to be defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked

  3. Understanding proton affinity of tyrosine sidechain in hydrophobic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tyrosine (Tyr), like histidine (His), is known to play a crucial role in a wide range of chemical and biochemi- cal processes3 primarily through (a) deprotonation of the phenolic –OH group present in its sidechain and. #Dedicated to Prof. N Sathyamurthy on his 60th birthday. ∗. For correspondence. (b) formation of hydrogen ...

  4. Isolation of a tyrosine-activating enzyme from baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.M. van de; Koningsberger, V.V.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1958-01-01

    The extracts of ether-CO2-frozen baker's yeast contain enzymes that catalyze the ATP-linked amino acid activation by way of pyrophosphate elimination. From the extract a tyrosine-activating enzyme could be isolated, which, judging from ultracentrifugation and electrophoretic data, was about 70% pure

  5. D-tyrosine negatively regulates melanin synthesis by competitively inhibiting tyrosinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisu; Jung, Hyejung; Kim, Kyuri; Lim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Ji-Young; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2017-11-09

    Although L-tyrosine is well known for its melanogenic effect, the contribution of D-tyrosine to melanin synthesis was previously unexplored. Here, we reveal that, unlike L-tyrosine, D-tyrosine dose-dependently reduced the melanin contents of human MNT-1 melanoma cells and primary human melanocytes. In addition, 500 μM of D-tyrosine completely inhibited 10 μM L-tyrosine-induced melanogenesis, and both in vitro assays and L-DOPA staining MNT-1 cells showed that tyrosinase activity is reduced by D-tyrosine treatment. Thus, D-tyrosine appears to inhibit L-tyrosine-mediated melanogenesis by competitively inhibiting tyrosinase activity. Furthermore, we found that D-tyrosine inhibited melanogenesis induced by α-MSH treatment or UV irradiation, which are the most common environmental factors responsible for melanin synthesis. Finally, we confirmed that D-tyrosine reduced melanin synthesis in the epidermal basal layer of a 3D human skin model. Taken together, these data suggest that D-tyrosine negatively regulates melanin synthesis by inhibiting tyrosinase activity in melanocyte-derived cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Residual gas analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, I.

    1982-01-01

    Determination of the residual gas composition in vacuum systems by a special mass spectrometric method was presented. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its application in thin film technology was discussed. Results, partial pressure versus time curves as well as the line spectra of the residual gases in case of the vaporization of a Ti-Pd-Au alloy were demonstrated together with the possible construction schemes of QMS residual gas analysers. (Sz.J.)

  7. Phosphorylation at serine 31 targets tyrosine hydroxylase to vesicles for transport along microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Kleppe, Rune; Jung-Kc, Kunwar; Ying, Ming; Marie, Michael; Rios-Mondragon, Ivan; Salvatore, Michael F; Saraste, Jaakko; Martinez, Aurora

    2017-08-25

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the conversion of l-tyrosine into l-DOPA, which is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of catecholamines, such as dopamine, in dopaminergergic neurons. Low dopamine levels and death of the dopaminergic neurons are hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD), where α-synuclein is also a key player. TH is highly regulated, notably by phosphorylation of several Ser/Thr residues in the N-terminal tail. However, the functional role of TH phosphorylation at the Ser-31 site (THSer(P)-31) remains unclear. Here, we report that THSer(P)-31 co-distributes with the Golgi complex and synaptic-like vesicles in rat and human dopaminergic cells. We also found that the TH microsomal fraction content decreases after inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and ERK1/2. The cellular distribution of an overexpressed phospho-null mutant, TH1-S31A, was restricted to the soma of neuroblastoma cells, with decreased association with the microsomal fraction, whereas a phospho-mimic mutant, TH1-S31E, was distributed throughout the soma and neurites. TH1-S31E associated with vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and α-synuclein in neuroblastoma cells, and endogenous THSer(P)-31 was detected in VMAT2- and α-synuclein-immunoprecipitated mouse brain samples. Microtubule disruption or co-transfection with α-synuclein A53T, a PD-associated mutation, caused TH1-S31E accumulation in the cell soma. Our results indicate that Ser-31 phosphorylation may regulate TH subcellular localization by enabling its transport along microtubules, notably toward the projection terminals. These findings disclose a new mechanism of TH regulation by phosphorylation and reveal its interaction with key players in PD, opening up new research avenues for better understanding dopamine synthesis in physiological and pathological states. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Separate domains of the insulin receptor contain sites of autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, H.J.; White, M.F.; Khan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the solubilized insulin receptor before and after partial proteolytic digestion to define domains in the β-subunit that undergo autophosphorylation and contain the tyrosine kinase activity. Wheat germ agglutinin purified insulin receptor from Fao cells was digested briefly at 22 0 C with low concentrations of trypsin, staphylococcal V8 protease, or elastase. Autophosphorylation of the β-subunit was carried out before and after digestion, and the [ 32 P]phosphoproteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detected by autoradiography, and analyzed by tryptic peptide mapping by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 85-kDa fragment was not immunoprecipitated by an antibody directed against the C-terminal domain of the β-subunit (αPep-1), indicating that this region of the receptor was lost. The 85-kDa fragment contained about half of the [ 32 P]phosphate originally found in the β-subunit, and tryptic peptide mapping showed that two major tryptic phosphopeptides (previously called pY2 and pY3) were removed. Three other tryptic phosphopeptides (pY1, pY1a, and pY4) were found in the 85- and 70-kDa fragments. To determined the structural requirements for kinase activity, the insulin receptor was subjected to tryptic digestion for 30 s-30 min, such that the receptor was composed exclusively of 85- and 70-kDa fragments of the β-subunit. The 85-kDa fragment exhibited autophosphorylation at pY1, pY1a, and pY4. Both the 85- and 70-kDa fragments phosphorylated tyrosine residues in a synthetic decapeptide that has the sequence of the C-terminal domain of the β-subunit of human insulin rare in the receptor

  9. Role of exposed aromatic residues in substrate-binding of CBM family 5 chitin-binding domain of alkaline chitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uni, Fumiya; Lee, Sunmi; Yatsunami, Rie; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Chitinase J (ChiJ) from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain J813 has a multidomain structure containing a catalytic domain (CatD), a fibronectin type III like domain (FnIIID) and a chitin-binding domain (ChBD). It has been shown that the ChBD binds to an insoluble chitin and enhances its degradation by the CatD. Further binding study of the ChBD was performed with a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein. This fusion protein showed binding abilities to insoluble chitin and chitosan. Two surface-exposed aromatic residues (Trp541 and Trp542) were found in the tertiary-structure model of ChBD and targeted for mutational analysis. Single and double mutations of the two aromatic residues decreased the chitin- and chitosan-binding abilities. It was revealed that these residues would be important for substrate-binding of the ChBD.

  10. Sequence-specific backbone 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli protein tyrosine kinase, Wzc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Deniz B.; Dutta, Kaushik; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases in bacteria are structurally and functionally distinct from their eukaryotic counterparts. The largest family of bacterial tyrosine kinases, the BY-kinase family, is highly conserved in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, and plays a central role in biofilm and capsule formation. In E. coli the BY-kinase, Wzc, is a critical component of the machinery responsible for the synthesis and export of the exo-polysaccharide colanic acid, a key constituent of biofilms. Here we present the main-chain 1HN, 15N, 13C′ and 13Cα, side-chain 13Cβ resonance assignments for a construct that encodes the entire 274-residue cytosolic catalytic domain of Wzc. PMID:23225198

  11. Agricultural pesticide residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuehr, F.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of tracer techniques in the study of agricultural pesticide residues is reviewed under the following headings: lysimeter experiments, micro-ecosystems, translocation in soil, degradation of pesticides in soil, biological availability of soil-applied substances, bound residues in the soil, use of macro- and microautography, double and triple labelling, use of tracer labelling in animal experiments. (U.K.)

  12. Phosphoproteomics identifies driver tyrosine kinases in sarcoma cell lines and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Li, Jiannong; Fang, Bin; Edwards, Arthur; Zhang, Guolin; Bui, Marilyn; Eschrich, Steven; Altiok, Soner; Koomen, John; Haura, Eric B

    2012-05-15

    Driver tyrosine kinase mutations are rare in sarcomas, and patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation are poorly understood. To better understand the signaling pathways active in sarcoma, we examined global tyrosine phosphorylation in sarcoma cell lines and human tumor samples. Anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies were used to purify tyrosine phosphorylated peptides, which were then identified by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The findings were validated with RNA interference, rescue, and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 1,936 unique tyrosine phosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 844 unique phosphotyrosine proteins. In sarcoma cells alone, peptides corresponding to 39 tyrosine kinases were found. Four of 10 cell lines showed dependence on tyrosine kinases for growth and/or survival, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α, MET, insulin receptor/insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling, and SRC family kinase signaling. Rhabdomyosarcoma samples showed overexpression of PDGFRα in 13% of examined cases, and sarcomas showed abundant tyrosine phosphorylation and expression of a number of tyrosine phosphorylated tyrosine kinases, including DDR2, EphB4, TYR2, AXL, SRC, LYN, and FAK. Together, our findings suggest that integrating global phosphoproteomics with functional analyses with kinase inhibitors can identify drivers of sarcoma growth and survival. ©2012 AACR.

  13. D-tyrosine affects aggregation behavior of Pantoea agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Yu, Jiajia; Jiang, Jing; Liang, Chen; Feng, Yongjun

    2017-02-01

    D-amino acids have been proved to disassemble biofilms by disassociating the matrix. Pantoea agglomerans is characterized by the formation of another kind of multicellular structure called symplasmata, which also remains the ability to form biofilms. In this study, a rice diazotrophic endophyte P. agglomerans YS19 was selected as a model strain to explore the effects of D-amino acids on these two kinds of cell aggregate structures. It was discovered that D-tyrosine disassociates biofilm, yet promotes symplasmata formation. D-tyrosine showed no influence on bacterial growth yet promoted the bacterial motility and inhibited the expression of cellular MalE and OmpF proteins, which enriched our knowledge of the biological effect of D-amino acids and expanded the research ideas of symplasmata formation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Receptor tyrosine kinases: the emerging tip of systems control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seger, R; Rodeck, U; Yarden, Y

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are transmembrane allosteric enzymes: binding of ligand growth factors to their ectodomains stimulates a cytoplasm-facing tyrosine kinase activity, which initiates a plethora of cellular processes. The enormous complexity of RTK signalling, along with rich involvement in pathologies (e.g. cancer and diabetes), motivated the establishment of the international, multi-disciplinary RTK consortium (http://www.rtkconsort.org/) in 2005. In collaboration with the British Society for Proteome Research and the European Bioinformatics Institute, the Consortium held on July 23rd and 24th a Workshop on Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics of RTK Signalling Networks (Hinxton Hall Conference Centre, Cambridge, UK). As highlighted below, systems control (a layered web of regulatory loops summarised in Fig.1) emerged throughout the workshop as a common theme of many presentations.

  15. Novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Cruz OJ

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Osmond J D'Cruz,1 Fatih M Uckun1,21Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk is intimately involved in multiple signal-transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation, and differentiation of B-lineage lymphoid cells. Btk is overexpressed and constitutively active in several B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Btk has emerged as a new antiapoptotic molecular target for treatment of B-lineage leukemias and lymphomas. Preclinical and early clinical results indicate that Btk inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of leukemias and lymphomas.Keywords: tyrosine kinase, personalized therapy, kinase inhibitors, Btk, leukemia, lymphoma

  16. Stress signaling by Tec tyrosine kinase in the ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael J; Franklin, Sarah; Li, Yifeng; Wang, Sujing; Ru, Xiaochen; Mitchell-Jordan, Scherise A; Mano, Hiroyuki; Stefani, Enrico; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2010-09-01

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases have an increasingly appreciated role in cardiac injury and protection. To investigate novel tasks for members of the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in cardiac phenotype, we examined the behavior of the Tec isoform in myocardial ischemic injury. Ischemia-reperfusion, but not cardiac protective agents, induced altered intracellular localization of Tec, highlighting distinct actions of this protein compared with other isoforms, such as Bmx, in the same model. Tec is abundantly expressed in cardiac myocytes and assumes a diffuse intracellular localization under basal conditions but is recruited to striated structures upon various stimuli, including ATP. To characterize Tec signaling targets in vivo, we performed an exhaustive proteomic analysis of Tec-binding partners. These experiments expand the role of the Tec family in the heart, identifying the Tec isoform as an ischemic injury-induced isoform, and map the subproteome of its interactors in isolated cells.

  17. Cloning and expression of a widely expressed receptor tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; D'Eustachio, P; Givol, D

    1990-01-01

    and Bmp-2a loci. The corresponding mRNA (3.0 kilobases) is expressed in most murine tissues and most abundantly expressed in brain and kidney. Antibodies against a synthetic peptide of R-PTP-alpha identified a 130-kDa protein in cells transfected with the R-PTP-alpha cDNA.......We describe the identification of a widely expressed receptor-type (transmembrane) protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase; EC 3.1.3.48). Screening of a mouse brain cDNA library under low-stringency conditions with a probe encompassing the intracellular (phosphatase) domain of the CD45 lymphocyte...... antigen yielded cDNA clones coding for a 794-amino acid transmembrane protein [hereafter referred to as receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (R-PTP-alpha)] with an intracellular domain displaying clear homology to the catalytic domains of CD45 and LAR (45% and 53%, respectively). The 142-amino acid...

  18. Bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured osteoblasts contains tyrosine sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecarot-Charrier, B.; Bouchard, F.; Delloye, C.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated mouse osteoblasts that retain their osteogenic activity in culture were incubated with [35S] sulfate. Two radiolabeled proteins, in addition to proteoglycans, were extracted from the calcified matrix of osteoblast cultures. All the sulfate label in both proteins was in the form of tyrosine sulfate as assessed by amino acid analysis and thin layer chromatography following alkaline hydrolysis. The elution behavior on DEAE-Sephacel of the major sulfated protein and the apparent Mr on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels were characteristic of bone sialoprotein II extracted from rat. This protein was shown to cross-react with an antiserum raised against bovine bone sialoprotein II, indicating that bone sialoprotein II synthesized by cultured mouse osteoblasts is a tyrosine-sulfated protein. The minor sulfated protein was tentatively identified as bone sialoprotein I or osteopontin based on its elution properties on DEAE-Sephacel and anomalous behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels similar to those reported for rat bone sialoprotein I

  19. Proteomic analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation during human liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutros Tarek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R causes a dramatic reprogramming of cell metabolism during liver transplantation and can be linked to an alteration of the phosphorylation level of several cellular proteins. Over the past two decades, it became clear that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a pivotal role in a variety of important signalling pathways and was linked to a wide spectrum of diseases. Functional profiling of the tyrosine phosphoproteome during liver transplantation is therefore of great biological significance and is likely to lead to the identification of novel targets for drug discovery and provide a basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Results Using liver biopsies collected during the early phases of organ procurement and transplantation, we aimed at characterizing the global patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation during hepatic I/R. A proteomic approach, based on the purification of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins followed by their identification using mass spectrometry, allowed us to identify Nck-1, a SH2/SH3 adaptor, as a potential regulator of I/R injury. Using immunoblot, cell fractionation and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that Nck-1 phosphorylation, expression and localization were affected in liver tissue upon I/R. In addition, mass spectrometry identification of Nck-1 binding partners during the course of the transplantation also suggested a dynamic interaction between Nck-1 and actin during I/R. Conclusion Taken together, our data suggest that Nck-1 may play a role in I/R-induced actin reorganization, which was previously reported to be detrimental for the hepatocytes of the transplanted graft. Nck-1 could therefore represent a target of choice for the design of new organ preservation strategies, which could consequently help to reduce post-reperfusion liver damages and improve transplantation outcomes.

  20. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. (Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (USA))

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  2. Handling of Solid Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Bermudez, Clara Ines

    1999-01-01

    The topic of solid residues is specifically of great interest and concern for the authorities, institutions and community that identify in them a true threat against the human health and the atmosphere in the related with the aesthetic deterioration of the urban centers and of the natural landscape; in the proliferation of vectorial transmitters of illnesses and the effect on the biodiversity. Inside the wide spectrum of topics that they keep relationship with the environmental protection, the inadequate handling of solid residues and residues dangerous squatter an important line in the definition of political and practical environmentally sustainable. The industrial development and the population's growth have originated a continuous increase in the production of solid residues; of equal it forms, their composition day after day is more heterogeneous. The base for the good handling includes the appropriate intervention of the different stages of an integral administration of residues, which include the separation in the source, the gathering, the handling, the use, treatment, final disposition and the institutional organization of the administration. The topic of the dangerous residues generates more expectation. These residues understand from those of pathogen type that are generated in the establishments of health that of hospital attention, until those of combustible, inflammable type, explosive, radio-active, volatile, corrosive, reagent or toxic, associated to numerous industrial processes, common in our countries in development

  3. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  4. [Residual neuromuscular blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Buder, T; Schmartz, D

    2017-06-01

    Even small degrees of residual neuromuscular blockade, i. e. a train-of-four (TOF) ratio >0.6, may lead to clinically relevant consequences for the patient. Especially upper airway integrity and the ability to swallow may still be markedly impaired. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that residual neuromuscular blockade may affect postoperative outcome of patients. The incidence of these small degrees of residual blockade is relatively high and may persist for more than 90 min after a single intubating dose of an intermediately acting neuromuscular blocking agent, such as rocuronium and atracurium. Both neuromuscular monitoring and pharmacological reversal are key elements for the prevention of postoperative residual blockade.

  5. TENORM: Wastewater Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and wastes which have been discharged into municipal sewers are treated at wastewater treatment plants. These may contain trace amounts of both man-made and naturally occurring radionuclides which can accumulate in the treatment plant and residuals.

  6. Residuation in orthomodular lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chajda Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We show that every idempotent weakly divisible residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law can be transformed into an orthomodular lattice. The converse holds if adjointness is replaced by conditional adjointness. Moreover, we show that every positive right residuated lattice satisfying the double negation law and two further simple identities can be converted into an orthomodular lattice. In this case, also the converse statement is true and the corresponence is nearly one-to-one.

  7. Toxoplasma growth in vitro is dependent on exogenous tyrosine and is independent of AAH2 even in tyrosine-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Nicole D; Boothroyd, John C

    2017-05-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite capable of infecting virtually all nucleated cell types in almost all warm-blooded animals. Interestingly, Toxoplasma has a relatively full repertoire of amino acid biosynthetic machinery, perhaps reflecting its broad host range and, consequently, its need to adapt to a wide array of amino acid resources. Although Toxoplasma has been shown to be auxotrophic for tryptophan and arginine, it has not previously been determined if Toxoplasma is also auxotrophic for tyrosine. Toxoplasma tachyzoites and bradyzoites were recently found to express an amino acid hydroxylase (AAH2) that is capable of synthesizing tyrosine and dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) from phenylalanine; however, the role of AAH2 in tachyzoite and bradyzoite infection has not yet been identified. To determine if Toxoplasma requires exogenous tyrosine for growth, we performed growth assays on tachyzoites and bradyzoites in nutrient-rich media titrated with varying amounts of tyrosine. We found that Toxoplasma tachyzoites form significantly smaller plaques in tyrosine-limiting media in a dose-dependent manner and that this phenotype is not affected by deletion of TgAAH2. To determine if bradyzoites require exogenous tyrosine for growth, we induced differentiation from tachyzoites in vitro in tyrosine-limiting media and found that replication and vacuole number are all decreased in tyrosine-deficient media. Importantly, culture of confluent human fibroblasts in tyrosine-deficient media does not affect their viability, indicating that, at least in vitro, the need for tyrosine is at the level of Toxoplasma, not the host cell supporting its growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Hospital Residuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Meza, A.; Bonilla Jimenez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the characterization of the solid residuals. A description of the handling of the liquid and gassy waste generated in hospitals is also given, identifying the source where they originate. To achieve the proposed objective the work was divided in three stages: The first one was the planning and the coordination with each hospital center, in this way, to determine the schedule of gathering of the waste can be possible. In the second stage a fieldwork was made; it consisted in gathering the quantitative and qualitative information of the general state of the handling of residuals. In the third and last stage, the information previously obtained was organized to express the results as the production rate per day by bed, generation of solid residuals for sampled services, type of solid residuals and density of the same ones. With the obtained results, approaches are settled down to either determine design parameters for final disposition whether for incineration, trituration, sanitary filler or recycling of some materials, and storage politics of the solid residuals that allow to determine the gathering frequency. The study concludes that it is necessary to improve the conditions of the residuals handling in some aspects, to provide the cleaning personnel of the equipment for gathering disposition and of security, minimum to carry out this work efficiently, and to maintain a control of all the dangerous waste, like sharp or polluted materials. In this way, an appreciable reduction is guaranteed in the impact on the atmosphere. (Author) [es

  9. Novel Mixed-Type Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B. Kinetic and Computational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jazmín Sarabia-Sánchez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlas of Diabetes reports 415 million diabetics in the world, a number that has surpassed in half the expected time the twenty year projection. Type 2 diabetes is the most frequent form of the disease; it is characterized by a defect in the secretion of insulin and a resistance in its target organs. In the search for new antidiabetic drugs, one of the principal strategies consists in promoting the action of insulin. In this sense, attention has been centered in the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, a protein whose overexpression or increase of its activity has been related in many studies with insulin resistance. In the present work, a chemical library of 250 compounds was evaluated to determine their inhibition capability on the protein PTP1B. Ten molecules inhibited over the 50% of the activity of the PTP1B, the three most potent molecules were selected for its characterization, reporting Ki values of 5.2, 4.2 and 41.3 µM, for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Docking and molecular dynamics studies revealed that the three inhibitors made interactions with residues at the secondary binding site to phosphate, exclusive for PTP1B. The data reported here support these compounds as hits for the design more potent and selective inhibitors against PTP1B in the search of new antidiabetic treatment.

  10. Rapid phospho-turnover by receptor tyrosine kinases impacts downstream signaling and drug binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Laura B; Maiwald, Thomas; Conzelmann, Holger; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2011-09-02

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (ErbB1-4) are oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) that regulate diverse cellular processes. In this study, we combine measurement and mathematical modeling to quantify phospho-turnover at ErbB receptors in human cells and to determine the consequences for signaling and drug binding. We find that phosphotyrosine residues on ErbB1 have half-lives of a few seconds and therefore turn over 100-1000 times in the course of a typical immediate-early response to ligand. Rapid phospho-turnover is also observed for EGF-activated ErbB2 and ErbB3, unrelated RTKs, and multiple intracellular adaptor proteins and signaling kinases. Thus, the complexes formed on the cytoplasmic tail of active receptors and the downstream signaling kinases they control are highly dynamic and antagonized by potent phosphatases. We develop a kinetic scheme for binding of anti-ErbB1 drugs to receptors and show that rapid phospho-turnover significantly impacts their mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and casein as substrates for 124-v-Mos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stabel Silvia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mos proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic serine/threonine-specific protein kinase with crucial function during meiotic cell division in vertebrates. Based on oncogenic amino acid substitutions the viral derivative, 124-v-Mos, displays constitutive protein kinase activity and functions independent of unknown upstream effectors of mos protein kinase. We have utilized this property of 124-v-Mos and screened for novel mos substrates in immunocomplex kinase assays in vitro. Results We generated recombinant 124-v-Mos using the baculovirus expression system in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and demonstrated constitutive kinase activity by the ability of 124-v-Mos to auto-phosphorylate and to phosphorylate vimentin, a known substrate of c-Mos. Using this approach we analyzed a panel of acidic and basic substrates in immunocomplex protein kinase assays and identified novel in vitro substrates for 124-v-Mos, the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B, alpha-casein and beta-casein. We controlled mos-specific phosphorylation of PTP1B and casein in comparative assays using a synthetic kinase-inactive 124-v-Mos mutant and further, tryptic digests of mos-phosphorylated beta-casein identified a phosphopeptide specifically targeted by wild-type 124-v-Mos. Two-dimensional phosphoamino acid analyses showed that 124-v-mos targets serine and threonine residues for phosphorylation in casein at a 1:1 ratio but auto-phosphorylation occurs predominantly on serine residues. Conclusion The mos substrates identified in this study represent a basis to approach the identification of the mos-consensus phosphorylation motif, important for the development of specific inhibitors of the Mos protein kinase.

  12. Detection of Sequence-Specific Tyrosine Nitration of Manganese SOD and SERCA in Cardiovascular Disease and Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shanqin; Ying, Jia; Jiang, Bingbing; Guo, Wei; Adachi, Takeshi; Sharov, Victor; Lazar, Harold; Menzoian, James; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Schoneich, Christian; Cohen, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Nitration of protein tyrosine residues (nY) is a marker of oxidative stress and may alter the biological activity of the modified proteins. The aim of this study was to develop antibodies towards site-specific nY-modified proteins and to use histochemical and immunoblotting to demonstrate protein nitration in tissues. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies towards peptides with known nY sites in MnSOD nY-34 and of two adjacent nY in the sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2 di-nY-294,295) were developed. Kidneys from rats infused with angiotensin II with known MnSOD nY and aorta from atherosclerotic rabbits and aging rat skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum with known SERCA di-nY were used for positive controls. Staining for MnSOD nY-34 was most intense in distal renal tubules and collecting ducts. Staining of atherosclerotic aorta for SERCA2 di-nY was most intense in atherosclerotic plaques. Aging rat skeletal muscle and atherosclerotic aorta and cardiac atrium from human diabetic patients also stained positively. Staining was decreased by sodium dithionite that chemically reduces nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, and the antigenic nY-peptide blocked staining for each respective nY site, but not for the other. As previously demonstrated, immunoblotting failed to detect these modified proteins in whole tissue lysates, but did when the proteins were concentrated. Immunohistochemical staining for specific nY-modified tyrosine residues offers the ability to assess the effects of oxidant stress associated with pathological conditions on individual proteins whose function may be affected in specific tissue sites.

  13. Conversion of recombinant hirudin to the natural form by in vitro tyrosine sulfation. Differential substrate specificities of leech and bovine tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehrs, C; Huttner, W B; Carvallo, D; Degryse, E

    1990-06-05

    Hirudin, a tyrosine-sulfated protein secreted by the leech Hirudo medicinalis, is one of the most potent anticoagulants known. The hirudin cDNA has previously been cloned and has been expressed in yeast, but the resulting recombinant protein was found to be produced in the unsulfated form, which is known to have an at least 10 times lower affinity for thrombin than the naturally occurring tyrosine-sulfated hirudin. Here we describe the in vitro tyrosine sulfation of recombinant hirudin by leech and bovine tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). With both enzymes, in vitro sulfation of recombinant hirudin occurred at the physiological site (Tyr-63) and rendered the protein biochemically and biologically indistinguishable from natural hirudin. However, leech TPST had an over 20-fold lower apparent Km value for recombinant hirudin than bovine TPST. Further differences in the catalytic properties of leech and bovine TPSTs were observed when synthetic peptides were tested as substrates. Moreover, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the 9 carboxyl-terminal residues of hirudin (which include Tyr-63) was sulfated by leech TPST with a similar apparent Km value as full length hirudin, indicating that structural determinants residing in the immediate vicinity of Tyr-63 are sufficient for sulfation to occur.

  14. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Induces Platelet/Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells through a PP2-Inhibitable Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Huang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a low-molecular-weight phospholipid derivative released by activated platelets. S1P transduces signals through a family of G protein-coupled receptors to modulate various physiological behaviors of endothelial cells. Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; CD31 is a 130-kDa protein expressed on the surfaces of leukocytes, platelets, and endothelial cells. Upon PECAM-1 activation, its cytoplasmic tyrosine residues become phosphorylated and bind with SH2 domain-containing proteins, thus leading to the downstream functions mediated by PECAM-1. In the present study, we found that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. The pretreatment of BAECs with a series of chemical inhibitors to determine the signaling pathway showed that the PECAM-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by PP2, indicating the participation of Src family kinases. These results demonstrated that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in BAECs through mediation of Src family kinases, and this may regulate the physiological behaviors of endothelial cells.

  15. Tyrosine-rich crystals associated with oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilcrease, M Z; Nelson, F S; Guzman-Paz, M

    1998-07-01

    Crystalloids have been identified ultrastructurally within the epithelial cells of Warthin's tumors, but there have been no studies characterizing crystals or crystalloids in Warthin's tumors by light microscopy. The finding of abundant needle-shaped crystals in a fine-needle aspirate of a cystadenoma of the parotid prompted us to examine the prevalence of crystals and crystalloids in oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms. Ninety-seven oncocytic neoplasms (93 Warthin's tumors, 3 cystadenomas, and 1 oncocytoma) excised at our institution between 1950 and 1996 were examined, to identify crystals. Neoplasms with crystals were further characterized by means of a variety of histochemical stains and electron microscopy. Ninety-nine pleomorphic adenomas were similarly reviewed. Seven cases with crystals were identified. Five of these were Warthin's tumors, 1 was a cystadenoma, and 1 was an oncocytoma. The crystals were noted within tumor cysts but were not limited to the neoplasms. The crystals were predominantly either needle-shaped or tabular, but some cases contained mixtures of both as well as intermediate forms. They stained pink with hematoxylin-eosin, although the tabular forms also exhibited a focal yellow hue. The crystals were not discernible under polarized light. They stained a red-brown color with Millon's reagent, which indicated the presence of tyrosine. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff stain with diastase, alcian blue (pH 2.5), and Congo red stains were negative. Electron microscopy revealed sharply defined, elongate, electron-dense structures with periodicity, both extracellular and within epithelial cells. No crystals or crystalloids were identified in any of 99 pleomorphic adenomas reviewed. The findings indicate that tyrosine-rich crystals associated with several oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms are morphologically, histochemically, and ultrastructurally distinct from previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids and collagenous crystalloids of

  16. Genomic organization of Bruton`s tyrosine kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, J.; Conley, M.E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Bruton`s tyrosine kinase (Btk), is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that has been identified as the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). XLA patients have profound hypogammaglobulinemia and markedly reduced numbers of B cells while their T cell and phagocyte numbers remain normal. To determine the genomic organization of Btk, intron/exon borders were identified by sequencing cosmid DNA using cDNA primers. Nineteen exons spanning 37 kb of genomic DNA were identified. All the intron/exon splice junctions followed the GT/AG rule. The translational ATG start codon was in exon 2 which was 6 kb downstream of exon 1. Exon 19, 519 bp in length and 3.8 kb distal to exon 18, was the largest exon and included the 450 bp of the 3{prime} untranslated region. Exons 6 through 18 formed the largest cluster of exons with no intron being longer than 1550 bp. There was no apparent correlation between the exon boundaries of Btk and the functional domains of the protein or the exon boundaries of src, the nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase prototype. The region 500 bp upstream of the presumed transcriptional start site was sequenced and found to have a G+C content of 52%. No TATA-type promoter elements in the -20 bp to -30 bp region were identified. However, at position -48 bp, a TGTGAA motif was found that bears some similarity to the TATA box. This sequence was preceded by a perfect inverted CCAAT box at position -90 bp. Three retinoic acid binding sites were also identified at positions -50 bp, -83 bp and -197 bp. Defining the genomic structure of Btk will permit us to identify regulatory elements in this gene and to identify mutations in genomic DNA of patients with XLA.

  17. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  18. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  19. Management of NORM Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA attaches great importance to the dissemination of information that can assist Member States in the development, implementation, maintenance and continuous improvement of systems, programmes and activities that support the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear applications, and that address the legacy of past practices and accidents. However, radioactive residues are found not only in nuclear fuel cycle activities, but also in a range of other industrial activities, including: - Mining and milling of metalliferous and non-metallic ores; - Production of non-nuclear fuels, including coal, oil and gas; - Extraction and purification of water (e.g. in the generation of geothermal energy, as drinking and industrial process water; in paper and pulp manufacturing processes); - Production of industrial minerals, including phosphate, clay and building materials; - Use of radionuclides, such as thorium, for properties other than their radioactivity. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) may lead to exposures at some stage of these processes and in the use or reuse of products, residues or wastes. Several IAEA publications address NORM issues with a special focus on some of the more relevant industrial operations. This publication attempts to provide guidance on managing residues arising from different NORM type industries, and on pertinent residue management strategies and technologies, to help Member States gain perspectives on the management of NORM residues

  20. Annatto seed residue (Bixa orellana L.: nutritional quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Alessandra Valério

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering that annatto seeds are rich in protein, the present work aimed to evaluate the biological quality of this nutrient in the meal residue originating from annatto seed processing. We determined the general composition, mineral levels, amino acid composition and chemical scores, antinutritional factors, and protein quality using biological assays. The following values were obtained: 11.50% protein, 6.74% moisture, 5.22% ash, 2.22% lipids, 42.19% total carbohydrates and 28.45% fiber. The residue proved to be a food rich in fiber and also a protein source. Antinutritional factors were not detected. The most abundant amino acids were lysine, phenylalanine + tyrosine, leucine and isoleucine. Valine was the most limiting amino acid (chemical score 0.22. The protein quality of the seed residue and the isolated protein showed no significant differences. The biological value was lower than that of the control protein but higher than that found in other vegetables. Among the biochemical analyses, only creatinine level was decreased in the two test groups compared to the control group. Enzyme tests did not indicate liver toxicity. The results showed favorable aspects for the use of annatto seed residue in the human diet, meriting further research.

  1. Phenylalanine as substrate for tyrosine hydroxylase in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukami, M H; Haavik, J; Flatmark, T

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of bovine chromaffin cells with L-[14C]phenylalanine resulted in label accumulation in catecholamines at about 30% of the rate seen with L-tyrosine as precursor. Studies with purified tyrosine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.16.2) showed that the enzyme catalysed the hydroxylation of L-phenylalanine first to L-p-tyrosine and then to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). No evidence for a significant involvement of an L-m-tyrosine intermediate in DOPA formation was found.

  2. Food for thought: association between dietary tyrosine and cognitive performance in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Simone; Düzel, Sandra; Colzato, Lorenza; Norman, Kristina; Gallinat, Jürgen; Brandmaier, Andreas M; Lindenberger, Ulman; Widaman, Keith F

    2017-12-18

    The fact that tyrosine increases dopamine availability that, in turn, may enhance cognitive performance has led to numerous studies on healthy young participants taking tyrosine as a food supplement. As a result of this dietary intervention, participants show performance increases in working memory and executive functions. However, the potential association between habitual dietary tyrosine intake and cognitive performance has not been investigated to date. The present study aims at clarifying the association of episodic memory (EM), working memory (WM) and fluid intelligence (Gf), and tyrosine intake in younger and older adults. To this end, we acquired habitual tyrosine intake (food frequency questionnaire) from 1724 participants of the Berlin Aging Study II (1383 older adults, 341 younger adults) and modelled its relations to cognitive performance assessed in a broad battery of cognitive tasks using structural equation modeling. We observed a significant association between tyrosine intake and the latent factor capturing WM, Gf, and EM in the younger and the older sample. Due to partial strong factorial invariance between age groups for a confirmatory factor analysis on cognitive performance, we were able to compare the relationship between tyrosine and cognition between age groups and found no difference. Above and beyond previous studies on tyrosine food supplementation the present result extend this to a cross-sectional association between habitual tyrosine intake levels in daily nutrition and cognitive performance (WM, Gf, and EM). This corroborates nutritional recommendations that are thus far derived from single-dose administration studies.

  3. Organization and evolution of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.R.; Coker, G.T. III; O'Malley, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the organization of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene and compares its structure with the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Both genes are single copy and contain 13 exons separated by 12 introns. Remarkably, the positions of 10 out 12 intron/exon boundaries are identical for the two genes. These results support the idea that these hydroxylases genes are members of a gene family which has a common evolutionary origin. The authors predict that this ancestral gene would have encoded exons similar to those of TH prior to evolutionary drift to other members of this gene family

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, Jerald P; Mauro, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of new cases of leukemia. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to a reduction in mortalities. Thus, the estimated prevalence of CML is increasing. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the European Leukemia Net guidelines incorporate frequent molecular monitoring of the fusion BCR-ABL transcript to ensure that patients reach and keep treatment milestones. Most patients with CML are diagnosed in the chronic phase, and approximately 10% to 30% of these patients will at some time in their course meet definition criteria of resistance to imatinib. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib, ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111.

  6. Second-generation inhibitors of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Christina; Tsui, Stella T; Liu, Delong

    2016-09-02

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical effector molecule for B cell development and plays a major role in lymphoma genesis. Ibrutinib is the first-generation BTK inhibitor. Ibrutinib has off-target effects on EGFR, ITK, and Tec family kinases, which explains the untoward effects of ibrutinib. Resistance to ibrutinib was also reported. The C481S mutation in the BTK kinase domain was reported to be a major mechanism of resistance to ibrutinib. This review summarizes the clinical development of novel BTK inhibitors, ACP-196 (acalabrutinib), ONO/GS-4059, and BGB-3111.

  7. Residual-stress measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeilo, A.N.; Webster, G.A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Webster, P.J. [Salford Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Because neutrons can penetrate distances of up to 50 mm in most engineering materials, this makes them unique for establishing residual-stress distributions non-destructively. D1A is particularly suited for through-surface measurements as it does not suffer from instrumental surface aberrations commonly found on multidetector instruments, while D20 is best for fast internal-strain scanning. Two examples for residual-stress measurements in a shot-peened material, and in a weld are presented to demonstrate the attractive features of both instruments. (author).

  8. Catabolism of L-tyrosine in Trichosporon cutaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparnins, V L; Burbee, D G; Dagley, S

    1979-01-01

    Protocatechuic acid was a catabolite in the degradation of L-tyrosine by Trichosporon cutaneum. Intact cells oxidized to completion various compounds proposed as intermediates in this conversion, but they did not readily oxidize catabolites of the homogentisate and homoprotocatechuate metabolic pathways, which are known to function in other organisms. Cell extracts converted tyrosine first to 4-hydroxycinnamic acid and then to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. The proposed hydration product of 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, namely, beta-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-hydracrylic acid, was synthesized chemically, and its enzymatic degradation to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde was shown to be dependent upon additions of adenosine triphosphate and coenzyme A. The hydroxylase that attacked 4-hydroxybenzoate showed a specific requirement for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Protocatechuate, the product of this reaction, was oxidized by cell extracts supplemented with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or, less effectively, with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, but these extracts contained no ring fission dioxygenase for protocatechuate. Evidence is presented that the principal hydroxylation product of protocatechuate was hydroxyquinol, the benzene nucleus of which was cleaved oxidatively to give maleylacetic acid. PMID:571434

  9. Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Tyrosine-Derived Polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, N.; Laredo, E.; Bello, A.; Kohn, J.

    1996-03-01

    Tyrosine-derived polycarbonates represent a new family of polymers that were specifically designed for medical applications. In this work we have used Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) to study for the first time the dielectric relaxation behavior of a series of degradable tyrosine-derived polycarbonates. The test polymers differed only in the length of the pendent chain which was increased from two to eight carbons by the use of ethyl, butyl, hexyl and octyl esters as C-terminus protecting groups. The high temperature zone of the spectra shows the glass transition relaxation located at decreasing temperatures as the length of the pendent chain is increased. The low temperature spectrum exhibits a complex dielectric relaxation composed of 4 peaks. The relative intensities of these four peaks are sensitive to packing and entanglement effects caused by the variation in the length of the pendent chain. For data analysis, the Direct Signal Analysis (DSA) procedure was used. This procedure allows the precise determination of the relaxation parameters without having to use peak cleaning techniques. To analyze the whole spectra the Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence of the relaxation time was used for the glass transition relaxation, and the Arrhenius dependence for the remaining relaxations.

  10. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Renal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis can be induced in different renal diseases, but ultimately progresses to end stage renal disease. Although the pathophysiologic process of renal fibrosis have not been fully elucidated, it is characterized by glomerulosclerosis and/or tubular interstitial fibrosis, and is believed to be caused by the proliferation of renal inherent cells, including glomerular epithelial cells, mesangial cells, and endothelial cells, along with defective kidney repair, renal interstitial fibroblasts activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs regulate a variety of cell physiological processes, including metabolism, growth, differentiation, and survival. Many studies from in vitro and animal models have provided evidence that RTKs play important roles in the pathogenic process of renal fibrosis. It is also showed that tyrosine kinases inhibitors (TKIs have anti-fibrotic effects in basic research and clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the evidence for involvement of specific RTKs in renal fibrosis process and the employment of TKIs as a therapeutic approach for renal fibrosis.

  11. Tyrosine Sulfation as a Protein Post-Translational Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of inorganic sulfate into biological molecules plays an important role in biological systems and is directly involved in the instigation of diseases. Protein tyrosine sulfation (PTS is a common post-translational modification that was first reported in the literature fifty years ago. However, the significance of PTS under physiological conditions and its link to diseases have just begun to be appreciated in recent years. PTS is catalyzed by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST through transfer of an activated sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to tyrosine in a variety of proteins and peptides. Currently, only a small fraction of sulfated proteins is known and the understanding of the biological sulfation mechanisms is still in progress. In this review, we give an introductory and selective brief review of PTS and then summarize the basic biochemical information including the activity and the preparation of TPST, methods for the determination of PTS, and kinetics and reaction mechanism of TPST. This information is fundamental for the further exploration of the function of PTS that induces protein-protein interactions and the subsequent biochemical and physiological reactions.

  12. Dietary Tyrosine Protects Striatal Dopamine Receptors from the Adverse Effects of REM Sleep Deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, A; Brock, J W; Payne, S; Ross, K D; Bond, S P; Prasad, C

    1998-01-01

    L-Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid that is produced as an intermediary metabolite in the conversion of phenylalanine to 3,4-dihyroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and is a precursor of the neurotransmitter dopamine. In previous studies, tyrosine pretreatment was shown to protect against the neurochemical and behavioral deficits of acute stress caused by tail shock or cold exposure in rodents. The present study addressed the hypothesis that tyrosine administration may be an effective counter-measure to dopamine-mediated behaviors induced by rapid eye-movement sleep deprivation (RSD). In order to test the hypothesis, Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 9 treatment groups: RSD-treated rats on normal-protein diet (20% casein: 1% tyrosine, 1% valine); tank control (TC) rats on a normal diet; cage control (CC) rats on normal diet; RSD-treated rats on 4% tyrosine diet; TC rats on 4% tyrosine diet; CC rats on 4% tyrosine diet; RSD-treated rats on 4% valine diet; TC rats on 4% valine diet; CC rats on 4% valine diet. In the RSD group receiving tyrosine, there was no apparent change in Bmax for binding of the dopamine D2 receptor ligand [(3)H]YM-09151-2 in the striata as compared to the respective TC and CC groups; whereas RSD-treated rats maintained on the normal diet and valine supplementation demonstrated expected increases in Bmax for ligand binding. The TC group on the tyrosine diet showed attenuated catalepsy compared to the corresponding CC group, while the RSD group consuming tyrosine showed a catalepsy that was significantly increased, and similar to that of cage control animais on a control diet. These data suggest that the tyrosine-supplemented diet significantly attenuated RSD-induced changes in striatal dopamine D2 receptors, and the effect appeared sufficient to influence RSD-induced behaviors.

  13. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-27

    This report compared the composition of samples from Wesseling and Leuna. In each case the sample was a residue from carbonization of the residues from hydrogenation of the brown coal processed at the plant. The composition was given in terms of volatile components, fixed carbon, ash, water, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, volatile sulfur, and total sulfur. The result of carbonization was given in terms of (ash and) coke, tar, water, gas and losses, and bitumen. The composition of the ash was given in terms of silicon dioxide, ferric oxide, aluminum oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, potassium and sodium oxides, sulfur trioxide, phosphorus pentoxide, chlorine, and titanium oxide. The most important difference between the properties of the two samples was that the residue from Wesseling only contained 4% oil, whereas that from Leuna had about 26% oil. Taking into account the total amount of residue processed yearly, the report noted that better carbonization at Leuna could save 20,000 metric tons/year of oil. Some other comparisons of data included about 33% volatiles at Leuna vs. about 22% at Wesseling, about 5 1/2% sulfur at Leuna vs. about 6 1/2% at Leuna, but about 57% ash for both. Composition of the ash differed quite a bit between the two. 1 table.

  14. Designing with residual materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, W.; Wever, R.; Blom, E.; Addink-Dölle, L.; Tempelman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Many entrepreneurial businesses have attempted to create value based on the residual material streams of third parties. Based on ‘waste’ materials they designed products, around which they built their company. Such activities have the potential to yield sustainable products. Many of such companies

  15. Contaminant interferences with SIMS analyses of microparticle impactor residues on LDEF surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, C.G.; Batchelor, D.; Griffis, D.P.; Hunter, J.L.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D.A.; Wortman, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental analyses of impactor residues on high purity surface exposed to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment for 5.8 years on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has revealed several probable sources for microparticles at this altitude, including natural micrometeorites and manmade debris ranging from paint pigments to bits of stainless steel. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences included pre-, post-, and in-flight deposited particulate surface contaminants, as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminants traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF and proximity to active electrical fields. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants included urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal blankets

  16. Slipping processes in residual badlands reliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Hernández, Jose Luis; Yepes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    this process. Pseudo-stalactites are normally found as vertical, but occasionally they lean, indicating movement of unstable blocks. The process can present recycling when some of the forms described become detached and fall. This is more likely on poorly sheltered surfaces, exposed to wind and the direct impact of rain and frost. All forms of slips suggests that these morphologies depend on the varying characteristics of the colloidal suspensions causing them, and constitute intermediate stages in the retention of sediments from erosion, which are very different to the alluvial sediments stored in the drainage network.

  17. State-by-State Investigation of Destructive Interference in Resonance Raman Spectra of Neutral Tyrosine and the Tyrosinate Anion with the Simplified Sum-over-States Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cabalo, Jerry B.; Saikin, Semion K.; Emmons, Erik D.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    UV resonance Raman scattering is uniquely sensitive to the molecular electronic structure as well as intermolecular interactions. To better understand the relationship between electronic structure and resonance Raman cross section, we carried out combined experimental and theoretical studies of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. We studied the Raman cross sections of four vibrational modes as a function of excitation wavelength, and we analyzed them in terms of the contributions of th...

  18. Unlocking Doors without Keys: Activation of Src by Truncated C-terminal Intracellular Receptor Tyrosine Kinases Lacking Tyrosine Kinase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Mezquita

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the best examples of the renaissance of Src as an open door to cancer has been the demonstration that just five min of Src activation is sufficient for transformation and also for induction and maintenance of cancer stem cells [1]. Many tyrosine kinase receptors, through the binding of their ligands, become the keys that unlock the structure of Src and activate its oncogenic transduction pathways. Furthermore, intracellular isoforms of these receptors, devoid of any tyrosine kinase activity, still retain the ability to unlock Src. This has been shown with a truncated isoform of KIT (tr-KIT and a truncated isoform of VEGFR-1 (i21-VEGFR-1, which are intracellular and require no ligand binding, but are nonetheless able to activate Src and induce cell migration and invasion of cancer cells. Expression of the i21-VEGFR-1 is upregulated by the Notch signaling pathway and repressed by miR-200c and retinoic acid in breast cancer cells. Both Notch inhibitors and retinoic acid have been proposed as potential therapies for invasive breast cancer.

  19. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators of this sign...

  20. Peptide Microarray Analysis of the Cross-talk Between O-GlcNAcylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Jie; Tomašič, Tihomir; Sharif, Suhela; Brouwer, Arwin J; Anderluh, Marko; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Pieters, Roland J

    2017-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation of proteins regulates important cellular processes. A few reports noted that O-GlcNAcylation exhibits cross-talk with tyrosine phosphorylation. With an activity-based microarray analysis of 256 tyrosine kinase peptide substrates, we found that phosphorylation of 6 peptides by Jak2

  1. The Relationship among Tyrosine Decarboxylase and Agmatine Deiminase Pathways in Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Perez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterococci are considered mainly responsible for the undesirable accumulation of the biogenic amines tyramine and putrescine in cheeses. The biosynthesis of tyramine and putrescine has been described as a species trait in Enterococcus faecalis. Tyramine is formed by the decarboxylation of the amino acid tyrosine, by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC route encoded in the tdc cluster. Putrescine is formed from agmatine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway encoded in the agdi cluster. These biosynthesis routes have been independently studied, tyrosine and agmatine transcriptionally regulate the tdc and agdi clusters. The objective of the present work is to study the possible co-regulation among TDC and AGDI pathways in E. faecalis. In the presence of agmatine, a positive correlation between putrescine biosynthesis and the tyrosine concentration was found. Transcriptome studies showed that tyrosine induces the transcription of putrescine biosynthesis genes and up-regulates pathways involved in cell growth. The tyrosine modulation over AGDI route was not observed in the mutant Δtdc strain. Fluorescence analyses using gfp as reporter protein revealed PaguB (the promoter of agdi catabolic genes was induced by tyrosine in the wild-type but not in the mutant strain, confirming that tdc cluster was involved in the tyrosine induction of putrescine biosynthesis. This study also suggests that AguR (the transcriptional regulator of agdi was implicated in interaction among the two clusters.

  2. Bosutinib induced pleural effusions: Case report and review of tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia I. Moguillansky, MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are known to cause pulmonary complications. We report a case of bosutinib related bilateral pleural effusions in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia. Characteristics of the pleural fluid are presented. We also discuss other tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicities, including pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease.

  3. From immune response to cancer : a spot on the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, A. C. S.; Azoubel, S.; Queiroz, K. C. S.; Peppelenbosch, M. P.; Ferreira, C. V.

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation is a key posttranslational regulatory modification of proteins in all eukaryotic cells in normal and pathological processes. Recently a pivotal janus-faced biological role of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) has become clear. On the

  4. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Macek, B

    2006-01-01

    by kinase YwqD and phosphatase YwqE. Phosphorylation of B.subtilis SSB increased binding almost 200-fold to single-stranded DNA in vitro. Tyrosine phosphorylation of B.subtilis, S.coelicolor and Escherichia coli SSBs occured while they were expressed in E.coli, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation...

  5. Phosphotyrosine enrichment identifies focal adhesion kinase and other tyrosine kinases for targeting in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, K; Maier, C S; Helfand, S C

    2012-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is an endothelial cell malignancy driven, in part, by activating mutations in receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases. Proteomics, Western blots and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor were used to elucidate activating mechanisms in HSA cell lines. Phosphotyrosine peptides from focal adhesion kinase (FAK) STAT3, Lyn, Fyn and other signal transduction kinases were identified by mass spectrometry. FAK was constitutively activated at tyrosine 397, the autophosphorylation site, and this was reversible with high concentrations of a FAK inhibitor. FAK inhibitor-14 suppressed migration and phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397 and tyrosines 576/577 and was cytotoxic to HSA cells suggesting FAK signalling may be an important contributor to canine HSA survival. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Loss of Function Studies in Mice and Genetic Association Link Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase a to Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takahashi, Nagahide; Nielsen, Karin Sandager; Aleksic, Branko

    2011-01-01

    Solid evidence links schizophrenia (SZ) susceptibility to neurodevelopmental processes involving tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling. Mouse studies implicate the Ptpra gene, encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPa, in the control of radial neuronal migration, cortical cytoarchitecture...

  7. Residual stresses in material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaczek, K. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Hubbard, C. R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then addresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  8. SRC Residual fuel oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  9. Translation of tyrosine hydroxylase from poly(A)-mRNA in pheochromocytoma cells is enhanced by dexamethasone.

    OpenAIRE

    Baetge, E E; Kaplan, B B; Reis, D J; Joh, T H

    1981-01-01

    Polysomal poly(A)-mRNA was purified from a clonal cell line of rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) and translated in a reticulocyte cell-free protein-synthesizing system. Tyrosine hydroxylase [tyrosine 3-monooxygenase; L-tyrosine, tetrahyropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2] was isolated from other protein by immunoprecipitation and NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight and relative proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase to other proteins synthesi...

  10. Composition of carbonization residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1943-11-30

    This report gave a record of the composition of several samples of residues from carbonization of various hydrogenation residue from processing some type of coal or tar in the Bergius process. These included Silesian bituminous coal processed at 600 atm. with iron catalyst, in one case to produce gasoline and middle oil and in another case to produce heavy oil excess, Scholven coal processed at 250 atm. with tin oxalate and chlorine catalyst, Bruex tar processed in a 10-liter oven using iron catalyst, and a pitch mixture from Welheim processed in a 10-liter over using iron catalyst. The values gathered were compared with a few corresponding values estimated for Boehlen tar and Gelsenberg coal based on several assumptions outlined in the report. The data recorded included percentage of ash in the dry residue and percentage of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine, total sulfur, and volatile sulfur. The percentage of ash varied from 21.43% in the case of Bruex tar to 53.15% in the case of one of the Silesian coals. Percentage of carbon varied from 44.0% in the case of Scholven coal to 78.03% in the case of Bruex tar. Percentage of total sulfur varied from 2.28% for Bruex tar to a recorded 5.65% for one of the Silesian coals and an estimated 6% for Boehlen tar. 1 table.

  11. PTEN is a protein tyrosine phosphatase for IRS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuji; Wang, Junru; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Cross, Justin; Thompson, Craig; Rosen, Neal; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    The biological function of the PTEN tumor suppressor is mainly attributed to its lipid phosphatase activity. This study demonstrates that mammalian PTEN is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that selectively dephosphorylates insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1), a mediator of insulin and IGF signals. IGF signaling was defective in cells lacking NEDD4, a PTEN ubiquitin ligase, whereas AKT activation triggered by EGF or serum was unimpaired. Defective IGF signaling caused by NEDD4 deletion, including phosphorylation of IRS1 and AKT, was rescued by PTEN ablation. We demonstrate the nature of PTEN as an IRS1 phosphatase by direct biochemical analysis and cellular reconstitution, showing that NEDD4 supports insulin-mediated glucose metabolism and is required for the proliferation of IGF1 receptor-dependent but not EGF receptor-dependent tumor cells. Thus, PTEN is a protein phosphatase for IRS1, and its antagonism by NEDD4 promotes signaling by IGF and insulin.

  12. Effect of radiation on tyrosine and tetracycline in poultry meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachin, I.; Pavlov, A.; Lashev, L.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of gamma rays on tissue level changes of unbound tyrosine and tetracycline was examined in comparative trials with broiler chicken meat. White meat and dark meat samples were taken from the killed chicken and were frozen at -18 o C. The three experimental groups were gamma irradiated with doses of 1.0, 1.5 and 2 kGy. The contents of the unbound antibiotics were microbiologically tested on 24th hour and 45th day after irradiation using Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, respectively Bac. mycoides HB 2 as test organisms. It was found that on 25th hour after irradiation both antibiotics were not significantly changed compared to the controls. After 45 days of storage a tendency towards decreasing the antibiotic concentrations in both the white and dark meat had been detected. (author)

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Landscape in Lung Cancer: Therapeutical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Quintanal-Villalonga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease responsible for the most cases of cancer-related deaths. The majority of patients are clinically diagnosed at advanced stages, with a poor survival rate. For this reason, the identification of oncodrivers and novel biomarkers is decisive for the future clinical management of this pathology. The rise of high throughput technologies popularly referred to as “omics” has accelerated the discovery of new biomarkers and drivers for this pathology. Within them, tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs have proven to be of importance as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive tools and, due to their molecular nature, as therapeutic targets. Along this review, the role of TKRs in the different lung cancer histologies, research on improvement of anti-TKR therapy, and the current approaches to manage anti-TKR resistance will be discussed.

  14. The Receptor Tyrosine Kinase AXL in Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erinn B. Rankin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The AXL receptor tyrosine kinase (AXL has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Recent studies have revealed a central role of AXL signaling in tumor proliferation, survival, stem cell phenotype, metastasis, and resistance to cancer therapy. Moreover, AXL is expressed within cellular components of the tumor microenvironment where AXL signaling contributes to the immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotypes. A variety of AXL inhibitors have been developed and are efficacious in preclinical studies. These agents offer new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of advanced disease. Here we review the literature that has illuminated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which AXL signaling promotes tumor progression and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of AXL inhibition for cancer therapy.

  15. Design and Synthesis of Novel Macrocyclic Mer Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Stashko, Michael A; Nichols, James; Miley, Michael J; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Chen, Zhilong; Machius, Mischa; DeRyckere, Deborah; Wood, Edgar; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton; Kireev, Dmitri; Frye, Stephen V

    2016-12-08

    Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK) is aberrantly elevated in various tumor cells and has a normal anti-inflammatory role in the innate immune system. Inhibition of MerTK may provide dual effects against these MerTK-expressing tumors through reducing cancer cell survival and redirecting the innate immune response. Recently, we have designed novel and potent macrocyclic pyrrolopyrimidines as MerTK inhibitors using a structure-based approach. The most active macrocycles had an EC 50 below 40 nM in a cell-based MerTK phosphor-protein ELISA assay. The X-ray structure of macrocyclic analogue 3 complexed with MerTK was also resolved and demonstrated macrocycles binding in the ATP binding pocket of the MerTK protein as anticipated. In addition, the lead compound 16 (UNC3133) had a 1.6 h half-life and 16% oral bioavailability in a mouse PK study.

  16. Receptor tyrosine kinase structure and function in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg A. Karpov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are membrane proteins that control the flow of information through signal transduction pathways, impacting on different aspects of cell function. RTKs are characterized by a ligand-binding ectodomain, a single transmembrane α-helix, a cytosolic region comprising juxtamembrane and kinase domains followed by a flexible C-terminal tail. Somatic and germline RTK mutations can induce aberrant signal transduction to give rise to cardiovascular, developmental and oncogenic abnormalities. RTK overexpression occurs in certain cancers, correlating signal strength and disease incidence. Diverse RTK activation and signal transduction mechanisms are employed by cells during commitment to health or disease. Small molecule inhibitors are one means to target RTK function in disease initiation and progression. This review considers RTK structure, activation, and signal transduction and evaluates biological relevance to therapeutics and clinical outcomes.

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced immune thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital F. Barak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients has remarkably changed with the treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Currently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is considered mainly as a third line salvage therapy in cases of TKIs resistance or intolerance. Here we describe a patient with chronic phase CML who developed both resistance and late occurrence of s severe thrombocytopenia on first and second generation TKIs and eventually underwent HSCT. Although the mechanism of the myelosuppression is not fully understood, we showed for the first time the development of dose dependent platelet antibodies in the presence of TKIs, suggesting the possibility of TKIs induced thrombocytopenia. Our case emphasizes that late development of severe myelosuppression during imatinib treatment is probably an important indication for consideration of early HSCT.

  18. Conserved Molecular Mechanism of TyrA Dehydrogenase Substrate Specificity Underlying Alternative Tyrosine Biosynthetic Pathways in Plants and Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Schenck

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available L-Tyrosine (Tyr is an aromatic amino acid synthesized de novo in plants and microbes. In animals, Tyr must be obtained through their diet or synthesized from L-phenylalanine. In addition to protein synthesis, Tyr serves as the precursor of neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine and epinephrine in animals and of numerous plant natural products, which serve essential functions in both plants and humans (e.g., vitamin E and morphine. Tyr is synthesized via two alternative routes mediated by a TyrA family enzyme, prephenate, or arogenate dehydrogenase (PDH/TyrAp or ADH/TyrAa, typically found in microbes and plants, respectively. Although ADH activity is also found in some bacteria, the origin of arogenate-specific TyrAa enzymes is unknown. We recently identified an acidic Asp222 residue that confers ADH activity in plant TyrAs. In this study, structure-guided phylogenetic analyses identified bacterial homologs, closely-related to plant TyrAs, that also have an acidic 222 residue and ADH activity. A more distant archaeon TyrA that preferred PDH activity had a non-acidic Gln, whose substitution to Glu introduced ADH activity. These results indicate that the conserved molecular mechanism operated during the evolution of arogenate-specific TyrAa in both plants and microbes.

  19. Viscoelastic finite element analysis of residual stresses in porcelain-veneered zirconia dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Dhital, Sukirti; Zhivago, Paul; Kaizer, Marina R; Zhang, Yu

    2018-03-21

    The main problem of porcelain-veneered zirconia (PVZ) dental restorations is chipping and delamination of veneering porcelain owing to the development of deleterious residual stresses during the cooling phase of veneer firing. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of cooling rate, thermal contraction coefficient and elastic modulus on residual stresses developed in PVZ dental crowns using viscoelastic finite element methods (VFEM). A three-dimensional VFEM model has been developed to predict residual stresses in PVZ structures using ABAQUS finite element software and user subroutines. First, the newly established model was validated with experimentally measured residual stress profiles using Vickers indentation on flat PVZ specimens. An excellent agreement between the model prediction and experimental data was found. Then, the model was used to predict residual stresses in more complex anatomically-correct crown systems. Two PVZ crown systems with different thermal contraction coefficients and porcelain moduli were studied: VM9/Y-TZP and LAVA/Y-TZP. A sequential dual-step finite element analysis was performed: heat transfer analysis and viscoelastic stress analysis. Controlled and bench convection cooling rates were simulated by applying different convective heat transfer coefficients 1.7E-5 W/mm 2 °C (controlled cooling) and 0.6E-4 W/mm 2 °C (bench cooling) on the crown surfaces exposed to the air. Rigorous viscoelastic finite element analysis revealed that controlled cooling results in lower maximum stresses in both veneer and core layers for the two PVZ systems relative to bench cooling. Better compatibility of thermal contraction coefficients between porcelain and zirconia and a lower porcelain modulus reduce residual stresses in both layers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Growth hormone-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine 333 and/or 338 of the growth hormone receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1995-01-01

    Many signaling pathways initiated by ligands that activate receptor tyrosine kinases have been shown to involve the binding of SH2 domain-containing proteins to specific phosphorylated tyrosines in the receptor. Although the receptor for growth hormone (GH) does not contain intrinsic tyrosine...

  1. Spectroscopic analyses on interaction of o-Vanillin- D-Phenylalanine, o-Vanillin- L-Tyrosine and o-Vanillin- L-Levodopa Schiff Bases with bovine serum albumin (BSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingqun; Guo, Yuwei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhiqiu; Jin, Xudong; Cheng, Chunping; Li, Ying; Li, Kai

    2011-04-01

    In this work, three o-Vanillin Schiff Bases (o-VSB: o-Vanillin- D-Phenylalanine (o-VDP), o-Vanillin- L-Tyrosine (o-VLT) and o-Vanillin- L-Levodopa (o-VLL)) with alanine constituent were synthesized by direct reflux method in ethanol solution, and then were used to study the interaction to bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules by fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on the fluorescence quenching calculation, the bimolecular quenching constant ( Kq), apparent quenching constant ( Ksv), effective binding constant ( KA) and corresponding dissociation constant ( KD) as well as binding site number ( n) were obtained. In addition, the binding distance ( r) was also calculated according to Foster's non-radioactive energy transfer theory. The results show that these three o-VSB can efficiently bind to BSA molecules, but the binding array order is o-VDP-BSA > o-VLT-BSA > o-VLL-BSA. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that the o-VDP is more accessibility to tryptophan (Trp) residues of BSA molecules than to tyrosine (Tyr) residues. Nevertheless, the o-VLT and o-VLL are more accessibility to Tyr residues than to Trp residues.

  2. The conserved tyrosine residue 940 plays a key structural role in membrane interaction of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, Jiří; Roderová, Jana; Osičková, Adriana; Novák, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Fišer, Radovan; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 24 (2017), s. 1-14, č. článku 9330. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11851S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15089; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : PERTUSSIS CYAA * BENZODIAZEPINE-RECEPTOR * ESCHERICHIA-COLI Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: Ligand interaction analysis and optimisation of virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Bichenkova, Elena V; Bryce, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    Docking-based virtual screening is an established component of structure-based drug discovery. Nevertheless, scoring and ranking of computationally docked ligand libraries still suffer from many false positives. Identifying optimal docking parameters for a target protein prior to virtual screening can improve experimental hit rates. Here, we examine protocols for virtual screening against the important but challenging class of drug target, protein tyrosine phosphatases. In this study, common interaction features were identified from analysis of protein-ligand binding geometries of more than 50 complexed phosphatase crystal structures. It was found that two interactions were consistently formed across all phosphatase inhibitors: (1) a polar contact with the conserved arginine residue, and (2) at least one interaction with the P-loop backbone amide. In order to investigate the significance of these features on phosphatase-ligand binding, a series of seeded virtual screening experiments were conducted on three phosphatase enzymes, PTP1B, Cdc25b and IF2. It was observed that when the conserved arginine and P-loop amide interactions were used as pharmacophoric constraints during docking, enrichment of the virtual screen significantly increased in the three studied phosphatases, by up to a factor of two in some cases. Additionally, the use of such pharmacophoric constraints considerably improved the ability of docking to predict the inhibitor's bound pose, decreasing RMSD to the crystallographic geometry by 43% on average. Constrained docking improved enrichment of screens against both open and closed conformations of PTP1B. Incorporation of an ordered water molecule in PTP1B screening was also found to generally improve enrichment. The knowledge-based computational strategies explored here can potentially inform structure-based design of new phosphatase inhibitors using docking-based virtual screening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tyrosine Aminotransferase Contributes to Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Opium Poppy1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TyrAT) catalyzes the transamination of l-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, yielding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid and l-glutamate. The decarboxylation product of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, is a precursor to a large and diverse group of natural products known collectively as benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). We have isolated and characterized a TyrAT cDNA from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), which remains the only commercial source for several pharmaceutical BIAs, including codeine, morphine, and noscapine. TyrAT belongs to group I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes wherein Schiff base formation occurs between PLP and a specific Lys residue. The amino acid sequence of TyrAT showed considerable homology to other putative plant TyrATs, although few of these have been functionally characterized. Purified, recombinant TyrAT displayed a molecular mass of approximately 46 kD and a substrate preference for l-Tyr and α-ketoglutarate, with apparent Km values of 1.82 and 0.35 mm, respectively. No specific requirement for PLP was detected in vitro. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirmed the conversion of l-Tyr to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. TyrAT gene transcripts were most abundant in roots and stems of mature opium poppy plants. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to evaluate the contribution of TyrAT to BIA metabolism in opium poppy. TyrAT transcript levels were reduced by at least 80% in silenced plants compared with controls and showed a moderate reduction in total alkaloid content. The modest correlation between transcript levels and BIA accumulation in opium poppy supports a role for TyrAT in the generation of alkaloid precursors, but it also suggests the occurrence of other sources for 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde. PMID:21949209

  5. Molecular modeling and structural characterization of a high glycine-tyrosine hair keratin associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rakesh S; Palmer, Jeremy C; Pudney, Paul D A; Paul, Prem K C; Johannessen, Christian; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Raut, Janhavi; Lee, Ken; Noro, Massimo; Tiemessen, David

    2017-03-22

    High glycine-tyrosine (HGT) proteins are an important constituent of the keratin associated proteins (KAPs) present in human hair. The glassy state physics of hair fibres are thought to be largely regulated by KAPs, which exist in an amorphous state and are readily affected by environmental conditions. However, there are no studies characterizing the individual KAPs. In this paper, we present the first step to fill this gap by computational modeling and experimental studies on a HGT protein, KAP8.1. In particular, we have modeled the three-dimensional structure of this 63-residue protein using homology information from an anti-freeze protein in snow flea. The model for KAP8.1 is characterized by four strands of poly-proline II (or PPII) type helical secondary structures, held together by two cysteine disulphide bridges. Computer simulations confirm the stability of the modelled structure and show that the protein largely samples the PPII and β-sheet conformations during the molecular dynamics simulations. Spectroscopic studies including Raman, IR and vibrational circular dichroism have also been performed on synthesized KAP8.1. The experimental studies suggest that KAP8.1 is characterised by β-sheet and PPII structures, largely consistent with the simulation studies. The model built in this work is a good starting point for further simulations to study in greater depth the glassy state physics of hair, including its water sorption isotherms, glass transition, and the effect of HGT proteins on KAP matrix plasticization. These results are a significant step towards our goal of understanding how the properties of hair can be affected and manipulated under different environmental conditions of temperature, humidity, ageing and small molecule additives.

  6. Epigenetic Reprogramming Sensitizes CML Stem Cells to Combined EZH2 and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mary T; Korfi, Koorosh; Saffrey, Peter; Hopcroft, Lisa E M; Kinstrie, Ross; Pellicano, Francesca; Guenther, Carla; Gallipoli, Paolo; Cruz, Michelle; Dunn, Karen; Jorgensen, Heather G; Cassels, Jennifer E; Hamilton, Ashley; Crossan, Andrew; Sinclair, Amy; Holyoake, Tessa L; Vetrie, David

    2016-11-01

    A major obstacle to curing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is residual disease maintained by tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-persistent leukemic stem cells (LSC). These are BCR-ABL1 kinase independent, refractory to apoptosis, and serve as a reservoir to drive relapse or TKI resistance. We demonstrate that Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 is misregulated in chronic phase CML LSCs. This is associated with extensive reprogramming of H3K27me3 targets in LSCs, thus sensitizing them to apoptosis upon treatment with an EZH2-specific inhibitor (EZH2i). EZH2i does not impair normal hematopoietic stem cell survival. Strikingly, treatment of primary CML cells with either EZH2i or TKI alone caused significant upregulation of H3K27me3 targets, and combined treatment further potentiated these effects and resulted in significant loss of LSCs compared to TKI alone, in vitro, and in long-term bone marrow murine xenografts. Our findings point to a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy to more effectively target LSCs in patients with CML receiving TKIs. In CML, TKI-persistent LSCs remain an obstacle to cure, and approaches to eradicate them remain a significant unmet clinical need. We demonstrate that EZH2 and H3K27me3 reprogramming is important for LSC survival, but renders LSCs sensitive to the combined effects of EZH2i and TKI. This represents a novel approach to more effectively target LSCs in patients receiving TKI treatment. Cancer Discov; 6(11); 1248-57. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Xie et al., p. 1237This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1197. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Quadratic residues and non-residues selected topics

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an account of the classical theory of quadratic residues and non-residues with the goal of using that theory as a lens through which to view the development of some of the fundamental methods employed in modern elementary, algebraic, and analytic number theory. The first three chapters present some basic facts and the history of quadratic residues and non-residues and discuss various proofs of the Law of Quadratic Reciprosity in depth, with an emphasis on the six proofs that Gauss published. The remaining seven chapters explore some interesting applications of the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, prove some results concerning the distribution and arithmetic structure of quadratic residues and non-residues, provide a detailed proof of Dirichlet’s Class-Number Formula, and discuss the question of whether quadratic residues are randomly distributed. The text is a valuable resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate students as well as for mathematicians interested in number theory.

  8. Determination of o-tyrosine as a marker for the detection of irradiated shrimps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunková, J.; Simat, T.J.; Steinhart, H.

    2000-01-01

    o-tyrosine is proposed as a marker for the identification of irradiated protein-rich food. An HPLC method for qualitative and quantitative determination of non-protein bound o-tyrosine in shrimps (Crangon crangon) has been developed. For this purpose the o-tyrosine was extracted from non-irradiated as well as irradiated samples with perchloric acid, then separated isocratically (ammoniumformiat buffer, pH 4) on an RP-C18 column and detected by FLD (275/305 nm). The quantification of o-tyrosine was based on the use of alfa-methyl-p-tyrosine as internal standard. In non-irradiated shrimps a background level of 28.9 microg/kg was found. The content of o-tyrosine in 1 kGy irradiated shrimps was found to be 119.9 mikrog/kg, which was well 4-fold over the background level. The dependency between radiation dose and the amount of o-tyrosine was observed in the range of 0-5 kGy

  9. Production of tyrosine through phenylalanine hydroxylation bypasses the intrinsic feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Lin, Yuheng; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosine is a proteinogenic aromatic amino acid that is often used as a supplement of food and animal feed, as well as a (bio-)synthetic precursor to various pharmaceutically or industrially important molecules. Extensive metabolic engineering efforts have been made towards the efficient and cost-effective microbial production of tyrosine. Conventional strategies usually focus on eliminating intrinsic feedback inhibition and redirecting carbon flux into the shikimate pathway. In this study, we found that continuous conversion of phenylalanine into tyrosine by the action of tetrahydromonapterin (MH4)-utilizing phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase (P4H) can bypass the feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli, leading to tyrosine accumulation in the cultures. First, expression of the P4H from Xanthomonas campestris in combination with an MH4 recycling system in wild-type E. coli allowed the strain to accumulate tyrosine at 262 mg/L. On this basis, enhanced expression of the key enzymes associated with the shikimate pathway and the MH4 biosynthetic pathway resulted in the elevation of tyrosine production up to 401 mg/L in shake flasks. This work demonstrated a novel approach to tyrosine production and verified the possibility to alleviate feedback inhibition by creating a phenylalanine sink.

  10. Role of RET protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment RET-driven thyroid and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert; Sadeghi-Nejad, Abdollah

    2018-02-01

    RET is a transmembrane receptor protein-tyrosine kinase that is required for the development of the nervous system and several other tissues. The mechanism of activation of RET by its glial-cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) ligands differs from that of all other receptor protein-tyrosine kinases owing to the requirement for additional GDNF family receptor-α (GFRα) co-receptors (GFRα1/2/3/4). RET point mutations have been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN2A, MEN2B) and medullary thyroid carcinoma. In contrast, RET fusion proteins have been reported in papillary thyroid and non-small cell lung adenocarcinomas. More than a dozen fusion partners of RET have been described in papillary thyroid carcinomas, most frequently CCDC6-RET and NCOA4-RET. RET-fusion proteins, commonly KIF5B-RET, have also been found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Several drugs targeting RET have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of cancer: (i) cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid carcinomas and (ii) lenvatinib and sorafenib for differentiated thyroid cancers. In addition, alectinib and sunitinib are approved for the treatment of other neoplasms. Each of these drugs is a multikinase inhibitor that has activity against RET. Previous X-ray studies indicated that vandetanib binds within the ATP-binding pocket and forms a hydrogen bond with A807 within the RET hinge and it makes hydrophobic contact with L881 of the catalytic spine which occurs in the floor of the adenine-binding pocket. Our molecular modeling studies indicate that the other antagonists bind in a similar fashion. All of these antagonists bind to the active conformation of RET and are therefore classified as type I inhibitors. The drugs also make variable contacts with other residues of the regulatory and catalytic spines. None of these drugs was designed to bind preferentially to RET and it is hypothesized that RET-specific antagonists might produce even better clinical outcomes

  11. Sharing Residual Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbonara, Emanuela; Guerra, Alice; Parisi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of tort law evaluate the efficiency of liability rules in terms of care and activity levels. A liability regime is optimal when it creates incentives to maximize the value of risky activities net of accident and precaution costs. The allocation of primary and residual liability...... the virtues and limits of loss-sharing rules in generating optimal (second-best) incentives and allocations of risk. We find that loss sharing may be optimal in the presence of countervailing policy objectives, homogeneous risk avoiders, and subadditive risk, which potentially offers a valuable tool...

  12. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Pattern in Sperm Proteins Isolated from Normospermic and Teratospermic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sepideh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Amirjanati, Naser; Lakpour, Niknam; Asgharpour, Lima; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In mammalian system, spermatozoa are not able to fertilize the oocyte immediately upon ejaculation, thus they undergo a series of biochemical and molecular changes which is termed capacitation. During sperm capacitation, signal transduction pathways are activated which lead to protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have an important role in sperm capacitation such as hyperactive motility, interaction with zona pellucida and acrosome reaction. Evaluation of tyrosine phosphorylation pattern is important for further understanding of molecular mechanisms of fertilization and the etiology of sperm dysfunctions and abnormalities such as teratospermia. The goal of this study is to characterize tyrosine phosphorylation pattern in sperm proteins isolated from normospermic and teratospermic infertile men attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic in Tehran. Materials and Methods Semen samples were collected and the spermatozoa were isolated using Percoll gradient centrifugation. Then the spermatozoa were incubated up to 6h at 37°C with 5% CO2 in 3% Bovine Serum Albumin-supplemented Ham's F-10 for capacitation to take place. The total proteins from spermatozoa were extracted and were subjected to SDS-PAGE before and after capacitation. To evaluate protein tyrosine phosphorylation pattern, western blotting with specific antibody against phosphorylated tyrosines was performed. Results The results upon western blotting showed: 1) at least six protein bands were detected before capacitation in the spermatozoa from normospermic samples. However, comparable levels of tyrosine phosphorylation was not observed in the spermatozoa from teratospermic samples. 2) The intensity of protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to have been increased during capacitation in the normospermic relative to the teratospermic group. Conclusion For the first time, these findings demonstrate and suggest that the differences in the types of proteins and diminished

  13. Rates and energetics of tyrosine ring flips in yeast iso-2-cytochrome c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nall, B.T.; Zuniga, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Isotope-edited nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to monitor ring flip motion of the five tyrosine side chains in the oxidized and reduced forms of yeast iso-2-cytochrome c. With specifically labeled protein purified from yeast grown on media containing [3,5- 13 C]tyrosine, isotope-edited one-dimensional proton spectra have been collected over a 5-55 degree C temperature range. The spectra allow selective observation of the 10 3,5 tyrosine ring proton resonances and, using a two-site exchange model, allow estimation of the temperature dependence of ring flip rates from motion-induced changes in proton line shapes. For the reduced protein, tyrosines II and IV are in fast exchange throughout the temperature range investigated, or lack resolvable differences in static chemical shifts for the 3,5 ring protons. Tyrosines I, III, and V are in sloe exchange at low temperatures and in fast exchange at high temperatures. Spectral simulations give flip rates for individual tyrosines in a range of one flip per second at low temperatures to thousands of flips per second at high temperatures. Eyring plots show that two of the tyrosines (I and III) have essentially the same activation parameters. Tentative sequence-specific assignments for the tyrosines in reduced iso-2 are suggested by comparison to horse cytochrome c. For oxidized iso-2, five resonances are observed at high temperatures, suggesting flip rates for all five tyrosines sufficient to average static chemical shift differences. At lower temperatures, there is evidence of intermediate and slow flipping for some of the rings

  14. Sequence-specific backbone ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N assignments of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli protein tyrosine kinase, Wzc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Deniz B; Dutta, Kaushik; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-04-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases in bacteria are structurally and functionally distinct from their eukaryotic counterparts. The largest family of bacterial tyrosine kinases, the BY-kinase family, is highly conserved in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, and plays a central role in biofilm and capsule formation. In Escherichia coli the BY-kinase, Wzc, is a critical component of the machinery responsible for the synthesis and export of the exo-polysaccharide colanic acid, a key constituent of biofilms. Here we present the main-chain (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C' and (13)Cα, side-chain (13)Cβ resonance assignments for a construct that encodes the entire 274-residue cytosolic catalytic domain of Wzc.

  15. Sulfone-stabilized carbanions for the reversible covalent capture of a posttranslationally-generated cysteine oxoform found in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zachary D; Ruddraraju, Kasi Viswanatharaju; Santo, Nicholas; Gates, Kent S

    2016-06-15

    Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) involves oxidative conversion of the active site cysteine thiolate into an electrophilic sulfenyl amide residue. Reduction of the sulfenyl amide by biological thiols regenerates the native cysteine residue. Here we explored fundamental chemical reactions that may enable covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide residue in oxidized PTP1B. Various sulfone-containing carbon acids were found to react readily with a model peptide sulfenyl amide via attack of the sulfonyl carbanion on the electrophilic sulfur center in the sulfenyl amide. Both the products and the rates of these reactions were characterized. The results suggest that capture of a peptide sulfenyl amide residue by sulfone-stabilized carbanions can slow, but not completely prevent, thiol-mediated generation of the corresponding cysteine-containing peptide. Sulfone-containing carbon acids may be useful components in the construction of agents that knock down PTP1B activity in cells via transient covalent capture of the sulfenyl amide oxoform generated during insulin signaling processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elicitor-induced tyrosine decarboxylase in berberine-synthesizing suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügler, K; Funk, C; Brodelius, P

    1988-01-04

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) was induced in suspension cultures of Thalictrum rugosum by treatment with a yeast glucan elicitor. Maximum induction was observed at a carbohydrate concentration of 0.4 mg/g fresh weight of cells and maximum enzyme activity was reached 20 h after addition of elicitor. The enzyme was inducible in late exponential and early stationary growth phases. A good correlation between induced tyrosine decarboxylase activity and berberine biosynthesis has been established. It is suggested that tyrosine decarboxylase may be a key enzyme between primary and secondary metabolisms in the biosynthesis of norlaudanosoline-derived alkaloids.

  17. Calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) phosphorylates and activates tyrosine hydroxylase.

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, K A; Helmer-Matyjek, E; Nairn, A C; Müller, T H; Haycock, J W; Greene, L A; Goldstein, M; Greengard, P

    1984-01-01

    Protein kinase C, purified to homogeneity, was found to phosphorylate and activate tyrosine hydroxylase that had been partially purified from pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells. These actions of protein kinase C required the presence of calcium and phospholipid. This phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase reduced the Km for the cofactor 6-methyltetrahydropterine from 0.45 mM to 0.11 mM, increased the Ki for dopamine from 4.2 microM to 47.5 microM, and produced no change in the Km for tyrosine. Lit...

  18. The use of the tyrosine phosphatase antagonist orthovanadate in the study of a cell proliferation inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enebo, D. J.; Hanek, G.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of murine fibroblasts with orthovanadate, a global tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, was shown to confer a "pseudo-transformed" phenotype with regard to cell morphology and growth characteristics. This alteration was manifested by both an increasing refractile appearance of the cells, consistent with many transformed cell lines, as well as an increase in maximum cell density was attained. Despite the abrogation of cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity, orthovanadate-treated cells remained sensitive to the biological activity of a naturally occurring sialoglycopeptide (SGP) cell surface proliferation inhibitor. The results indicated that tyrosine phosphatase activity, inhibited by orthovanadate, was not involved in the signal transduction pathway of the SGP.

  19. Processes for the production of hydroxycinnamic acids using polypeptides having tyrosine ammonia lyase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the field of biotechnology as it applies to the production of hydroxycinnamic acids using polypeptides having tyrosine ammonia lyase activity. More particularly, the present invention pertains to polypeptides having tyrosine ammonia lyase activity and high...... substrate specificity towards tyrosine, which makes them particularly suitable in the production of p-coumaric acid and other hydroxycinnamic acids. The present invention thus provides processes for the production of p-coumaric acid and other hydroxycinnamic acids employing these polypeptides as well...

  20. [Dasatinib. A novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, I.H.; Stentoft, J.; Hasselbalch, H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is characterized by an abnormal tyrosin kinase in the cytoplasm of the clonal cells. The enzyme is derived from a fusion gene on the Philadelphia-chromosome, evolved by a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Understanding the biology of the tyrosin kinase led to t...... to targeted therapy, inhibiting the ATP-binding site by a small molecule--imatinib (Glivec). A novel 2nd generation tyrosin kinase inhibitor--dasatinib (Sprycel)--is now available in cases of insufficient response or intolerance to imatinib Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/28...

  1. Prognostic impact of postoperative, pre-irradiation 18F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine uptake in glioblastoma patients treated with radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Pinkawa, Michael; Stoffels, Gabriele; Kaiser, Hans J.; Galldiks, Norbert; Herzog, Hans; Coenen, Heinz H.; Eble, Michael J.; Langen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Resection is considered as essential for the efficacy of modern adjuvant treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Previous studies have indicated that amino acid PET is more specific than contrast enhancement on MRI for detecting residual tumor tissue after surgery. In a prospective study we investigated the prognostic impact of postoperative tumor volume and tumor/brain ratios (TBR) in PET using O-(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) in comparison with MRI. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients with GBM were investigated by FET PET and MRI after surgery. Tumor volume in FET PET with a tumor/brain ratio (TBR) > 1.6 and a TBR > 2, mean and maximum TBR and gadolinium contrast-enhancement on MRI (Gd-volume) were determined. Thereafter patients received a fractionated radiotherapy with concomitant temozolomide (RCX). The median follow-up was 15.4 (3-35) months. The prognostic value of postoperative residual tumor volume in FET PET, TBR mean, TBR max and Gd-volume was evaluated using Kaplan-Maier estimates for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Postoperative tumor volume in FET PET had a significant independent influence on OS and DFS (OS 20.0 vs. 6.9 months; DFS 9.6 vs. 5.1 months, p 18 F-FET PET. The TBR mean and TBR max of FET uptake had a significant influence on DFS (p < 0.05). Gd-volume in MRI had significant effect on OS and DFS in the univariate analysis. No independent significant influence in OS or DFS could be observed for Gd-volume in MRI. Conclusions: Our data indicate that the tumor volume in FET PET after surgery of GBM has a strong prognostic impact for these patients. FET PET appears to be helpful to determine the residual tumor volume after surgery of GBM and may serve as a valuable tool for optimal planning of radiation treatment.

  2. Bioenergy from sisal residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The main objectives of this report are: To analyse the bioenergy potential of the Tanzanian agro-industries, with special emphasis on the Sisal industry, the largest producer of agro-industrial residues in Tanzania; and to upgrade the human capacity and research potential of the Applied Microbiology Unit at the University of Dar es Salaam, in order to ensure a scientific and technological support for future operation and implementation of biogas facilities and anaerobic water treatment systems. The experimental work on sisal residues contains the following issues: Optimal reactor set-up and performance; Pre-treatment methods for treatment of fibre fraction in order to increase the methane yield; Evaluation of the requirement for nutrient addition; Evaluation of the potential for bioethanol production from sisal bulbs. The processing of sisal leaves into dry fibres (decortication) has traditionally been done by the wet processing method, which consumes considerable quantities of water and produces large quantities of waste water. The Tanzania Sisal Authority (TSA) is now developing a dry decortication method, which consumes less water and produces a waste product with 12-15% TS, which is feasible for treatment in CSTR systems (Continously Stirred Tank Reactors). (EG)

  3. The effect of aspartate-lysine-isoleucine and aspartate-arginine-tyrosine mutations on the expression and activity of vasopressin V2 receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafzadeh, Hossein; Safaeian, Leila; Mirmohammad Sadeghi, Hamid; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jafarian, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) plays an important role in the water reabsorption in the kidney collecting ducts. V2R is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and the triplet of amino acids aspartate-arginine-histidine (DRH) in this receptor might significantly influence its activity similar to other GPCR. However, the role of this motif has not been fully confirmed. Therefore, the present study attempted to shed some more light on the role of DRH motif in G protein coupling and V2R function with the use of site-directed mutagenesis. Nested PCR using specific primers was used to produce DNA fragments containing aspartate-lysine-isoleucine and aspartate-arginine-tyrosine mutations with replacements of the arginine to lysine and histidine to tyrosine, respectively. After digestion, these inserts were ligated into the pcDNA3 vector and transformation into E. coli HB101 was performed using heat shock method. The obtained colonies were analyzed for the presence and orientation of the inserts using proper restriction enzymes. After transient transfection of COS-7 cells using diethylaminoethyl-dextran method, the adenylyl cyclase activity assay was performed for functional study. The cell surface expression was analyzed by indirect ELISA method. The functional assay indicated that none of these mutations significantly altered cAMP production and cell surface expression of V2R in these cells. Since some substitutions in arginine residue have shown to lead to the inactive V2 receptor, further studies are required to define the role of this residue more precisely. However, it seems that the role of the histidine residue is not critical in the V2 receptor function.

  4. Differential evolutionary wiring of the tyrosine kinase Btk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain M Nawaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central question within biology is how intracellular signaling pathways are maintained throughout evolution. Btk29A is considered to be the fly-homolog of the mammalian Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk, which is a non-receptor tyrosine-kinase of the Tec-family. In mammalian cells, there is a single transcript splice-form and the corresponding Btk-protein plays an important role for B-lymphocyte development with alterations within the human BTK gene causing the immunodeficiency disease X-linked agammaglobulinemia in man and a related disorder in mice. In contrast, the Drosophila Btk29A locus encodes two splice-variants, where the type 2-form is the more related to the mammalian Btk gene product displaying more than 80% homology. In Drosophila, Btk29A displays a dynamic pattern of expression through the embryonic to adult stages. Complete loss-of-function of both splice-forms is lethal, whereas selective absence of the type 2-form reduces the adult lifespan of the fly and causes developmental abnormalities in male genitalia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Out of 7004-7979 transcripts expressed in the four sample groups, 5587 (70-79% were found in all four tissues and strains. Here, we investigated the role of Btk29A type 2 on a transcriptomic level in larval CNS and adult heads. We used samples either selectively defective in Btk29A type 2 (Btk29A(ficP or revertant flies with restored Btk29A type 2-function (Btk29A(fic Exc1-16. The whole transcriptomic profile for the different sample groups revealed Gene Ontology patterns reflecting lifespan abnormalities in adult head neuronal tissue, but not in larvae. CONCLUSIONS: In the Btk29A type 2-deficient strains there was no significant overlap between transcriptomic alterations in adult heads and larvae neuronal tissue, respectively. Moreover, there was no significant overlap of the transcriptomic changes between flies and mammals, suggesting that the evolutionary conservation is confined

  5. Screening of selected starter cultures for the presence of DNA sequences coding for tyrosine decarboxylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radka Burdychová

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, seven different starter cultures used in the production of fermented sausages were screened for the presence or absence of specific DNA sequences coding for tyrosine decarboxylase. PCR with the a set of specific primers TDC2/TDC5 (COTON et al., 2004 was used. The PCR analysis of DNA from two starter cultures confirmed the presence of DNA sequences for tyrosine decarboxylase. A detailed analysis of the starter cultures showed that DNA sequences for tyrosine decarboxylase are contained in genomic DNA of Lactobacillus curvatus and Lactobacillus sakei. These results show suitability of the described PCR method for the screening of starter cultures for the presence of the gene for tyrosine decarboxylase that is responsible for the production of the biogenic amine tyramine.

  6. Lattice modes of the chirally pure and racemic phases of tyrosine crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyanchikov, M. A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Gorelik, V. S., E-mail: gorelik@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Gorshunov, B. P. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Pyatyshev, A. Yu., E-mail: jb-valensia@mail.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    High-Q librational modes have been found to be present in the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of chirally pure L-tyrosine. Such modes can serve as terahertz radiation detectors and generators in chirally pure biostructures.

  7. Administration of supplemental L-tyrosine with phenelzine: a clinical literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; Ryan, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this literature review is the alleged relationship between L-tyrosine, phenelzine, and hypertensive crisis. Phenelzine (Nardil®) prescribing information notes: “The potentiation of sympathomimetic substances and related compounds by MAO inhibitors may result in hypertensive crises (see WARNINGS). Therefore, patients being treated with NARDIL should not take […] L-tyrosine […]”. Interest in the scientific foundation of this claim was generated during routine patient care. A comprehensive literature search of Google Scholar and PubMed revealed no reported cases of hypertensive crisis associated with concomitant administration of L-tyrosine and phenelzine. Review of current US Food and Drug Administration nutritional guidelines relating to ongoing phenelzine studies reveals no mention and requires no consideration of L-tyrosine ingestion in combination with phenelzine. This paper is intended to provide an objective review of the science to then allow the reader to formulate the final opinion. PMID:25092999

  8. Reciprocal regulation of C-Maf tyrosine phosphorylation by Tec and Ptpn22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Chun; Lai, Chen-Yen; Yen, Wei-Feng; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Tai, Tzong-Shyuan; Lu, Yu-Jung; Tsao, Hsiao-Wei; Ho, I-Cheng; Miaw, Shi-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    C-Maf plays an important role in regulating cytokine production in TH cells. Its transactivation of IL-4 is optimized by phosphorylation at Tyr21, Tyr92, and Tyr131. However, the molecular mechanism regulating its tyrosine phosphorylation remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that Tec kinase family member Tec, but not Rlk or Itk, is a tyrosine kinase of c-Maf and that Tec enhances c-Maf-dependent IL-4 promoter activity. This effect of Tec is counteracted by Ptpn22, which physically interacts with and facilitates tyrosine dephosphorylation of c-Maf thereby attenuating its transcriptional activity. We further show that phosphorylation of Tyr21/92/131 of c-Maf is also critical for its recruitment to the IL-21 promoter and optimal production of this cytokine by TH17 cells. Thus, manipulating tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Maf through its kinases and phosphatases can have significant impact on TH cell-mediated immune responses.

  9. Conformational Structure of Tyrosine, Tyrosyl-Glycine, and Tyrosyl-Glycyl-Glycine by Double Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Riziq, Ali; Grace, Louis; Crews, Bridgit; Callahan, Michael P,; van Mourik, Tanja; de Vries, Mattanjah S,

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the variation in conformation for the amino acid tyrosine (Y), alone and in the small peptides tyrosine-glycine (YC) and tyrosine-glycine-glycine (YGG), in the gas phase by using UV-UV and IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. For tyrosine we found seven different conformations, for YG we found four different conformations, and for YGG we found three different conformations. As the peptides get larger, we observe fewer stable conformers, despite the increasing complexity and number of degrees of freedom. We find structural trends similar to those in phenylalanine-glycine glycine (FGG) and tryptophan-glycine-glycine (WGG)j however) the effect of dispersive forces in FGG for stabilizing a folded structure is replaced by that of hydrogen bonding in YGG.

  10. Immunoglobulins against Tyrosine Nitrated Epitopes in Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Leonor; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Lightfoot, Richard; Tsika, Epida; Parastatidis, Ioannis; Martinez, Marissa; Greco, Todd M.; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Wu, Yuping; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence support a pathophysiological role of immunity in atherosclerosis. Tyrosine nitrated proteins, a footprint of oxygen and nitrogen derived oxidants generated by cells of the immune system, are enriched in atheromatous lesions and in circulation of coronary artery disease (CAD) subjects. However, the consequences of possible immune reactions triggered by the presence of nitrated proteins in subjects with clinically documented atherosclerosis have not been explored. Methods and Results Specific immunoglobulins that recognize 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were identified in human lesions, as well as in circulation of CAD subjects. The levels of circulating immunoglobulins against 3-nitrotyrosine epitopes were quantified in CAD patients (n=374) and subjects without CAD (non CAD controls, n=313). A ten-fold increase in the mean level of circulating immunoglobulins against protein-bound 3-nitrotyrosine was documented in the CAD subjects (3.75 ± 1.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma vs. 0.36 ± 0.8 μg antibody Eq/mL plasma), and was strongly associated with angiographic evidence of significant CAD. Conclusions The results of this cross sectional study suggest that post-translational modification of proteins via nitration within atherosclerotic plaque-laden arteries and in circulation serve as neoepitopes for elaboration of immunoglobulins, thereby providing an association between oxidant production and the activation of the immune system in CAD. PMID:23081989

  11. The 2010 patent landscape for spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Alessandro F; Dehnhardt, Christoph; Kaila, Neelu; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Thorarensen, Atli

    2012-05-01

    Discovery of small molecular inhibitors for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is a major ongoing effort within the pharmaceutical industry. Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is one of leading small molecular targets with regard to clinical development primarlly due to efforts by Rigel and Portola. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the SYK patent landscape. The patent literature we evaluated relates to any organization that has filed applications that imply that SYK is the intended target. The interest in SYK was initiated in the early 2000's with many organizations, including several large pharmaceutical companies, and has been active for years. In general, the structural theme of most of the compounds in these applications is a traditional ATP competitive inhibitor with each organization having a different hinge binding element. In general, the attachment to the hinge is an aryl amine that is decorated with a solubilizing group. The other substituents are broadly variable across the numerous companies indicating that SYK has significant flexibility in its interactions in that portion of the kinase. This overview of the SYK patent literature and the learnings of the inhibitors' substitution patterns would be an important reference for anyone working in this area.

  12. Tyrosine aminotransferase from Leishmania infantum: A new drug target candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Moreno

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the etiological agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin. The disease is fatal without treatment, which has been based on antimonial pentavalents for more than 60 years. Due to resistances, relapses and toxicity to current treatment, the development of new drugs is required. The structure of the L. infantum tyrosine aminotransferase (LiTAT has been recently solved showing important differences with the mammalian orthologue. The characterization of LiTAT is reported herein. This enzyme is cytoplasmic and is over-expressed in the more infective stages and nitric oxide resistant parasites. Unlike the mammalian TAT, LiTAT is able to use ketomethiobutyrate as co-substrate. The pharmacophore model of LiTAT with this specific co-substrate is described herein. This may allow the identification of new inhibitors present in the databases. All the data obtained support that LiTAT is a good target candidate for the development of new anti-leishmanial drugs.

  13. Tyrosine kinase expression in pulmonary metastases and paired primary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Bernd M; Toelkes, Sara; Schelzig, Hubert; Barth, Thomas F E; Sunder-Plassmann, Ludger

    2010-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors against the receptors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR), epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and the platelet derived growth factor (PDGFR) are increasingly used in the treatment of progressive cancers. However, the expression of these receptors especially in lung metastases has not been examined. Tissue specimen from 35 lung metastases of 33 patients with renal cell carcinoma (n=8), sarcoma (n=10), colorectal carcinoma (n=6), otolaryngologic carcinoma (OLC, n=4), testicular and endometrial cancer (n=1 each), malignant melanoma (n=1), adrenal cancer (n=2), malignant fibrous histiocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (n=1 each) have been immunohistochemically tested for the expression of PDGFR alpha/beta, VEGFR and EGFR. None of the patients had been pretreated with angiogenic inhibitors prior to metastasectomy. PDGFRalpha was expressed in all metastases; 31% stained negative for PDGFRbeta, 86% negative for VEGFR and 45% negative for EGFR. Primary tumors revealed positive staining for PDGFRalpha in 88%, for PDGFRbeta in 59%, for VEGFR in 0% and for EGFR in 18%. Our investigation of a pilot character represents a 'biomarker-based' analysis of pulmonary metastases of different primary tumors; we conclude that an immediate 'tumor profiling' at initial diagnosis should be considered in order to guide tumor therapy individually.

  14. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  15. Metazoan-like signaling in a unicellular receptor tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultheiss Kira P

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are crucial components of signal transduction systems in multicellular animals. Surprisingly, numerous RTKs have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates and other protists. Here, we report the first biochemical study of a unicellular RTK, namely RTKB2 from Monosiga brevicollis. Results We cloned, expressed, and purified the RTKB2 kinase, and showed that it is enzymatically active. The activity of RTKB2 is controlled by autophosphorylation, as in metazoan RTKs. RTKB2 possesses six copies of a unique domain (designated RM2 in its C-terminal tail. An isolated RM2 domain (or a synthetic peptide derived from the RM2 sequence served as a substrate for RTKB2 kinase. When phosphorylated, the RM2 domain bound to the Src homology 2 domain of MbSrc1 from M. brevicollis. NMR structural studies of the RM2 domain indicated that it is disordered in solution. Conclusions Our results are consistent with a model in which RTKB2 activation stimulates receptor autophosphorylation within the RM2 domains. This leads to recruitment of Src-like kinases (and potentially other M. brevicollis proteins and further phosphorylation, which may serve to increase or dampen downstream signals. Thus, crucial features of signal transduction circuitry were established prior to the evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors.

  16. Identification of a variant form of tyrosine phosphatase LYP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Wanting T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs are important cell signaling regulators with major pathological implications. LYP (also known as PTPN22 is an intracellular enzyme initially found to be predominately expressed in lymphocytes. Importantly, an allelic R620W variant of LYP is strongly associated with multiple autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and autoimmune thyroid disease. Results In this study, we isolated a novel isoform of LYP designated LYP3. LYP3 differs from LYP1, the known isoform of LYP, in that it lacks a 28 amino acid segment right after the R620W site embedded in a proline-rich protein-protein interaction motif. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that LYP3 resulted from alternative splicing of the LYP gene located on chromosome 1p 13.3-13.1. Reverse transcription PCR analyses of 48 human tissues demonstrated that both LYP1 and LYP3 are predominantly expressed in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues but the relative expression levels of the two isoforms varies in different human tissues and individuals. Conclusions We thus identified a new variant form of LYP and conducted a comprehensive analysis of LYP tissue expressions. Considering the pathogenesis of LYP R620W, we believe that the expression of LYP3 may have an important role in regulating activity and function of LYP and may be implicated in autoimmune diseases.

  17. The protein tyrosine kinase Tec regulates mast cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Uwe; Abramova, Anastasia; Boucheron, Nicole; Eckelhart, Eva; Schebesta, Alexandra; Bilic, Ivan; Kneidinger, Michael; Unger, Bernd; Hammer, Martina; Sibilia, Maria; Valent, Peter; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2009-11-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in a variety of normal and pathophysiological processes and their activation has to be tightly controlled. Here, we demonstrate that the protein tyrosine kinase Tec is a crucial regulator of murine mast cell function. Tec was activated upon Fc epsilon RI stimulation of BM-derived mast cells (BMMC). The release of histamine in the absence of Tec was normal in vitro and in vivo; however, leukotriene C(4) levels were reduced in Tec(-) (/) (-) BMMC. Furthermore, the production of IL-4 was severely impaired, and GM-CSF, TNF-alpha and IL-13 levels were also diminished. Finally, a comparison of WT, Tec(-) (/) (-), Btk(-) (/) (-) and Tec(-) (/) (-)Btk(-) (/) (-) BMMC revealed a negative role for Btk in the regulation of IL-4 production, while for the efficient production of TNF-alpha, IL-13 and GM-CSF, both Tec and Btk were required. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for Tec in mast cells, which is partially different to the function of the well-characterized family member Btk.

  18. Raman spectra of iodine-derivatives of tyrosine and thyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, E.

    1974-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the iodine derivatives of tyrosine and thyronine in the form of compressed crystalline powders have been excited by 4880 A Argon laser on rotating samples at room temperature. The strong peaks in the low-frequency, -1 , region may be described by analogous vibrations of benzene as: I. the C-I out-of-plane bendings of E 1 sub(g) mode from 100 cm -1 to 180 cm -1 ; II. the C-I in-plane bendings of E 2 sub(g) and A 2 sub(g) mode from 190 cm -1 to 330 cm -1 and III. the C-I stretchings of E 2 sub(g) mode from 330 cm -1 to 400 cm -1 . In 3,3',5-triiodo-derivatives, the number of both the C-I in-plane bendings and C-I stretchings on the inner phenyl ring approximately doubles from thet of diiodo-derivatives. This doubling in number of peaks is presumably due to the modulation caused by the libration, which is associated with the C-I out-of-plane bending at position 3', of the outer phenyl ring

  19. l-Tyrosine Contained in Dietary Supplement by Chemiluminescence Reaction of an Iron-Phthalocyanine Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Ohtomo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemiluminescence (CL signal immediately appeared when a hydrogen peroxide solution was injected into an iron-phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (Fe-PTS aqueous solution. Moreover, the CL intensity of Fe-PTS decreased by adding L-tyrosine. Based on these results, the determination of trace amounts of L-tyrosine was developed using the quenching-chemiluminescence. The calibration curve of L-tyrosine was obtained in the concentration range of 2.0×10−7 M to 2.0×10−5 M. Moreover, the relative standard deviation (RSD was 1.63 % (=5 for 2.0×10−6 M L-tyrosine, and its detection limits (3σ were 1.81×10−7 M. The spike and recovery experiments for L-tyrosine were performed using a soft drink. Furthermore, the determination of L-tyrosine was applied to supplements containing various kinds of amino acids. Each satisfactory relative recovery was obtained at 98 to 102%.

  20. Validation of o-tyrosine as a marker for detection and dosimetry of irradiated chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T.E.; Guerrero, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The o-tyrosine has been proposed as a marker for postirradiation identification of food that contains protein. In this study, the validity of using o-tyrosine for this purpose has been tested and established. The validation process involved examination of background levels of o-tyrosine in unirradiated chicken, radiation dose yield, postirradiation storage, dose rate, radiation type, temperature during irradiation, and oxygen concentration during irradiation. The o-tyrosine is present in unirradiated chicken meat at variable levels. However, these background levels are low enough that o-tyrosine can serve to determine whether chicken has been irradiated or not at the commercially approved doses (3 kGy). The radiation dose response curve for the formation of o-tyrosine is linear. The apparent yields may vary with the analytical method used; however, it is independent of the dose rate, radiation type, atmosphere, and temperature (above freezing) during irradiation. It is also independent of the storage time and temperature after irradiation. It is concluded that this marker can be used to determine the absorbed dose in chicken meat irradiated with either gamma rays or electrons under normal or modified atmosphere

  1. Verbascoside promotes the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-qing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine hydroxylase is a key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. Change in tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the nigrostriatal system is closely related to the occurrence and development of Parkinson′s disease. Verbascoside, an extract from Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata has been shown to be clinically effective in treating Parkinson′s disease. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. It is hypothesized that the effects of verbascoside on Parkinson′s disease are related to tyrosine hydroxylase expression change in the nigrostriatal system. Rat models of Parkinson′s disease were established and verbascoside (60 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally once a day. After 6 weeks of verbascoside treatment, rat rotational behavior was alleviated; tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expression and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the rat right substantia nigra were significantly higher than the Parkinson′s model group. These findings suggest that the mechanism by which verbascoside treats Parkinson′s disease is related to the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra.

  2. Structural basis for the regulation mechanism of the tyrosine kinase CapB from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Olivares-Illana

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria were thought to be devoid of tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes. However, several tyrosine kinases without similarity to their eukaryotic counterparts have recently been identified in bacteria. They are involved in many physiological processes, but their accurate functions remain poorly understood due to slow progress in their structural characterization. They have been best characterized as copolymerases involved in the synthesis and export of extracellular polysaccharides. These compounds play critical roles in the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, and bacterial tyrosine kinases can thus be considered as potential therapeutic targets. Here, we present the crystal structures of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states of the tyrosine kinase CapB from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus together with the activator domain of its cognate transmembrane modulator CapA. This first high-resolution structure of a bacterial tyrosine kinase reveals a 230-kDa ring-shaped octamer that dissociates upon intermolecular autophosphorylation. These observations provide a molecular basis for the regulation mechanism of the bacterial tyrosine kinases and give insights into their copolymerase function.

  3. Marine Tar Residues: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Warnock, April M.; Hagen, Scott C.; Passeri, Davina L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in ...

  4. Evaluation of residue-residue contact predictions in CASP9

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions submitted to CASP9. The methodology for the assessment does not differ from that used in previous CASPs, with two basic evaluation measures being the precision in recognizing contacts and the difference between the distribution of distances in the subset of predicted contact pairs versus all pairs of residues in the structure. The emphasis is placed on the prediction of long-range contacts (i.e., contacts between residues separated by at least 24 residues along sequence) in target proteins that cannot be easily modeled by homology. Although there is considerable activity in the field, the current analysis reports no discernable progress since CASP8.

  5. Inhaled tyrosine kinase inhibitors for pulmonary hypertension: a possible future treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitsiou G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Georgia Pitsiou,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,1 Dimitris Petridis,2 Ioannis Kioumis,1 Sofia Lampaki,1 John Organtzis,1 Konstantinos Porpodis,1 Antonis Papaiwannou,1 Theodora Tsiouda,3 Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,4 Stylianos Kakolyris,5 Konstantinos Syrigos,6 Haidong Huang,7 Qiang Li,7 J Francis Turner,8 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis1 1Pulmonary Department, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 2Department of Food Technology, School of Food Technology and Nutrition, Alexander Technological Educational Institute, 3Internal Medicine Department, Thegenio Anticancer Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 4II Medical Department, Coburg Regional Hospital, Coburg, Germany; 5Oncology Department, Sotiria Hospital of Chest Diseases, University of Athens, Athens, 6Oncology Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 7Department of Respiratory Diseases, Changhai Hospital/First Affiliated Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 8Division of Interventional Pulmonology and Medical Oncology, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Western Regional Medical Center, Goodyear, AZ, USA Abstract: Pulmonary hypertension is a disease with severe consequences for the human body. There are several diseases and situations that induce pulmonary hypertension and are usually underdiagnosed. Treatments include conventional medical therapies and oral, inhaled, intravenous, and subcutaneous options. Depending on its severity, heart or lung transplant may also be an option. A possible novel treatment could be tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted experiments with three jet nebulizers and three ultrasound nebulizers with erlotinib, gefitinib, and imatinib. Different residual cup designs and residual cup loadings were used in order to identify the best combination to produce droplets of less than 5 µm in mass median aerodynamic diameter. We

  6. Sulfonation of Tyrosine as a Method To Improve Biodistribution of Peptide-Based Radiotracers: Novel18F-Labeled Cyclic RGD Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskali, Mohammad B; Denoyer, Delphine; Noonan, Wayne; Culinane, Carleen; Rangger, Christine; Pouliot, Normand; Haubner, Roland; Roselt, Peter D; Hicks, Rodney J; Hutton, Craig A

    2017-04-03

    Control of the biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides has proven to be a major challenge in their application as imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). Modification of peptide hydrophilicity in order to increase renal clearance has been a common endeavor to improve overall biodistribution. Herein, we examine the effect of site-specific sulfonation of tyrosine moieties in cyclic(RGDyK) peptides as a means to enhance their hydrophilicity and improve their biodistribution. The novel sulfonated cyclic(RGDyK) peptides were conjugated directly to 4-nitrophenyl 2-[ 18 F]fluoropropionate, and the biodistribution of the radiolabeled peptides was compared with that of their nonsulfonated, clinically relevant counterparts, [ 18 F]GalactoRGD and [ 18 F]FPPRGD2. Site-specific sulfonation of the tyrosine residues was shown to increase hydrophilicity and improve biodistribution of the RGD peptides, despite contributing just 79 Da toward the MW, compared with 189 Da for both the "Galacto" and mini-PEG moieties, suggesting this may be a broadly applicable approach to enhancing biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides.

  7. Mer Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Disseminated Prostate Cancer Cellular Dormancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cackowski, Frank C; Eber, Matthew R; Rhee, James; Decker, Ann M; Yumoto, Kenji; Berry, Janice E; Lee, Eunsohl; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Jung, Younghun; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Taichman, Russell S

    2017-04-01

    Many prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences are thought to be due to reactivation of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). We previously found a role of the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK in PCa dormancy regulation. However, the mechanism and contributions of the individual TAM receptors is largely unknown. Knockdown of MERTK, but not AXL or TYRO3 by shRNA in PCa cells induced a decreased ratio of P-Erk1/2 to P-p38, increased expression of p27, NR2F1, SOX2, and NANOG, induced higher levels of histone H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, and induced a G1/G0 arrest, all of which are associated with dormancy. Similar effects were also observed with siRNA. Most importantly, knockdown of MERTK in PCa cells increased metastasis free survival in an intra-cardiac injection mouse xenograft model. MERTK knockdown also failed to inhibit PCa growth in vitro and subcutaneous growth in vivo, which suggests that MERTK has specificity for dormancy regulation or requires a signal from the PCa microenvironment. The effects of MERTK on the cell cycle and histone methylation were reversed by p38 inhibitor SB203580, which indicates the importance of MAP kinases for MERTK dormancy regulation. Overall, this study shows that MERTK stimulates PCa dormancy escape through a MAP kinase dependent mechanism, also involving p27, pluripotency transcription factors, and histone methylation. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 891-902, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mefloquine neurotoxicity is mediated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Yu, Yingchun; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Among several available antimalarial drugs, mefloquine has proven to be effective against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and remains the drug of choice for both therapy and chemoprophylaxis. However, mefloquine is known to cause adverse neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms, which offset its therapeutic advantage. The exact mechanisms leading to the adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are poorly defined. Alterations in neurotransmitter release and calcium homeostasis, the inhibition of cholinesterases and the interaction with adenosine A(2A) receptors have been hypothesized to play prominent roles in mediating the deleterious effects of this drug. Our recent data have established that mefloquine can also trigger oxidative damage and subsequent neurodegeneration in rat cortical primary neurons. Furthermore, we have utilized a system biology-centered approach and have constructed a pathway model of cellular responses to mefloquine, identifying non-receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) as a critical target in mediating mefloquine neurotoxicity. In this study, we sought to establish an experimental validation of Pyk2 using gene-silencing techniques (siRNA). We have examined whether the downregulation of Pyk2 in primary rat cortical neurons alters mefloquine neurotoxicity by evaluating cell viability, apoptosis and oxidative stress. Results from our study have confirmed that mefloquine neurotoxicity is associated with apoptotic response and oxidative injury, and we have demonstrated that mefloquine affects primary rat cortical neurons, at least in part, via Pyk2. The implication of these findings may prove beneficial in suppressing the neurological side effects of mefloquine and developing effective therapeutic modalities to offset its adverse effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  10. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieńska, Małgorzata; Labus, Karolina; Lewańczuk, Marcin; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Liesiene, Jolanta; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2), which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native) to 30% (immobilized enzyme). To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme) and 70% (immobilized). A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity.

  11. Effective L-Tyrosine Hydroxylation by Native and Immobilized Tyrosinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cieńska

    Full Text Available Hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA by immobilized tyrosinase in the presence of ascorbic acid (AH2, which reduces DOPA-quinone to L-DOPA, is characterized by low reaction yields that are mainly caused by the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by L-DOPA and AH2. The main aim of this work was to compare processes with native and immobilized tyrosinase to identify the conditions that limit suicide inactivation and produce substrate conversions to L-DOPA of above 50% using HPLC analysis. It was shown that immobilized tyrosinase does not suffer from partitioning and diffusion effects, allowing a direct comparison of the reactions performed with both forms of the enzyme. In typical processes, additional aeration was applied and boron ions to produce the L-DOPA and AH2 complex and hydroxylamine to close the cycle of enzyme active center transformations. It was shown that the commonly used pH 9 buffer increased enzyme stability, with concomitant reduced reactivity of 76%, and that under these conditions, the maximal substrate conversion was approximately 25 (native to 30% (immobilized enzyme. To increase reaction yield, the pH of the reaction mixture was reduced to 8 and 7, producing L-DOPA yields of approximately 95% (native enzyme and 70% (immobilized. A three-fold increase in the bound enzyme load achieved 95% conversion in two successive runs, but in the third one, tyrosinase lost its activity due to strong suicide inactivation caused by L-DOPA processing. In this case, the cost of the immobilized enzyme preparation is not overcome by its reuse over time, and native tyrosinase may be more economically feasible for a single use in L-DOPA production. The practical importance of the obtained results is that highly efficient hydroxylation of monophenols by tyrosinase can be obtained by selecting the proper reaction pH and is a compromise between complexation and enzyme reactivity.

  12. State-by-state investigation of destructive interference in resonance Raman spectra of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion with the simplified sum-over-states approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabalo, Jerry B; Saikin, Semion K; Emmons, Erik D; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-16

    UV resonance Raman scattering is uniquely sensitive to the molecular electronic structure as well as intermolecular interactions. To better understand the relationship between electronic structure and resonance Raman cross section, we carried out combined experimental and theoretical studies of neutral tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. We studied the Raman cross sections of four vibrational modes as a function of excitation wavelength, and we analyzed them in terms of the contributions of the individual electronic states as well as of the Albrecht A and B terms. Our model, which is based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), reproduced the experimental resonance Raman spectra and Raman excitation profiles for both studied molecules with good agreement. We found that for the studied modes, the contributions of Albrecht's B terms in the Raman cross sections were important across the frequency range spanning the L(a,b) and B(a,b) electronic excitations in tyrosine and the tyrosinate anion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interference with high-energy states had a significant impact and could not be neglected even when in resonance with a lower-energy state. The symmetry of the vibrational modes served as an indicator of the dominance of the A or B mechanisms. Excitation profiles calculated with a damping constant estimated from line widths of the electronic absorption bands had the best consistency with experimental results.

  13. Human glioblastoma ADF cells express tyrosinase, L-tyrosine hydroxylase and melanosomes and are sensitive to L-tyrosine and phenylthiourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, Antonella; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Colafarina, Sabrina; Cimini, Anna Maria; Ragnelli, Anna Maria; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Miranda, Michele

    2006-06-01

    Melanocytes and neuroblasts share the property of transforming L-tyrosine through two distinct metabolic pathways leading to melanogenesis and catecholamine synthesis, respectively. While tyrosinase (TYR) activity has been shown to be expressed by neuroblastoma it remains to be established as to whether also glioblastomas cells are endowed with this property. We have addressed this issue using the human continuous glioblastoma cell line ADF. We demonstrated that these cells possess tyrosinase as well as L-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and synthesize melanosomes. Because the two pathways are potentially cyto-genotoxic due to production of quinones, semiquinones, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have also investigated the expression of the peroxisomal proliferators activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and nuclear factor-kB (NFkB) transcription factor as well the effect of L-tyrosine concentration on cell survival. We report that L-tyrosine down-regulates PPARalpha expression in ADF cells but not neuroblastoma and that this aminoacid and phenylthiourea (PTU) induces apoptosis in glioblastoma and neuroblastoma. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Landfilling of waste incineration residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas; Cai, Zuansi

    2002-01-01

    Residues from waste incineration are bottom ashes and air-pollution-control (APC) residues including fly ashes. The leaching of heavy metals and salts from the ashes is substantial and a wide spectrum of leaching tests and corresponding criteria have been introduced to regulate the landfilling...

  15. Spectrofluorometric and Molecular Modeling Studies on Binding of Nitrite Ion with Bovine Hemoglobin: Effect of Nitrite Ion on Amino Acid Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, T.; Bagheri, H.; Afkhami, A.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between nitrite ion and bovine hemoglobin was investigated by a spectrofluorometric technique. The experimental results indicated that the interaction causes a static quenching of the fluorescence of bovine hemoglobin, that the binding reaction is spontaneous, and that H-bonding interactions play a major role in binding of this ion to bovine hemoglobin. The formation constant for this interaction was calculated. Based on Förster's theory of nonradiative energy transfer, the binding distance between this ion and bovine hemoglobin was determined. Furthermore, the interaction of nitrite ion with tyrosine and tryptophan was investigated with synchronous fluorescence. There was no significant shift of the maximum emission wavelength with interactions of the mentioned ion with bovine hemoglobin, which implies that interaction of nitrite ion with bovine hemoglobin does not affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, the effect of nitrite ion on amino acid residues of bovine hemoglobin was studied by a molecular docking technique.

  16. Statistical inference on residual life

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    This is a monograph on the concept of residual life, which is an alternative summary measure of time-to-event data, or survival data. The mean residual life has been used for many years under the name of life expectancy, so it is a natural concept for summarizing survival or reliability data. It is also more interpretable than the popular hazard function, especially for communications between patients and physicians regarding the efficacy of a new drug in the medical field. This book reviews existing statistical methods to infer the residual life distribution. The review and comparison includes existing inference methods for mean and median, or quantile, residual life analysis through medical data examples. The concept of the residual life is also extended to competing risks analysis. The targeted audience includes biostatisticians, graduate students, and PhD (bio)statisticians. Knowledge in survival analysis at an introductory graduate level is advisable prior to reading this book.

  17. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  18. The usefulness of dynamic O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET in the clinical evaluation of brain tumors in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkl, Veronika; Cleff, Corvin; Stoffels, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Experience regarding O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in children and adolescents with brain tumors is limited. METHODS: Sixty-nine (18)F-FET PET scans of 48 children and adolescents (median age, 13 y; range, 1-18 y) were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-six scans...... to assess newly diagnosed cerebral lesions, 24 scans for diagnosing tumor progression or recurrence, 8 scans for monitoring of chemotherapy effects, and 11 scans for the detection of residual tumor after resection were obtained. Maximum and mean tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRs) were determined at 20-40 min...... decision making in pediatric brain tumor patients....

  19. Crystal Structure of the Frizzled-Like Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiegler, A.; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is an essential receptor tyrosine kinase for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Activation of MuSK by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), the agrin receptor, leads to clustering of acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic side of the NMJ. The ectodomain of MuSK comprises three immunoglobulin-like domains and a cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) related to those in Frizzled proteins, the receptors for Wnts. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MuSK Fz-CRD at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a five-disulfide-bridged domain similar to CRDs of Frizzled proteins but with a divergent C-terminal region. An asymmetric dimer present in the crystal structure implicates surface hydrophobic residues that may function in homotypic or heterotypic interactions to mediate co-clustering of MuSK, rapsyn, and acetylcholine receptors at the NMJ.

  20. A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Unknown Primary that Responded to the Multi-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Lenvatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Kimura-Tsuchiya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lenvatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, fibroblast growth factor receptors 1 through 4, as well as platelet-derived growth factor receptor α, RET, and KIT. At present, lenvatinib is used in the treatment of thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of a 67-year-old patient with squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary who was effectively treated with lenvatinib. The patient was initially diagnosed as having undifferentiated thyroid cancer, and after total thyroidectomy and bilateral lymph node dissection, lenvatinib was administered for the treatment of residual lymph node metastasis. A computed tomography scan after 1 month of lenvatinib administration showed marked regression of the lymph nodes, but interstitial pneumonia was also detected. Because the drug lymphocyte stimulation test for lenvatinib was strongly positive, we concluded that the interstitial pneumonia was induced by lenvatinib. The interstitial pneumonia only improved by the withdrawal of lenvatinib. Finally, his thyroid tumor was diagnosed as a metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma; however, we were unable to identify the primary lesion. This is the first reported case of interstitial pneumonia induced by lenvatinib.

  1. Consequences of two naturally occurring missense mutations in the structure and function of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; López-Herrera, Gabriela; Maravillas-Montero, José L; Vences-Catalán, Felipe; Mogica-Martínez, Dolores; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco J; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2012-04-01

    Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a key protein in the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway and plays an essential role in the differentiation of B lymphocytes. X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary humoral immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gene encoding BTK. Previously, we identified two novel variations, L111P and E605G, in BTK; these are localized within the pleckstrin homology and Src homology 1 domains, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the potential effects of these variations on the structural conformation and the function of BTK. Using in silico methods, we found that the L111P and E650G variations are not located directly in protein-protein interfaces but close to them. They distorted the native structural conformation of the BTK protein, affecting not only its geometry and stability but also its ability for protein recognition and in consequence its functionality. To confirm the results of the in silico assays, WT BTK, L111P, and E650G variants were expressed in the BTK-deficient DT40 cell line. The mutant proteins exhibited an absence of catalytic activity, aberrant redistribution after BCR-crosslinking, and deficient intracellular calcium mobilization. This work demonstrates that L111 and E605 residues are fundamental for the activation and function of BTK. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cutaneous metabolic pathway of tyrosine as a precursor to melanin in Asinara’s white donkey, Equus asinus L., 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Cappai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available L-tyrosine (L-Tyr is a conditionally indispensable amino acid for Equids. The biologic role of L-Tyr is ubiquitous, being involved in the production of hair and skin pigments. The white donkeys of Asinara island display a peculiar white coat, with life-long hypopigmentation of skin, hairs and eyes. Our results underline how the white phenotype is due to a disorder of melanin biosynthesis, detected in skin biopsies and on hair bulbs through immunohistochemical and enzymatic assays. The metabolic pathway of L-Tyr is compatible with the clinical frame of ocular-cutaneous albinism (OCA. The enzymatic activity in hair bulbs for the conversion of L-Tyr to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenilalanine (L-DOPA tested negative, but positive for L-DOPA conversion into eumelanin in the 100% of the Asinara’s white donkey. This is the case of a negative-tyrosinase albinism, which contemporarily excludes dietary deficiencies of phenylalanine (Phe or L-Tyr and potential incapability of Tyr intestinal uptake or Tyr conversion from Phe. The tyrosinase (TYR residual activity positively and significantly (P=0.012 correlates (P=0.897 with the albino phenotype of the Asinara’s white donkey. These results definitely point to the fact that Asinara’s white donkey population owes its phenotype to TYR residual activity, thus on genetic basis. From a comparative point of view, the albino form of the Asinara’s white donkeys is similar to the human OCA type 1, from which however differs for positively testing to L-DOPA conversion, upon incubation of hair bulbs in L-DOPA solutions.

  3. Two novel tyrosine-containing peptides (Tyr(4)) of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the families Coccinellidae and Silphidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2015-11-01

    Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family of peptides have been identified from the corpora cardiaca (CC) of two species of beetles representing two families, the Silphidae and the Coccinellidae. A crude CC extract (0.3 gland equivalents) of the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, was active in mobilizing trehalose in a heterologous assay using the cockroach Periplaneta americana, whereas the CC extract (0.5 gland equivalents) of the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis, exhibited no hypertrehalosemic activity. Primary sequences of one adipokinetic hormone from each species were elucidated by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The multiple MS(N) electrospray mass data revealed an octapeptide with an unusual tyrosine residue at position 4 for each species: pGlu-Leu-Thr-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for N. vespilloides (code-named Nicve-AKH) and pGlu-Ile-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Gly-Trp amide for H. axyridis (code-named Harax-AKH). Assignment of the correct sequences was confirmed by synthesis of the peptides and co-elution in reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection or by LC-MS. Moreover, synthetic peptides were shown to be active in the heterologous cockroach assay system, but Harax-AKH only at a dose of 30 pmol, which explains the negative result with the crude CC extract. It appears that the tyrosine residue at position 4 can be used as a diagnostic feature for certain beetle adipokinetic peptides, because this feature has not been found in another order other than Coleoptera.

  4. Sulphur Atoms from Methionines Interacting with Aromatic Residues Are Less Prone to Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledo, Juan C.; Cantón, Francisco R.; Veredas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Methionine residues exhibit different degrees of susceptibility to oxidation. Although solvent accessibility is a relevant factor, oxidation at particular sites cannot be unequivocally explained by accessibility alone. To explore other possible structural determinants, we assembled different sets of oxidation-sensitive and oxidation-resistant methionines contained in human proteins. Comparisons of the proteins containing oxidized methionines with all proteins in the human proteome led to the conclusion that the former exhibit a significantly higher mean value of methionine content than the latter. Within a given protein, an examination of the sequence surrounding the non-oxidized methionine revealed a preference for neighbouring tyrosine and tryptophan residues, but not for phenylalanine residues. However, because the interaction between sulphur atoms and aromatic residues has been reported to be important for the stabilization of protein structure, we carried out an analysis of the spatial interatomic distances between methionines and aromatic residues, including phenylalanine. The results of these analyses uncovered a new determinant for methionine oxidation: the S-aromatic motif, which decreases the reactivity of the involved sulphur towards oxidants. PMID:26597773

  5. Csk-Induced Phosphorylation of Src at Tyrosine 530 is Essential for H2O2-Mediated Suppression of ERK1/2 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bo Kyung; Kwon, Kihwan; Kang, Jihee Lee; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal transducers involved in various cellular events such as growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Previous studies have reported that H2O2 leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), one of the MAPKs in endothelial cells. The current study shows that H2O2 suppressed ERK1/2 activation and phosphorylation at specific concentrations and times in human umbilical vein endothelial cells but not in immortalized mouse aortic endothelial cells or human astrocytoma cell line CRT-MG. Phosphorylation of other MAPK family members (i.e., p38 and JNK) was not suppressed by H2O2. The decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H2O2 was inversely correlated with the level of phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 530. Using siRNA, it was found that H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 was dependent on Csk. Physiological laminar flow abrogated, but oscillatory flow did not affect, the H2O2-induced suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In conclusion, H2O2-induced Csk translocation to the plasma membrane leads to phosphorylation of Src at the tyrosine 530 residue resulting in a reduction of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Physiological laminar flow abrogates this effect of H2O2 by inducing phosphorylation of Src tyrosine 419. These findings broaden our understanding of signal transduction mechanisms in the endothelial cells against oxidative stress. PMID:26234813

  6. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  7. Src drives the Warburg effect and therapy resistance by inactivating pyruvate dehydrogenase through tyrosine-289 phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Anitha K.; Lim, Sangbin; Zhang, Ying; Charles, Steve; Tarrash, Miriam; Fu, Xueqi; Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Trevino, Jose G.; Tan, Ming; Lu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    The Warburg effect, which reflects cancer cells' preference for aerobic glycolysis over glucose oxidation, contributes to tumor growth, progression and therapy resistance. The restraint on pyruvate flux into mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in cancer cells is in part attributed to the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. Src is a prominent oncogenic non-receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes cancer cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance to conventional and targeted therapies. However, the potential role of Src in tumor metabolism remained unclear. Here we report that activation of Src attenuated PDH activity and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conversely, Src inhibitors activated PDH and increased cellular ROS levels. Src inactivated PDH through direct phosphorylation of tyrosine-289 of PDH E1α subunit (PDHA1). Indeed, Src was the main kinase responsible for PDHA1 tyrosine phosphorylation in cancer cells. Expression of a tyrosine-289 non-phosphorable PDHA1 mutant in Src-hyperactivated cancer cells restored PDH activity, increased mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress, decreased experimental metastasis, and sensitized cancer cells to pro-oxidant treatment. The results suggest that Src contributes to the Warburg phenotype by inactivating PDH through tyrosine phosphorylation, and the metabolic effect of Src is essential for Src-driven malignancy and therapy resistance. Combination therapies consisting of both Src inhibitors and pro-oxidants may improve anticancer efficacy. PMID:26848621

  8. Elicitor-Induced l-Tyrosine Decarboxylase from Plant Cell Suspension Cultures : II. Partial Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, I A; Brodelius, P E

    1988-09-01

    Properties of purified l-tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) from elicitor-induced cell suspension cultures of Eschscholtzia californica Cham. and Thalictrum rugosum Ait. are described. l-Tyrosine decarboxylase is a dimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 112,600 +/- 600 daltons. The isoelectric point was estimated to be at pH 5.2 and pH 5.4 for the enzyme from E. californica and T. rugosum, respectively. The purified enzymes were stabilized in the presence of pyridoxal-5-phosphate. Optimum pH for the enzyme from both plants was found to be 8.4. Enzyme activity was dependent on exogeneously supplied pyridoxal-5-phosphate. The enzyme decarboxylated l-tyrosine and l-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine but was inactive toward l-phenylalanine and l-tryptophan. Apparent K(m) values of Eschscholtzia- and Thalictrum-decarboxylase for l-tyrosine were 0.25 +/- 0.03 and 0.27 +/- 0.04 millimolar, respectively. Similar affinities were found for l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Eschscholtzial-tyrosine decarboxylase was strongly inhibited by the phenylalanine analogue l-alpha-aminooxy-beta-phenylpropionate and largely unaffected by d,l-alpha-monofluoromethyl-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and alpha-difluoromethyltyrosine.

  9. Development of amperometric L-tyrosine sensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanchana, P.; Lavanya, N.; Sekar, C., E-mail: Sekar2025@gmail.com

    2014-02-01

    A novel biosensor based on Fe-doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HA) nanoparticles and tyrosinase has been developed for the detection of L-tyrosine. Nanostructured Fe-HA was synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method, and its phase formation, morphology and magnetic property were examined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Electrochemical performance of the nano Fe-HA/tyrosinase modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for detection of L-tyrosine was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric methods. The fabricated biosensor exhibited a linear response to L-tyrosine over a wide concentration range of 1.0 × 10{sup −7} to 1.0 × 10{sup −5} M with a detection limit of 245 nM at pH 7.0. In addition, the fabricated sensor showed an excellent selectivity, good reproducibility, long-term stability and anti-interference towards the determination of L-tyrosine. - Highlights: • A novel amperometric L-tyrosine biosensor has been fabricated using nanostructured Fe-HA. • The fabricated sensor exhibits a wide linear range, good stability and high reproducibility. • Fe-HA assists microenvironment and direct electron transfer between enzyme and electrode surface. • The nano Fe-HA and electrode fabrication procedure are simple and less expensive.

  10. Tyrosine 402 Phosphorylation of Pyk2 Is Involved in Ionomycin-Induced Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yun; Mou, Zheng; Chu, Shifeng; Chen, Xiaoyu; He, Wenbin; Guo, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuhe; Takahashi, Masami; Chen, Naihong

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases, which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, are implicated in many neural processes. However, the relationship between protein tyrosine kinases and neurotransmitter release remains unknown. In this study, we found that ionomycin, a Ca2+ ionophore, concurrently induced asynchronous neurotransmitter release and phosphorylation of a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), in clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and cerebellar granule cells, whereas introduction of Pyk2 siRNA dramatically suppressed ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release. Further study indicated that Tyr-402 (Y402) in Pyk2, instead of other tyrosine sites, underwent rapid phosphorylation after ionomycin induction in 1 min to 2 min. We demonstrated that the mutant of Pyk2 Y402 could abolish ionomycin-induced dopamine (DA) release by transfecting cells with recombinant Pyk2 and its mutants (Y402F, Y579F, Y580F, and Y881F). In addition, Src inhibition could prolong phosphorylation of Pyk2 Y402 and increase DA release. These findings suggested that Pyk2 was involved in ionomycin-induced neurotransmitter release through phosphorylation of Y402. PMID:24718602

  11. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: ETHYLENE OXIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes the residual risk assessment for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. For stationary sources, section 112 (f) of the Clean Air Act requires EPA to assess risks to human health and the environment following implementation of technology-based control standards. If these technology-based control standards do not provide an ample margin of safety, then EPA is required to promulgate addtional standards. This document describes the methodology and results of the residual risk assessment performed for the Ethylene Oxide Commercial Sterilization source category. The results of this analyiss will assist EPA in determining whether a residual risk rule for this source category is appropriate.

  12. Nitrogen availability of biogas residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed Fouda, Sara

    2011-09-07

    The objectives of this study were to characterize biogas residues either unseparated or separated into a liquid and a solid phase from the fermentation of different substrates with respect to their N and C content. In addition, short and long term effects of the application of these biogas residues on the N availability and N utilization by ryegrass was investigated. It is concluded that unseparated or liquid separated biogas residues provide N at least corresponding to their ammonium content and that after the first fertilizer application the C{sub org}:N{sub org} ratio of the biogas residues was a crucial factor for the N availability. After long term application, the organic N accumulated in the soil leads to an increased release of N.

  13. Residual stress analysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques which are or could be employed to measure residual stresses are outlined. They include X-ray and neutron diffraction. Comments are made on the reliability and accuracy to be expected from particular techniques

  14. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  15. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  16. Giant hub Src and Syk tyrosine kinase thermodynamic profiles recapitulate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Thermodynamic scaling theory, previously applied mainly to small proteins, here analyzes quantitative evolution of the titled functional network giant hub enzymes. The broad domain structure identified homologically is confirmed hydropathically using amino acid sequences only. The most surprising results concern the evolution of the tyrosine kinase globular surface roughness from avians to mammals, which is first order, compared to the evolution within mammals from rodents to humans, which is second order. The mystery of the unique amide terminal region of proto oncogene tyrosine protein kinase is resolved by the discovery there of a rare hydroneutral septad targeting cluster, which is paralleled by an equally rare octad catalytic cluster in tyrosine kinase in humans and a few other species (cat and dog). These results, which go far towards explaining why these proteins are among the largest giant hubs in protein interaction networks, use no adjustable parameters.

  17. New insights into biodrying mechanism associated with tryptophan and tyrosine degradations during sewage sludge biodrying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Krafft, Thomas; Chen, Tong-Bin; Lv, Wen-Zhou; Gao, Ding; Zhang, Han-Yan

    2017-11-01

    Sewage sludge biodrying is a treatment that uses bio-heat generated from organic degradation to remove water from sewage sludge. Dewatering is still limited during biodrying, due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in sludge. To study the biodrying mechanism associated with EPS compositions tryptophan and tyrosine degradations, this study investigated the microbial function in sludge biodrying material. This study conducted a taxonomic analysis of biodrying material; determined the most abundant genetic functions; analyzed the functional microorganisms involved in the degradations of tryptophan and tyrosine; and summarized the metabolic pathways. The results indicated efficient degradations of tryptophan and tyrosine were observed during the initial thermophilic phase; functional microorganisms were mainly from the phyla Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, enriched with genes involved in amino acid transport and metabolism. These findings highlight the potentially important microorganisms and typical pathways that may help improve dewaterability during biodegradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Boar sperm storage capacity of BTS and Androhep Plus: viability, motility, capacitation, and tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Charlotte; Beaulieu, Martin; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos; Guillemette, Christine; Bailey, Janice L

    2004-09-01

    Androhep Plus, a long-term extender (up to 7 days) and Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS), a short-term extender (up to 3 days), are commonly used for liquid storage of porcine semen. To test the hypothesis that modifications in sperm viability, motility, chlortetracycline (CTC) fluorescence patterns, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation occur during semen storage in extenders, we compared these end points at different periods of storage in either Androhep Plus or BTS. Sperm from five boars were assessed daily over 12 days of storage (n = 5 ejaculates from different boars). Viability was not different (P BTS (P BTS. A tyrosine-phosphorylated protein of Mr 21,000 appeared after 10 days in sperm incubated in BTS, and was identified as a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase. Therefore, modifications in viability, motility, CTC fluorescence patterns, and sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation were apparent during sperm storage in extenders; these may affect the fertilizing capacity of the semen.

  19. Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in the Biological Functions Associated with Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi W. Ijiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In sexual reproduction, two gamete cells (i.e., egg and sperm fuse (fertilization to create a newborn with a genetic identity distinct from those of the parents. In the course of these developmental processes, a variety of signal transduction events occur simultaneously in each of the two gametes, as well as in the fertilized egg/zygote/early embryo. In particular, a growing body of knowledge suggests that the tyrosine kinase Src and/or other protein-tyrosine kinases are important elements that facilitate successful implementation of the aforementioned processes in many animal species. In this paper, we summarize recent findings on the roles of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in many sperm-related processes (from spermatogenesis to epididymal maturation, capacitation, acrosomal exocytosis, and fertilization.

  20. Vesícula residual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio C. U. Coelho

    Full Text Available Our objective is to report three patients with recurrent severe upper abdominal pain secondary to residual gallbladder. All patients had been subjected to cholecystectomy from 1 to 20 years before. The diagnosis was established after several episodes of severe upper abdominal pain by imaging exams: ultrasonography, tomography, or endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Removal of the residual gallbladder led to complete resolution of symptoms. Partial removal of the gallbladder is a very rare cause of postcholecystectomy symptoms.

  1. Structural Basis for Autoinhibition of c-Abl Tyrosine Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Bhushan; Hantschel, Oliver; Young, Matthew A.; Scheffzek,Klaus; Veach, Darren; Bornmann, William; Clarkson, Bayard; Superti-Furga,Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2003-03-21

    c-Abl is normally regulated by an autoinhibitory mechanism, the disruption of which leads to chronic myelogenous leukemia. The details of this mechanism have been elusive because c-Abl lacks aphosphotyrosine residue that triggers the assembly of the autoinhibited form of the closely related Src kinases by internally engaging the SH2 domain. Crystal structures of c-Abl show that the N-terminal myristoyl modification of c-Abl 1b binds to the kinase domain and induces conformational changes that allow the SH2 and SH3 domains to dock onto it. Autoinhibited c-Abl forms an assembly that is strikingly similar to that of inactive Src kinases but with specific differences that explain the differential ability of the drug STI-571/Gleevec/imatinib (STI-571)to inhibit the catalytic activity of Abl, but not that of c-Src.

  2. A Mutational Analysis of Residues in Cholera Toxin A1 Necessary for Interaction with Its Substrate, the Stimulatory G Protein Gsα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Jobling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea requires cholera toxin (CT-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP-ribosylation of stimulatory G protein (Gsα in enterocytes. CT is an AB5 toxin with an inactive CTA1 domain linked via CTA2 to a pentameric receptor-binding B subunit. Allosterically activated CTA1 fragment in complex with NAD+ and GTP-bound ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6-GTP differs conformationally from the CTA1 domain in holotoxin. A surface-exposed knob and a short α-helix (formed, respectively, by rearranging “active-site” and “activation” loops in inactive CTA1 and an ADP ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT motif, all located near the CTA1 catalytic site, were evaluated for possible roles in recognizing Gsα. CT variants with one, two or three alanine substitutions at surface-exposed residues within these CTA1 motifs were tested for assembly into holotoxin and ADP-ribosylating activity against Gsα and diethylamino-(benzylidineamino-guanidine (DEABAG, a small substrate predicted to fit into the CTA1 active site. Variants with single alanine substitutions at H55, R67, L71, S78, or D109 had nearly wild-type activity with DEABAG but significantly decreased activity with Gsα, suggesting that the corresponding residues in native CTA1 participate in recognizing Gsα. As several variants with multiple substitutions at these positions retained partial activity against Gsα, other residues in CTA1 likely also participate in recognizing Gsα.

  3. Marine Tar Residues: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, April M; Hagen, Scott C; Passeri, Davina L

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in the sea floor. However, in many cases, they are transported ashore via currents and waves where they pose a concern to coastal recreation activities, the seafood industry and may have negative effects on wildlife. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on marine tar residue formation, transport, degradation, and distribution. Methods of detection and removal of marine tar residues and their possible ecological effects are discussed, in addition to topics of marine tar research that warrant further investigation. Emphasis is placed on benthic tar residues, with a focus on the remnants of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in particular, which are still affecting the northern Gulf of Mexico shores years after the leaking submarine well was capped.

  4. Typhonium flagelliforme decreases tyrosine kinase and Ki67 expression in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodidjah Chodidjah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Worldwide, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women after lung cancer. Treatments include surgery, radiation, immunotherapy and chemotherapy, but are not effective. Tyrosine kinase and Ki67 protein are markers of proliferation. Typhonium flagelliforme ethanol extract (TFEE has been shown to inhibit proliferation of Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7 cells in culture. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of administration of TFEE on tyrosine kinase and Ki67 expression in mice. Methods This experimental study using post test randomized design with control group was conducted in 24 tumor-bearing CH3 mice. They were randomly divided into 4 groups, consisting of one control and 3 treatment groups (TI, T2, T3 treated daily for 30 days with 0.2 ml TFEE at dosages of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kgBW, respectively. On day 31 the tumor tissues were collected and their tyrosine kinase and Ki67 expression were levels assessed using ELISA and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Tyrosine kinase and Ki67 expression levels were analyzed, respectively using Kruskal Wallis test and one-way Anova followed by Bonferroni post hoc test. Results Mean tyrosine kinase level was highest in the control group, followed by T3, T2 and T1 (p=0.019. Mean level of Ki 67 expression was highest in the control group, followed by T2, T3 and T1 (p=0.000. Conclussions Oral administration of TFEE at a dose of 200 mg/kgBW decreases tyrosine kinase levels and Ki 67 expression.

  5. Bioanalytical verification of V-type nerve agent exposure: simultaneous detection of phosphonylated tyrosines and cysteine-containing disulfide-adducts derived from human albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranawetvogl, Andreas; Küppers, Jim; Siegert, Markus; Gütschow, Michael; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Elsinghorst, Paul W; John, Harald

    2018-02-01

    Nerve agents still represent a serious threat to civilian and military personnel as demonstrated by the violent conflict in the Middle East. For verification of poisoning, covalent adducts with endogenous proteins (e.g., human serum albumin, HSA) are valuable long-term biomarkers. Accordingly, we developed a microbore liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/high-resolution mass spectrometry (μLC-ESI MS/HR MS) method for simultaneous detection of HSA-adducts with the V-type nerve agents VX, Chinese VX (CVX), and Russian VX (RVX). Following Pronase-catalyzed proteolysis, novel disulfide-adducts were detected in addition to phosphonylated tyrosine residues. Dipeptide disulfide-adducts were formed between the thiol-containing leaving group of the V-type nerve agents (2-(diisopropylamino)ethanethiol, DPAET, for VX and 2-(diethylamino)ethanethiol, DEAET, for CVX and RVX) and the free thiol group of Cys 34 in HSA (DPAET-CysPro, DEAET-CysPro). We also identified tripeptide disulfide-adducts containing Cys 448 (MetProCys-DPAET, MetProCys-DEAET) and to a lesser extent Cys 514 (AspIleCys-DPAET, AspIleCys-DEAET). Synthetic tripeptide references were used for confirmation of the postulated structures by μLC-ESI MS/HR MS. Lower limits of detection were determined in human plasma, being nearly identical for the three V-type nerve agents, and corresponded to 1-6 μM nerve agent for tyrosine-adducts, 1-3 μM nerve agent for CysPro-adducts, and 6 μM nerve agent for MetProCys-adducts, thus covering concentrations of toxicological relevance. Characterization of proteolysis kinetics revealed stable plateaus for all adducts being reached between 60 and 90 min at 37 °C. Adduct formation kinetics were characterized by simultaneously monitoring the V-type nerve agent, its leaving group, and the corresponding disulfide dimer. Furthermore, adduct formation patterns were investigated as a function of the molar ratio of HSA to V-type nerve agent. Graphical abstract

  6. The molecular basis for RET tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Valentina; Carlomagno, Francesca; Li, Hong-Yu; Santoro, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    RET receptor tyrosine kinase acts as a mutated oncogenic driver in several human malignancies and it is over-expressed in other cancers. Small molecule compounds with RET tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity are being investigated for the targeted treatment of these malignancies. Multi-targeted compounds with RET inhibitory concentration in the nanomolar range have entered clinical practice. This review summarizes mechanisms of RET oncogenic activity and properties of new compounds that, at the preclinical stage, have demonstrated promising anti-RET activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mast cells express tyrosine hydroxylase and store dopamine in a serglycin-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Elin; Calounova, Gabriela; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Here we show that mast cells contain dopamine and that mast cell activation causes dopamine depletion, indicating its presence within secretory granules. Dopamine storage increased during mast cell maturation from bone marrow precursors, and was dependent on the presence of serglycin. Moreover, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis, was induced during mast cell maturation; histidine decarboxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were also induced. Mast cell activation caused a robust induction of histidine decarboxylase, but no stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase 1 expression. The present study points toward a possible role of dopamine in mast cell function.

  8. Tyrosine kinase inhibition: A therapeutic target for the management of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematologic neoplasm with a progressive, ultimately terminal, disease course. In most cases, CML arises owing to the aberrant formation of a chimeric gene for a constitutively active tyrosine kinase. Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. New tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) continue to improve the management of CML, offering alternative options for those resistant to or intolerant of standard TKIs. Here we review the pathobiology of CML and explore emerging strategies to optimize the management of chronic-phase CML, particularly first-line treatment. PMID:24236822

  9. Activation of the TASK-2 channel after cell swelling is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Signe Skyum; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2010-01-01

    , it is demonstrated that mpV(pic) increased the volume-sensitive part of the K(+) efflux 1.3 times. To exclude K(+) efflux via a KCl cotransporter, cellular Cl(-) was substituted with NO(3)(-). Also under these conditions K(+) efflux was completely blocked by genistein. Thus tyrosine kinases seem to be involved...... together with Western blotting and antibodies against phosphotyrosines revealed a cell swelling-induced, time-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the channel. Even though we found an inhibiting effect of PP2 on RVD, neither Src nor the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) seem to be involved. Inhibitors...

  10. Lack of miR-133a Decreases Contractility of Diabetic Hearts: A Role for Novel Cross Talk Between Tyrosine Aminotransferase and Tyrosine Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Zheng, Hong; Sharma, Neeru M; Shahshahan, Hamid R; Patel, Kaushik P; Mishra, Paras K

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have a fundamental role in diabetic heart failure. The cardioprotective miRNA-133a (miR-133a) is downregulated, and contractility is decreased in diabetic hearts. Norepinephrine (NE) is a key catecholamine that stimulates contractility by activating β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR). NE is synthesized from tyrosine by the rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and tyrosine is catabolized by tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). However, the cross talk/link between TAT and TH in the heart is unclear. To determine whether miR-133a plays a role in the cross talk between TH and TAT and regulates contractility by influencing NE biosynthesis and/or β-AR levels in diabetic hearts, Sprague-Dawley rats and miR-133a transgenic (miR-133aTg) mice were injected with streptozotocin to induce diabetes. The diabetic rats were then treated with miR-133a mimic or scrambled miRNA. Our results revealed that miR-133a mimic treatment improved the contractility of the diabetic rat's heart concomitant with upregulation of TH, cardiac NE, β-AR, and downregulation of TAT and plasma levels of NE. In miR-133aTg mice, cardiac-specific miR-133a overexpression prevented upregulation of TAT and suppression of TH in the heart after streptozotocin was administered. Moreover, miR-133a overexpression in CATH.a neuronal cells suppressed TAT with concomitant upregulation of TH, whereas knockdown and overexpression of TAT demonstrated that TAT inhibited TH. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-133a targets TAT. In conclusion, miR-133a controls the contractility of diabetic hearts by targeting TAT, regulating NE biosynthesis, and consequently, β-AR and cardiac function. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Evaluation of residue-residue contact prediction in CASP10

    KAUST Repository

    Monastyrskyy, Bohdan

    2013-08-31

    We present the results of the assessment of the intramolecular residue-residue contact predictions from 26 prediction groups participating in the 10th round of the CASP experiment. The most recently developed direct coupling analysis methods did not take part in the experiment likely because they require a very deep sequence alignment not available for any of the 114 CASP10 targets. The performance of contact prediction methods was evaluated with the measures used in previous CASPs (i.e., prediction accuracy and the difference between the distribution of the predicted contacts and that of all pairs of residues in the target protein), as well as new measures, such as the Matthews correlation coefficient, the area under the precision-recall curve and the ranks of the first correctly and incorrectly predicted contact. We also evaluated the ability to detect interdomain contacts and tested whether the difficulty of predicting contacts depends upon the protein length and the depth of the family sequence alignment. The analyses were carried out on the target domains for which structural homologs did not exist or were difficult to identify. The evaluation was performed for all types of contacts (short, medium, and long-range), with emphasis placed on long-range contacts, i.e. those involving residues separated by at least 24 residues along the sequence. The assessment suggests that the best CASP10 contact prediction methods perform at approximately the same level, and comparably to those participating in CASP9.

  12. The Syk protein tyrosine kinase can function independently of CD45 or Lck in T cell antigen receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, D. H.; Spits, H.; Peyron, J. F.; Rowley, R. B.; Bolen, J. B.; Weiss, A.

    1996-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is a critical component of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling pathway, acting as a positive regulator of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as Lck. Most CD45-deficient human and murine T cell lines are unable to signal through their TCRs.

  13. Cloning of a novel phosphotyrosine binding domain containing molecule, Odin, involved in signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.

    2002-01-01

    We have used a proteomic approach using mass spectrometry to identify signaling molecules involved in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Using affinity purification by anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to enrich for tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, we have identified a novel signaling mo...

  14. Biodegradation of the allelopathic chemical m-tyrosine by Bacillus aquimaris SSC5 involves the homogentisate central pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Kumari, Munesh; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    m-Tyrosine is an amino acid analogue, exuded from the roots of fescue grasses, which acts as a potent allelopathic and a broad spectrum herbicidal chemical. Although the production and toxic effects of m-tyrosine are known, its microbial degradation has not been documented yet. A soil microcosm study showed efficient degradation of m-tyrosine by the inhabitant microorganisms. A bacterial strain designated SSC5, that was able to utilize m-tyrosine as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy, was isolated from the soil microcosm and was characterized as Bacillus aquimaris. Analytical methods such as HPLC, GC-MS, and (1)H-NMR performed on the resting cell samples identified the formation of 3-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (3-OH-PPA), 3-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-OH-PhAc), and homogentisate (HMG) as major intermediates in the m-tyrosine degradation pathway. Enzymatic assays carried out on cell-free lysates of m-tyrosine-induced cells confirmed transamination reaction as the first step of m-tyrosine degradation. The intermediate 3-OH-PhAc thus obtained was further funneled into the HMG central pathway as revealed by a hydroxylase enzyme assay. Subsequent degradation of HMG occurred by ring cleavage catalyzed by the enzyme homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase. This study has significant implications in terms of understanding the environmental fate of m-tyrosine as well as regulation of its phytotoxic effect by soil microorganisms.

  15. Treatment of Breast Cancer Cells by IGF1R Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Combined with Conventional Systemic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Boezen, H. M.; Wesseling, J.

    Aim: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  16. Treatment of breast cancer cells by IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor combined with conventional systemic drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, H.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boezen, H.M.; Wesseling, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor mediating cell growth and survival of cancer cells. We studied responses to IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 combined with conventional systemic drugs in breast cancer cell lines of different clinical subtype.

  17. DMPD: Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12472665 Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase: potential...:545-53. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage-stimulating protein and RON receptor tyrosine kinase:... potentialregulators of macrophage inflammatory activities. PubmedID 12472665 Title Macrophage-stimu

  18. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of O-[11C]methyl-L-tyrosine for tumor imaging by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Tsukada, Hideo; Kubota, Kazuo; Nariai, Tadashi; Harada, Norihiro; Kawamura, Kazunori; Kimura, Yuichi; Oda, Keiichi; Iwata, Ren; Ishii, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    We performed preclinical and clinical studies of O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine, a potential tracer for imaging amino acid transport of tumors by positron emission tomography (PET). Examinations of the radiation-absorbed dose by O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine and the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of O-methyl-L-tyrosine showed suitability of the tracer for clinical use. The whole-body imaging of monkeys and healthy humans by PET showed low uptake of O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine in all normal organs except for the urinary track and bladder, suggesting that the O-[ 11 C]methyl-L-tyrosine PET has the potential for tumor imaging in the whole-body. Finally, the brain tumor imaging was preliminarily demonstrated

  19. The role of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP ACP1) in oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Irina; Costa, Luís; Bicho, Manuel; Coelho, Constança

    2013-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a crucial cellular event that is involved in the most important processes of cellular metabolism. Low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMW-PTP) is a tyrosine phosphatase that presents two active distinct isoforms and is regulated through cysteine oxidation and tyrosine phosphorylation. This enzyme has been linked to tumorigenesis, but its role is considered controversial: it may be considered oncogenic or anti-oncogenic depending on its interaction with different substrates. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that LMW-PTP is involved in epithelial cell migration, a characteristic of tumor cells. This fact strengthens the importance of this enzyme in the oncogenic process and opens new avenues for future research. The study of LMW-PTP and its pathways may enhance therapeutic strategies that target tyrosine phosphorylation and its substrates. In this review, we try to clarify the importance of this protein in carcinogenesis through the analysis of LMW-PTP interaction with different substrates.

  20. Residual stresses around Vickers indents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajares, A.; Guiberteau, F.; Steinbrech, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The residual stresses generated by Vickers indentation in brittle materials and their changes due to annealing and surface removal were studied in 4 mol% yttria partially stabilized zirconia (4Y-PSZ). Three experimental methods to gain information about the residual stress field were applied: (i) crack profile measurements based on serial sectioning, (ii) controlled crack propagation in post indentation bending tests and (iii) double indentation tests with smaller secondary indents located around a larger primary impression. Three zones of different residual stress behavior are deduced from the experiments. Beneath the impression a crack free spherical zone of high hydrostatic stresses exists. This core zone is followed by a transition regime where indentation cracks develop but still experience hydrostatic stresses. Finally, in an outward third zone, the crack contour is entirely governed by the tensile residual stress intensity (elastically deformed region). Annealing and surface removal reduce this crack driving stress intensity. The specific changes of the residual stresses due to the post indentation treatments are described and discussed in detail for the three zones

  1. H-bonding networks of the distal residues and water molecules in the active site of Thermobifida fusca hemoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoletti , Francesco P; Droghetti , Enrica; Howes , Barry D; Bustamante , Juan P; Bonamore , Alessandra; Sciamanna , Natascia; Estrin , Darío A; Feis , Alessandro; Boffi , Alberto; Smulevich , Giulietta

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The ferric form of truncated hemoglobin II from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) and its triple mutant WG8F-YB10F-YCD1F at neutral and alkaline pH, and in the presence of CN(-) have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Tf-trHb contains three polar residues in the distal site, namely TrpG8, TyrCD1 and TyrB10. Whereas TrpG8 can act as a potential hydrogen-bond donor, the tyrosine...

  2. Efficient expression of tyrosine-sulfated proteins in E. coli using an expanded genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang C; Cellitti, Susan E; Geierstanger, Bernhard H; Schultz, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is an important post-translational modification that occurs in higher eukaryotes and is involved in cell-cell communication, viral entry and adhesion. We describe a protocol for the heterologous expression of selectively tyrosine-sulfated proteins in Escherichia coli through the use of an expanded genetic code that co-translationally inserts sulfotyrosine in response to the amber nonsense codon, TAG. The components required for this process, an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase specific for sulfotyrosine and its cognate orthogonal tRNA that recognizes the amber codon, are encoded on the plasmid pSUPAR6-L3-3SY, and their use, along with a simple chemical synthesis of sulfotyrosine, are outlined in this protocol. Specifically, the gene for a protein of interest is mutated such that the codon corresponding to the desired location of tyrosine sulfate is TAG. Co-transformation of an expression vector containing this gene and pSUPAR6-L3-3SY into an appropriate E. coli strain allows the overexpression of the site-specifically sulfated protein with high efficiency and fidelity. The resulting protein contains tyrosine sulfate at any location specified by a TAG codon, making this method significantly simpler and more versatile than competing methods such as in vitro enzymatic sulfation, chemical sulfation and peptide synthesis. Once the proper expression vectors are cloned, our protocol should allow the production of the desired sulfated proteins in <1 week.

  3. Greater Sensitivity of Blood Pressure Than Renal Toxicity to Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Inhibition With Sunitinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lankhorst, Stephanie; Baelde, Hans J; Kappers, Mariëtte H W

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and renal injury are off-target effects of sunitinib, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor used for the treatment of various tumor types. Importantly, these untoward effects are accompanied by activation of the endothelin system. Here, we set up a study to explore the dose dependency...

  4. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergwerff, C.E.; Luman, M.; Blom, H.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and

  5. Engagement of CD81 induces ezrin tyrosine phosphorylation and its cellular redistribution with filamentous actin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg P.; Rajapaksa, Ranjani; Liu, Raymond; Sharpe, Orr; Kuo, Chiung-Chi; Wald Krauss, Sharon; Sagi, Yael; Davis, R. Eric; Staudt, Louis M.; Sharman, Jeff P.; Robinson, William H.; Levy, Shoshana

    2009-06-09

    CD81 is a tetraspanin family member involved in diverse cellular interactions in the immune and nervous systems and in cell fusion events. However, the mechanism of action of CD81 and of other tetraspanins has not been defined. We reasoned that identifying signaling molecules downstream of CD81 would provide mechanistic clues. We engaged CD81 on the surface of Blymphocytes and identified the induced tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the most prominent tyrosine phosphorylated protein was ezrin, an actin binding protein and a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family. We also found that CD81 engagement induces spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and that Syk was involved in tyrosine phosphorylation of ezrin. Ezrin colocalized with CD81 and F-actin upon stimulation and this association was disrupted when Syk activation was blocked. Taken together, these studies suggest a model in which CD81 interfaces between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton by activating Syk, mobilizing ezrin, and recruiting F-actin to facilitate cytoskeletal reorganization and cell signaling. This may be a mechanism explaining the pleiotropic effects induced in response to stimulating cells by anti-CD81 antibodies or by the hepatitis C virus, which uses this molecule as its key receptor.

  6. Syndecan-2 is a novel ligand for the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James R; Xian, Xiaojie; Chaussade, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Syndecan-2 is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that has a cell adhesion regulatory domain contained within its extracellular core protein. Cell adhesion to the syndecan-2 extracellular domain (S2ED) is ß1 integrin dependent; however, syndecan-2 is not an integrin ligand. Here the protein tyrosine p...

  7. Mild impairment of motor nerve repair in mice lacking PTP-BL tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, D.G.; Peters, W.J.M; Schaafsma, I.; Sutmuller, R.P.M.; Oerlemans, F.T.J.J.; Adema, G.J.; Wieringa, B.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Mouse PTP-BL is a large, nontransmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase of unclear physiological function that consists of a KIND domain, a FERM domain, five PDZ domains, and a COOH-terminal catalytic PTP domain. PTP-BL and its human ortholog PTP-BAS have been proposed to play a role in the

  8. Expression of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in the major insulin target tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norris, K; Norris, F; Kono, D H

    1997-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulators of the insulin receptor signal transduction pathway. We have performed a detailed analysis of PTP expression in the major human insulin target tissues or cells (liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and endothelial cells). To obtain a repre...

  9. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and forty...

  10. Brain tumors : L-[1-C-11]tyrosine PET for visualization and quantification of protein synthesis rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruim, J; Willemsen, A T; Molenaar, W M; Waarde, A van; Paans, A M; Heesters, M A; Go, K G; Visser, Gerben; Franssen, E J; Vaalburg, W

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the amino acid tracer L-[1-C-11]-tyrosine was evaluated in 27 patients with primary and recurrent brain tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients underwent either static (n = 14) or dynamic PET (n = 13), with quantification of protein synthesis rate

  11. Tyrosine hydroxylase polymorphism (C-824T) and hypertension: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren J; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) overactivity is present in a large proportion of the hypertensive population and precedes the development of established hypertension. Variations in the proximal promoter of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene have been shown to influence biochemical and physiologi...

  12. Detection of oral dysplasia in animals with fluorine-18-FDG and carbon-11-tyrosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braams, JW; Witjes, MJH; Nooren, CAAM; Nikkels, PGJ; Vaalburg, W; Vermey, A; Roodenburg, JLN

    The uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and L-[1-C-11]tyrosine (TYR) was investigated in male Wistar albino rats with chemically induced dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to correlate the uptake values with the grade of dysplasia, Methods: The palates of 54 rats was painted three

  13. The role of Ryk and Ror receptor tyrosine kinases in Wnt signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, J.; Nusse, R.; van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the Ryk and Ror families were initially classified as orphan receptors because their ligands were unknown. They are now known to contain functional extracellular Wnt-binding domains and are implicated in Wnt-signal transduction in multiple species. Although their

  14. Mutant torsinA interacts with tyrosine hydroxylase in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, C A; Martin, K L; Hutton, M; Delatycki, M B; Cookson, M R; Lockhart, P J

    2009-12-15

    A specific mutation (DeltaE302/303) in the torsinA gene underlies most cases of dominantly inherited early-onset torsion dystonia. This mutation causes the protein to aggregate and form intracellular inclusion bodies in cultured cells and animal models. Co-expression of the wildtype and mutant proteins resulted in the redistribution of the wildtype protein from the endoplasmic reticulum to inclusion bodies in cultured HEK293 cells, and this was associated with increased interaction between the two proteins. Expression of DeltaE302/303 but not wildtype torsinA in primary postnatal midbrain neurons resulted in the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies, predominantly in dopaminergic neurons. Tyrosine hydroxylase was sequestered in these inclusions and this process was mediated by increased protein-protein interaction between mutant torsinA and tyrosine hydroxylase. Analysis in an inducible neuroblastoma cell culture model demonstrated altered tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the presence of the mutant but not wildtype torsinA protein. Our results suggest that the interaction of tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant torsinA may contribute to the phenotype and reported dopaminergic dysfunction in torsinA-mediated dystonia.

  15. Detection of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic neuron cell using gold nanoparticles-based barcode DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jeung Hee; Oh, Byung-Keun; Choi, Jeong Woo

    2013-04-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosysthesis, is predominantly expressed in several cell groups within the brain, including the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. We evaluated the efficacy of this protein-detection method in detecting tyrosine hydroxylase in normal and oxidative stress damaged dopaminergic cells. In this study, a coupling of DNA barcode and bead-based immnunoassay for detecting tyrosine hydroxylaser with PCR-like sensitivity is reported. The method relies on magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies and nanoparticles that are encoded with DNA and antibodies that can sandwich the target protein captured by the nanoparticle-bound antibodies. The aggregate sandwich structures are magnetically separated from solution, and treated to remove the conjugated barcode DNA. The DNA barcodes were identified by PCR analysis. The concentration of tyrosine hydroxylase in dopaminergic cell can be easily and rapidly detected using bio-barcode assay. The bio-barcode assay is a rapid and high-throughput screening tool to detect of neurotransmitter such as dopamine.

  16. A comparison of tyrosine against placebo, phentermine, caffeine, and D-amphetamine during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, William F; Magill, Richard A; Bray, George A; Volaufova, Julia; Smith, Steven R; Lieberman, Harris R; Rood, Jennifer; Hurry, Mark; Anderson, Tai; Ryan, Donna H

    2003-08-01

    Sleep deprivation can impair alertness and cognitive and motor performance. We hypothesized that the amino acid tyrosine might reduce deleterious effects of sleep deprivation. Seventy-six healthy males, age 18-35 years, participated in a four-day protocol that included a habituation night, a baseline night, a 40.5 h period without sleep, and a recovery night. Tyrosine 150 mg/kg, caffeine 300 mg/70 kg, phentermine 37.5 mg, D-amphetamine 20 mg and placebo were administered in a double-blind, randomized fashion to compare their effects on the time it took to fall asleep, on endocrine responses during sleep deprivation, and on sleep quantity, quality and architecture as measured by polysomnography during recovery sleep. When given after 36 h without sleep, tyrosine had no significant effect on any parameter of sleep. D-amphetamine produced marked decrease in sleep drive but caused deleterious effects on many aspects of recovery sleep. Still, D-amphetamine was associated with increased alertness on the first recovery day. Phentermine and caffeine both decreased sleep drive during sleep deprivation, but phentermine impaired rapid-eye-movement (REM) recovery sleep. Tyrosine (when compared to placebo) had no effect on any sleep related measure, but it did stimulate prolactin release.

  17. Fragment-based lead discovery of small molecule inhibitors for the EPHA4 receptor tyrosine kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linden, O.P.J.; Farenc, C; Zoutman, W.H.; Hameetman, L; Wijtmans, M.; Leurs, R.; Tensen, C.P.; Siegal, G.; de Esch, I.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The in silico identification, optimization and crystallographic characterization of a 6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-3H-pyrazolo[3,4-c]isoquinolin-1-amine scaffold as an inhibitor for the EPHA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is described. A database containing commercially available compounds was subjected to an in

  18. Carbon-11 labelled tyrosine to study tumor metabolism by positron emission tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, J.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Paans, A.M.J.; Dijk, T.H. van; Elsinga, P.H.; Zijlstra, J.B.; Piers, D.A.; Mulder, N.H.; Woldring, M.G.; Wynberg, H.

    1986-10-01

    To measure the rate of protein synthesis in human neoplasms by positron emission tomography, we prepared no carrier added DL-(1-/sup 11/C)-tyrosine by /sup 11/C-carboxylation of the appropriate ..cap alpha..-lithioisocyanide followed by hydrolysis of the isocyanide function and removal of the protecting methoxy group. The purification, resolution and solvent switch to saline was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). DL-(1-/sup 11/C)-Tyrosine in 0.1 N NaH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/ buffer was prepared with a radiochemical yield of 8%-16% (EOS, 35 min). The enantiometric separation and solvent switch to saline were achieved in 5 min and 10 min respectively. Consequently l-(1-/sup 11/C)-tyrosine in physiological saline was obtained in 2%-4% radiochemical yield. Tumor accumulation in rats with the experimental WALKER 256 carcinosarcoma was observed for both the L- and D-isomer. Using positron emission tomography a tumor/muscle ratio of two was observed for the L-isomer 15 min after injection. The corresponding figure for the D-isomer was 2.5. The first clinical results with DL-(1-/sup 11/C)-tyrosine show accumulation of radioactivity in meningioma, a primary breast carcinoma and in liver metastases of a colonic carcinoma.

  19. Expression patterns of Src-family tyrosine kinases during Xenopus laevis development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferjentsik, Zoltán; Šindelka, Radek; Jonák, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2009), s. 163-168 ISSN 0214-6282 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/0408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Xenopus laevis * Src-tyrosine kinases * embryonic development Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.161, year: 2009

  20. Peroxidase-mediated cross-linking of a tyrosine-containing peptide with ferulic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudgenoeg, G.; Hilhorst, H.; Piersma, S.R.; Boeriu, C.G.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Laane, C.

    2001-01-01

    The tyrosine-containing peptide Gly-Tyr-Gly (GYG) was oxidatively cross-linked by horseradish peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. As products, covalently coupled di- to pentamers of the peptide were identified by LC-MS. Oxidative cross-linking of ferulic acid with horseradish peroxidase

  1. Lipedema – lack of evidence for the involvement of tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneble, N; Wetzker, R; Wollina, U

    2016-01-01

    Lipedema is a chronic disorder characterized by abnormal distribution of subcutaneous adipose tissue on the proximal extremities, pain and capillary fragility. Its etiology is unknown but in analogy to central obesity, chronic low-level inflammation in adipose tissue has been suggested. There seems to be an increased propagation of pre-adipocytes into mature adipocytes contributing to the massive enlargement of subcutaneous adipose tissue. We investigated whether tyrosine kinases might be involved. Proteins from adipose tissue harvested during microcannular tumescent liposuction in lipedema and in lipomas were subjected to 10% polyacrylamide-gel, transferred to a polyvinylidenfluorid membrane and immunoblotted with indicated P-Tyr-100 antibody followed by enhanced chemiluminescence reaction. A survey of all blots did not reveal tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins with a molecular weight >100 kD in lipedema tissue and controls. These investigations suggest absence of activated growth factor receptors. Some signals indicating unspecific tyrosine-phosphorylation of smaller proteins were detected in tissue of both lipedema patients and controls. The present data suggest that there is no enduring activation of tyrosine kinase pathways of adipogenesis in lipedema as in lipoma controls.

  2. PTP-S2, a nuclear tyrosine phosphatase, is phosphorylated and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PTP-S2 is a tyrosine specific protein phosphatase that binds to DNA and is localized to the nucleus in association with chromatin. It plays a role in the regulation of cell proliferation. Here we show that the subcellular distribution of this protein changes during cell division. While PTP-S2 was localized exclusively to the ...

  3. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-01-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions with signal...

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Ligand-Receptor Pair Prediction by Using Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yarimizu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are essential proteins involved in cellular differentiation and proliferation in vivo and are heavily involved in allergic diseases, diabetes, and onset/proliferation of cancerous cells. Identifying the interacting partner of this protein, a growth factor ligand, will provide a deeper understanding of cellular proliferation/differentiation and other cell processes. In this study, we developed a method for predicting tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from their amino acid sequences. We collected tyrosine kinase ligand-receptor pairs from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP and UniProtKB, filtered them by removing sequence redundancy, and used them as a dataset for machine learning and assessment of predictive performance. Our prediction method is based on support vector machines (SVMs, and we evaluated several input features suitable for tyrosine kinase for machine learning and compared and analyzed the results. Using sequence pattern information and domain information extracted from sequences as input features, we obtained 0.996 of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. This accuracy is higher than that obtained from general protein-protein interaction pair predictions.

  5. Essential domain of receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) for interaction with Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Wada, Akihiro; Yamasaki, Eiki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori produces a potent exotoxin, VacA, which causes progressive vacuolation as well as gastric injury. Although VacA was able to interact with two receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases, RPTPbeta and RPTPalpha, RPTPbeta was found to be responsible for gastric damage caused...

  6. phenylalanine and l-tyrosine as chiral micellar media for the cat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The effect of a range of O-alkyl ester hydrochloride surfactants derived from L-phenylalanine and. L-tyrosine as catalysts on the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl acrylate was studied. Both chain lengths (C8-C14) and head groups of the surfactants were found to influence the yield and ...

  7. The role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J A; Hansen, L H; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    . Mutated GH receptors lacking all but one of these three tyrosines are able to mediate a transcriptional response when transiently transfected into CHO cells together with a Spi 2.1 promoter/luciferase construct. Similarly, these GH receptors were found to be able to mediate activation of Stat5 DNA...

  8. Ultrafast Spectroscopic and AB Initio Computational Investigations on Solvation Dynamics of Neutral and Deprotonated Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashige; Zgierski, Marek Z.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied one of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine, regarding its photophysical properties in various solvent conditions by using a femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique and high-level TDDFT and CC2 computations. In this talk, profound details not only on ultrafast solvation dynamics on a neutral tyrosine in various solvents, but also on the excited-state dynamics for a single- (or doubly-) deprotonated tyrosine under various pH solutions will be presented. In high basicity, a tyrosine shows different absorption/emission spectra, and a total spectrum consists of a combination of these individual spectra that depend on the pH of the solution. The time scale of acid--base equilibrium is essential in solvation dynamics; whereas the protonation is simply controlled by diffusion, the de-protonation is considered to be slow process such that acid--base equilibrium may not be reached in the short-lived excited state after photo-excitation. Experimental and computational approaches taken and insights obtained in this concerted work will be described.

  9. Response to Comment on "Positive Selection of Tyrosine Loss in Metazoan Evolution"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Chris Soon Heng; Schoof, Erwin; Creixell, Pau

    2011-01-01

    Su et al. claim guanine-cytosine (GC) content variation can largely explain the observed tyrosine frequency variation, independent of adaptive evolution of cell-signaling complexity. We found that GC content variation, in the absence of selection for amino acid changes, can only maximally account...

  10. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...

  11. Efficacy of HER2-targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Kümler, Iben; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Therapies targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 are effective in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review the efficacy of HER2-directed therapies, focussing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting HER2 that have been tested in phase II-III studies...

  12. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A new process for recovery of plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste has been demonstrated. It is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, which eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flowsheet concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 = from high chloride-low acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with 1N HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. The plutonium is recovered, after elution, via hydroxide precipitation, while the americium is recovered via NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process are discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are now in progress for MSE residues. Flow sheets for actinide recovery from electrorefining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  13. Actinide recovery from pyrochemical residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avens, L.R.; Clifton, D.G.; Vigil, A.R.

    1985-05-01

    We demonstrated a new process for recovering plutonium and americium from pyrochemical waste. The method is based on chloride solution anion exchange at low acidity, or acidity that eliminates corrosive HCl fumes. Developmental experiments of the process flow chart concentrated on molten salt extraction (MSE) residues and gave >95% plutonium and >90% americium recovery. The recovered plutonium contained 6 2- from high-chloride low-acid solution. Americium and other metals are washed from the ion exchange column with lN HNO 3 -4.8M NaCl. After elution, plutonium is recovered by hydroxide precipitation, and americium is recovered by NaHCO 3 precipitation. All filtrates from the process can be discardable as low-level contaminated waste. Production-scale experiments are in progress for MSE residues. Flow charts for actinide recovery from electro-refining and direct oxide reduction residues are presented and discussed

  14. A comparison of functional and structural consequences of the tyrosine B10 and glutamine E7 motifs in two invertebrate hemoglobins (Ascaris suum and Lucina pectinata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E S; Huang, S; Wang, J; Miller, L M; Vidugiris, G; Kloek, A P; Goldberg, D E; Chance, M R; Wittenberg, J B; Friedman, J M

    1997-10-21

    The architecture of the distal heme pocket in hemoglobins and myoglobins can play an important role in controlling ligand binding dynamics. The size and polarity of the residues occupying the distal pocket may contribute steric and dielectric effects. In vertebrate systems, the distal pocket typically contains a "distal" histidine at position E7 and a leucine at position B10. There are several invertebrate organisms that have hemoglobins or myoglobins that display a pattern in which residues E7 and B10 are a glutamine and tyrosine, respectively. These proteins often have very high oxygen affinities stemming from very slow ligand off rates. In this study, two such hemoglobins, one from the nematode Ascaris suum and the other from the sulfide-fixing clam Lucina pectinata, are compared with respect to conformational and functional properties. Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy and visible resonance Raman spectroscopy are used to probe, respectively, the ligand-dependent hydrogen bonding pattern of the tyrosine residues and the proximal heme pocket interactions. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy is used to probe the dielectric properties of the distal heme pocket through the stretching frequency of carbon monoxide bound to the heme. Functionality is probed through the geminate rebinding of both CO and O2. The findings reveal two very different patterns indicative of two different mechanisms for achieving low oxygen off rates. In Hb Ascaris, a hydrogen bonding network that includes the E7 Gln, B10 Tyr, and oxygen bound to the heme results in a tight cage for the oxygen. Dissociation of the O2 requires a large amplitude conformational fluctuation that results both in a spontaneous dissociation of the oxygen through the loss of hydrogen bond stabilization and in an enhanced probability for ligand escape though the transient disruption and opening of the tight distal cage. In the case of the Hb from Lucina, there is no evidence for a tight cage

  15. Alternatives to crop residues for soil amendment

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, J.M.; Unger, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Metadata only record In semiarid agroecosystems, crop residues can provide important benefits of soil and water conservation, nutrient cycling, and improved subsequent crop yields. However, there are frequently multiple competing uses for residues, including animal forage, fuel, and construction material. This chapter discusses the various uses of crop residues and examines alternative soil amendments when crop residues cannot be left on the soil.

  16. Leaching From Biomass Gasification Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allegrini, Elisa; Boldrin, Alessio; Polletini, A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled with geoche......The aim of the present work is to attain an overall characterization of solid residues from biomass gasification. Besides the determination of chemical and physical properties, the work was focused on the study of leaching behaviour. Compliance and pH-dependence leaching tests coupled...

  17. Carbaryl residues in maize products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, S.M.A.D.; Mansour, S.A.; Mostafa, I.Y.; Hassan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The 14 C-labelled insecticide carbaryl was synthesized from [1- 14 C]-1-naphthol at a specific activity of 3.18mCig -1 . Maize plants were treated with the labelled insecticide under simulated conditions of agricultural practice. Mature plants were harvested and studied for distribution of total residues in untreated grains as popularly roasted and consumed, and in the corn oil and corn germ products. Total residues found under these conditions in the respective products were 0.2, 0.1, 0.45 and 0.16ppm. (author)

  18. Combinatorial construction of toric residues

    OpenAIRE

    Khetan, Amit; Soprounov, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    The toric residue is a map depending on n+1 semi-ample divisors on a complete toric variety of dimension n. It appears in a variety of contexts such as sparse polynomial systems, mirror symmetry, and GKZ hypergeometric functions. In this paper we investigate the problem of finding an explicit element whose toric residue is equal to one. Such an element is shown to exist if and only if the associated polytopes are essential. We reduce the problem to finding a collection of partitions of the la...

  19. The CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase is required for the completion of the activation program leading to lymphokine production in the Jurkat human T cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peyron, J. F.; Verma, S.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Sancho, J.; Terhorst, C.; Spits, H.

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of the T cell antigen receptor, TCR-CD3, induces tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular proteins through activation of a tyrosine kinase. The possible regulatory role of the CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase in this process was explored by studying the functional properties of

  20. Analysis of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine-binding proteins in germinating seeds from Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Valentina; Cramer, Rainer; Krynytskyy, Hryhoriy; Gout, Ivan; Gout, Roman

    2013-06-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in angiosperms has been implicated in various physiological processes, including seed development and germination. In conifers, the role of tyrosine phosphorylation and the mechanisms of its regulation are yet to be investigated. In this study, we examined the profile of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in Scots pine seeds at different stages of germination. We detected extensive protein tyrosine phosphorylation in extracts from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) dormant seeds. In addition, the pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was found to change significantly during seed germination, especially at earlier stages of post-imbibition which coincides with the initiation of cell division, and during the period of intensive elongation of hypocotyls. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of phosphotyrosine signaling, we employed affinity purification and mass spectrometry for the identification of pTyr-binding proteins from the extracts of Scots pine seedlings. Using this approach, we purified two proteins of 10 and 43 kDa, which interacted specifically with pTyr-Sepharose and were identified by mass spectrometry as P. sylvestris defensin 1 (PsDef1) and aldose 1-epimerase (EC:5.1.3.3), respectively. Additionally, we demonstrated that both endogenous and recombinant PsDef1 specifically interact with pTyr-Sepharose, but not Tyr-beads. As the affinity purification approach did not reveal the presence of proteins with known pTyr binding domains (SH2, PTB and C2), we suggest that plants may have evolved a different mode of pTyr recognition, which yet remains to be uncovered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy can cure chronic myeloid leukemia without hitting leukemic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, Tom; Pacheco, Jorge M.; Traulsen, Arne; Dingli, David

    2010-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib, are not considered curative for chronic myeloid leukemia – regardless of the significant reduction of disease burden during treatment – since they do not affect the leukemic stem cells. However, the stochastic nature of hematopoiesis and recent clinical observations suggest that this view must be revisited. Design and Methods We studied the natural history of a large cohort of virtual patients with chronic myeloid leukemia under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy using a computational model of hematopoiesis and chronic myeloid leukemia that takes into account stochastic dynamics within the hematopoietic stem and early progenitor cell pool. Results We found that in the overwhelming majority of patients the leukemic stem cell population undergoes extinction before disease diagnosis. Hence leukemic progenitors, susceptible to tyrosine kinase inhibitor attack, are the natural target for chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. Response dynamics predicted by the model closely match data from clinical trials. We further predicted that early diagnosis together with administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitor opens the path to eradication of chronic myeloid leukemia, leading to the wash out of the aberrant progenitor cells, ameliorating the patient’s condition while lowering the risk of blast transformation and drug resistance. Conclusions Tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy can cure chronic myeloid leukemia, although it may have to be prolonged. The depth of response increases with time in the vast majority of patients. These results illustrate the importance of stochastic effects on the dynamics of acquired hematopoietic stem cell disorders and have direct relevance for other hematopoietic stem cell-derived diseases. PMID:20007137

  2. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Caspase-8 Abrogates Its Apoptotic Activity and Promotes Activation of c-Src

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Jennifer LY; Jia, Song Hui; Parodo, Jean; Plant, Pamela; Lodyga, Monika; Charbonney, Emmanuel; Szaszi, Katalin; Kapus, Andras; Marshall, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) phosphorylate caspase-8A at tyrosine (Y) 397 resulting in suppression of apoptosis. In addition, the phosphorylation of caspase-8A at other sites including Y465 has been implicated in the regulation of caspase-8 activity. However, the functional consequences of these modifications on caspase-8 processing/activity have not been elucidated. Moreover, various Src substrates are known to act as potent Src regulators, but no such role has been explored for caspase-8. We asked whether the newly identified caspase-8 phosphorylation sites might regulate caspase-8 activation and conversely, whether caspase-8 phosphorylation might affect Src activity. Here we show that Src phosphorylates caspase-8A at multiple tyrosine sites; of these, we have focused on Y397 within the linker region and Y465 within the p12 subunit of caspase-8A. We show that phosphomimetic mutation of caspase-8A at Y465 prevents its cleavage and the subsequent activation of caspase-3 and suppresses apoptosis. Furthermore, simultaneous phosphomimetic mutation of caspase-8A at Y397 and Y465 promotes the phosphorylation of c-Src at Y416 and increases c-Src activity. Finally, we demonstrate that caspase-8 activity prevents its own tyrosine phosphorylation by Src. Together these data reveal that dual phosphorylation converts caspase-8 from a pro-apoptotic to a pro-survival mediator. Specifically, tyrosine phosphorylation by Src renders caspase-8 uncleavable and thereby inactive, and at the same time converts it to a Src activator. This novel dynamic interplay between Src and caspase-8 likely acts as a potent signal-integrating switch directing the cell towards apoptosis or survival. PMID:27101103

  3. Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate from Kaempferia galanga inhibits angiogenesis through tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Ekowati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Many tumors express on their receptor tyrosine kinases vascular endothelial growth factor activity associated with angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis through reduction of tyrosine kinase activity is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. The present study aimed to determine the mechanism and potency of ethyl p-methoxycinnamate (EPMC isolated from Kaempferia galanga as angiogenesis inhibitor. Methods A laboratory experimental study was conducted using chorio-allantoic membranes (CAMs of nine-day old chicken eggs induced by 60ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate (EPMC potency was determined at dosages of 30, 60, 90 and 120 mg and compared with celecoxib 60 mg as reference drug and one negative bFGF-induced control group. Neovascularization and endothelial cell count in CAM blood vessels were evaluated. To predict the antiangiogenic mechanism of EPMC, a docking study was performed with the Molegro Virtual Docker program on tyrosine kinase as receptor (PDB 1XKK. Results Angiogenesis stimulation by bFGF was prevented significantly (p<0.05 by EPMC at dosages of 30, 60, 90 and 120 mg and this activity was dose dependent. Molecular docking showed interaction between EPMC functional groups and tyrosine kinase amino acids at Met766, Met793, Thr854, Thr790, Gln791 and Ala743. There was an association between EPMC antiangiogenic activity and docking study results. Conclusions Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate is a potential new angiogenesis inhibitor through interaction with tyrosine kinase. EPMC could be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of angiogenesis-related diseases.

  4. BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Sandra; Vozniak, Michael; Rhodes, Jill; Forcello, Nicholas; Olszta, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The management of chronic myeloid leukemia with BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors has evolved chronic myeloid leukemia into a chronic, manageable disease. A patient-centered approach is important for the appropriate management of chronic myeloid leukemia and optimization of long-term treatment outcomes. The pharmacist plays a key role in treatment selection, monitoring drug-drug interactions, identification and management of adverse events, and educating patients on adherence. The combination of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with unique safety profiles and individual patients with unique medical histories can make managing treatment difficult. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding tyrosine kinase inhibitor-based treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Management strategies for adverse events and considerations for drug-drug interactions will not only vary among patients but also across tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drug-drug interactions can be mild to severe. In instances where co-administration of concomitant medications cannot be avoided, it is critical to understand how drug levels are impacted and how subsequent dose modifications ensure therapeutic drug levels are maintained. An important component of patient-centered management of chronic myeloid leukemia also includes educating patients on the significance of early and regular monitoring of therapeutic milestones, emphasizing the importance of adhering to treatment in achieving these targets, and appropriately modifying treatment if these clinical goals are not being met. Overall, staying apprised of current research, utilizing the close pharmacist-patient relationship, and having regular interactions with patients, will help achieve successful long-term treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in the age of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  5. Weld Residual Stress in Corner Boxing Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuyoshi, Matsuoka; Tokuharu, Yoshii; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport; Ship Research Institute, Ministry of Transport

    1998-01-01

    Fatigue damage often occurs in corner boxing welded joints because of stress concentration and residual stress. The hot spot stress approach is applicable to stress concentration. However, the number of suitable methods for estimating residual stress in welded joints is limited. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the residual stress in corner boxing joints. The method of estimating residual stresses based on the inherent stress technique is presented. Residual stress measurements are per...

  6. Cis and trans regulatory mechanisms control AP2-mediated B cell receptor endocytosis via select tyrosine-based motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Busman-Sahay

    Full Text Available Following antigen recognition, B cell receptor (BCR-mediated endocytosis is the first step of antigen processing and presentation to CD4+ T cells, a crucial component of the initiation and control of the humoral immune response. Despite this, the molecular mechanism of BCR internalization is poorly understood. Recently, studies of activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL have shown that mutations within the BCR subunit CD79b leads to increased BCR surface expression, suggesting that CD79b may control BCR internalization. Adaptor protein 2 (AP2 is the major mediator of receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. The BCR contains five putative AP2-binding YxxØ motifs, including four that are present within two immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs. Using a combination of in vitro and in situ approaches, we establish that the sole mediator of AP2-dependent BCR internalization is the membrane proximal ITAM YxxØ motif in CD79b, which is a major target of mutation in ABC DLBCL. In addition, we establish that BCR internalization can be regulated at a minimum of two different levels: regulation of YxxØ AP2 binding in cis by downstream ITAM-embedded DCSM and QTAT regulatory elements and regulation in trans by the partner cytoplasmic domain of the CD79 heterodimer. Beyond establishing the basic rules governing BCR internalization, these results illustrate an underappreciated role for ITAM residues in controlling clathrin-dependent endocytosis and highlight the complex mechanisms that control the activity of AP2 binding motifs in this receptor system.

  7. Substitution of Active Site Tyrosines with Tryptophan Alters the Free Energy for Nucleotide Flipping by Human Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Jenna M.; Wolfe, Abigail E.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) locates and excises a wide variety of structurally diverse alkylated and oxidized purine lesions from DNA to initiate the base excision repair pathway. Recognition of a base lesion requires flipping of the damaged nucleotide into a relatively open active site pocket between two conserved tyrosine residues, Y127 and Y159. We have mutated each of these amino acids to tryptophan and measured the kinetic effects on the nucleotide flipping and base excision steps. The Y127W and Y159W mutant proteins have robust glycosylase activity toward DNA containing 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), within 4-fold of that of the wildtype enzyme, raising the possibility that tryptophan fluorescence could be used to probe the DNA binding and nucleotide flipping steps. Stopped-flow fluorescence was used to compare the time-dependent changes in tryptophan fluorescence and εA fluorescence. For both mutants, the tryptophan fluorescence exhibited two-step binding with essentially identical rate constants as were observed for the εA fluorescence changes. These results provide evidence that AAG forms an initial recognition complex in which the active site pocket is perturbed and the stacking of the damaged base is disrupted. Upon complete nucleotide flipping, there is further quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence with coincident quenching of the εA fluorescence. Although these mutations do not have large effects on the rate constant for excision of εA, there are dramatic effects on the rate constants for nucleotide flipping that result in 40 to 100-fold decreases in the flipping equilibrium relative to wildtype. Most of this effect is due to an increased rate of unflipping, but surprisingly the Y159W mutation causes a 5-fold increase in the rate constant for flipping. The large effect on the equilibrium for nucleotide flipping explains the greater deleterious effects that these mutations have on the glycosylase activity toward base lesions that are in

  8. Solidification process for sludge residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria

  9. Machine Arithmetic in Residual Classes,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-03

    rsmainder/residue, as this ascape /-nsues from thp determination of system. It can be. zaalizpd ;n the presence of th- arithmetic urit, which wor~s in thz sys...modules Nj. Page 417. Proof. Proof ascaps /ensues directly from the theorem of Gauss. Actually/really, since according to condition (py, qj)-=-. then

  10. Residual stress in polyethylene pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poduška, Jan; Hutař, Pavel; Kučera, J.; Frank, A.; Sadílek, J.; Pinter, G.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, SEP (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : polyethylene pipe * residual stress * ring slitting method * lifetime estimation Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.464, year: 2016

  11. Managing woodwaste: Yield from residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, E. [LNS Services, Inc., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Rayner, S. [Pacific Waste Energy Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Historically, the majority of sawmill waste has been burned or buried for the sole purpose of disposal. In most jurisdictions, environmental legislation will prohibit, or render uneconomic, these practices. Many reports have been prepared to describe the forest industry`s residue and its environmental effect; although these help those looking for industry-wide or regional solutions, such as electricity generation, they have limited value for the mill manager, who has the on-hands responsibility for generation and disposal of the waste. If the mill manager can evaluate waste streams and break them down into their usable components, he can find niche market solutions for portions of the plant residue and redirect waste to poor/no-return, rather than disposal-cost, end uses. In the modern mill, residue is collected at the individual machine centre by waste conveyors that combine and mix sawdust, shavings, bark, etc. and send the result to the hog-fuel pile. The mill waste system should be analyzed to determine the measures that can improve the quality of residues and determine the volumes of any particular category before the mixing, mentioned above, occurs. After this analysis, the mill may find a niche market for a portion of its woodwaste.

  12. Leptogenesis and residual CP symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Peng; Ding, Gui-Jun; King, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss flavour dependent leptogenesis in the framework of lepton flavour models based on discrete flavour and CP symmetries applied to the type-I seesaw model. Working in the flavour basis, we analyse the case of two general residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, which corresponds to all possible semi-direct models based on a preserved Z 2 in the neutrino sector, together with a CP symmetry, which constrains the PMNS matrix up to a single free parameter which may be fixed by the reactor angle. We systematically study and classify this case for all possible residual CP symmetries, and show that the R-matrix is tightly constrained up to a single free parameter, with only certain forms being consistent with successful leptogenesis, leading to possible connections between leptogenesis and PMNS parameters. The formalism is completely general in the sense that the two residual CP symmetries could result from any high energy discrete flavour theory which respects any CP symmetry. As a simple example, we apply the formalism to a high energy S 4 flavour symmetry with a generalized CP symmetry, broken to two residual CP symmetries in the neutrino sector, recovering familiar results for PMNS predictions, together with new results for flavour dependent leptogenesis.

  13. Solow Residuals Without Capital Stocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burda, Michael C.; Severgnini, Battista

    2014-01-01

    We use synthetic data generated by a prototypical stochastic growth model to assess the accuracy of the Solow residual (Solow, 1957) as a measure of total factor productivity (TFP) growth when the capital stock in use is measured with error. We propose two alternative measurements based on current...

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase and tyrosine-phosphatase activation positively modulate Convulxin-induced platelet activation. Comparison with collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrue, A H; Francischetti, I M; Guimarães, J A; Jandrot-Perrus, M

    1999-04-01

    In this report we have studied the role of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-K) and tyrosine phosphatase activation on platelet activation by Convulxin (Cvx). Wortmannin, a specific PI3-K inhibitor, and phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a sulfhydryl reagent that inhibits tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), block Cvx-induced platelet aggregation, granule secretion, inositol phosphate production, and increase in [Ca2+]i. However, PAO does not inhibit Cvx-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet proteins, including Syk and PLCgamma2, but blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2. In contrast, Cvx-induced PLCgamma2 tyrosyl phosphorylation was partially inhibited by wortmannin. We conclude that (i) although Cvx and collagen activate platelets by a similar mechanism, different regulatory processes are specific to each agonist; (ii) mechanisms other than tyrosine phosphorylation regulate PLCgamma2 activity; and (iii) besides protein tyrosine kinases, PI3-K (and PTPase) positively modulate platelet activation by both Cvx and collagen, and this enzyme is required for effective transmission of GPVI-Fc receptor gamma chain signal to result in full activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2 in Cvx-stimulated platelets.

  15. Chiral recognition of tyrosine enantiomers based on decreased resonance scattering signals with silver nanoparticles as optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xuanping; Li, Qin; Shen, Yizhong; Wu, Huan; Zhao, Yanmei; Yang, Jidong

    2015-03-01

    A novel chiral sensing platform, employing silver nanoparticles capped with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC-Ag NPs), was utilized for the discrimination of L-tyrosine and D-tyrosine. This nanosensor, which could be used as an optical sensing unit and chiral probe, was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy. After the proposed sensing platform interacted with L-tyrosine and D-tyrosine, a decreased resonance scattering signal was only obtained from L-tyrosine. This phenomenon offered a useful assay for the selectivity and determination of L-tyrosine with the RRS method. The linear range and detection limit of L-tyrosine were 0.2838-20.0 µg⋅mL(-1) and 0.0860 µg⋅mL(-1) , respectively. In addition, experimental factors such as acidity, interaction time, and the concentration of enantiomers were investigated with regard to the effect on enantioselective interaction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Transient appearance of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells in the midline epithelial seam of the human fetal secondary palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Yukio; Shibata, Shunichi; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen

    2012-07-01

    Transient immunoreactivity for tyrosine hydroxylase, which mediates the conversion of the amino acid L-tyrosine to dihydroxyphenylalanine, in the midline epithelial seam between the bilateral palatal shelves was investigated in human fetuses. Horizontal or frontal paraffin sections of two human fetuses at 9 and 15 weeks of gestation were used to examine the distribution of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells in regions of the entire head other than the brain. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 protein, calretinin, cytokeratin 14, and vimentin was examined using adjacent or near sections. Tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells were large and densely distributed in the midline epithelial seam at the site of palatal fusion in fetuses at 9 weeks but not in fetuses at 15 weeks, in which the midline epithelial seam had already disappeared. No expression of S100 protein, calretinin, or vimentin was detected, but the midline epithelial seam was positive for cytokeratin 14. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was not detected in epithelia during the process of palatal fusion in mice from E 14.0 to 15.0. These findings indicate that tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells in the midline epithelial seams are nonneural epithelial cells and suggest that the tyrosine hydroxylase is a novel factor involved in normal palatal formation, especially the fate of the midline epithelial seam in humans.

  17. Uptake of 3-[{sup 125}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-L-tyrosine into colon cancer DLD-1 cells: characterization and inhibitory effect of natural amino acids and amino acid-like drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikano, Naoto [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan)], E-mail: sikano@ipu.ac.jp; Ogura, Masato [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Okudaira, Hiroyuki [School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-0942 (Japan); Nakajima, Syuichi; Kotani, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masato [School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-0942 (Japan); Nakazawa, Shinya [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Baba, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Naoto [Center for Medical Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kubota, Nobuo [Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Iwamura, Yukio [Center for Humanities and Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ami-machi, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi [School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-0942 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    involved in LAT1 depends on the structure of the group corresponding to the amino acid residue. Beta-hydroxylation may confer reduction of transport affinity of tyrosine analogues via LAT1.

  18. Inhibition of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROR1 by Anti-ROR1 Monoclonal Antibodies and siRNA Induced Apoptosis of Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ghaemimanesh, Fatemeh; Daneshmanesh, Amir Hossein; Bayat, Ali-Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Mellstedt, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) ROR1 is overexpressed and of importance for the survival of various malignancies, including lung adenocarcinoma, breast cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). There is limited information however on ROR1 in melanoma. In the present study we analysed in seven melanoma cell lines ROR1 expression and phosphorylation as well as the effects of anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and ROR1 suppressing siRNA on cell survival. ROR1 was overexpressed at the protein level to a varying degree and phosphorylated at tyrosine and serine residues. Three of our four self-produced anti-ROR1 mAbs (clones 3H9, 5F1 and 1A8) induced a significant direct apoptosis of the ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375 cell lines as well as cell death in complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). The ESTDAB081 and 094 cell lines respectively were resistant to direct apoptosis of the four anti-ROR1 mAbs alone but not in CDC or ADCC. ROR1 siRNA transfection induced downregulation of ROR1 expression both at mRNA and protein levels proceeded by apoptosis of the melanoma cells (ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375) including ESTDAB081, which was resistant to the direct apoptotic effect of the mAbs. The results indicate that ROR1 may play a role in the survival of melanoma cells. The surface expression of ROR1 on melanoma cells may support the notion that ROR1 might be a suitable target for mAb therapy. PMID:23593420

  19. Inhibition of the receptor tyrosine kinase ROR1 by anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies and siRNA induced apoptosis of melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hojjat-Farsangi

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK ROR1 is overexpressed and of importance for the survival of various malignancies, including lung adenocarcinoma, breast cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. There is limited information however on ROR1 in melanoma. In the present study we analysed in seven melanoma cell lines ROR1 expression and phosphorylation as well as the effects of anti-ROR1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and ROR1 suppressing siRNA on cell survival. ROR1 was overexpressed at the protein level to a varying degree and phosphorylated at tyrosine and serine residues. Three of our four self-produced anti-ROR1 mAbs (clones 3H9, 5F1 and 1A8 induced a significant direct apoptosis of the ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375 cell lines as well as cell death in complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. The ESTDAB081 and 094 cell lines respectively were resistant to direct apoptosis of the four anti-ROR1 mAbs alone but not in CDC or ADCC. ROR1 siRNA transfection induced downregulation of ROR1 expression both at mRNA and protein levels proceeded by apoptosis of the melanoma cells (ESTDAB049, ESTDAB112, DFW and A375 including ESTDAB081, which was resistant to the direct apoptotic effect of the mAbs. The results indicate that ROR1 may play a role in the survival of melanoma cells. The surface expression of ROR1 on melanoma cells may support the notion that ROR1 might be a suitable target for mAb therapy.

  20. ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ROS1 fusion protein-driven non-small cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2017-07-01

    ROS1 protein-tyrosine kinase fusion proteins are expressed in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers. The ROS1 fusion partners include CD74, CCDC6, EZR, FIG, KDELR2, LRIG3, MSN, SDC4, SLC34A2, TMEM106B, TMP3, and TPD52L1. Physiological ROS1 is closely related to the ALK, LTK, and insulin receptor protein-tyrosine kinases. ROS1 is a so-called orphan receptor because the identity of its activating ligand, if any, is unknown. The receptor is expressed during development, but little is expressed in adults and its physiological function is unknown. The human ROS1 gene encodes 2347 amino acid residues and ROS1 is the largest protein-tyrosine kinase receptor protein. Unlike the ALK fusion proteins that are activated by the dimerization induced by their amino-terminal portions, the amino-terminal domains of several of its fusion proteins including CD74 apparently lack the ability to induce dimerization so that the mechanism of constitutive protein kinase activation is unknown. Downstream signaling from the ROS1 fusion protein leads to the activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK1/2 cell proliferation module, the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase cell survival pathway, and the Vav3 cell migration pathway. Moreover, several of the ROS1 fusion proteins are implicated in the pathogenesis of a very small proportion of other cancers including glioblastoma, angiosarcoma, and cholangiocarcinoma as well as ovarian, gastric, and colorectal carcinomas. The occurrence of oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer, has fostered considerable interest in the development of ROS1 inhibitors. Although the percentage of lung cancers driven by ROS1 fusion proteins is low, owing to the large number of new cases of non-small cell lung cancer per year, the number of new cases of ROS1-positive lung cancers is significant and ranges from 2000 to 4000 per year in the United States and 10,000-15,000 worldwide. Crizotinib was the first inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug

  1. Ligand binding affinity at the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A and subsequent IR-A tyrosine phosphorylation kinetics are important determinants of mitogenic biological outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinda eRajapaksha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The insulin receptor (IR is a tyrosine kinase receptor that can mediate both metabolic and mitogenic biological actions. The IR isoform-A (IR-A arises from alternative splicing of exon 11 and has different ligand binding and signalling properties compared to the IR isoform-B. The IR-A not only binds insulin but also insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II with high affinity. IGF-II acting through the IR-A promotes cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration by activating some unique signalling molecules compared to those activated by insulin. This observation led us to investigate whether the different IR-A signalling outcomes in response to IGF-II and insulin could be attributed to phosphorylation of a different subset of IR-A tyrosine residues or to the phosphorylation kinetics. We correlated IR-A phosphorylation to activation of molecules involved in mitogenic and metabolic signalling (MAPK and Akt and receptor internalisation rates (related to mitogenic signalling. We also extended this study to incorporate two ligands that are known to promote predominantly mitogenic ([His4, Tyr15, Thr49, Ile51] IGF-I, qIGF-I or metabolic (S597 peptide biological actions, to see if common mechanisms can be used to define mitogenic or metabolic signalling through the IR-A. The 3-fold lower mitogenic action of IGF-II compared to insulin was associated with a decreased potency in activation of Y960, Y1146, Y1150, Y1151, Y1316 and Y1322, in MAPK phosphorylation and in IR-A internalization. With the poorly mitogenic S597 peptide it was a decreased rate of tyrosine phosphorylation rather than potency that was associated with a low mitogenic potential. We conclude that both decreased affinity of IR-A binding and the kinetics of IR-A phosphorylation can independently lead to a lower mitogenic activity. None of the studied parameters could account for the lower metabolic activity of qIGF-I.

  2. Radioactive material in residues of health services residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa R, A. Jr.; Recio, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The work presents the operational actions developed by the one organ responsible regulator for the control of the material use radioactive in Brazil. Starting from the appearance of coming radioactive material of hospitals and clinical with services of nuclear medicine, material that that is picked up and transported in specific trucks for the gathering of residuals of hospital origin, and guided one it manufactures of treatment of residuals of services of health, where they suffer radiological monitoring before to guide them for final deposition in sanitary embankment, in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The appearance of this radioactive material exposes a possible one violation of the norms that govern the procedures and practices in that sector in the country. (Author)

  3. RECOVERY OF WHEAT RESIDUE NITROGEN 15 AND RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore 85 kg ha-1 N as labelled ammonium sulfate (9.764% atomic excess) was applied in a three-split application. Fertiliser N recovery by wheat in the first year was 33.1%. At harvest, 64.8% of fertiliser N was found in the 0 - 80 cm profile as residual fertiliser-derived N; 2.1% of the applied N could not be accounted for ...

  4. The radioprotector O-phospho-tyrosine stimulates DNA-repair via epidermal growth factor receptor- and DNA-dependent kinase phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmann, Klaus; Mayer, Claus; Wanner, Gabriele; Kehlbach, Rainer; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Purpose of the study was to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of the radioprotector O-phospho-tyrosine (P-Tyr). Methods: Molecular effects of P-Tyr at the level of EGFR responses were investigated in vitro with bronchial carcinoma cell line A549. Nuclear EGFR transport and DNA-PK activation were quantified after Western blotting. Residual DNA-damages were quantified by help of γH 2 AX focus assay. Results: As determined by dose-response curves, treatment of cells with P-Tyr for 16 h before irradiation results in radioprotection. Simultaneous treatment with EGFR blocking antibody Cetuximab abolished P-Tyr associated radioprotection. At the molecular level P-Tyr mediated a general phosphorylation of EGFR and a pronounced phosphorylation of nuclear EGFR at residue Thr No. 654, also observed after treatment with ionizing radiation. This phosphorylation was associated with nuclear EGFR accumulation. Moreover, P-Tyr-triggered EGFR nuclear accumulation was associated with phosphorylation of DNA-PK at Thr 2609. This activated form of DNA-PK was not DNA associated, but after radiation, DNA binding increased, particularly after P-Tyr pre-treatment. These molecular effects of P-Tyr resulted in a reduction of residual DNA-damage after irradiation. Conclusions: Radioprotection by P-Tyr is mediated through its stimulation of nuclear EGFR transport and concurrent, but DNA-damage independent, activation of DNA-PK. Thus, subsequent irradiation results in increased binding of DNA-PK to DNA, improved DNA-repair and increased cell survival

  5. Rhizobiales-like Phosphatase 2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Novel Phospho-tyrosine-specific Phospho-protein Phosphatase (PPP) Family Protein Phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Labandera, Anne-Marie; Muhammad, Jamshed; Samuel, Marcus; Moorhead, Greg B

    2016-03-11

    Cellular signaling through protein tyrosine phosphorylation is well established in mammalian cells. Although lacking the classic tyrosine kinases present in humans, plants have a tyrosine phospho-proteome that rivals human cells. Here we report a novel plant tyrosine phosphatase from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtRLPH2) that, surprisingly, has the sequence hallmarks of a phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase belonging to the PPP family. Rhizobiales/Rhodobacterales/Rhodospirillaceae-like phosphatases (RLPHs) are conserved in plants and several other eukaryotes, but not in animals. We demonstrate that AtRLPH2 is localized to the plant cell cytosol, is resistant to the classic serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin, but is inhibited by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate and is particularly sensitive to inhibition by the adenylates, ATP and ADP. AtRLPH2 displays remarkable selectivity toward tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides versus serine/threonine phospho-peptides and readily dephosphorylates a classic tyrosine phosphatase protein substrate, suggesting that in vivo it is a tyrosine phosphatase. To date, only one other tyrosine phosphatase is known in plants; thus AtRLPH2 represents one of the missing pieces in the plant tyrosine phosphatase repertoire and supports the concept of protein tyrosine phosphorylation as a key regulatory event in plants. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The Cauchy method of residues

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrinović, Dragoslav S

    1993-01-01

    Volume 1, i. e. the monograph The Cauchy Method of Residues - Theory and Applications published by D. Reidel Publishing Company in 1984 is the only book that covers all known applications of the calculus of residues. They range from the theory of equations, theory of numbers, matrix analysis, evaluation of real definite integrals, summation of finite and infinite series, expansions of functions into infinite series and products, ordinary and partial differential equations, mathematical and theoretical physics, to the calculus of finite differences and difference equations. The appearance of Volume 1 was acknowledged by the mathematical community. Favourable reviews and many private communications encouraged the authors to continue their work, the result being the present book, Volume 2, a sequel to Volume 1. We mention that Volume 1 is a revised, extended and updated translation of the book Cauchyjev raeun ostataka sa primenama published in Serbian by Nau~na knjiga, Belgrade in 1978, whereas the greater part ...

  7. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  8. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  9. Alteration of radiation response by two tyrosine kinase inhibitors: STI571 (Glivec) and BIBW 2992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, F.

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent chemo-radiation is one of the main weapon in the treatment of cancer. The targeted therapies may act on the mechanisms of tumor resistance to radiation and are therefore very promising in combination with radiotherapy. The STI571 (imatinib or Gleevec) inhibits specifically the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase. It leads to radiosensitization in K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cell line by alterations of the cell cycle. The BIBW2992 is a selective inhibitor of EGFR and HER2. The BIBW 2992 shows cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells BxPC3 and Capan-2, regardless of KRAS status. The mechanism underlying this radiosensitization is not unequivocal, involving both changes in the cell cycle and induction of mitotic death. Our results show that the combination of an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase with ionizing radiation may lead to a radiosensitization in vitro with mechanisms depending on the type of cell line. (author)

  10. Tyrosine administration enhances dopamine synthesis and release in light-activated rat retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C. J.; Watkins, C. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dark-adapted albino rats to light (350 lux) significantly elevated retinal levels of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid during the next hour; their return to a dark environment caused dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid levels to fall. Retinal dopamine levels were increased slightly by light exposure, suggesting that the increase in dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid reflected accelerated dopamine synthesis. Administration of tyrosine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) further elevated retinal dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid among light-exposed animals, but failed to affect dopamine release among animals in the dark. These observations show that a physiological stimulus - light exposure - can cause catecholaminergic neurons to become tyrosine-dependent; they also suggest that food consumption may affect neurotransmitter release within the retina.

  11. How tyrosine kinase inhibitors impair metabolism and endocrine system function: a systematic updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-12-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) advent has deeply changed the outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, with improved rates of response and overall survival. However, for this success some patients paid the price of a number of peculiar side effects, the so-called off-target side effects, specific for each one TKI. These effects are due to non-selective inhibition of other tyrosine kinase receptors, such as PDGFR, c-KIT, Src, VEGF. Consequences of this inhibition, some metabolic changes during the treatment with TKIs are reported. Aim of present review is to report metabolic changes and potential mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis related to imatinib, second (nilotinib and dasatinib) and third generation (bosutinib and ponatinib) TKIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tyrosine kinase/phosphatase inhibitors decrease dengue virus production in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Panaampon, Jutatip; Malakar, Shilu; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2017-01-29

    Dengue virus is the causative agent of dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome. High rates of dengue virus replication and virion production are related to disease severity. To identify anti-DENV compounds, we performed cell-based ELISA testing to detect the level of DENV E protein expression. Among a total of 83 inhibitors, eight were identified as inhibitors with antiviral activity. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor II (EGFR/ErbB-2/ErbB-4 inhibitor II) and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor IV (PTP inhibitor IV) significantly inhibited dengue virus production and demonstrated low toxicity in hepatocyte cell lines. Our results suggest the efficacy of tyrosine kinase/phosphatase inhibitors in decreasing dengue virus production in HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tyrosine binding and promiscuity in the arginine repressor from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariutti, Ricardo Barros; Ullah, Anwar; Araujo, Gabriela Campos; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy

    2016-07-08

    The arginine repressor (ArgR) regulates arginine biosynthesis in a number of microorganisms and consists of two domains interlinked by a short peptide; the N-terminal domain is involved in DNA binding and the C-terminal domain binds arginine and forms a hexamer made-up of a dimer of trimers. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of ArgR from the pathogenic Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis determined at 1.9 Å resolution contains a tightly bound tyrosine at the arginine-binding site indicating hitherto unobserved promiscuity. Structural analysis of the binding pocket displays clear molecular adaptations to accommodate tyrosine binding suggesting the possible existence of an alternative regulatory process in this pathogenic bacterium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tyrosine 110 in the measles virus phosphoprotein is required to block STAT1 phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaux, Patricia; Messling, Veronika von; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Springfeld, Christoph; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) P gene encodes three proteins: P, an essential polymerase cofactor, and C and V, which have multiple functions including immune evasion. We show here that the MV P protein also contributes to immune evasion, and that tyrosine 110 is required to block nuclear translocation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factors (STAT) after interferon type I treatment. In particular, MV P inhibits STAT1 phosphorylation. This is shown not only by transient expression but also by reverse genetic analyses based on a new functional infectious cDNA derived from a MV vaccine vial (Moraten strain). Our study also identifies a conserved sequence around P protein tyrosine 110 as a candidate interaction site with a cellular protein

  15. Synchrotron ultraviolet microspectroscopy on rat cortical bone: involvement of tyrosine and tryptophan in the osteocyte and its environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Pallu

    Full Text Available Alcohol induced osteoporosis is characterized by a bone mass decrease and microarchitecture alterations. Having observed an excess in osteocyte apoptosis, we aimed to assess the bone tissue biochemistry, particularly in the osteocyte and its environment. For this purpose, we used a model of alcohol induced osteoporosis in rats. Bone sections of cortical bone were investigated using synchrotron UV-microspectrofluorescence at subcellular resolution. We show that bone present three fluorescence peaks at 305, 333 and 385 nm, respectively corresponding to tyrosine, tryptophan and collagen. We have determined that tyrosine/collagen and tryptophan/collagen ratios were higher in the strong alcohol consumption group. Tryptophan is related to the serotonin metabolism involved in bone formation, while tyrosine is involved in the activity of tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in osteocytes. Our experiment represents the first combined synchrotron UV microspectroscopy analysis of bone tissue with a quantitative biochemical characterization in the osteocyte and surrounding matrix performed separately.

  16. Allosteric inhibition of SHP2 phosphatase inhibits cancers driven by receptor tyrosine kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; LaMarche, Matthew J.; Chan, Ho Man; Fekkes, Peter; Garcia-Fortanet, Jorge; Acker, Michael G.; Antonakos, Brandon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Chen, Zhouliang; Cooke, Vesselina G.; Dobson, Jason R.; Deng, Zhan; Fei, Feng; Firestone, Brant; Fodor, Michelle; Fridrich, Cary; Gao, Hui; Grunenfelder, Denise; Hao, Huai-Xiang; Jacob, Jaison; Ho, Samuel; Hsiao, Kathy; Kang, Zhao B.; Karki, Rajesh; Kato, Mitsunori; Larrow, Jay; La Bonte, Laura R.; Lenoir, Francois; Liu, Gang; Liu, Shumei; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meyer, Matthew J.; Palermo, Mark; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Price, Edmund; Quinn, Christopher; Shakya, Subarna; Shultz, Michael D.; Slisz, Joanna; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Wang, Ping; Warmuth, Markus; Williams, Sarah; Yang, Guizhi; Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zhu, Ping; Ramsey, Timothy; Keen, Nicholas J.; Sellers, William R.; Stams, Travis; Fortin , Pascal D. (Novartis)

    2016-06-29

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, has an important role in signal transduction downstream of growth factor receptor signalling and was the first reported oncogenic tyrosine phosphatase1. Activating mutations of SHP2 have been associated with developmental pathologies such as Noonan syndrome and are found in multiple cancer types, including leukaemia, lung and breast cancer and neuroblastoma1, 2, 3, 4, 5. SHP2 is ubiquitously expressed and regulates cell survival and proliferation primarily through activation of the RAS–ERK signalling pathway2, 3. It is also a key mediator of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) immune checkpoint pathways6, 7. Reduction of SHP2 activity suppresses tumour cell growth and is a potential target of cancer therapy8, 9. Here we report the discovery of a highly potent (IC50 = 0.071 μM), selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule SHP2 inhibitor, SHP099, that stabilizes SHP2 in an auto-inhibited conformation. SHP099 concurrently binds to the interface of the N-terminal SH2, C-terminal SH2, and protein tyrosine phosphatase domains, thus inhibiting SHP2 activity through an allosteric mechanism. SHP099 suppresses RAS–ERK signalling to inhibit the proliferation of receptor-tyrosine-kinase-driven human cancer cells in vitro and is efficacious in mouse tumour xenograft models. Together, these data demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of SHP2 is a valid therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers.

  17. Is tyrosine kinase activation involved in basophil histamine release in asthma due to western red cedar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, A; Chan, H; Salari, H; Chan-Yeung, M

    1998-02-01

    Occupational asthma due to western red cedar is associated with histamine release from basophils and mast cells on exposure to plicatic acid (PA), but the mechanisms underlying this response remain unclear. Specific kinase inhibitors were used to study the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in PA-induced histamine release from human basophils. Pretreatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor methyl 2,5-dihydroxy-cinnamate (MDHC) attenuated histamine release from basophils triggered by anti-IgE (29.8% inhibition; n = 15; P < 0.01) or grass pollen (48% inhibition; n = 6; P < 0.01). Inhibition was concentration-dependent and could be reversed by washing the cells in buffer, while the inactive stereoisomer of MDHC did not affect histamine release. In contrast, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine did not affect histamine release by either anti-IgE or grass pollen. Pretreatment with MDHC partially inhibited PA-induced histamine release from basophils of 6/9 patients with red cedar asthma (25.4% vs 33.8%; P = NS). Staurosporine gave a similar level of inhibition of PA-induced histamine release (25.3% vs 33.8%; P = NS). Thus, signal transduction of the human basophil Fc epsilon RI appears to depend upon tyrosine kinase activation, but not on protein kinase C (serine/threonine kinase) activation. The lack of specific effect on plicatic acid-induced histamine release in basophils obtained from patients with occupational asthma due to western red cedar suggests that tyrosine kinases are not as important in this disease as in atopic asthma, and is consistent with the view that histamine release in red cedar asthma is largely IgE-independent.

  18. Exploring the Hypersensitivity of PTEN Deleted Prostate Cancer Stem Cells to WEE1 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    damage before entry into mitosis . Figure 2: WEE1 and AKT signaling in isogenic PTEN-deficient and proficient prostate cancer cells. A. C42B...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0251 TITLE: Exploring the Hypersensitivity of PTEN Deleted Prostate Cancer Stem Cells to WEE1 Tyrosine Kinase...Inhibitors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. KIRAN MAHAJAN CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612

  19. Analyte-induced photoreduction method for visual and colorimetric detection of tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satheeshkumar, Elumalai; Yang, Jyisy, E-mail: jyisy@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2015-06-16

    Highlights: • New detection scheme for detection of tyrosine is developed. • Photoactivity of tyrosine is used to form color nanoparticles selectively. • Detection step is simple and effective allowing rapid screening. • Highly sensitive and selective in detection of tyrosine. - Abstract: A new method based on photochemical formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for detection of tyrosine (Tyr). To selectively detect Tyr and to simplify the detection procedure, the photoactivity of Tyr was utilized to trigger the photochemical reduction in production of AgNPs. The drastic change of solution color caused by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption band of the formed AgNPs was used to extract the quantitative information of Tyr. This developed method is simple in detection, while both the sensitivity and selectivity are significant improved. Meanwhile, the solution color was changed from colorless to dark yellow after the formation of AgNPs, which allows a much higher sensitivity in visual identification when compared with the SPR band shifting technique commonly, used in conventional colorimetric methods. To optimize the detection system and to understand the mechanism in this proposed method, parameters such as irradiation time, intensity of light source, and the concentration of Tyr were systematically examined. Results indicated that these factors mainly affected the reaction rate of photoreduction. The morphologies of the formed AgNPs were similar, but with small differences in particle sizes. In the examination of selectivity, sixteen other amino acids were examined. Results indicated that only amino acids of tryptophan, cysteine and histidine are photoactive and possess potential interferences in analysis of Tyr. Quantitative studies indicated that a linear response up to 10 μM with a detection limit of 100 nM could be obtained. For visually detection, color change could be observed with a concentration as low as 500 nM of Tyr.

  20. Laminin increases both levels and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in calf adrenal chromaffin cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of substrate-bound laminin on levels of enzymes of the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway in primary cultures of calf adrenal chromaffin cells. Laminin increases the levels of the enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl-transferase. This effect is selective, in that levels of other enzymes (lactate dehydrogenase, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and acetylcholinesterase) are not increased. The effect of lamini...

  1. Long-Term Behavioral Recovery in Parkinsonian Rats by an HSV Vector Expressing Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    OpenAIRE

    During, Matthew J.; Naegele, Janice R.; O’Malley, Karen L.; Geller, Alfred I.

    1994-01-01

    One therapeutic approach to treating Parkinson’s disease is to convert endogenous striatal cells into levo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa)–producing cells. A defective herpes simplex virus type 1 vector expressing human tyrosine hydroxylase was delivered into the partially denervated striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine–lesioned rats, used as a model of Parkinson’s disease. Efficient behavioral and biochemical recovery was maintained for 1 year after gene transfer. Biochemical recovery included ...

  2. NMR backbone assignments of the tyrosine kinase domain of human fibroblast growth factor receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajpai, Navratna; Schott, Anne-Kathrin; Vogtherr, Martin; Breeze, Alexander L

    2014-04-01

    Members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase family (FGFR1-4) play an important role in many signalling cascades. Although tightly regulated, aberrant activity of these enzymes may lead to, or become features of, disease pathologies including cancer. FGFR isoforms have been the subject of drug discovery programmes, with a number of kinase-domain inhibitors in pre-clinical and clinical development. Here, we present the first (83% complete) backbone resonance assignments of apo-FGFR1 kinase.

  3. Phospho-Tyrosine(s) vs. Phosphatidylinositol Binding in Shc Mediated Integrin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiaochen; Vinogradova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The Shc adaptor protein, particularly its p52 isoform, has been identified as a primary signaling partner for the tyrosine(s)-phosphorylated cytoplasmic tails of activated ? 3 integrins. Inspired by our recent structure of the Shc PTB domain in complex with a bi-phosphorylated peptide derived from ? 3 cytoplasmic tail, we have initiated the investigation of Shc interaction with phospholipids of the membrane. We are particularly focused on PtdIns and their effects on Shc mediated integrin sign...

  4. Emerging issues in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase function: lifting fog or simply shifting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrone, A; Sap, J

    2000-01-01

    Transmembrane (receptor) tyrosine phosphatases are intimately involved in responses to cell-cell and cell-matrix contact. Several important issues regarding the targets and regulation of this protein family are now emerging. For example, these phosphatases exhibit complex interactions...... with signaling pathways involving SRC family kinases, which result from their ability to control phosphorylation of both activating and inhibitory sites in these kinases and possibly also their substrates. Similarly, integrin signaling illustrates how phosphorylation of a single protein, or the activity...

  5. TNK2 Tyrosine Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0311 TITLE: TNK2 Tyrosine Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Triple- Negative Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent only 10%-15% of all breast cancers ; however... cancers (TNBC) represent 10-15% of all breast cancers . While significant advances have been made for targeted therapy of ER and HER2-positive breast

  6. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  7. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia patients intolerant to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    OpenAIRE

    DeAngelo, D J

    2012-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia have improved dramatically with the development and availability of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) over the past decade. TKI therapy has a superior safety profile compared with the previous standard of care, interferon-α, and most adverse events (AEs) observed with front-line and second-line TKI treatment are managed with supportive care. However, some patients are intolerant to TKI therapy and experience AEs that cannot be m...

  8. Characterisation and management of concrete grinding residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Matt; Gupta, Nautasha; Watts, Ben; Chadik, Paul A; Ferraro, Christopher; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Concrete grinding residue is the waste product resulting from the grinding, cutting, and resurfacing of concrete pavement. Potential beneficial applications for concrete grinding residue include use as a soil amendment and as a construction material, including as an additive to Portland cement concrete. Concrete grinding residue exhibits a high pH, and though not hazardous, it is sufficiently elevated that precautions need to be taken around aquatic ecosystems. Best management practices and state regulations focus on reducing the impact on such aquatic environment. Heavy metals are present in concrete grinding residue, but concentrations are of the same magnitude as typically recycled concrete residuals. The chemical composition of concrete grinding residue makes it a useful product for some soil amendment purposes at appropriate land application rates. The presence of unreacted concrete in concrete grinding residue was examined for potential use as partial replacement of cement in new concrete. Testing of Florida concrete grinding residue revealed no dramatic reactivity or improvement in mortar strength.

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Residue Effects Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The PCB Residue Effects (PCBRes) Database was developed to assist scientists and risk assessors in correlating PCB and dioxin-like compound residues with toxic...

  10. Interpretation on Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is considering an interpretation of its regulations that would generally allow for recycling of plastic separated from shredder residue under the conditions described in the Voluntary Procedures for Recycling Plastics from Shredder Residue.

  11. Rational, combinatorial, and genomic approaches for engineering L-tyrosine production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Christine Nicole S; Xiao, Wenhai; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-08-21

    Although microbial metabolic engineering has traditionally relied on rational and knowledge-driven techniques, significant improvements in strain performance can be further obtained through the use of combinatorial approaches exploiting phenotypic diversification and screening. Here, we demonstrate the combined use of global transcriptional machinery engineering and a high-throughput L-tyrosine screen towards improving L-tyrosine production in Escherichia coli. This methodology succeeded in generating three strains from two separate mutagenesis libraries (rpoA and rpoD) exhibiting up to a 114% increase in L-tyrosine titer over a rationally engineered parental strain with an already high capacity for production. Subsequent strain characterization through transcriptional analysis and whole genome sequencing allowed complete phenotype reconstruction from well-defined mutations and point to important roles for both the acid stress resistance pathway and the stringent response of E. coli in imparting this phenotype. As such, this study presents one of the first examples in which cell-wide measurements have helped to elucidate the genetic and biochemical underpinnings of an engineered cellular property, leading to the total restoration of metabolite overproduction from specific chromosomal mutations.

  12. Functional interaction between nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl and SR-Rich protein RBM39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Sanyue [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Qu, Xiuhua [General Navy Hospital of PLA, 6 Fucheng Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100037 (China); Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Liu, Xuan, E-mail: liux931932@163.com [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Cao, Cheng, E-mail: cao_c@sohu.com [Beijing Institute of Biotechnology, 27 Taiping Rd, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2016-04-22

    RBM39, also known as splicing factor HCC1.4, acts as a transcriptional coactivator for the steroid nuclear receptors JUN/AP-1, ESR1/ER-α and ESR2/ER-β. RBM39 is involved in the regulation of the transcriptional responses of these steroid nuclear receptors and promotes transcriptional initiation. In this paper, we report that RBM39 interacts with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. Both the Src homology (SH) 2 and SH3 domains of c-Abl interact with RBM39. The major tyrosine phosphorylation sites on RBM39 that are phosphorylated by c-Abl are Y95 and Y99, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and mutational analysis. c-Abl was shown boost the transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 for ERα and PRβ in a tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. The results suggest that mammalian c-Abl plays an important role in steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription by regulating RBM39. - Highlights: • c-Abl interacts with RBM39. • RBM39 is phosphorylated by c-Abl. • c-Abl regulates transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 on the ERα and PRβ.

  13. The intensity of tyrosine nitration is associated with selenite and selenate toxicity in Brassica juncea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Árpád; Feigl, Gábor; Trifán, Vanda; Ördög, Attila; Szőllősi, Réka; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna

    2018-01-01

    Selenium phytotoxicity involves processes like reactive nitrogen species overproduction and nitrosative protein modifications. This study evaluates the toxicity of two selenium forms (selenite and selenate at 0µM, 20µM, 50µM and 100µM concentrations) and its correlation with protein tyrosine nitration in the organs of hydroponically grown Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Selenate treatment resulted in large selenium accumulation in both Brassica organs, while selenite showed slight root-to-shoot translocation resulting in a much lower selenium accumulation in the shoot. Shoot and root growth inhibition and cell viability loss revealed that Brassica tolerates selenate better than selenite. Results also show that relative high amounts of selenium are able to accumulate in Brassica leaves without obvious visible symptoms such as chlorosis or necrosis. The more severe phytotoxicity of selenite was accompanied by more intense protein tyrosine nitration as well as alterations in nitration pattern suggesting a correlation between the degree of Se forms-induced toxicities and nitroproteome size, composition in Brassica organs. These results imply the possibility of considering protein tyrosine nitration as novel biomarker of selenium phytotoxicity, which could help the evaluation of asymptomatic selenium stress of plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional interaction between nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl and SR-Rich protein RBM39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, Sanyue; Qu, Xiuhua; Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun; Liu, Xuan; Cao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    RBM39, also known as splicing factor HCC1.4, acts as a transcriptional coactivator for the steroid nuclear receptors JUN/AP-1, ESR1/ER-α and ESR2/ER-β. RBM39 is involved in the regulation of the transcriptional responses of these steroid nuclear receptors and promotes transcriptional initiation. In this paper, we report that RBM39 interacts with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. Both the Src homology (SH) 2 and SH3 domains of c-Abl interact with RBM39. The major tyrosine phosphorylation sites on RBM39 that are phosphorylated by c-Abl are Y95 and Y99, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and mutational analysis. c-Abl was shown boost the transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 for ERα and PRβ in a tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. The results suggest that mammalian c-Abl plays an important role in steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription by regulating RBM39. - Highlights: • c-Abl interacts with RBM39. • RBM39 is phosphorylated by c-Abl. • c-Abl regulates transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 on the ERα and PRβ.

  15. Irreversible AE1 tyrosine phosphorylation leads to membrane vesiculation in G6PD deficient red cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pantaleo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While G6PD deficiency is one of the major causes of acute hemolytic anemia, the membrane changes leading to red cell lysis have not been extensively studied. New findings concerning the mechanisms of G6PD deficient red cell destruction may facilitate our understanding of the large individual variations in susceptibility to pro-oxidant compounds and aid the prediction of the hemolytic activity of new drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results show that treatment of G6PD deficient red cells with diamide (0.25 mM or divicine (0.5 mM causes: (1 an increase in the oxidation and tyrosine phosphorylation of AE1; (2 progressive recruitment of phosphorylated AE1 in large membrane complexes which also contain hemichromes; (3 parallel red cell lysis and a massive release of vesicles containing hemichromes. We have observed that inhibition of AE1 phosphorylation by Syk kinase inhibitors prevented its clustering and the membrane vesiculation while increases in AE1 phosphorylation by tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors increased both red cell lysis and vesiculation rates. In control RBCs we observed only transient AE1 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our findings indicate that persistent tyrosine phosphorylation produces extensive membrane destabilization leading to the loss of vesicles which contain hemichromes. The proposed mechanism of hemolysis may be applied to other hemolytic diseases characterized by the accumulation of hemoglobin denaturation products.

  16. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of a Mr = 160,000 glycoprotein in adipocyte plasma membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.T.; Khalaf, N.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to identify putative substrates for the insulin receptor kinase, adipocyte plasma membranes were incubated with [γ- 32 P]ATP in the presence and absence of insulin. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor β subunit but does not detectably alter the phosphorylation of other membrane proteins. In contrast, when plasma membranes from insulin-treated adipocytes are phosphorylated, the 32 P-labeling of a Mr=160,000 species (p160) and insulin receptor β subunit are markedly increased when compared to controls. p160 exhibits a rapid response (max. at 1 min) and high sensitivity (ED 50 = 2 x 10 -10 M) to insulin. The stimulatory effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of p160 is rapidly reversed following the addition of anti-insulin serum. Cold chase experiments indicate that insulin promotes the phosphorylation of p160 rather than inhibiting its dephosphorylation. p160 is a glycoprotein as evidenced by its adsorption to immobilized lectins and does not represent the insulin receptor precursor. The action of insulin on p160 tyrosine phosphorylation is mimicked by concanavalin A but not by EGF and other insulin-like agents such as hydrogen peroxide and vanadate. These results suggest that p160 tyrosine phosphorylation is an insulin receptor-mediated event and may participate in signalling by the insulin receptor

  17. Use of deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine in the study of catecholamine and aromatic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, H.C.; Redweik, U.; Steinmann, B.; Leimbacher, W.; Wegmann, H.

    1975-01-01

    Deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine have been used for the study of their respective metabolism in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) and in healthy persons. Urinary excretion of dopamine and its metabolites was studied by GC-MS after oral administration of deuterated L-tyrosine in 2 patients with PKU and in normal controls at low and high plasma phenylalanine levels. From these studies it seemed that the in vivo tyrosine 3-hydroxylase activity and thus the formation of L-dopa depend on the phenylalanine concentration in plasma and also in tissues. After loading 3 mentally retarded patients with 3,5-[ 2 H 2 ]-4-hydroxyphenylalanine, we found, among others, excretion of deuterated m-hydroxyphenyl-hydracrylic acid, p-hydroxymandelic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-hydroxyhippuric acid, benzoic acid and hippuric acid. An intramolecular rearrangement is postulated. Deuterated phenylalanine was used to investigate phenylalanine and dopa metabolism in PKU. In addition, one untreated person with PKU of normal intelligence and normal excretion of catecholamines at high plasma phenylalanine concentration was investigated in order to see whether there exists an alternative metabolic pathway from phenylalanine to dopa formation

  18. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced thyroid dysfunction: a review of its incidence, pathophysiology, clinical relevance, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadieh, Hala; Salti, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) belong to a new class of molecular multitargeted anticancer therapy which targets different growth factor receptors and hence attenuates cancer cell survival and growth. Since their introduction as adjunct treatment for renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), a number of reports have demonstrated that TKI can induce thyroid dysfunction which was especially more common with sunitinib maleate. Many mechanisms with respect to this adverse effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been proposed including their induction of thyroiditis, capillary regression in the thyroid gland, antithyroid peroxidase antibody production, and their ability to decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid gland. Of interest is the observation that TKI-induced thyroid dysfunction may actually be protective as it was shown to improve overall survival, and it was suggested that it may have a prognostic value. Followup on thyroid function tests while patients are maintained on tyrosine kinase inhibitor is strongly recommended. When thyroid dysfunction occurs, appropriate treatment should be individualized depending on patients symptoms and thyroid stimulating hormone level.

  19. XPS and NEXAFS study of tyrosine-terminated propanethiol assembled on gold

    CERN Document Server

    Petoral, R M

    2003-01-01

    Tyrosine-terminated propanethiol (TPT), tyrosine linked to 3-mercaptopropionic acid through an amide bond, is adsorbed to gold surfaces. The adsorbates are characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). XPS is used to investigate the chemical binding and electronic structure of the monolayer. Strong molecular binding of the tyrosine derivative on the gold surface through the sulfur atom is attained. Angle-dependent XPS results shows that TPT molecules are oriented with the sulfur atoms molecularly oriented close to the gold surface and that the phenol moiety is oriented away from the gold surface. Average orientation of the adsorbate on gold is deduced using the NEXAFS results. It shows that the main molecular axis is tilted approximately 38 deg. relative to the Au surface normal. The ring plane of the phenol moiety exhibits a preferential orientation with an average tilt angle of the normal of the ring plane from the surfa...

  20. L-tyrosine-based backbone-modified poly(amino acids).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anirban Sen; Lopina, Stephanie T

    2002-01-01

    Tyrosine-based pseudo-peptide polymers, first introduced in 1987 by Kohn and Langer, have been identified for potential biomaterial applications. These materials combine the desired polypeptide properties of biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and non-immunogenicity with good processing properties including solubility, thermal stability, and moldability which arise from alternating non-amide bonds along the polymer backbone. This paper focuses on the analysis of two such polymers based on the natural amino acid L-tyrosine. Starting from L-tyrosine and its deaminated analogue, 3-(4-para-hydroxy)-phenylpropionic acid, a diphenolic structure containing an amide linkage, was synthesized following standard procedures of peptide synthesis. This diphenolic structure was then used as a monomer to synthesize a polyiminocarbonate using a cyanogen bromide-initiated reaction and a polycarbonate using a triphosgene-initiated reaction. The polyiminocarbonate has iminocarbonate linkages and the polycarbonate has carbonate linkages alternating with amide linkages in the respective polymer backbone. Analytical studies were performed regarding the feasibility of the reaction procedures, the physical properties of the polymers, and their degradation processes, to gain insight into the potential biomaterial applications of these polymers. These results independently reaffirm the studies published by Kohn et al. working on similar polymeric systems.

  1. The relation between plasma tyrosine concentration and fatigue in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrolijk Jan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC fatigue is a major clinical problem. Abnormal amino acid (AA patterns have been implicated in the development of fatigue in several non-hepatological conditions but for PBC and PSC no data are available. This study aimed to identify abnormalities in AA patterns and to define their relation with fatigue. Methods Plasma concentrations of tyrosine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, valine, leucine and isoleucine were determined in plasma of patients with PBC (n = 45, PSC (n = 27, chronic hepatitis C (n = 22 and healthy controls (n = 73. Fatigue and quality of life were quantified using the Fisk fatigue severity scale, a visual analogue scale and the SF-36. Results Valine, isoleucine, leucine were significantly decreased in PBC and PSC. Tyrosine and phenylalanine were increased (p Conclusion In patients with PBC and PSC, marked abnormalities in plasma AA patterns occur. Normal tyrosine concentrations, compared to increased concentrations, may be associated with fatigue and diminished quality of life.

  2. Dialkoxyquinazolines: Screening Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Potential Tumor Imaging Probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Lim, John K.; Coffing, Stephanie L.; Hom, Darren L.; Negash, Kitaw; Ono, Michele Y.; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Taylor, Scott E.; Vanderpoel, Jennifer L.; Slavik, Sarah M.; Morris, Andrew B.; Riese II, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a long-standing drug development target, is also a desirable target for imaging. Sixteen dialkoxyquinazoline analogs, suitable for labeling with positron-emitting isotopes, have been synthesized and evaluated in a battery of in vitro assays to ascertain their chemical and biological properties. These characteristics provided the basis for the adoption of a selection schema to identify lead molecules for labeling and in vivo evaluation. A newEGFR tyrosine kinase radiometric binding assay revealed that all of the compounds possessed suitable affinity (IC50 = 0.4 - 51 nM) for the EGFR tyrosine kinase. All of the analogs inhibited ligand-induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation (IC50 = 0.8 - 20 nM). The HPLC-estimated octanol/water partition coefficients ranged from 2.0-5.5. Four compounds,4-(2'-fluoroanilino)- and 4-(3'-fluoroanilino)-6,7-diethoxyquinazoline as well as 4-(3'-chloroanilino)- and4-(3'-bromoanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, possess the best combination of characteristics that warrant radioisotope labeling and further evaluation in tumor-bearing mice

  3. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  4. A Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase associates with an adapter protein required for axonal guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J C; Ursuliak, Z; Clemens, K K; Price, J V; Dixon, J E

    1996-07-19

    We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to isolate a novel Drosophila adapter protein, which interacts with the Drosophila protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) dPTP61F. Absence of this protein in Drosophila causes the mutant photoreceptor axon phenotype dreadlocks (dock) (Garrity, P. A., Rao, Y., Salecker, I., and Zipursky, S. L.(1996) Cell 85, 639-650). Dock is similar to the mammalian oncoprotein Nck and contains three Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and one Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. The interaction of dPTP61F with Dock was confirmed in vivo by immune precipitation experiments. A sequence containing five PXXP motifs from the non-catalytic domain of the PTP is sufficient for interaction with Dock. This suggests that binding to the PTP is mediated by one or more of the SH3 domains of Dock. Immune precipitations of Dock also co-precipitate two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins having molecular masses of 190 and 145 kDa. Interactions between Dock and these tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins are likely mediated by the Dock SH2 domain. These findings identify potential signal-transducing partners of Dock and propose a role for dPTP61F and the unidentified phosphoproteins in axonal guidance.

  5. NF-kappaB regulates the transcription of protein tyrosine kinase Tec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Simonson, Oscar E; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Smith, C I Edvard

    2009-11-01

    The tyrosine kinase expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (Tec) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) that is expressed in hematopoietic cells, such as B and T lymphocytes, myeloid lineage cells and neutrophils. Mutations in the human Btk gene cause X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), but the corresponding mutation in mice results in a much milder defect. However, the combined inactivation of Btk and Tec genes in mice cause a severe phenotype resembling XLA. Tec is involved in the regulation of both B and T lymphocytes, fine-tuning of TCR/BCR signaling, and also activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells. Previous work has shown that the transcription factors Sp1 and PU.1 can bind and regulate the Tec promoter. In this study, we demonstrate that NF-kappaB is an essential transcription factor for optimal expression of the Tec gene, and identify a unique functionally active NF-kappaB binding site in its promoter. The NF-kappaB subunit p65/RelA directly induced transcriptional activity of the Tec promoter. Moreover, we also found that proteasome inhibitors, including Bortezomib, repress Tec transcription through inactivation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. This study, together with our previous findings on the transcriptional regulation of Btk (Bruton's tyrosine kinase) by proteasome inhibitors, provides important insight into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the role of NF-kappaB in Tec family kinase signaling and lymphocyte development.

  6. One-step expression and tyrosine O-sulfonation of Ax21 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuguo, Hou; Wei, Zhang; Chao, Zhang; Daoji, Wu

    2012-03-01

    Ax21 (activator of Xa21-mediated immunity), a pathogen-associated molecular pattern secreted by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, can be perceived by a membrane-located pattern recognition receptor Xa21 and triggered immune responses in rice. An Ax21-derived peptide (17-amino acid) containing a sulfated tyrosine-22 (axY(S)22) is sufficient for Ax21 activity. Here, we expressed Ax21 and O-sulfated its tyrosine-22 through coexpressing a putative tyrosine sulfotransferase, raxST, and two other genes involved in the synthesis of 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The sulfated Ax21 fused with a histidine tag in its N-terminus was extracted and bound onto a Ni-NTA agarose and then cleaved with Factor Xa and CNBr in turn. Δax21Y(S)22, a 36-amino acid peptide covering axY(S)22 in the lysate supernatant, was finally yielded after ultrafiltration. The purified peptide was further verified by Tricine-SDS-PAGE and isoelectrofocusing electrophoresis. Lesion length analysis, reactive oxygen species production, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation of rice leaves inoculated with Δax21Y(S)22 confirmed the activity of the sulfated peptide. Overall, this study successfully established an efficient system for expression and purification of a sulfated peptide. In addition, the sulfotransferase activity of RaxST was confirmed for the first time.

  7. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Induced Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review of Its Incidence, Pathophysiology, Clinical Relevance, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Ahmadieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI belong to a new class of molecular multitargeted anticancer therapy which targets different growth factor receptors and hence attenuates cancer cell survival and growth. Since their introduction as adjunct treatment for renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, a number of reports have demonstrated that TKI can induce thyroid dysfunction which was especially more common with sunitinib maleate. Many mechanisms with respect to this adverse effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been proposed including their induction of thyroiditis, capillary regression in the thyroid gland, antithyroid peroxidase antibody production, and their ability to decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid gland. Of interest is the observation that TKI-induced thyroid dysfunction may actually be protective as it was shown to improve overall survival, and it was suggested that it may have a prognostic value. Followup on thyroid function tests while patients are maintained on tyrosine kinase inhibitor is strongly recommended. When thyroid dysfunction occurs, appropriate treatment should be individualized depending on patients symptoms and thyroid stimulating hormone level.

  8. MHC class I signaling in T cells leads to tyrosine kinase activity and PLC-gamma 1 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the biochemical signal pathway leading to a rise in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) following cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T leukemic Jurkat cells. Evidence is presented that MHC-I signaling is dependent on tyrosine kinase activity......). Collectively, these results indicate that the MHC-I signaling pathway is linked to activation of tyrosine kinase(s) in Jurkat cells....

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-04

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  10. Influence of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the crystallization and spectral properties of L-tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenmozhi, M.; Suguna, K.; Sekar, C.

    2011-12-01

    L-Tyrosine (C 9H 11NO 3) is an essential amino acid in living organisms. It is also a building unit in protein, takes part in bio-synthesis of hormones, neurotransmitters, pigments and one of the organic chemical constituents of urinary stones. L-Tyrosine has been crystallized in silica gel by double diffusion technique with and without the addition of NaF. The crystals had rosette-like shape. In case of fluoride addition, two types of crystals have formed: rosette like crystallites, at the gel-solution interface and reticulate type crystallites beneath the interface. XRD results confirmed that both the products are of L-tyrosine with identical crystal structures. Crystal structure, morphology, thermal and spectral properties are analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-vis transmittance studies. The TG-DTA results suggest that the thermal stability of L-tyrosine has markedly improved due to fluoride doping. Optical band gap energy of NaF grown L-tyrosine crystallite is estimated as 4.28 eV. Second harmonic generation efficiency test indicates that L-tyrosine crystals can be used for application in nonlinear optical devices.

  11. Residual Analysis of Generalized Autoregressive Integrated Moving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, analysis of residuals of generalized autoregressive integrated moving average bilinear time series model was considered. The adequacy of this model was based on testing the estimated residuals for whiteness. Jarque-Bera statistic and squared-residual autocorrelations were used to test the estimated ...

  12. 9 CFR 311.39 - Biological residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biological residues. 311.39 Section... Biological residues. Carcasses, organs, or other parts of carcasses of livestock shall be condemned if it is determined that they are adulterated because of the presence of any biological residues. ...

  13. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes is the main input of nitrogen in ecological agriculture. The cycling of N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues was studied during three years in small field plots and lysimeters. The residual organic labelled N declined rapidly during the initial...... management methods in order to conserve grain legume residue N sources within the soil-plant system....

  14. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Michael; Gnaëpel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-11-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines.

  15. Neutron residual stress measurements in linepipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Michael; Gnaepel-Herold, Thomas; Luzin, Vladimir; Bowie, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Residual stresses in gas pipelines are generated by manufacturing and construction processes and may affect the subsequent pipe integrity. In the present work, the residual stresses in eight samples of linepipe were measured by neutron diffraction. Residual stresses changed with some coating processes. This has special implications in understanding and mitigating stress corrosion cracking, a major safety and economic problem in some gas pipelines

  16. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  17. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazineu, M.H.P.; Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A.; Hazin, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the 238 U and 232 Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for 226 Ra, 228 Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for 226 Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for 228 Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  18. Natural radioactivity in petroleum residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazineu, M.H.P. [UNICAP, Dept. de Quimica, Recife (Brazil); Gazineu, M.H.P.; Hazin, C.A. [UFPE, Dept. de Energia Nuclear, Recife (Brazil); Hazin, C.A. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares/ CNEN, Recife (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The oil extraction and production industry generates several types of solid and liquid wastes. Scales, sludge and water are typical residues that can be found in such facilities and that can be contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (N.O.R.M.). As a result of oil processing, the natural radionuclides can be concentrated in such residues, forming the so called Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material, or T.E.N.O.R.M.. Most of the radionuclides that appear in oil and gas streams belong to the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th natural series, besides 40 K. The present work was developed to determine the radionuclide content of scales and sludge generated during oil extraction and production operations. Emphasis was given to the quantification of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and 40 K since these radionuclides,are responsible for most of the external exposure in such facilities. Samples were taken from the P.E.T.R.O.B.R.A.S. unity in the State of Sergipe, in Northeastern Brazil. They were collected directly from the inner surface of water pipes and storage tanks, or from barrels stored in the waste storage area of the E and P unit. The activity concentrations for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and 40 K were determined by using an HP Ge gamma spectrometric system. The results showed concentrations ranging from 42.7 to 2,110.0 kBq/kg for {sup 226}Ra, 40.5 to 1,550.0 kBq/kg for {sup 228}Ra, and 20.6 to 186.6 kBq/kg for 40 K. The results highlight the importance of determining the activity concentration of those radionuclides in oil residues before deciding whether they should be stored or discarded to the environment. (authors)

  19. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...

  20. Process to recycle shredder residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.